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Sample records for spect imaging probe

  1. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pham, Th Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh Tt

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. (57)Co(2+) ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive (67)Ga(3+) and Cu(2+)-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the (57)Co(2+)-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe.

  2. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pham, TH Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh TT

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. PMID:28184160

  3. Neuroreceptor imaging with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Innis, R B

    1992-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging can provide useful measurements of brain receptors and endogenous neurotransmitters and may have significant experimental and clinical applications. This presentation reviews the use of SPECT for neuroreceptor imaging. Studies of receptors for benzodiazepines, dopamine D2 agents, and dopamine reuptake sites will be used to exemplify the capabilities of SPECT. Tracers labeled with the radioisotope 125I have high affinity, high brain uptake, and high ratios of specific to nonspecific binding. Imaging studies of human and nonhuman primate brain will be presented, and the potential clinical applicability of these agents will be discussed.

  4. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  5. Probing In Vivo Trafficking of Polymer/DNA Micellar Nanoparticles Using SPECT/CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rajesh R; Yu, Jianhua; Banerjee, Sangeeta R; Ren, Yong; Leong, Derek; Jiang, Xuan; Pomper, Martin; Tsui, Benjamin; Kraitchman, Dara L; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Successful translation of nonviral gene delivery to therapeutic applications requires detailed understanding of in vivo trafficking of the vehicles. This report compares the pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles of polyethylene glycol-b-polyphosphoramidate (PEG-b-PPA)/DNA micellar nanoparticles after administration through intravenous infusion, intrabiliary infusion, and hydrodynamic injection using single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Nanoparticles were labeled with 111In using an optimized protocol to retain their favorable physicochemical properties. Quantitative imaging analysis revealed different in vivo trafficking kinetics for PEG-b-PPA/DNA nanoparticles after different routes of administration. The intrabiliary infusion resulted in the highest liver uptake of micelles compared with the other two routes. Analysis of intrabiliary infusion by the two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling revealed efficient retention of micelles in the liver and minimal micelle leakage from the liver to the blood stream. This study demonstrates the utility of SPECT/CT as an effective noninvasive imaging modality for the characterization of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo and confirms that intrabiliary infusion is an effective route for liver-targeted delivery of DNA-containing nanoparticles. PMID:21750533

  6. Novel Cancer-Targeting SPECT/NIRF Dual-modality Imaging Probe 99mTc -PC-1007: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Li; Popovic, Kosta; Xie, Xiuzhen; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Chung, Leland W.K.; Williams, Mark B.; Yue, Wei; Pan, Dongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis, characterization, in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation of a heptamethine cyanine based dual-mode single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging probe 99mTc-PC-1007 is described. 99mTc-PC-1007 exhibited preferential accumulation in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Cancer-specific SPECT/CT and NIRF imaging of 99mTc -PC-1007 was performed in a breast cancer xenograft model. The probe uptake ratio of tumor to control (spinal cord) was calculated to be 4.02 ± 0.56 at 6 h post injection (pi) and 8.50 ± 1.41 at 20 h pi (P<0.0001). Pharmacokinetic parameters such as blood clearance and organ distribution were assessed. PMID:24125889

  7. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  8. Tc-99m Radiolabeled Peptide p5 + 14 is an Effective Probe for SPECT Imaging of Systemic Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Kennel, Stephen J; Stuckey, Alan; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Richey, Tina; Wall, Jonathan S

    2016-08-01

    Systemic peripheral amyloidosis is a rare disease in which misfolded proteins deposit in various organs. We have previously developed I-124 labeled peptide p5 + 14 as a tracer for positron emission tomography imaging of amyloid in patients. In this report, we now document the labeling efficiency, bioactivity, and stability of Tc-99m labeled p5 + 14 for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of amyloidosis, validated in a mouse model of systemic amyloidosis. Radiochemical yield, purity, and biological activity of [(99m)Tc]p5 + 14 were documented by instant thin-layer chromatography (ITLC), SDS-PAGE and a quantitative amyloid fibril pulldown assay. The efficacy and stability were documented in serum amyloid protein A (AA) amyloid-bearing or wild-type (WT) control mice imaged with SPECT/X-ray computed tomography (CT) at two time points. The uptake and retention of [(99m)Tc]p5 + 14 in hepatosplenic amyloid was evaluated using region of interest (ROI) and tissue counting measurements. Tc-99m p5 + 14 was produced with a radiochemical yield of 75 % with greater than 90 % purity and biological activity comparable to that of radioiodinated peptide. AA amyloid was visualized by SPECT/CT imaging with specific uptake seen in amyloid-laden organs at levels ∼5 folds higher than in healthy mice. ROI analyses of decay-corrected SPECT/CT images showed <20 % loss of radiolabel from the 1 to 4 h imaging time points. Biodistribution data confirmed the specificity of the probe accumulation by amyloid-laden organs as compared to non-diseased tissues. [(99m)Tc]p5 + 14 is a specific and stable radiotracer for systemic amyloid in mice and may provide a convenient and inexpensive alternative to imaging of peripheral amyloidosis in patients.

  9. Development of an Optimized Activatable MMP-14 targeted SPECT Imaging Probe

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Gregory A.; Jones, Ella Fung; Shell, M. Scott; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Pan, Mei-Hsiu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Feng, Jin Jin; He, Jiang; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Dill, Ken A.; Contag, Christopher H.; Coussens, Lisa M.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix Metalloproteinase-14 (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) is a membrane-associated protease implicated in a variety of tissue remodeling processes and a molecular hallmark of select metastatic cancers. The ability to detect MMP-14 in vivo would be useful in studying its role in pathologic processes and may potentially serve as a guide for the development of targeted molecular therapies. Four MMP-14 specific probes containing a positively charged cell penetrating peptide (CPP) d-arginine octamer (r8) linked with a MMP-14 peptide substrate and attenuating sequences with glutamate (8e, 4e) or glutamate-glycine (4eg and 4egg) repeating units were modeled using an AMBER force field method. The probe with 4egg attenuating sequence exhibited the highest CPP/attenuator interaction, predicting minimized cellular uptake until cleaved. The in vitro MMP-14-mediated cleavage studies using the human recombinant MMP-14 catalytic domain revealed an enhanced cleavage rate that directly correlated with the linearity of the embedded peptide substrate sequence. Successful cleavage and uptake of a technetium-99m labeled version of the optimal probe was demonstrated in MMP-14 transfected human breast cancer cells. Two- fold reduction of cellular uptake was found in the presence of a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. The combination of computational chemistry, parallel synthesis and biochemical screening, therefore, shows promise as a set of tools for developing new radiolabeled probes that are sensitive to protease activity. PMID:19109023

  10. Filtering in SPECT Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi

    2011-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is widely implemented in nuclear medicine as its clinical role in the diagnosis and management of several diseases is, many times, very helpful (e.g., myocardium perfusion imaging). The quality of SPECT images are degraded by several factors such as noise because of the limited number of counts, attenuation, or scatter of photons. Image filtering is necessary to compensate these effects and, therefore, to improve image quality. The goal of filtering in tomographic images is to suppress statistical noise and simultaneously to preserve spatial resolution and contrast. The aim of this work is to describe the most widely used filters in SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality. The choice of the filter type, the cut-off frequency and the order is a major problem in clinical routine. In many clinical cases, information for specific parameters is not provided, and findings cannot be extrapolated to other similar SPECT imaging applications. A literature review for the determination of the mostly used filters in cardiac, brain, bone, liver, kidneys, and thyroid applications is also presented. As resulting from the overview, no filter is perfect, and the selection of the proper filters, most of the times, is done empirically. The standardization of image-processing results may limit the filter types for each SPECT examination to certain few filters and some of their parameters. Standardization, also, helps in reducing image processing time, as the filters and their parameters must be standardised before being put to clinical use. Commercial reconstruction software selections lead to comparable results interdepartmentally. The manufacturers normally supply default filters/parameters, but these may not be relevant in various clinical situations. After proper standardisation, it is possible to use many suitable filters or one optimal filter. PMID:21760768

  11. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  12. Lanthanide-based nanocrystals as dual-modal probes for SPECT and X-ray CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongquan; Sun, Yun; Zhu, Xingjun; Liu, Qian; Cao, Tianye; Peng, Juanjuan; Yang, Yang; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2014-05-01

    Applications of lanthanide-based nanoparticles for bioimaging have attracted increasing attention. Herein, small size PEG-EuOF:(153)Sm nanocrystals (∼5 nm) (PEG = poly(ethylene glycol)bis(carboxymethyl)ether) combined with the radioactive and X-ray absorption properties were synthesized. The distribution of the PEG-EuOF nanocrystals in living animals was studied by ex vivo radioassay, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrum (ICP-AES) analysis and in vivo SPECT imaging, which indicated that the small size PEG-EuOF:(153)Sm had long blood retention time (blood half-life (t1/2) reach to 4.65 h) and were eliminated significantly through biliary/gastrointestinal pathway in vivo. Meanwhile, benefiting from the high attenuation ability of Eu, the small size PEG-EuOF was successfully applied for lymph node CT imaging, extending the bio-applications of these small nanocrystals. The results of cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity also showed that the PEG-EuOF nanocrystals have relatively low toxicity, which suggest their safety for in vivo imaging. The studies provide preliminary validation for the use of PEG-EuOF nanocrystals for in vivo bioimaging applications.

  13. Receptor binding characterization of the benzodiazepine radioligand sup 125 I-Ro16-0154: Potential probe for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Woods, S.W.; Zoghbi, S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Innis, R.B. ); McBride, B.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The binding of an iodinated benzodiazepine (BZ) radioligand has been characterized, particularly in regard to its potential use as a neuroreceptor brain imaging agent with SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). Ro16-0154 is an iodine-containing BZ antagonist and a close analog of Ro15-1788. In tissue homogenates prepared from human and monkey brain, the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Ro16-0154 was saturable, of high affinity, and had high ratios of specific to non-specific binding. Physiological concentrations of NaCl enhanced specific binding approximately 15% compared to buffer without this salt. Kinetic studies of association and dissociation demonstrated a temperature dependent decrease in affinity with increasing temperature. Drug displacement studies confirmed that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 binds to the central type BZ receptor: binding is virtually identical to that of {sup 3}H-Ro15-1788 except that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 shows an almost 10 fold higher affinity at 37{degree}C. These in vitro results suggest that {sup 123}I-labeled Ro16-0154 shows promise as a selective, high affinity SPECT probe of the brain's BZ receptor.

  14. The AdaptiSPECT Imaging Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Moore, Jared W.; Van Holen, Roel; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the imaging aperture of an adaptive SPECT imaging system being developed at the Center for Gamma Ray Imaging (AdaptiSPECT). AdaptiSPECT is designed to automatically change its configuration in response to preliminary data, in order to improve image quality for a particular task. In a traditional pinhole SPECT imaging system, the characteristics (magnification, resolution, field of view) are set by the geometry of the system, and any modification can be accomplished only by manually changing the collimator and the distance of the detector to the center of the field of view. Optimization of the imaging system for a specific task on a specific individual is therefore difficult. In an adaptive SPECT imaging system, on the other hand, the configuration can be conveniently changed under computer control. A key component of an adaptive SPECT system is its aperture. In this paper, we present the design, specifications, and fabrication of the adaptive pinhole aperture that will be used for AdaptiSPECT, as well as the controls that enable autonomous adaptation. PMID:27019577

  15. SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Brian F.

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is widely used as a means of imaging the distribution of administered radiotracers that have single-photon emission. The most widely used SPECT systems are based on the Anger gamma camera, usually involving dual detectors that rotate around the patient. Several factors affect the quality of SPECT images (e.g., resolution and noise) and the ability to perform absolute quantification (e.g., attenuation, scatter, motion, and resolution). There is a trend to introduce dual-modality systems and organ-specific systems, both developments that enhance diagnostic capability.

  16. Development of PET and SPECT Probes for Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    l-Glutamate and its receptors (GluRs) play a key role in excitatory neurotransmission within the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Impaired regulation of GluRs has also been implicated in various neurological disorders. GluRs are classified into two major groups: ionotropic GluRs (iGluRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels, and metabotropic GluRs (mGluRs), which are coupled to heterotrimeric guanosine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins). Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of GluRs could provide a novel view of CNS function and of a range of brain disorders, potentially leading to the development of new drug therapies. Although no satisfactory imaging agents have yet been developed for iGluRs, several PET ligands for mGluRs have been successfully employed in clinical studies. This paper reviews current progress towards the development of PET and SPECT probes for GluRs. PMID:25874256

  17. TC-99m MIBI SPECT imaging in patients with lung carcinoma: is it a functional probe of multidrug resistance genes?

    PubMed

    Ak, Ilknur; Gülbaş, Zafer; Ocak, Suna; Kaya, Eser; Alataş, Füsun; Vardareli, Erkan; Metintaş, Muzaffer

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype concerns altered membrane transport that results in lower cell concentrations of cytotoxic drug in many cancer types, including lung cancer, and is related to the overexpression of a variety of proteins that act as adenosine triphosphate-dependent extrusion pumps. Tc-99m Sestamibi (MIBI) is a transport substrate for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) pump. In this study, we assessed the uptake and clearance of technetium-99m-2-hexakis 2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (Tc-99m MIBI) from the tumor and its correlation with messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of Pgp, MDR-associated protein (MRP1), and lung resistance protein (LRP) in lung carcinoma. This study was carried out on 19 patients (mean age, 60.1 +/- 2.07 years) with advanced-stage lung carcinoma. The tumor samples obtained by bronchoscopy were assessed to estimate the levels of Pgp, MRP1, and LRP expression on mRNA level by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tc-99m MIBI chest imaging was performed 15 and 180 minutes after injection of 740 MBq Tc-99m MIBI. The early (T/Be) and delayed (T/Bd) Tc-99m MIBI uptakes and washout rate (WR) of Tc-99m MIBI from the tumor were measured. No correlation was found between the T/Be Tc-99m MIBI uptake of tumors (T/Be) and the levels of Pgp mRNA, MRP1 mRNA, and LRP mRNA by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. There was a correlation between the mean T/Bd Tc-99m MIBI uptake and Pgp expression of the tumors (P = 0.001, Spearman rho = - 0.702). There was a correlation between the WR of Tc-99m MIBI from the tumor and Pgp expression of the tumor (P = 0.000, Spearman rho = 0.875). Washout rate of Tc-99m MIBI was not related to the levels of MRP1 mRNA (P = 0.93, Spearman rho = 0.02) or LRP mRNA (P = 0.47, Spearman rho = 0.177). Increased WR of Tc-99m MIBI is related in Pgp over expression of the tumor. Tc-99m MIBI single photon emission computed tomography imaging may be a functional probe of overexpression of Pgp in

  18. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  19. Cerebral SPECT imaging: Impact on clinical management

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.; Jacobs, S.; Pozniakof, T.

    1994-05-01

    Although cerebral SPECT has been reported to be of value in a variety of neurologic disorders, there is limited data available on the value of SPECT relative to clinical management decisions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cerebral SPECT imaging on patient management. A total of 94 consecutive patients referred for clinical evaluation with brain SPECT were included in this study. Patients were assigned to one of nine groups depending on the clinical indication for the study. These groups included transient ischemia (16), stroke (20), dementia (18), seizures (5), hemorrhage (13), head trauma (6), arteriovenous malformations (6), encephalopathy (6) and a miscellaneous (4) group. All patients were injected with 99mTc HMPAO in doses ranging from 15 mCi to 22 mCi (555 MBq to 814 MBq) and scanned on a triple headed SPECT gamma camera. Two weeks after completion of the study, a standardized interview was conducted between the nuclear and referring physicians to determine if the SPECT findings contributed to an alteration in patient management. Overall, patient management was significantly altered in 47% of the cases referred. The greatest impact on patient management occurred in the group evaluated for transient ischemia, where a total of 13/16 (81%) of patients had their clinical management altered as a result of the cerebral SPECT findings. Clinical management was altered in 61% of patients referred for evaluation of dementia, 67% of patients evaluated for arteriovenous malformations, and 50% of patients with head trauma. In the remainder of the patients, alteration in clinical management ranged from 17% to 50% of patients. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of cerebral SPECT imaging since in a significant number of cases clinical management was altered as a result of the examination. Long term follow up will be necessary to determine patient outcome.

  20. Integration of AdaptiSPECT, a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Kovalsky, Stephen; Kosmider, Matthew; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical adaptive SPECT imaging system under final development at the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. The system incorporates multiple adaptive features: an adaptive aperture, 16 detectors mounted on translational stages, and the ability to switch between a non-multiplexed and a multiplexed imaging configuration. In this paper, we review the design of AdaptiSPECT and its adaptive features. We then describe the on-going integration of the imaging system. PMID:26347197

  1. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  2. Towards personalized interventional SPECT-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gardiazabal, José; Esposito, Marco; Matthies, Philipp; Okur, Asli; Vogel, Jakob; Kraft, Silvan; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2014-01-01

    The development of modern robotics and compact imaging detectors allows the transfer of diagnostic imaging modalities to the operating room, supporting surgeons to perform faster and safer procedures. An intervention that currently suffers from a lack of interventional imaging is radioembolization, a treatment for hepatic carcinoma. Currently, this procedure requires moving the patient from an angiography suite for preliminary catheterization and injection to a whole-body SPECT/CT for leakage detection, necessitating a second catheterization back in the angiography suite for the actual radioembolization. We propose an imaging setup that simplifies this procedure using a robotic approach to directly acquire an interventional SPECT/CT in the angiography suite. Using C-arm CT and a co-calibrated gamma camera mounted on a robotic arm, a personalized trajectory of the gamma camera is generated from the C-arm CT, enabling an interventional SPECT reconstruction that is inherently co-registered to the C-arm CT. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of this personalized interventional SPECT/CT imaging approach in a liver phantom study.

  3. SPECT gallium imaging in abdominal lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, K.A.; Friefeld, G.D.; Waldron, J.A. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    A case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen studied by gallium SPECT imaging is reported. The tomographic slices accurately demonstrated the location of residual disease after chemotherapy in the region of the transverse mesocolon. Previous transmission CT had shown considerable persistent retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, but was not helpful in determining the presence of viable lymphoma.

  4. Radiolabeled Sugars Used for PET and SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Lopez, Brianda; Bergstrom, Kim

    2016-01-01

    There are new efforts to develop "sugar" probes for molecular imaging focusing on human clinical studies. Radiolabeled carbohydrates are used as substrate probes for studying specific processes in tissues and organisms. The best application case is 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG), which is incorporated by cancer cells. The introduction of ltF-FDG has advanced enormously human Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This review focuses on the importance of 18FFDG and other sugars as imaging probes in PET and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. In conclusion, new radiolabeled molecules that can be used as radiopharmaceuticals also would possibly help in the treatment of cancer cells in human patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. New Approaches in SPECT Breast Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    the use of their breast and torso phantoms. The software package, "SPECTER", developed by Tim Turkington, was used to analyze and display the phantom...breast images. The software package, "SPECT-MAP", developed by James Bowsher, was used for reconstructions. VI. REFERENCES [1] Tornai MP, Bowsher JE...based software . and standard errors of the mean. No attenuation or scatter corrections were taken into account in For a given statistical ensemble of

  6. SPECT and PET Imaging of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue. PMID:22623896

  7. SPECT and PET imaging of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue.

  8. Bayesian learning for cardiac SPECT image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Jarosław P; Goodenday, Lucy S; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a system for automating the diagnosis of myocardial perfusion from single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of male and female hearts. Initially we had several thousand of SPECT images, other clinical data and physician-interpreter's descriptions of the images. The images were divided into segments based on the Yale system. Each segment was described by the physician as showing one of the following conditions: normal perfusion, reversible perfusion defect, partially reversible perfusion defect, fixed perfusion defect, defect showing reverse redistribution, equivocal defect or artifact. The physician's diagnosis of overall left ventricular (LV) perfusion, based on the above descriptions, categorizes a study as showing one or more of eight possible conditions: normal, ischemia, infarct and ischemia, infarct, reverse redistribution, equivocal, artifact or LV dysfunction. Because of the complexity of the task, we decided to use the knowledge discovery approach, consisting of these steps: problem understanding, data understanding, data preparation, data mining, evaluating the discovered knowledge and its implementation. After going through the data preparation step, in which we constructed normal gender-specific models of the LV and image registration, we ended up with 728 patients for whom we had both SPECT images and corresponding diagnoses. Another major contribution of the paper is the data mining step, in which we used several new Bayesian learning classification methods. The approach we have taken, namely the six-step knowledge discovery process has proven to be very successful in this complex data mining task and as such the process can be extended to other medical data mining projects.

  9. PET/SPECT imaging agents for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission computed tomography (PET) imaging agents for neurodegenerative disease have a significant impact on clinical diagnosis and patient care. The examples of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) imaging agents described in this paper provide a general view on how imaging agents, ie radioactive drugs, are selected, chemically prepared and applied in humans. Imaging the living human brain can provide unique information on the pathology and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD and PD. The imaging method will also facilitate preclinical and clinical trials of new drugs offering specific information related to drug binding sites in the brain. In the future, chemists will continue to play important roles in identifying specific targets, synthesizing target-specific probes for screening and ultimately testing them by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:24676152

  10. Preclinical Evaluation of a Potential GSH Ester Based PET/SPECT Imaging Probe DT(GSHMe)2 to Detect Gamma Glutamyl Transferase Over Expressing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Harleen; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Prakash, Surbhi; Chuttani, Krishna; Chadha, Nidhi; Jaswal, Ambika; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Hazari, Puja Panwar

    2015-01-01

    imaging using PET/SPECT. PMID:26221728

  11. Preclinical Evaluation of a Potential GSH Ester Based PET/SPECT Imaging Probe DT(GSHMe)₂ to Detect Gamma Glutamyl Transferase Over Expressing Tumors.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Harleen; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Prakash, Surbhi; Chuttani, Krishna; Chadha, Nidhi; Jaswal, Ambika; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Hazari, Puja Panwar

    2015-01-01

    imaging using PET/SPECT.

  12. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  13. SPECT-US image fusion and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kaar, Marcus; Hoffmann, Rainer; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Beyer, Thomas; Staudenherz, Anton; Figl, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Because scintigraphic images lack anatomical information, single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography systems (PET) are combined physically with CTs to compensate for this drawback. In our work, we present a method where the CT is replaced by a 3D ultrasound device. Because in this case a mechanical linkage is not possible, we use an additional optical tracking system (OTS) for spatial correlation of the SPECT or PET information and the US. To enable image fusion between the functional SPECT and the anatomical US we first calibrate the SPECT by means of the optical tracking system. This is done by imaging a phantom with SPECT and scanning the surface of the phantom using a calibrated stylus of the OTS. Applying an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm results in the transformation between the optical coordinate system and the SPECT coordinate system. When a patient undergoes a SPECT scan, a 3D US image is taken immediately after the scan. Since the scan head of the US is also tracked by the OTS, the transformation between OTS and SPECT can be calculated straight forward. For clinical intervention, the patient is again imaged with the US and a 3D/3D registration between the two US volumes allows to transform the functional information of the SPECT to the current US image in real time. We found a mean distance between the point cloud of the optical stylus and the segmented surface of the phantom of 2.3 mm while the maximum distance was found to be 6.9 mm. The 3D3D registration between the two US images was accomplished with an error of 2.1 mm.

  14. Iterative restoration of SPECT projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, S. J.; Xia, Weishi

    1997-04-01

    Photon attenuation and the limited nonstationary spatial resolution of the detector can reduce both qualitative and quantitative image quality in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper, a reconstruction approach is described which can compensate for both of these degradations. The approach involves processing the projection data with Bellini's method for attenuation compensation followed by an iterative deconvolution technique which uses the frequency distance principle (FDP) to model the distance-dependent camera blur. Modeling of the camera blur with the FDP allows an efficient implementation using fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods. After processing of the projection data, reconstruction is performed using filtered backprojection. Simulation studies using two different brain phantoms show that this approach gives reconstructions with a favorable bias versus noise tradeoff, provides no visually undesirable noise artifacts, and requires a low computational load.

  15. Initial Investigation of Preclinical Integrated SPECT and MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, Mark J.; Ha, Seunghoon; Roeck, Werner W.; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Meier, Dirk; Patt, Bradley E.; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide specific functional information while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-spatial resolution anatomical information as well as complementary functional information. In this study, we utilized a dual modality SPECT/MRI (MRSPECT) system to investigate the integration of SPECT and MRI for improved image accuracy. The MRSPECT system consisted of a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) nuclear radiation detector interfaced with a specialized radiofrequency (RF) coil that was placed within a whole-body 4 T MRI system. The importance of proper corrections for non-uniform detector sensitivity and Lorentz force effects was demonstrated. MRI data were utilized for attenuation correction (AC) of the nuclear projection data and optimized Wiener filtering of the SPECT reconstruction for improved image accuracy. Finally, simultaneous dual-imaging of a nude mouse was performed to demonstrated the utility of co-registration for accurate localization of a radioactive source. PMID:20082527

  16. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  17. A SPECT imager with synthetic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havelin, Ronan J.; Miller, Brian W.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Murphy, J. M.; Foley, Mark J.

    2013-09-01

    This work outlines the development of a multi-pinhole SPECT system designed to produce a synthetic-collimator image of a small field of view. The focused multi-pinhole collimator was constructed using rapid-prototyping and casting techniques. The collimator projects the field of view through forty-six pinholes when the detector is adjacent to the collimator. The detector is then moved further from the collimator to increase the magnification of the system. The amount of pinhole-projection overlap increases with the system magnification. There is no rotation in the system; a single tomographic angle is used in each system configuration. The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) algorithm is implemented on graphics processing units to reconstruct the object in the field of view. Iterative reconstruction algorithms, such as MLEM, require an accurate model of the system response. For each system magnification, a sparsely-sampled system response is measured by translating a point source through a grid encompassing the field of view. The pinhole projections are individually identified and associated with their respective apertures. A 2D elliptical Gaussian model is applied to the pinhole projections on the detector. These coefficients are associated with the object-space location of the point source, and a finely-sampled system matrix is interpolated. Simulations with a hot-rod phantom demonstrate the efficacy of combining low-resolution non-multiplexed data with high-resolution multiplexed data to produce high-resolution reconstructions.

  18. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents.

  19. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT or SPECT/CT for lung function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema?

    PubMed

    Froeling, Vera; Heimann, Uwe; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Kroencke, Thomas J; Maurer, Martin H; Doellinger, Felix; Geisel, Dominik; Hamm, Bernd; Brenner, Winfried; Schreiter, Nils F

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the utility of attenuation correction (AC) of V/P SPECT images for patients with pulmonary emphysema. Twenty-one patients (mean age 67.6 years) with pulmonary emphysema who underwent V/P SPECT/CT were included. AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images were compared visually and semiquantitatively. Visual comparison of AC/non-AC images was based on a 5-point likert scale. Semiquantitative comparison assessed absolute counts per lung (aCpLu) and lung lobe (aCpLo) for AC/non-AC images using software-based analysis; percentage counts (PC = (aCpLo/aCpLu) × 100) were calculated. Correlation between AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images was analyzed using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient; differences were tested for significance with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Visual analysis revealed high conformity for AC and non-AC V/P SPECT images. Semiquantitative analysis of PC in AC/non-AC images had an excellent correlation and showed no significant differences in perfusion (ρ = 0.986) or ventilation (ρ = 0.979, p = 0.809) SPECT/CT images. AC of V/P SPECT images for lung lobe-based function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema do not improve visual or semiquantitative image analysis.

  20. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Pato, Lara R V; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-21

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems' performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view ([Formula: see text] of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice.

  1. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pato, Lara R. V.; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-01

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems’ performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view (75% of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice.

  2. PET/SPECT molecular imaging in clinical neuroscience: recent advances in the investigation of CNS diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive technology widely used in clinical practice that greatly enhances our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. It is a novel multidisciplinary technique that can be defined as real-time visualization, in vivo characterization and qualification of biological processes at the molecular and cellular level. It involves the imaging modalities and the corresponding imaging agents. Nowadays, molecular imaging in neuroscience has provided tremendous insights into disturbed human brain function. Among all of the molecular imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have occupied a particular position that visualize and measure the physiological processes using high-affinity and high-specificity molecular radioactive tracers as imaging probes in intact living brain. In this review, we will put emphasis on the PET/SPECT applications in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) as major CNS disorders. We will first give an overview of the main classical molecular neuroimaging modalities. Then, the major clinical applications of PET and SPECT along with molecular probes in the fields of psychiatry and neurology will be discussed. PMID:26029646

  3. 3D quantitative analysis of brain SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Ceskovic, Ivan; Petrovic, Ratimir; Loncaric, Srecko

    2001-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a computer-based technique for quantitative analysis of 3-D brain images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In particular, the volume and location of ischemic lesion and penumbra is important for early diagnosis and treatment of infracted regions of the brain. SPECT imaging is typically used as diagnostic tool to assess the size and location of the ischemic lesion. The segmentation method presented in this paper utilizes a 3-D deformable model in order to determine size and location of the regions of interest. The evolution of the model is computed using a level-set implementation of the algorithm. In addition to 3-D deformable model the method utilizes edge detection and region growing for realization of a pre-processing. Initial experimental results have shown that the method is useful for SPECT image analysis.

  4. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Small animal SPECT and its place in the matrix of molecular imaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Steven R.; Kench, Peter; Kassiou, Michael; Banati, Richard B.

    2005-11-01

    Molecular imaging refers to the use of non-invasive imaging techniques to detect signals that originate from molecules, often in the form of an injected tracer, and observe their interaction with a specific cellular target in vivo. Differences in the underlying physical principles of these measurement techniques determine the sensitivity, specificity and length of possible observation of the signal, characteristics that have to be traded off according to the biological question under study. Here, we describe the specific characteristics of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) relative to other molecular imaging technologies. SPECT is based on the tracer principle and external radiation detection. It is capable of measuring the biodistribution of minute (<10-10 molar) concentrations of radio-labelled biomolecules in vivo with sub-millimetre resolution and quantifying the molecular kinetic processes in which they participate. Like some other imaging techniques, SPECT was originally developed for human use and was subsequently adapted for imaging small laboratory animals at high spatial resolution for basic and translational research. Its unique capabilities include (i) the ability to image endogenous ligands such as peptides and antibodies due to the relative ease of labelling these molecules with technetium or iodine, (ii) the ability to measure relatively slow kinetic processes (compared with positron emission tomography, for example) due to the long half-life of the commonly used isotopes and (iii) the ability to probe two or more molecular pathways simultaneously by detecting isotopes with different emission energies. In this paper, we review the technology developments and design tradeoffs that led to the current state-of-the-art in SPECT small animal scanning and describe the position SPECT occupies within the matrix of molecular imaging technologies.

  7. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and built a small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ~35 keV photons from the decay of 125I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1×1×5 mm3/pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five 1 mm diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications. PMID:19701447

  8. System Integration of FastSPECT III, a Dedicated SPECT Rodent-Brain Imager Based on BazookaSPECT Detector Technology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Moore, Stephen K.; Barber, H. Bradford; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    FastSPECT III is a stationary, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager designed specifically for imaging and studying neurological pathologies in rodent brain, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons’s disease. Twenty independent BazookaSPECT [1] gamma-ray detectors acquire projections of a spherical field of view with pinholes selected for desired resolution and sensitivity. Each BazookaSPECT detector comprises a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, image-intensifier, optical lens, and fast-frame-rate CCD camera. Data stream back to processing computers via firewire interfaces, and heavy use of graphics processing units (GPUs) ensures that each frame of data is processed in real time to extract the images of individual gamma-ray events. Details of the system design, imaging aperture fabrication methods, and preliminary projection images are presented. PMID:21218137

  9. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Rodriguez, F.; Arevila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-28

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162{+-}37 g and 169{+-}34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  10. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-Morales, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, F.; Arévila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-01

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162±37 g and 169±34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  11. (99m)Tc-labelled nanosystem as tumour imaging agent for SPECT and SPECT/CT modalities.

    PubMed

    Polyák, András; Hajdu, István; Bodnár, Magdolna; Trencsényi, György; Pöstényi, Zita; Haász, Veronika; Jánoki, Gergely; Jánoki, Győző A; Balogh, Lajos; Borbély, János

    2013-06-05

    We report the synthesis, in vitro and in vivo investigation of folate-targeted, biocompatible, biodegradable self-assembled nanoparticles radiolabelled with (99m)Tc, as potential new SPECT or SPECT/CT imaging agent. Nanoparticles with hydrodynamic size in the range of 75-200 nm were prepared by self-assembly of chitosan and folated poly-γ-glutamic acid, and then radiolabelled with (99m)Tc. The nanoparticles target tumour cells overexpressing folate receptors and internalize specifically into them to realize early tumour diagnosis detected by SPECT and SPECT/CT modalities. Rat hepatocellular carcinoma cells were used as model system. Cell specificity and tumour targeting efficacy of these nanosystems were investigated in vitro, and in vivo using SPECT and fusion nanoSPECT/CT imaging. In vitro results showed that the radiolabeled nanosystem was efficiently internalized by tumour cells. Whole-body biodistribution of the new radiolabelled, folate-targeted nanoparticles revealed higher uptake in the tumorous kidney compared to the non-tumorous contralateral side. Uptake by the lungs and thyroids was negligible, which confirmed the stability of the nanoparticles in vivo. In vivo SPECT and SPECT/CT imaging visually reinforced the uptake results and were in accordance with the biodistribution data: the new nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent improve tumour targeting and are able to detect folate-receptor-overexpressing tumours in animal models with enhanced contrast.

  12. A COMPUTER MODEL OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY TO ANALYZE SPECT IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) spatial distribution of aerosol deposition can be performed using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The advantage of using 3-D techniques over planar gamma imaging is that deposition patterns can be related to real lun...

  13. A COMPUTER MODEL OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY TO ANALYZE SPECT IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) spatial distribution of aerosol deposition can be performed using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The advantage of using 3-D techniques over planar gamma imaging is that deposition patterns can be related to real lun...

  14. CT, MR and SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Patterson, J; Hadley, D M; Macpherson, P; Brodie, M J; Bone, I; McGeorge, A P; Wyper, D J

    1990-01-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) with modified temporal lobe technique, 0.15T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were carried out on 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Lateralising abnormalities were detected in 21/30 patients overall. Specific lesions were detected by CT in one patient and by MRI in seven patients (in one case bilateral). In addition CT detected asymmetry of the sylvian fissures or temporal horns in 10 patients, and MRI in eight patients. SPECT detected lateralising abnormalities in 19 patients (in five cases bilateral). It is concluded that low field MRI is superior to modified CT in demonstrating subtle structural lesions of the temporal lobe. Functional scanning with SPECT supports the evidence of origin of an epileptic focus in a substantial proportion of cases and may improve the selection of patients for surgery.

  15. Design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Hugg, James W.; Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Meier, Dirk; Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a continuing design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals. A first generation prototype SPECT system was designed and constructed to fit inside a MRI system with a gradient bore inner diameter of 12 cm. It consists of 3 angularly offset rings of 8 detectors (1"x1", 16x16 pixels MR-compatible solid-state CZT). A matching 24-pinhole collimator sleeve, made of a tungsten-compound, provides projections from a common FOV of ~25 mm. A birdcage RF coil for MRI data acquisition surrounds the collimator. The SPECT system was tested inside a clinical 3T MRI system. Minimal interference was observed on the simultaneously acquired SPECT and MR images. We developed a sparse-view image reconstruction method based on accurate modeling of the point response function (PRF) of each of the 24 pinholes to provide artifact-free SPECT images. The stationary SPECT system provides relatively low resolution of 3-5 mm but high geometric efficiency of 0.5- 1.2% for fast dynamic acquisition, demonstrated in a SPECT renal kinetics study using Tc-99m DTPA. Based on these results, a second generation prototype MR-compatible SPECT system with an outer diameter of 20 cm that fits inside a mid-sized preclinical MRI system is being developed. It consists of 5 rings of 19 CZT detectors. The larger ring diameter allows the use of optimized multi-pinhole collimator designs, such as high system resolution up to ~1 mm, high geometric efficiency, or lower system resolution without collimator rotation. The anticipated performance of the new system is supported by simulation data.

  16. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  17. Showcase of Intraoperative 3D Imaging of the Sentinel Lymph Node in a Breast Cancer Patient using the New Freehand SPECT Technology.

    PubMed

    Schnelzer, Andreas; Ehlerding, Alexandra; Blümel, Christina; Okur, Asli; Scheidhauer, Klemens; Paepke, Stefan; Kiechle, Marion

    2012-12-01

    After the development of a hand-held intraoperative device for 3D real-time imaging of radioactively labeled sentinel lymph nodes in the human body, we present our first experience with the newest version of the freehand single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology in the operating room. The freehand SPECT system combines a gamma probe and an optical infrared positioning system, and provides surgeons with 3D imaging including exact depth information of the radioactive target. This technology was used intraoperatively in a female breast cancer patient to localize the axillary sentinel lymph nodes. The data obtained with freehand SPECT correlate well with conventional lymphoscintigraphy and with data collected using a conventional hand-held probe. By offering fast real-time intraoperative imaging, the new freehand SPECT system might facilitate the detection and removal of the sentinel lymph node(s) in certain situations and can be used for documentation and quality assurance purposes.

  18. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  19. A novel SPECT camera for molecular imaging of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Alan; Gilland, David; Su, Li-Ming; Wagenaar, Douglas; Bahadori, Amir

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an improved SPECT camera for dedicated prostate imaging. Complementing the recent advancements in agents for molecular prostate imaging, this device has the potential to assist in distinguishing benign from aggressive cancers, to improve site-specific localization of cancer, to improve accuracy of needle-guided prostate biopsy of cancer sites, and to aid in focal therapy procedures such as cryotherapy and radiation. Theoretical calculations show that the spatial resolution/detection sensitivity of the proposed SPECT camera can rival or exceed 3D PET and further signal-to-noise advantage is attained with the better energy resolution of the CZT modules. Based on photon transport simulation studies, the system has a reconstructed spatial resolution of 4.8 mm with a sensitivity of 0.0001. Reconstruction of a simulated prostate distribution demonstrates the focal imaging capability of the system.

  20. Development of a Hybrid Nanoprobe for Triple-Modality MR/SPECT/Optical Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Renata; Svenmarker, Pontus; Ingvar, Christian; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Engels, Stefan-Andersson; Knutsson, Linda; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid clinical imaging is an emerging technology, which improves disease diagnosis by combining already existing technologies. With the combination of high-resolution morphological imaging, i.e., MRI/CT, and high-sensitive molecular detection offered by SPECT/PET/Optical, physicians can detect disease progression at an early stage and design patient-specific treatments. To fully exploit the possibilities of hybrid imaging a hybrid probe compatible with each imaging technology is required. Here, we present a hybrid nanoprobe for triple modality MR/SPECT/Fluorescence imaging. Our imaging agent is comprised of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), labeled with 99mTc and an Alexa fluorophore (AF), together forming 99mTc-AF-SPIONs. The agent was stable in human serum, and, after subcutaneous injection in the hind paw of Wistar rats, showed to be highly specific by accumulating in the sentinel lymph node. All three modalities clearly visualized the imaging agent. Our results show that a single imaging agent can be used for hybrid imaging. The use of a single hybrid contrast agent permits simultaneous hybrid imaging and, more conventionally, allow for single modality imaging at different time points. For example, a hybrid contrast agent enables pre-operative planning, intra-operative guidance, and post-operative evaluation with the same contrast agent. PMID:26852675

  1. IQ-SPECT for thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: effect of normal databases on quantification.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Matsuo, Shinro; Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Kinuya, Seigo

    2017-07-01

    Although IQ-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides rapid acquisition and attenuation-corrected images, the unique technology may create characteristic distribution different from the conventional imaging. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of IQ-SPECT using Japanese normal databases (NDBs) with that of the conventional SPECT for thallium-201 ((201)Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). A total of 36 patients underwent 1-day (201)Tl adenosine stress-rest MPI. Images were acquired with IQ-SPECT at approximately one-quarter of the standard time of conventional SPECT. Projection data acquired with the IQ-SPECT system were reconstructed via an ordered subset conjugate gradient minimizer method with or without scatter and attenuation correction (SCAC). Projection data obtained using the conventional SPECT were reconstructed via a filtered back projection method without SCAC. The summed stress score (SSS) was calculated using NDBs created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group, and scores were compared between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT using the acquisition condition-matched NDBs. The diagnostic performance of the methods for the detection of coronary artery disease was also compared. SSSs were 6.6 ± 8.2 for the conventional SPECT, 6.6 ± 9.4 for IQ-SPECT without SCAC, and 6.5 ± 9.7 for IQ-SPECT with SCAC (p = n.s. for each comparison). The SSS showed a strong positive correlation between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT (r = 0.921 and p < 0.0001), and the correlation between IQ-SPECT with and without SCAC was also good (r = 0.907 and p < 0.0001). Regarding diagnostic performance, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80.8, 78.9, and 79.4%, respectively, for the conventional SPECT; 80.8, 80.3, and 82.0%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT without SCAC; and 88.5, 86.8, and 87.3%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT with SCAC, respectively. The area under the curve obtained via receiver operating

  2. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  3. Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT in patients with left bundle branch block suspected for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Elsemiek M; Timmer, Jorik R; Mouden, Mohamed; Knollema, Siert; Jager, Pieter L; Ottervanger, Jan Paul

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on sequential single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/ CT imaging starting with stress-first SPECT. Consecutive symptomatic low- to intermediate-risk patients without a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for SPECT/CT were included from an observational registry. If stress SPECT was abnormal, additional rest SPECT and, if feasible, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) were acquired. Of the 5,018 patients, 218 (4.3 %) demonstrated LBBB. Patients with LBBB were slightly older than patients without LBBB (65±12 vs. 61±11 years, p<0.001). Stress SPECT was more frequently abnormal in patients with LBBB (82 % vs. 46 %, p<0.001). After reviewing stress and rest images, SPECT was normal in 43 % of the patients with LBBB, compared to 77 % of the patients without LBBB (p<0.001). Sixty-four of the 124 patients with LBBB and abnormal stress-rest SPECT underwent CCTA (52 %), which could exclude obstructive CAD in 46 of the patients (72 %). Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT is not the optimal imaging protocol in patients with LBBB, as the majority of these patients have potentially false-positive stress SPECT. First-line testing using CCTA may be more appropriate in low- to intermediate-risk patients with LBBB. • Stress-first SPECT imaging is attractive if many patients demonstrate normal stress perfusion. • The majority of left bundle branch block patients have abnormal stress-first SPECT. • Coronary CT excluded obstructive CAD in many LBBB patients with abnormal SPECT. • Stress-first SPECT imaging is not the optimal imaging protocol in LBBB patients. • In LBBB patients imaging with initial coronary CT may be more appropriate.

  4. Nonlinear dual reconstruction of SPECT activity and attenuation images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction.

  5. Nonlinear Dual Reconstruction of SPECT Activity and Attenuation Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction. PMID:25225796

  6. Cerebral blood flow imaging with thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    van Royen, E.A.; de Brune, J.F.H.; Hill, T.C.; Vyth, A.; Limburg, M.; Byse, B.L.; O'Leary, D.H.; de Jong, J.M.; Hijdra, A.; van der Schoot, J.B.

    1987-02-01

    Thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate ((/sup 201/TI)DDC) was studied in humans as an agent for cerebral blood flow imaging. Brain uptake proved to be complete 90 sec after injection with no appreciable washout or redistribution for hours. Intracarotid injection suggested an almost 100% extraction during the first passage. Whole-body distribution studies demonstrated a brain uptake of 4.3% of the dose compared with 0.9% for (/sup 201/TI)chloride. No differences were found in the distribution of (/sup 201/TI)DDC versus (/sup 201/TI)chloride in other organs. After the injection of 3 mCi /sup 201/TI, good quality single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain were obtained with both a rotating gamma camera and a multidetector system. In ischemic brain disease, perfusion defects were easily demonstrated. We conclude that (/sup 201/TI)DDC is a suitable radiopharmaceutical for SPECT studies of cerebral blood flow.

  7. Molecular Imaging of Hydrolytic Enzymes Using PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Brian P.; Price, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a large class of biological catalysts that play a vital role in a plethora of critical biochemical processes required to maintain human health. However, the expression and/or activity of these important enzymes can change in many different diseases and therefore represent exciting targets for the development of positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers. This review focuses on recently reported radiolabeled substrates, reversible inhibitors, and irreversible inhibitors investigated as PET and SPECT tracers for imaging hydrolytic enzymes. By learning from the most successful examples of tracer development for hydrolytic enzymes, it appears that an early focus on careful enzyme kinetics and cell-based studies are key factors for identifying potentially useful new molecular imaging agents. PMID:28927325

  8. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Smith, M F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  9. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lee, B. Kross, D. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, M.S. Smith

    2012-02-01

    Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  10. Improved diagnostic accuracy of lung perfusion imaging using Tc-99m MAA SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Golish, J.A.; Go, R.T.; Risius, B.; Graor, R.A.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Feiglin, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The addition of emission tomography (SPECT) to pulmonary perfusion imaging should improve diagnostic accuracy by detecting perfusion defects otherwise masked by superimposition of normal lung activity and by reducing problems with interpretation of defects that result from overlying soft tissue or pleural effusions. In order to examine the contribution of SPECT in the scintigraphic evaluation for pulmonary embolus (PE), the authors have obtained both planar and SPECT studies in 94 cases of suspected PE. All studies employed 3-4 mCi of Tc-99m MAA and standard six-view planar image acquisition. SPECT raw data of 64 images were then acquired over a 360 degree transaxial rotation with subsequent computer reconstruction. Xe-133 ventilation studies were performed when clinically indicated and tolerated by the patient. For 19 studies angiographic (AN) correlation was obtained within 24 hours. In 16/19 planar and SPECT both gave a high probability of PE but SPECT gave better segmental localization and showed better agreement with the number of defects seen at AN. In 3 indeterminate planar scans, 2 were low probability with SPECT and had negative AN. The third, a patient with Wegener's vasculitis, remained indeterminate with SPECT and had negative AN. Five patients with PE had repeat planar/SPECT/AN studies to evaluate response to treatment. SPECT correlated better with AN findings in each case. The authors conclude that SPECT perfusion imaging provides better anatomic accuracy for defects representing PE and is the non-invasive technique of choice for documenting response to therapy.

  11. [Cost-effectiveness of stress-only myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging].

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Enrique; Acevedo, César; Varela, Samuel; Alburez, José Carlos; Bialostozky, David

    2012-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging is widely used for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD). However, SPECT costs, imaging time, and radiation exposure, limit SPECT indications. Determine whether a stress-only SPECT imaging would be enough to obtain a diagnosis of CAD improving nuclear laboratory efficiency. 122 patients with unknown CAD were evaluated with stress-only SPECT imaging. In order to evaluate diagnostic accuracy and the prognostic value of the stress-only protocol, patients with abnormal SPECT underwent invasive angiography and patients with normal SPECT were followed-up during 3 years. Diagnosis time, SPECT cost, and radiopharmaceutical dosage were significantly lower as compared with the conventional SPECT imaging protocol (30, 40 and 55%, respectively). Diagnostic accuracy and cardiac prognosis information were comparable to those obtained with the conventional imaging protocol (positive predictive value for CAD of 85% and negative predictive value for cardiac events of 97%). In patients with intermediate risk for CAD, stress-only SPECT imaging will significantly improve nuclear laboratory efficiency, and with similar accuracy than that the one obtained with the conventional protocol.

  12. A Multimodal Imaging Protocol, (123)I/(99)Tc-Sestamibi, SPECT, and SPECT/CT, in Primary Hyperparathyroidism Adds Limited Benefit for Preoperative Localization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace S; McKenzie, Travis J; Mullan, Brian P; Farley, David R; Thompson, Geoffrey B; Richards, Melanie L

    2016-03-01

    Focused parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism (1°HPT) is possible with accurate preoperative localization and intraoperative PTH monitoring (IOPTH). The added benefit of multimodal imaging techniques for operative success is unknown. Patients with 1°HPT, who underwent parathyroidectomy in 2012-2014 at a single institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Only the patients who underwent the standardized multimodal imaging workup consisting of (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi subtraction scintigraphy, SPECT, and SPECT/CT were assessed. Of 360 patients who were identified, a curative operation was performed in 96%, using pre-operative imaging and IOPTH. Imaging analysis showed that (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi had a sensitivity of 86% (95% CI 82-90%), positive predictive value (PPV) 93%, and accuracy 81%, based on correct lateralization. SPECT had a sensitivity of 77% (95% CI 72-82%), PPV 92% and accuracy 72%. SPECT/CT had a sensitivity of 75% (95% CI 70-80%), PPV of 94%, and accuracy 71%. There were 3 of 45 (7%) patients with negative sestamibi imaging that had an accurate SPECT and SPECT/CT. Of 312 patients (87%) with positive uptake on sestamibi (93% true positive, 7% false positive), concordant findings were present in 86% SPECT and 84% SPECT/CT. In cases where imaging modalities were discordant, but at least one method was true-positive, (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi was significantly better than both SPECT and SPECT/CT (p < 0.001). The inclusion of SPECT and SPECT/CT in 1°HPT imaging protocol increases patient cost up to 2.4-fold. (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi subtraction imaging is highly sensitive for preoperative localization in 1°HPT. SPECT and SPECT/CT are commonly concordant with (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi and rarely increase the sensitivity. Routine inclusion of multimodality imaging technique adds minimal clinical benefit but increases cost to patient in high-volume setting.

  13. Diagnostic role of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for early and atypical bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Liang; Li, Qian; Cao, Lin; Jiang, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The bone metastasis appeared early before the bone imaging for most of the above patients. (99)Tc(m)-MDP ((99)Tc(m) marked methylene diphosphonate) bone imaging could diagnosis the bone metastasis with highly sensitivity, but with lower specificity. The aim of this study is to explore the diagnostic value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for the early period atypical bone metastases. 15 to 30 mCi (99)Tc(m)-MDP was intravenously injected to the 34 malignant patients diagnosed as doubtful early bone metastases. SPECT, CT and SPECT/CT images were captured and analyzed consequently. For the patients diagnosed as early period atypical bone metastases by SPECT/CT, combining the SPECT/CT and MRI together as the SPECT/MRI integrated image. The obtained SPECT/MRI image was analyzed and compared with the pathogenic results of patients. The results indicated that 34 early period doubtful metastatic focus, including 34 SPECT positive focus, 17 focus without special changes by using CT method, 11 bone metastases focus by using SPECT/CT method, 23 doubtful bone metastases focus, 8 doubtful bone metastases focus, 14 doubtful bone metastases focus and 2 focus without clear image. Totally, SPECT/CT combined with SPECT/MRI method diagnosed 30 bone metastatic focus and 4 doubtfully metastatic focus. In conclusion, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging shows a higher diagnostic value for the early period bone metastases, which also enhances the diagnostic accuracy rate.

  14. Direction-dependent localization errors in SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Justin; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is being investigated for imaging inside radiation therapy treatment rooms to localize biological targets. Here, computer simulations were used to analyze locational and directional dependencies in localization errors and to assess the effects of spatial resolution modeling and observer normalization on localization performance. Methods: SPECT images of the XCAT phantom, containing 12 hot tumors, were reconstructed with detector response function compensation (DRC) and without DRC (nDRC). Numerical observers were forced to select the most suspicious tumor location, using normalized cross correlation (NXC) or un-normalized cross correlation (XC), from 3 cm diameter search volumes that each contained only one tumor. For each tumor site, localization was optimized as a function of the iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing. Localization error, the distance between true and estimated tumor positions, was calculated across the ensembles of 80 images. Direction-dependent localization bias and precision were estimated from the image ensemble. Results: For the six superficial tumors in close proximity to the detector trajectory, mean localization errors were <2 mm and were lowest or comparable using DRC-NXC, though differences from DRC-XC and nDRC-NXC were not statistically significant. DRC-NXC did provide statistically significantly better localization than nDRC-XC for five of these six tumors. At the other six sites where attenuation was more severe and the distance was generally greater between the tumor and detector, DRC typically did not show better localization than nDRC. Observer normalization improved the localization substantially for a tumor near the hotter heart. Localization errors were anisotropic and dependent on tumor location relative to the detector trajectory. Conclusions: This computer-simulation study compared localization performance for normalized and un-normalized numerical

  15. Validation of a short-scan-time imaging protocol for thallium-201 myocardial SPECT with a multifocal collimator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Yoriko; Ueda, Tomohiro; Shiomori, Tomofumi; Kanna, Masahiko; Matsushita, Hirooki; Kawaminami, Tomoko; Sudo, Yuta; Kikuchi, Shinnosuke; Sasaki, Ryo; Hoshimiya, Jun; Morita, Yukiko

    2014-10-01

    IQ-SPECT (Siemens AG, Munich, Germany) is a highly sensitive single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) system that uses a multifocal collimator. We searched for a suitable protocol for short-time imaging by IQ-SPECT in thallium-201 (Tl-201) MPI by evaluating phantom images and also by comparing human IQ-SPECT images with conventional SPECT images as reference standards. We assessed the image quality using the normalized mean square error (NMSE) and drew up count profiles in Tl-201 SPECT images acquired with IQ-SPECT in a phantom study. We also performed Tl-201 stress myocardial SPECT/CT in 21 patients and compared delayed images acquired by using IQ-SPECT with 36 or 17 views per head with images obtained by using conventional SPECT. The NMSE of SPECT images from IQ-SPECT with 36 views was approximately one-fifth of that with 17 views. The myocardial count profile of images with 17 views was lower than those of images with 36 or 104 views in some regions. Defect scores were significantly lower, and image quality scores higher, in images from conventional SPECT than in those from IQ-SPECT with 17 views. Defect scores and image quality scores were equivalent in images from conventional SPECT and those from IQ-SPECT with 36 views. Agreement with the results of conventional SPECT in terms of coronary artery territory-based defect judgment was the best in IQ-SPECT with 36 views with computed tomography-derived attenuation correction (CTAC): the kappa values for IQ-SPECT with 36 views were 0.76 (without CTAC) and 0.83 (with CTAC), and those for IQ-SPECT with 17 views were 0.62 (without CTAC) and 0.59 (with CTAC). The difference in quantitative tracer uptake between conventional SPECT images and IQ-SPECT images was significantly greater for IQ-SPECT images with 17 views than for those with 36 views. Scanning with 36 views per head with CTAC may be appropriate for Tl-201 MPI using IQ-SPECT, because it provides images equivalent to

  16. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  17. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  18. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  19. Thallium-201 SPECT imaging of brain tumors: Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Black, K.L.; Marciano, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Guze, B.H.; Grafton, S.; Hawkins, R.A.; Becker, D.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) planar scans of brain tumors more accurately reflect viable tumor burden than CT, MRI, or radionuclide studies with other single-photon emitting compounds. We have previously reported the utility of {sup 201}Tl SPECT index in distinguishing low- from high-grade gliomas elsewhere. Here we describe the technical considerations of deriving a simple {sup 201}Tl index, based on uptake in the tumor normalized to homologous contralateral tissue, from SPECT images of brain tumors. We evaluated the importance of consistently correcting for tissue attenuation, as it may achieve better lesion discrimination on qualitative inspection, and the methodologic limitations imposed by partial volume effects at the limits of resolution.

  20. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  1. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-09-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the pro-gression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code.

  2. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code. PMID:26190884

  3. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  4. Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    New developments have been made in optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging that measures 3D position and orientation (pose) for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system. Ongoing SPECT imaging research has been directed towards head motion measurement for brain studies in awake, unrestrained mice. In contrast to previous results using external markers, this work extracts and tracks intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computes relative pose from the tracked features over time. Motion tracking thus far has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to the mouse s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the additional animal handling required to attach the markers is undesirable. A significant improvement in the procedure is achieved by measuring the pose of the head without extrinsic markers using only the external surface appearance. This approach is currently being developed with initial results presented here. The intrinsic features measurement extracts discrete, sparse natural features from 2D images such as eyes, nose, mouth and other visible structures. Stereo correspondence between features for a camera pair is determined for calculation of 3D positions. These features are also tracked over time to provide continuity for surface model fitting. Experimental results from live images are presented.

  5. Comparison of heterogeneity quantification algorithms for brain SPECT perfusion images

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several algorithms from the literature were compared with the original random walk (RW) algorithm for brain perfusion heterogeneity quantification purposes. Algorithms are compared on a set of 210 brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) simulations and 40 patient exams. Methods Five algorithms were tested on numerical phantoms. The numerical anthropomorphic Zubal head phantom was used to generate 42 (6 × 7) different brain SPECT simulations. Seven diffuse cortical heterogeneity levels were simulated with an adjustable Gaussian noise function and six focal perfusion defect levels with temporoparietal (TP) defects. The phantoms were successively projected and smoothed with Gaussian kernel with full width at half maximum (FWHM = 5 mm), and Poisson noise was added to the 64 projections. For each simulation, 5 Poisson noise realizations were performed yielding a total of 210 datasets. The SPECT images were reconstructed using filtered black projection (Hamming filter: α = 0.5). The five algorithms or measures tested were the following: the coefficient of variation, the entropy and local entropy, fractal dimension (FD) (box counting and Fourier power spectrum methods), the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and the new RW. The heterogeneity discrimination power was obtained with a linear regression for each algorithm. This regression line is a mean function of the measure of heterogeneity compared to the different diffuse heterogeneity and focal defect levels generated in the phantoms. A greater slope denotes a larger separation between the levels of diffuse heterogeneity. The five algorithms were computed using 40 99mTc-ethyl-cysteinate-dimer (ECD) SPECT images of patients referred for memory impairment. Scans were blindly ranked by two physicians according to the level of heterogeneity, and a consensus was obtained. The rankings obtained by the algorithms were compared with the physicians' consensus ranking. Results The GLCM method

  6. Comparison of heterogeneity quantification algorithms for brain SPECT perfusion images.

    PubMed

    Modzelewski, Romain; Janvresse, Elise; de la Rue, Thierry; Vera, Pierre

    2012-07-20

    Several algorithms from the literature were compared with the original random walk (RW) algorithm for brain perfusion heterogeneity quantification purposes. Algorithms are compared on a set of 210 brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) simulations and 40 patient exams. Five algorithms were tested on numerical phantoms. The numerical anthropomorphic Zubal head phantom was used to generate 42 (6 × 7) different brain SPECT simulations. Seven diffuse cortical heterogeneity levels were simulated with an adjustable Gaussian noise function and six focal perfusion defect levels with temporoparietal (TP) defects. The phantoms were successively projected and smoothed with Gaussian kernel with full width at half maximum (FWHM = 5 mm), and Poisson noise was added to the 64 projections. For each simulation, 5 Poisson noise realizations were performed yielding a total of 210 datasets. The SPECT images were reconstructed using filtered black projection (Hamming filter: α = 0.5).The five algorithms or measures tested were the following: the coefficient of variation, the entropy and local entropy, fractal dimension (FD) (box counting and Fourier power spectrum methods), the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and the new RW.The heterogeneity discrimination power was obtained with a linear regression for each algorithm. This regression line is a mean function of the measure of heterogeneity compared to the different diffuse heterogeneity and focal defect levels generated in the phantoms. A greater slope denotes a larger separation between the levels of diffuse heterogeneity.The five algorithms were computed using 40 99mTc-ethyl-cysteinate-dimer (ECD) SPECT images of patients referred for memory impairment. Scans were blindly ranked by two physicians according to the level of heterogeneity, and a consensus was obtained. The rankings obtained by the algorithms were compared with the physicians' consensus ranking. The GLCM method (slope = 58.5), the fractal

  7. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J. . Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  8. CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT treatment plans are comparable to SPECT ventilation functional image-based plans.

    PubMed

    Kida, Satoshi; Bal, Matthieu; Kabus, Sven; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Shan, Xin; Loo, Billy W; Keall, Paul J; Yamamoto, Tokihiro

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans designed to avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions are comparable to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation functional image-based plans. Three IMRT plans were created for eight thoracic cancer patients using: (1) CT ventilation functional images, (2) SPECT ventilation functional images, and (3) anatomic images (no functional images). CT ventilation images were created by deformable image registration of 4D-CT image data sets and quantitative analysis. The resulting plans were analyzed for the relationship between the deviations of CT-functional plan metrics from anatomic plan metrics (ΔCT-anatomic) and those of SPECT-functional plans (ΔSPECT-anatomic), and moreover for agreements of various metrics between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plans. The relationship between ΔCT-anatomic and ΔSPECT-anatomic was strong (e.g., R=0.94; linear regression slope 0.71). The average differences and 95% limits of agreement between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plan metrics (except for monitor units) for various structures were mostly less than 1% and 2%, respectively. This study demonstrated a reasonable agreement between the CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans and SPECT-functional plans, suggesting the potential for CT ventilation imaging to serve as a surrogate for SPECT ventilation in functional image-guided radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  10. Molecular Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques Targeted to Oxidized LDL Receptor LOX-1 Using SPECT/CT and Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dayuan; Patel, Amit; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Ruiz, Mirta; Kang, Bum-Yong; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Beller, George A.; Glover, David K.; Meyer, Craig H

    2010-01-01

    Background The oxidized-LDL receptor LOX-1 plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. We sought to detect and assess atherosclerotic plaque in vivo using SPECT/CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a molecular probe targeted at LOX-1. Methods & Results Apo E−/− mice on Western diet and LDLR−/− and LDLR−/−/LOX-1−/− mice on atherogenic diet were used. Imaging probes consisted of liposomes decorated with LOX-1 antibodies (LOX-1) or nonspecific IgG (nIgG), 111In or gadolinium (Gd), and DiI fluorescence markers. In vivo imaging was performed 24 hrs after intravenous injection (150 µl) of LOX-1 (or nIgG) probes labeled with either 111In (600 µCi) or Gd (0.075 mmol/kg) followed by aortic excision for phosphor imaging and Sudan IV staining or fluorescence imaging and H&E staining. The LOX-1 probe was also co-localized with specific cell types, apoptosis, and MMP9 expression using frozen aortic sections. SPECT/CT imaging of the LOX-1 probe showed aortic arch hotspots in Apo E−/− mice (n=8), confirmed by phosphor imaging. MRI showed significant Gd enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in LDLR−/− mice with the LOX-1 (n=7), but not nIgG, probe (n=5). No signal enhancement was observed in LDLR−/−/LOX-1−/− mice injected with LOX-1 probe (n=5). These results were confirmed by ex-vivo fluorescence imaging. The LOX-1 probe bound preferentially to the plaque shoulder, a region with vulnerable plaque features including extensive LOX-1 expression, macrophage accumulation, apoptosis and MMP9 expression. Conclusions LOX-1 can be used as a target for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaque in vivo. Furthermore, LOX-1 imaging may identify rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:20442371

  11. [Usefulness of SPECT images in helping radiologists understand brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Hayashida, K

    2001-04-01

    Nuclear brain imaging is able to show functional abnormalities of lesions that are not detectable by CT and MR images. The diagnostic keys of nuclear-imaging in terms of clinical usefulness are its early detection of lesions and determination of the efficacy of drug and surgical therapies. In dementic patients, F-18 FDG brain images can be diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease 12 months earlier than is possible on CT and MRI images, and can provide information for effective drug therapy. O-15 water CBF images can predict the effect of Nicholin by assessing transient increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF), thereby facilitating improvement in higher brain functions such as orientation. In stroke patients, brain SPECT images with Tc-99m HMPAO can predict fatal cerebral hemorrhage caused by anti-thrombic therapy by showing the decrease in count ratio (count ratio of infarcted to contralateral area of < 0.34) in the acute phase and identifying disruption of the blood brain barrier by showing hyperfixation in the subacute phase. Brain SPECT with I-123 IMP can also identify "misery" perfused areas resulting from reduced CBF and decreased vasoreactivity in the chronic phase. This criterion is utilized for patient selection for extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery, because patients with areas of poor perfusion might be indicated for such surgery. Since nuclear medicine images can accurately select candidates for drug or surgical therapies, they will be beneficial in reducing Medicare costs as well as in enhancing patients' quality of life as a result of the successful treatment. With the advancement of technology, nuclear medicine units that can simultaneously obtain CT images and can combine functional with anatomical images will provide more useful information for the diagnosis of brain disease.

  12. Automated coregistration and statistical analyses of SPECT brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.; Devous, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    Statistical analyses of SPECT image data often require highly accurate image coregistration. Several image coregistration algorithms have been developed. The Pellizari algorithm (PA) uses the Powell technique to estimate transformation parameters between the {open_quotes}head{close_quotes} (model) and {open_quotes}hat{close_quotes} (images to be registered). Image normalization and good initial transformation parameters heavily affect the accuracy and speed of convergence of the PA. We have explored various normalization methods and found a simple technique that avoids most artificial edge effects and minimizes blurring of useful edges. We have tested the effects on accuracy and convergence speed of the PA caused by different initial transformation parameters. From these data, a modified PA was integrated into an automated coregistration system for SPECT brain images on the PRISM 3000S under X Windows. The system yields an accuracy of approximately 2 mm between model and registered images, and employs minimal user intervention through a simple graphic user interface. Data are automatically resliced, normalized and coregistered, with the user choosing only the slice range for inclusion and two initial transformation parameters (under computer-aided guidance). Coregistration is accomplished (converges) in approximately 8 min for a 128 x 128 x 128 set of 2 mm{sup 3} voxels. The complete process (editing, reslicing, normalization, coregistration) takes about 20 min. We have also developed automated 3-dimensional parametric images ({open_quotes}t{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}z{close_quotes}, and subtraction images) from coregistered data sets for statistical analyses. Data are compared against a coregistered normal control group (N = 50) distributed in age and gender for matching against subject samples.

  13. Comparison of planar and SPECT thallium imaging in men and women

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Fintel, D.F.; Becker, L.C.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied the overall accuracy of planar and SPECT Tl imaging in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 85 subjects (65 males, 20 females; 52 with angiographic CAD, 33 without CAD), and then separately analyzed men and women to see if factors such as breast attenuation significantly alter the accuracy. All subjects were exercised to symptom-limit or peak heart rate achievement, and injected with 2 mCi Tl-201. Planar and SPECT stress studies were acquired in a random order, with delayed studies acquired 3 hours after injection. The studies were viewed in a blinded, random order, and interpreted on a 5 point scale by consensus of 3 observers (1: definitely normal, 2: probably normal, 3: equivocal, 4: probably abnormal, 5: definitely abnormal). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for overall planar and SPECT, and then separately for male planar, male SPECT, female planar, female SPECT. The overall SPECT curve was above the overall planar curve. The overall SPECT curve was above the overall planar curve. At a specificity of 90%, SPECT sensitivity was 93%, planar was 80%. For both males and females, the SPECT curves were above the planar curves. However, both planar and SPECT male curves were above both female curves. At a specificity of 90%, sensitivities were male planar, 83%; male SPECT, 97%; female planar, 50%; female SPECT, 80%. This difference in accuracy between males and females was not due to adequacy of exercise (peak exercise heart rate in CAD pts: males, 145 +- 28 bpm; females, 151 +- 28; p=NS; in normals: 178 bpm for both males and females). SPECT is more accurate than planar imaging in the diagnosis of CAD. However, differences in accuracy exist between men and women, which may be due to breast attenuation.

  14. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  15. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihiko Sasaki, Masayuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao; Baba, Shingo

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  17. Filter and slice thickness selection in SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A.; Wilson, G.A.; O'Mara, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    The choice of filter and slice thickness in SPECT image reconstruction as function of activity and linear and angular sampling were investigated in phantom and patient imaging studies. Reconstructed transverse and longitudinal spatial resolution of the system were measured using a line source in a water filled phantom. Phantom studies included measurements of the Data Spectrum phantom; clinical studies included tomographic procedures in 40 patients undergoing imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Slices of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial resolution, noise, and image quality. Major findings include; spatial resolution and image quality improve with increasing linear sampling frequencies over the range of 4-8 mm/p in the phantom images, best spatial resolution and image quality in clinical images were observed at a linear sampling frequency of 6mm/p, Shepp and Logan filter gives the best spatial resolution for phantom studies at the lowest linear sampling frequency; smoothed Shepp and Logan filter provides best quality images without loss of resolution at higher frequencies and, spatial resolution and image quality improve with increased angular sampling frequency in the phantom at 40 c/p but appear to be independent of angular sampling frequency at 400 c/p.

  18. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf .

  19. Simultaneous reconstruction and segmentation for dynamic SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Rossmanith, Carolin; Zhang, Xiaoqun

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with the reconstruction of dynamic images that incorporate characteristic dynamics in certain subregions, as arising for the kinetics of many tracers in emission tomography (SPECT, PET). We make use of a basis function approach for the unknown tracer concentration by assuming that the region of interest can be divided into subregions with spatially constant concentration curves. Applying a regularised variational framework reminiscent of the Chan-Vese model for image segmentation we simultaneously reconstruct both the labelling functions of the subregions as well as the subconcentrations within each region. Our particular focus is on applications in SPECT with the Poisson noise model, resulting in a Kullback-Leibler data fidelity in the variational approach. We present a detailed analysis of the proposed variational model and prove existence of minimisers as well as error estimates. The latter apply to a more general class of problems and generalise existing results in literature since we deal with a nonlinear forward operator and a nonquadratic data fidelity. A computational algorithm based on alternating minimisation and splitting techniques is developed for the solution of the problem and tested on appropriately designed synthetic data sets. For those we compare the results to those of standard EM reconstructions and investigate the effects of Poisson noise in the data.

  20. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Imaging in Patients after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Demakopoulos, Nikolaos

    2010-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease affecting about 13 million Americans, while more than one million percutaneous transluminal intervention (PCI) procedures are performed annually in the USA. The relative high occurrence of restenosis, despite stent implementation, seems to be the primary limitation of PCI. Over the last decades, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), has proven an invaluable tool for the diagnosis of CAD and patients' risk stratification, providing useful information regarding the decision about revascularization and is well suited to assess patients after intervention. Information gained from post-intervention MPI is crucial to differentiate patients with angina from those with exo-cardiac chest pain syndromes, to assess peri-intervention myocardial damage, to predict-detect restenosis after PCI, to detect CAD progression in non-revascularized vessels, to evaluate the effects of intervention if required for occupational reasons and to evaluate patients' long-term prognosis. On the other hand, chest pain and exercise electrocardiography are largely unhelpful in identifying patients at risk after PCI.Although there are enough published data demonstrating the value of myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients after PCI, there is still debate on whether or not these tests should be performed routinely.

  1. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  2. Pharmacokinetics of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging hypoxic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, L I; Stypinski, D

    1996-09-01

    Although hypoxia has been known for decades to play an important role in the outcome of radiotherapy in oncology, and inspite of the contribution of hypoxia to a myriad of pathologies that involve vascular disease, the selective imaging of hypoxic tissue has attained prominence only within the past decade. Contemporary research in the hypoxia imaging field is based largely on radiosensitizer research of the 1960's and 1970's. Early sensitizer research identified a family of nitro-organic compounds, the N-1 substituted 2-nitroimidazoles as candidate drugs. The early champion, and still the reference standard for therapeutic radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells is misonidazole (MISO). Its peripheral neurotoxicity led to failure in clinical studies, but its biological, biophysical and biochemical properties have been investigated in detail and serve as a basis for further design, not only of sensitizers, but of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic characterization of radiopharmaceuticals, specifically radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia, has not been a central theme in their development. The advent of PET, through which quantitative determinations first became possible, opened the field for both descriptive and analytical radiopharmacokinetic studies. In SPECT, however, this approach is still undergoing refinement. This paper addresses some of the underlying issues in radiopharmaceutical pharmacokinetics. There is a paucity of published radiopharmacokinetic data for SPECT hypoxia imaging agents. Consequently, the pharmacokinetic issues for MISO are presented as a basis for development of pharmacokinetics for the chemically-related imaging agents. Properties of an hypoxia marker are described from a pharmacokinetic viewpoint, a theoretical model for descriptive pharmacokinetics is introduced and finally, recent pharmacokinetic studies from our laboratory are described.

  3. Tomographic mesh generation for OSEM reconstruction of SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Yu, Bo; Vogelsang, Levon; Krol, Andrzej; Xu, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaofei; Feiglin, David

    2009-02-01

    To improve quality of OSEM SPECT reconstruction in the mesh domain, we implemented an adaptive mesh generation method that produces tomographic mesh consisting of triangular elements with size and density commensurate with geometric detail of the objects. Node density and element size change smoothly as a function of distance from the edges and edge curvature without creation of 'bad' elements. Tomographic performance of mesh-based OSEM reconstruction is controlled by the tomographic mesh structure, i.e. node density distribution, which in turn is ruled by the number of key points on the boundaries. A greedy algorithm is used to influence the distribution of nodes on the boundaries. The relationship between tomographic mesh properties and OSEM reconstruction quality has been investigated. We conclude that by selecting adequate number of key points, one can produce a tomographic mesh with lowest number of nodes that is sufficient to provide desired quality of reconstructed images, appropriate for the imaging system properties.

  4. SPECT imaging of teboroxime during myocardial blood flow changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bella, E. V. R.; Khare, H. S.; Kadrmas, D. J.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2000-06-01

    Kinetic parameters and static images from dynamic SPECT imaging of /sup 99m/Tc-teboroxime have been shown to reflect blood flow in dogs and in humans at rest and during adenosine stress. When compartment modeling is used, steady-state physiological conditions are assumed. With standard adenosine stress protocols, imaging of teboroxime would likely involve significant changes in flow, even if performed only for five minutes. These flow changes may significantly bias the kinetic parameter estimates. On the other hand, when static imaging is performed, large flow changes during acquisition may improve contrast between normal and occluded regions. Computer simulations were performed to determine the effect of changing flows on kinetic parameter estimation and on static (average tissue uptake) images. Two canine studies were also performed in which adenosine was given with a standard protocol, and then imaging was repeated with adenosine infusion held constant. The simulations predicted biases on the order of 7% for kinetic washin parameter estimation and 18% for the washout parameter. Contrast for static studies was found to depend critically on the time-activity behavior of the distribution as well as on the stress protocol. The differences in washin contrast from the standard and continuous adenosine dog studies was slightly larger than predicted from the simulations. Optimal imaging of teboroxime with adenosine using compartment modeling will require non-standard adenosine stress protocols, although sub-optimal imaging may still be useful clinically.

  5. Observer detection limits for a dedicated SPECT breast imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, S J; Perez, K L; Barnhart, H X; Tornai, M P

    2012-01-01

    An observer-based contrast-detail study is performed in an effort to evaluate the limits of object detectability using a dedicated CZT-based breast SPECT imaging system under various imaging conditions. A custom geometric contrast-resolution phantom was developed that can be used for both positive (‘hot’) and negative contrasts (‘cold’). The 3 cm long fillable tubes are arranged in six sectors having equal inner diameters ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm with plastic wall thicknesses of <0.25 mm, on a pitch of twice their inner diameters. Scans of the activity filled tubes using simple circular trajectories are obtained in a 215 mL uniform water filled cylinder, varying the rod:background concentration ratios from 10:1 to 1:10 simulating a large range of biological uptake ratios. The rod phantom is then placed inside a non-uniformly shaped 500 mL breast phantom and scans are again acquired using both simple and complex 3D trajectories for similarly varying contrasts. Summed slice and contiguous multi-slice images are evaluated by five independent readers, identifying the smallest distinguishable rod for each concentration and experimental setup. Linear and quadratic regression is used to compare the resulting contrast-detail curves. Results indicate that in a moderately low-noise 500 mL background, using the SPECT camera having 2.5 mm intrinsic pixels, the mean detectable rod was ~3.4 mm at a 10:1 ratio, degrading to ~5.2 mm with the 2.5:1 concentration ratio. The smallest object detail was observed using a 45° tilted trajectory acquisition. The complex 3D projected sine wave acquisition, however, had the most consistent combined intra- and inter-observer results, making it potentially the best imaging approach for consistent results. PMID:20224159

  6. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rutao; Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  7. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Rutao Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. Methods: The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. Results: The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. Conclusions: The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  8. Multi-slice SPECT/CT vs. lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma ray probe for sentinel node mapping in HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Meerwein, C M; Sekine, T; Veit-Haibach, P; Bredell, M G; Huber, G F; Huellner, M W

    2017-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic potential of multi-slice single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for preoperative sentinel node (SN) mapping in early stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Retrospective case-control study including data of consecutive HNSCC patients treated between November 2011 and December 2015. The diagnostic accuracy of multi-slice SPECT/CT was assessed with regard to the gold standard intraoperative gamma ray detection probe, using McNemar's test and calculating the area under the ROC curve. Additionally, the hot spot yield of SPECT/CT and planar lymphoscintigraphy (LS) was compared. Compared to the intraoperative gold standard, SPECT/CT showed an overall positive predictive value of 60.3% [confidence interval (CI) 46.6-73.0%)], a negative predictive value of 96.3% (CI 93.6-98.1%), and an accuracy of 90.8% (CI 89.1-92.4%). SPECT/CT detected more hot spots than LS and provided detailed anatomical information as well as relevant additional findings with potential impact on further patient management. Sentinel lymph node biopsy proved to be a reliable and safe procedure with an excellent SN excision rate (97%). Multi-slice SPECT/CT is a highly accurate diagnostic test and matches the gold standard intraoperative gamma ray detection probe.

  9. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun Ozsahin, D.; Bläckberg, L.; El Fakhri, G.; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  10. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaoli; Liu, Ying; He, Yong; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Binqing; Gao, Zairong; An, Rui; Zhang, Yongxue

    2010-04-01

    with ex vivo gamma counting and mRNA levels from RT-PCR analysis. The gamma counting and RT-PCR also correlated well with each other in both sets of experiments. Both SPECT planar and tomographic images showed clear uptake of (131)I-FIAU in the anterolateral wall where Ad5-tk was injected. The study confirmed the feasibility of cardiac SPECT reporter gene imaging with HSV1-tk as a reporter gene and (131)I-FIAU as a reporter probe. The optimal Ad5-tk titer for imaging was 1x10(8) pfu and the optimal imaging time was 1-2 days after gene transfer. Thus, the imaging of HSV1-tk transgene expression in the heart is feasible and may be used for the noninvasive SPECT imaging of gene therapy in cardiac diseases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A combined static-dynamic single-dose imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT.

    PubMed

    Sciammarella, Maria; Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Gullberg, Grant T; Botvinick, Elias H

    2017-08-03

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a clinical mainstay that is typically performed with static imaging protocols and visually or semi-quantitatively assessed for perfusion defects based upon the relative intensity of myocardial regions. Dynamic cardiac SPECT presents a new imaging technique based on time-varying information of radiotracer distribution, which permits the evaluation of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). In this work, a preliminary feasibility study was conducted in a small patient sample designed to implement a unique combined static-dynamic single-dose one-day visit imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT for improving the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifteen patients (11 males, four females, mean age 71 ± 9 years) were enrolled for a combined dynamic and static SPECT (Infinia Hawkeye 4, GE Healthcare) imaging protocol with a single dose of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin administered at rest and a single dose administered at stress in a one-day visit. Out of 15 patients, eleven had selective coronary angiography (SCA), 8 within 6 months and the rest within 24 months of SPECT imaging, without intervening symptoms or interventions. The extent and severity of perfusion defects in each myocardial region was graded visually. Dynamically acquired data were also used to estimate the MBF and CFR. Both visually graded images and estimated CFR were tested against SCA as a reference to evaluate the validity of the methods. Overall, conventional static SPECT was normal in ten patients and abnormal in five patients, dynamic SPECT was normal in 12 patients and abnormal in three patients, and CFR from dynamic SPECT was normal in nine patients and abnormal in six patients. Among those 11 patients with SCA, conventional SPECT was normal in 5, 3 with documented CAD on SCA with an overall accuracy of 64%, sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 83%. Dynamic SPECT image

  12. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Rouchota, Maritina; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.

  13. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ploussi, Agapi; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast. PMID:24804144

  14. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paolo; Larobina, Michele; Di Lillo, Francesca; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Mettivier, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  15. Dual labeling of lipopolysaccharides for SPECT-CT imaging and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duheron, Vincent; Moreau, Mathieu; Collin, Bertrand; Sali, Wahib; Bernhard, Claire; Goze, Christine; Gautier, Thomas; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Deckert, Valérie; Brunotte, François; Lagrost, Laurent; Denat, Franck

    2014-03-21

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or endotoxins are amphipathic, pro-inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In the host, LPS can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. To bring insight into in vivo tissue distribution and cellular uptake of LPS, dual labeling was performed with a bimodal molecular probe designed for fluorescence and nuclear imaging. LPS were labeled with DOTA-Bodipy-NCS, and pro-inflammatory properties were controlled after each labeling step. LPS were then radiolabeled with (111)In and subsequently injected intravenously into wild-type, C57B16 mice, and their in vivo behavior was followed by single photon emission computed tomography coupled with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and fluorescence microscopy. Time course of liver uptake of radiolabeled LPS ((111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS) was visualized over a 24-h period in the whole animal by SPECT-CT. In complementary histological analyses with fluorescent microscopy, the bulk of injected (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to localize early within the liver. Serum kinetics of unlabeled and DOTA-Bodipy-labeled LPS in mouse plasma were similar as ascertained by direct quantitation of β-hydroxymyristate, and DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to retain the potent, pro-inflammatory property of the unlabeled molecule as assessed by serum cytokine assays. It is concluded that the dual labeling process, involving the formation of covalent bonds between a DOTA-Bodipy-NCS probe and LPS molecules is relevant for imaging and kinetic analysis of LPS biodistribution, both in vivo and ex vivo. Data of the present study come in direct and visual support of a lipopolysaccharide transport through which pro-inflammatory LPS can be transported from the periphery to the liver for detoxification. The (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS probe arises here as a relevant tool to identify key components of LPS detoxification in vivo.

  16. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  17. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  18. 3D SPECT/CT fusion using image data projection of bone SPECT onto 3D volume-rendered CT images: feasibility and clinical impact in the diagnosis of bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Ode, Kenichi; Matsusaka, Yohji; Katagiri, Mari; Iwabuchi, Yu; Itoh, Kazunari; Ichimura, Akira; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method of image data projection of bone SPECT into 3D volume-rendered CT images for 3D SPECT/CT fusion. The aims of our study were to evaluate its feasibility and clinical usefulness. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB) and SPECT/CT scans were performed in 318 cancer patients using a dedicated SPECT/CT systems. Volume data of bone SPECT and CT were fused to obtain 2D SPECT/CT images. To generate our 3D SPECT/CT images, colored voxel data of bone SPECT were projected onto the corresponding location of the volume-rendered CT data after a semi-automatic bone extraction. Then, the resultant 3D images were blended with conventional volume-rendered CT images, allowing to grasp the three-dimensional relationship between bone metabolism and anatomy. WB and SPECT (WB + SPECT), 2D SPECT/CT fusion, and 3D SPECT/CT fusion were evaluated by two independent reviewers in the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The inter-observer variability and diagnostic accuracy in these three image sets were investigated using a four-point diagnostic scale. Increased bone metabolism was found in 744 metastatic sites and 1002 benign changes. On a per-lesion basis, inter-observer agreements in the diagnosis of bone metastasis were 0.72 for WB + SPECT, 0.90 for 2D SPECT/CT, and 0.89 for 3D SPECT/CT. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for the diagnostic accuracy of bone metastasis showed that WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT had an area under the curve of 0.800, 0.983, and 0.983 for reader 1, 0.865, 0.992, and 0.993 for reader 2, respectively (WB + SPECT vs. 2D or 3D SPECT/CT, p < 0.001; 2D vs. 3D SPECT/CT, n.s.). The durations of interpretation of WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT images were 241 ± 75, 225 ± 73, and 182 ± 71 s for reader 1 and 207 ± 72, 190 ± 73, and 179 ± 73 s for reader 2, respectively. As a result, it took shorter time to read 3D SPECT/CT images than 2D SPECT/CT (p < 0.0001) or WB + SPECT

  19. Pre-reconstruction restoration of SPECT projection images by a neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the projection images obtained at view angles surrounding the patient are degraded due to the geometric response of the imaging system (a spatially-variant blur), Compton scatter, Poisson noise, and other factors. Various methods have been proposed for compensating for the spatially varying geometric response of the camera. In this study the authors examine restoration of SPECT projection images using an artificial neural network. A three layer feed-forward neural network is trained to compute the spatially-variant standard deviations of a symmetric Gaussian blur. A Hopfield network is then used to restore the projection images in which the restoration problem is formulated as a minimization of an error function of the network. Results from applying this restoration procedure on SPECT projection images are presented and the resulting SPECT reconstruction are analyzed.

  20. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  1. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, Matthias N; Kreuger, Rob; Buckle, Tessa; Mahn, Wendy A; Bunschoten, Anton; Josephson, Lee; van Leeuwen, Fijs Wb; Beekman, Freek J

    2014-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images.

  2. Implementation of technetium-99m MIBI SPECT imaging guidelines: optimizing the two day stress-rest protocol.

    PubMed

    Lavalaye, J M; Schroeder-Tanka, J M; Tiel-van Buul, M M; van der Wall, E E; Lie, K I; van Royen, E A

    1997-08-01

    In a previous study in 460 patients, we found that in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease undergoing stress-rest technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging, rest SPECT imaging could be withhold in approximately 20% of patients because of a completely normal stress study. The present study was set up to evaluate the consequences of the implementation of this finding in a subsequent population of patients, and to set standards for the variety of protocols now used for MIBI SPECT imaging. Within a period of 4 months, 235 consecutive patients referred for MIBI SPECT scintigraphy were studied. All patients had stable cardiac chest pain and underwent symptom-limited exercise MIBI SPECT perfusion imaging. The stress SPECT images were reconstructed and evaluated immediately after acquisition of the images. In case of a clearly normal stress SPECT study, rest imaging was cancelled. Twenty-six of 235 patients (11%) had a completely normal stress MIBI SPECT study and the rest SPECT imaging procedure could be subsequently cancelled. In 20 patients (9%) the stress SPECT was inconclusive, and in 189 (80%) of patients stress imaging was clearly abnormal. In the first month of the study, the nuclear medicine physicians and cardiologists would interprete only 6% of the stress images as normal, while this number increased to 13% after 9 weeks, with a mean of 11% for the whole investigation period of 4 months. In patients undergoing stress MIBI SPECT imaging, it was found justified to cancel rest MIBI SPECT imaging in at least 11% of patients because of a completely normal stress SPECT. As 9% of the images were inconclusive, the number of normal stress images could theoretically increase to 20% if reliable measures are taken to improve reading accuracy. This number is in close agreement with the number of normal stress studies previously reported by our institution and would lead to a considerable reduction of radiation dose, costs, and

  3. Prediction of sentinel lymph node status using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) imaging of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomiguchi, Mai; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Fujisue, Mamiko; Shiraishi, Shinya; Inao, Touko; Murakami, Kei-ichi; Honda, Yumi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2016-02-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) improves the anatomical identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs). We aimed to evaluate the possibility of predicting the SN status using SPECT/CT. SN mapping using a SPECT/CT system was performed in 381 cases of clinically node-negative, operable invasive breast cancer. We evaluated and compared the values of SN mapping on SPECT/CT, the findings of other modalities and clinicopathological factors in predicting the SN status. Patients with SNs located in the Level I area were evaluated. Of the 355 lesions (94.8 %) assessed, six cases (1.6 %) were not detected using any imaging method. According to the final histological diagnosis, 298 lesions (78.2 %) were node negative and 83 lesions (21.7 %) were node positive. The univariate analysis showed that SN status was significantly correlated with the number of SNs detected on SPECT/CT in the Level I area (P = 0.0048), total number of SNs detected on SPECT/CT (P = 0.011), findings of planar lymphoscintigraphy (P = 0.011) and findings of a handheld gamma probe during surgery (P = 0.012). According to the multivariate analysis, the detection of multiple SNs on SPECT/CT imaging helped to predict SN metastasis. The number of SNs located in the Level I area detected using the SPECT/CT system may be a predictive factor for SN metastasis.

  4. Modeling of the Sensitivity of Fan-Beam Collimation in Spect Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dB by the manufacturer and by projection measurements of a uniform flood source. 2 THEORY 2.1 Ideal collimation Consider a schematic representation of...MODELING OF THE SENSITIVITY OF FAN-BEAM COLLIMATION IN SPECT IMAGING Michel Koolex, Yves D’Asselerx, Stefaan Vandenberghex, Rik Van de Wallex, Koen...Nuclear Medicine Division, University Hospital of Ghent, De Pintelaan 185 B-9000 Ghent, Belgium Abstract An essential feature of SPECT imaging is

  5. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT-CT scanners

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Frank P.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners. PMID:18635899

  6. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Filippo, Frank P.

    2008-08-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners.

  7. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Knight, James C; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart

    2017-06-01

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins.

  8. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.05). The left ventricular ejection fraction from IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a

  9. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grova, C.; Jannin, P.; Biraben, A.; Buvat, I.; Benali, H.; Bernard, A. M.; Scarabin, J. M.; Gibaud, B.

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  10. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Grova, C; Jannin, P; Biraben, A; Buvat, I; Benali, H; Bernard, A M; Scarabin, J M; Gibaud, B

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  11. Clinical application of SPECT in adrenal imaging with iodine-131 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura, J.; Kawanaka, M.; Fukuchi, M.

    1989-04-01

    Forty-one patients with or without adrenocortical disorders were studied to evaluate the clinical usefulness of SPECT in adrenal imaging with I-131 Adosterol. In the SPECT images from this study, all glands with either normally functioning or hyperfunctioning adrenal cortices could be detected, while those glands with hypofunctioning adrenal cortices could not be detected. Particularly in transaxial and sagittal slices, the adrenal gland was identified posteriorly and was clearly distinguished from the gallbladder. In preliminary results using SPECT by a standard method, uptake in 68 detectable glands ranged from 1.7% to 4.9% in four glands with Cushing's syndrome, from 1.1% to 1.3% in seven glands with primary aldosteronism, and were distributed below 1.0% in the remaining glands with normally functioning adrenal cortices. These data show that it is possible to evaluate the adrenocortical functioning status simply by analyzing the SPECT images of the adrenal.

  12. Automatic estimation of detector radial position for contoured SPECT acquisition using CT images on a SPECT/CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruijie Rachel; Erwin, William D.

    2006-08-15

    An algorithm was developed to estimate noncircular orbit (NCO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detector radius on a SPECT/CT imaging system using the CT images, for incorporation into collimator resolution modeling for iterative SPECT reconstruction. Simulated male abdominal (arms up), male head and neck (arms down) and female chest (arms down) anthropomorphic phantom, and ten patient, medium-energy SPECT/CT scans were acquired on a hybrid imaging system. The algorithm simulated inward SPECT detector radial motion and object contour detection at each projection angle, employing the calculated average CT image and a fixed Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold. Calculated radii were compared to the observed true radii, and optimal CT threshold values, corresponding to patient bed and clothing surfaces, were found to be between -970 and -950 HU. The algorithm was constrained by the 45 cm CT field-of-view (FOV), which limited the detected radii to {<=}22.5 cm and led to occasional radius underestimation in the case of object truncation by CT. Two methods incorporating the algorithm were implemented: physical model (PM) and best fit (BF). The PM method computed an offset that produced maximum overlap of calculated and true radii for the phantom scans, and applied that offset as a calculated-to-true radius transformation. For the BF method, the calculated-to-true radius transformation was based upon a linear regression between calculated and true radii. For the PM method, a fixed offset of +2.75 cm provided maximum calculated-to-true radius overlap for the phantom study, which accounted for the camera system's object contour detect sensor surface-to-detector face distance. For the BF method, a linear regression of true versus calculated radius from a reference patient scan was used as a calculated-to-true radius transform. Both methods were applied to ten patient scans. For -970 and -950 HU thresholds, the combined overall average root-mean-square (rms) error

  13. Clinical value of stress-only Tc-99m SPECT imaging: importance of attenuation correction.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shishir; Heller, Gary V; Bateman, Timothy M; Ruffin, Richard; Yekta, Arshad; Katten, Deborah; Alluri, Nitya; Ahlberg, Alan W

    2013-02-01

    In selected patients, stress-only SPECT imaging has been proposed as an alternative to rest-stress SPECT imaging to improve laboratory efficiency and reduce radiation exposure. The impact of attenuation correction (AC) upon interpretation, post-test patient management and cardiac risk stratification in relation to stress-only imaging is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical value for laboratory throughput and predicting outcomes of normal and abnormal stress-only SPECT imaging with AC in a consecutive series of clinically referred patients. A retrospective analysis of 1,383 consecutive patients who were scheduled for stress-only SPECT imaging for symptom assessment of suspected myocardial ischemia was performed. All images had been interpreted and categorized using the standard 17-segment model without AC followed by AC. Follow-up data for 2.1 ± 1.3 years after SPECT imaging for the occurrence of cardiac events (non-fatal MI, cardiac death, and cardiac revascularization) previously collected by routine methods were reviewed. Non-AC SPECT image interpretation revealed that 58% (802/1383) of patients had abnormal stress images. AC image interpretation of the abnormal non-AC images re-classified 83% (666/802) of these as normal. Among patients with abnormal stress images after AC (136/1383), 63% (86/136) returned for additional rest scans, while the remaining 37% (50/136) were clinically managed without further rest images. The incidence of cardiac death or non-fatal MI was very low in patients with normal stress-only scans (0.7%). A strategy of stress-only imaging with AC in symptomatic patients is an efficient method which appropriately identifies at risk and low-risk patients yielding a low percentage requiring rest imaging. Clinical decisions can be made based on abnormal stress-only imaging without further rest imaging if clinically appropriate.

  14. Can hybrid SPECT-CT overcome the limitations associated with poor imaging properties of 131I-MIBG?: Comparison with planar scintigraphy and SPECT in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Dhull, Varun Singh; Jeph, Sunil; Reddy, Rama Mohan; Singh, Harmandeep; Naswa, Niraj; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incremental value of (131)I-MIBG hybrid SPECT-CT over planar scintigraphy (PS) and SPECT alone in patients with clinical or biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma. A total of 126 adrenals of 63 patients (mean [SD] age, 28.6 [15.7] years; male patients, n = 34; female patients, n = 29) with clinical or biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had undergone (131)I-MIBG SPECT-CT of adrenal region. The PS, SPECT, and SPECT-CT images were independently evaluated by 2 nuclear medicine physicians with 6 years (R1) and 2 years (R2) experience and in separate sessions 1 week apart. A scoring scale of 1 to 5 was used, in which 1 is definitely abnormal, 2 is probably abnormal, 3 is indeterminate, 4 is probably normal, and 5 is definitely normal. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values were calculated taking a score 2 or less as abnormal. With receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for each modality and compared. Histopathology and/or clinical/imaging follow-up were taken as reference standard. Of the 126 adrenals evaluated, 29 were indeterminate on PS for R1 and 48 for R2, 39 were indeterminate on SPECT for both, and on SPECT-CT, 1 was indeterminate for R1 and 2 for R2. SPECT-CT correctly characterized 28 of 29 indeterminate adrenals on PS and 37 of 39 indeterminate adrenals on SPECT for R1. Similarly, for R2, SPECT-CT correctly characterized 45 of 48 indeterminate adrenals on PS and 33 of 39 indeterminate adrenals on SPECT. On ROC comparison, PS was inferior to SPECT (P = 0.040 for R1; P < 0.001 for R2) and SPECT-CT (P = 0.001 for R1; P < 0.001 for R2) for both the observers. Moreover, SPECT was inferior to SPECT-CT for both the observers (P = 0.017 for R1 and P = 0.001 for R2). Accuracy of SPECT-CT (R1, 97.6%; R2, 97.6%) was higher than PS (R1, 91.2%; R2, 84.1%) and SPECT (R1, 94.4%; R2, 86.5%). Interobserver agreement was

  15. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P < 0.05). (99m)Tc- RBC SPECT/CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  16. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  17. The optimized evaluation of diabetic foot infection by dual isotope SPECT/CT imaging protocol.

    PubMed

    Heiba, Sherif I; Kolker, Dov; Mocherla, Bharat; Kapoor, Karan; Jiang, Manli; Son, Hongju; Rangaswamy, Balasubramanya; Kostakoglu, Lale; Savitch, Ina; DaCosta, Maria; Machac, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Sequential Tc-99m hydroxymethylene-diphosphonate (HDP) 3-phase bone (BS) and In-111 leukocyte scanning (WBCS) have been frequently used to evaluate the diabetic foot, as nonosteomyelitis BS uptake is repeatedly observed and osteomyelitis (OM) in WBCS is often uncertain without BS correlation. Additionally, both modalities are limited in lesion localization because of low resolution and lack of anatomic details. We investigated a method that combined BS/WBCS, and if needed, WBCS/bone marrow scanning (BMS) using SPECT/CT to accurately diagnose/localize infection in a practical protocol. Blood flow/pool images were obtained followed by WBC reinjection and next day dual isotope (DI) BS/WBCS planar and SPECT/CT. BMS/WBCS SPECT/CT (step 2 DI) was obtained on the following day when images were suspicious for mid/hindfoot OM. Diagnosis accuracy and confidence were judged for the various imaging combinations. Diagnosis was classified as OM, soft tissue infection (STI), both OM/STI, and other/no bony pathology by microbiology/pathology or follow-up. Distinction between various diagnostic categories and overall OM diagnostic accuracy in 213 patients were higher for DI than WBCS or BS alone, and for DI SPECT/CT than DI planar or SPECT only. Diagnostic confidence/lesion site was significantly higher for DI SPECT/CT than other comparative imaging methods. In a group of 97 patients with confirmed microbiologic/pathologic diagnosis, similar results were attained. Step 2 DI SPECT/CT performed in 67 patients further improved diagnostic accuracy/confidence. DI SPECT/CT is a highly accurate modality that considerably improves detection and discrimination of STI and OM while providing precise anatomic localization in the diabetic foot. This combined imaging technique promises to beneficially impact diabetic patient care. Copyright © 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A parallel Monte Carlo code for planar and SPECT imaging: implementation, verification and applications in (131)I SPECT.

    PubMed

    Dewaraja, Yuni K; Ljungberg, Michael; Majumdar, Amitava; Bose, Abhijit; Koral, Kenneth F

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the implementation of the SIMIND Monte Carlo code on an IBM SP2 distributed memory parallel computer. Basic aspects of running Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on parallel architectures are described. Our parallelization is based on equally partitioning photons among the processors and uses the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library for interprocessor communication and the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generator (SPRNG) to generate uncorrelated random number streams. These parallelization techniques are also applicable to other distributed memory architectures. A linear increase in computing speed with the number of processors is demonstrated for up to 32 processors. This speed-up is especially significant in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) simulations involving higher energy photon emitters, where explicit modeling of the phantom and collimator is required. For (131)I, the accuracy of the parallel code is demonstrated by comparing simulated and experimental SPECT images from a heart/thorax phantom. Clinically realistic SPECT simulations using the voxel-man phantom are carried out to assess scatter and attenuation correction.

  19. NMF-Based Analysis of SPECT Brain Images for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Pablo; Górriz, Juan-Manuel; Ramírez, Javier; Lang, Elmar; Chaves, Rosa; Segovia, Fermin; Álvarez, Ignacio; Salas-González, Diego; López, Miriam

    This paper offers a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) technique for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by means of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image classification. The SPECT database for different patients is analyzed by applying the Fisher discriminant ratio (FDR) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the selection and extraction of the most significative features of each patient SPECT data, in order to reduce the large dimensionality of the input data and the problem of the curse of dimensionality, extracting score features. The NMF-transformed set of data, with reduced number of features, is classified by means of support vector machines (SVM) classification. The proposed NMF+SVM method yields up to 94% classification accuracy, thus becoming an accurate method for SPECT image classification. For the sake of completeness, comparison between conventional PCA+SVM method and the proposed method is also provided.

  20. A SPECT study in internal carotid artery occlusion: Discrepancies between flow image and neurologic deficits

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, H.; Hougaku, H.; Matsuda, I.; Kusunoki, M.; Shirai, J. )

    1989-08-01

    A SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) study in internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion was performed in 6 patients. The validity of iodoamphetamine (IMP) SPECT study in the evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or neurologic function is still controversial. In this study, the authors showed several cases in whom SPECT images of brain were not compatible with their neurologic deficits. In 2 typical cases, a large low-density area was observed in the non-dominant hemisphere in computed tomography (CT) scan, but no apparent motor-sensory deficits in left limbs were present. In these patients, SPECT study also revealed flow reduction in the affected side of the brain. So there was a possibility that an IMP brain image could not always reflect CBF, which maintains neurologic function of the brain.

  1. Compensation for non-uniform attenuation in SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Photon attenuation is a major limitation in performing quantitative SPECT brain imaging. A number of methods have been proposed for compensation of attenuation in regions of the body that can be modelled as a uniform attenuator. The magnitude of the errors introduced into reconstructed brain images by assuming the head to be a uniform attenuator are uncertain (the skull, sinus cavities and head holder all have different attenuation properties than brain tissue). Brain imaging is unique in that the radioisotope, for the most part, is taken up within a uniform attenuation medium (i.e., brain tissue) which is surrounded by bone (i.e., the skull) of a different density. Using this observation, Bellini`s method for attenuation compensation (which is an exact solution to the exponential Radon transform) has been modified to account for the different attenuation properties of the skull. To test this modified Bellini method, a simple mathematical phantom was designed to model the brain and a skull of varying thickness less than 7.5 mm. To model brain imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO, the attenuation coefficient of the brain tissue and skull were set to 0.15 cm{sup -1} and 0.22 cm{sup -1} respectively. A ray-driven projector which accounted for non-uniform attenuation was used to simulate projection data from 128 views. The detector response and scatter were not simulated. It was observed that reconstructions processed with uniform attenuation compensation (i.e., where it was assumed that the brain tissue and the skull had the same attenuation coefficient) provided errors of 6-20%, whereas those processed with the non-uniform Bellini algorithm were biased by only 0-5%.

  2. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  3. Optical imaging probes in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Cristina; Dico, Alessia Lo; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management. Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation. The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27145373

  4. Cardiac sarcoidosis demonstrated by Tl-201 and Ga-67 SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, J.; Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Ohguchi, M.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Ga-67 and Tl-201 SPECT was performed to evaluate cardiac sarcoidosis in a 15-year-old boy. Tl-201 SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake in the inferior to lateral wall and Ga-67 accumulation in the area of decreased Tl-201 uptake. These findings suggested cardiac sarcoidosis, and cardiac biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. After corticosteroid therapy, myocardial uptake of Ga-67 disappeared and myocardial TI-201 uptake became more homogeneous.

  5. SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging for the assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Garcia, Ernest V.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Iskandrian, Ami E.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Soman, Prem

    2012-01-01

    Phase analysis of gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is an evolving technique for measuring LV mechanical dyssynchrony. Since its inception in 2005, it has undergone considerable technical development and clinical evaluation. This article reviews the background, the technical and clinical characteristics, and evolving clinical applications of phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI in patients requiring cardiac resynchronization therapy or implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy and in assessing LV diastolic dyssynchrony. PMID:21567281

  6. Hybrid SPECT/CT Imaging in the Evaluation of Coronary Stenosis: Role in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Andrea; Schillaci, Orazio; Arganini, Chiara; Gaspari, Eleonora; Ricci, Aurora; Morosetti, Daniele; Coco, Irene; Crusco, Sonia; Calabria, Ferdinando; Sperandio, Massimiliano; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Our purpose was to combine the results of the MDCT (multidetector computed tomography) morphological data and the SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) data using hybrid imaging to overcome the limits of the MDCT in the evaluation of coronary stenosis in diabetic patients with large amount of calcium in the coronary arteries. Method and Materials. 120 diabetic patients underwent MDCT examination and SPECT examination. We evaluated 324 coronary arteries. After the examinations, we merged CT and SPECT images. Results. CT evaluation: 52 (32.8%) coronaries with stenosis ≥ 50%, 228 (70.4%) with stenosis < 50%, and 44 (13.6%) with a doubtful evaluation. SPECT evaluation: 80 (24.7%) areas with hypoperfusion, 232 (71.6%) with normal perfusion, and 12 (3.7%) with a doubtful evaluation. Of 324 coronary arteries and corresponding areas, the hybrid SPECT/CT evaluation showed 92 (28.4%) areas with hypoperfusion, and 232 (71.6%) with normal perfusion. Conclusion. Hybrid CT/SPECT imaging could be useful in the detection of significant coronary stenosis in patients with large amount of coronary calcifications. PMID:24959556

  7. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography and SPECT/computed tomography in oncologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Brandon, David; Alazraki, Adina; Halkar, Raghuveer K; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2011-02-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras have emerged as a dominant technology providing invaluable tools in the diagnosis, staging, therapy planning, and treatment monitoring of multiple cancers over the past decade. In the same way that positron emission tomography (PET) benefited from the addition of CT, functional SPECT and anatomic CT data obtained as a single study have shown improvements in diagnostic imaging sensitivity and specificity by improving lesion conspicuity, reducing false positives, and clarifying indeterminate lesions. Furthermore, the anatomic imaging better localizes the functional data, which can be critical in surgical and therapy planning. As more disease-specific imaging agents become available, the role of SPECT/CT in the new paradigms of molecular imaging for personalized medicine will expand. Established and emerging uses of SPECT/CT in a wide variety of oncologic diseases, as well as radiation exposure issues, are reviewed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Samara Probe For Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Imaging probe descends through atmosphere of planet, obtaining images of ground surface as it travels. Released from aircraft over Earth or from spacecraft over another planet. Body and single wing shaped like samara - winged seed like those of maple trees. Rotates as descends, providing panoramic view of terrain below. Radio image obtained by video camera to aircraft or spacecraft overhead.

  9. Radiolabeled Peptide Scaffolds for PET/SPECT - Optical in Vivo Imaging of Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Deutscher, Susan

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this research is to develop phage display-selected peptides into radio- and fluoresecently- labeled scaffolds for the multimodal imaging of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. While numerous protein and receptor systems are being explored for the development of targeted imaging agents, the targeting and analysis of carbohydrate-lectin complexes in vivo remains relatively unexplored. Antibodies, nanoparticles, and peptides are being developed that target carbohydrate-lectin complexes in living systems. However, antibodies and nanoparticles often suffer from slow clearance and toxicity problems. Peptides are attractive alternative vehicles for the specific delivery of radionuclides or fluorophores to sites of interest in vivo, although, because of their size, uptake and retention may be less than antibodies. We have selected high affinity peptides that bind a specific carbohydrate-lectin complex involved in cell-cell adhesion and cross-linking using bacteriophage (phage) display technologies (1,2). These peptides have allowed us to probe the role of these antigens in cell adhesion. Fluorescent versions of the peptides have been developed for optical imaging and radiolabeled versions have been used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo imaging (3-6). A benefit in employing the radiolabeled peptides in SPECT and PET is that these imaging modalities are widely used in living systems and offer deep tissue sensitivity. Radiolabeled peptides, however, often exhibit poor stability and high kidney uptake in vivo. Conversely, optical imaging is sensitive and offers good spatial resolution, but is not useful for deep tissue penetration and is semi-quantitative. Thus, multimodality imaging that relies on the strengths of both radio- and optical- imaging is a current focus for development of new in vivo imaging agents. We propose a novel means to improve the efficacy of radiolabeled and fluorescently

  10. Comparison of planar images and SPECT with bayesean preprocessing for the demonstration of facial anatomy and craniomandibular disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Ortendahl, D.A.; Hattner, R.S.; Faulkner, D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Craniomandiublar disorders involving the facial anatomy may be difficult to demonstrate in planar images. Although bone scanning is generally more sensitive than radiography, facial bone anatomy is complex and focal areas of increased or decreased radiotracer may become obscured by overlapping structures in planar images. Thus SPECT appears ideally suited to examination of the facial skeleton. A series of patients with craniomandibular disorders of unknown origin were imaged using 20 mCi Tc-99m MDP. Planar and SPECT (Siemens 7500 ZLC Orbiter) images were obtained four hours after injection. The SPECT images were reconstructed with a filtered back-projection algorithm. In order to improve image contrast and resolution in SPECT images, the rotation views were pre-processed with a Bayesean deblurring algorithm which has previously been show to offer improved contrast and resolution in planar images. SPECT images using the pre-processed rotation views were obtained and compared to the SPECT images without pre-processing and the planar images. TMJ arthropathy involving either the glenoid fossa or the mandibular condyle, orthopedic changes involving the mandible or maxilla, localized dental pathosis, as well as changes in structures peripheral to the facial skeleton were identified. Bayesean pre-processed SPECT depicted the facial skeleton more clearly as well as providing a more obvious demonstration of the bony changes associated with craniomandibular disorders than either planar images or SPECT without pre-processing.

  11. Attenuation correction for small animal SPECT imaging using x-ray CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-15

    Photon attenuation in small animal nuclear medicine scans can be significant when using isotopes that emit lower energy photons such as iodine-125. We have developed a method to use microCT data to perform attenuation corrected small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A microCT calibration phantom was first imaged, and the resulting calibration curve was used to convert microCT image values to linear attenuation coefficient values that were then used in an iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm. This method was applied to reconstruct a SPECT image of a uniform phantom filled with {sup 125}I-NaI. Without attenuation correction, the image suffered a 30% decrease in intensity in the center of the image, which was removed with the addition of attenuation correction. This reduced the relative standard deviation in the region of interest from 10% to 6%.

  12. Multi-pinhole collimator design for small-object imaging with SiliSPECT: a high-resolution SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, S; Metzler, S D; Wilson, D W; Peterson, T E

    2010-01-01

    We have designed a multi-pinhole collimator for a dual-headed, stationary SPECT system that incorporates high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors. The compact camera design of our system enables imaging at source–collimator distances between 20 and 30 mm. Our analytical calculations show that using knife-edge pinholes with small-opening angles or cylindrically shaped pinholes in a focused, multi-pinhole configuration in combination with this camera geometry can generate narrow sensitivity profiles across the field of view that can be useful for imaging small objects at high sensitivity and resolution. The current prototype system uses two collimators each containing 127 cylindrically shaped pinholes that are focused toward a target volume. Our goal is imaging objects such as a mouse brain, which could find potential applications in molecular imaging. PMID:19088387

  13. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  14. Value of attenuation correction in stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging using CZT-SPECT.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J D; Mouden, M; Ottervanger, J P; van Dalen, J A; Knollema, S; Slump, C H; Jager, P L

    2017-04-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) improves the diagnostic outcome of stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using conventional SPECT. Our aim was to determine the value of AC using a cadmium zinc telluride-based (CZT)-SPECT camera. We retrospectively included 107 consecutive patients who underwent stress-optional rest MPI CZT-SPECT/CT. Next, we created three types of images for each patient; (1) only displaying reconstructed data without the CT-based AC (NC), (2) only displaying AC, and (3) with both NC and AC (NC + AC). Next, two experienced physicians visually interpreted these 321 randomized images as normal, equivocal, or abnormal. Image outcome was compared with all hard events over a mean follow-up time of 47.7 ± 9.8 months. The percentage of images interpreted as normal increased from 45% using the NC images to 72% using AC and to 67% using NC + AC images (P < .001). Hard event hazard ratios for images interpreted as normal were not different between using NC and AC (1.01, P = .99), or NC and NC + AC images (0.97, P = .97). AC lowers the need for additional rest imaging in stress-first MPI using CZT-SPECT, while long-term patient outcome remained identical. Use of AC reduces the need for additional rest imaging, decreasing the mean effective dose by up to 1.2 mSv.

  15. Navigation of a robot-integrated fluorescence laparoscope in preoperative SPECT/CT and intraoperative freehand SPECT imaging data: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosterom, Matthias Nathanaël; Engelen, Myrthe Adriana; van den Berg, Nynke Sjoerdtje; KleinJan, Gijs Hendrik; van der Poel, Henk Gerrit; Wendler, Thomas; van de Velde, Cornelis Jan Hadde; Navab, Nassir; van Leeuwen, Fijs Willem Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery is becoming an established technique for prostatectomy and is increasingly being explored for other types of cancer. Linking intraoperative imaging techniques, such as fluorescence guidance, with the three-dimensional insights provided by preoperative imaging remains a challenge. Navigation technologies may provide a solution, especially when directly linked to both the robotic setup and the fluorescence laparoscope. We evaluated the feasibility of such a setup. Preoperative single-photon emission computed tomography/X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT) or intraoperative freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) scans were used to navigate an optically tracked robot-integrated fluorescence laparoscope via an augmented reality overlay in the laparoscopic video feed. The navigation accuracy was evaluated in soft tissue phantoms, followed by studies in a human-like torso phantom. Navigation accuracies found for SPECT/CT-based navigation were 2.25 mm (coronal) and 2.08 mm (sagittal). For fhSPECT-based navigation, these were 1.92 mm (coronal) and 2.83 mm (sagittal). All errors remained below the <1-cm detection limit for fluorescence imaging, allowing refinement of the navigation process using fluorescence findings. The phantom experiments performed suggest that SPECT-based navigation of the robot-integrated fluorescence laparoscope is feasible and may aid fluorescence-guided surgery procedures.

  16. Blind deconvolution of human brain SPECT images using a distribution mixture estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignotte, Max; Meunier, Jean

    2000-06-01

    Thanks to its ability to yield functionally-based information, the SPECT imagery technique has become a great help in the diagnostic of cerebrovascular diseases. Nevertheless, due to the imaging process, SPECT images are blurred and consequently their interpretation by the clinician is often difficult. In order to improve the spatial resolution of these images and then to facilitate their interpretation, we propose herein to implement a deconvolution procedure relying on an accurate distribution mixture parameter estimation procedure. Parameters of this distribution mixture are efficiently exploited in order to prevent overfitting of the noisy data or to determine the support of the object to be deconvolved when this one is needed. In this context, we compare the deconvolution results obtained by the Lucy-Richardson method and by the recent blind deconvolution technique called the NAS-RIF algorithm on real and simulated brain SPECT images. The NAS-RIF performs the best and shows significant contrast enhancement with little mottle (noise) amplification.

  17. Cerebral infarction on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Haitao; Kuang, Anren

    2013-11-01

    A 70-year-old man with lung cancer underwent whole-body MDP bone scintigraphy to evaluate bone metastases that showed marked tracer uptake in the right side of the head, suggestive of skull metastasis. SPECT/CT imaging was performed for further evaluation. The SPECT images demonstrated increased MDP activity in the region of the brain perfused by the right middle cerebral artery. On CT images, there was a large hypoattenuation area corresponding to elevated MDP accumulation. At the same day, magnetic resonance angiography of the brain revealed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery.

  18. Non-invasive monitoring of BMP-2 retention and bone formation in composites for bone tissue engineering using SPECT/CT and scintillation probes

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Diederik H.R.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Heijink, Andras; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Creemers, Laura B.; Britson, Jason; Maran, Avudaiappan; Classic, Kelly L.; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; Lu, Lichun

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging can provide essential information for the optimization of new drug delivery-based bone regeneration strategies to repair damaged or impaired bone tissue. This study investigates the applicability of nuclear medicine and radiological techniques to monitor growth factor retention profiles and subsequent effects on bone formation. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, 6.5 μg/scaffold) was incorporated into a sustained release vehicle consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres embedded in a poly(propylene fumarate) scaffold surrounded by a gelatin hydrogel and implanted subcutaneously and in 5-mm segmental femoral defects in 9 rats for a period of 56 days. To determine the pharmacokinetic profile, BMP-2 was radiolabeled with 125I and the local retention of 125I-BMP-2 was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), scintillation probes and ex vivo scintillation analysis. Bone formation was monitored by micro-computed tomography (μCT). The scaffolds released BMP-2 in a sustained fashion over the 56-day implantation period. A good correlation between the SPECT and scintillation probe measurements was found and there were no significant differences between the non-invasive and ex-vivo counting method after 8 weeks of follow up. SPECT analysis of the total body and thyroid counts showed a limited accumulation of 125I within the body. Ectopic bone formation was induced in the scaffolds and the femur defects healed completely. In vivo μCT imaging detected the first signs of bone formation at days 14 and 28 for the orthotopic and ectopic implants, respectively, and provided a detailed profile of the bone formation rate. Overall, this study clearly demonstrates the benefit of applying non-invasive techniques in drug delivery-based bone regeneration strategies by providing detailed and reliable profiles of the growth factor retention and bone formation at different implantation sites in a limited number

  19. Non-invasive monitoring of BMP-2 retention and bone formation in composites for bone tissue engineering using SPECT/CT and scintillation probes.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Diederik H R; Yaszemski, Michael J; Heijink, Andras; Hefferan, Theresa E; Creemers, Laura B; Britson, Jason; Maran, Avudaiappan; Classic, Kelly L; Dhert, Wouter J A; Lu, Lichun

    2009-03-19

    Non-invasive imaging can provide essential information for the optimization of new drug delivery-based bone regeneration strategies to repair damaged or impaired bone tissue. This study investigates the applicability of nuclear medicine and radiological techniques to monitor growth factor retention profiles and subsequent effects on bone formation. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, 6.5 microg/scaffold) was incorporated into a sustained release vehicle consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres embedded in a poly(propylene fumarate) scaffold surrounded by a gelatin hydrogel and implanted subcutaneously and in 5-mm segmental femoral defects in 9 rats for a period of 56 days. To determine the pharmacokinetic profile, BMP-2 was radiolabeled with (125)I and the local retention of (125)I-BMP-2 was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), scintillation probes and ex vivo scintillation analysis. Bone formation was monitored by micro-computed tomography (microCT). The scaffolds released BMP-2 in a sustained fashion over the 56-day implantation period. A good correlation between the SPECT and scintillation probe measurements was found and there were no significant differences between the non-invasive and ex-vivo counting method after 8 weeks of follow up. SPECT analysis of the total body and thyroid counts showed a limited accumulation of (125)I within the body. Ectopic bone formation was induced in the scaffolds and the femur defects healed completely. In vivo microCT imaging detected the first signs of bone formation at days 14 and 28 for the orthotopic and ectopic implants, respectively, and provided a detailed profile of the bone formation rate. Overall, this study clearly demonstrates the benefit of applying non-invasive techniques in drug delivery-based bone regeneration strategies by providing detailed and reliable profiles of the growth factor retention and bone formation at different implantation sites in a

  20. MRI-SPECT image registration using multiple MR pulse sequences to examine osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John A.; Peterfy, Charles G.; White, David L.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Genant, Harry K.

    1999-05-01

    We have examined whether automated image registration can be used to combine metabolic information from SPECT knee scans with anatomical information from MRI. Ten patients, at risk of developing OA due to meniscal surgery, were examined. 99mTc methyldiphosphonate SPECT, T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) MRI, and T1-weighted, 3D fat-suppressed gradient recalled echo (SPGR) MRI images were obtained. Registration was performed using normalized mutual information. For each patient, FSE data was registered to SPGR data, providing a composite MRI image with each voxel represented by two intensities (ISPGR, IFSE). Modifications to the registration algorithm were made to allow registration of SPECT data (one intensity per voxel) to composite MRI data (2 intensities per voxel). Registration sources was assessed by visual inspection of uptake localization over expected anatomical locations, and the absence of uptake over unlikely sites. Three patients were discarded from SPECT-MRI registration tests since they had metallic artifacts that prevented co-registration of MR data. Registration of SPECT to SPGR or FSE data alone proved unreliable, with less than 50% of attempts succeeding. The modified algorithm, treating co-registered SPGR and FSE data as a two-value-per-voxel image, proved most reliable, allowing registration of all patients with no metallic artifacts on MRI.

  1. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Salmaso, Dario; Nardo, Davide; Jonsson, Cathrine; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A; Gardner, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in (99m)Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders.

  2. What do practice policies have to do with SPECT imaging?

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, R.N. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    The introduction of new technologies has been the hallmark of professionals in nuclear medicine from the beginning of our specialty less than 50 years ago. A side effect of the entrenched and productive scenario whereby new technologies beget medical advances, and most of the advances in other areas of science beget new technologies applicable to medicine, is a constant escalation of the scope of practice, a desirable effect. A second side effect is a constant escalation of the cost of providing medical care. Careful analyses of the increases in costs of medical care allocate approximately one-third of the increase to new technology. We require mechanisms to argue competitively for the utility, the effectiveness, and the global relevance of new technologies. The first audience to be reached is the professionals who will, if we are successful, learn what we can do, and then will ask that it be made available in their hospitals. This workshop addresses primarily this first transition: radiopharmaceuticals, instrument performance characteristics, image processing, patient conditioning and positioning, interpretive strategies, and the definition of normal. At the time of the workshop, looking backward, it might appear the SPECT had not arrived at the time for interactions with other specialty societies; first, there must be evidence that techniques are repeatable; that they correlate with whatever gold standard is available; and that our patient-referring colleagues are willing to ask for them. However, looking forward, the questions of clinical utility, and the choices of {open_quotes}which technology{close_quotes} are here. It is time to prepare conceptually for the next step; how do we bring our new technologies to clinical acceptance, to reimbursement, and to an appropriate niche in the clinical firmament? The answer is via the pathways of practice guidelines.

  3. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  4. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT PhantomTM), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  5. SPECT Imaging as a Tool for Testing and Challenging Assumptions About Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysey, S. M.; DeVol, T. A.; Tornai, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging has shown promise for unraveling the influence of physical, chemical and biological processes on contaminant transport. Micro-CT scans, for instance, are increasingly utilized to image the pore-scale structure of rocks and soils, which can subsequently be used within modeling studies. A disadvantage of micro-CT, however, is that this imaging modality does not directly detect contaminants. In contrast, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) can provide the three-dimensional distribution of gamma emitting materials and is thus ideal for imaging the transport of radionuclides. SPECT is of particular interest as a tool for both directly imaging the behavior of long-lived radionuclides of interest, e.g., 99Tc and 137Cs, as well as monitoring shorter-lived isotopes as in-situ tracers of flow and biogeochemical processes. We demonstrate the potential of combining CT and SPECT imaging to improve the mechanistic understanding of flow and transport processes within a heterogeneous porous medium. In the experiment, a column was packed with 0.2mm glass beads with a cylindrical zone of 2mm glass beads embedded near the outlet; this region could be readily identified within the CT images. The column was injected with a pulse of NaCl solution spiked with 99mTcO4- and monitored using SPECT while aliquots of the effluent were used to analyze the breakthrough of both solutes. The breakthrough curves could be approximately replicated by a one-dimensional transport model, but the SPECT data revealed that the tracers migrated around the inclusion of larger beads. Although the zone of large-diameter beads was expected to act as a preferential pathway, the observed behavior could only be replicated in numerical transport simulations if this region was treated as a low-permeability zone relative to the rest of the column. This simple experiment demonstrates the potential of SPECT for investigating flow and transport phenomena within a porous medium.

  6. SemiSPECT: A small-animal SPECT imager based on eight cadmium zinc tellurium detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunki

    We have completed a new small-animal imaging system, called SemiSPECT, based on eight pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) gamma-ray detector arrays. The detector is a 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 0.15 cm slab having a 64 x 64 pixel array. A read-out application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is attached onto the detector via indium-bump bonding, and a -180 V bias is applied onto the detector surface to transport electron-hole pairs generated by gamma-ray interaction. Eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. An eight-pinhole aperture is placed at the center of the ring, and an object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole. The object can be rotated about a vertical axis to attain sufficient angular projections for tomographic reconstruction. The whole system gantry is compact enough to be placed onto a desktop-sized optical breadboard. Eight front-end boards were developed to detect events, generate list-mode data arrays, and send them to back-end boards. Four back-end boards are utilized to hold the list-mode data arrays and transfer them to a host computer. Eight clock-and-bias boards provide clock and bias signals to the eight ASICs. Eight control-and-bias boards were developed to monitor and control the temperatures on the eight detectors, analog and digital currents supplied to the eight ASICs, and -180 V biases applied to the eight detector surfaces. The spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, estimated both based on the system geometry and via the Fourier crosstalk approach, is about 1˜2 mm. The system sensitivity measured with a point source is about 1.53 x 10-4, and the estimated one from the system geometry is about 1.41 x 10-4. The energy resolution acquired by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum for 140 keV gamma rays. The detectabilities for multiple signal spheres simulating various lesions or organs in a small animal are presented and discussed. A line

  7. Progress in BazookaSPECT: High-Resolution, Dynamic Scintigraphy with Large-Area Imagers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.; Liu, Zhonglin; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We present recent progress in BazookaSPECT, a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray detector. It is a new class of scintillation detector that combines columnar scintillators, image intensifiers, and CCD (charge-coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) sensors for high-resolution imaging. A key feature of the BazookaSPECT paradigm is the capability to easily design custom detectors in terms of the desired intrinsic detector resolution and event detection rate. This capability is possible because scintillation light is optically amplified by the image intensifier prior to being imaging onto the CCD/CMOS sensor, thereby allowing practically any consumer-grade CCD/CMOS sensor to be used for gamma-ray imaging. Recent efforts have been made to increase the detector area by incorporating fiber-optic tapers between the scintillator and image intensifier, resulting in a 16× increase in detector area. These large-area BazookaSPECT detectors can be used for full-body imaging and we present preliminary results of their use as dynamic scintigraphy imagers for mice and rats. Also, we discuss ongoing and future developments in BazookaSPECT and the improved event-detection rate capability that is achieved using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), multi-core processors, and new high-speed, USB 3.0 CMOS cameras. PMID:26346514

  8. Progress in BazookaSPECT: high-resolution dynamic scintigraphy with large-area imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.; Liu, Zhonglin; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2012-10-01

    We present recent progress in BazookaSPECT, a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray detector. It is a new class of scintillation detector that combines columnar scintillators, image intensifiers, and CCD (charge- coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) sensors for high-resolution imaging. A key feature of the BazookaSPECT paradigm is the capability to easily design custom detectors in terms of the desired intrinsic detector resolution and event detection rate. This capability is possible because scintillation light is optically amplfied by the image intensifier prior to being imaging onto the CCD/CMOS sensor, thereby allowing practically any consumer-grade CCD/CMOS sensor to be used for gamma-ray imaging. Recent efforts have been made to increase the detector area by incorporating fiber-optic tapers between the scintillator and image intensi_er, resulting in a 16x increase in detector area. These large-area BazookaSPECT detectors can be used for full-body imaging and we present preliminary results of their use as dynamic scintigraphy imagers for mice and rats. Also, we discuss ongoing and future developments in BazookaSPECT and the improved event- detection rate capability that is achieved using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), multi-core processors, and new high-speed, USB 3.0 CMOS cameras.

  9. Progress in BazookaSPECT: High-Resolution, Dynamic Scintigraphy with Large-Area Imagers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Barber, H Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H; Liu, Zhonglin; Nagarkar, Vivek V; Furenlid, Lars R

    2012-08-12

    We present recent progress in BazookaSPECT, a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray detector. It is a new class of scintillation detector that combines columnar scintillators, image intensifiers, and CCD (charge-coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) sensors for high-resolution imaging. A key feature of the BazookaSPECT paradigm is the capability to easily design custom detectors in terms of the desired intrinsic detector resolution and event detection rate. This capability is possible because scintillation light is optically amplified by the image intensifier prior to being imaging onto the CCD/CMOS sensor, thereby allowing practically any consumer-grade CCD/CMOS sensor to be used for gamma-ray imaging. Recent efforts have been made to increase the detector area by incorporating fiber-optic tapers between the scintillator and image intensifier, resulting in a 16× increase in detector area. These large-area BazookaSPECT detectors can be used for full-body imaging and we present preliminary results of their use as dynamic scintigraphy imagers for mice and rats. Also, we discuss ongoing and future developments in BazookaSPECT and the improved event-detection rate capability that is achieved using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), multi-core processors, and new high-speed, USB 3.0 CMOS cameras.

  10. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  11. High-Resolution SPECT-CT/MR Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis in the Vx2 Model

    PubMed Central

    Lijowski, Michal; Caruthers, Shelton; Hu, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Scott, Michael J.; Williams, Todd; Erpelding, Todd; Schmieder, Anne H.; Kiefer, Garry; Gulyas, Gyongyi; Athey, Phillip S.; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of antiangiogenic therapy in conjunction with traditional chemotherapy is becoming increasingly in cancer management, but the optimal benefit of these targeted pharmaceuticals has been limited to a subset of the population treated. Improved imaging probes that permit sensitive detection and high-resolution characterization of tumor angiogenesis could improve patient risk-benefit stratification. Objectives The overarching objective of these experiments was to develop a dual modality αvβ3-targeted nanoparticle molecular imaging agent that affords sensitive nuclear detection in conjunction with high-resolution MR characterization of tumor angiogenesis. Materials and Methods In part 1, New Zealand white rabbits (n = 21) bearing 14d Vx2 tumor received either αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles at doses of 11, 22, or 44 MBq/kg, nontargeted 99mTc nanoparticles at 22 MBq/kg, or αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles (22 MBq/kg) competitively inhibited with unlabeled αvβ3-nanoparticles. All animals were imaged dynamically over 2 hours with a planar camera using a pinhole collimator. In part 2, the effectiveness of αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles in the Vx2 rabbit model was demonstrated using clinical SPECT-CT imaging techniques. Next, MR functionality was incorporated into αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles by inclusion of lipophilic gadolinium chelates into the outer phospholipid layer, and the concept of high sensitivity – high-resolution detection and characterization of tumor angiogenesis was shown using sequential SPECT-CT and MR molecular imaging with 3D neovascular mapping. Results αvβ3-Targeted 99mTc nanoparticles at 22 MBq/kg produced the highest tumor-to-muscle contrast ratio (8.56 ± 0.13, TMR) versus the 11MBq/kg (7.32 ± 0.12) and 44 MBq/kg (6.55 ± 0.07) doses, (P < 0.05). TMR of nontargeted particles at 22.2 MBq/kg (5.48 ± 0.09) was less (P < 0.05) than the equivalent dosage of αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles. Competitively

  12. Diffuse Gallium-67 Accumulation in the Left Atrial Wall Detected Using SPECT/CT Fusion Images

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Joji; Higashiyama, Shigeaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Shiomi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is useful for detecting active inflammation. We show a 66-year-old female patient with atrial fibrillation and diffuse thickening of the left atrial wall due to acute myocarditis, who presented diffuse abnormal accumulation of gallium-67 in the left atrium on single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) fusion images. In the second gallium-67 scan 2 months after the first scintigraphy, the abnormal accumulation in the heart was no longer visible. Gallium-67 SPECT/CT images helped understanding the disease condition that temporary inflammation in the left atrium caused atrial fibrillation. PMID:28097031

  13. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  14. Quantitative Comparison of PET and Bremsstrahlung SPECT for Imaging the In Vivo Yttrium-90 Microsphere Distribution after Liver Radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Elschot, Mattijs; Vermolen, Bart J.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; de Keizer, Bart; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background After yttrium-90 (90Y) microsphere radioembolization (RE), evaluation of extrahepatic activity and liver dosimetry is typically performed on 90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT images. Since these images demonstrate a low quantitative accuracy, 90Y PET has been suggested as an alternative. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare SPECT and state-of-the-art PET on the ability to detect small accumulations of 90Y and on the accuracy of liver dosimetry. Methodology/Principal Findings SPECT/CT and PET/CT phantom data were acquired using several acquisition and reconstruction protocols, including resolution recovery and Time-Of-Flight (TOF) PET. Image contrast and noise were compared using a torso-shaped phantom containing six hot spheres of various sizes. The ability to detect extra- and intrahepatic accumulations of activity was tested by quantitative evaluation of the visibility and unique detectability of the phantom hot spheres. Image-based dose estimates of the phantom were compared to the true dose. For clinical illustration, the SPECT and PET-based estimated liver dose distributions of five RE patients were compared. At equal noise level, PET showed higher contrast recovery coefficients than SPECT. The highest contrast recovery coefficients were obtained with TOF PET reconstruction including resolution recovery. All six spheres were consistently visible on SPECT and PET images, but PET was able to uniquely detect smaller spheres than SPECT. TOF PET-based estimates of the dose in the phantom spheres were more accurate than SPECT-based dose estimates, with underestimations ranging from 45% (10-mm sphere) to 11% (37-mm sphere) for PET, and 75% to 58% for SPECT, respectively. The differences between TOF PET and SPECT dose-estimates were supported by the patient data. Conclusions/Significance In this study we quantitatively demonstrated that the image quality of state-of-the-art PET is superior over Bremsstrahlung SPECT for the assessment of the 90Y

  15. Effect of reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy of 99mTc sestamibi SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kenneth J; Tronco, Gene G; Palestro, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The superiority of SPECT/CT over SPECT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid imaging often is assumed to be due to improved lesion localization provided by the anatomic component (computed tomography) of the examination. It also is possible that this superiority may be related to the algorithms used for SPECT data reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of SPECT reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy of MIBI SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging. We retrospectively analyzed preoperative MIBI SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging studies performed on 106 patients. SPECT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and by iterative reconstruction with corrections for collimator resolution recovery and attenuation (IRC). Two experienced readers independently graded lesion detection certainty on a 5-point scale without knowledge of each other’s readings, reconstruction methods, other test results or final diagnoses. All patients had surgical confirmation of the final diagnosis, including disease limited to the neck, and location and weight of excised lesion(s). There were 135 parathyroid lesions among the 106 patients. For FBP SPECT/CT and IRC SPECT/CT sensitivity was 76% and 90% (p = 0.003), specificity was 87% and 87% (p = 0.90), and accuracy was 83% and 88% (p = 0.04), respectively. Inter-rater agreement was significantly higher for IRC than for FBP (kappa = 0.76, “good agreement”, versus kappa = 0.58, “moderate agreement”, p < 0.0001). We conclude that the improved accuracy of MIBI SPECT/CT compared to MIBI SPECT for preoperative parathyroid lesion localization is due in part to the use of IRC for SPECT data reconstruction. PMID:25973340

  16. SPECT imaging with the long bore collimator: Loss in sensitivity vs improved contrast resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, S.; Polak, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Eisner, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    A long bore (LB) collimator (16 cm thick) was compared with the standard low energy all purpose (LEAP) collimator for SPECT imaging. Line spread functions at various depths were measured in scatter material (planar imaging). Both collimators have similar full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) values yet the LB has less resolution loss with distance and consistently lower full-width-at-tenth-maximum (FWTM) values. An assessment of overall performance was made by planar imaging of the Rollo phantom with both collectors. Performance was judged by calculating the chi-square for the observed and expected contrasts of spherical cold targets (2.54, 1.91, 1.27 and 0.95 cm diameter). In all cases, LB scored consistently better than the LEAP. SPECT imaging of a bar phantom (spacing 2.25 cm) filled with I-123 (p,2n) confirmed the superior contrast resolution of the LB. Using SPECT data from 5 clinical I-123 IMP brain studies and from measurements of % rms noise as a function of total slice counts in a cylindrical phantom, the authors calculate that LB images would have a % rms noise of 8.7% compared to 5.7% for LEAP images acquired over the same time interval. The authors conclude that SPECT of the brain with the LB would lead to improved contrast resolution and a minimal increase in % rms noise despite a significant loss in sensitivity.

  17. Multimodal fluorescence-mediated tomography and SPECT/CT for small-animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Metasebya; Nothdruft, Ralph E; Akers, Walter; Edwards, W Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Suddlow, Gail P; Deghani, Hamid; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P

    2013-04-01

    Spatial and temporal coregistration of nuclear and optical images can enable the fusion of the information from these complementary molecular imaging modalities. A critical challenge is in integrating the optical and nuclear imaging hardware. Flexible fiber-based fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) systems provide a viable solution. The various bore sizes of small-animal nuclear imaging systems can potentially accommodate the FMT fiber imaging arrays. In addition, FMT imaging facilitates coregistration of the nuclear and optical contrasts in time. Herein, we combine a fiber-based FMT system with a preclinical SPECT/CT platform. Feasibility of in vivo imaging is demonstrated by tracking a monomolecular multimodal imaging agent (MOMIA) during transport from the forepaw to the axillary lymph node region of a rat. The fiber-based, video-rate FMT imaging system is composed of 12 sources (785- and 830-nm laser diodes) and 13 detectors. To maintain high temporal sampling, the system simultaneously acquires ratio-metric data at each detector. A 3-dimensional finite element model derived from CT projections provides anatomically based light propagation modeling. Injection of a MOMIA intradermally into the forepaw of rats provided spatially and temporally coregistered nuclear and optical contrasts. FMT data were acquired concurrently with SPECT and CT data. The incorporation of SPECT data as a priori information in the reconstruction of FMT data integrated both optical and nuclear contrasts. Accurate depth localization of phantoms with different thicknesses was accomplished with an average center-of-mass error of 4.1 ± 2.1 mm between FMT and SPECT measurements. During in vivo tests, fluorescence and radioactivity from the MOMIA were colocalized in spatially coincident regions with an average center-of-mass error of 2.68 ± 1.0 mm between FMT and SPECT for axillary lymph node localization. Intravital imaging with surgical exposure of the lymph node validated the

  18. Detection of breast cancer microcalcification using 99mTc-MDP SPECT or Osteosense 750EX FMT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Dayo D.; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barnes, Stephanie; Whisenant, Jennifer; Weis, Jared; Shoukouhi, Sepideh; Virostko, John; Nickels, Michael; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Sanders, Melinda; Abramson, Vandana; Tantawy, Mohammed N.

    2015-01-01

    Background In previous work, we demonstrated the presence of hydroxyapetite (type II microcalcification), HAP, in triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We used 18F-NaF to detect these types of cancers in mouse models as the free fluorine, 18F−, binds to HAP similar to bone uptake. In this work, we investigate other bone targeting agents and techniques including 99mTc-MDP SPECT and Osteosense 750EX FMT imaging as alternatives for breast cancer diagnosis via targeting HAP within the tumor microenvironment. Methods Thirteen mice were injected subcutaneously in the right flank with 106 MDA-MB-231 cells. When the tumor size reached ~0.6 cm3, mice (n = 9) were injected with ~37 MBq of 99mTc-MDP intravenously and then imaged one hour later in a NanoSPECT/CT or injected intravenously with 4 nmol/g of Osetosense 750EX and imaged 24 hours later in an FMT (n = 4). The imaging probe concentration in the tumor was compared to that of muscle. Following SPECT imaging, the tumors were harvested, sectioned into 10 µm slices, and underwent autoradiography or von Kossa staining to correlate 99mTc-MDP binding with HAP distribution within the tumor. The SPECT images were normalized to the injected dose and regions-of-interest (ROIs) were drawn around bone, tumor, and muscle to obtain the radiotracer concentration in these regions in units of percent injected dose per unit volume. ROIs were drawn around bone and tumor in the FMT images as no FMT signal was observed in normal muscle. Results Uptake of 99mTc-MDP was observed in the bone and tumor with little or no uptake in the muscle with concentrations of 11.34 ± 1.46 (mean ± SD), 2.22 ± 0.95, and 0.05 ± 0.04 %ID/cc, respectively. Uptake of Osteosense 750EX was also observed in the bone and tumor with concentrations of 0.35 ± 0.07 (mean ± SD) and 0.04 ± 0.01 picomoles, respectively. No FMT signal was observed in the normal muscle. There was no significant difference in the bone-to-tumor ratio between the two

  19. Initial experience with SPECT imaging of the brain using I-123 p-iodoamphetamine in focal epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Sussman, N.M.; Harner, R.N.; Kaplan, L.R.; Hershey, B.L.; Bernstein, D.R.; Goldstein, P.; Parker, J.A.; Wolodzko, J.G.; Popky, G.L.

    1989-06-01

    Nineteen patients with complex partial seizures refractory to medical treatment were examined with routine electroencephalography (EEG), video EEG monitoring, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological tests and interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with I-123 iodoamphetamine (INT). In 18 patients, SPECT identified areas of focal reduction in tracer uptake that correlated with the epileptogenic focus identified on the EEG. In addition, SPECT disclosed other areas of neurologic dysfunction as elicited on neuropsychological tests. Thus, IMP SPECT is a useful tool for localizing epileptogenic foci and their associated dynamic deficits.

  20. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  1. Imaging analysis of Parkinson’s disease patients using SPECT and tractography

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seong-Jin; Kim, Mansu; Park, Hyunjin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder that affects the central nervous system. PD-related alterations in structural and functional neuroimaging have not been fully explored. This study explored multi-modal PD neuroimaging and its application for predicting clinical scores on the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). Multi-modal imaging that combined 123I-Ioflupane single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were adopted to incorporate complementary brain imaging information. SPECT and DTI images of normal controls (NC; n = 45) and PD patients (n = 45) were obtained from a database. The specific binding ratio (SBR) was calculated from SPECT. Tractography was performed using DTI. Group-wise differences between NC and PD patients were quantified using SBR of SPECT and structural connectivity of DTI for regions of interest (ROIs) related to PD. MDS-UPDRS scores were predicted using multi-modal imaging features in a partial least-squares regression framework. Three regions and four connections within the cortico-basal ganglia thalamocortical circuit were identified using SBR and DTI, respectively. Predicted MDS-UPDRS scores using identified regions and connections and actual MDS-UPDRS scores showed a meaningful correlation (r = 0.6854, p < 0.001). Our study provided insight on regions and connections that are instrumental in PD. PMID:27901100

  2. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhinav K; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2015-04-13

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method provided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  3. Intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, J.F.; Wood, W.C.; Moinuddin, M.; Loveless, V.; Parrish, B. )

    1990-06-01

    Tl-201 exercise imaging in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) has proven to be indeterminate for significant left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery stenosis because of the presence of immediate septal perfusion defects with redistribution on delayed images in almost all cases. Tl-201 redistribution occurs regardless of the presence or absence of LAD stenosis. Nineteen patients having LBBB were evaluated with dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT. Fourteen of these subjects had normal dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT imaging. Three patients had normal coronary angiograms. None of the remaining 11 patients with normal dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT images was found to have clinical coronary artery disease in a 5-11 month follow-up period. Five patients had abnormal septal perfusion. Four underwent coronary angiography. One had a significant LAD stenosis. The single patient with septal redistribution who refused to undergo coronary angiography died shortly thereafter of clinical coronary artery disease. This preliminary work suggests that dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT may be more useful for excluding LAD stenosis in patients with LBBB than Tl-201 exercise imaging.

  4. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  5. Registration of renal SPECT and 2.5D US images.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Francisco J; Perez, Claudio A; Estévez, Pablo A; Held, Claudio M; Jaillet, Fabrice; Lobo, Gabriel; Donoso, Gilda; Coll, Claudia

    2011-06-01

    Image registration is the process of transforming different image data sets of an object into the same coordinate system. This is a relevant task in the field of medical imaging; one of its objectives is to combine information from different imaging modalities. The main goal of this study is the registration of renal SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) images and a sparse set of ultrasound slices (2.5D US), combining functional and anatomical information. Registration is performed after kidney segmentation in both image types. The SPECT segmentation is achieved using a deformable model based on a simplex mesh. The 2.5D US image segmentation is carried out in each of the 2D slices employing a deformable contour and Gabor filters to capture multi-scale image features. Moreover, a renal medulla detection method was developed to improve the US segmentation. A nonlinear optimization algorithm is used for the registration. In this process, movements caused by patient breathing during US image acquisition are also corrected. Only a few reports describe registration between SPECT images and a sparse set of US slices of the kidney, and they usually employ an optical localizer, unlike our method, that performs movement correction using information only from the SPECT and US images. Moreover, it does not require simultaneous acquisition of both image types. The registration method and both segmentations were evaluated separately. The SPECT segmentation was evaluated qualitatively by medical experts, obtaining a score of 5 over a scale from 1 to 5, where 5 represents a perfect segmentation. The 2.5D US segmentation was evaluated quantitatively, by comparing our method with an expert manual segmentation, and obtaining an average error of 3.3mm. The registration was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitatively the distance between the manual segmentation of the US images and the model extracted from the SPECT image was measured, obtaining an

  6. Multimodal fluorescence mediated tomography and SPECT/CT for small animals imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Metasebya; Nothdruft, Ralph E.; Akers, Walter; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Suddlow, Gail P.; Deghani, Hamid; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal co-registration of nuclear and optical images would enable the fusion of the information from theses complementary molecular imaging modalities. A critical challenge in integration is fitting optical hardware into the nuclear imaging platforms. Flexible fiber-based fluorescence mediated tomography (FMT) systems provide a viable solution because the various imaging bore sizes of small animal nuclear imaging systems can potentially accommodate the FMT fiber imaging arrays. Further, FMT imaging facilitates co-registering the nuclear and optical contrasts in time. Herein, we combine a fiber based FMT system with a preclinical NanoSPECT/CT platform. Feasibility of in vivo imaging is demonstrated by tracking the accumulation of a monomolecular multimodal imaging agent (MOMIA) in a sentinel lymph node (SLN) of a rat. Methods The fiber-based, video-rate FMT imaging system is composed of 12 alternating sources (785nm and 830nm LDs) and 13 detectors. To maintain high temporal sampling, the system simultaneously acquires ratio-metric data at each detector. The data is reconstructed using the normalized Born approach with a three-dimensional finite element model derived from an anatomical CT image of a rat for accurate light propagation modeling. Nuclear and optical contrasts are integrated by using a MOMIA. Data collection begins immediately after injection of the MOMIA intradermally into the forepaw with the FMT data acquired simultaneously with both the SPECT and CT. Results Fluorescence and radioactivity from the MOMIA were co-localized in a spatially coincident region. Intravital imaging with surgical exposure of the lymph node validated the localization of the optical contrast. The optical and nuclear contrasts where integrated by incorporating SPECT as a prior in the DOT reconstruction. Conclusion The feasibility of integrating a fiber-based, video-rate FMT system with a commercial preclinical NanoSPECT/CT platform was established. The co

  7. 99mTc-labelled anti-CD11b SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of plaque destabilization tightly linked to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guobing; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Li, Xiao; Li, Yanli; Tan, Hui; Zhao, Yanzhao; Cheng, Dengfeng; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to predict the risk of rupture for a specific atherosclerotic plaque timely, a thrombotic trigger tightly linked to inflammation. CD11b, is a biomarker abundant on inflammatory cells, not restricted to monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we fabricated a probe named as 99mTc-MAG3-anti-CD11b for detecting inflamed atherosclerotic plaques with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). The ApoE-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice were selected to establish animal models, with C57BL/6J mice used for control. A higher CD11b+-cell recruitment with higher CD11b expression and more serious whole-body inflammatory status were identified in ApoE−/− mice. The probe showed high in vitro affinity and specificity to the Raw-264.7 macrophages, as well as inflammatory cells infiltrated in atherosclerotic plaques, either in ex vivo fluorescent imaging or in in vivo micro-SPECT/CT imaging, which were confirmed by ex vivo planar gamma imaging, Oil-Red-O staining and CD11b-immunohistochemistry staining. A significant positive relationship was identified between the radioactivity intensity on SPECT/CT images and the CD11b expression in plaques. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of anti-CD11b antibody mediated noninvasive SPECT/CT imaging of inflammatory leukocytes in murine atherosclerotic plaques. This imaging strategy can identify inflammation-rich plaques at risk for rupture and evaluate the effectiveness of inflammation-targeted therapies in atheroma. PMID:26877097

  8. Collimator Interchange System for Adaptive Cardiac Imaging in C-SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Rozler, Mike; Chang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Compared to imaging the heart with conventional cameras, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems can achieve much higher performance through use of a small field of view. To realize this potential, however, the heart must be reliably placed in the appropriate small FOV prior to imaging, thus requiring a separate scout operation to locate the heart and estimate its size. Further-more, to achieve high performance across the general population, a system should provide several imaging configurations optimized for different size and location of the heart and the size of the patient. Because of the critical role the collimator plays in SPECT, it would be ideal if a dedicated collimator could be used for each of the different patient groups, as well as for the scout imaging. The ability to exchange collimators without moving the patient can also enable serial studies with different imaging options while preserving anatomic registration. We developed a slit exchange system for the slit-slat collimator of the C-SPECT cardiac platform. The full-scale prototype, a precision link conveyor following a curved, body contouring path, allows four distinct transaxial collimation options. The collimators can be exchanged in 10 seconds without disturbing the patient, thus allowing adaptive clinical SPECT imaging. The positioning precision for all elements of the system is within 0.1 mm and has shown no degradation over 100,000 complete revolutions of the conveyor—twice the expected usage for a clinical system. We consider the rapid and precise operation allowing optimal collimation for different imaging tasks to be an important technological step for cardiac SPECT. PMID:24499740

  9. Recent and future evolutions in NeuroSPECT with particular emphasis on the synergistic use and fusion of imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    d'Asseler, Y M; Koole, M; Lemahieu, I; Achten, E; Boon, P; De Deyn, P P; Dierckx, R A

    1997-09-01

    Recent and future evolutions in neuroSPECT apply to radiopharmaceuticals techniques and the synergistic use of different imaging modalities in the work-up of neurological disorders. The introduction of Technetium labelled perfusion tracers, which could pass the intact blood-brain barrier, together with the implementation of the tomographic principle, by making the conventional gamma camera rotating, enabled estimation of regional cerebral blood flow and indirectly of local brain metabolism. In addition at present Thallium-201 and Tc-99m sestaMIBI allow functional detection of viable tumor tissue, without interference from previous surgery or radiotherapy as seen using CT-scan or MRI. In neurology this has led to the recognition of SPECT by the American Academy of Neurology (Therapeutics and technology subcommittee) as an established or promising tool in major neurological disorders such as dementia, stroke and epilepsy, while other domains such as brain oncology are considered investigational. With regard to radiopharmaceuticals, recent evolutions mainly include the development of mostly Iodine-123 labelled receptor ligands, some of which are already commercially available. For instrumentation advances consist e.g. of multidetector systems equipped with fanbeam collimators, attenuation and scatter correction or coincidence detection. Given the present role for nuclear neurology it may be expected that these additional radiopharmaceutical and technical innovations will continue to stimulate the development of SPECT of the brain. The synergistic use of several imaging techniques such as CT, (functional) MRI, source imaging, SPECT and PET represents a multimodal holistic approach to probe cerebral functions for research and clinical purposes. Clinical indications, in which this synergistic use is illustrated include e.g. support of the clinical diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer type, presurgical ictal detection of seizure focus, detection of acute ischemia and

  10. Myocardial perfusion imaging parameters: IQ-SPECT and conventional SPET system comparison.

    PubMed

    Havel, Martin; Kolacek, Michal; Kaminek, Milan; Dedek, Vladimir; Kraft, Otakar; Sirucek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancement in hardware and software development in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) leads to the shortening of acquisition time and reduction of the radiation burden to patients. We compared semiquantitative perfusion results and functional parameters of the left ventricle between new dedicated cardiac system with astigmatic collimators called IQ-SPECT (Siemens Medical Solutions, USA) and conventional single photon emission tomography (SPET) system equipped with standard low energy high resolution collimators. A group of randomly selected 81 patients underwent consecutively the MPI procedure on IQ-SPECT and on conventional SPET systen, both without attenuation correction. The summed scores and the values of the functional parameters of the left ventricle: ejection fraction (EF), end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes (ESV, EDV) received from the automatic analysis software were compared and statistically analyzed. Our results showed that summed scores values were significantly higher for the IQ-SPECT system in comparison to the conventional one. Calculated EF were significantly lower for IQ-SPECT, whereas evaluated left ventricular volumes (LVV) were significantly higher for this system. In conclusion, we recorded significant differences in automatically calculated semiquantitative perfusion and functional parameters when compared uncorrected studies obtained by the IQ-SPECT with the conventional SPET system.

  11. SPECT/CT of osteitis condensans ilii: one-stop shop imaging.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Filip; de Coningh, Arwin van Vrijberghe; Collins, James; Rijk, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A 16-year-old, nonpregnant, healthy, and sportive teenager suffers from intermittent low back pain. Pelvic x-ray complemented by bone-SPECT/CT demonstrated an uncommon benign condition called osteitis condensans ilii. In the early phase, it is of paramount importance to distinguish osteitis condensans ilii from sacroiliitis or ankylosing spondylitis. This case report highlights the incremental value of performing one-stop shop hybrid SPECT/low-dose CT bone imaging in diagnosing and managing this rare benign skeletal condition.

  12. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, J. P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  13. 5-HT Radioligands for Human Brain Imaging With PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Louise M.; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Nutt, David J.; Pike, Victor W.; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonergic system plays a key modulatory role in the brain and is the target for many drug treatments for brain disorders either through reuptake blockade or via interactions at the 14 subtypes of 5-HT receptors. This review provides the history and current status of radioligands used for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging of human brain serotonin (5-HT) receptors, the 5-HT transporter (SERT), and 5-HT synthesis rate. Currently available radioligands for in vivo brain imaging of the 5-HT system in humans include antagonists for the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4 receptors, and for SERT. Here we describe the evolution of these radioligands, along with the attempts made to develop radioligands for additional serotonergic targets. We describe the properties needed for a radioligand to become successful and the main caveats. The success of a PET or SPECT radioligand can ultimately be assessed by its frequency of use, its utility in humans, and the number of research sites using it relative to its invention date, and so these aspects are also covered. In conclusion, the development of PET and SPECT radioligands to image serotonergic targets is of high interest, and successful evaluation in humans is leading to invaluable insight into normal and abnormal brain function, emphasizing the need for continued development of both SPECT and PET radioligands for human brain imaging. PMID:21674551

  14. Multimodal imaging with hybrid semiconductor detectors Timepix for an experimental MRI-SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Jakubek, J.; Burian, M.; Vobecky, M.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical applications are being based on multimodal imaging systems (MIS), including anatomical (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT) techniques to provide complex information in a single image. CT with one of the scintigraphic methods (PET or SPECT) is nowadays a combination of choice for clinical practice and it is mostly used in cardiography and tumour diagnostics. Combination with MRI is also being implemented as no radiation dose is imparted to the patient and it is possible to gain higher structural resolution of soft tissues (brain imaging). A major disadvantage of such systems is inability to operate scintillators with photomultipliers (used for detection of γ rays) in presence of high magnetic fields. In this work we present the application of the semiconductor pixel detector for SPECT method in combination with MR imaging. We propose a novel approach based on MRI compatible setup with CdTe pixel sensor Timepix and non-conductive collimator. Measurements were performed on high proton-density (PD) phantom (1H) with an embedded radioisotopic source inside the shielded RF coil by MRI animal scanner (4.7 T). Our results pave the way for a combined MRI-SPECT system. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  15. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  16. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  17. New open-source ictal SPECT analysis method implemented in BioImage Suite.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Teisseyre, Thomas Z; Distasio, Marcello; DeSalvo, Matthew N; Papademetris, Xenophon; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-04-01

    Ictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful tool for noninvasive seizure localization, but it has been underutilized because of practical challenges, including difficulty in implementing ictal-interictal SPECT difference analysis. We previously validated a freely available utility for this purpose, ictal-interictal subtraction analysis by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) (ISAS). To further simplify and improve the difference imaging technique, we now compare a new algorithm, ISAS BioImage Suite (see http://spect.yale.edu and http://bioimagesuite.org), to the original ISAS method in 13 patients with known seizure localization. We found that ISAS BioImage Suite was in agreement with the original algorithm in all cases for which ISAS correctly identified a single unambiguous region of seizure onset. We also tested for possible effects of scan-order bias in the control group used for the analysis and found no significant effect on the results. These findings establish a simple, validated and objective method for analyzing ictal-interictal SPECT difference images for use in the care of patients with epilepsy.

  18. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-05-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  19. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  20. Impact of image processing in the detection of ischaemia using CZT-SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Daniëlle; van Dalen, Jorn A; Slump, Cornelis H; Lots, Dimitri; Timmer, Jorik R; Jager, Pieter L

    2015-01-01

    The new multipinhole cardiac single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors are highly sensitive and produce images of high quality but rely on complex dedicated reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of various processing steps on image formation and in the detection of ischaemia in CZT-SPECT/CT both with and without attenuation correction (AC). Data on 20 consecutive patients who underwent a 1-day protocol stress-rest SPECT/CT using 99mTc-tetrofosmin were processed twice by three experienced operators, yielding 120 AC and 120 noncorrected (NC) data sets. Processing steps included selection and determination of myocardial axes, manual SPECT/CT coregistration for AC and myocardial masking. Using the 17-segment cardiac model, differences between stress and rest segmental uptake (%) were calculated for NC and AC image sets. Both interoperator and intraoperator variations were considered significant for the diagnosis of ischaemia when greater than 5%. The mean interoperator variations were 2.4±1.4% (NC) and 3.8±1.9% (AC) (P<0.01). In 6% (NC) and 23% (AC) of the 120 processed cases, operator variation was larger than 5% and therefore potentially clinically interfering with the diagnosis of ischaemia. Differences between interoperator and intraoperator variations were nonsignificant. Operator variations in the processing of myocardial perfusion image data using CZT-SPECT/CT are significant and may influence the diagnosis of ischaemia, especially when AC is applied. Clearer guidelines for image processing are necessary to improve the reproducibility of the studies and to obtain a more reliable diagnosis of ischaemia.

  1. A Silicon SPECT System for Molecular Imaging of the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Fritz, Mark A; McDonald, Benjamin S; Durko, Heather L; Furenlid, Lars R; Wilson, Donald W; Peterson, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the feasibility of using silicon double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs) for SPECT imaging of the activity distribution of iodine-125 using a 300-micrometer thick detector. Based on this experience, we now have developed fully customized silicon DSSDs and associated readout electronics with the intent of developing a multi-pinhole SPECT system. Each DSSD has a 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm active area and is 1 mm thick. The strip pitch is 59 micrometers, and the readout of the 1024 strips on each side gives rise to a detector with over one million pixels. Combining four high-resolution DSSDs into a SPECT system offers an unprecedented space-bandwidth product for the imaging of single-photon emitters. The system consists of two camera heads with two silicon detectors stacked one behind the other in each head. The collimator has a focused pinhole system with cylindrical-shaped pinholes that are laser-drilled in a 250 μm tungsten plate. The unique ability to collect projection data at two magnifications simultaneously allows for multiplexed data at high resolution to be combined with lower magnification data with little or no multiplexing. With the current multi-pinhole collimator design, our SPECT system will be capable of offering high spatial resolution, sensitivity and angular sampling for small field-of-view applications, such as molecular imaging of the mouse brain.

  2. A method of analysis of SPECT blood flow image data for comparison with computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mountz, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    A consistent method for the qualitative analysis of regional cerebral blood flow on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has not yet been realized. Regional analysis usually refers an area of abnormal tracer uptake to another region of brain (e.g., the contralateral hemisphere), but region of interest size and analysis differ between investigators. In patients who have had a stroke, the flow deficit size on the SPECT image often appears much larger than the abnormality visualized on computed tomography (CT), and confounds attempts to differentiate between ''purely'' infarcted brain tissue, ischemic brain tissue, edema, or brain tissue having diminution of flow resulting from deafferentation. The author presents a method to determine a flow deficit volume that can be easily calculated from the SPECT image, which yields a volume size that is equivalent to a hypothetical volume having zero blood flow. The method of calculation is objective, independent of region of interest size, and provides a SPECT volume deficit that may be correlated with the CT volume deficit, thus helping to differentiate ''purely'' infarcted tissue from tissue having infarction, edema, ischemia, and deafferentation.

  3. A restraint-free small animal SPECT imaging system with motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2005-06-01

    We report on an approach toward the development of a high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/unanesthetized mice. An infrared (IR)-based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with submillimeter accuracy. The high-resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixellated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, and novel readout circuitry requiring fewer analog-digital converter (ADC) channels while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based upon position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the tracking system will be used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  4. Synthesis, radiolabeling, and baboon SPECT imaging of 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(3′-[123I]iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]YP256) as a serotonin transporter radiotracer.([123I]YP256) a potential serotonin transporter radiotracer)

    PubMed Central

    Bois, Frederic; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Amici, Louis; Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S.; Kula, Nora; Baldessarini, Ross; Innis, Robert B.; Staley, Julie K.; Tamagnan., Gilles D.

    2008-01-01

    To develop a potential SPECT probe to evaluate the integrity of the serotoninergic system (5-HTT) whose dysfunction is linked to several disease conditions such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s diseases and depression, we report the synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo baboon imaging of 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(3′-[123I]iodophenyl) tropane (YP256, 6). The radiolabeling was performed by iododestannylation using sodium [123I]iodide and peracetic acid. Although the ligand displayed high selectivity for 5-HTT over dopamine transporter (DAT) in vitro, SPECT imaging in baboons did not reveal selective 5-HTT accumulation in brain in vivo. PMID:18158943

  5. Bayesian SPECT lung imaging for visualization and quantification of pulmonary perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Scarfone, C.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Gilland, D.R.; Greer, K.L.; Munley, M.T.; Marks, L.B.; Coleman, R.E.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, the authors quantitatively and qualitatively examine the use of a Gibbs prior in maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction of SPECT images of pulmonary perfusion using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. This Bayesian approach is applied to SPECT projection data acquired from a realistic torso phantom with spherical defects in the lungs simulating perfusion deficits. Both the scatter subtraction constant (k) and the smoothing parameter beta ({beta}) characterizing the prior are varied to study their effect on image quality and quantification. Region of interest (ROI) analysis is used to compare MAP-EM radionuclide concentration estimates with those derived from a ``clinical`` implementation of filtered backprojection (CFBP), and a quantitative implementation of FBP (QFBP) utilizing nonuniform attenuation and scatter compensation. Qualitatively, the MAP-EM images contain reduced artifacts near the lung boundaries relative to the FBP implementations. Generally, the MAP-EM image`s visual quality and the ability to discern the areas of reduced radionuclide concentration in the lungs depend on the value of {beta} and the total number of iterations. For certain choices of {beta} and total iterations, MAP-EM lung images are visually comparable to FBP. Based on profile and ROI analysis, SPECT QFBP and MAP-EM images have the potential to provide quantitatively accurate reconstructions when compared to CFBP. The computational burden, however, is greater for the MAP-EM approach. To demonstrate the clinical efficacy of the methods, the authors present pulmonary images of a patient with lung cancer.

  6. Development of novel 123I-labeled pyridyl benzofuran derivatives for SPECT imaging of β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masahiro; Cheng, Yan; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Masashi; Iikuni, Shimpei; Okamoto, Yoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Saji, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Imaging of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain may facilitate the diagnosis of cerebral β-amyloidosis, risk prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and effectiveness of anti-amyloid therapies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate novel (123)I-labeled pyridyl benzofuran derivatives as SPECT probes for Aβ imaging. The formation of a pyridyl benzofuran backbone was accomplished by Suzuki coupling. [(123)I/(125)I]-labeled pyridyl benzofuran derivatives were readily prepared by an iododestannylation reaction. In vitro Aβ binding assays were carried out using Aβ(1-42) aggregates and postmortem human brain sections. Biodistribution experiments were conducted in normal mice at 2, 10, 30, and 60 min postinjection. Aβ labeling in vivo was evaluated by small-animal SPECT/CT in Tg2576 transgenic mice injected with [(123)I]8. Ex vivo autoradiography of the brain sections was performed after SPECT/CT. Iodinated pyridyl benzofuran derivatives showed excellent affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates (2.4 to 10.3 nM) and intensely labeled Aβ plaques in autoradiographs of postmortem AD brain sections. In biodistribution experiments using normal mice, all these derivatives displayed high initial uptake (4.03-5.49% ID/g at 10 min). [(125)I]8 displayed the quickest clearance from the brain (1.30% ID/g at 60 min). SPECT/CT with [(123)I]8 revealed higher uptake of radioactivity in the Tg2576 mouse brain than the wild-type mouse brain. Ex vivo autoradiography showed in vivo binding of [(123)I]8 to Aβ plaques in the Tg2576 mouse brain. These combined results warrant further investigation of [(123)I]8 as a SPECT imaging agent for visualizing Aβ plaques in the AD brain.

  7. SPECT Imaging to Evaluate Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    neuroinflammation. J Nucl Med, 2007. 48(4): p. 573-81. 66. Seibyl, J.P., E. Wallace, E.O. Smith, M. Stabin, R.M. Baldwin, S. Zoghbi, Y. Zea -Ponce, Y. Gao... Zea -Ponce, C. Olson, D.S. Charney, and et al., Human biodistribution and dosimetry of the SPECT benzodiazepine receptor radioligand iodine-123...J Nucl Med, 1997. 24(11): p. 1422-5. 23 70. van Dyck, C.H., J.P. Seibyl, J.B. Stubbs, S. Zoghbi, G. Wisniewski, R.M. Baldwin, Y. Zea -Ponce, D.S

  8. Nanosized multifunctional liposomes for tumor diagnosis and molecular imaging by SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Silindir, Mine; Erdoğan, Suna; Özer, A Yekta; Doğan, A Lale; Tuncel, Murat; Uğur, Ömer; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-03-01

    Among currently used cancer imaging methods, nuclear medicine modalities provide metabolic information, whereas modalities in radiology provide anatomical information. However, different modalities, having different acquisition times in separate machines, decrease the specificity and accuracy of images. To solve this problem, hybrid imaging modalities were developed as a new era, especially in the cancer imaging field. With widespread usage of hybrid imaging modalities, specific contrast agents are essentially needed to use in both modalities, such as single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). Liposomes are one of the most desirable drug delivery systems, depending on their suitable properties. The aim of this study was to develop a liposomal contrast agent for the diagnosis and molecular imaging of tumor by SPECT/CT. Liposomes were prepared nanosized, coated with polyethylene glycol to obtain long blood circulation, and modified with monoclonal antibody 2C5 for specific tumor targeting. Although DTPA-PE and DTPA-PLL-NGPE (polychelating amphilic polymers; PAPs) were loaded onto liposomes for stable radiolabeling for SPECT imaging, iopromide was encapsulated into liposomes for CT imaging. Liposomes [(DPPC:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:DTPA-PE), (PL 90G:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:DTPA-PE), (DPPC:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:PAPs), (PL 90G:PEG(2000)-PE:Chol:PAPs), (60:0.9:39:0.1% mol ratio)] were characterized in terms of entrapment efficiency, particle size, physical stability, and release kinetics. Additionally, in vitro cell-binding studies were carried out on two tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and EL 4) by counting radioactivity. Tumor-specific antibody-modified liposomes were found to be effective multimodal contrast agents by designating almost 3-8 fold more uptake than nonmodified ones in different tumor cell lines. These results could be considered as an important step in the development of tumor-targeted SPECT/CT contrast agents for cancer imaging.

  9. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  10. Indium-Labeling of siRNA for Small Animal SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven; Merkel, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), therapeutic delivery of siRNA has attracted a lot of interest. However, due to the nature and structure of siRNA, a carrier is needed for any mode of systemic treatment. Furthermore, specific imaging techniques are required to trace where the deposition of the siRNA occurs throughout the body after treatment. Tracking in vivo siRNA biodistribution allows understanding and interpreting therapeutics effects and side effects. A great advantage of noninvasive imaging techniques such as SPECT imaging is that several time points can be assessed in the same subject. Thus, the time course of biodistribution or metabolic processes can be followed. Therefore, we have described an approach to modify siRNA with a DTPA (Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid) chelator in order to utilize an indium labeled siRNA for SPECT imaging. Here, we explain the details of the labeling and purification procedures. PMID:26530916

  11. Indium-Labeling of siRNA for Small Animal SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven; Merkel, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), therapeutic delivery of siRNA has attracted a lot of interest. However, due to the nature and structure of siRNA, a carrier is needed for any mode of systemic treatment. Furthermore, specific imaging techniques are required to trace where the deposition of the siRNA occurs throughout the body after treatment. Tracking in vivo siRNA biodistribution allows understanding and interpreting therapeutics effects and side effects. A great advantage of noninvasive imaging techniques such as SPECT imaging is that several time points can be assessed in the same subject. Thus, the time course of biodistribution or metabolic processes can be followed. Therefore, we have described an approach to modify siRNA with a DTPA (Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid) chelator in order to utilize an indium labeled siRNA for SPECT imaging. Here, we explain the details of the labeling and purification procedures.

  12. System calibration and image reconstruction for a new small-animal SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun

    A novel small-animal SPECT imager, FastSPECT II, was recently developed at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. FastSPECT II consists of two rings of eight modular scintillation cameras and list-mode data-acquisition electronics that enable stationary and dynamic imaging studies. The instrument is equipped with exchangeable aperture assemblies and adjustable camera positions for selections of magnifications, pinhole sizes, and fields of view (FOVs). The purpose of SPECT imaging is to recover the radiotracer distribution in the object from the measured image data. Accurate knowledge of the imaging system matrix (referred to as H) is essential for image reconstruction. To assure that all of the system physics is contained in the matrix, experimental calibration methods for the individual cameras and the whole imaging system were developed and carefully performed. The average spatial resolution over the FOV of FastSPECT II in its low-magnification (2.4X) configuration is around 2.4 mm, computed from the Fourier crosstalk matrix. The system sensitivity measured with a 99mTc point source at the center of the FOV is about 267 cps/MBq. The system detectability was evaluated by computing the ideal-observer performance on SKE/BKE (signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly) detection tasks. To reduce the system-calibration time and achieve finer reconstruction grids, two schemes for interpolating H were implemented and compared: these are centroid interpolation with Gaussian fitting and Fourier interpolation. Reconstructed phantom and mouse-cardiac images demonstrated the effectiveness of the H-matrix interpolation. Tomographic reconstruction can be formulated as a linear inverse problem and solved using statistical-estimation techniques. Several iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced, including maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) and its ordered-subsets (OS) version, and some least-squares (LS) and weighted-least-squares (WLS) algorithms such

  13. Investigation of the use of X-ray CT images for attenuation compensation in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    LaCroix, K.J.; Tsui, B.M.W. ); Hasegawa, B.H.; Brown, J.K. )

    1994-12-01

    This study investigates the general use of single-beam X-ray computed tomography (CT) images for generating attenuation maps for compensation of photon attenuation in SPECT images. A 3D mathematical thorax phantom is used to simulate both emission and transmission projection data for monoenergetic and polyenergetic sources. Polyenergetic transmission projection data are simulated for a standard X-ray spectrum and fan-beam geometry. The projection data are reconstructed using filtered backprojection to form an X-ray CT image which is then scaled to produce an estimate of the attenuation map at the energy of the emission radionuclide. Emission projection data are simulated for a fan-beam geometry at the energies of [sup 201]Tl and [sup 99m]Tc, two radionuclides commonly used in cardiac SPECT. Detector response and scatter are not included in the model. Noiseless, emission projection data are iteratively reconstructed using the ML-EM algorithm with nonuniform attenuation compensation and attenuation maps derived from both the simulated X-ray CT image and from a simulated monoenergetic transmission CT image. The attenuation maps generated from the X-ray CT images accurately estimate the attenuation coefficient for muscle and lung tissues, but not for bone tissues, which show error in the attenuation coefficient of 21--42% for spinal bone and 34--58% for rib bone. However, despite the inaccurate estimate of bone attenuation, the reconstructed SPECT images provide estimates of myocardial radioactivity concentration to within 9% and show few artifacts.

  14. Registration of serial SPECT/CT images for three-dimensional dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjögreen-Gleisner, K.; Rueckert, D.; Ljungberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    For radionuclide therapy, individual patient pharmacokinetics can be measured in three dimensions by sequential SPECT imaging. Accurate registration of the time series of images is central for voxel-based calculations of the residence time and absorbed dose. In this work, rigid and non-rigid methods are evaluated for registration of 6-7 SPECT/CT images acquired over a week, in anatomical regions from the head-and-neck region down to the pelvis. A method for calculation of the absorbed dose, including a voxel mass determination from the CT images, is also described. Registration of the SPECT/CT images is based on a CT-derived spatial transformation. Evaluation is focused on the CT registration accuracy, and on its impact on values of residence time and absorbed dose. According to the CT evaluation, the non-rigid method produces a more accurate registration than the rigid one. For images of the residence time and absorbed dose, registration produces a sharpening of the images. For volumes-of-interest, the differences between rigid and non-rigid results are generally small. However, the non-rigid method is more consistent for regions where non-rigid patient movements are likely, such as in the head-neck-shoulder region.

  15. Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions?

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P A; Buechel, R R

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA.

  16. Morphology supporting function: attenuation correction for SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzu C.; Alessio, Adam M.; Miyaoka, Robert M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    Both SPECT, and in particular PET, are unique in medical imaging for their high sensitivity and direct link to a physical quantity, i.e. radiotracer concentration. This gives PET and SPECT imaging unique capabilities for accurately monitoring disease activity for the purposes of clinical management or therapy development. However, to achieve a direct quantitative connection between the underlying radiotracer concentration and the reconstructed image values several confounding physical effects have to be estimated, notably photon attenuation and scatter. With the advent of dual-modality SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR scanners, the complementary CT or MR image data can enable these corrections, although there are unique challenges for each combination. This review covers the basic physics underlying photon attenuation and scatter and summarizes technical considerations for multimodal imaging with regard to PET and SPECT quantification and methods to address the challenges for each multimodal combination. PMID:26576737

  17. New iodinated quinoline-2-carboxamides for SPECT imaging of the translocator protein.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise; Tavares, Adriana A S; Brunet, Aurélie; McGonagle, Fiona I; Dewar, Deborah; Pimlott, Sally L; Sutherland, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    With the aim of developing new SPECT imaging agents for the translocator protein (TSPO), a small library of iodinated quinoline-2-carboxamides have been prepared and tested for binding affinity with TSPO. N,N-Diethyl-3-iodomethyl-4-phenylquinoline-2-carboxamide was found to have excellent affinity (K(i) 12.0 nM), comparable to that of the widely used TSPO imaging agent PK11195. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SPECT imaging with Tl-201 and Ga-67 in myocardial sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Sakata, K.; Taguchi, T.; Fukumoto, Y.; Miyata, H.; Aoshima, S.; Yamazaki, N. )

    1990-06-01

    Two patients with myocardial sarcoidosis are presented, both of whom underwent SPECT imaging with Tl-201 and Ga-67. The first had Ga-67 myocardial uptake with a Tl-201 defect, which disappeared with corticosteroid therapy. The second had multiple Tl-201 defects without Ga-67 uptake, which persisted despite corticosteroid therapy. Therefore, the combination of Tl-201 and Ga-67 imaging may be useful for recognizing myocardial sarcoidosis and for predicting the response to corticosteroid therapy.

  19. SPECT/NIRF Dual Modality Imaging for Detection of Intraperitoneal Colon Tumor with an Avidin/Biotin Pretargeting System.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chengyan; Yang, Sujuan; Shi, Jiyun; Zhao, Huiyun; Zhong, Lijun; Liu, Zhaofei; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan

    2016-01-06

    We describe herein dual-modality imaging of intraperitoneal colon tumor using an avidin/biotin pretargeting system. A novel dual-modality probe, (99m)Tc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin, was designed, synthesized and characterized. Single-photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging were developed using intraperitoneal LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts. Following avidin preinjection for 4 hours, (99m)Tc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin could successfully detect colon tumors of different sizes inside the abdominal region using both modalities, and the imaging results showed no differences. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumors had a very high uptake of the probe (99m)Tc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin (12.74 ± 1.89% ID/g at 2 h p.i.), and the clearance from blood and other normal tissues occured very fast. The low tumor uptake in the non-pretargeted mice (1.63 ± 0.50% ID/g at 2 h p.i.) and tumor cell staining results showed excellent tumor binding specificity of the pretargeting system. The ability of the novel probe to show excellent imaging quality with high tumor-to-background contrast, a high degree of binding specificity with tumors and excellent in vivo biodistribution pharmacokinetics should prove that the avidin/biotin based dual-modality pretargeting probe is a promising imaging tool during the entire period of tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  20. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  1. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of −180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 × 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 × 10−4 with the energy window of ±10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  2. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA

    2011-12-06

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  3. Gamma-Ray Imaging Probes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Walter James

    1988-12-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work. The central concept lies in the representation of the aperture shell by a sequence of binary digits. This, coupled with the mode of operation which is data encoding within an axial slice of space, leads to the fundamental imaging equation in which the coding operation is conveniently described by a circulant matrix operator. The coding/decoding process is a classic coded-aperture problem, and various estimators to achieve decoding are discussed. Some estimators require a priori information about the object (or object class) being imaged; the only unbiased estimator that does not impose this requirement is the simple inverse-matrix operator. The effects of noise on the estimate (or reconstruction) is discussed for general noise models and various codes/decoding operators. The choice of an optimal aperture for detector count times of clinical relevance is examined using a statistical class-separability formalism.

  4. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  5. Single photon emission photography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI) visualization for frontal-lobe-damaged regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokking, Rik; Zuiderveld, Karel J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Viergever, Max A.

    1994-09-01

    We present multi-modality visualization strategies to convey information contained in registered Single Photon Emission Photography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the brain. Multi-modality visualization provides a means to retrieve valuable information from the data which might otherwise remain obscured. Here we use MRI as an anatomical framework for functional information acquired with SPECT. This is part of clinical research studying the change of functionality caused by a frontal lobe damaged region. A number of known and newly developed techniques for the integrated visualization of SPECT and MR images will be discussed.

  6. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  7. Thallium-201 myocardial SPECT in a patient with mirror-image dextrocardia and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Bülent; Kitapci, Mehmet T; Temiz, N Hakan; Unlü, Mustafa; Erselcan, Taner

    2003-09-01

    A 53-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of situs inversus with mirror-image dextrocardia underwent thallium-201 (Tl-201) stress-redistribution myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Electrocardiogram (ECG) obtained on right hemithorax revealed constant complete left bundle branch block. Tl-201 stress-redistribution SPECT images revealed abnormal perfusion with reversible ischemia in the anteroseptal, septal and inferoseptal walls. Coronary angiography performed 1 month after SPECT study was normal. This case illustrates that false positive reversible perfusion defects can be seen in patients with mirror-image dextrocardia associated with constant complete left bundle branch block. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mirror-image dextrocardia and constant complete left bundle branch block with false positive Tl-201 SPECT findings.

  8. A prototype instrument for single pinhole small animal adaptive SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have designed and constructed a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system as a prototype for quantifying the potential benefit of adaptive SPECT imaging over the traditional fixed geometry approach. The optical design of the system is based on filling the detector with the region of interest for each viewing angle, maximizing the sensitivity, and optimizing the resolution in the projection images. Additional feedback rules for determining the optimal geometry of the system can be easily added to the existing control software. Preliminary data have been taken of a phantom with a small, hot, offset lesion in a flat background in both adaptive and fixed geometry modes. Comparison of the predicted system behavior with the actual system behavior is presented, along with recommendations for system improvements. PMID:18561667

  9. Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: the role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after (99m)Tc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity.

  10. Do short-time SPECT images of bone scintigraphy improve the diagnostic value in the evaluation of solitary lesions in the thoracic spine in patients with extraskeletal malignancies?

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kana; Okuyama, Chio; Kubota, Takao; Nakai, Takako; Ushijima, Yo; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-10-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images provide many details of the anatomical structure. Also about bone scintigraphy, there are many reports of the improvement of diagnosis by SPECT images. Although SPECT is useful, it requires much time. So to perform SPECT for all cases is difficult in the clinical situation. Recently, due to technical improvements in gamma cameras, we can get SPECT images in a short time. We examined diagnosis of solitary hot spots of thoracic spine in cancer patients using short-time SPECT. And we considered whether short-time SPECT contributes to the precise diagnosis of the lesion. We performed bone scintigraphy image acquisition and both planar and short-time SPECT of the chest. Short-time SPECT was acquired in 6 minutes. We selected 36 cases with malignancy, whose bone scintigraphy demonstrated a solitary accumulation hot spot in the thoracic spine. Three experienced radiologists in nuclear medicine and 4 beginners diagnosed the images. They interpreted planar, short-time SPECT and maximum intensity projection (MIP) view of the chest of each case. The observers' response data were analyzed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Of the three types of images, the Az (the area under ROC curve) values of short-time SPECT were the highest in all the observers except for only one beginner. Compared with experienced observers, beginners scored lower Az values of short-time SPECT. MIP images were constructed using SPECT data, but the Az values of MIP images were not higher than those of planar images. As to diagnosis, beginners tended to interprete most of the accumulations as metastatic lesions. Short-time SPECT can be helpful to some degree, but to provide greater benefit, the observers require considerable exercise and experience.

  11. Peritoneal fluid causing inferior attenuation on SPECT thallium-201 myocardial imaging in women

    SciTech Connect

    Rab, S.T.; Alazraki, N.P.; Guertler-Krawczynska, E.

    1988-11-01

    On SPECT thallium images, myocardial left ventricular (LV) anterior wall attenuation due to breast tissue is common in women. In contrast, in men, inferior wall counts are normally decreased compared to anterior counts. The purpose of this report is to describe cases of inferior wall attenuation of counts in women caused by peritoneal fluid, not myocardial disease. Twelve consecutive SPECT thallium myocardial studies performed in women on peritoneal dialysis, being evaluated for kidney transplant, were included in this study. For all studies, 3.5 mCi 201Tl were injected intravenously. Thirty-two images were acquired over 180 degrees (45 degrees RAO progressing to 45 degrees LPO) at 40 sec per stop. SPECT images were reviewed in short axis, horizontal long and vertical long axes. Data were also displayed in bullseye format with quantitative comparison to gender-matched normal files. Ten of 12 female patients studied had inferior wall defects on images, confirmed by bullseye display. All patients had approximately 2 liters of peritoneal fluid. Review of planar rotational views showed diaphragm elevation and fluid margin attenuations affecting left ventricular inferior wall. Thus, peritoneal fluid is a cause of inferior attenuation on 201Tl cardiac imaging.

  12. An Adaptation of the Distance Driven Projection Method for Single Pinhole Collimators in SPECT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihsani, Alvin; Farncombe, Troy

    2016-02-01

    The modelling of the projection operator in tomographic imaging is of critical importance especially when working with algebraic methods of image reconstruction. This paper proposes a distance-driven projection method which is targeted to single-pinhole single-photon emission computed tomograghy (SPECT) imaging since it accounts for the finite size of the pinhole, and the possible tilting of the detector surface in addition to other collimator-specific factors such as geometric sensitivity. The accuracy and execution time of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing to a ray-driven approach where the pinhole is sub-sampled with various sampling schemes. A point-source phantom whose projections were generated using OpenGATE was first used to compare the resolution of reconstructed images with each method using the full width at half maximum (FWHM). Furthermore, a high-activity Mini Deluxe Phantom (Data Spectrum Corp., Durham, NC, USA) SPECT resolution phantom was scanned using a Gamma Medica X-SPECT system and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and structural similarity of reconstructed images was compared at various projection counts. Based on the reconstructed point-source phantom, the proposed distance-driven approach results in a lower FWHM than the ray-driven approach even when using a smaller detector resolution. Furthermore, based on the Mini Deluxe Phantom, it is shown that the distance-driven approach has consistently higher SNR and structural similarity compared to the ray-driven approach as the counts in measured projections deteriorates.

  13. Myocardial Infarction Area Quantification using High-Resolution SPECT Images in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; Mejia, Jorge; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Lataro, Renata Maria; Frassetto, Sarita Nasbine; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Hélio Cesar; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Simões, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-01-01

    Background Imaging techniques enable in vivo sequential assessment of the morphology and function of animal organs in experimental models. We developed a device for high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging based on an adapted pinhole collimator. Objective To determine the accuracy of this system for quantification of myocardial infarct area in rats. Methods Thirteen male Wistar rats (250 g) underwent experimental myocardial infarction by occlusion of the left coronary artery. After 4 weeks, SPECT images were acquired 1.5 hours after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi. The tomographic reconstruction was performed by using specially developed software based on the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The analysis of the data included the correlation between the area of perfusion defects detected by scintigraphy and extent of myocardial fibrosis assessed by histology. Results The images showed a high target organ/background ratio with adequate visualization of the left ventricular walls and cavity. All animals presenting infarction areas were correctly identified by the perfusion images. There was no difference of the infarct area as measured by SPECT (21.1 ± 21.2%) and by histology (21.7 ± 22.0%; p=0.45). There was a strong correlation between individual values of the area of infarction measured by these two methods. Conclusion The developed system presented adequate spatial resolution and high accuracy for the detection and quantification of myocardial infarction areas, consisting in a low cost and versatile option for high-resolution SPECT imaging of small rodents. PMID:23917507

  14. Multi-centre evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of planar and SPECT image quantification: An IAEA phantom study.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Brian E; Grošev, Darko; Buvat, Irène; Coca Pérez, Marco A; Frey, Eric C; Green, Alan; Krisanachinda, Anchali; Lassmann, Michael; Ljungberg, Michael; Pozzo, Lorena; Quadir, Kamila Afroj; Terán Gretter, Mariella A; Van Staden, Johann; Poli, Gian Luca

    2016-04-19

    Accurate quantitation of activity provides the basis for internal dosimetry of targeted radionuclide therapies. This study investigated quantitative imaging capabilities at sites with a variety of experience and equipment and assessed levels of errors in activity quantitation in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and planar imaging. Participants from 9 countries took part in a comparison in which planar, SPECT and SPECT with X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging were used to quantify activities of four epoxy-filled cylinders containing (133)Ba, which was chosen as a surrogate for (131)I. The sources, with nominal volumes of 2, 4, 6 and 23mL, were calibrated for (133)Ba activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, but the activity was initially unknown to the participants. Imaging was performed in a cylindrical phantom filled with water. Two trials were carried out in which the participants first estimated the activities using their local standard protocols, and then repeated the measurements using a standardized acquisition and analysis protocol. Finally, processing of the imaging data from the second trial was repeated by a single centre using a fixed protocol. In the first trial, the activities were underestimated by about 15% with planar imaging. SPECT with Chang's first order attenuation correction (Chang-AC) and SPECT-CT overestimated the activity by about 10%. The second trial showed moderate improvements in accuracy and variability. Planar imaging was subject to methodological errors, e.g., in the use of a transmission scan for attenuation correction. The use of Chang-AC was subject to variability from the definition of phantom contours. The project demonstrated the need for training and standardized protocols to achieve good levels of quantitative accuracy and precision in a multicentre setting. Absolute quantification of simple objects with no background was possible with the strictest protocol to about 6% with

  15. Image quality phantom and parameters for high spatial resolution small-animal SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Eric P.; Harteveld, Anita A.; Meeuwis, Antoi P. W.; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Beekman, Freek J.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-10-01

    At present, generally accepted standards to characterize small-animal single photon emission tomographs (SPECT) do not exist. Whereas for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), the NEMA NU 4-2008 guidelines are available, such standards are still lacking for small-animal SPECT. More specifically, a dedicated image quality (IQ) phantom and corresponding IQ parameters are absent. The structures of the existing PET IQ phantom are too large to fully characterize the sub-millimeter spatial resolution of modern multi-pinhole SPECT scanners, and its diameter will not fit into all scanners when operating in high spatial resolution mode. We therefore designed and constructed an adapted IQ phantom with smaller internal structures and external diameter, and a facility to guarantee complete filling of the smallest rods. The associated IQ parameters were adapted from NEMA NU 4. An additional parameter, effective whole-body sensitivity, was defined since this was considered relevant in view of the variable size of the field of view and the use of multiple bed positions as encountered in modern small-animal SPECT scanners. The usefulness of the phantom was demonstrated for 99mTc in a USPECT-II scanner operated in whole-body scanning mode using a multi-pinhole mouse collimator with 0.6 mm pinhole diameter.

  16. Combining SPECT medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics for analyzing blood and dialysate flow in hemodialyzers.

    PubMed

    Eloot, S; D'Asseler, Y; De Bondt, P; Verdonck, R

    2005-07-01

    For a better insight in dialyzer efficiency with respect to local mass transport in a low flux dialyzer (Fresenius F6HPS), blood and dialysate flow distributions were visualized with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, which were validated with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. To visualize blood-side flow while avoiding transport through the fiber membrane, a bolus of 99m-Technetium labeled MAA (Macro Aggregated Albumin) was injected in the flow using an electronic valve. Water was used to simulate blood, but flow rate was adjusted according to laws of dynamic similarity to account for the viscosity difference (factor 2.75). For the visualization of dialysate flow, a bolus of 99m-Technetium labeled DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic Acid) was injected, while pressurized air in the blood compartment avoided transmembrane flow. For each test series, 3D acquisitions were made on a two respectively three-headed SPECT camera. By evaluating the images at different time steps, dynamic 3D intensity plots were obtained, which were further used to derive local flow velocities. Additionally, three-dimensional CFD models were developed for simulating the overall blood and dialysate flow, respectively. In both models,the whole fiber compartment was defined as a porous medium with overall axial and radial permeability derived theoretically and from in vitro tests. With the imaging as well as with the computational technique, a homogeneous blood flow distribution was found, while vortices and fluid stagnation were observed in the dialyzer inlet manifold. The non-homogeneous dialysate distribution, as found with SPECT imaging, implies the occurrence of non-efficient sites with respect to mass transfer. The discrepancy between the dialysate results of both techniques indicated that the assumption of a constant fiber bundle permeability in the CFD model was too optimistic. In conclusion, medical imaging techniques like SPECT are very helpful to validate

  17. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  18. SPECT/CT imaging of the lumbar spine in chronic low back pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical low back pain is a common indication for Nuclear Medicine imaging. Whole-body bone scan is a very sensitive but poorly specific study for the detection of metabolic bone abnormalities. The accurate localisation of metabolically active bone disease is often difficult in 2D imaging but single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) allows accurate diagnosis and anatomic localisation of osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions in 3D imaging. We present a clinical case of a patient referred for evaluation of chronic lower back pain with no history of trauma, spinal surgery, or cancer. Planar whole-body scan showed heterogeneous tracer uptake in the lumbar spine with intense localisation to the right lateral aspect of L3. Integrated SPECT/CT of the lumbar spine detected active bone metabolism in the right L3/L4 facet joint in the presence of minimal signs of degenerative osteoarthrosis on CT images, while a segment demonstrating more gross degenerative changes was more quiescent with only mild tracer uptake. The usefulness of integrated SPECT/CT for anatomical and functional assessment of back pain opens promising opportunities both for multi-disciplinary clinical assessment and treatment for manual therapists and for research into the effectiveness of manual therapies. PMID:21247412

  19. EM-IntraSPECT algorithm with ordered subsets (OSEMIS) for nonuniform attenuation correction in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Echeruo, Ifeanyi; Solgado, Roberto B.; Hardikar, Amol S.; Bowsher, James E.; Feiglin, David H.; Thomas, Frank D.; Lipson, Edward; Coman, Ioana L.

    2002-05-01

    Performance of the EM-IntraSPECT (EMIS) algorithm with ordered subsets (OSEMIS) for non-uniform attenuation correction in the chest was assessed. EMIS is a maximum- likelihood expectation maximization(MLEM) algorithm for simultaneously estimating SPECT emission and attenuation parameters from emission data alone. EMIS uses the activity within the patient as transmission tomography sources, with which attenuation coefficients can be estimated. However, the reconstruction time is long. The new algorithm, OSEMIS, is a modified EMIS algorithm based on ordered subsets. Emission Tc-99m SPECT data were acquired over 360 degree(s) in non-circular orbit from a physical chest phantom using clinical protocol. Both a normal and a defect heart were considered. OSEMIS was evaluated in comparison to EMIS and a conventional MLEM with a fixed uniform attenuation map. Wide ranges of image measures were evaluated, including noise, log-likelihood, and region quantification. Uniformity was assessed from bull's eye plots of the reconstructed images. For the appropriate subset size, OSEMIS yielded essentially the same images as EMIS and better than MLEM, but required only one-tenth as many iterations. Consequently, adequate images were available in about fifteen iterations.

  20. Improved Pose Measurement and Tracking System for Motion Correction of Awake, Unrestrained Small Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Weisenberger, A G; Smith, M F

    2007-01-01

    An improved optical landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system has been developed to provide 3D animal pose data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained laboratory animals. The six degree of freedom animal position and orientation measurement data are time synchronized with the SPECT list mode data to provide for motion correction after the scan and before reconstruction. The tracking system employs infrared (IR) markers placed on the animal's head along with synchronized, strobed IR LEDs to illuminate the reflectors and freeze motion while minimizing reflections. A new design trinocular stereo image acquisition system using IEEE 1394 CMOS cameras acquires images of the animal with markers contained within a transparent enclosure. The trinocular configuration provides improved accuracy, range of motion, and robustness over the binocular stereo used previously. Enhanced software detects obstructions, automatically segments the markers, rejects reflections, performs marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal's head using image data from three cameras. The new hardware design provides more compact camera positioning with enhanced animal viewing through the 360 degree SPECT scan. This system has been implemented on a commercial scanner and tested using live mice and has been shown to be more reliable with higher accuracy than the previous system. Experimental results showing the improved motion tracking results are given.

  1. Investigation of Metastatic Breast Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression Using Dual Optical/SPECT Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    tumors in the lungs or other internal organs. Figures 3c and 3d show images obtained first in air and then in gel, with the fiber displaced 10 mm from the...the mouse lungs and viscera, and characterize the advantages of this method for quantitative imaging. We have also demonstrated micro-SPECT imaging of...resolution, high-throughput screening. 3. Prototype Recently, a prototype system using CR image plates for co-registered 1-125 planar scintigraphy and x

  2. Differential diagnosis of bilateral parietal abnormalities in I-123 IMP SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Y.; Ichiya, Y.; Otsuka, M.; Tahara, T.; Fukumura, T.; Gunasekera, R.; Masuda, K. )

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the clinical significance of bilateral parietal abnormalities on I-123 IMP SPECT imaging in 158 patients with cerebral disorders. This pattern was seen in 15 out of 21 patients with Alzheimer's disease; it was also seen in 4 out of 5 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, in 3 out of 17 patients with vascular dementia, in 1 out of 36 patients with cerebral infarction without dementia, in 1 out of 2 patients with hypoglycemia, and in 1 out of 2 patients with CO intoxication. Detection of bilateral parietal abnormalities is a useful finding in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, but one should keep in mind that other cerebral disorders may also show a similar pattern with I-123 IMP SPECT imaging.

  3. Design and evaluation of a mobile bedside PET/SPECT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenski, Matthew Thomas

    Patients confined to an intensive care unit, the emergency room, or a surgical suite are managed without nuclear medicine procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These studies have diagnostic value which can greatly benefit the physician's treatment of the patient but require that the patient is moved to a scanner. This dissertation examines the feasibility of an economical PET/SPECT system that can be brought to the bedside of an immobile patient for imaging. We chose to focus on cardiac SPECT imaging including perfusion imaging using 99mTc tracers and viability imaging using 18F tracers first because of problems arising from positioning a detector beneath a patient's bed, a requirement for the opposed detector orientation in PET imaging. Second, SPECT imaging acquiring over the anterior 180 degrees of the patient results in reduced attenuation effects due to the heart's location in the anterior portion of the body. Four studies were done to assess the clinical feasibility of the mobile system; 1) the performance of the system was evaluated in SPECT mode at both 140 keV (99mTc tracers) and 511 keV (positron emitting tracers), 2) a dynamic cardiac phantom was used to develop and test image acquisition and processing methods for the system at both energies, 3) a high energy pinhole collimator was designed to reduce the effects of high energy photon penetration through the parallel hole collimator, and 4) we estimated the radiation dose to persons that would be in the vicinity of a patient to ensure that the effective dose is below the regulatory limit. With these studies, we show that the mobile system provides an economical means of bringing nuclear medicine to an immobile patient while staying below the regulatory dose limit to other persons. The system performed well at both 140 keV and 511 keV and provided viable images of a phantom myocardium at both energies. The system does not achieve the

  4. Comparison of I-123 MIBG planar imaging and SPECT for the detection of decreased heart uptake in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Song, In-Uk; Kim, Joong-Seok; Chung, Yong-An

    2015-10-01

    Decreased myocardial uptake of I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an important finding for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study compared I-123 MIBG SPECT and planar imaging with regard to their diagnostic yield for PD. 52 clinically diagnosed PD patients who also had decreased striatal uptake on FP-CIT PET/CT were enrolled. 16 normal controls were also included. All underwent cardiac MIBG planar scintigraphy and SPECT separately. Myocardial I-123 MIBG uptake was interpreted on planar and SPECT/CT images separately by visual and quantitative analysis. The final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. Kappa analyses were performed to determine inter-observer agreement for both methods. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared with McNemar's test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 84.6, 100, and 88.2% for planar images and 96.2, 100 and 97.1% for SPECT, respectively, with a significant difference between the two imaging methods (p < 0.031). All inter-observer agreements were almost perfect (planar scintigraphy: κ = 0.82; SPECT: κ = 0.93). Heart-to-mediastinum ratios from PD patients with negative planar and positive SPECT scans (group A) and patients with positive planar and positive SPECT scans (group B) were 1.69 ± 0.16 (1.59-1.85) and 1.41 ± 0.15 (1.20-1.53), respectively, and showed significant difference (p = 0.023). Lung-to-mediastinum ratios for groups A and B were 2.16 ± 0.20 (1.96-2.37) and 1.6 ± 0.19 (1.3-1.78), respectively, and were significantly higher in the former (p = 0.001). I-123 MIBG SPECT has a significantly higher diagnostic performance for PD than planar images. Increased lung uptake may cause false-negative results on planar imaging.

  5. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  6. Nickel-mediated radioiodination of aryl and heteroaryl bromides: rapid synthesis of tracers for SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Cant, Alastair A; Champion, Sue; Bhalla, Rajiv; Pimlott, Sally L; Sutherland, Andrew

    2013-07-22

    Rapid and efficient radioiodination of aryl and heteroaryl bromides has been achieved using a nickel(0)-mediated halogen-exchange reaction. This transformation gives direct access to [(123)I]- and [(125)I]-imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), such as 5-[(123)I]-A85380 (see scheme, Boc = tert-butyloxycarbonyl, cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, TFA = trifluoroacetic acid). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Recent advances in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    1998-08-28

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a medical imaging modality that combines conventional nuclear medicine imaging technique and methods of computed tomography (CT). From images that represent the biodistribution of the injected radiopharmaceutical in the patient, SPECT provides functional information that is unique. The first SPECT system was developed in the sixties. However, early progress of SPECT was hampered by the lack of adequate image reconstruction methods. The development of x-ray CT and image reconstruction methods in the seventies spurred a renewed interest in SPECT. In 1981, the first commercial SPECT system based on a single rotating camera was available for clinical use. Today, most modern SPECT systems consist of multiple cameras that rotate around the patients. They have better spatial resolution and higher detection efficiency as compared to the earlier single camera systems. Recently, a new generation of dual camera systems allowing for coincidence imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals has emerged in the commercial market. Additionally, new quantitative image reconstruction methods are under development. They compensate for image degrading factors including attenuation, collimator-detector blurring and scatter. Also, they result in SPECT images with improved image quality and more accurately represent the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution in the patient. Such advances in radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation, image reconstruction, compensation methods, and clinical applications have fueled a steady growth of SPECT as an important diagnostic tool in patient management.

  8. Discrete Bimodal Probes for Thrombus Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Ciesienski, Kate L.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Loving, Galen S.; Caravan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a generalizable solid/solution phase strategy for the synthesis of discrete bimodal fibrin-targeted imaging probes. A fibrin-specific peptide was conjugated with two distinct imaging reporters at the C- and N-terminus. In vitro studies demonstrated retention of fibrin affinity and specificity. Imaging studies showed that these probes could detect fibrin over a wide range of probe concentrations by optical, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:22698259

  9. A study on the change in image quality before and after an attenuation correction with the use of a CT image in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Kim, Woo-Hyun; Shim, Dong-Oh; Kim, Ho-Sung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) images before and after applying an attenuation correction by using the CT (computed tomography) image in a SPECT/CT scan and examined depending of the change in image quality on the CT dose. A flangeless Esser PET (positron emission tomography) Phantom was used to evaluate the image quality for the Precedence 16 SPECT/CT system manufactured by Philips. The experimental method was to obtain a SPECT image and a CT image of a flangeless Esser PET Phantom to acquire an attenuation-corrected SPECT image. A ROI (region of interest) was then set up at a hot spot of the acquired image to measure the SNR (signal to noise ratio) and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) and to compare the image quality with that of an unattenuation-corrected SPECT image. To evaluate the quality of a SPECT image, we set the ROI as a cylinder diameter (25, 16, 12, and 8 mm) and the BKG (background) radioactivity of the phantom images was obtained when each CT condition was changed. Subsequently, the counts were compared to measure the SNR. The FWHM of the smallest cylinder (8 mm) was measured to compare the image quality. A comparison of the SPECT images with and without attenuation correction revealed 5.01-fold, 4.77 fold, 4.43-fold, 4.38-fold, and 5.13-fold differences in SNR for the 25-mm cylinder, 16-mm cylinder, 12-mm cylinder, 8-mm cylinder, and BKG, respectively. In the phantom image obtained when the CT dose was changed, the FWHM of the 8-mm cylinder showed almost no difference under each condition regardless of the changes in kVp and mAs.

  10. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  11. Differential diagnosis of regional cerebral hyperfixation of TC-99m HMPAO on SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, P.; Konopka, L.; Crayton, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate diagnostic evaluation of patients with neurologic and neuropsychiatric disease is important because early treatment may halt disease progression and prevent impairment or disability. Cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO has been ascribed to luxury perfusion following ischemic infarction. The present study sought to identify other conditions that also display radiotracer hyperfixation in order to develop a differential diagnosis of this finding on SPECT imaging. Two hundred fifty (n=250) successive cerebral SPECT images were reviewed for evidence of HMPAO hyperfixation. Hyperfixation was defined as enhanced focal perfusion surrounded by a zone of diminished or normal cerebral perfusion. All patients were scanned after intravenous injection of 25 mCi Tc-99m HMPAO. Volume-rendered and oblique images were obtained with a Trionix triple-head SPECT system using ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Thirteen (13/250; 5%) of the patients exhibited regions of HMPAO hyperfixation. CT or MRI abnormalities were detected in 6/13 cases. Clinical diagnoses in these patients included intractable psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and narcotic dependence, major depression, acute closed-head trauma, hypothyroidism, as well as subacute ischemic infarction. A wide variety of conditions may be associated with cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO. These conditions include neurologic and psychiatric diagnoses, and extend the consideration of hyperfixation beyond ischemic infarction. Consequently, a differential diagnosis of HMPAO hyperfixation may be broader than originally considered, and this may suggest a fundamental role for local cerebral hyperperfusion. Elucidation of the fundamental mechanism(s) for cerebral hyperperfusion requires further investigation.

  12. Radionuclide (131)I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Zhao, Lingzhou; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-11-21

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive (131)I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5·NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and labeling of radioactive iodine-131 ((131)I). The generated multifunctional (131)I-G5·NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers were characterized via different methods. We show that prior to (131)I labeling, the G5·NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers conjugated with approximately 9.4 HPAO moieties per dendrimer are noncytotoxic at a concentration up to 20 μM and are able to target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors (FAR), thanks to the modified FA ligands. In the presence of a phenol group, radioactive (131)I is able to be efficiently labeled onto the dendrimer platform with good stability and high radiochemical purity, and render the platform with an ability for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an FAR-overexpressing xenografted tumor model in vivo. The designed strategy to use the facile dendrimer nanotechnology may be extended to develop various radioactive theranostic nanoplatforms for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of different types of cancer.

  13. Comparison of Tc-99m pertechnetate images with dual-phase Tc 99m MIBI and SPECT images in primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Sait; Shafipour, Hojjat; Asa, Sertac; Yılmaz, Sabire; Teksöz, Serkan; Önsel, Çetin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of Tc-99m pertechnetate planar, dual-phase MIBI and MIBI-SPECT images in the determination and localization of parathyroid lesions. Materials and Methods: In this study, 38 patients who underwent operation for primary hyperparathyroidism were included. Tc-99m pertechnetate planar-pinhole imaging of the neck and then MIBI planar and SPECT images in supine position was performed. Late SPECT images were acquired 120 minutes after the injection. Early and late MIBI images were quantitatively evaluated. Results: Of the 38 patients, 30 of them had adenoma, 2 patients had hyperplasia and 6 of them were normal on planar images. Thirty-four of 38 patients were positive on SPECT images. SPECT images of the patients with positive results were matched with pathology results. Conclusion: As a result, Tc-99m pertechnetate planar-pinhole, Tc-99m MIBI planar and SPECT images are useful for localization of parathyroid lesions especially in multinodular thyroid gland. However, US or CT images are necessary for more accurate localization and Tc-99m pertechnetate images are useful for interpreting and comparing with the early and late MIBI images. PMID:25143912

  14. Comparison of Tc-99m pertechnetate images with dual-phase Tc 99m MIBI and SPECT images in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Shafipour, Hojjat; Asa, Sertac; Yılmaz, Sabire; Teksöz, Serkan; Onsel, Cetin

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of Tc-99m pertechnetate planar, dual-phase MIBI and MIBI-SPECT images in the determination and localization of parathyroid lesions. In this study, 38 patients who underwent operation for primary hyperparathyroidism were included. Tc-99m pertechnetate planar-pinhole imaging of the neck and then MIBI planar and SPECT images in supine position was performed. Late SPECT images were acquired 120 minutes after the injection. Early and late MIBI images were quantitatively evaluated. Of the 38 patients, 30 of them had adenoma, 2 patients had hyperplasia and 6 of them were normal on planar images. Thirty-four of 38 patients were positive on SPECT images. SPECT images of the patients with positive results were matched with pathology results. As a result, Tc-99m pertechnetate planar-pinhole, Tc-99m MIBI planar and SPECT images are useful for localization of parathyroid lesions especially in multinodular thyroid gland. However, US or CT images are necessary for more accurate localization and Tc-99m pertechnetate images are useful for interpreting and comparing with the early and late MIBI images.

  15. Segmentation of acute pyelonephritis area on kidney SPECT images using binary shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Hsiang; Sun, Yung-Nien; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    1999-05-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is a serious disease in children that may result in irreversible renal scarring. The ability to localize the site of urinary tract infection and the extent of acute pyelonephritis has considerable clinical importance. In this paper, we are devoted to segment the acute pyelonephritis area from kidney SPECT images. A two-step algorithm is proposed. First, the original images are translated into binary versions by automatic thresholding. Then the acute pyelonephritis areas are located by finding convex deficiencies in the obtained binary images. This work gives important diagnosis information for physicians and improves the quality of medical care for children acute pyelonephritis disease.

  16. Principles of nuclear medicine imaging: planar, SPECT, PET, multi-modality, and autoradiography systems.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat

    2012-04-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear medicine imaging involve the use of unsealed sources of radioactivity in the form of radiopharmaceuticals. The ionizing radiations that accompany the decay of the administered radioactivity can be quantitatively detected, measured, and imaged in vivo with instruments such as gamma cameras. This paper reviews the design and operating principles, as well as the capabilities and limitations, of instruments used clinically and preclinically for in vivo radionuclide imaging. These include gamma cameras, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners, and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The technical basis of autoradiography is reviewed as well.

  17. Comparison of 360 degrees and 180 degrees data collection in SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Knesaurek, K

    1987-11-01

    The problem of using 360 degrees or 180 degrees data sampling techniques in transaxial SPECT imaging is still to be solved. A theoretical point source study for an ideal response detector has shown, for objects which are close enough to the origin of the reconstructed area, that there are significant differences between sections obtained by different sampling methods. A computer simulation study of line sources in a homogeneous attenuated medium has confirmed the results of clinical studies in which significant image distortion has been observed in 180 degrees sections but not in 360 degrees reconstructed images.

  18. Radiolabeled cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD)-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shengming; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Hong, Ruoyu; Chen, Qing; Dong, Jiajia; Chen, Yinyiin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yiwei

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) modified with a novel cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide were made and radiolabeled as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer. The probe was tested both in vitro and in vivo to determine its receptor targeting efficacy and feasibility for SPECT and MRI. The radiochemical syntheses of 125I-cRGD-USPIO were accomplished with a radiochemical purity of 96.05 ± 0.33 %. High radiochemical stability was found in fresh human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline. The average hydrodynamic size of 125I-cRGD-USPIO determined by dynamic light scattering was 51.3 nm. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the radiolabeled nanoparticles to tumor cells. Preliminary biodistribution studies of 125I-radiolabeled cRGD-USPIO in Bcap37-bearing nude mice showed that it had long circulation half-life, high tumor uptake, and high initial blood retention with moderate liver uptake. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the radiolabeled nanoparticles in mice model were visualized by SPECT and MRI collected at different time points. Our results strongly indicated that the 125I-cRGD-USPIO could be used as a promising bifunctional radiotracer for early clinical tumor detection with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution by SPECT and MRI.

  19. SPECT Imaging of 2-D and 3-D Distributed Sources with Near-Field Coded Aperture Collimation: Computer Simulation and Real Data Validation.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhiping; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    The imaging of distributed sources with near-field coded aperture (CA) remains extremely challenging and is broadly considered unsuitable for single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). This study proposes a novel CA SPECT reconstruction approach and evaluates the feasibilities of imaging and reconstructing distributed hot sources and cold lesions using near-field CA collimation and iterative image reconstruction. Computer simulations were designed to compare CA and pinhole collimations in two-dimensional radionuclide imaging. Digital phantoms were created and CA images of the phantoms were reconstructed using maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM). Errors and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated and image resolution was evaluated. An ex vivo rat heart with myocardial infarction was imaged using a micro-SPECT system equipped with a custom-made CA module and a commercial 5-pinhole collimator. Rat CA images were reconstructed via the three-dimensional (3-D) MLEM algorithm developed for CA SPECT with and without correction for a large projection angle, and 5-pinhole images were reconstructed using the commercial software provided by the SPECT system. Phantom images of CA were markedly improved in terms of image quality, quantitative root-mean-squared error, and CNR, as compared to pinhole images. CA and pinhole images yielded similar image resolution, while CA collimation resulted in fewer noise artifacts. CA and pinhole images of the rat heart were well reconstructed and the myocardial perfusion defects could be clearly discerned from 3-D CA and 5-pinhole SPECT images, whereas 5-pinhole SPECT images suffered from severe noise artifacts. Image contrast of CA SPECT was further improved after correction for the large projection angle used in the rat heart imaging. The computer simulations and small-animal imaging study presented herein indicate that the proposed 3-D CA SPECT imaging and reconstruction approaches worked reasonably

  20. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-04-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus.

  1. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  2. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus. PMID:20068582

  3. Dual head HIPDM SPECT imaging in the differential diagnosis of dementia with MR and CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, H.N.; Gilmor, R.; Hendrie, H.; Mock, B.; Kapuscinski, A.; Appledorn, C.R.; Krepshaw, J.

    1985-05-01

    Dual head SPECT brain imaging was performed in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia approximately one-half hour after a 5mCi dose of high purity (p,5n) I-123 HIPDM (N,N,N'-Trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)- 1,3-propane diamine). Tomographic reconstruction used a 30th order, moderate cutoff (0.2) Butterworth filter found previously to optimize low noise and conspicuity. Most patients had CT and MR imaging and some patients were studied more than once. In approximately one-half of patients referred with a diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type, SPECT results were consistent with multiple infarct dementia (MID). MR studies in most of these patients with MID demonstrated multiple white matter defects correlating with multiple gray matter defects seen with SPECT and consistent with angiogenic disease of the Binswanger's type. While CT demonstrated cortical abnormalities in some patients, the findings were often nonspecific with enlarged ventricles and widened sulci.

  4. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  5. Attenuation correction in SPECT images using attenuation map estimation with its emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Meysam; Naji, Maryam; Abdollahi, Ali; Kalantari, Faraz

    2017-03-01

    Photon attenuation during SPECT imaging significantly degrades the diagnostic outcome and the quantitative accuracy of final reconstructed images. It is well known that attenuation correction can be done by using iterative reconstruction methods if we access to attenuation map. Two methods have been used to calculate the attenuation map: transmission-based and transmissionless techniques. In this phantom study, we evaluated the importance of attenuation correction by quantitative evaluation of errors associated with each method. For transmissionless approach, the attenuation map was estimated from the emission data only. An EM algorithm with attenuation model was developed and used for attenuation correction during image reconstruction. Finally, a comparison was done between reconstructed images using our OSEM code and analytical FBP method before and after attenuation correction. The results of measurements showed that: our programs are capable to reconstruct SPECT images and correct the attenuation effects. Moreover, to evaluate reconstructed image quality before and after attenuation correction we applied a novel approach using Image Quality Index. Attenuation correction increases the quality and quantitative accuracy in both methods. This increase is independent of activity in quantity factor and decreases with activity in quality factor. In EM algorithm, it is necessary to use regularization to obtain true distribution of attenuation coefficients.

  6. Predictors of high-risk coronary artery disease in subjects with normal SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Rine; Gransar, Heidi; Slomka, Piotr; Arsanjani, Reza; Shalev, Aryeh; Otaki, Yuka; Friedman, John D; Hayes, Sean W; Thomson, Louise E B; Fish, Mathews; Germano, Guido; Abidov, Aiden; Shaw, Leslee; Rozanski, Alan; Berman, Daniel S

    2016-06-01

    While uncommon, normal stress SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can be seen in patients with high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD) by invasive coronary angiography (ICA).The predictors of high-risk CAD in patients with normal SPECT-MPI have not been described. We studied 580 patients (age 64 ± 12 years, 49% men) without known CAD who underwent stress-gated SPECT-MPI [exercise (41%) or vasodilator (59%)] <2 months before ICA and had summed stress score (SSS) <4. High-risk CAD was defined as 3 vessels with ≥70% stenosis, 2 vessels with ≥70% stenosis including proximal left anterior descending, or left main with ≥50% stenosis. Obstructive non-high-risk CAD was defined by the presence of a ≥70% stenosis but without having other high-risk criteria. Tenfold cross-validated receiver operating characteristic (ROC) estimates were obtained to assess the predictors of high-risk CAD. Forty-two subjects (7.2%) had high-risk CAD and 168 (29.0%) had obstructive non-high-risk CAD. Variables associated with high-risk CAD were pretest probability of CAD ≥66% (Odds ratio [OR] 3.63, 95% CI 1.6-8.3, P = .002), SSS > 0 (OR 7.46, 95% CI 2.6-21.1, P < 0.001), and abnormal TID (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.0-4.5, P = 0.044). When substituted for TID, EF change was also predictive of high-risk CAD (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.9-1.0, P = 0.023). The prevalence of high-risk CAD increased as the number of these predictors increased. In a sub-analysis of patients in whom quantitative total perfusion deficit (TPD) was available, TPD > 0 was also a predictor of high-risk CAD (OR 6.01, 95% CI 1.5-22.2, P = 0.011). Several clinical, stress, and SPECT-MPI findings are associated high-risk CAD among patients with normal SPECT-MPI. Consideration of these factors may improve the overall assessment of the likelihood of high-risk CAD in patients undergoing stress SPECT-MPI.

  7. First imaging result with an ultrahigh resolution stationary MR compatible SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Cai, L.; Shen, Z. M.; Zhang, J. C.; Chen, C. T.; Meng, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will present the design and preliminary performance of an ultrahigh resolution stationary MR compatible SPECT (MRC-SPECT) system that is developed in our lab. The MRC-SPECT system is based on the second-generation energy-resolved photon-counting (ERPC) CdTe detectors and there are several key features associated with this system. Firstly, up to a total of twenty ERPC detectors will be assembled as a very compact ring, which provides an adequate angular sampling capability and a relatively high detection efficiency. The detectors are supported on a gantry made of high strength polyamide structure constructed using 3-D printing. This compact system can be directly operated inside an MR scanner. The detector module used in this system offers an intrinsic resolution of 350μm and an excellent energy resolution of around 3~4kev. Each ERPC detector module consists of four pixelated CdTe detectors with a total dimension of 4.5cm×2.25cm. Secondly, a die-cast platinum pinhole inserts and cast lead apertures are developed for this stationary SPECT system. Four 300/500μm diameter pinholes are used for each detector and all pinholes are mounted around a casted cylinder lead aperture tube. The inner diameter of the lead aperture tube is 6cm and the lead tube thickness is 16mm. The opposite detectors are placed 15.6cm apart and the magnification factor of this SPECT system is about 1.2. Thirdly, a comprehensive charge collection model inside strong magnetic field has been developed to account for the magnetic field induced distortion in the SPECT image. This model can accurately predict the detector’s energy and spatial response to gamma ray incident events and then help to compensate for the event position recording error due to the strong magnetic field. In this development, we have made an effort to minimize the amount of magnetic materials in the system to alleviate potential interference to magnetic field inhomogeneity. PMID:26692275

  8. Multimodal formyl peptide receptor 1 targeted inflammation imaging probe: cFLFLF-MHI-DOTA.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Chordia, Mahendra D; Wu, Hua; Shao, Li; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) targeting multimodal probe cFLFLFK-MHI-DOTA for leukocyte based inflammation imaging is described. The compound consists of three domains, (a) cFLFLF peptide for FPR1 recognition and binding for activated leukocyte, (b) heptamethine cyanine dye (MHI) for near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) detection and imaging, and (c) metal chelator DOTA ligand that could form complex with a radiometal for nuclear (PET/SPECT) imaging or with a paramagnetic metal for MRI imaging. Detailed synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation are reported. The availability of dual mode inflammation imaging probe would allow in vivo gross level imaging of inflammation foci as well as ex vivo microscopic level cellular imaging for role played by innate immune cells in inflamed tissue. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Simulation of realistic abnormal SPECT brain perfusion images: application in semi-quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T.; Fleming, J. S.; Hoffmann, S. M. A.; Kemp, P. M.

    2005-11-01

    Simulation is useful in the validation of functional image analysis methods, particularly when considering the number of analysis techniques currently available lacking thorough validation. Problems exist with current simulation methods due to long run times or unrealistic results making it problematic to generate complete datasets. A method is presented for simulating known abnormalities within normal brain SPECT images using a measured point spread function (PSF), and incorporating a stereotactic atlas of the brain for anatomical positioning. This allows for the simulation of realistic images through the use of prior information regarding disease progression. SPECT images of cerebral perfusion have been generated consisting of a control database and a group of simulated abnormal subjects that are to be used in a UK audit of analysis methods. The abnormality is defined in the stereotactic space, then transformed to the individual subject space, convolved with a measured PSF and removed from the normal subject image. The dataset was analysed using SPM99 (Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College, London) and the MarsBaR volume of interest (VOI) analysis toolbox. The results were evaluated by comparison with the known ground truth. The analysis showed improvement when using a smoothing kernel equal to system resolution over the slightly larger kernel used routinely. Significant correlation was found between effective volume of a simulated abnormality and the detected size using SPM99. Improvements in VOI analysis sensitivity were found when using the region median over the region mean. The method and dataset provide an efficient methodology for use in the comparison and cross validation of semi-quantitative analysis methods in brain SPECT, and allow the optimization of analysis parameters.

  10. Accelerated 3D-OSEM image reconstruction using a Beowulf PC cluster for pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Sohlberg, Antti; Iida, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    A conventional pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a single circular orbit has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. Recently, we demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) images with uniform spatial resolution and no blurring can be obtained by complete data acquired using two-circular orbit, combined with the 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction method. However, a long computation time is required to obtain the reconstruction image, because of the fact that 3D-OSEM is an iterative method and two-orbit acquisition doubles the size of the projection data. To reduce the long reconstruction time, we parallelized the two-orbit pinhole 3D-OSEM reconstruction process by using a Beowulf personal computer (PC) cluster. The Beowulf PC cluster consists of seven PCs connected to Gbit Ethernet switches. Message passing interface protocol was utilized for parallelizing the reconstruction process. The projection data in a subset are distributed to each PC. The partial image forward- and back-projected in each PC is transferred to all PCs. The current image estimate on each PC is updated after summing the partial images. The performance of parallelization on the PC cluster was evaluated using two independent projection data sets acquired by a pinhole SPECT system with two different circular orbits. Parallelization using the PC cluster improved the reconstruction time with increasing number of PCs. The reconstruction time of 54 min by the single PC was decreased to 10 min when six or seven PCs were used. The speed-up factor was 5.4. The reconstruction image by the PC cluster was virtually identical with that by the single PC. Parallelization of 3D-OSEM reconstruction for pinhole SPECT using the PC cluster can significantly reduce the computation time, whereas its implementation is simple and inexpensive.

  11. Advances in CNS Imaging Agents: Focus on PET and SPECT Tracers in Experimental and Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    George, Noble; Gean, Emily G; Nandi, Ayon; Frolov, Boris; Zaidi, Eram; Lee, Ho; Brašić, James R; Wong, Dean F

    2015-04-01

    The physiological functioning of the brain is not well-known in current day medicine and the pathologies of many neuropsychiatric disorders are still not yet fully understood. With our aging population and better life expectancies, it has become imperative to find better biomarkers for disease progression as well as receptor target engagements. In the last decade, these major advances in the field of molecular CNS imaging have been made available with tools such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and neuroreceptor-targeted positron emission tomography (PET). These tools have given researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and clinical physicians a better method of understanding CNS dysfunctions, and the ability to employ improved therapeutic agents. This review is intended to provide an update on brain imaging agents that are currently used in clinical and translational research toward treatment of CNS disorders. The review begins with amyloid and tau imaging, the former of which has at least three [(18)F] agents that have been recently approved and will soon be available for clinical use for specific indications in the USA and elsewhere. Other prevalent PET and SPECT neurotransmitter system agents, including those newly US FDA-approved imaging agents related to the dopaminergic system, are included. A review of both mature and potentially growing PET imaging agents, including those targeting serotonin and opiate receptor systems, is also provided.

  12. A non-rigid registration method for serial lower extremity hybrid SPECT/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung W.; Scheinost, Dustin; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2010-01-01

    Small animal X-ray computed tomographic (microCT) imaging of the lower extremities permits evaluation of arterial growth in models of hindlimb ischemia, and when applied serially can provide quantitative information about disease progression and aid in the evaluation of therapeutic interventions. The quantification of changes in tissue perfusion and concentration of molecular markers concurrently obtained using nuclear imaging requires the ability to non-rigidly register the microCT images over time, a task made more challenging by the potentially large changes in the positions of the legs due to articulation. While non-rigid registration methods have been extensively used in the evaluation of individual organs, application in whole body imaging has been limited, primarily because the scale of possible displacements and deformations is large resulting in poor convergence of most methods. In this paper we present a new method based on the extended demons algorithm that uses a level-set representation of the body contour and skeletal structure as an input. The proposed serial registration method reflects the natural physical moving combination of mouse anatomy in which the movement of bones is the framework for body movements, and the movement of skin constrains the detailed movements of the specific segmented body regions. We applied our method to both the registration of serial microCT mouse images and the quantification of microSPECT component of the serially hybrid microCT-SPECT images demonstrating improved performance as compared to existing registration techniques. PMID:20869902

  13. SPECT imaging for brain improvement quantification in a patient with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Bardes, Ignasi; Jacas, Carlos; Jubany, Lluis; Lorenzo-Bosquet, Carles; Cuberas-Borrós, Gemma; Vilardell-Tarres, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations of the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene (CYP27), which leads to reduced synthesis of bile acids, particularly chenodeoxycholic acid (Cali et al, J Biol Chem. 1991;266:7779-7783; Gallus et al, Neurol Sci. 2006;27:143-149). The disease is characterized by progressive neurologic dysfunction due to accumulation of cholestanol in neurologic tissues (Moghadasian et al, Arch Neurol. 2002;59:527-529; Selva-O'Callaghan et al, Rheumatology. 2007;46:1212-1213). Long-term treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid can arrest or even reverse progression of the disease (Pierre et al, J Inherit Metab Dis. In press).Brain SPECT with 740 MBq of Tc-99m ethyl cysteinate dimmer, using a double-head gamma camera (Siemens E.cam) with high-resolution, low-energy parallel collimators was performed in our patient at onset and 2 years after starting chenodeoxycholic acid treatment. SPECT acquisitions were performed using a 360-degree orbit, 1 image/30 seg/3 degree, and 128 × 128 matrix. Reconstruction was by means of filtered back-projection, Butterworth 5/0.25, without attenuation correction. Pre- and post-SPECT dicom images were reoriented into Talairach space using NeuroGam (Segami Corporation). To visually identify abnormal perfusion regions, volume render brain image was computed, where abnormal perfusion regions were found by comparing with age-matched normal database, and Brodmann areas (BA) were quantified. Pre- versus post-treatment changes were computed by means of relative percentage between counts. Post-treatment SPECT showed better perfusion than pretreatment SPECT with an increase between 5% and 10% in frontal cortex (BA 9, BA 24, BA 32, BA 46, BA 47), parietal cortex (BA 5, BA 31), and temporal cortex (BA 20, BA 22, BA 28, BA 36, BA 37, BA 38), and with an increase of more than 10% in frontal cortex (BA 45) and parietal cortex (BA 23). This case illustrates the benefit of bile acid therapy for

  14. Clinical application of 3D arterial spin-labeled brain perfusion imaging for Alzheimer disease: comparison with brain perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Ishii, K; Hosokawa, C; Hyodo, T; Kashiwagi, N; Matsuki, M; Ashikaga, R; Murakami, T

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder with dementia, and a practical and economic biomarker for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is needed. Three-dimensional arterial spin-labeling, with its high signal-to-noise ratio, enables measurement of cerebral blood flow precisely without any extrinsic tracers. We evaluated the performance of 3D arterial spin-labeling compared with SPECT, and demonstrated the 3D arterial spin-labeled imaging characteristics in the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. This study included 68 patients with clinically suspected Alzheimer disease who underwent both 3D arterial spin-labeling and SPECT imaging. Two readers independently assessed both images. Kendall W coefficients of concordance (K) were computed, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed for each reader. The differences between the images in regional perfusion distribution were evaluated by means of statistical parametric mapping, and the incidence of hypoperfusion of the cerebral watershed area, referred to as "borderzone sign" in the 3D arterial spin-labeled images, was determined. Readers showed K = 0.82/0.73 for SPECT/3D arterial spin-labeled imaging, and the respective areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.82/0.69 for reader 1 and 0.80/0.69 for reader 2. Statistical parametric mapping showed that the perisylvian and medial parieto-occipital perfusion in the arterial spin-labeled images was significantly higher than that in the SPECT images. Borderzone sign was observed on 3D arterial spin-labeling in 70% of patients misdiagnosed with Alzheimer disease. The diagnostic performance of 3D arterial spin-labeling and SPECT for Alzheimer disease was almost equivalent. Three-dimensional arterial spin-labeled imaging was more influenced by hemodynamic factors than was SPECT imaging. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Further capacitive imaging experiments using modified probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaokang; Li, Zhen; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, capacitive imaging (CI) is growing in popularity within the NDE communities, as it has the potential to test materials and structures for defects that are not easily tested by other techniques. In previous work, The CI technique has been successfully used on a various types of materials, including concrete, glass/carbon fibre composite, steel, etc. In such CI experiments, the probes are normally with symmetric or concentric electrodes etched onto PCBs. In addition to these conventional coplanar PCB probes, modified geometries can be made and they can lead to different applications. A brief overview of these modified probes, including high resolution surface imaging probe, combined CI/eddy current probe, and CI probe using an oscilloscope probe as the sensing electrode, is presented in this work. The potential applications brought by these probes are also discussed.

  16. A collimator optimization method for quantitative imaging: application to Y-90 bremsstrahlung SPECT.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xing; Frey, Eric C

    2013-08-01

    Post-therapy quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has shown great potential to provide reliable activity estimates, which are essential for dose verification. Typically 90Y imaging is performed with high- or medium-energy collimators. However, the energy spectrum of 90Y bremsstrahlung photons is substantially different than typical for these collimators. In addition, dosimetry requires quantitative images, and collimators are not typically optimized for such tasks. Optimizing a collimator for 90Y imaging is both novel and potentially important. Conventional optimization methods are not appropriate for 90Y bremsstrahlung photons, which have a continuous and broad energy distribution. In this work, the authors developed a parallel-hole collimator optimization method for quantitative tasks that is particularly applicable to radionuclides with complex emission energy spectra. The authors applied the proposed method to develop an optimal collimator for quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT in the context of microsphere radioembolization. To account for the effects of the collimator on both the bias and the variance of the activity estimates, the authors used the root mean squared error (RMSE) of the volume of interest activity estimates as the figure of merit (FOM). In the FOM, the bias due to the null space of the image formation process was taken in account. The RMSE was weighted by the inverse mass to reflect the application to dosimetry; for a different application, more relevant weighting could easily be adopted. The authors proposed a parameterization for the collimator that facilitates the incorporation of the important factors (geometric sensitivity, geometric resolution, and septal penetration fraction) determining collimator performance, while keeping the number of free parameters describing the collimator small (i.e., two parameters). To make the optimization results for quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT more

  17. Reliability evaluation of I-123 ADAM SPECT imaging using SPM software and AAL ROI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Sung-Yi; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Su, Tung-Ping; Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Chen, Chia-Chieh; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    The level of serotonin was regulated by serotonin transporter (SERT), which is a decisive protein in regulation of serotonin neurotransmission system. Many psychiatric disorders and therapies were also related to concentration of cerebral serotonin. I-123 ADAM was the novel radiopharmaceutical to image SERT in brain. The aim of this study was to measure reliability of SERT densities of healthy volunteers by automated anatomical labeling (AAL) method. Furthermore, we also used statistic parametric mapping (SPM) on a voxel by voxel analysis to find difference of cortex between test and retest of I-123 ADAM single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images.Twenty-one healthy volunteers were scanned twice with SPECT at 4 h after intravenous administration of 185 MBq of 123I-ADAM. The image matrix size was 128×128 and pixel size was 3.9 mm. All images were obtained through filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Region of interest (ROI) definition was performed based on the AAL brain template in PMOD version 2.95 software package. ROI demarcations were placed on midbrain, pons, striatum, and cerebellum. All images were spatially normalized to the SPECT MNI (Montreal Neurological Institute) templates supplied with SPM2. And each image was transformed into standard stereotactic space, which was matched to the Talairach and Tournoux atlas. Then differences across scans were statistically estimated on a voxel by voxel analysis using paired t-test (population main effect: 2 cond's, 1 scan/cond.), which was applied to compare concentration of SERT between the test and retest cerebral scans.The average of specific uptake ratio (SUR: target/cerebellum-1) of 123I-ADAM binding to SERT in midbrain was 1.78±0.27, pons was 1.21±0.53, and striatum was 0.79±0.13. The cronbach's α of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.92. Besides, there was also no significant statistical finding in cerebral area using SPM2 analysis. This finding might help us

  18. Automated microSPECT/microCT image analysis of the mouse thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Hollingsworth, Brynn; Scarberry, Daniel; Shen, Daniel Hueng-Yuan; Powell, Kimerly; Smart, Sean C; Beech, John; Sheng, Xiaochao; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Menq, Chia-Hsiang; Jhiang, Sissy M

    2017-09-16

    Background: The ability of thyroid follicular cells to take up iodine enables the use of radioactive iodine (RAI) for imaging and targeted killing of RAI-avid thyroid cancer following thyroidectomy. To facilitate identifying novel strategies to improve 131I therapeutic efficacy for patients with RAI refractory disease, it is desired to optimize image acquisition and analysis for preclinical mouse models of thyroid cancer. Methods: A customized mouse cradle was designed and used for microSPECT/CT image acquisition at 1 hour (t1) and 24 hours (t24) post-injection of 123I, which mainly reflect RAI influx/efflux equilibrium and RAI retention in the thyroid, respectively. FVB/N mice with normal thyroid glands and TgBRAFV600E mice with thyroid tumors were imaged. In-house CTViewer software was developed to streamline image analysis with new capabilities along with display of 3D voxel-based 123I gamma photon intensity in MATLAB. Results: Our customized mouse cradle facilitates consistent tissue configuration among image acquisitions such that rigid body registration can be applied to align serial images of the same mouse via our in-house CTViewer software. CTViewer is designed specifically to streamline SPECT/CT image analysis with functions tailored to quantify thyroid radioiodine uptake. Automatic segmentation of thyroid volumes of interest (VOI) from adjacent salivary glands in t1 images is enabled by superimposing the thyroid VOI from the t24 image onto the corresponding aligned t1 image. The extent of heterogeneity in 123I accumulation within thyroid VOIs can be visualized by 3D display of voxel-based 123I gamma photon intensity. Conclusion: MicroSPECT/CT image acquisition and analysis for thyroidal RAI uptake is greatly improved by our cradle and CTViewer software, respectively. Furthermore, our approach of superimposing thyroid VOIs from t24 images to select thyroid VOIs on corresponding aligned t1

  19. Evaluation of hardware in a small-animal SPECT system using reconstructed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Wilson, Donald W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2007-03-01

    Evaluation of imaging hardware represents a vital component of system design. In small-animal SPECT imaging, this evaluation has become increasingly diffcult with the emergence of multi-pinhole apertures and adaptive, or patient-specific, imaging. This paper will describe two methods for hardware evaluation using reconstructed images. The first method is a rapid technique incorporating a system-specific non-linear, three-dimensional point response. This point response is easily computed and offers qualitative insight into an aperture's resolution and artifact characteristics. The second method is an objective assessment of signal detection in lumpy backgrounds using the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with 3D Laguerre-Gauss and difference-of-Gaussian channels to calculate area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Previous work presented at this meeting described a unique, small-animal SPECT system (M 3R) capable of operating under a myriad of hardware configurations and ideally suited for image quality studies. Measured system matrices were collected for several hardware configurations of M 3R. The data used to implement these two methods was then generated by taking simulated objects through the measured system matrices. The results of these two methods comprise a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis that is well-suited for hardware assessment.

  20. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn; Wei, Lihui

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision.

  1. Use of oral dipyridamole SPECT thallium-201 imaging in detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.G.; Heo, J.; Kong, B.; Lyons, E.; Iskandrian, A.S. )

    1989-11-01

    This study examined the merits of oral dipyridamole SPECT thallium-201 imaging in detecting CAD and multivessel CAD. The 65 patients included in this study (aged 62 +/- 11 years) were not candidates for exercise testing (for the usual reasons). Coronary arteriography revealed no significant CAD in 17 patients and greater than or equal to 50% narrowing of one or more vessels in 48 patients; 12 had one-vessel and 36 had multivessel CAD (high-risk group). Thallium-201 was injected intravenously 45 minutes after an oral dose of 375 mg of dipyridamole, and SPECT imaging was performed within 10 minutes and 4 hours after injection. There were no serious side effects; only six patients (8%) had ST segment depression and 18 patients (28%) had chest pain. The heart rate increased from 74 +/- 15 beats/min at rest to 84 +/- 14 beats/min at peak effect (p = 0.001); the systolic blood pressure did not change (130 +/- 18 and 128 +/- 20 mm Hg, respectively, p = NS). The thallium images were abnormal in 6 of 17 patients (35%) with no CAD, in 7 of 12 patients with one-vessel disease (58%), and in 34 of 36 patients with multivessel CAD (94%) (p = 0.001). Twenty-one of 25 patients (84%) with a perfusion abnormality in more than one vascular territory had multivessel CAD assessed by angiography. Thus oral dipyridamole SPECT thallium-201 imaging is a safe and inexpensive method for the detection of CAD in patients who are otherwise not candidates for exercise testing.

  2. The importance of the accuracy of image registration of SPECT images for 3D targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Periklis; Divoli, Antigoni; Hatziioannou, Konstantinos; Flux, Glenn D

    2007-12-21

    In this paper, the importance of the accuracy of image registration of time-sequential SPECT images for 3D targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry is studied. Image registration of a series of SPECT scans is required to allow the computation of the 3D absorbed dose distribution for both tumour sites and normal organs. Three simulated 4D datasets, based on patient therapy studies, were generated to allow the effect of mis-registration on the absorbed dose distribution to be investigated. The tumour sites studied range in size, shape and position, relative to the centre of the 3D SPECT scan. Randomly generated transformations along the x-, y- and z-axes and rotations around the z-axis were employed and the maximum and average absorbed dose distribution statistics, for the tumour sites present, were computed. It was shown that even small mis-registrations, translation of less than 9 mm and rotation of less than 5 degrees might cause differences in the absorbed dose statistics of up to 90%, especially when the size of the tumour is comparable to the induced mis-registration or when the tumour is situated close to the edge of the 3D dataset.

  3. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-05-27

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging.

  4. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  5. Skeletal muscle satellite cell migration to injured tissue measured with 111In-oxine and high-resolution SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Elster, Jennifer L.; Rathbone, Christopher R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Liu, Xiasong; Barrett, Harrison H.; Rhoads, Robert P.; Allen, Ronald E.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of adult skeletal muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, to several injured muscles via the circulation would be useful, however, an improved understanding of cell fate and biodistribution following their delivery is important for this goal to be achieved. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of systemically delivered satellite cells to home to injured skeletal muscle using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of 111In-labeled satellite cells. Satellite cells labeled with 111In-oxine and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected intravenously after bupivicaine-induced injury to the tibialis anterior muscle. Animals were imaged with a high-resolution SPECT system called FastSPECT II for up to 7 days after transplantation. In vivo FastSPECT II imaging demonstrated a three to five-fold greater number of transplanted satellite cells in bupivicaine-injured muscle as compared to un-injured muscle after transplantation; a finding that was verified through autoradiograph analysis and quantification of GFP expression. Satellite cells also accumulated in other organs including the lung, liver, and spleen, as determined by biodistribution measurements. These data support the ability of satellite cells to home to injured muscle and support the use of SPECT and autoradiograph imaging techniques to track systemically transplanted 111In labeled satellite cells in vivo, and suggest their homing may be improved by reducing their entrapment in filter organs. PMID:24190365

  6. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Noriko; Seto, Akiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-06-01

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P < 0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P < 0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease.

  7. Radionuclide 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Zhao, Lingzhou; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and labeling of radioactive iodine-131 (131I). The generated multifunctional 131I-G5.NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers were characterized via different methods. We show that prior to 131I labeling, the G5.NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers conjugated with approximately 9.4 HPAO moieties per dendrimer are noncytotoxic at a concentration up to 20 μM and are able to target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors (FAR), thanks to the modified FA ligands. In the presence of a phenol group, radioactive 131I is able to be efficiently labeled onto the dendrimer platform with good stability and high radiochemical purity, and render the platform with an ability for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an FAR-overexpressing xenografted tumor model in vivo. The designed strategy to use the facile dendrimer nanotechnology may be extended to develop various radioactive theranostic nanoplatforms for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of different types of cancer.We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and

  8. Probabilistic multiobject deformable model for MR/SPECT brain image registration and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikou, Christophoros; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    1999-05-01

    A probabilistic deformable model for the representation of brain structures is described. The statistically learned deformable model represents the relative location of head (skull and scalp) and brain surfaces in MR/SPECT images pairs and accommodates the significant variability of these anatomical structures across different individuals. To provide a training set, a representative collection of 3D MRI volumes of different patients have first been registered to a reference image. The head and brain surfaces of each volume are parameterized by the amplitudes of the vibration modes of a deformable spherical mesh. For a given MR image in the training set, a vector containing the largest vibration modes describing the head and the brain is created. This random vector is statistically constrained by retaining the most significant variations modes of its Karhunen-Loeve expansion on the training population. By these means, both head and brain surfaces are deformed according to the anatomical variability observed in the training set. Two applications of the probabilistic deformable model are presented: the deformable model-based registration of 3D multimodal (MR/SPECT) brain images and the segmentation of the brain from MRI using the probabilistic constraints embedded in the deformable model. The multi-object deformable model may be considered as a first step towards the development of a general purpose probabilistic anatomical atlas of the brain.

  9. Microdosing, imaging biomarkers and SPECT: a multi-sided tripod to accelerate drug development.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Bergstrom, Kim; Mariani, Giuliano; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2009-01-01

    The advances of nuclear medicine imaging instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical sciences allow their involvement in the developmental processes of therapeutic drugs. New chemical entities, meant as potential drugs, need to comply with the proof-of-principle. Tomographic imaging methods as PET, SPECT and CT have been used for small animal and human studies at an early stage of drug development. Using a drug candidate in a radiolabeled form in obtaining quantitative imaging data provides opportunity for a complete morphological and functional overview of targeting properties and overall pharmacokinetics. This can be helpful in go/no-go decision making. Microdosing, using e.g.1% of the proposed dose of the radiolabeled potential drug plays an important part in this early development and notably reduces the risk of serious adverse effects in human volunteers or patients. This paper primarily focuses on the way in which microdosing and SPECT imaging may contribute to the development of drugs. Furthermore, this paper illustrates how these techniques may help to eliminate weak drug candidates at early stage, making time and funds available for potential lead compounds. Eventually this approach facilitates and accelerates new drug approval. The present paper highlights how these techniques make drug development easier in the field of oncology and neurology.

  10. High-Resolution 4D Imaging of Technetium Transport in Porous Media using Preclinical SPECT-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; DeVol, T. A.; Groen, H.; Moysey, S. M.; Ramakers, R.; Powell, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Preclinical SPECT-CT (single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated X-ray computed tomography) offers the potential to quantitatively image the dynamic three-dimensional distribution of radioisotopes with sub-millimeter resolution, overlaid with structural CT images (20-200 micron resolution), making this an attractive method for studying transport in porous media. A preclinical SPECT-CT system (U-SPECT4CT, MILabs BV. Utrecht, The Netherlands) was evaluated for imaging flow and transport of 99mTc (t1/2=6hrs) using a 46,5mm by 156,4mm column packed with individual layers consisting of <0.2mm diameter silica gel, 0.2-0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0mm diameter glass beads, and a natural soil sample obtained from the Savannah River Site. The column was saturated with water prior to injecting the 99mTc solution. During the injection the flow was interrupted intermittently for 10 minute periods to allow for the acquisition of a SPECT image of the transport front. Non-uniformity of the front was clearly observed in the images as well as the retarded movement of 99mTc in the soil layer. The latter is suggesting good potential for monitoring transport processes occurring on the timescale of hours. After breakthrough of 99mTc was achieved, the flow was stopped and SPECT data were collected in one hour increments to evaluate the sensitivity of the instrument as the isotope decayed. Fused SPECT- CT images allowed for improved interpretation of 99mTc distributions within individual pore spaces. With ~3 MBq remaining in the column, the lowest activity imaged, it was not possible to clearly discriminate any of the pore spaces.

  11. Multi-pinhole SPECT Imaging with Silicon Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon double-sided strip detectors offer outstanding instrinsic spatial resolution with reasonable detection efficiency for iodine-125 emissions. This spatial resolution allows for multiple-pinhole imaging at low magnification, minimizing the problem of multiplexing. We have conducted imaging studies using a prototype system that utilizes a detector of 300-micrometer thickness and 50-micrometer strip pitch together with a 23-pinhole collimator. These studies include an investigation of the synthetic-collimator imaging approach, which combines multiple-pinhole projections acquired at multiple magnifications to obtain tomographic reconstructions from limited-angle data using the ML-EM algorithm. Sub-millimeter spatial resolution was obtained, demonstrating the basic validity of this approach. PMID:20953300

  12. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits

    PubMed Central

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrPSc). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrPSc. In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd = 24.5 nM) and capacity (Bmax = 36.3 pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrPSc-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6 nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [125I]SC-OMe and [125I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [123I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrPSc deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [123I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  13. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-12-16

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrP(Sc)). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrP(Sc). In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd = 24.5 nM) and capacity (Bmax = 36.3 pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrP(Sc)-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6 nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [(125)I]SC-OMe and [(125)I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [(123)I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrP(Sc) deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [(123)I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain.

  14. Validation of brain tumour imaging with p-[123I]iodo-L-phenylalanine and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Dirk; Ketter, Ralf; Romeike, Bernd F M; Sell, Nadja; Schaefer, Andrea; Moringlane, Jean R; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Samnick, Samuel

    2005-09-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to validate single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with p-[(123)I]iodo-L-phenylalanine (IPA) in brain tumours and to evaluate its potential for the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. In 45 patients with indeterminate brain lesions or suspected progression of glioma, amino acid uptake was studied using IPA-SPECT and compared with the final diagnosis established by biopsy or serial imaging. After image fusion of IPA-SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging, the presence of tumour was visually determined by two independent observers. IPA uptake was quantified as the ratio between maximum uptake in the suspicious lesion and mean uptake in unaffected brain. Primary brain tumours were present in 35 cases (12 low-grade and 23 high-grade gliomas). Non-neoplastic brain lesions were confirmed in seven cases (three dysplasias, three inflammatory lesions, one lesion after effective therapy). Visual analysis showed a high concordance between the two observers (kappa=0.90, p<0.001), with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 100% for the discrimination of primary brain tumours and non-neoplastic lesions. At 30 min p.i., IPA uptake in primary brain tumours was higher than that in non-neoplastic lesions (1.70+/-0.36 vs 1.14+/-0.18, p<0.05). Brain metastases showed no increased uptake (1.13+/-0.22, n=3). The persistent retention of IPA in low-grade gliomas without disruption of the blood-brain barrier was visualised up to 24 h p.i. Low-grade and high-grade gliomas showed equivalent IPA uptake (1.72+/-0.37 vs 1.67+/-0.36 at 30 min, p=0.745). IPA shows long and specific retention in gliomas. IPA is a promising and safe radiopharmaceutical for the visualisation of gliomas and the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions.

  15. Techniques for molecular imaging probe design.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease-specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology--all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we discuss target selection, screening techniques, and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents.

  16. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  17. Intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT imaging methodology, applications, and interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, J.F.; Magill, H.L.; Loveless, V.S.; Murray, G.L. )

    1990-10-01

    Dipyridamole TI-201 imaging is an ideal alternative to exercise TI-201 scintigraphy in patients who are unwilling or unable to perform maximum exercise stress. The use of intravenous dipyridamole, alone or in combination with exercise, has not been approved for clinical practice by the Food and Drug Administration. Once approval is granted, the test will become a widely used and important component of the cardiac work-up. The indications, methodology, side effects, and utility of dipyridamole cardiac imaging in the clinical setting are discussed and a variety of examples presented.59 references.

  18. Development of a high efficiency and high resolution Compton probe for prostate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, J.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Dewaraja, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Mikuž, M.; Roe, S.; Rogers, W. L.; Studen, A.; Weilhammer, P.; Zhang, L.; Žontar, D.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to diagnose early prostate cancer has outpaced imaging methods for accurate localization and staging of the disease. A precise determination of the extent of local disease is difficult and, unfortunately, present imaging instrumentation employing radiotracer techniques (PET, SPECT, planar scintigraphy) is limited in its ability to provide detailed information when imaging the prostate due to modest spatial resolution, often poor counting efficiency, and photon attenuation. The innovation in the work described here is the use of a silicon prostate probe based on the principle of the Compton scatter camera. Simulation studies show that the endorectal prostate probe will enhance the spatial resolution by a factor 4-5 and, simultaneously, provide a gain in efficiency of a factor 16-40 over conventional nuclear medicine cameras. The ongoing tasks are focused on the design optimization of a Compton probe prototype.

  19. Investigation of SP94 Peptide as a Specific Probe for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Guobing; Li, Xiao; Zhao, Yanzhao; Tan, Hui; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng

    2016-01-01

    SP94 (SFSIIHTPILPL), a novel peptide, has shown specific binding to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. We aimed to investigate the capability of SP94 as a targeting probe for HCC imaging and therapy following labeling with technetium-99m (99mTc) and rhenium-188 (188Re). HYNIC-SP94 was prepared by solid phase synthesis and then labeled with 99mTc. Cell competitive binding, internalization assay, in vitro and in vivo stability, biodistribution and micro-single photon emission computed tomography /computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging studies were performed to investigate the capability of 99mTc tricine-EDDA/HYNIC-SP94 as a specific HCC imaging probe. Initial promising targeting results inspired evaluation of its therapeutic effect when labeled by 188Re. HYNIC-SP94 was then labeled again with 188Re to perform cell apoptosis, microSPECT/CT imaging evaluation and immunohistochemistry. Huh-7 cells exhibited typical apoptotic changes after 188Re irradiation. According to 99mTc tricine-EDDA/HYNIC-SP94 microSPECT/CT imaging, tumor uptake was significantly decreased compared with that of pre-treatment with 188Re-HYNIC-SP94. The immunohistochemistry also displayed obvious necrosis and apoptosis as well as inhibition of proliferation in the 188Re-HYNIC-SP94 treatment group. The results supported that 99mTc tricine-EDDA/HYNIC-SP94 is able to target HCC cells and 188Re-HYNIC- SP94 holds potential as a therapeutic agent for HCC, making 99mTc/188Re-HYNIC-SP94 a promising targeting probe for HCC imaging and therapy. PMID:27649935

  20. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOEpatents

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1997-06-17

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  1. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOEpatents

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1997-06-17

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  2. [The group study of diagnostic efficacy of cerebro-vascular disease by I-123 IMP SPECT images obtained with ring type SPECT scanner--the ROC analysis on the diagnosis of perfusion defect and redistribution].

    PubMed

    Machida, K; Matsumoto, T; Honda, N; Mamiya, T; Takahashi, T; Takishima, T; Kamano, T; Tamaki, S; Iinuma, T A; Tateno, Y

    1991-11-01

    We performed two image reading experiments in order to investigate the diagnostic capability of I-123 IMP SPECT obtained by the ring type SPECT scanner in cerebro-vascular disease. Fourteen physicians diagnosed SPECT images of 55 cases with reference to clinical neurological informations, first without brain XCT images and second with XCT images. Each physician detected perfusion defects and redistributions of I-123 IMP and assigned a confidence level of abnormality for these SPECT findings by means of five rating method. From results obtained by ROC analysis, we concluded as follows: (1) Generally, I-123 IMP SPECT is a stable diagnostic modality in the diagnosis of cerebro-vascular disease and the image reading of XCT had no effects on the diagnosis of SPECT on the whole of physician, (2) However, there were unnegligible differences among individuals in the detectability of findings and the effect of XCT image reading, (3) Detectability of redistribution of I-123 IMP was lower than that of perfusion defect and inter-observer variation in the diagnostic performance for redistribution was larger than that of perfusion defect. The results suggest that it is necessary to standardize diagnostic criteria among physicians for redistribution of I-123 IMP.

  3. SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for dementia.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Claudio; Farioli, Daniela; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Meniconi, Martina; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade the interest towards functional neuroimaging has gradually increased, especially in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, diagnosis of dementia is mostly clinical. Numerous modalities of neuroimaging are today available, each of them allowing a different aspect of neurodegeneration to be investigated. Although during the last period many have predicted a forthcoming disappearance of SPECT imaging in favour of the PET imaging, many new radiotracers SPECT, dual-SPECT tracers techniques and receptor targeting designed radiopharmaceuticals are currently at study. Besides, last decade has also assisted to the development of new SPECT imaging systems, most of them integrated with other imaging modalities (MRI, CT, ultrasound techniques), granting improved imaging capabilities. All these improved conditions, especially appealing for the neuroimaging, together with the new radiopharmaceuticals in development may renovate the interest for SPECT clinical applications.

  4. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  5. Comparison of image quality, myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function between standard imaging and single-injection ultra-low-dose imaging using a high-efficiency SPECT camera: the MILLISIEVERT study.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Blankstein, Ron; Andrews, Howard; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Qureshi, Mehreen; Rakotoarivelo, Harivony; Slomka, Piotr; Nakazato, Ryo; Bokhari, Sabahat; Di Carli, Marcello; Berman, Daniel S

    2014-09-01

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging plays a central role in coronary artery disease diagnosis, but concerns exist regarding its radiation burden. Compared with standard Anger SPECT (A-SPECT) cameras, new high-efficiency (HE) cameras with specialized collimators and solid-state cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors offer potential to maintain image quality (IQ), while reducing administered activity and thus radiation dose to patients. No previous study has compared IQ, interpretation, total perfusion deficit (TPD), or ejection fraction (EF) in patients receiving both ultra-low-dose (ULD) imaging on an HE SPECT camera and standard low-dose (SLD) A-SPECT imaging. We compared ULD HE SPECT with SLD A-SPECT imaging by dividing the rest dose in 101 patients at 3 sites scheduled to undergo clinical A-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging using a same day rest-stress (99m)Tc protocol. Patients underwent HE SPECT imaging after an initial approximately 130-MBq (3.5 mCi) dose and SLD-A-SPECT imaging after the remainder of the planned dose. Images were scored visually by 2 masked readers for IQ and summed rest score. TPD and EF were assessed quantitatively. Mean activity was 134 MBq (3.62 mCi) for ULD HE SPECT (effective dose, 1.15 mSv) and 278 MBq (7.50 mCi, 2.39 mSv) for SLD A-SPECT. Overall IQ was superior for ULD HE SPECT (P < 0.0001), with twice as many studies graded excellent quality. Extracardiac activity and overall perfusion assessment were similar. Between-method correlations were high for summed rest score (r = 0.87), TPD (r = 0.91), and EF (r = 0.88). ULD HE SPECT rest imaging correlates highly with SLD A-SPECT. It has improved image quality, comparable extracardiac activity, and achieves radiation dose reduction to 1 mSv for a single injection. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. Iodine-125 radiolabeling of silver nanoparticles for in vivo SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chrastina, Adrian; Schnitzer, Jan E

    2010-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are increasingly finding applications in medicine; however, little is known about their in vivo tissue distribution. Here, we have developed a rapid method for radiolabeling of silver nanoparticles with iodine-125 in order to track in vivo tissue uptake of silver nanoparticles after systemic administration by biodistribution analysis and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging. Poly(N-vinyl-2 -pyrrolidone)-capped silver nanoparticles with an average size of 12 nm were labeled by chemisorption of iodine-125 with a > 80% yield of radiolabeling efficiency. Radiolabeled silver nanoparticles were intravenously injected in Balb/c mice, and the in vivo distribution pattern of these nanoparticles was evaluated by noninvasive whole-body SPECT imaging, which revealed uptake of the nanoparticles in the liver and spleen. Biodistribution analysis confirmed predominant accumulation of the silver nanoparticles in the spleen (41.5%ID/g) and liver (24.5%ID/g) at 24 h. Extensive uptake in the tissues of the reticuloendothelial system suggests that further investigation of silver nanoparticle interaction with hepatic and splenic tissues at the cellular level is critical for evaluation of the in vivo effects and potential toxicity of silver nanoparticles. This method enables rapid iodine-125 radiolabeling of silver nanoparticles with a specific activity sufficient for in vivo imaging and biodistribution analysis. PMID:20856841

  7. NOTE: Gaussian prefiltering of 123I DAT SPECT images when using depth-independent resolution recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Anne; Jakobson Mo, Susanna; Sundström, Torbjörn; Riklund, Katrine

    2007-09-01

    Previously we have investigated a depth-independent compensation for collimator detector response (CDR) included in the OSEM reconstruction, intended for SPECT images that have been corrected for scatter and septal penetration using convolution-based methods. In this work, the aim was to study how different filtering strategies affect contrast as a function of noise when using Gaussian smoothing filters in combination with the above-described CDR compensation. The evaluation was performed for 123I dopamine transporter (DAT) SPECT images. Prefiltering with 2D Gaussian filter kernels, where the deterioration in resolution is included in the depth-independent CDR compensation, was compared to conventional postfiltering with 3D Gaussian filter kernels. Images reconstructed without filtering are also included in the comparison. It was found that there is little benefit in noise reduction when using CDR compensation. However, this variant of prefiltering gives consistently higher contrasts as a function of noise compared with the postfiltering alternative, and that could be of interest when using other types of filters with contrast improving properties.

  8. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Yamamoto, T; Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Diehn, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  9. Silicon detectors for combined MR-PET and MR-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studen, A.; Brzezinski, K.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Cochran, E.; Grošičar, B.; Grkovski, M.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Llosa, G.; Mikuž, M.; Stankova, V.; Weilhammer, P.; Žontar, D.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon based devices can extend PET-MR and SPECT-MR imaging to applications, where their advantages in performance outweigh benefits of high statistical counts. Silicon is in many ways an excellent detector material with numerous advantages, among others: excellent energy and spatial resolution, mature processing technology, large signal to noise ratio, relatively low price, availability, versatility and malleability. The signal in silicon is also immune to effects of magnetic field at the level normally used in MR devices. Tests in fields up to 7 T were performed in a study to determine effects of magnetic field on positron range in a silicon PET device. The curvature of positron tracks in direction perpendicular to the field's orientation shortens the distance between emission and annihilation point of the positron. The effect can be fully appreciated for a rotation of the sample for a fixed field direction, compressing range in all dimensions. A popular Ga-68 source was used showing a factor of 2 improvement in image noise compared to zero field operation. There was also a little increase in noise as the reconstructed resolution varied between 2.5 and 1.5 mm. A speculative applications can be recognized in both emission modalities, SPECT and PET. Compton camera is a subspecies of SPECT, where a silicon based scatter as a MR compatible part could inserted into the MR bore and the secondary detector could operate in less constrained environment away from the magnet. Introducing a Compton camera also relaxes requirements of the radiotracers used, extending the range of conceivable photon energies beyond 140.5 keV of the Tc-99m. In PET, one could exploit the compressed sub-millimeter range of positrons in the magnetic field. To exploit the advantage, detectors with spatial resolution commensurate to the effect must be used with silicon being an excellent candidate. Measurements performed outside of the MR achieving spatial resolution below 1 mm are reported.

  10. Physical phantom evaluation of EM-IntraSPECT (EMIS) algorithm for nonuniform attenuation correction in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Bowsher, James E.; Feiglin, David H.; Gagne, George M.; Hellwig, Bradford J.; Tornai, Martin P.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance of the EM-IntraSPECT (EMIS) algorithm for non-uniform attenuation correction in the chest. EMIS is a maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm for simultaneously estimating SPECT emission and attenuation parameters from emission data alone. EMIS uses the activity within the patient as transmission tomography sources, with which attenuation coefficients can be estimated. A thorax phantom with a normal heart was used. The activity images reconstructed by EMIS were compared to images reconstructed using a conventional MLEM with a fixed uniform attenuation map. Uniformity of normal heart was improved with EMIS as compared to a conventional MLEM.

  11. Comparison of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography and thallium-201 SPECT imaging for detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Schwaiger, M.; Molina, E.; Popma, J.; Gacioch, G.M.; Kalus, M.; Squicciarini, S.; al-Aouar, Z.R.; Schork, A.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The diagnostic performance of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) positron emission tomography (PET) and thallium-201 (Tl-201) single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) for detecting coronary artery disease was investigated in 81 patients (52 men, 29 women). PET studies using 60 mCi of Rb-82 were performed at baseline and after intravenous infusion of 0.56 mg/kg dipyridamole in conjunction with handgrip stress. Tl-201 SPECT was performed after dipyridamole-handgrip stress and, in a subset of patients, after treadmill exercise. Sensitivity, specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy were assessed using both visually and quantitatively interpreted coronary angiograms. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET for detection of coronary artery disease (greater than 50% diameter stenosis) were 84, 88 and 85%, respectively. In comparison, the performance of SPECT revealed a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 53% (p less than 0.05 vs PET) and accuracy of 79%. Similar results were obtained using either visual or quantitative angiographic criteria for severity of coronary artery disease. In 43 patients without prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity for detection of disease was 71 and 73%, respectively, similar for both PET and SPECT. There was no significant difference in diagnostic performance between imaging modalities when 2 different modes of stress (exercise treadmill vs intravenous dipyridamole plus handgrip) were used with SPECT imaging. Thus, Rb-82 PET provides improved specificity compared with Tl-201 SPECT for identifying coronary artery disease, most likely due to the higher photon energy of Rb-82 and attenuation correction provided by PET. However, post-test referral cannot be entirely excluded as a potential explanation for the lower specificity of Tl-201 SPECT.

  12. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  13. An analytic model of pinhole aperture penetration for 3D pinhole SPECT image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark F.; Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    1998-04-01

    Photons penetrate the attenuating material close to the aperture of pinhole collimators in nuclear medicine, broadening the tails of point spread functions (PSFs) and degrading the resolution of planar and SPECT images. An analytic approximation has been developed that models this penetration contribution to the PSF for knife-edge point pinhole apertures. The approximation has the form images/0031-9155/43/4/006/img7.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>, where r is the distance on the detector surface from the projection of the point source through the pinhole. The rolloff coefficient images/0031-9155/43/4/006/img8.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> is a function of the photon energy, point source location and the design parameters of the collimator. There was excellent agreement between measured values of images/0031-9155/43/4/006/img8.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> from photon transport simulations of I-131 point sources (364 keV emission only) and theoretical predictions from the analytic formula. Predicted images/0031-9155/43/4/006/img8.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> values from the analytic formula averaged 25% greater than measured values from experimental I-131 point source acquisitions. Photon transport simulations were performed that modelled the 364 keV and less abundant 637 and 723 keV emissions and scatter within the scintillation crystal. Measured images/0031-9155/43/4/006/img8.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> values from these simulations averaged 12% greater than the experimental values, indicating that about half of the error between the analytic formula and the experimental measurements was due to unmodelled 637 and 723 keV emissions. The remaining error may be due in part to scatter in the pinhole region and backscatter from gamma camera components behind the scintillation crystal. The analytic penetration model was used in designing Metz filters to compensate for

  14. TH-E-BRF-02: 4D-CT Ventilation Image-Based IMRT Plans Are Dosimetrically Comparable to SPECT Ventilation Image-Based Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, S; Bal, M; Kabus, S; Loo, B; Keall, P; Yamamoto, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An emerging lung ventilation imaging method based on 4D-CT can be used in radiotherapy to selectively avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions, which may reduce pulmonary toxicity. Efforts to validate 4DCT ventilation imaging have been focused on comparison with other imaging modalities including SPECT and xenon CT. The purpose of this study was to compare 4D-CT ventilation image-based functional IMRT plans with SPECT ventilation image-based plans as reference. Methods: 4D-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for five thoracic cancer patients in an IRB-approved prospective clinical trial. The ventilation images were created by quantitative analysis of regional volume changes (a surrogate for ventilation) using deformable image registration of the 4D-CT images. A pair of 4D-CT ventilation and SPECT ventilation image-based IMRT plans was created for each patient. Regional ventilation information was incorporated into lung dose-volume objectives for IMRT optimization by assigning different weights on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The objectives and constraints of the other structures in the plan were kept identical. The differences in the dose-volume metrics have been evaluated and tested by a paired t-test. SPECT ventilation was used to calculate the lung functional dose-volume metrics (i.e., mean dose, V20 and effective dose) for both 4D-CT ventilation image-based and SPECT ventilation image-based plans. Results: Overall there were no statistically significant differences in any dose-volume metrics between the 4D-CT and SPECT ventilation imagebased plans. For example, the average functional mean lung dose of the 4D-CT plans was 26.1±9.15 (Gy), which was comparable to 25.2±8.60 (Gy) of the SPECT plans (p = 0.89). For other critical organs and PTV, nonsignificant differences were found as well. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that 4D-CT ventilation image-based functional IMRT plans are dosimetrically comparable to SPECT ventilation image

  15. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  16. Temperature dependent operation of PSAPD-based compact gamma camera for SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtaek; McClish, Mickel; Alhassen, Fares; Seo, Youngho; Shah, Kanai S.; Gould, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the dependence of image quality on the temperature of a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD)-based small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gamma camera with a CsI:Tl scintillator. Currently, nitrogen gas cooling is preferred to operate PSAPDs in order to minimize the dark current shot noise. Being able to operate a PSAPD at a relatively high temperature (e.g., 5 °C) would allow a more compact and simple cooling system for the PSAPD. In our investigation, the temperature of the PSAPD was controlled by varying the flow of cold nitrogen gas through the PSAPD module and varied from −40 °C to 20 °C. Three experiments were performed to demonstrate the performance variation over this temperature range. The point spread function (PSF) of the gamma camera was measured at various temperatures, showing variation of full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the PSF. In addition, a 99mTc-pertechnetate (140 keV) flood source was imaged and the visibility of the scintillator segmentation (16×16 array, 8 mm × 8 mm area, 400 μm pixel size) at different temperatures was evaluated. Comparison of image quality was made at −25 °C and 5 °C using a mouse heart phantom filled with an aqueous solution of 99mTc-pertechnetate and imaged using a 0.5 mm pinhole collimator made of tungsten. The reconstructed image quality of the mouse heart phantom at 5 °C degraded in comparision to the reconstructed image quality at −25 °C. However, the defect and structure of the mouse heart phantom were clearly observed, showing the feasibility of operating PSAPDs for SPECT imaging at 5 °C, a temperature that would not need the nitrogen cooling. All PSAPD evaluations were conducted with an applied bias voltage that allowed the highest gain at a given temperature. PMID:24465051

  17. Anamorphic preclinical SPECT imaging with high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a 60 mm x 60 mm, millimeter-thick megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector that permits ultrahigh-resolution imaging. While the stopping power of silicon is low for many common clinical radioisotopes, its performance is sufficient in the range of 20-60 keV to allow practical imaging experiments. The low-energy emissions of 125I fall within this energy window, and the 60-day half life provides an advantage for longitudinal studies. The flexible nature of this system allows the future application of adaptive imaging techniques. We have demonstrated ˜225-mum axial and ˜175-mum transaxial resolution across a 2.65 cm3 cylindrical field of view, as well as the capability for simultaneous multi-isotope acquisitions. We describe the key advancements that have made this system operational, including bringing up a new detector readout ASIC, development of detector control software and data-processing algorithms, and characterization of operating characteristics. We describe design and fabrication of the adjustable slit aperture platform, as well as the development of an accurate imaging forward model and its application in a novel geometric calibration technique and a GPU-based ultrahigh-resolution reconstruction code.

  18. Dual-Energy SPECT and the Development of Peptide p5+14 for Imaging Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Kennel, Stephen J.; Martin, Emily B.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidosis is associated with a number of rare diseases and is characterized by the deposition, in abdominothoracic organs and peripheral nerves, of extracellular protein fibrils, which leads to dysfunction and severe morbidity. Effective clinical evaluation and management of patients with systemic amyloidosis are hampered by the lack of a noninvasive, quantitative method for detecting whole-body amyloid load. We have used a battery of assays including dual-energy SPECT imaging and comparative effectiveness studies in support of translation of a synthetic polybasic peptide, p5+14, as a novel radiotracer for visualization of amyloidosis by molecular imaging. These data provide support for a phase 1 positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging trial of this reagent, labeled with iodine-124, in patients with all forms of systemic amyloidosis. PMID:28654386

  19. Prolonged local retention of subcutaneously injected polymers monitored by noninvasive SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Chie; Niki, Yuichiro; Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-10

    Polymers are widely applied to drug delivery systems because polymers are generally excreted from the body more slowly than small molecules. Subcutaneous injection is one plausible means of administration. In this study, the in vivo behaviors of subcutaneously injected polymers, linear poly(glutamic acid) (Poly-Glu), acetylated dendrimer (Ac-den) and collagen peptide-conjugated dendrimer (CP-den), were investigated. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was used to noninvasively monitor the in vivo behaviors. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) was conjugated to these polymers, which were labeled with radioactive (111)In. These (111)In-DTPA-bearing polymers (Poly-Glu-DTPA, Ac-den-DTPA and CP-den-DTPA) and unconjugated DTPA were subcutaneously injected into tumor-bearing mice, which were subjected to SPECT imaging. These (111)In-DTPA-bearing polymers were largely retained at the injection site for at least 1 day, whereas the unconjugated DTPA was rapidly cleared from the whole body through excretion. Poly-Glu-DTPA and Ac-den-DTPA were partly accumulated in the kidney (and the liver), but the CP-den-DTPA was not. However, these (111)In-DTPA-bearing polymers were accumulated in the liver and the kidney following intravenous administration. These results indicate that the subcutaneously injected polymers did not largely gain substantial access to the systemic circulation, which is useful for a depot of drug around the injection site.

  20. An SVD Investigation of Modeling Scatter in Multiple Energy Windows for Improved SPECT Images

    PubMed Central

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work singular value decomposition (SVD) techniques are used to investigate how the use of low energy photons and multiple energy windows affects the noise properties of Tc-99m SPECT imaging. We have previously shown that, when modeling scatter in the projector and backprojector of iterative reconstruction algorithms, simultaneous reconstruction from multiple energy window data can result in very different noise characteristics. Further, the properties depend upon the width and number of energy windows used. To investigate this further, we have generated photon transport matrices using models for scatter, an elliptical phantom containing cold rods of various sizes, and a number of multiple energy window acquisition schemes. Transfer matrices were also generated for the cases of perfect scatter rejection and ideal scatter subtraction. The matrices were decomposed using SVD, and signal power and projection space variance spectra were computed using the basis formed by the left singular vectors. Results indicate very different noise levels for the various energy window combinations. The perfect scatter rejection case resulted in the lowest variance spectrum, and reconstruction-based scatter compensation performed better than the scatter subtraction case. When including lower energy photons in reconstruction-based scatter compensation, using a series of multiple energy windows outperformed a single large energy window. One multiple window combination is presented which achieves a lower variance spectrum than the standard 20% energy window, indicating the potential for using low energy photons to improve the noise characteristics of SPECT images. PMID:20186285

  1. Optimal thallium-201 dose in cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masaru; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Shibutani, Takayuki

    2016-12-22

    We aimed to determine the optimal thallium 201 chloride (thallium-201) dose using a novel ultrafast cardiac gamma camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detectors (D-SPECT). The optimal thallium-201 dose for obtaining left ventricular (LV) myocardial counts was determined from a phantom study. Consecutive 292 patients underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging with a thallium-201 injection. Stress test comprised exercise or pharmacological (adenosine) provocation. We calculated an optimal thallium-201 dose that resulted in better LV myocardial counts during 6 minutes of acquisition time. We corrected the respective values according to the patient's age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and type of stress test. The lowest thallium-201 dose for obtaining acceptable imaging was 1.2 million counts. Radiopharmaceutical doses showed a positive correlation with the patient's age (P < .001), sex (P = .012), BMI (P < .001), and type of stress test (P < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the patient's BMI and the type of stress test were statistically significant factors for determining the correct radiopharmaceutical dose (P < .001 for both). For clinical use of the CZT SPECT system, the optimal individual thallium-201 doses can be determined based on the patient's BMI and type of stress test.

  2. Automated segmentation and registration technique for HMPAO-SPECT imaging of Alzheimer's patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radau, Perry E.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Julin, Per; Svensson, Leif; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2000-06-01

    We present an operator-independent software technique for segmentation, realignment and analysis of brain perfusion images, with both voxel-wise and regional quantitation methods. Inter-subject registration with normalized mutual information was tested with simulated defects. Brain perfusion images (HMPAO-SPECT) from 56 subjects (21 AD; 35 controls) were retrospectively analyzed. Templates were created from the 3-D registration of the controls. Automatic segmentation was developed to remove extraneous activity that disrupts registration. Two new registration methods, robust least squares (RLS) and normalized mutual information (NMI) were implemented and compared with sum of absolute differences (CD). The automatic segmentation method caused a registration displacement of 0.4 +/- 0.3 pixels compared with manual segmentation. NMI registration proved to be less adversely effected by simulated defects than RLS or CD. The error in quantitating the patient-template parietal ratio due to mis- registration was 2.0% and 0.5% for 70% and 85% hypoperfusion defects, respectively. The registration processing time was 1.6 min (233 MHz Pentium). The most accurate discriminant utilized a logistic equation parameterized by mean counts of the parietal and temporal regions of the map, (91 +/- 8% Se, 97 +/- 5% Sp). BRASS is a fast, objective software package for single-step analysis of brain SPECT, suitable to aid diagnosis of AD.

  3. Case-based statistical learning applied to SPECT image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górriz, Juan M.; Ramírez, Javier; Illán, I. A.; Martínez-Murcia, Francisco J.; Segovia, Fermín.; Salas-Gonzalez, Diego; Ortiz, A.

    2017-03-01

    Statistical learning and decision theory play a key role in many areas of science and engineering. Some examples include time series regression and prediction, optical character recognition, signal detection in communications or biomedical applications for diagnosis and prognosis. This paper deals with the topic of learning from biomedical image data in the classification problem. In a typical scenario we have a training set that is employed to fit a prediction model or learner and a testing set on which the learner is applied to in order to predict the outcome for new unseen patterns. Both processes are usually completely separated to avoid over-fitting and due to the fact that, in practice, the unseen new objects (testing set) have unknown outcomes. However, the outcome yields one of a discrete set of values, i.e. the binary diagnosis problem. Thus, assumptions on these outcome values could be established to obtain the most likely prediction model at the training stage, that could improve the overall classification accuracy on the testing set, or keep its performance at least at the level of the selected statistical classifier. In this sense, a novel case-based learning (c-learning) procedure is proposed which combines hypothesis testing from a discrete set of expected outcomes and a cross-validated classification stage.

  4. Prognosis of normal stress-only gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria João Vidigal; Cunha, Maria João; Albuquerque, Anabela; Moreira, Ana Paula; Ramos, Domingos; Costa, Gracinda; Lima, João; Pego, Mariano

    2013-10-01

    It has been advocated that using the stress followed by rest protocol, if the stress images were normal there is no need of rest images, reducing radiation exposure and costs. Our purpose was to assess the prognosis of a group of patients with normal stress-only gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. This was retrospective study that includes 790 patients with normal myocardial stress only perfusion gated SPECT images. Images were considered as normal if a homogeneous myocardial distribution of the tracer was associated with a normal ejection fraction. The mean follow-up was of 42.8 ± 13.3 months. The considered events were death of all causes, myocardial infarction and myocardial revascularization. During this period there were 85 events (10.8 %), including 57 deaths of all causes (67.1 %), 9 myocardial infarctions (10.6 %), 19 revascularizations (2.4 %). In the first year of follow-up there were 32 events (4.0 %) and excluding non cardiac deaths there were 8 events (1.0 %). Using Cox survival analysis, diabetes (HR = 2.2; CI = 1.4-3.4; p ≤ 0.0005), the history of coronary artery disease (CAD) (HR = 2.1; CI = 1.3-3.2; p ≤ 0.001), age (HR = 1.0; CI = 1.0-1.0; p ≤ 0.05) and type of stress protocol were related with events (exercise test vs. adenosine) (Exercise test: HR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-0.8; p ≤ 0.01). In a multivariate analysis the independent predictors were diabetes, CAD and the type of stress protocol. Based on these results, normal stress-only images are associated with an excellent prognosis even in patients at higher risk, diabetics and patients with known CAD.

  5. Parametric quantification of myocardial ischaemia using real-time perfusion adenosine stress echocardiography images, with SPECT as reference method.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, P; Shahgaldi, K; Winter, R; Dencker, M; Kitlinski, M; Thorsson, O; Ljunggren, L; Willenheimer, R

    2010-01-01

    Real-time perfusion (RTP) adenosine stress echocardiography (ASE) can be used to visually evaluate myocardial ischaemia. The RTP power modulation technique, provides images for off-line parametric perfusion quantification using Qontrast software. From replenishment curves, this generates parametric images of peak signal intensity (A), myocardial blood flow velocity (beta) and myocardial blood flow (Axbeta) at rest and stress. This may be a tool for objective myocardial ischaemia evaluation. We assessed myocardial ischaemia by RTP-ASE Qontrast((R))-generated images, using 99mTc-tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as reference. Sixty-seven patients admitted to SPECT underwent RTP-ASE (SONOS 5500) during Sonovue infusion, before and throughout adenosine stress, also used for SPECT. Quantitative off-line analyses of myocardial perfusion by RTP-ASE Qontrast-generated A, beta and Axbeta images, at different time points during rest and stress, were blindly compared to SPECT. We analysed 201 coronary territories [corresponding to the left anterior descendent (LAD), left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary (RCA) arteries] from 67 patients. SPECT showed ischaemia in 18 patients. Receiver operator characteristics and kappa values showed that A, beta and Axbeta image interpretation significantly identified ischaemia in all territories (area under the curve 0.66-0.80, P = 0.001-0.05). Combined A, beta and Axbeta image interpretation gave the best results and the closest agreement was seen in the LAD territory: 89% accuracy; kappa 0.63; P<0.001. Myocardial isachemia can be evaluated in the LAD territory using RTP-ASE Qontrast-generated images, especially by combined A, beta and Axbeta image interpretation. However, the technique needs improvements regarding the LCx and RCA territories.

  6. Definitive diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas: MR imaging versus Tc-99m-labeled red blood cell SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, B.A.; Weinreb, J.C.; Megibow, A.J.; Sanger, J.J.; Lubat, E.; Kanamuller, H.; Noz, M.E.; Bosniak, M.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients with 69 suspected hemangiomas found by means of computed tomography (CT) and/or ultrasound were studied with both 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and single photon emission CT (SPECT) with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells. Using a criterion of perfusion-blood pool mismatch, SPECT readers diagnosed 50 of 64 hemangiomas and all five nonhemangiomas (sensitivity, 78% (95% confidence interval, 0.664 - 0.864); accuracy, 80% (0.69 - 0.877)). Qualitative analysis of lesion signal intensity on T2-weighted spin-echo MR images allowed readers to diagnose 58 of 64 hemangiomas and four of five nonhemangiomas (sensitivity, 91% (0.814 - 0.96); accuracy, 90% (0.807 - 0.951)). Because of the significantly higher cost of MR imaging and its inability to categorically differentiate hemangiomas from hypervascular metastases, the authors consider SPECT to be the method of choice for diagnosing hepatic hemangiomas. MR imaging should be reserved for the diagnosis of lesions smaller than 2.0 cm and for those 2.5 cm and smaller adjacent to the heart or major hepatic vessels; in such cases MR imaging was found superior to SPECT.

  7. Prognostic utility of ischemic response in functional imaging tests (SPECT or stress echocardiography) in low-risk unstable angina patients.

    PubMed

    Trivi, Marcelo; Ronderos, Ricardo; Meretta, Alejandro; Conde, Diego; Avegliano, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ability of ischemic response in imaging stress tests (single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] or stress echocardiography [SE]) to predict events in low-risk unstable angina patients. Three hundred and fifty-nine patients with unstable angina (< 24 h), asymptomatic at admission, without ST-segment elevation or depression, normal troponins, and undergoing SPECT (n = 188) or SE (n = 171) during hospitalization (median = 1 day) were included. A positive imaging test (IMAGING+) was defined as the presence of reversible perfusion defects or wall motion abnormalities in at least 2 contiguous segments. Multivariate models were constructed using these results and clinical variables to predict events at 6 months. Ninety-nine (27%) patients had IMAGING+, 72/188 (38%) in SPECT and 27/17 (16%) in SE (p < 0.0001). Events occurred in 84 (23%) patients: 4 had myocardial infarction, 47 new hospitalizations due to angina and 33 coronary artery revascularizations. Independent predictors of coronary artery disease were: IMAGING+ (OR: 6.4, 95% CI: 3.4-11.8, p < 0.0001), history of coronary artery disease (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2-5.2, p < 0.02) and TIMI risk (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.2, p < 0.03). In low-risk unstable angina patients, an ischemic response in functional stress tests (SPECT or SE) was associated with adverse events and severe coronary artery disease.

  8. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  9. Linear intensity normalization of FP-CIT SPECT brain images using the α-stable distribution.

    PubMed

    Salas-Gonzalez, Diego; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Illán, Ignacio A; Lang, Elmar W

    2013-01-15

    In this work, a linear procedure to perform the intensity normalization of FP-CIT SPECT brain images is presented. This proposed methodology is based on the fact that the histogram of intensity values can be fitted accurately using a positive skewed α-stable distribution. Then, the predicted α-stable parameters and the location-scale property are used to linearly transform the intensity values in each voxel. This transformation is performed such that the new histograms in each image have a pre-specified α-stable distribution with desired location and dispersion values. The proposed methodology is compared with a similar approach assuming Gaussian distribution and the widely used specific-to-nonspecific ratio. In this work, we show that the linear normalization method using the α-stable distribution outperforms those existing methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of maintenance oral theophylline on dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging using SPECT and dipyridamole-induced hemodynamic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, P.J.; Mahn, T.H.; Zielonka, J.S.; Krubsack, A.J.; Akhtar, R.; Bamrah, V.S.

    1988-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of maintenance oral theophylline therapy on the diagnostic efficacy of dipyridamole-thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for coronary artery disease, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT imaging was performed in eight men with documented coronary artery disease before initiation of theophylline treatment and repeated while these patients were receiving therapeutic doses of oral theophylline. Before theophylline treatment, intravenous dipyridamole caused a significant increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, angina in seven of eight patients, and ST segment depression in four of eight patients. While they were being treated with theophylline, none of the patients had angina or ST segment depression, and there were no hemodynamic changes with intravenous dipyridamole. Before theophylline treatment, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT imaging showed reversible perfusion defects in myocardial segments supplied by stenotic coronary arteries. With theophylline treatment, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT showed total absence of reversible perfusion defects. Treatment with theophylline markedly reduced the diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole-thallium-201 imaging for coronary artery disease.

  11. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  12. Gold Nanoparticles Doped with (199) Au Atoms and Their Use for Targeted Cancer Imaging by SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Pang, Bo; Luehmann, Hannah; Detering, Lisa; Yang, Xuan; Sultan, Deborah; Harpstrite, Scott; Sharma, Vijay; Cutler, Cathy S; Xia, Younan; Liu, Yongjian

    2016-04-20

    Gold nanoparticles have been labeled with various radionuclides and extensively explored for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the context of cancer diagnosis. The stability of most radiolabels, however, still needs to be improved for accurate detection of cancer biomarkers and thereby monitoring of tumor progression and metastasis. Here, the first synthesis of Au nanoparticles doped with (199)Au atoms for targeted SPECT tumor imaging in a mouse triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) model is reported. By directly incorporating (199)Au atoms into the crystal lattice of each Au nanoparticle, the stability of the radiolabel can be ensured. The synthetic procedure also allows for a precise control over both the radiochemistry and particle size. When conjugated with D-Ala1-peptide T-amide, the Au nanoparticles doped with (199)Au atoms can serve as a C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-targeted nanoprobe for the sensitive and specific detection of both TNBC and its metastasis in a mouse tumor model.

  13. Alzheimer disease: Quantitative analysis of I-123-iodoamphetamine SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.; Tikofsky, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Palmer, D.W.; Glatt, S.L.; Antuono, P.G.; Isitman, A.T.; Papke, R.A.

    1989-07-01

    To enable a more quantitative diagnosis of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT), the authors developed and tested a semiautomated method to define regions of interest (ROIs) to be used in quantitating results from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of regional cerebral blood flow performed with N-isopropyl iodine-123-iodoamphetamine. SPECT/IMP imaging was performed in ten patients with probable SDAT and seven healthy subjects. Multiple ROIs were manually and semiautomatically generated, and uptake was quantitated for each ROI. Mean cortical activity was estimated as the average of the mean activity in 24 semiautomatically generated ROIs; mean cerebellar activity was determined from the mean activity in separate ROIs. A ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity less than 0.60 and a ratio of parietal to mean cortical activity less than 0.90 allowed correct categorization of nine of ten and eight of ten patients, respectively, with SDAT and all control subjects. The degree of diminished mental status observed in patients with SDAT correlated with both global and regional changes in IMP uptake.

  14. Flurpiridaz F 18 PET: Phase II Safety and Clinical Comparison with SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging for Detection of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Daniel S.; Maddahi, Jamshid; Tamarappoo, B. K.; Czernin, Johannes; Taillefer, Raymond; Udelson, James E.; Gibson, C. Michael; Devine, Marybeth; Lazewatsky, Joel; Bhat, Gajanan; Washburn, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phase II trial to assess flurpiridaz F 18 for safety and compare its diagnostic performance for PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to Tc-99m SPECT-MPI regarding image quality, interpretative certainty, defect magnitude and detection of coronary artery disease (CAD)(≥ 50% stenosis) on invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Background In preclinical and phase I studies, flurpiridaz F 18 has shown characteristics of an essentially ideal MPI tracer. Methods 143 patients from 21 centers underwent rest-stress PET and Tc-99m SPECT-MPI. Eighty-six patients underwent ICA, and 39 had low-likelihood of CAD. Images were scored by 3 independent, blinded readers. Results A higher % of images were rated as excellent/good on PET vs. SPECT on stress (99.2% vs. 88.5%, p<0.01) and rest (96.9% vs. 66.4, p<0.01) images. Diagnostic certainty of interpretation (% cases with definitely abnormal/normal interpretation) was higher for PET vs. SPECT (90.8% vs. 70.9%, p<0.01). In 86 patients who underwent ICA, sensitivity of PET was higher than SPECT [78.8% vs. 61.5%, respectively (p=0.02)]. Specificity was not significantly different (PET:76.5% vs. SPECT:73.5%). Receiver operating characteristic curve area was 0.82±0.05 for PET and 0.70±0.06 for SPECT (p=0.04). Normalcy rate was 89.7% with PET and 97.4% with SPECT (p=NS). In patients with CAD on ICA, the magnitude of reversible defects was greater with PET than SPECT (p=0.008). Extensive safety assessment revealed that flurpiridaz F 18 was safe in this cohort. Conclusions In this Phase 2 trial, PET MPI using flurpiridaz F 18 was safe and superior to SPECT MPI for image quality, interpretative certainty, and overall CAD diagnosis. PMID:23265345

  15. Left-ventricular dyssynchrony evaluated by Tl-201 gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: a comparison with Tc-99m sestamibi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Hung, Guang-Uei; Chen, Wan-Chen; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Ji

    2013-03-01

    Phase analysis of gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been validated as a reliable tool to assess left-ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony. The initial results were all confirmed from studies using technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi or tetrofosmin as the radiotracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of phase analysis in thallium-201 (Tl-201) gated SPECT MPI. Seventeen patients referred from a cardiology clinic for evaluation of coronary artery disease were studied. All patients underwent both Tl-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi gated SPECT MPI within 1 week. An additional 34 patients with Tl-201 gated SPECT and 22 patients with Tc-99m sestamibi gated SPECT, who had a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, normal LV function, and normal perfusion on MPI, were used as normal controls. LV dyssynchrony parameters, including phase standard deviation (PSD) and phase histogram bandwidth (PHB), were measured using a standard phase analysis tool and compared between Tl-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi images. The LV dyssynchrony parameters correlated well (r=0.93 for PSD and r=0.84 for PHB) between Tl-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi images. The dyssynchrony parameters of Tl-201 were significantly larger than those of Tc-99m sestamibi (PSD: 24.5±12.0 vs. 17.4±9.7, P<0.001; PHB: 74.7±35.5 vs. 50.6±25.0, P<0.001). In comparison with normal controls, Tl-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi images showed concordant results. LV dyssynchrony parameters correlated well between Tl-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi images, even though the values were significantly larger for Tl-201 than for Tc-99m sestamibi. Tl-201 images showed results similar to those of Tc-99m sestamibi in the diagnosis of LV dyssynchrony.

  16. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  17. Development and validation of an automatic method to detect the latest contracting viable left ventricular segments to assist guide CRT therapy from gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Tao, Ningchao; Hou, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yao; Folks, Russell D; Cooke, David C; Moncayo, Valeria M; Garcia, Ernest V; Zou, Jiangang

    2017-03-28

    The purpose of this study is to use ECG-gated SPECT MPI to detect the latest contracting viable left ventricular (LV) segments to help guide the LV probe placement used in CRT therapy and to validate segment selection against the visual integration method by experts. For each patient, the resting ECG-gated SPECT MPI short-axis images were sampled in 3D to generate a polar map of the perfusion distribution used to determine LV myocardial viability, and to measure LV synchronicity using our phase analysis tool. In the visual integration method, two experts visually interpreted the LV viability and mechanical dyssynchrony from the short-axis images and polar maps of viability and phase, to determine the latest contracting viable segments using the 17-segment model. In the automatic method, the apical segments, septal segments, and segments with more than 50% scar were excluded as these are not candidates for CRT LV probe placement. Amongst the remaining viable segments, the segments, whose phase angles were within 10° of the latest phase angle (the most delayed contracting segment), were identified for potential CRT LV probe placement and ranked based on the phase angles of the segments. Both methods were tested in 36 pre-CRT patients who underwent ECG-gated SPECT MPI. The accuracy was determined as the percent agreement between the visual integration and automatic methods. The automatic method was performed by a second independent operator to evaluate the inter-operator processing reproducibility. In all the 36 patients, the LV lead positions of the 1st choices recommended by the automatic and visual integration methods were in the same segments in 35 patients, which achieved an agreement rate of 97.2%. In the inter-operator reproducibility test, the LV lead positions of the 1st choices recommended by the two operators were in the same segments in 25 patients, and were in the adjacent segments in 7 patients, which achieved an overall agreement of 88.8%. An automatic

  18. Imaging characterization of a new gamma ray detector based on CRY019 scintillation crystal for PET and SPECT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, C.; Pani, R.; Trigila, C.; Cinti, M. N.; Fabbri, A.; Frantellizzi, V.; De Vincentis, G.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2017-02-01

    In the last 40 years, in the field of Molecular Medicine imaging there has been a huge growth in the employment and in the improvement of detectors for PET and SPECT applications in order to reach accurate diagnosis of the diseases. The most important feature required to these detectors is an high quality of images that is usually obtained benefitting from the development of a wide number of new scintillation crystals with high imaging performances. In this contest, features like high detection efficiency, short decay time, great spectral match with photodetectors, absence of afterglow and low costs are surely attractive. However, there are other factors playing an important role in the realization of high quality images such as energy and spatial resolutions, position linearity and contrast resolution. With the aim to realize an high performace gamma ray detector for PET and SPECT applications, this work is focused on the evaluation of the imaging characteristics of a recently developed scintillation crystal, CRY019.

  19. Expectation maximization SPECT reconstruction with a content-adaptive singularity-based mesh-domain image model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Ye, Hongwei; Xu, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaofei; Vogelsang, Levon; Shen, Lixin; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    To improve the speed and quality of ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) SPECT reconstruction, we have implemented a content-adaptive, singularity-based, mesh-domain, image model (CASMIM) with an accurate algorithm for estimation of the mesh-domain system matrix. A preliminary image, used to initialize CASMIM reconstruction, was obtained using pixel-domain OSEM. The mesh-domain representation of the image was produced by a 2D wavelet transform followed by Delaunay triangulation to obtain joint estimation of nodal locations and their activity values. A system matrix with attenuation compensation was investigated. Digital chest phantom SPECT was simulated and reconstructed. The quality of images reconstructed with OSEM-CASMIM is comparable to that from pixel-domain OSEM, but images are obtained five times faster by the CASMIM method.

  20. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. K. H.; Ramogida, C. F.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, C.; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Effective use of the {}225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both {}225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the {}225Ac decay chain: {}221Fr (218 keV) and {}213Bi (440 keV). Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous {}221Fr and {}213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to simultaneously image dynamic {}221Fr and {}213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a {}213Bi generator from {}225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy were observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both {}221Fr and {}213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in {}213Bi images and only rods  ⩾1.3 mm were resolved in {}221Fr images. After eluting the {}213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the {}225Ac decay chain. The feasibility of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the {}225Ac decay chain in vivo has been demonstrated. This presented method requires the use of a high-performance high-energy collimator.

  1. CT/99mTc-GSA SPECT fusion images demonstrate functional differences between the liver lobes

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Tokorodani, Ryoutarou; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Hata, Yasuhiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Murata, Yoriko; Nakamura, Toshio; Uka, Kiminori

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the functional differences between the 2 liver lobes in non-cirrhotic patients by using computed tomography/99mTc-galactosyl human serum albumin (CT/99mTc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) fusion images. METHODS: Between December 2008 and March 2012, 264 non-cirrhotic patients underwent preoperative liver function assessment using CT/99mTc-GSA SPECT fusion images. Of these, 30 patients, in whom the influence of a tumor on the liver parenchyma was estimated to be negligible, were selected. Specifically, the selected patients were required to meet either of the following criteria: (1) the presence of an extrahepatic tumor; or (2) presence of a single small intrahepatic tumor. These 30 patients were retrospectively analyzed to calculate the percentage volume (%Volume) and the percentage function (%Function) of each lobe. The ratio between the %Function and %Volume (function-to-volume ratio) of each lobe was also calculated, and the ratios were compared between the 2 lobes. Furthermore, the correlations between the function-to-volume ratio and each of 2 liver parameters [lobe volume and diameter ratio of the left portal vein to the right portal vein (LPV-to-RPV diameter ratio)] were investigated. RESULTS: The median values of %Volume and %Function were 62.6% and 67.1% in the right lobe, with %Function being significantly higher than %Volume (P < 0.01). The median values of %Volume and %Function were 31.0% and 28.7% in the left lobe, with %Function being significantly lower than %Volume (P < 0.01). The function-to-volume ratios of the right lobe (1.04-1.14) were significantly higher than those of the left lobe (0.74-0.99) (P < 0.01). The function-to-volume ratio showed no significant correlation between the lobe volume in either lobe. In contrast, the function-to-volume ratio showed significant correlations with the LPV-to-RPV diameter ratio in both lobes (right lobe: negative correlation, rs = -0.37, P = 0.048; left lobe: positive

  2. Development and testing of a restraint free small animal SPECT imaging system with infrared based motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Kross, B.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2003-10-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution single photon emission tomography (SPECT) based system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/un-anesthetized mice. An infrared (IR) based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with sub-millimeter accuracy. The high resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixelated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, arrays of compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes and novel readout circuitry for lower device cost while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based on a 4 /spl times/ 8 array of Hamamatsu R8520-C12 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the IR tracking system is used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  3. Feasibility of a CdTe-based SPECT for high-resolution low-dose small animal imaging: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Lee, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems based on pixelated semiconductors such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) are in development to study small animal models of human disease. In an effort to develop a high-resolution, low-dose system for small animal imaging, we compared a CdTe-based SPECT system and a conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In addition, we investigated the radiation absorbed dose and calculated a figure of merit (FOM) for both SPECT systems. Using the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system, we achieved a spatial resolution of 1.66 mm at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance, and a resolution of 2.4-mm hot-rods. Using the newly-developed CdTe-based SPECT system, we achieved a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm FWHM at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance, and a resolution of 1.7-mm hot-rods. The sensitivities at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance were 115.73 counts/sec/MBq and 83.38 counts/sec/MBq for the CdTe-based SPECT and conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT systems, respectively. To compare quantitative measurements in the mouse brain, we calculated the CNR for images from both systems. The CNR from the CdTe-based SPECT system was 4.41, while that from the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system was 3.11 when the injected striatal dose was 160 Bq/voxel. The CNR increased as a function of injected dose in both systems. The FOM of the CdTe-based SPECT system was superior to that of the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system, and the highest FOM was achieved with the CdTe-based SPECT at a dose of 40 Bq/voxel injected into the striatum. Thus, a CdTe-based SPECT system showed significant improvement in performance compared with a conventional system in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, and CNR, while reducing the radiation dose to the small animal subject. Herein, we discuss the feasibility of a CdTe-based SPECT system for high

  4. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L; Cooper, Margaret S; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L; Shaw, Karen P; Ordidge, Katherine L; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M; Blower, Philip J; Lythgoe, Mark F; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd(3+), (64)Cu(2+), or (111)In(3+), and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)(2000)] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L.; Cooper, Margaret S.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L.; Shaw, Karen P.; Ordidge, Katherine L.; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M.; Blower, Philip J.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Hailes, Helen C.; Tabor, Alethea B.

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd3+, 64Cu2+, or 111In3+, and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)2000] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent. PMID:23131536

  6. Detectability of perfusion defect in five-dimensional gated-dynamic cardiac SPECT images.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A; Wernick, Miles N

    2010-09-01

    In previous work, the authors developed and demonstrated the concept of an image reconstruction procedure aimed to unify gated and dynamic nuclear cardiac imaging, which the authors have termed five-dimensional (5D) SPECT. Gated imaging permits the clinician to evaluate wall motion and, through the use of stress and rest scans, allows perfusion defects to be observed. Dynamic imaging depicts kinetics in the myocardium, which can be used to evaluate perfusion, but traditional dynamic images are motionless and do not depict wall motion. In this article, the authors investigate the degree to which perfusion defects can be detected from the dynamic information conveyed by 5D images, a problem that is particularly challenging in the absence of multiple fast camera rotations. The authors first demonstrate the usefulness of dynamic reconstructed images for perfusion detection by using linear discriminant analyses (Fisher linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) and a numerical channelized Hotelling observer. The authors then derive three types of discriminant metrics for characterizing the temporal kinetic information in reconstructed dynamic images for differentiating perfusion defects from normal cardiac perfusion, which are the Fisher linear discriminant map, temporal derivative map, and kinetic parametric images. Results are based on the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom with simulation of Tc99m-teboroxime as the imaging agent. The derived metric maps and quantitative contrast-to-noise ratio results demonstrate that the reconstructed dynamic images could yield higher detectability of the perfusion defect than conventional gated reconstruction while providing wall motion information simultaneously. The proposed metrics can be used to produce new types of visualizations, showing wall motion and perfusion information, that may potentially be useful for clinical evaluation. Since 5D imaging permits wall motion and kinetics to be observed

  7. Collimator and energy window optimization for ⁹⁰Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging: A SIMIND Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Hoda Rezaei; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharepapagh, Esmaeil; Azarm, Ahmadreza; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2016-02-01

    Treatment efficacy of radioembolization using Yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres is assessed by the (90)Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging following radioembolization. The radioisotopic image has the potential of providing reliable activity map of (90)Y microspheres distribution. One of the main reasons of the poor image quality in (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging is the continuous and broad energy spectrum of the related bremsstrahlung photons. Furthermore, collimator geometry plays an impressive role in the spatial resolution, sensitivity and image contrast. Due to the relatively poor quality of the (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT images, we intend to optimize the medium-energy (ME) parallel-hole collimator and energy window. The Siemens e.cam gamma camera equipped with a ME collimator and a voxelized phantom was simulated by the SImulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors (SIMIND) program. We used the SIMIND Monte Carlo program to generate the (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT projection of the digital Jaszczak phantom. The phantom consist of the six hot spheres ranging from 9.5 to 31.8mm in diameter, which are used to evaluate the image contrast. In order to assess the effect of the energy window on the image contrast, three energy windows ranging from 60 to 160 KeV, 160 to 400 KeV, and 60 to 400 KeV were set on a (90)Y bremsstrahlung spectrum. As well, the effect of the hole diameter of a ME collimator on the image contrast and bremsstrahlung spectrum were investigated. For the fixed collimator and septa thickness values (3.28 cm and 1.14 mm, respectively), a hole diameter range (2.35-3.3mm) was chosen based on the appropriate balance between the spatial resolution and sensitivity. The optimal energy window for (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging was extended energy window from 60 to 400 KeV. Besides, The optimal value of the hole diameter of ME collimator was obtained 3.3mm. Geometry of the ME parallel-hole collimator and energy

  8. Objective documentation of traumatic brain injury subsequent to mild head trauma: multimodal brain imaging with MEG, SPECT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Lewine, Jeffrey David; Davis, John T; Bigler, Erin D; Thoma, Robert; Hill, Dina; Funke, Michael; Sloan, John Henry; Hall, Sandra; Orrison, William W

    2007-01-01

    To determine to what extent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) can provide objective evidence of brain injury in adult patients with persistent (>1 year) postconcussive symptoms following mild blunt head trauma. A retrospective and blind review of imaging data with respect to the presence of specific somatic, psychiatric, and cognitive complaints. Thirty complete data sets (with MRI, SPECT, MEG, and neuropsychological testing results) were collected between 1994 and 2000 from the MEG programs at the Albuquerque VAMC and the University of Utah. MRI data were evaluated for focal and diffuse structural abnormalities, SPECT data for regions of hypoperfusion, and resting MEG data for abnormal dipolar slow wave activity (DSWA) and epileptiform transients. Structural MRI was abnormal for 4 patients. SPECT showed regions of hypoperfusion in 12 patients, while MEG showed abnormal activity in 19 patients. None of the imaging methods produced findings statistically associated with postconcussive psychiatric symptoms. A significant association was found between basal ganglia hypoperfusion and postconcussive headaches. For patients with cognitive complaints, abnormalities were more likely to be detected by MEG (86%) than either SPECT (40%) or MRI (18%) (P<.01). MEG also revealed significant (P<.01) associations between temporal lobe DSWA and memory problems, parietal DSWA and attention problems, and frontal DSWA and problems in executive function. Functional brain imaging data collected in a resting state can provide objective evidence of brain injury in mild blunt head trauma patients with persistent postconcussive somatic and/or cognitive symptoms. MEG proved to be particularly informative for patients with cognitive symptoms.

  9. Murine cardiac images obtained with focusing pinhole SPECT are barely influenced by extra-cardiac activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; van der Have, Frans; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Viergever, Max A.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high-resolution SPECT images can be obtained with focused multipinhole collimators. Here we investigate the influence of unwanted high tracer uptake outside the scan volume on reconstructed tracer distributions inside the scan volume, for 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scanning in mice. Simulated projections of a digital mouse phantom (MOBY) in a focusing multipinhole SPECT system (U-SPECT-II, MILabs, The Netherlands) were generated. With this system differently sized user-defined scan volumes can be selected, by translating the animal in 3D through the focusing collimators. Scan volume selections were set to (i) a minimal volume containing just the heart, acquired without translating the animal during scanning, (ii) a slightly larger scan volume as is typically applied for the heart, requiring only small XYZ translations during scanning, (iii) same as (ii), but extended further transaxially, and (iv) same as (ii), but extended transaxially to cover the full thorax width (gold standard). Despite an overall negative bias that is significant for the minimal scan volume, all selected volumes resulted in visually similar images. Quantitative differences in the reconstructed myocardium between gold standard and the results from the smaller scan volume selections were small; the 17 standardized myocardial segments of a bull's eye plot, normalized to the myocardial mean of the gold standard, deviated on average 6.0%, 2.5% and 1.9% for respectively the minimal, the typical and the extended scan volume, while maximum absolute deviations were respectively 18.6%, 9.0% and 5.2%. Averaged over ten low-count noisy simulations, the mean absolute deviations were respectively 7.9%, 3.2% and 1.9%. In low-count noisy simulations, the mean and maximum absolute deviations for the minimal scan volume could be reduced to respectively 4.2% and 12.5% by performing a short survey scan of the exterior activity and focusing the remaining scan time at the organ of interest. We

  10. An automatic MRI/SPECT registration algorithm using image intensity and anatomical feature as matching characters: application on the evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2007-05-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of dopamine transporters with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 has recently been proposed to offer valuable information in assessing the functionality of dopaminergic systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and SPECT imaging are important in the noninvasive examination of dopamine concentration in vivo. Therefore, this investigation presents an automated MRI/SPECT image registration algorithm based on a new similarity metric. This similarity metric combines anatomical features that are characterized by specific binding, the mean count per voxel in putamens and caudate nuclei, and the distribution of image intensity that is characterized by normalized mutual information (NMI). A preprocess, a novel two-cluster SPECT normalization algorithm, is also presented for MRI/SPECT registration. Clinical MRI/SPECT data from 18 healthy subjects and 13 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are involved to validate the performance of the proposed algorithms. An appropriate color map, such as "rainbow," for image display enables the two-cluster SPECT normalization algorithm to provide clinically meaningful visual contrast. The proposed registration scheme reduces target registration error from >7 mm for conventional registration algorithm based on NMI to approximately 4 mm. The error in the specific/nonspecific (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 binding ratio, which is employed as a quantitative measure of TRODAT receptor binding, is also reduced from 0.45+/-0.22 to 0.08+/-0.06 among healthy subjects and from 0.28+/-0.18 to 0.12+/-0.09 among PD patients.

  11. Precise fusion of MRI and dual energy 111In WBC/99mTc HDP SPECT/CT in the diabetic foot using companion CT: an example of SPECT/MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Knešaurek, K; Kolker, D; Vatti, S; Heiba, S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to correctly fuse MRI and SPECT ¹¹¹In WBC and ⁹⁹m Tc HDP images using companion CT images. The fused images could be used to assess proper surgical approach in treatment of the diabetic foot. Nine patients who had dual energy ¹¹¹In WBC/ ⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT/CT and MRI studies within a week were investigated in an ongoing project. A GE Infinia SPECT/CT camera and Siemens MAGNETOM 1.5T MR system were used in this study. First, the MRI and corresponding CT images were coregistrated using a transformation based on normalized mutual information. The transformation was saved and used for MRI and ¹¹¹In WBC/ ⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT fusion. A Jaszczak phantom study was also performed in order to estimate accuracy of MRI/ SPECT fusion. The Jaszczak phantom study with 3.7 MBq ¹¹¹In hot sphere showed that MRI/SPECT alignment using the approach described above produced registration with 0.7 ± 0.4 mm accuracy in all three dimensions (3D). The nine clinical cases were visually evaluated and showed 1-2 mm 3D fusion accuracy. MRI provides almost perfect anatomy of soft tissue and bony structures but it may exaggerate the extent of infection. ¹¹¹In WBC/⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT imaging is more accurate for infection detection but lacks anatomical reference. Combination of these images proved an essential adjunct to diagnosis. A clinical utility of the approach is illustrated in two clinical examples. The CT in dual energy ¹¹¹In WBC/⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT/CT studies can be used to accurately fuse and compare ¹¹¹In WBC/⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT and MRI images of the diabetic foot. This can significantly help in conservative treatment planning and limb salvage procedures in treatment of diabetic foot infections.

  12. [New trends and novel possibilities in the clinical use of SPECT/CT imaging].

    PubMed

    Zámbó, Katalin; Schmidt, Erzsébet; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Sarkadi, Margit; Dérczy, Katalin; Szekeres, Sarolta

    2015-03-01

    The application of hybrid equipments and fused techniques has increasing importance in the field of imaging diagnostics. The biggest advantage of these methods is the simultaneous use of several modalities which can give data about the morphological, functional as well as molecular changes of the different diseases at the same time. The facilities, advantages and the applicability of the SPECT/CT (single photon emission computer tomograph/computer tomograph) are summarized in this paper mainly in oncologic diseases, but also in other disorders. The multimodality equipments showing the function and morphology together increase the specificity and diagnostic accuracy of the nuclear medicine methods and were found to be more efficient in the therapy effectiveness, too.

  13. Extracranial metastatic glioblastoma: Appearance on thallium-201-chloride/technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.A.; Schwartz, R.B.; Alexander, E. III; Loeffler, J.S.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Nagel, J.S.; Holman, B.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Sequential thallium-201-chloride and technetium-99m-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained in a patient with extracranial metastatic glioblastoma multiforme. Thallium-201 uptake was high (three times the scalp background) in all pathologically confirmed extracranial metastases and moderate (1.6 times scalp background) intracranially, where most biopsy specimens showed gliosis with scattered atypical astrocytes. Technetium-99m-HMPAO uptake was decreased intracranially in the right frontal and parietal lobes which had been irradiated. It was also decreased in one well-encapsulated scalp lesion and high in another scalp mass with less defined borders. Possible mechanisms of tumor uptake of these agents are reviewed.

  14. Brain imaging with sup 123 I-IMP-SPECT in migraine between attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Schlake, H.P.; Boettger, I.G.G.; Grotemeyer, K.H.; Husstedt, I.W.

    1989-06-01

    {sup 123}I-IMP-SPECT brain imaging was performed in patients with classic migraine (n = 5) and migraine accompagnee (n = 18) during the headache-free interval. A regional reduction of tracer uptake into brain was observed in all patients with migraine accompagnee, while in patients with classic migraine only one case showed an area of decreased activity. The most marked alteration was found in a patient with persisting neurological symptoms (complicated migraine). In most cases the areas of decreased tracer uptake corresponded to headache localization as well as to topography of neurologic symptoms during migraine attacks. It may be concluded that migraine attacks occur in connection with exacerbations of preexisting changes of cerebral autoregulation due to endogenous or exogenous factors.

  15. Clinical evaluation of 360 degrees and 180 degrees data sampling techniques for transaxial SPECT thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Go, R T; MacIntyre, W J; Houser, T S; Pantoja, M; O'Donnell, J K; Feiglin, D H; Sufka, B J; Underwood, D A; Meaney, T F

    1985-07-01

    The most serious controversy regarding the application of transaxial SPECT technology to 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging is the choice between 360 degrees compared with 180 degrees data sampling techniques. The present study utilized the original 360 degrees sampled raw data of 25 patients who had both SPECT 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging and coronary angio/ventriculography for back projection reprocessing to accomplish the 360 degrees/180 degrees comparison. The results show a high incidence, 36% (9/25), of false-positive segmental perfusion abnormality and a high incidence, 24% (6/25), of moderate to severe degree of image distortion with the 180 degrees data sampled reconstructed images. These were not observed in the 360 degrees data sampled reconstructed images. The above findings confirmed our previous preliminary conclusion that even though the 180 degrees data sampling technique has the advantage of providing improved image contrast and reduction in acquisition time it is not a reliable technique and should be abandoned. The 360 degrees data sampling is the technique of choice for transaxial SPECT 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging.

  16. Parametric Cerebrovascular Reserve Images Using Acetazolamide (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT: A Feasibility Study of Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Yoo, Min Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2013-09-01

    Basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used for evaluation of hemodynamics; however, qualitative and subjective visual assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) has been performed in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to generate parametric CVR images and evaluate its feasibility of quantification. Basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT data from 17 patients who underwent bypass surgery or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were used. Spatial normalization was performed and parametric CVR images were generated using relative CVR (rCVR) of each voxel proportional to CVR of the whole brain. Binary parametric maps to show area of relatively reduced CVR were generated also using threshold of rCVR < 90 %. We calculated rCVR of internal carotid artery (ICA) using the parametric CVR images and probabilistic maps for ICA territory. Pre- and postprocedural parametric CVR images were obtained and quantitative rCVRs were compared. The rCVRs were evaluated according to visual grades for regional decreased CVR. Postprocedural rCVR obtained from parametric CVR images increased significantly from preprocedural rCVR. The rCVR was significantly correlated with visual grades of reduced CVR for each side of ICA territories. We generated parametric CVR images for basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT. As a quantitative measurement, rCVR obtained from the parametric image was feasibly assessed hemodynamic abnormalities with preserved anatomical information.

  17. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  18. Analysis of SPECT brain images for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease based on NMF for feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Padilla, P; Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Lang, E W; Chaves, R; Segovia, F; López, M; Salas-González, D; Alvarez, I

    2010-08-02

    This letter presents a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) technique for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) analysis applied to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. A baseline normalized SPECT database containing normalized data for both AD patients and healthy reference patients is selected for this study. The SPECT database is analyzed by applying the Fisher discriminant ratio (FDR) for feature selection and NMF for feature extraction of relevant components of each subject. The main goal of these preprocessing steps is to reduce the large dimensionality of the input data and to relieve the so called "curse of dimensionality" problem. The resulting NMF-transformed set of data, which contains a reduced number of features, is classified by means of a support vector machines based classification technique (SVM). The proposed NMF + SVM method yields up to 94% classification accuracy, with high sensitivity and specificity values (upper than 90%), becoming an accurate method for SPECT image classification. For the sake of completeness, comparison between another recently developed principal component analysis (PCA) plus SVM method and the proposed method is also provided, yielding results for the NMF + SVM approach that outperform the behavior of the reference PCA + SVM or conventional voxel-as-feature (VAF) plus SVM methods.

  19. Fiber bundle probes for interconnecting miniaturized medical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Hofmann, Jens; Marx, Sebastian; Herter, Jonas; Nguyen, Dennis; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning

    2017-02-01

    Miniaturization of medical imaging devices will significantly improve the workflow of physicians in hospitals. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies offer a high level of miniaturization. However, they need fiber optic interconnection solutions for their functional integration. As part of European funded project (InSPECT) we investigate fiber bundle probes (FBPs) to be used as multi-mode (MM) to single-mode (SM) interconnections for PIC modules. The FBP consists of a set of four or seven SM fibers hexagonally distributed and assembled into a holder that defines a multicore connection. Such a connection can be used to connect MM fibers, while each SM fiber is attached to the PIC module. The manufacturing of these probes is explored by using well-established fiber fusion, epoxy adhesive, innovative adhesive and polishing techniques in order to achieve reliable, low-cost and reproducible samples. An innovative hydrofluoric acid-free fiber etching technology has been recently investigated. The preliminary results show that the reduction of the fiber diameter shows a linear behavior as a function of etching time. Different etch rate values from 0.55 μm/min to 2.3 μm/min were found. Several FBPs with three different type of fibers have been optically interrogated at wavelengths of 630nm and 1550nm. Optical losses are found of approx. 35dB at 1550nm for FBPs composed by 80μm fibers. Although FBPs present moderate optical losses, they might be integrated using different optical fibers, covering a broad spectral range required for imaging applications. Finally, we show the use of FBPs as promising MM-to-SM interconnects for real-world interfacing to PIC's.

  20. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  1. Monitoring therapeutic response of human ovarian cancer to trastuzumab by SPECT imaging with (99m)Tc-peptide-Z(HER2:342).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingmian; Zhao, Xinming; Wang, Shijie; Wang, Na; Han, Jingya; Jia, Lizhuo; Ren, Xiuchun

    2015-06-01

    Patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive cancer are candidates for treatment with the anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab. How to systemically assess tumor HER2 expression and identifying appropriate use of anti-HER2 therapies by noninvasive imaging in vivo is an urgent issue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate SPECT imaging of (99m)Tc-Gly-(D)Ala-Gly-Gly-Z(HER2:342) ((99m)Tc-peptide-Z(HER2:342)) for monitoring therapeutic response to trastuzumab in nude mice bearing HER2-positive SKOV-3 xenografts. Nude mice bearing HER2-positive SKOV-3 xenografts were treated with trastuzumab (treatment group) or saline (control) with ten mice in each group. Mice in trastuzumab-treated group were given trastuzumab intraperiotoneally 4 mg/kg on day 1 and 2 mg/kg on day 8; Mice in control group were given physiological saline on day 1 and 8. Mice body weights and tumour volume were monitored every three days during treatment. In vivo SPECT imaging was performed in mice of the two groups using (99m)Tc-peptide-Z(HER2:342) before treatment, on day 8 and 15 after treatment. Radiolabeled probe uptake in tumours was measured as the ratio of radioactive counts in the tumour to that in the contralateral equivalent region (T/NT). After SPECT imaging on day 15, all the mice were euthanized, biodistribution studies of the SKOV-3 xenografts were carried out to validate the imaging results and HER2 expression of the transplanted tumours was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Correlation analysis was performed between T/NT ratios acquired by in vivo SPECT imaging on day 15 and the HER2 level of tumours. In vitro cell binding capacity of (99m)Tc-Z(HER2:342) with SKOV-3 cells in the absence and presence of varying amount of trastuzumab were also conducted in the study. Twenty mice body weight in the two groups gradually increased during treatment, but there was no statistical difference (p > 0.05). Though volumes of SKOV-3 xenografts gradually increased in each

  2. A study to improve the image quality in low-dose computed tomography (SPECT) using filtration.

    PubMed

    Kheruka, Sc; Naithani, Uc; Maurya, Ak; Painuly, Nk; Aggarwal, Lm; Gambhir, S

    2011-01-01

    The output of the X-ray tube used in computed tomography (CT) provides a spectrum of photon energies. Low-energy photons are preferentially absorbed in tissue; the beam spectrum shifts toward the higher energy end as it passes through more tissue, thereby changing its effective attenuation coefficient and producing a variety of artifacts (beam-hardening effects) in images. Filtering of the beam may be used to remove low-energy photon component. The accuracy of attenuation coefficient calculation by bilinear model depends highly upon accuracy of Hounsfield units. Therefore, we have made an attempt to minimize the beam-hardening effects using additional copper filter in the X-ray beam. The quantitative evaluation were made to see the effect of additional filters on resulting CT images. This study was performed on dual-head SPECT (HAWKEYE 4, GE Healthcare) with low-dose CT which acquires images at peak voltages of 120/140 kV and a tube current of 2.5 mA. For the evaluation of image quality, we used CT QA Phantom (PHILIPS) having six different density pins of Water, Polyethylene, Nylon (Aculon), Lexan, Acrylic (Perspex) and Teflon. The axial images were acquired using copper filters of various thicknesses ranging from 1 to 5 mm in steps of 1 mm. The copper filter was designed in such a manner that it fits exactly on the collimator cover of CT X-ray tube. Appropriate fixation of the copper filter was ensured before starting the image acquisition. As our intention was only to see the effect of beam hardening on the attenuation map, no SPECT study was performed. First set of images was acquired without putting any filter into the beam. Then, successively, filters of different thicknesses were placed into the beam and calibration of the CT scanner was performed before acquiring the images. The X-ray tube parameters were kept the same as that of unfiltered X-ray beam. All the acquired image sets were displayed using Xeleris 2 (GE Healthcare) on a high-resolution monitor

  3. Comparison of occupational radiation exposure from myocardial perfusion imaging with Rb-82 PET and Tc-99m SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tout, Deborah; Davidson, Gillian; Hurley, Caroline; Bartley, Michelle; Arumugam, Parthiban; Bradley, Andy

    2014-10-01

    Rubidium-82 (Rb-82) PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has superior diagnostic accuracy, at least similar prognostic value, and lower patient radiation exposure when compared with technetium-99m single-photon emission computed tomography (Tc-99m SPECT) MPI. The aim of this study was to compare occupational radiation exposure from the two modalities and show that improvements for the patient do not come at a cost to staff. Electronic personal dosimeters were worn by staff involved in the administration and imaging of routine clinical Tc-99m SPECT and Rb-82 PET MPI, and during tracer production and QC. To estimate dose to the staff in the event of a medical emergency, a survey meter was placed in close contact with the patient during Rb-82 infusion and imaging, and immediately after administration for Tc-99m SPECT. Mean (SD) whole-body effective dose to staff during a single MPI procedure was 0.4 (0.4) μSv for Rb-82 PET (1110 MBq) and 3.3 (1.7) μSv for Tc-99m SPECT (350 MBq). Staff effective dose during tracer production and QC was low (<0.2 μSv/patient) and comparable between tracers. An additional effective dose was measured at close contact to the patient during, and immediately after, tracer administration, although this will not pose a significant radiation risk to staff with either technique as long as this is not routine practice. There is a significant reduction in effective dose during Rb-82 PET when compared with Tc-99m SPECT MPI because of the short half-life of Rb-82 and reduced patient contact.

  4. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  5. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J.; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer’s Disease (n=38 ), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n=29 ) or healthy normal controls (n=30 ), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject’s CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used. We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  6. Steal phenomenon-induced lung perfusion defects in pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas: assessment with automated perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Tokuda, Osamu; Okada, Munemasa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2010-09-01

    Lung perfusion impairment in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was evaluated by automated deep inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Participants were 14 patients with a single (N=6) or multiple nodular AVFs (N=8) diagnosed by contrast-enhanced CT scan and/or pulmonary angiography. After the injection of 185MBq Tc-99m-macroaggregated albumin, a whole-body scan was obtained to quantify an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt. Subsequently, DIBrH SPECT was obtained using the continuous rotating acquisition mode of a dual-headed SPECT system, which was automatically coregistered with DIBrH CT. The anatomic relationship between AVF and perfusion defects was assessed on the fusion images. The whole-body scan depicted systemic organs indicating the presence of an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt in all the patients. DIBrH SPECT showed 34 perfusion defects in these patients, which were located at the AVF and in the surrounding lungs of the AVF on the fusion images, regardless of the absence of morphologic abnormality on CT in all the patients. These defects were considered to be caused by the 'steal phenomenon' associated with the high and fast pulmonary arterial flow to each AVF, which were more extensive and severe in the multiple AVFs compared with a single AVF (P=0.0012), occasionally extending to the entire lobe with AVF or even to the adjacent lobe. In five patients, the fusion images detected a total of six tiny AVFs with unexpectedly extensive 'steal phenomenon'-induced defects, which had been missed by other radiological imaging techniques. The summed value of the shunt index estimated by the whole-body scan and the lung perfusion defect extent estimated by DIBrH SPECT was significantly correlated with PaO2 in all the patients (P < 0.0001), with a better correlation compared with the shunt index alone. In addition to the right-to-left shunt, 'steal phenomenon

  7. Multimodality imaging using SPECT/CT and MRI and ligand functionalized 99mTc-labeled magnetic microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we used multimodal imaging to investigate biodistribution in rats after intravenous administration of a new 99mTc-labeled delivery system consisting of polymer-shelled microbubbles (MBs) functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), thiolated poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), chitosan, 1,4,7-triacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA), NOTA-super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION), or DTPA-SPION. Methods Examinations utilizing planar dynamic scintigraphy and hybrid imaging were performed using a commercially available single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) system. For SPION containing MBs, the biodistribution pattern of 99mTc-labeled NOTA-SPION and DTPA-SPION MBs was investigated and co-registered using fusion SPECT/CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Moreover, to evaluate the biodistribution, organs were removed and radioactivity was measured and calculated as percentage of injected dose. Results SPECT/CT and MRI showed that the distribution of 99mTc-labeled ligand-functionalized MBs varied with the type of ligand as well as with the presence of SPION. The highest uptake was observed in the lungs 1 h post injection of 99mTc-labeled DTPA and chitosan MBs, while a similar distribution to the lungs and the liver was seen after the administration of PMAA MBs. The highest counts of 99mTc-labeled NOTA-SPION and DTPA-SPION MBs were observed in the lungs, liver, and kidneys 1 h post injection. The highest counts were observed in the liver, spleen, and kidneys as confirmed by MRI 24 h post injection. Furthermore, the results obtained from organ measurements were in good agreement with those obtained from SPECT/CT. Conclusions In conclusion, microbubbles functionalized by different ligands can be labeled with radiotracers and utilized for SPECT/CT imaging, while the incorporation of SPION in MB shells enables imaging using MR. Our investigation revealed that biodistribution

  8. Design and assessment of a novel SPECT system for desktop open-gantry imaging of small animals: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Rahmim, Arman; Sarkar, Saeed; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Given increasing efforts in biomedical research utilizing molecular imaging methods, development of dedicated high-performance small-animal SPECT systems has been growing rapidly in the last decade. In the present work, we propose and assess an alternative concept for SPECT imaging enabling desktop open-gantry imaging of small animals. Methods: The system, PERSPECT, consists of an imaging desk, with a set of tilted detector and pinhole collimator placed beneath it. The object to be imaged is simply placed on the desk. Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical simulations were utilized to accurately model and evaluate the proposed concept and design. Furthermore, a dedicated image reconstruction algorithm, finite-aperture-based circular projections (FABCP), was developed and validated for the system, enabling more accurate modeling of the system and higher quality reconstructed images. Image quality was quantified as a function of different tilt angles in the acquisition and number of iterations in the reconstruction algorithm. Furthermore, more complex phantoms including Derenzo, Defrise, and mouse whole body were simulated and studied. Results: The sensitivity of the PERSPECT was 207 cps/MBq. It was quantitatively demonstrated that for a tilt angle of 30°, comparable image qualities were obtained in terms of normalized squared error, contrast, uniformity, noise, and spatial resolution measurements, the latter at ∼0.6 mm. Furthermore, quantitative analyses demonstrated that 3 iterations of FABCP image reconstruction (16 subsets/iteration) led to optimally reconstructed images. Conclusions: The PERSPECT, using a novel imaging protocol, can achieve comparable image quality performance in comparison with a conventional pinhole SPECT with the same configuration. The dedicated FABCP algorithm, which was developed for reconstruction of data from the PERSPECT system, can produce high quality images for small-animal imaging via accurate modeling of the system as

  9. First Results in the Development of a Compton Probe Prototype for Prostate Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, G.

    2004-07-01

    Compton imaging offers the possibility to improve significantly prostate imaging. Current radiotracer techniques, such as PET, SPECT or planar scintigraphy, suffer from photon attenuation in the tissue, poor resolution or low efficiency. The development of a Compton probe employing silicon as scatter detector makes possible to obtain a considerable benefit over present instrumentation. Electronic collimation overcomes the resolution-efficiency tradeoff imposed by mechanical collimators, and due to its near field operation, both high resolution and high counting efficiency can be achieved. Silicon pad sensors and low noise electronics are being optimized for this application. A Compton probe prototype has been developed, proving its viability and enabling further steps towards the construction of a clinical prototype.

  10. Image processing for HTS SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Koetitz, R.; Itozaki, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabe, U.

    2005-10-01

    An HTS SQUID probe microscope has been developed using a high-permeability needle to enable high spatial resolution measurement of samples in air even at room temperature. Image processing techniques have also been developed to improve the magnetic field images obtained from the microscope. Artifacts in the data occur due to electromagnetic interference from electric power lines, line drift and flux trapping. The electromagnetic interference could successfully be removed by eliminating the noise peaks from the power spectrum of fast Fourier transforms of line scans of the image. The drift between lines was removed by interpolating the mean field value of each scan line. Artifacts in line scans occurring due to flux trapping or unexpected noise were removed by the detection of a sharp drift and interpolation using the line data of neighboring lines. Highly detailed magnetic field images were obtained from the HTS SQUID probe microscope by the application of these image processing techniques.

  11. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  12. SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) Scan

    MedlinePlus

    SPECT scan Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scan lets your doctor analyze the function of some of your internal organs. A SPECT scan is a type of nuclear imaging test, ...

  13. Utility of SPECT/CT as an adjunct to planar whole body I-131 imaging: liver metastasis from papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Hall, Lance; Wilson, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    One of the major limitations of planar I-131 imaging is its lack of anatomic precision. SPECT/CT offers the benefit of precise anatomic localization that planar imaging lacks. Whether for confirmation of physiologic uptake or true pathology, SPECT/CT has an important role to play in clarifying equivocal findings. We present a case of papillary thyroid cancer metastatic to the liver, a relatively rare scenario. SPECT/CT allowed definitive lesion characterization at the time of the patient's visit to the nuclear medicine department.

  14. Characteristics of images of angiographically proven normal coronary arteries acquired by adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT with CT attenuation correction changed stepwise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Haruki; Kozono, Nami; Tanakamaru, Yoshiki; Idei, Naomi; Ohashi, Norihiko; Ohtsubo, Hideki; Okada, Takenori; Yasunobu, Yuji; Kaseda, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    Although several studies have shown the diagnostic and prognostic value of CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD), this issue remains a matter of debate. To clarify the characteristics of CT-AC SPECT images that might potentially improve diagnostic performance, we analyzed images acquired using adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT equipped with IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT (SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT) from patients with angiographically proven normal coronary arteries after changing the CT attenuation correction (CT-AC) in a stepwise manner. We enrolled 72 patients (Male 36, Female 36) with normal coronary arteries according to findings of invasive coronary angiography or CT-angiography within three months after a SPECT/CT study. Projection images were reconstructed at CT-AC values of (-), 40, 60, 80 and 100 % using a CT number conversion program according to our definition and analyzed using polar maps according to sex. CT attenuation corrected segments were located from the mid- and apical-inferior spread through the mid- and apical-septal regions and finally to the basal-anterior and basal- and mid-lateral regions in males, and from the mid-inferior region through the mid-septal and mid-anterior, and mid-lateral regions in females as the CT-AC values increased. Segments with maximal mean counts shifted from the apical-anterior to mid-anterolateral region under both stress and rest conditions in males, whereas such segments shifted from the apical-septal to the mid-anteroseptal region under both stress and rest conditions in females. We clarified which part of the myocardium and to which degree CT-AC affects it in adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT images by changing the CT-AC value stepwise. We also identified sex-specific shifts of segments with maximal mean counts that changed as

  15. Cumulative sums for edge determination of a single object in PET and SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protonotarios, Nicholas E.; Spyrou, George M.; Kastis, George A.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of edge determination of a single object in reconstructed nuclear medicine images has been examined thoroughly in the past, nevertheless most of the investigation has focused on the concepts of either numerical sinogram differentiation or segmentation. This work aims to develop an automated method for determining the contour of a single convex object in PET and SPECT reconstructed images, which can be used for computing body edges for attenuation correction, as well as for eliminating streak artifacts outside the specific object. This was accomplished by implementing a modified cumulative sums (CUSUM) scheme in the sinogram. Our method can automatically detect the object's boundary in the reconstructed image. This approach has been tested in simulated as well as real phantoms and it performed efficiently for all convex objects. We were able to detect the contour of a single object in the image space, which in turn enabled us to eliminate streak artifacts outside and thus to obtain body edges necessary for attenuation correction.

  16. Numerical surrogates for human observers in myocardial motion evaluation from SPECT image

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Thibault; Kalayehis, Mahdi M.; Parages, Felipe M.; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    In medical imaging, the gold standard for image-quality assessment is a task-based approach in which one evaluates human observer performance for a given diagnostic task (e.g., detection of a myocardial perfusion or motion defect). To facilitate practical task-based image-quality assessment, model observers are needed as approximate surrogates for human observers. In cardiac-gated SPECT imaging, diagnosis relies on evaluation of the myocardial motion as well as perfusion. Model observers for the perfusion-defect detection task have been studied previously, but little effort has been devoted toward development of a model observer for cardiac-motion defect detection. In this work describe two model observers for predicting human observer performance in detection of cardiac-motion defects. Both proposed methods rely on motion features extracted using previously reported deformable mesh model for myocardium motion estimation. The first method is based on a Hotelling linear discriminant that is similar in concept to that used commonly for perfusion-defect detection. In the second method, based on relevance vector machines (RVM) for regression, we compute average human observer performance by first directly predicting individual human observer scores, and then using multi reader receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Our results suggest that the proposed RVM model observer can predict human observer performance accurately, while the new Hotelling motion-defect detector is somewhat less effective. PMID:23981533

  17. Real-time landmark-based unrestrained animal tracking system for motion-corrected PET/SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Goddard; S.S. Gleason; M.J. Paulus; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Mark Smith; Andrew Weisenberger; Benjamin Welch; Randolph Wojcik

    2003-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Jefferson Lab and are collaborating to develop a new high-resolution single photon emission tomography (SPECT) instrument to image unrestrained laboratory animals. This technology development will allow functional imaging studies to be performed on the animals without the use of anesthetic agents. This technology development could have eventual clinical applications for performing functional imaging studies on patients that cannot remain still (Parkinson's patients, Alzheimer's patients, small children, etc.) during a PET or SPECT scan. A key component of this new device is the position tracking apparatus. The tracking apparatus is an integral part of the gantry and designed to measure the spatial position of the animal at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with sub-millimeter accuracy. Initial work focuses on brain studies where anesthetic agents or physical restraint can significantly impact physiologic processes.

  18. Evaluation of the olfactory nerve transport function by SPECT-MRI fusion image with nasal thallium-201 administration.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hideaki; Taki, Junichi; Yamada, Masato; Washiyama, Kohshin; Amano, Ryohei; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Matsui, Osamu; Tatsutomi, Shinji; Yagi, Sayaka; Tsuchida, Asuka; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Kinuya, Seigo; Miwa, Takaki

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize the human olfactory transport pathway to the brain by performing imaging after nasal thallium-201 ((201)Tl) administration. Healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study after giving informed consent (five males, 35-51 years old). The subjects were nasally administered (201)TlCl into either the olfactory cleft. Twenty-four hours later, uptake of (201)Tl was detected by a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/X-ray computed tomography hybrid system. For each subject, an MRI image was obtained and merged with the SPECT image. The peak of the (201)Tl uptake entered into the olfactory bulb in the anterior skull base through the cribriform lamina 24 h after nasal administration of (201)Tl. No participant had olfactory disturbance after treatment. Nasal (201)Tl administration was safely used to assess the direct pathway to the brain via the nose in healthy volunteers with normal olfactory threshold.

  19. Comparison of two I-123 labeled SPECT probes, for the dopamine transporter in non-human primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, M.S.; Scanley, B.E.; Al-Tikrite, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    A comparative SPECT evaluation of the regional uptake of 28-carboisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (IP-CIT) and 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) was performed to assess the improved specificity of IP-CIT over {beta}-CIT for the dopamine (DE) transporter, as shown previously by in vitro studies (n=10), ranging from 7 to 10 hours with 6.9 to 15 mCi injected dose, were completed in 3 baboons. Peripheral metabolism of the two ligands were similar The SPECT images utilized ROIs over striatum (which reflect DA transporters), midbrain (previously shown for {beta}-CIT to reflect primarily serotonin transporters), and the occipital lobe (a region of non-specific uptake). The time to peak specific striatal uptake (striatal minus occipital activity) was similar for IP-CIT and {beta}-CIT (377{plus_minus}60 and 410{plus_minus}60 min, respectively); whereas midbrain peak activity occurred at a significantly earlier time for IP-CIT (21{plus_minus}4 min) as compared to {beta}-CIT (60{plus_minus}17 min). At time of peak specific striatal activity, striatal to occipital ratios were 2.7+0.6 for IP-CIT and 7.6{plus_minus}0.7 for {beta}-CIT, and at time of peak midbrain activity, midbrain to occipital ratios were 1.1{plus_minus}0.1 for IP-CIT, and 1.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. At peak specific striatal time, normalized regional uptake values ({mu}Ci/cc per {mu}Ci injected dose per g body mass) for the striatum were 4.9{plus_minus}1.1 IP-CIT and 5.2{plus_minus}0.7 {beta}-CIT, whereas for the occipital lobe normalized regional uptake values were 1.9{plus_minus}0.4 IP-CIT and 0.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. Similar regional kinetics in the striatum were observed, as both ligands demonstrate comparable peak striatal uptake and time to peak.

  20. [Elaboration of the SPM template for the standardization of SPECT images with 123I-Ioflupane].

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, F J; García-Solís, D; Luis-Simón, F J; Marín-Oyaga, V A; Carrillo, F; Mir, P; Vázquez-Albertino, R J

    2013-01-01

    Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) is a widely used produced for normalization of functional images. This study has aimed to develop a normalization template of (123)I-Ioflupane SPECT-imaging DaTSCAN(®), GE Healthcare), not available in SPM5, and to validate it compared to other quantification methods. In order to write the template we retrospectively selected 26 subjects who had no evidence of nigrostriatal degeneration and whose age distribution was similar to that of the patients in the usual practice of our Department: 2 subjects (7.6%) were < 35 years, 9 between 35-65 years (34.6%) and 15 > 65 years (57.7%). All the studies were normalized with the T1-template available in SPM5 and an average image of the value was obtained for each voxel. For validation we analyzed 60 patients: 30 with idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (iPD) with right involvement (66.83±12.20 years) and 30 with essential tremor patients (ET) (67.27±8.33 years). Specific uptake rates (SUR) of different striatal regions were compared after image normalization with our template and the application of a semiautomated VOIs-map created with Analyze v9.0 ((©)BIR, Mayo Clinic), against two quantification methods: a) manual adjustment of a ROIs-map drawn in Analyze, and b) semi-automated method (HERMES-BRASS) with normalization and implementation of VOIs-map. No statistically significant differences in the iPD/ET discriminatory capacity between the three methods analyzed were observed (p<0,001). The correlation of SUR after normalization with our «template» was higher than that obtained by method b) (R>0,871, p<0,001). This difference was greater in patients with PD. Our study demonstrates the efficacy of our SPM «template» for (123)I-Ioflupane SPECT-imaging, obtained from normalization with «T1-template». Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of extraneous mispositioned events on motion-corrected brain SPECT images of freely moving animals.

    PubMed

    Angelis, Georgios I; Ryder, William J; Bashar, Rezaul; Fulton, Roger R; Meikle, Steven R

    2014-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging of freely moving small animals would allow a wide range of important neurological processes and behaviors to be studied, which are normally inhibited by anesthetic drugs or precluded due to the animal being restrained. While rigid body motion of the head can be tracked and accounted for in the reconstruction, activity in the torso may confound brain measurements, especially since motion of the torso is more complex (i.e., nonrigid) and not well correlated with that of the head. The authors investigated the impact of mispositioned events and attenuation due to the torso on the accuracy of motion corrected brain images of freely moving mice. Monte Carlo simulations of a realistic voxelized mouse phantom and a dual compartment phantom were performed. Each phantom comprised a target and an extraneous compartment which were able to move independently of each other. Motion correction was performed based on the known motion of the target compartment only. Two SPECT camera geometries were investigated: a rotating single head detector and a stationary full ring detector. The effects of motion, detector geometry, and energy of the emitted photons (hence, attenuation) on bias and noise in reconstructed brain regions were evaluated. The authors observed two main sources of bias: (a) motion-related inconsistencies in the projection data and (b) the mismatch between attenuation and emission. Both effects are caused by the assumption that the orientation of the torso is difficult to track and model, and therefore cannot be conveniently corrected for. The motion induced bias in some regions was up to 12% when no attenuation effects were considered, while it reached 40% when also combined with attenuation related inconsistencies. The detector geometry (i.e., rotating vs full ring) has a big impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed images, with the full ring detector being more advantageous. Motion

  2. Impact of extraneous mispositioned events on motion-corrected brain SPECT images of freely moving animals

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, Georgios I. Ryder, William J.; Bashar, Rezaul; Meikle, Steven R.; Fulton, Roger R.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging of freely moving small animals would allow a wide range of important neurological processes and behaviors to be studied, which are normally inhibited by anesthetic drugs or precluded due to the animal being restrained. While rigid body motion of the head can be tracked and accounted for in the reconstruction, activity in the torso may confound brain measurements, especially since motion of the torso is more complex (i.e., nonrigid) and not well correlated with that of the head. The authors investigated the impact of mispositioned events and attenuation due to the torso on the accuracy of motion corrected brain images of freely moving mice. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a realistic voxelized mouse phantom and a dual compartment phantom were performed. Each phantom comprised a target and an extraneous compartment which were able to move independently of each other. Motion correction was performed based on the known motion of the target compartment only. Two SPECT camera geometries were investigated: a rotating single head detector and a stationary full ring detector. The effects of motion, detector geometry, and energy of the emitted photons (hence, attenuation) on bias and noise in reconstructed brain regions were evaluated. Results: The authors observed two main sources of bias: (a) motion-related inconsistencies in the projection data and (b) the mismatch between attenuation and emission. Both effects are caused by the assumption that the orientation of the torso is difficult to track and model, and therefore cannot be conveniently corrected for. The motion induced bias in some regions was up to 12% when no attenuation effects were considered, while it reached 40% when also combined with attenuation related inconsistencies. The detector geometry (i.e., rotating vs full ring) has a big impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed images, with the full ring detector being more

  3. Improved scatter correction with factor analysis for planar and SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Peter; Rahmim, Arman; Gültekin, Selma; Šámal, Martin; Ljungberg, Michael; Mirzaei, Siroos; Segars, Paul; Szczupak, Boguslaw

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative nuclear medicine imaging is an increasingly important frontier. In order to achieve quantitative imaging, various interactions of photons with matter have to be modeled and compensated. Although correction for photon attenuation has been addressed by including x-ray CT scans (accurate), correction for Compton scatter remains an open issue. The inclusion of scattered photons within the energy window used for planar or SPECT data acquisition decreases the contrast of the image. While a number of methods for scatter correction have been proposed in the past, in this work, we propose and assess a novel, user-independent framework applying factor analysis (FA). Extensive Monte Carlo simulations for planar and tomographic imaging were performed using the SIMIND software. Furthermore, planar acquisition of two Petri dishes filled with 99mTc solutions and a Jaszczak phantom study (Data Spectrum Corporation, Durham, NC, USA) using a dual head gamma camera were performed. In order to use FA for scatter correction, we subdivided the applied energy window into a number of sub-windows, serving as input data. FA results in two factor images (photo-peak, scatter) and two corresponding factor curves (energy spectra). Planar and tomographic Jaszczak phantom gamma camera measurements were recorded. The tomographic data (simulations and measurements) were processed for each angular position resulting in a photo-peak and a scatter data set. The reconstructed transaxial slices of the Jaszczak phantom were quantified using an ImageJ plugin. The data obtained by FA showed good agreement with the energy spectra, photo-peak, and scatter images obtained in all Monte Carlo simulated data sets. For comparison, the standard dual-energy window (DEW) approach was additionally applied for scatter correction. FA in comparison with the DEW method results in significant improvements in image accuracy for both planar and tomographic data sets. FA can be used as a user

  4. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: planar images generated from V/Q SPECT are not a reliable substitute for traditional planar V/Q scan.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Abgral, Ronan; Jaffrelot, Morgan; Delluc, Aurelien; Gut-Gobert, Christophe; Querellou, Solène; Cornily, Jean-Christophe; Le Gal, Grégoire; Salaün, Pierre-Yves

    2012-07-01

    The use of summed planar images generated from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy has been proposed as a substitute for planar V/Q scans in order to use the revised PIOPED interpretation criteria when only SPECT acquisition is performed in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. The aim was to evaluate the accuracy of angular summed planar scans in comparison with true planar images. Patients included in the 'SPECT study' assessing the diagnostic performance of V/Q SPECT were analysed. Angular summed planar images were generated from SPECT acquisition data and compared with true planar scans. Angular summed planar images were successfully generated for 246 patients. Regarding interobserver variability, the interpretation result was different for 15 (6%) summed planar scans with an excellent degree of agreement (κ=0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.88-0.96). With regard to intermodality interpretation variability between conventional planar and angular summed images, the result was different for 63 (26%) of 246 patients with an intermodality degree of agreement of κ=0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73). Planar images generated from SPECT V/Q scintigraphy are not a reliable substitute for true planar V/Q images.

  5. Quantitative (177)Lu SPECT imaging using advanced correction algorithms in non-reference geometry.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, M; Cozzella, M L; Fazio, A; De Felice, P; Iaccarino, G; D'Andrea, M; Ungania, S; Cazzato, M; Schmidt, K; Kimiaei, S; Strigari, L

    2016-12-01

    Peptide receptor therapy with (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues is a promising tool in the management of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours. The aim of this work was to perform accurate activity quantification of (177)Lu in complex anthropomorphic geometry using advanced correction algorithms. Acquisitions were performed on the higher (177)Lu photopeak (208keV) using a Philips IRIX gamma camera provided with medium-energy collimators. System calibration was performed using a 16mL Jaszczak sphere surrounded by non-radioactive water. Attenuation correction was performed using μ-maps derived from CT data, while scatter and septal penetration corrections were performed using the transmission-dependent convolution-subtraction method. SPECT acquisitions were finally corrected for dead time and partial volume effects. Image analysis was performed using the commercial QSPECT software. The quantitative SPECT approach was validated on an anthropomorphic phantom provided with a home-made insert simulating a hepatic lesion. Quantitative accuracy was studied using three tumour-to-background activity concentration ratios (6:1, 9:1, 14:1). For all acquisitions, the recovered total activity was within 12% of the calibrated activity both in the background region and in the tumour. Using a 6:1 tumour-to-background ratio the recovered total activity was within 2% in the tumour and within 5% in the background. Partial volume effects, if not properly accounted for, can lead to significant activity underestimations in clinical conditions. In conclusion, accurate activity quantification of (177)Lu can be obtained if activity measurements are performed with equipment traceable to primary standards, advanced correction algorithms are used and acquisitions are performed at the 208keV photopeak using medium-energy collimators. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic molecular imaging of cardiac innervation using a dual headpinhole SPECT system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jicun; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Reutter, BryanW.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-03-29

    Typically 123I-MIBG is used for the study of innervation andfunction of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. The protocolinvolves two studies: first a planar or SPECT scan is performed tomeasure initial uptake of the tracer, followed some 3-4 hours later byanother study measuring the wash-out of the tracer from the heart. A fastwash-out is indicative of a compromised heart. In this work, a dual headpinhole SPECT system was used for imaging the distribution and kineticsof 123I-MIBG in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) andnormotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The system geometry was calibratedbased on a nonlinear point projection fitting method using a three-pointsource phantom. The angle variation effect of the parameters was modeledwith a sinusoidal function. A dynamic acquisition was performed byinjecting 123I-MIBG into rats immediately after starting the dataacquisition. The detectors rotated continuously performing a 360o dataacquisition every 90 seconds. We applied the factor analysis (FA)methodand region of interest (ROI) sampling method to obtain time activitycurves (TACs)in the blood pool and myocardium and then appliedtwo-compartment modeling to estimate the kinetic parameters. Since theinitial injection bolus is too fast for obtaining a consistenttomographic data set in the first few minutes of the study, we appliedthe FA method directly to projections during the first rotation. Then thetime active curves for blood and myocardial tissue were obtained from ROIsampling. The method was applied to determine if there were differencesin the kinetics between SHR and WKY rats and requires less time byreplacing the delayed scan at 3-4 hours after injection with a dynamicacquisition over 90 to 120 minutes. The results of a faster washout and asmaller distribution volume of 123IMIBG near the end of life in the SHRmodel of hypertrophic cardiomyopthy may be indicative of a failing heartin late stages of heart failure.

  7. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Song, Shaoli; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring.

  8. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring. PMID:28251150

  9. Cost-minimization analysis of intravenous adenosine and dipyridamole in thallous chloride TI 201 SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Hilleman, D E; Lucas, B D; Mohiuddin, S M; Holmberg, M J

    1997-09-01

    To conduct a cost-minimization analysis of intravenous adenosine and intravenous dipyridamole in thallous chloride TI 201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging. A retrospective, open-label, cost-minimization analysis. University hospital, outpatient nuclear medicine department. Eighty-three patients undergoing dipyridamole TI 201 SPECT and 166 patients undergoing adenosine TI 201 SPECT. A cost-minimization analysis was conducted using a direct cost accounting approach estimating institutional costs. For the purpose of this study, sensitivity and specificity between adenosine SPECT and dipyridamole SPECT were assumed to be identical. Key costs evaluated included acquisition, administration, monitoring, treatment of adverse effects, follow-up care, and repeat tests. Adenosine increased heart rate and lowered blood pressure to a significantly greater extent than dipyridamole. The frequency of adverse reactions was not significantly different (p = 0.103) between adenosine (1.64 +/- 1.32 per patient) and dipyridamole (1.36 +/- 1.23 per patient). The frequency of prolonged and late-onset adverse effects was significantly greater for dipyridamole than for adenosine (p < 0.001). The frequency of adverse events requiring medical intervention was statistically greater for dipyridamole (24%) compared with adenosine (5%) (p < 0.00001). Total cost was significantly less for adenosine ($378.50 +/- $128.20 per patient) compared with dipyridamole ($485.60 +/- $230.40). Although adenosine had a significantly greater acquisition cost than dipyridamole (p < 0.0001), administration, monitoring, and adverse reaction costs were significantly less for adenosine than for dipyridamole. The cost of using dipyridamole is significantly greater than the cost of using adenosine despite adenosine's high acquisition cost. Adenosine is less expensive to use because of lower administration costs, monitoring costs, and adverse effect costs. Adenosine should

  10. ⁹⁹mTc-HYNIC-MPG: a novel SPECT probe for targeting mutated EGFR.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zun-Yu; Song, Yan; Kang, Zhao-Ting; Wang, Ping; Sun, Xi-Lin; Shen, Bao-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important biomarker for cancer diagnosis and molecular target for many anticancer drugs. Localizing EGFR and evaluating EGFR mutational status can help to identify patients who are potentially the most suitable ones for targeted treatments. Hence, we developed a novel EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor labeled with (99m)Tc ((99m)Tc-HYNIC-MPG) and evaluated its EGFR binding capacity in vitro and in vivo. This molecular probe was synthesized by one-step method that is simple and highly efficient. Importantly, the uptake rate for (99m)Tc-HYNIC-MPG in the liver was as low as 28.44 ± 0.15% (mean ± SD, n=3). This finding presents for the first time that (99m)Tc-HYNIC-MPG can bind to mutated EGFR efficiently and thus provides a novel molecular tool to detect mutated EGFR and suppress tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Impact of the Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction Technique on Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Bone SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Sibille, Louis; Chambert, Benjamin; Alonso, Sandrine; Barrau, Corinne; D'Estanque, Emmanuel; Al Tabaa, Yassine; Collombier, Laurent; Demattei, Christophe; Kotzki, Pierre-Olivier; Boudousq, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a routine bone SPECT/CT protocol using CT reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) with an optimized protocol using low-dose CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this prospective study, enrolled patients underwent bone SPECT/CT, with 1 SPECT acquisition followed by 2 randomized CT acquisitions: FBP CT (FBP; noise index, 25) and ASiR CT (70% ASiR; noise index, 40). The image quality of both attenuation-corrected SPECT and CT images was visually (5-point Likert scale, 2 interpreters) and quantitatively (contrast ratio [CR] and signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]) estimated. The CT dose index volume, dose-length product, and effective dose were compared. Seventy-five patients were enrolled in the study. Quantitative attenuation-corrected SPECT evaluation showed no inferiority for contrast ratio and SNR issued from FBP CT or ASiR CT (respectively, 13.41 ± 7.83 vs. 13.45 ± 7.99 and 2.33 ± 0.83 vs. 2.32 ± 0.84). Qualitative image analysis showed no difference between attenuation-corrected SPECT images issued from FBP CT or ASiR CT for both interpreters (respectively, 3.5 ± 0.6 vs. 3.5 ± 0.6 and 3.6 ± 0.5 vs. 3.6 ± 0.5). Quantitative CT evaluation showed no inferiority for SNR between FBP and ASiR CT images (respectively, 0.93 ± 0.16 and 1.07 ± 0.17). Qualitative image analysis showed no quality difference between FBP and ASiR CT images for both interpreters (respectively, 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 and 4.0 ± 0.1 vs. 4.0 ± 0.2). Mean CT dose index volume, dose-length product, and effective dose for ASiR CT (3.0 ± 2.0 mGy, 148 ± 85 mGy⋅cm, and 2.2 ± 1.3 mSv) were significantly lower than for FBP CT (8.5 ± 3.7 mGy, 365 ± 160 mGy⋅cm, and 5.5 ± 2.4 mSv). The use of 70% ASiR blending in bone SPECT/CT can reduce the CT radiation dose by 60%, with no sacrifice in attenuation-corrected SPECT and CT image quality, compared with the conventional protocol using FBP CT

  12. Performance of coincidence imaging with long-lived positron emitters as an alternative to dedicated PET and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandström, Mattias; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Kairemo, Kalevi; Lundqvist, Hans; Lubberink, Mark

    2004-12-01

    An important application of quantitative imaging in nuclear medicine is the estimation of absorbed doses in radionuclide therapy. Depending on the radionuclide used for therapy, quantitative imaging of the kinetics of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical could be done using planar imaging, SPECT or PET. Since many nuclear medicine departments have a gamma camera system that is also suitable for coincidence imaging, the performance of these systems with respect to quantitative imaging of PET isotopes that could be of use in radionuclide dosimetry is of interest. We investigated the performance of a gamma camera with coincidence imaging capabilities with 99mTc, 111In, 18F and 76Br and a dedicated PET system with 18F and 76Br, using a single standard set of phantom measurements. Here, 76Br was taken as a typical example of prompt gamma-emitting PET isotopes that are applicable in radionuclide therapy dosimetry such as 86Y and 124I. Image quality measurements show comparable image contrasts for 76Br coincidence imaging and 111In SPECT. Although the spatial resolution of coincidence imaging is better than single photon imaging, the contrast obtained with 76Br is not better than that with 99mTc or 111In because of the prompt gamma involved. Additional improvements are necessary to allow for quantitative coincidence imaging of long-lived, prompt gamma producing positron emitters.

  13. Real-time Awake Animal Motion Tracking System for SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2008-01-01

    Enhancements have been made in the development of a real-time optical pose measurement and tracking system that provides 3D position and orientation data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained small animals. Three optical cameras with infrared (IR) illumination view the head movements of an animal enclosed in a transparent burrow. Markers placed on the head provide landmark points for image segmentation. Strobed IR LED s are synchronized to the cameras and illuminate the markers to prevent motion blur for each set of images. The system using the three cameras automatically segments the markers, detects missing data, rejects false reflections, performs trinocular marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal s head. Improvements have been made in methods for segmentation, tracking, and 3D calculation to give higher speed and more accurate measurements during a scan. The optical hardware has been installed within a Siemens MicroCAT II small animal scanner at Johns Hopkins without requiring functional changes to the scanner operation. The system has undergone testing using both phantoms and live mice and has been characterized in terms of speed, accuracy, robustness, and reliability. Experimental data showing these motion tracking results are given.

  14. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Andrew K H; Ramogida, Caterina; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-03-31

    Purpose: Effective use of the 225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both 225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the 225Ac decay chain: 221Fr (218 keV) and 213Bi (440 keV). Methods: Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous 221Fr and 213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to image dynamic 221Fr and 213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a 213Bi generator from 225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Results: Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both 221Fr and 213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in 213Bi images and only rods ≥1.3 mm were resolved in 221Fr images. After eluting the 213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the 225Ac decay chain. Conclusion: A novel imaging method with potential to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the 225

  15. Soft tissue attenuation patterns in stress myocardial perfusion SPECT images: a comparison between supine and upright acquisition systems.

    PubMed

    Chawla, David; Rahaby, Mouyyad; Amin, Amit P; Vashistha, Raj; Alyousef, Tareq; Martinez, Hector X; Doukky, Rami

    2011-04-01

    Soft tissue attenuation patterns and their interaction with body habitus and gender in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)-myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) of upright patient-position acquisition systems are not well described. In a retrospective cross-sectional study, we compared the prevalence and patterns of soft tissue attenuation in two groups of normal SPECT-MPI studies acquired by supine (n = 263) vs upright (n = 212) acquisition systems. Attenuation patterns observed in the study population were: anterior (22.3%), inferior (51.6%) and lateral (18.1%). Anterior attenuation was significantly less in those imaged upright (6.1% vs 35.4%), P < .001; particularly among women (9.5% vs 50.7%), P < .001. Inferior attenuation was more common among women imaged upright (49.5% vs 13.5%), P < .001; but was not affected by imaging position among men. Lateral attenuation was more prevalent in the upright group (24.1% vs 13.3%), P = .002; and had a strong association with female gender (P < .001) and BMI ≥ 30 (P < .001). Upright SPECT-MPI acquisition is associated with a unique attenuation pattern which is vastly different than the supine position. Female gender strongly impacted this attenuation pattern, particularly obese women. Our study is the first to describe, in details, the attenuation patterns with upright imaging and is critical for the accurate interpretation of SPECT-MPI acquired with upright systems.

  16. Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Miao, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaofen; Tang, Xiaodong; Han, Peizhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background Optical imaging (OI) techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging have been widely used to track diseases in a non-invasive manner within living subjects. These techniques generally require bioluminescent and fluorescent probes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using radioactive probes for in vivo molecular OI. Methodology/Principal Findings By taking the advantages of low energy window of light (1.2–3.1 eV, 400–1000 nm) resulting from radiation, radionuclides that emit charged particles such as β+ and β− can be successfully imaged with an OI instrument. In vivo optical images can be obtained for several radioactive probes including 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG), Na18F, Na131I, 90YCl3 and a 90Y labeled peptide that specifically target tumors. Conclusions/Significance These studies demonstrate generalizability of radioactive OI technique. It provides a new molecular imaging strategy and will likely have significant impact on both small animal and clinical imaging. PMID:20208993

  17. Computational tools and methods for objective assessment of image quality in x-ray CT and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Robin

    Computational tools of use in the objective assessment of image quality for tomography systems were developed for computer processing units (CPU) and graphics processing units (GPU) in the image quality lab at the University of Arizona. Fast analytic x-ray projection code called IQCT was created to compute the mean projection image for cone beam multi-slice helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. IQCT was optimized to take advantage of the massively parallel architecture of GPUs. CPU code for computing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) projection images was written calling upon previous research in the image quality lab. IQCT and the SPECT modeling code were used to simulate data for multi-modality SPECT/CT observer studies. The purpose of these observer studies was to assess the benefit in image quality of using attenuation information from a CT measurement in myocardial SPECT imaging. The observer chosen for these studies was the scanning linear observer. The tasks for the observer were localization of a signal and estimation of the signal radius. For the localization study, area under the localization receiver operating characteristic curve (A LROC) was computed as AMeasLROC = 0.89332 ± 0.00474 and ANoLROC = 0.89408 ± 0.00475, where "Meas" implies the use of attenuation information from the CT measurement, and "No" indicates the absence of attenuation information. For the estimation study, area under the estimation receiver operating characteristic curve (AEROC) was quantified as AMeasEROC = 0.55926 ± 0.00731 and ANoEROC = 0.56167 ± 0.00731. Based on these results, it was concluded that the use of CT information did not improve the scanning linear observer's ability to perform the stated myocardial SPECT tasks. The risk to the patient of the CT measurement was quantified in terms of excess effective dose as 2.37 mSv for males and 3.38 mSv for females. Another image quality tool generated within this body of work was a singular value

  18. Optimization of Imaging Parameters for SPECT scans of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 Using Taguchi Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Kai; Wu, Jay; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans using [99mTc]TRODAT-1 can image dopamine transporters and provide valuable diagnostic information of PD. In this study, we optimized the scanning parameters for [99mTc]TRODAT-1/SPECT using the Taguchi analysis to improve image quality. SPECT scans were performed on forty-five healthy volunteers according to an L9 orthogonal array. Three parameters were considered, including the injection activity, uptake duration, and acquisition time per projection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated from the striatum/occipital activity ratio as an image quality index. Ten healthy subjects and fifteen PD patients were used to verify the optimal parameters. The estimated optimal parameters were 962 MBq for [99mTc]TRODAT-1 injection, 260 min for uptake duration, and 60 s/projection for data acquisition. The uptake duration and time per projection were the two dominant factors which had an F-value of 18.638 (38%) and 25.933 (53%), respectively. Strong cross interactions existed between the injection activity/uptake duration and injection activity/time per projection. Therefore, under the consideration of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for radiation protection, we can decrease the injection activity to 740 MBq. The image quality remains almost the same for clinical applications. PMID:25790100

  19. Radiolabeled novel mAb 4G1 for immunoSPECT imaging of EGFRvIII expression in preclinical glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xujie; Dong, Chengyan; Shi, Jiyun; Ma, Teng; Jin, Zhongxia; Jia, Bing; Liu, Zhaofei; Shen, Li; Wang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor mutant III (EGFRvIII) is exclusively expressed in tumors, such as glioblastoma, breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, but never in normal organs. Increasing evidence suggests that EGFRvIII has clinical significance in glioblastoma prognosis due to its enhanced tumorigenicity and chemo/radio resistance, thus the development of an imaging approach to early detect EGFRvIII expression with high specificity is urgently needed. To illustrate this point, we developed a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody 4G1 through mouse immunization, cell fusion and hybridoma screening and then confirmed its specificity and affinity by a serial of assays. Following biodistribution and small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging of 125I-4G1 in EGFRvIII positive/negative tumor-bearing mice were performed and evaluated to verify the tumor accumulation of this radiotracer. The biodistribution indicated that 125I-4G1 showed prominent tumor accumulation at 24 h post-injection, which reached maximums of 11.20 ± 0.75% ID/g and 13.98 ± 0.57% ID/g in F98npEGFRvIII and U87vIII xenografts, respectively. In contrast, 125I-4G1 had lower tumor accumulation in F98npEGFR and U87MG xenografts. Small animal SPECT/CT imaging revealed that 125I-4G1 had a higher tumor uptake in EGFRvIII-positive tumors than that in EGFRvIII-negative tumors. This study demonstrates that radiolabeled 4G1 can serve as a valid probe for the imaging of EGFRvIII expression, and would be valuable into the clinical translation for the diagnosis, prognosis, guiding therapy, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of tumors. PMID:28031526

  20. LROC assessment of non-linear filtering methods in Ga-67 SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Clercq, Stijn; Staelens, Steven; De Beenhouwer, Jan; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2006-03-01

    In emission tomography, iterative reconstruction is usually followed by a linear smoothing filter to make such images more appropriate for visual inspection and diagnosis by a physician. This will result in a global blurring of the images, smoothing across edges and possibly discarding valuable image information for detection tasks. The purpose of this study is to investigate which possible advantages a non-linear, edge-preserving postfilter could have on lesion detection in Ga-67 SPECT imaging. Image quality can be defined based on the task that has to be performed on the image. This study used LROC observer studies based on a dataset created by CPU-intensive Gate Monte Carlo simulations of a voxelized digital phantom. The filters considered in this study were a linear Gaussian filter, a bilateral filter, the Perona-Malik anisotropic diffusion filter and the Catte filtering scheme. The 3D MCAT software phantom was used to simulate the distribution of Ga-67 citrate in the abdomen. Tumor-present cases had a 1-cm diameter tumor randomly placed near the edges of the anatomical boundaries of the kidneys, bone, liver and spleen. Our data set was generated out of a single noisy background simulation using the bootstrap method, to significantly reduce the simulation time and to allow for a larger observer data set. Lesions were simulated separately and added to the background afterwards. These were then reconstructed with an iterative approach, using a sufficiently large number of MLEM iterations to establish convergence. The output of a numerical observer was used in a simplex optimization method to estimate an optimal set of parameters for each postfilter. No significant improvement was found for using edge-preserving filtering techniques over standard linear Gaussian filtering.

  1. Errors Associated With Measurements from Imaging Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging probes, collecting data on particles from about 20 or 50 microns to several centimeters, are the probes that have been collecting data on the droplet and ice microphysics for more than 40 years. During that period, a number of problems associated with the measurements have been identified, including questions about the depth of field of particles within the probes' sample volume, and ice shattering, among others, have been identified. Many different software packages have been developed to process and interpret the data, leading to differences in the particle size distributions and estimates of the extinction, ice water content and radar reflectivity obtained from the same data. Given the numerous complications associated with imaging probe data, we have developed an optical array probe simulation package to explore the errors that can be expected with actual data. We simulate full particle size distributions with known properties, and then process the data with the same software that is used to process real-life data. We show that there are significant errors in the retrieved particle size distributions as well as derived parameters such as liquid/ice water content and total number concentration. Furthermore, the nature of these errors change as a function of the shape of the simulated size distribution and the physical and electronic characteristics of the instrument. We will introduce some methods to improve the retrieval of particle size distributions from real-life data.

  2. Caudate nucleus infarction demonstrated by N-isopropyl-p iodoamphetamine SPECT imaging using a rotating gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.F.; Mueller, S.P.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-10-01

    N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) was used in two patients with previous unilateral basal ganglia infarcts documented by CT of the head. Tomographic images obtained with a commercially available rotating gamma camera equipped with a long-bore collimator showed corresponding areas of decreased uptake in the head of the caudate nuclei. Detection of such small areas of decreased perfusion is possible using SPECT and I-123 radiolabeled IMP.

  3. Value of thallium-201 reinjection after delayed SPECT imaging for predicting reversible ischemia after coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, H.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Mohiuddin, I.H.; Hirata, K.; Ban, T.; Konishi, J. )

    1990-08-15

    The reinjection of a small dose (40 MBq) of thallium-201 after stress and delayed imaging often shows new redistribution in the regions with persistent defect. To assess whether these segments may represent reversible ischemia, reinjection thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed after stress and 3-hour delayed imaging in 24 patients before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The left ventricular myocardium was divided into 5 myocardial segments and regional wall motion was scored on a scale from 0 (normal) to 4 (dyskinesia). Thallium-201 findings were compared with improvement in regional perfusion and wall motion 1 to 2 months after CABG. The reinjection imaging identified new redistribution in 15 of 32 persistent defects (47%) on the 3-hour delayed images. In the study of stress and delayed SPECT imaging, the improvement in perfusion was observed in 34 of 43 segments (79%) exhibiting redistribution and 15 of 32 (47%) segments without redistribution (p less than 0.01). The reinjection SPECT identified new redistribution in 12 of the 15 improved segments that were not detected on the delayed images. Similarly, the improvement in wall motion was observed in 23 of 31 segments (74%) exhibiting redistribution and 14 of 30 segments (47%) without redistribution on the delayed images (p less than 0.05). The reinjection identified new redistribution in 10 of the 14 improved segments that were undetected on the delayed images. The predictive values for improvement in perfusion and wall motion by the reinjection imaging were significantly higher (92 and 89%) than those by the delayed imaging (69 and 62%, respectively, p less than 0.05 each).

  4. Targeted Probes for Cardiovascular MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in studying molecular and cellular processes associated with heart disease. Targeted probes that recognize important biomarkers of atherosclerosis, apoptosis, necrosis, angiogenesis, thrombosis and inflammation have been developed. Discussion This review discusses properties of chemically different types of contrast agents including iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium based nanoparticles or micelles, discrete peptide conjugates and activatable probes. Numerous examples of contrast agents based on these approaches have been used in preclinical MR imaging of cardiovascular diseases. Clinical applications are still under investigation for some selected agents with highly promising initial results. Conclusion Molecular MR imaging shows great potential for the detection, characterization of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases and for monitoring response to therapy. PMID:20539821

  5. Molecular imaging probe development: a chemistry perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael L; Guo, Ning; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive modality that has been widely employed in many aspects of biomedical research; especially those aimed at the early detection of diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative disorders. The field emerged in response to a new research paradigm in healthcare that seeks to integrate detection capabilities for the prediction and prevention of diseases. This approach made a distinct impact in biomedical research as it enabled researchers to leverage the capabilities of molecular imaging probes to visualize a targeted molecular event non-invasively, repeatedly and continuously in a living system. In addition, since such probes are inherently compact, robust, and amenable to high-throughput production, these probes could potentially facilitate screening of preclinical drug discovery, therapeutic assessment and validation of disease biomarkers. They could also be useful in drug discovery and safety evaluations. In this review, major trends in the chemical synthesis and development of positron emission tomography (PET), optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes are discussed. PMID:22943038

  6. Imaging Probe Development Center: a National Institutes of Health core synthesis resource for imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen-Dan; Wu, Haitao; Ruddy, Brian; Griffiths, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    The Imaging Probe Development Center (IPDC) has been set up under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap as part of the molecular libraries and imaging initiatives. It comprises a core synthesis facility dedicated to the preparation of imaging probes, initially for intramural NIH scientists, and later, for the extramural scientific community. The facility opened fully in late 2006, in refurbished laboratories in Rockville, Maryland, and a staff of around a dozen was recruited into place by early 2007; the director was hired in late 2005. The IPDC provides a mechanism for the production of sensitive probes for use by imaging scientists who cannot obtain such probes commercially. The probes to be made will encompass all major imaging modalities including radionuclide, magnetic resonance, and optical. The operation of the IPDC is outlined, together with the results of interim achievements while the IPDC maintained a small temporary laboratory in Bethesda. As of December 2006, a total of eleven probe compositions had been made, and several of these are described with particular mention of those probes intended for use in optical applications.

  7. A flexible high-rate USB2 data acquisition system for PET and SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. Proffitt, W. Hammond, S. Majewski, V. Popov, R.R. Raylman, A.G. Weisenberger, R. Wojcik

    2006-02-01

    A new flexible data acquisition system has been developed to instrument gamma-ray imaging detectors designed by the Jefferson Lab Detector and Imaging Group. Hardware consists of 16-channel data acquisition modules installed on USB2 carrier boards. Carriers have been designed to accept one, two, and four modules. Application trigger rate and channel density determines the number of acquisition boards and readout computers used. Each channel has an independent trigger, gated integrator and a 2.5 MHz 12-bit ADC. Each module has an FPGA for analog control and signal processing. Processing includes a 5 ns 40-bit trigger time stamp and programmable triggering, gating, ADC timing, offset and gain correction, charge and pulse-width discrimination, sparsification, event counting, and event assembly. The carrier manages global triggering and transfers module data to a USB buffer. High-granularity time-stamped triggering is suitable for modular detectors. Time stamped events permit dynamic studies, complex offline event assembly, and high-rate distributed data acquisition. A sustained USB data rate of 20 Mbytes/s, a sustained trigger rate of 300 kHz for 32 channels, and a peak trigger rate of 2.5 MHz to FIFO memory were achieved. Different trigger, gating, processing, and event assembly techniques were explored. Target applications include >100 kHz coincidence rate PET detectors, dynamic SPECT detectors, miniature and portable gamma detectors for small-animal and clinical use.

  8. Evaluation of two conjugate gradient based algorithms for quantitation in cardiac SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sire, P.; Grangeat, P.; Iovleff, S.; Mallon, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    Correction attenuation in SPECT is a very important issue in cardiac imaging. In this paper we evaluate two conjugate gradient (CG) based algorithms to reconstruct an attenuation compensated emission map. The first algorithm is a classic preconditioned CG approach, the second one uses the minimal residual (MR) algorithm. We discuss the emission reconstruction problem and the difficulty to get a good uniformity within the reconstructed cardiac wall. An evaluation on numerical and real phantoms shows that the point spread function (PSF) of the system strongly affects the uniformity. Thus, two essential improvements are made. First, the response of the reconstruction procedure is made isotropic by replacing the classic 1D apodized ramp reconstruction filter with a 2D filter. Second, to improve the spatial resolution, we apply a PSF deconvolution to the projections. A threshold parameter is used to prevent the deconvolution from amplifying high-frequency noise. Stabilization is also achieved by incorporating into the reconstruction algorithms a regularization, which is made spatially adaptive to preserve high contrast within the heart while smoothing the rest of the image. Results obtained on numerical and anatomic phantoms show that the proposed algorithms lead to fast, stabilized and more accurate attenuation compensation.

  9. MO-G-17A-02: Computer Simulation Studies for On-Board Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Prostate Using a Robotic Multi-Pinhole SPECT System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Yan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate prostate imaging onboard radiation therapy machines using a novel robotic, 49-pinhole Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. Methods: Computer-simulation studies were performed for region-of-interest (ROI) imaging using a 49-pinhole SPECT collimator and for broad cross-section imaging using a parallel-hole SPECT collimator. A male XCAT phantom was computersimulated in supine position with one 12mm-diameter tumor added in the prostate. A treatment couch was added to the phantom. Four-minute detector trajectories for imaging a 7cm-diameter-sphere ROI encompassing the tumor were investigated with different parameters, including pinhole focal length, pinhole diameter and trajectory starting angle. Pseudo-random Poisson noise was included in the simulated projection data, and SPECT images were reconstructed by OSEM with 4 subsets and up to 10 iterations. Images were evaluated by visual inspection, profiles, and Root-Mean- Square-Error (RMSE). Results: The tumor was well visualized above background by the 49-pinhole SPECT system with different pinhole parameters while it was not visible with parallel-hole SPECT imaging. Minimum RMSEs were 0.30 for 49-pinhole imaging and 0.41 for parallelhole imaging. For parallel-hole imaging, the detector trajectory from rightto- left yielded slightly lower RMSEs than that from posterior to anterior. For 49-pinhole imaging, near-minimum RMSEs were maintained over a broader range of OSEM iterations with a 5mm pinhole diameter and 21cm focal length versus a 2mm diameter pinhole and 18cm focal length. The detector with 21cm pinhole focal length had the shortest rotation radius averaged over the trajectory. Conclusion: On-board functional and molecular prostate imaging may be feasible in 4-minute scan times by robotic SPECT. A 49-pinhole SPECT system could improve such imaging as compared to broadcross-section parallel-hole collimated SPECT imaging. Multi-pinhole imaging can be improved by

  10. Spatial resolution is dependent on image content for SPECT with iterative reconstruction incorporating distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction.

    PubMed

    Badger, Daniel; Barnden, Leighton

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dependence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) spatial resolution on the content of images for iterative reconstruction with distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction. An experiment was performed using a perturbation technique to measure change in resolution of line sources in simple and complex images with iterative reconstruction with increasing iteration. Projections of the line sources were reconstructed alone and again after the addition of projections of a uniform flood or a complex phantom. An alternative experiment used images of a realistic brain phantom and evaluated an effective spatial resolution by matching the images to the digital version of the phantom convolved with 3D Gaussian kernels. The experiments were performed using ordered subset expectation maximisation iterative reconstruction with and without the use of DDR correction. The results show a significant difference in reconstructed resolution between images of line sources depending on the content of the added image. The full width at half maximum of images of a line source reconstructed using DDR correction increased by 20-30 % when the added image was complex. Without DDR this difference was much smaller and disappeared with increasing iteration. Reported SPECT resolution should be taken as indicative only with regard to clinical imaging if the measurement is made using a point or line source alone and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is used.

  11. Noninvasive quantification of coronary endothelial function by SPECT imaging in children with a history of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Silvana; Pellegrino, Teresa; Storto, Giovanni; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Paladini, Rodolfo; Mainolfi, Ciro; de Leva, Francesco; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    The feasibility of coronary function estimation by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been recently demonstrated. The aim of this study was to apply SPECT imaging in patients with previous Kawasaki disease (KD) to assess the coronary functional status at long-term follow-up of the acute phase of the disease. Sixteen children with a history of KD underwent 99mTc-sestamibi imaging at rest and during the cold pressor test (CPT). Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was estimated by measuring first transit counts in the pulmonary artery and myocardial counts from SPECT images. Coronary endothelial function was expressed as the ratio of the CPT to rest MBF. Six KD patients without coronary artery lesions served as controls and ten with coronary artery aneurysms during the acute phase of the disease were separated into two groups: group 1 (n=4) with regressed and group 2 (n=6) with persistent aneurysm at follow-up. The estimated coronary endothelial function was higher in controls compared to patients with coronary artery aneurysms (2.5±0.3 vs 1.7±0.7, p<0.05). A significant difference in coronary endothelial function among groups was found (F=5.21, p<0.02). Coronary endothelial function was higher in patients of group 1 than in those of group 2 (1.9±0.6 vs 1.4±0.7, p<0.02). SPECT may be applied as a noninvasive method for assessing coronary vascular function in children with a history of KD, demonstrating an impaired response to the CPT, an endothelial-dependent vasodilator stimulus. These findings reinforce the concept that coronary endothelial dysfunction may represent a long-term sequela of KD.

  12. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  13. Genetic Incorporation of Human Metallothionein into the Adenovirus Protein IX for Non-Invasive SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, J. Michael; Bhatia, Shilpa; Khandelwal, Alok; Kovesdi, Imre; Lokitz, Stephen J.; Odaka, Yoshi; Takalkar, Amol M.; Terry, Tracee; Curiel, David T.

    2011-01-01

    As the limits of existing treatments for cancer are recognized, clearly novel therapies must be considered for successful treatment; cancer therapy using adenovirus vectors is a promising strategy. However tracking the biodistribution of adenovirus vectors in vivo is limited to invasive procedures such as biopsies, which are error prone, non-quantitative, and do not give a full representation of the pharmacokinetics involved. Current non-invasive imaging strategies using reporter gene expression have been applied to analyze adenoviral vectors. The major drawback to approaches that tag viruses with reporter genes is that these systems require initial viral infection and subsequent cellular expression of a reporter gene to allow non-invasive imaging. As an alternative to conventional vector detection techniques, we developed a specific genetic labeling system whereby an adenoviral vector incorporates a fusion between capsid protein IX and human metallothionein. Our study herein clearly demonstrates our ability to rescue viable adenoviral particles that display functional metallothionein (MT) as a component of their capsid surface. We demonstrate the feasibility of 99mTc binding in vitro to the pIX-MT fusion on the capsid of adenovirus virions using a simple transchelation reaction. SPECT imaging of a mouse after administration of a 99mTc-radiolabeled virus showed clear localization of radioactivity to the liver. This result strongly supports imaging using pIX-MT, visualizing the normal biodistribution of Ad primarily to the liver upon injection into mice. The ability we have developed to view real-time biodistribution in their physiological milieu represents a significant tool to study adenovirus biology in vivo. PMID:21347423

  14. Collimator selection for SPECT brain imaging: the advantage of high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.P.; Polak, J.F.; Kijewski, M.F.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    We compared a prototype long-bore (LB) high-resolution collimator with a low-energy, general-purpose collimator (LEGP) using 99mTc and /sup 123/I. The LB collimator provided a 56% improvement in tomographic resolution (autocorrelation width) over the LEGP for 99mTc; for /sup 123/I, the gain was 79%, providing substantially improved contrast for small structures. The sensitivity of the LB collimator, however, is only 32% of that of the LEGP. The imaging tasks to be performed on (/sup 123/I)IMP brain scans involve localization and discrimination of small, high-contrast brain structures and detection of abnormalities in shape, size, or uptake, rather than simple detection of lesions. Observer performance in such higher-order imaging tasks is known to depend on high spatial resolution, even at the cost of sensitivity. Patient studies confirmed that, for resolution-limited tasks, the increase in resolution outweighs the increased noise due to a loss in sensitivity. When the tomographic resolution of the LB collimator was degraded by smoothing to that of the LEGP, the noise in the LB images was lower than that of the LEGP by a factor of 2.9 for the same imaging time, demonstrating the advantage of high-resolution detectors and a smooth reconstruction filter over low-resolution detectors without smoothing. Therefore, collimators designed for high resolution, even at substantial cost in sensitivity, are expected to yield significant improvements for brain SPECT. Geometric calculations show that commercially available low-energy, high-resolution cast collimators promise to meet these requirements.

  15. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Mejia, J; Galvis-Alonso, O Y; Castro, A A de; Braga, J; Leite, J P; Simões, M V

    2010-12-01

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  16. Quantification of GABAA receptors in the rat brain with [(123)I]Iomazenil SPECT from factor analysis-denoised images.

    PubMed

    Tsartsalis, Stergios; Moulin-Sallanon, Marcelle; Dumas, Noé; Tournier, Benjamin B; Ghezzi, Catherine; Charnay, Yves; Ginovart, Nathalie; Millet, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In vivo imaging of GABAA receptors is essential for the comprehension of psychiatric disorders in which the GABAergic system is implicated. Small animal SPECT provides a modality for in vivo imaging of the GABAergic system in rodents using [(123)I]Iomazenil, an antagonist of the GABAA receptor. The goal of this work is to describe and evaluate different quantitative reference tissue methods that enable reliable binding potential (BP) estimations in the rat brain to be obtained. Five male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for [(123)I]Iomazenil brain SPECT scans. Binding parameters were obtained with a one-tissue compartment model (1TC), a constrained two-tissue compartment model (2TCc), the two-step Simplified Reference Tissue Model (SRTM2), Logan graphical analysis and analysis of delayed-activity images. In addition, we employed factor analysis (FA) to deal with noise in data. BPND obtained with SRTM2, Logan graphical analysis and delayed-activity analysis was highly correlated with BPF values obtained with 2TCc (r=0.954 and 0.945 respectively, p<0.0001). Equally significant correlations were found between values obtained with 2TCc and SRTM2 in raw and FA-denoised images (r=0.961 and 0.909 respectively, p<0.0001). Scans of at least 100min are required to obtain stable BPND values from raw images while scans of only 70min are sufficient from FA-denoised images. These images are also associated with significantly lower standard errors of 2TCc and SRTM2 BP values. Reference tissue methods such as SRTM2 and Logan graphical analysis can provide equally reliable BPND values from rat brain [(123)I]Iomazenil SPECT. Acquisitions, however, can be much less time-consuming either with analysis of delayed activity obtained from a 20-minute scan 50min after tracer injection or with FA-denoising of images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  18. Clinical Role of Subtraction Ictal SPECT Coregistered to MR Imaging and (18)F-FDG PET in Pediatric Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Perissinotti, Andrés; Setoain, Xavier; Aparicio, Javier; Rubí, Sebastiá; Fuster, Berta Marti; Donaire, Antonio; Carreño, Mar; Bargalló, Nuria; Rumiá, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Gemma; Mayoral, Maria; Sanmartí, Francesc; Pons, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    A precise assessment of the drug-resistant epileptic pediatric population for surgical candidacy is often challenging, and to date there are no evidence-based guidelines for presurgical identification of the epileptogenic zone. To evaluate the usefulness of radionuclide imaging techniques for presurgical evaluation of epileptic pediatric patients, we compared the results of video-electroencephalography (EEG), brain MR imaging, interictal SPECT, ictal SPECT, subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MR imaging (SISCOM), and interictal PET with (18)F-FDG. Fifty-four children with drug-resistant epilepsy who had undergone video-EEG monitoring, brain MR imaging, interictal and ictal brain perfusion SPECT, SISCOM, and (18)F-FDG PET were included in this study. All abnormal findings revealed by these neuroimaging techniques were compared with the presumed location of the epileptogenic zone (PEZ) as determined by video-EEG and clinical data. The proportion of localizing studies for each technique was statistically compared. In the 18 patients who underwent resective brain surgery, neuroimaging results were compared with histopathology results and surgical outcome. SISCOM and (18)F-FDG PET concordance with the PEZ was significantly higher than MR imaging (P < 0.05). MR imaging showed localizing results in 21 of 54 cases (39%), SISCOM in 36 of 54 cases (67%), and (18)F-FDG PET in 31 of 54 cases (57%). If we consider SISCOM and (18)F-FDG PET results together, nuclear medicine imaging techniques showed coinciding video-EEG results in 76% of patients (41/54). In those cases in which MR imaging failed to identify any epileptogenic lesion (61% [33/54]), SISCOM or (18)F-FDG PET findings matched PEZ in 67% (22/33) of cases. SISCOM and (18)F-FDG PET provide complementary presurgical information that matched video-EEG results and clinical data in three fourths of our sample. SISCOM was particularly useful in those cases in which MR imaging findings were abnormal but no epileptogenic

  19. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  20. Molecular platform for design and synthesis of targeted dual-modality imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Zhang, Shanrong; Hao, Guiyang; Hassan, Gedaa; Ramezani, Saleh; Sagiyama, Koji; Lo, Su-Tang; Takahashi, Masaya; Sherry, A Dean; Öz, Orhan K; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-03-18

    We report a versatile dendritic structure based platform for construction of targeted dual-modality imaging probes. The platform contains multiple copies of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) branching out from a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) core. The specific coordination chemistries of the NOTA and DOTA moieties offer specific loading of (68/67)Ga(3+) and Gd(3+), respectively, into a common molecular scaffold. The platform also contains three amino groups which can potentiate targeted dual-modality imaging of PET/MRI or SPECT/MRI (PET: positron emission tomography; SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging) when further functionalized by targeting vectors of interest. To validate this design concept, a bimetallic complex was synthesized with six peripheral Gd-DOTA units and one Ga-NOTA core at the center, whose ion T1 relaxivity per gadolinium atom was measured to be 15.99 mM(-1) s(-1) at 20 MHz. Further, the bimetallic agent demonstrated its anticipated in vivo stability, tissue distribution, and pharmacokinetic profile when labeled with (67)Ga. When conjugated with a model targeting peptide sequence, the trivalent construct was able to visualize tumors in a mouse xenograft model by both PET and MRI via a single dose injection.