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Sample records for spect j-access study

  1. Surveillance study for creating the national clinical database relating to ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT of asymptomatic ischemic heart disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus: J-ACCESS 2 study design.

    PubMed

    Kusuoka, Hideo; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Izumi, Tohru; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. Thus, a surveillance study was conducted as part of studies to create a national database related to electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of ischemic heart disease. Single-photon emission computed tomography was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their prognoses will be followed for 3 years, stratified by patients' clinical background and SPECT findings. A total of 513 patients from 50 institutions were enrolled in this study, 297 of whom were men (age 66.2 +/- 0.4 years, mean +/- SEM) and 261 women (age 67.8 +/- 0.5 years). They have a history of retinopathy (25.3%), neuropathy (19.9%), cerebrovascular disorder, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and photocoagulation. Major risk factors for present disease were hypertension (82.3%) and hyperlipidemia (79.7%). In 244 patients (129 men and 115 women), body mass index (BMI) was 25 or more. Fifty-two of them (10.1%) underwent coronary angiography; of these, 26 (50.0%) had no coronary artery lesions with 75% or more stenosis, and only 1 (1.9%) had a left main trunk with 50% or more stenosis. An overwhelming majority of patients (94.3%) underwent SPECT imaging by a 1-day stress-followed-by-rest procedure. Stress procedure was exercise in most (70.8%) patients, followed by dipyridamole infusion in 14.6%, adenosine infusion in 6.6%, and adenosine triphosphate infusion in 5.7%. Endpoint of stress examination was most often fatigue in lower limbs (40.7%), followed by completion of pharmacological stress protocol (28.7%), and achievement of target heart rate (26.3%). The largest number of patients (198, 38.6%) received (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin at an initial dosage of 200-300 MBq (mean 331 +/- 3 MBq) followed by a second dosage of 700-800 MBq (mean 748 +/- 8 MBq). Among them, 491 (95.7%) received some kind of therapeutic drug: hypoglycemic drugs were used by the

  2. Cardiovascular events in Japan. Lessons from the J-ACCESS multicenter prognostic study using myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2012-01-01

    The multicenter Japanese-Assessment of Cardiac Events and Survival Study by Quantitative Gated SPECT (J-ACCESS), which involved 117 institutions and 4,629 patients, was the first attempt to quantify cardiac events and survival using stress-rest-gated single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion images (MPI) and QGS software in Japan. A 3-year follow-up study showed a relatively lower incidence of hard events than in the USA and some European countries, but a similar role of perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. A low event risk with normal MPI and a higher incidence of major cardiac events in patients with large perfusion defects and LV dysfunction were defined. MPI was useful even among patients with proven coronary artery stenosis. The association between diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was an important predictor of cardiac events and the risk was evaluated using new software and risk charts. Additional studies were extended to include asymptomatic diabetes (J-ACCESS 2) and CKD (J-ACCESS 3). Because risk estimation is linked to the national healthcare system and clinical practice, optimal risk stratification and guidance for therapeutic strategies are recommended.

  3. Hypoglycaemic hemiplegia: a repeat SPECT study.

    PubMed Central

    Shintani, S; Tsuruoka, S; Shiigai, T

    1993-01-01

    During a hypoglycaemic right hemiplegia induced by a deliberate overdose of oral hypoglycaemics, brain CT and angiography revealed no abnormalities. SPECTs made one day and six days later showed relative hypoperfusion in the left hemisphere. Repeat SPECT study suggested that the left hemisphere was more vulnerable than the right in the cerebral blood perfusion. This vulnerability might provoke the right hemiplegia in a critical condition, such as severe hypoglycaemia. Images PMID:8509788

  4. PET and SPECT studies in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D J

    1997-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) provide sensitive means for quantifying the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic fibres in Parkinson's disease and for detecting the presence of dopaminergic dysfunction in asymptomatic at-risk relatives and patients with isolated tremor. Functional imaging can also be used to follow the rate of disease progression objectively, determine the efficacy of putative neuroprotective agents, and monitor the viability of transplants of fetal tissue. Additionally, in vivo pharmacological changes associated with development of treatment complications (fluctuations, dyskinesias) can be studied. Loss of dopaminergic projections produces profound changes in resting and activated brain metabolism. PET and SPECT activation studies have suggested that the akinesia of Parkinson's disease is associated with failure to activate the supplementary motor and dorsal pre-frontal areas. Activation of these cortical areas is restored towards normal by the use of dopaminergic medication, striatal transplantation with fetal mesencephalic tissue, and pallidotomy. The aim of this chapter is to review the insight which functional imaging has given us into the pathophysiology of parkinsonism.

  5. Dual Isotope SPECT Study With Epilepsy Patients Using Semiconductor SPECT System.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Atsuro; Sakurai, Kotarou; Kurita, Tsugiko; Takeuchi, Wataru; Toyonaga, Takuya; Hirata, Kenji; Kobashi, Keiji; Katoh, Chietsugu; Kubo, Naoki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2017-09-01

    We developed a prototype CdTe SPECT system with 4-pixel matched collimator for brain study. This system provides high-energy-resolution (6.6%), high-sensitivity (220 cps/MBq/head), and high-spatial-resolution images. The aim of this study was to evaluate dual-isotope study of CBF and central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) images using Tc-ECD and I-IMZ with the new SPECT system in patients with epilepsy comparing with single-isotope study using the conventional scintillation gamma camera. This study included 13 patients with partial epilepsy. The BZR images were acquired at 3 hours after I-IMZ injection for 20 minutes. The images of IMZ were acquired with a conventional 3-head scintillation gamma camera. After BZR image acquisition with the conventional camera, Tc-ECD was injected, and CBF and BZR images were acquired simultaneously 5 minutes after ECD injection with the new SPECT system. The CBF images were also acquired with the conventional camera on separate days. The findings were visually analyzed, and 3D-SSP maximum Z scores of lesions were compared between the 2 studies. There were 47 abnormal lesions on BZR images and 60 abnormal lesions on CBF images in the single-isotope study with the conventional camera. Dual-isotope study with the new system showed concordant abnormal findings of 46 of 47 lesions on BZR and 54 of 60 lesions on CBF images with the single-isotope study with the conventional camera. There was high agreement between the 2 studies in both BZR and CBF findings (Cohen κ values = 0.96 for BZR and 0.78 for CBF). In semiquantitative analysis, maximum Z scores of dual-isotope study with the new system strongly correlated with those of single-isotope study with the conventional camera (BZR: r = 0.82, P < 0.05, CBF: r = 0.87, P < 0.05). Our new SPECT system permits dual-isotope study for pixel-by-pixel analysis of CBF and BZR information with the same pathophysiological condition in patients with epilepsy.

  6. Delayed redistribution in thallium 201 SPECT myocardial perfusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ziessman, H.A.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; Fox, L.M.; Green, C.E.; Fox, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Stress {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion studies are useful in differentiating viable, reversibly ischemic from infarcted myocardium. A perfusion defect that shows redistribution 2 to 4 h after {sup 201}Tl injection is diagnostic of ischemia, while a fixed defect suggests infarction. However, occasional patients with a fixed defect at 4 h have redistribution at 24 h. This study evaluates the frequency and significance of this delayed redistribution with SPECT {sup 201}Tl. Patients with either no or incomplete redistribution at 4 h had repeat imaging 18 to 48 h later. Delayed redistribution was seen in 8/26 (31 percent). Four had incomplete and four had no redistribution at 4 h. Delayed redistribution with SPECT {sup 201}Tl is more common than generally appreciated, and we recommend delayed images in patients with fixed perfusion defects or incomplete redistribution at 4-h imaging, particularly in patients with previous infarctions for whom a revascularization procedure is being considered.

  7. SPECT study of regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.; Ross, E.D.; Chehabi, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1986-07-01

    A common cause of dementia in late midlife and old age is Alzheimer disease (AD), which affects more than one in 20 individuals over the age of 65. Past studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD here suggested blood flow abnormalities, but findings have differed. We have studied 37 patients diagnosed as having AD with inhalation and washout of /sup 133/Xe and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), obtaining evidence of abnormal rCBF patterns in 19. Flow reductions were most common in the temporoparietal regions and were occasionally found in the frontal areas. Investigators using positron-emission tomography (PET) have identified similar findings with respect to rCBF and regional oxygen, glucose, and protein metabolism. The SPECT determination of rCBF, which gives information similar to that provided by PET, may assume importance in the diagnosis of AD and in the differential diagnosis of the dementias.

  8. Non-ketotic hyperglycaemic chorea: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Chang, M H; Li, J Y; Lee, S R; Men, C Y

    1996-04-01

    To study regional blood flow of the striatum in non-ketotic hyperglycaemic choreic patients. Brain SPECT was performed with intravenous injection of 20 mCi 99mTc hexamethylpropylene amineoxime in six non-ketotic hyperglycaemic choreic patients and 10 age matched patients with a similar level of hyperglycaemia without chorea as a control. The focal perfusion defects were analysed by visual interpretation and semiquantitative determination with reference to homolateral occipital blood flow. The measured blood flow of striatum on the contralateral side of chorea was significantly decreased. Hypometabolism of the striatum is seen not only in Huntington's disease, but also in non-ketotic hyperglycaemic chorea. Hypofunction of the striatum is a possible common pathogenesis in the development of contralateral chorea in different diseases. Furthermore, the sensitivity and reliability of SPECT is as good as PET in assessing choreic patients.

  9. In Vivo Dosimetry Of Patients Submitted To Brain Spect Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Cortés, D.; Azorín, J.; Saucedo, V. M.

    2004-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a diagnosis technique which allows to visualize a three dimensional distribution of a radioactive material in the brain. This technique is used for evaluating the blood flux and the metabolic function of the diverse brain regions and is very useful to diagnostic several pathologies such as Alzheimer disease, tumors, epilepsy brain hemorrhages, etc. The radioactive tracer used is 99mTc-labeled hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime (99mTc-HMPAO). We present the results obtained from measurements performed in the chest, back and skull of patients submitted to brain SPECT studies during two hours using home-made LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results obtained showed that the dose received by the patients during two hours are lower than 0.3 mGy.

  10. Radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study of neurotransmitter systems is one of the major thrusts in emission tomography today. The current generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) radiotracers examines neurotransmitter properties from a number of different perspectives including their pre and post synaptic sites and the activity of the enzymes which regulate their concentration. Although the dopamine system has been the most extensively investigated, other neurotransmitter systems including the acetylcholine muscarine, serotonin, benzodiazepine, opiate, NMDA and others are also under intensive development. Enzymes involved in the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitter concentration, for example monoamine oxidase and amino acid decarboxylase has also been probed in vivo. Medical applications range from the study of normal function and the characterization of neurotransmitter activity in neurological and psychiatric diseases and in heart disease and cancer to the study of the binding of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. This chapter will provide an overview of the current generation of radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems including radiotracer design, synthesis localization mechanisms and applications in emission tomography. 60 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Attenuation correction effects on SPECT/CT procedures: phantoms studies.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M L; Seren, M E G; Rocha, F C; Brunetto, S Q; Ramos, C D; Button, V L S N

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation correction is widely used in SPECT/CT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) procedures, especially for imaging of the thorax region. Different compensation methods have been developed and introduced into clinical practice. Most of them use attenuation maps obtained using transmission scanning systems. However, this gives extra dose of radiation to the patient. The purpose of this study was to identify when attenuation correction is really important during SPECT/CT procedures.For this purpose, we used Jaszczak phantom and phantom with three line sources, filled with technetium ((99m)-Tc), with scattering materials, like air, water and acrylic, in different detectors configurations. In all images acquired were applied analytic and iterative reconstruction algorithms; the last one with or without attenuation correction. We analyzed parameters such as eccentricity, contrast and spatial resolution in the images.The best reconstruction algorithm on average was iterative, for images with 128 × 128 and 64 × 64 matrixes. The analytical algorithm was effective only to improve eccentricity in 64 × 64 matrix and matrix in contrast 128 × 128 with low statistics. Turning to the clinical routine examinations, on average, for 128 × 128 matrix and low statistics counting, the best algorithm was the iterative, without attenuation correction,improving in 150% the three parameters analyzed and, for the same matrix size, but with high statistical counting, iterative algorithm with attenuation correction was 25% better than that without correction. We can conclude that using the iterative algorithm with attenuation correction in the water, and its extra dose given, is not justified for the procedures of low statistic counting, being relevant only if the intention is to prioritize contrast in acquisitions with high statistic counting.

  12. A SPECT study in internal carotid artery occlusion: Discrepancies between flow image and neurologic deficits

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, H.; Hougaku, H.; Matsuda, I.; Kusunoki, M.; Shirai, J. )

    1989-08-01

    A SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) study in internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion was performed in 6 patients. The validity of iodoamphetamine (IMP) SPECT study in the evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or neurologic function is still controversial. In this study, the authors showed several cases in whom SPECT images of brain were not compatible with their neurologic deficits. In 2 typical cases, a large low-density area was observed in the non-dominant hemisphere in computed tomography (CT) scan, but no apparent motor-sensory deficits in left limbs were present. In these patients, SPECT study also revealed flow reduction in the affected side of the brain. So there was a possibility that an IMP brain image could not always reflect CBF, which maintains neurologic function of the brain.

  13. Navigation of a robot-integrated fluorescence laparoscope in preoperative SPECT/CT and intraoperative freehand SPECT imaging data: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosterom, Matthias Nathanaël; Engelen, Myrthe Adriana; van den Berg, Nynke Sjoerdtje; KleinJan, Gijs Hendrik; van der Poel, Henk Gerrit; Wendler, Thomas; van de Velde, Cornelis Jan Hadde; Navab, Nassir; van Leeuwen, Fijs Willem Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery is becoming an established technique for prostatectomy and is increasingly being explored for other types of cancer. Linking intraoperative imaging techniques, such as fluorescence guidance, with the three-dimensional insights provided by preoperative imaging remains a challenge. Navigation technologies may provide a solution, especially when directly linked to both the robotic setup and the fluorescence laparoscope. We evaluated the feasibility of such a setup. Preoperative single-photon emission computed tomography/X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT) or intraoperative freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) scans were used to navigate an optically tracked robot-integrated fluorescence laparoscope via an augmented reality overlay in the laparoscopic video feed. The navigation accuracy was evaluated in soft tissue phantoms, followed by studies in a human-like torso phantom. Navigation accuracies found for SPECT/CT-based navigation were 2.25 mm (coronal) and 2.08 mm (sagittal). For fhSPECT-based navigation, these were 1.92 mm (coronal) and 2.83 mm (sagittal). All errors remained below the <1-cm detection limit for fluorescence imaging, allowing refinement of the navigation process using fluorescence findings. The phantom experiments performed suggest that SPECT-based navigation of the robot-integrated fluorescence laparoscope is feasible and may aid fluorescence-guided surgery procedures.

  14. Regional cardiac wall motion from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. F.; Brigger, P.; Ferrand, S. K.; Dilsizian, V.; Bacharach, S. L.

    1999-06-01

    A method for estimating regional epicardial and endocardial wall motion from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT studies has been developed. The method uses epicardial and endocardial boundaries determined from four long-axis slices at each gate of the cardiac cycle. The epicardial and endocardial wall position at each time gate is computed with respect to stationary reference ellipsoids, and wall motion is measured along lines normal to these ellipsoids. An initial quantitative evaluation of the method was made using the beating heart from the dynamic mathematical cardiac torso (MCAT) phantom, with and without a 1.5-cm FWHM Gaussian blurring filter. Epicardial wall motion was generally well-estimated within a fraction of a 3.56-mm voxel, although apical motion was overestimated with the Gaussian filter. Endocardial wall motion was underestimated by about two voxels with and without the Gaussian filter. The MCAT heart phantom was modified to model hypokinetic and dyskinetic wall motion. The wall motion analysis method enabled this abnormal motion to be differentiated from normal motion. Regional cardiac wall motion also was analyzed for /sup 201/Tl patient studies. Estimated wall motion was consistent with a nuclear medicine physician's visual assessment of motion from gated long-axis slices for male and female study examples. Additional research is required for a comprehensive evaluation of the applicability of the method to patient studies with normal and abnormal wall motion.

  15. Complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease: a spect study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Wik, Gustav

    2010-02-01

    We studied cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measures of 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-TRODAT-4, before and after five weeks of treatment. Ten patients were randomly assigned to receive levodopa alone (controls) or levodopa and complementary scalp electro-acupuncture. Before treatment, no hemispheric regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) differences were found, whereas striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) activity was lower in the most affected hemisphere. Treatment with levodopa alone did not change rCBF, whereas it increased basal ganglion DAT activity in the most affected hemisphere. Patients who received levodopa and complementary acupuncture had increased rCBF in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe, the basal ganglion, and the cerebellum in the most affected hemisphere as compared to baseline, but there were no changes in basal ganglia DAT levels. Thus, complementary acupuncture treatment in Parkinson's disease may affect rCBF but not basal ganglion DAT.

  16. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  17. Voxel Based Analysis of Surgical Revascularization for Moyamoya Disease: Pre- and Postoperative SPECT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Takagi, Yasushi; Funaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Jun C.; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, progressive, cerebrovascular occlusive disease that causes abnormal enlargement of collateral pathways (moyamoya vessels) in the region of the basal ganglia and thalamus. Cerebral revascularization procedures remain the preferred treatment for patients with MMD, improving the compromised cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, voxel based analysis (VBA) of revascularization surgery for MMD based on data from pre- and postoperative data has not been established. The latest algorithm called as Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) has been introduced for VBA as the function of statistical parametric mapping (SPM8), and improved registration has been achieved by SPM8 with DARTEL. In this study, VBA was conducted to evaluate pre- and postoperative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for MMD by SPM8 with DARTEL algorithm, and the results were compared with those from SPM8 without DARTEL (a conventional method). Thirty-two patients with MMD who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass surgery as the first surgery were included and all patients underwent pre- and postoperative 3D T1-weighted imaging and SPECT. Pre- and postoperative SPECT images were registered to 3D T1-weighted images, then VBA was conducted. Postoperative SPECT showed more statistically increased CBF areas in the bypassed side cerebral hemisphere by using SPM8 with DARTEL (58,989 voxels; P<0.001), and increased ratio of CBF after operation was less than 15%. Meanwhile, postoperative SPECT showed less CBF increased areas by SPM8 without DARTEL. In conclusion, VBA was conducted for patients with MMD, and SPM8 with DARTEL revealed that postoperative SPECT showed statistically significant CBF increases over a relatively large area and with at most 15% increase ratio. PMID:26867219

  18. Voxel Based Analysis of Surgical Revascularization for Moyamoya Disease: Pre- and Postoperative SPECT Studies.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Takagi, Yasushi; Funaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Jun C; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, progressive, cerebrovascular occlusive disease that causes abnormal enlargement of collateral pathways (moyamoya vessels) in the region of the basal ganglia and thalamus. Cerebral revascularization procedures remain the preferred treatment for patients with MMD, improving the compromised cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, voxel based analysis (VBA) of revascularization surgery for MMD based on data from pre- and postoperative data has not been established. The latest algorithm called as Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) has been introduced for VBA as the function of statistical parametric mapping (SPM8), and improved registration has been achieved by SPM8 with DARTEL. In this study, VBA was conducted to evaluate pre- and postoperative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for MMD by SPM8 with DARTEL algorithm, and the results were compared with those from SPM8 without DARTEL (a conventional method). Thirty-two patients with MMD who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass surgery as the first surgery were included and all patients underwent pre- and postoperative 3D T1-weighted imaging and SPECT. Pre- and postoperative SPECT images were registered to 3D T1-weighted images, then VBA was conducted. Postoperative SPECT showed more statistically increased CBF areas in the bypassed side cerebral hemisphere by using SPM8 with DARTEL (58,989 voxels; P<0.001), and increased ratio of CBF after operation was less than 15%. Meanwhile, postoperative SPECT showed less CBF increased areas by SPM8 without DARTEL. In conclusion, VBA was conducted for patients with MMD, and SPM8 with DARTEL revealed that postoperative SPECT showed statistically significant CBF increases over a relatively large area and with at most 15% increase ratio.

  19. SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for dementia.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Claudio; Farioli, Daniela; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Meniconi, Martina; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade the interest towards functional neuroimaging has gradually increased, especially in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, diagnosis of dementia is mostly clinical. Numerous modalities of neuroimaging are today available, each of them allowing a different aspect of neurodegeneration to be investigated. Although during the last period many have predicted a forthcoming disappearance of SPECT imaging in favour of the PET imaging, many new radiotracers SPECT, dual-SPECT tracers techniques and receptor targeting designed radiopharmaceuticals are currently at study. Besides, last decade has also assisted to the development of new SPECT imaging systems, most of them integrated with other imaging modalities (MRI, CT, ultrasound techniques), granting improved imaging capabilities. All these improved conditions, especially appealing for the neuroimaging, together with the new radiopharmaceuticals in development may renovate the interest for SPECT clinical applications.

  20. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  1. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  2. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies.

    PubMed

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-21

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic (94)Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((94)Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K(1) for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K(1). For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from (94)Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The

  3. Realistic Simulation of Regional Myocardial Perfusion Defects for Cardiac SPECT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fung, George S.K.; Segars, W. Paul; Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.

    2012-01-01

    The current 3D XCAT phantom allows users to manually define the regional myocardial perfusion defect (MPD) as a simple pie-shaped wedge region with reduced activity level in the myocardium of left ventricle. To more accurately and realistically model the MPD, we have developed a new regional MPD model for the 3D XCAT phantom for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MP-SPECT) studies based on the location and the severity of the stenosis in a computer generated coronary arterial tree. First, we generated a detailed coronary arterial tree by extending the large proximal branches segmented from patient CT images to cover the whole heart using an iterative rule-based algorithm. Second, we determined the affected downstream vascular segments of a given stenosis. Third, we computed the activity of each myocardial region as a function of the inverse-distance-weighted average of the flow of the neighboring vascular segments. Fourth, we generated a series of bull’s-eye maps of MP-SPECT images of different coronary artery stenosis scenarios. Fifth, we had expert physician readers to qualitatively assess the bull’s-eye maps based on their similarity to typical clinical cases in terms of the shape, the extent, and the severity of the MPDs. Their input was used to iteratively revise the coronary artery tree model so that the MPDs were closely matched to those found in bull’s-eye maps from patient studies. Finally, from our simulated MP-SPECT images, we observed that (1) the locations of the MPDs caused by stenoses at different main arteries were different largely according to their vascular territories, (2) a stenosis at a proximal branch produced a larger MPD than the one at a distal branch, and (3) a more severe stenosis produced a larger MPD than the less severe one. These observations were consistent to those found in clinical cases. Therefore, this new regional MPD model has enhanced the generation of realistic pathological MP-SPECT images using the XCAT phantom. When

  4. Task Equivalence for Model and Human-Observer Comparisons in SPECT Localization Studies.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anando; Kalantari, Faraz; Gifford, Howard C

    2016-06-01

    While mathematical model observers are intended for efficient assessment of medical imaging systems, their findings should be relevant for human observers as the primary clinical end users. We have investigated whether pursuing equivalence between the model and human-observer tasks can help ensure this goal. A localization ROC (LROC) study tested prostate lesion detection in simulated In-111 SPECT imaging with anthropomorphic phantoms. The test images were 2D slices extracted from reconstructed volumes. The iterative OSEM reconstruction method was used with Gaussian postsmoothing. Variations in the number of iterations and the level of postfiltering defined the test strategies in the study. Human-observer performance was compared with that of a visual-search (VS) observer, a scanning channelized Hotelling observer, and a scanning nonprewhitening (CNPW) observer. These model observers were applied with precise information about the target regions of interest (ROIs). ROI knowledge was a study variable for the human observers. In one study format, the humans read the SPECT image alone. With a dual-modality format, the SPECT image was presented alongside an anatomical image slice extracted from the density map of the phantom. Performance was scored by area under the LROC curve. The human observers performed significantly better with the dual-modality format, and correlation with the model observers was also improved. Given the human-observer data from the SPECT study format, the Pearson correlation coefficients for the model observers were 0.58 (VS), -0.12 (CH), and -0.23 (CNPW). The respective coefficients based on the human-observer data from the dual-modality study were 0.72, 0.27, and -0.11. These results point towards the continued development of the VS observer for enhancing task equivalence in model-observer studies.

  5. Task Equivalence for Model and Human-Observer Comparisons in SPECT Localization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Anando; Kalantari, Faraz; Gifford, Howard C.

    2016-06-01

    While mathematical model observers are intended for efficient assessment of medical imaging systems, their findings should be relevant for human observers as the primary clinical end users. We have investigated whether pursuing equivalence between the model and human-observer tasks can help ensure this goal. A localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study tested prostate lesion detection in simulated In-111 SPECT imaging with anthropomorphic phantoms. The test images were 2D slices extracted from reconstructed volumes. The iterative ordered sets expectation-maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm was used with Gaussian postsmoothing. Variations in the number of iterations and the level of postfiltering defined the test strategies in the study. Human-observer performance was compared with that of a visual-search (VS) observer, a scanning channelized Hotelling observer, and a scanning channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW) observer. These model observers were applied with precise information about the target regions of interest (ROIs). ROI knowledge was a study variable for the human observers. In one study format, the humans read the SPECT image alone. With a dual-modality format, the SPECT image was presented alongside an anatomical image slice extracted from the density map of the phantom. Performance was scored by area under the LROC curve. The human observers performed significantly better with the dual-modality format, and correlation with the model observers was also improved. Given the human-observer data from the SPECT study format, the Pearson correlation coefficients for the model observers were 0.58 (VS), -0.12 (CH), and -0.23 (CNPW). The respective coefficients based on the human-observer data from the dual-modality study were 0.72, 0.27, and -0.11. These results point towards the continued development of the VS observer for enhancing task equivalence in model-observer studies.

  6. Neuroreceptor imaging with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Innis, R B

    1992-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging can provide useful measurements of brain receptors and endogenous neurotransmitters and may have significant experimental and clinical applications. This presentation reviews the use of SPECT for neuroreceptor imaging. Studies of receptors for benzodiazepines, dopamine D2 agents, and dopamine reuptake sites will be used to exemplify the capabilities of SPECT. Tracers labeled with the radioisotope 125I have high affinity, high brain uptake, and high ratios of specific to nonspecific binding. Imaging studies of human and nonhuman primate brain will be presented, and the potential clinical applicability of these agents will be discussed.

  7. A randomized study of the effect of carbonated water prior to myocardial SPECT.

    PubMed

    Vermeltfoort, Ilse A C; van Dijk, Arjan B; de Jong, Jeroen A F; Teule, Gerrit J J; Gevers, Marjon; Verhoeven, Bas; Raaijmakers, Esther; Knaapen, Paul; Raijmakers, Pieter G H M

    2014-08-01

    In myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), abdominal activity often interferes with the evaluation of perfusion in the inferior wall, especially after pharmacological stress. In this randomized study, we examined the effect of carbonated water intake versus still water intake on the quality of images obtained during myocardial perfusion images (MPI) studies. A total of 467 MIBI studies were randomized into a carbonated water group and a water group. The presence of intestinal activity adjacent to the inferior wall was evaluated by two observers. Furthermore, a semi-quantitative analysis was performed in the adenosine subgroup, using a count ratio of the inferior myocardial wall and adjacent abdominal activity. The need for repeated SPECT in the adenosine studies was 5.3% in the carbonated water group versus 19.4% in the still water group (p = 0.019). The inferior wall-to-abdomen count ratio was significantly higher in the carbonated water group compared to the still water group (2.11 ± 1.00 vs. 1.72 ± 0.73, p < 0.001). The effect of carbonated water during rest and after exercise was not significant. This randomized study showed that carbonated water significantly reduced the interference of extra-cardiac activity in adenosine SPECT MPI.

  8. Multi-centre evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of planar and SPECT image quantification: An IAEA phantom study.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Brian E; Grošev, Darko; Buvat, Irène; Coca Pérez, Marco A; Frey, Eric C; Green, Alan; Krisanachinda, Anchali; Lassmann, Michael; Ljungberg, Michael; Pozzo, Lorena; Quadir, Kamila Afroj; Terán Gretter, Mariella A; Van Staden, Johann; Poli, Gian Luca

    2016-04-19

    Accurate quantitation of activity provides the basis for internal dosimetry of targeted radionuclide therapies. This study investigated quantitative imaging capabilities at sites with a variety of experience and equipment and assessed levels of errors in activity quantitation in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and planar imaging. Participants from 9 countries took part in a comparison in which planar, SPECT and SPECT with X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging were used to quantify activities of four epoxy-filled cylinders containing (133)Ba, which was chosen as a surrogate for (131)I. The sources, with nominal volumes of 2, 4, 6 and 23mL, were calibrated for (133)Ba activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, but the activity was initially unknown to the participants. Imaging was performed in a cylindrical phantom filled with water. Two trials were carried out in which the participants first estimated the activities using their local standard protocols, and then repeated the measurements using a standardized acquisition and analysis protocol. Finally, processing of the imaging data from the second trial was repeated by a single centre using a fixed protocol. In the first trial, the activities were underestimated by about 15% with planar imaging. SPECT with Chang's first order attenuation correction (Chang-AC) and SPECT-CT overestimated the activity by about 10%. The second trial showed moderate improvements in accuracy and variability. Planar imaging was subject to methodological errors, e.g., in the use of a transmission scan for attenuation correction. The use of Chang-AC was subject to variability from the definition of phantom contours. The project demonstrated the need for training and standardized protocols to achieve good levels of quantitative accuracy and precision in a multicentre setting. Absolute quantification of simple objects with no background was possible with the strictest protocol to about 6% with

  9. SPECT/CT localization of oral radioiodine activity: a retrospective study and in-vitro assessment

    PubMed Central

    Burlison, Jared S.; Hartshorne, Michael F.; Voda, Alan M.; Cocks, Franklin H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We sought to further localize radioiodine activity in the mouth on post-thyroid cancer therapy imaging using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). Materials and methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients (58) who underwent thyroid cancer therapy with iodine-131 (131I) at our institution from August 2009 to March 2011 whose post-therapy radioiodine imaging included neck SPECT/CT. A small group (six) of diagnostic 123I scans including SPECT/CT was also reviewed. Separately, we performed in-vitro 131I (sodium iodide) binding assays with amalgam and Argenco HP 77 (77% dental gold alloy) as proof of principle for these interactions. Results Of the 58 post-therapy patients, 45 (78%) had undergone metallic dental restorations, and of them 41 (91%) demonstrated oral 131I activity localizing preferentially to those restorations. It was observed that radioiodine also localized to other dental restorations and to orthodontic hardware. Gum-line activity in edentulous patients suggests radioiodine interaction with denture adhesive. In vitro, dental amalgam and Argenco HP 77 bound 131I in a time-dependent manner over 1–16 days of exposure. Despite subsequent washings with normal saline, significant 131I activity (maximally 12% for amalgam and 68% for Argenco HP 77) was retained by these metals. Subsequent soaking in a saturated solution of potassium iodide partially displaced 131I from amalgam, with near-total displacement of 131I from Argenco HP 77. Conclusion SPECT/CT shows that radioiodine in the oral cavity localizes to metallic dental restorations. Furthermore, in-vitro studies demonstrate partially reversible binding of 131I to common dental metals. PMID:24128897

  10. SPECT study of low intensity He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation therapy for brain infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xue-Chang; Dong, Jia-Zheng; Chu, Xiao-Fan; Jia, Shao-Wei; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Zheng, Xi-Yuan; Zhou, Ci-Xiong

    2003-12-01

    We used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in brain perfusion imaging to study the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral function in brain infarction patients treated with intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). 17 of 35 patients with brain infarction were admitted to be treated by ILIB on the base of standard drug therapy, and SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after ILIB therapy with self-comparison. The results were analyzed in quantity with brain blood flow function change rate (BFCR%) model. Effect of ILIB during the therapy process in the other 18 patients were also observed. In the 18 patients, SPECT indicated an improvement of rCBF (both in focus and in total brain) and cerebral function after a 30 min-ILIB therapy. And the 17 patients showed an enhancement of total brain rCBF and cerebral function after ILIB therapy in comparison with that before, especially for the focus side of the brain. The enhancement for focus itself was extremely obvious with a higher significant difference (P<0.0001). The mirror regions had no significant change (P>0.05). BFCR% of foci was prominently higher than that of mirror regions (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the ILIB therapy can improve rCBF and cerebral function and activate brain cells of patients with brain infarction. The results denote new evidence of ILIB therapy for those patients with cerebral ischemia.

  11. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  12. Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP): A Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Guido; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Nasuto, Michelangelo; Totaro, Manuela; Aucella, Filippo; Frusciante, Vincenzo; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; Potenza, Adele; Savino, Maria; Stanislao, Mario; Popolizio, Teresa; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP) is characterized by abdominal pain, neurologic symptoms and psychiatric disorders, even if it might remain asymptomatic. The pathophysiology of both neurologic and psychiatric symptoms is not fully understood. Therefore, aiming to evaluate a possible role of brain blood flow disorders, we have retrospectively investigated cerebral perfusion patterns in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) studies in HCP patients. Materials & Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients diagnosed as being affected by HCP. A total of seven HCP patients had been submitted to brain perfusion SPECT study with 99mTc-Exametazime (hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, HMPAO) or with its functionally equivalent 99mTc-Bicisate (ECD or Neurolite) according with common procedures. In 3 patients the scintigraphic study had been repeated for a second time after the first evaluation at 3, 10 and 20 months, respectively. All the studied subjects had been also submitted to an electromyographic and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) study of the brain. Results: Mild to moderate perfusion defects were detected in temporal lobes (all 7 patients), frontal lobes (6 patients) and parietal lobes (4 patients). Occipital lobe, basal ganglia and cerebellar involvement were never observed. In the three subjects in which SPECT study was repeated, some recovery of hypo-perfused areas and appearance of new perfusion defects in other brain regions have been found. In all patients electromyography resulted normal and MRI detected few unspecific gliotic lesions only in one patient. Discussion & Conclusions: Since perfusion abnormalities were usually mild to moderate, this can probably explain the normal pattern observed at MRI studies. Compared to MRI, SPECT with 99mTc showed higher sensitivity in HCP patients. Changes observed in HCP patients who had more than one study suggest that transient perfusion defects might be due to a brain

  13. Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP): A Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Study.

    PubMed

    Valle, Guido; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Nasuto, Michelangelo; Totaro, Manuela; Aucella, Filippo; Frusciante, Vincenzo; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; Potenza, Adele; Savino, Maria; Stanislao, Mario; Popolizio, Teresa; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP) is characterized by abdominal pain, neurologic symptoms and psychiatric disorders, even if it might remain asymptomatic. The pathophysiology of both neurologic and psychiatric symptoms is not fully understood. Therefore, aiming to evaluate a possible role of brain blood flow disorders, we have retrospectively investigated cerebral perfusion patterns in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) studies in HCP patients. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients diagnosed as being affected by HCP. A total of seven HCP patients had been submitted to brain perfusion SPECT study with 99mTc-Exametazime (hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, HMPAO) or with its functionally equivalent 99mTc-Bicisate (ECD or Neurolite) according with common procedures. In 3 patients the scintigraphic study had been repeated for a second time after the first evaluation at 3, 10 and 20 months, respectively. All the studied subjects had been also submitted to an electromyographic and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) study of the brain. Mild to moderate perfusion defects were detected in temporal lobes (all 7 patients), frontal lobes (6 patients) and parietal lobes (4 patients). Occipital lobe, basal ganglia and cerebellar involvement were never observed. In the three subjects in which SPECT study was repeated, some recovery of hypo-perfused areas and appearance of new perfusion defects in other brain regions have been found. In all patients electromyography resulted normal and MRI detected few unspecific gliotic lesions only in one patient. Discussion & Conclusions: Since perfusion abnormalities were usually mild to moderate, this can probably explain the normal pattern observed at MRI studies. Compared to MRI, SPECT with 99mTc showed higher sensitivity in HCP patients. Changes observed in HCP patients who had more than one study suggest that transient perfusion defects might be due to a brain artery spasm possibly leading to psychiatric

  14. Perfusion SPECT studies with mapping of Brodmann areas in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from frontotemporal degeneration syndromes.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Papatriantafyllou, John; Sifakis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Chara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies with mapping of Brodmann areas (BAs) in the differential diagnosis between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal degeneration (FTLD) syndromes. Thirty-nine patients with AD and 73 patients with FTLD syndromes [behavioural variant FTLD (bvFTLD); language variant FTLD (lvFTLD), including semantic dementia (SD) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA); and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)/progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) syndromes] underwent brain perfusion SPECT. The NeuroGam software was used for the semiquantitative evaluation of perfusion in BAs of the left (L) and right (R) hemispheres. Compared with those in AD patients, BAs with statistically significant hypoperfusion were found in the prefrontal, orbitofrontal and cingulated cortices and Broca's areas of FTLD and bvFTLD patients; in the temporal and prefrontal cortices and Broca's areas of lvFTLD patients; in the left temporal gyrus of SD patients; in premotor and supplementary motor, prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal and anterior cingulated cortices and Broca's areas of PNFA patients; and in the prefrontal, temporal, posterior cingulated and primary and secondary visual cortices of CBD/PSP patients. BA 46R could differentiate AD patients from FTLD and bvFTLD patients; 21L and 25L were found to be independent predictors for lvFTLD in comparison with AD, and 25R, 21L and 23R could differentiate AD patients from PNFA, SD and CBD/PSP patients, respectively. Brain perfusion SPECT with BA mapping in AD and FTLD patients could improve the definition of brain areas that are specifically implicated in these disorders, resulting in a more accurate differential diagnosis.

  15. Systolic and diastolic assessment by 3D-ASM segmentation of gated-SPECT Studies: a comparison with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, C.; Bijnens, B. H.; Huguet, M.; Sukno, F.; Moragas, G.; Frangi, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    Gated single photon emission tomography (gSPECT) is a well-established technique used routinely in clinical practice. It can be employed to evaluate global left ventricular (LV) function of a patient. The purpose of this study is to assess LV systolic and diastolic function from gSPECT datasets in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) measurements. This is achieved by applying our recently implemented 3D active shape model (3D-ASM) segmentation approach for gSPECT studies. This methodology allows for generation of 3D LV meshes for all cardiac phases, providing volume time curves and filling rate curves. Both systolic and diastolic functional parameters can be derived from these curves for an assessment of patient condition even at early stages of LV dysfunction. Agreement of functional parameters, with respect to CMR measurements, were analyzed by means of Bland-Altman plots. The analysis included subjects presenting either LV hypertrophy, dilation or myocardial infarction.

  16. Feasibility of a CdTe-based SPECT for high-resolution low-dose small animal imaging: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Lee, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems based on pixelated semiconductors such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) are in development to study small animal models of human disease. In an effort to develop a high-resolution, low-dose system for small animal imaging, we compared a CdTe-based SPECT system and a conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In addition, we investigated the radiation absorbed dose and calculated a figure of merit (FOM) for both SPECT systems. Using the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system, we achieved a spatial resolution of 1.66 mm at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance, and a resolution of 2.4-mm hot-rods. Using the newly-developed CdTe-based SPECT system, we achieved a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm FWHM at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance, and a resolution of 1.7-mm hot-rods. The sensitivities at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance were 115.73 counts/sec/MBq and 83.38 counts/sec/MBq for the CdTe-based SPECT and conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT systems, respectively. To compare quantitative measurements in the mouse brain, we calculated the CNR for images from both systems. The CNR from the CdTe-based SPECT system was 4.41, while that from the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system was 3.11 when the injected striatal dose was 160 Bq/voxel. The CNR increased as a function of injected dose in both systems. The FOM of the CdTe-based SPECT system was superior to that of the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system, and the highest FOM was achieved with the CdTe-based SPECT at a dose of 40 Bq/voxel injected into the striatum. Thus, a CdTe-based SPECT system showed significant improvement in performance compared with a conventional system in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, and CNR, while reducing the radiation dose to the small animal subject. Herein, we discuss the feasibility of a CdTe-based SPECT system for high

  17. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaoli; Liu, Ying; He, Yong; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Binqing; Gao, Zairong; An, Rui; Zhang, Yongxue

    2010-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with (131)I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ((131)I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with (131)I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10(8) pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10(8), 1x10(8), 5x10(7) and 1x10(7) pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant (131)I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of (131)I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10(7) pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10(8) pfu. The ARG images in region of interest-derived semi-quantitative study correlated well

  18. Detection of salivary aspiration using radionuclide salivagram SPECT/CT in patients with COPD exacerbation: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Peng; Deng, Huaifu; Wu, Zhida; Liu, Haiping; Liu, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study was to assess the utility of radionuclide salivagram for detecting salivary aspiration in AECOPD patients and to evaluate the adding value of SPECT/CT to planar imaging. Methods 52 consecutive AECOPD patients underwent radionuclide salivagram SPECT/CT and water swallow test between April 2012 and March 2014. All images were interpreted independently by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Final diagnosis was made by consensus of two readers. The radionuclide salivagram and water swallow test results were compared using kappa values. The relationship between radionuclide salivagram results and exacerbation frequency was evaluated with the Person χ2 test. Results Salivary aspiration was diagnosed by radionuclide salivagram in 17 of 52 patients. Aspiration into the right main bronchus and branch was seen in 8 patients, bilateral main bronchi in 6 patients, and left lung field in 3 patients. SPECT/CT provided more accurate information on the extent and location of salivary aspiration, in 11 cases, SPECT/CT demonstrated aspiration of pulmonary segment bronchus and the following areas. Moreover, SPECT/CT revealed salivary aspiration corresponding to aspiration pneumonia in 8 cases. There was general agreement between the radionuclide salivagram and water swallow test results (Kappa =0.712; 95% CI, 0.504–0.920; P<0.001). The incidence of frequent exacerbations was greater among subjects with positive salivagram than among those with negative salivagram results (RR =3.43; 95% CI, 1.90–6.19; P<0.001). Conclusions Radionuclide salivagram is an objective method for detecting salivary aspiration in AECOPD patients. Moreover, SPECT/CT can identify more precise location of salivary aspiration and suggest a possible role for saliva in the pathophysiology of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:27867548

  19. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  20. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  1. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  2. Experimental studies of SPECT scintimammography with combined cone-beam and parallel-beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Gangal, K. R.; Coman, Ioana L.; Salgado, Roberto B.; Lipson, Edward D.; Karczewski, Deborah A.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2003-05-01

    Conventional SPECT Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography (STSM) has limited clinical utility due to fairly low radiopharmaceutical uptake in the breast tissue as compared to the heart and the liver. We investigated the use of a cone-beam collimator (CBC) to STSM. Each detector on a multi-headed gamma camera can be equipped with parallel-beam (PBC) or cone-beam collimators (CBC). PBC can provide truncation-free SPECT projection sets, while CBC offers increased sensitivity in a limited field-of-view (FOV). Combined PBC and CBC SPECT ddata acquisition may provide improved lesion contrast and overall better imaging performance within CBC FOV with significantly reduced truncation artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper we evaluate the combined CBC&PBC SPECT method using a limited number of confirmed breast cancer patients and female chest phantoms with simulated breast lesions. We envision the combined CBC&PBC SPECT as a useful clinical tool in scintimammography.

  3. Evaluation of reconstruction techniques in regional cerebral blood flow SPECT using trade-off plots: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anna; Arlig, Asa; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm; Gustafsson, Agnetha

    2007-09-01

    The image quality of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) depends on the reconstruction algorithm used. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate parameters in ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and to compare systematically with filtered back-projection (FBP) for reconstruction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) SPECT, incorporating attenuation and scatter correction. The evaluation was based on the trade-off between contrast recovery and statistical noise using different sizes of subsets, number of iterations and filter parameters. Monte Carlo simulated SPECT studies of a digital human brain phantom were used. The contrast recovery was calculated as measured contrast divided by true contrast. Statistical noise in the reconstructed images was calculated as the coefficient of variation in pixel values. A constant contrast level was reached above 195 equivalent maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterations. The choice of subset size was not crucial as long as there were > or = 2 projections per subset. The OSEM reconstruction was found to give 5-14% higher contrast recovery than FBP for all clinically relevant noise levels in rCBF SPECT. The Butterworth filter, power 6, achieved the highest stable contrast recovery level at all clinically relevant noise levels. The cut-off frequency should be chosen according to the noise level accepted in the image. Trade-off plots are shown to be a practical way of deciding the number of iterations and subset size for the OSEM reconstruction and can be used for other examination types in nuclear medicine.

  4. The prognosis of a normal Tl-201 stress-only SPECT MPI study.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane; Hiensch, Robert J; Levine, Elliot J; Croft, Lori B; Henzlova, Milena J

    2012-10-01

    Stress-only Tc-99m SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) decreases test time and patient radiation exposure with a proven benign prognosis of a normal study. The imaging sequence of Tl-201 MPI always starts with the stress portion; therefore, no pre-test decisions are needed regarding the imaging sequence. The recent intermittent Tc-99m shortage afforded the unique opportunity to study an unselected group of patients undergoing Tl-201 imaging. We retrospectively reviewed all the patients who had SPECT MPI with Tc-99m or Tl-201 over a 1-year period. When Tc-99m was not available, patients received Tl-201. All stress Tl-201 images were routinely processed, and if normal, rest imaging was not done. When Tc-99m was used, patients with lower pre-test probability were selected for a stress-first protocol. We compared the all-cause mortality of patients with normal Tl-201 studies to those with normal stress-only and rest-stress Tc-99m studies using the Social Security Death Index. Unadjusted and risk-adjusted survival analysis was performed. Specific causes of death (cardiac or non-cardiac) were determined by medical record review and contact with treating physicians. A total of 3,658 patients underwent stress MPI during this time period. Of the 1,215 patients who had Tl-201 MPI, 716 (67%) had a normal stress-only study. Out of 2,443 patients who underwent Tc-99m MPI, 70% had normal perfusion with 1,098 normal stress-only studies and 493 normal rest-stress studies. The average follow-up was 23.3 ± 5.3 months. Unadjusted all-cause mortality at the end of follow-up was 7.1% in the Tl-201 stress-only group, 6.3% for Tc-99m stress-only patients, and 4.3% in the Tc-99m rest-stress cohort. After controlling for confounding variables, survival was similar in the three groups (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.62-1.82, P = .82 for normal Tl-201 stress-only compared to normal Tc-99m rest-stress). The risk-adjusted 1-year survival was between 98.5 and 98.8% in the three groups. Normal stress

  5. [Utility of SPECT in gallium scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki

    2002-11-01

    Whole-body gallium planar scintigraphy is a mainstay for the detection of tumors and inflammatory lesions. Recently, gallium SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) has become more common in the clinical setting. This diagnostic modality is widely employed in our hospital, and lesions are actually detected by SPECT in some cases. Although the contrast of SPECT images is better than that of planar images, spatial resolution is limited by the limited matrix size. Thus, the overall diagnostic utility of SPECT remains to be confirmed. The usefulness of SPECT for the detection of gallium-accumulated lesions was evaluated in a phantom. In this study, we showed that SPECT is able to detect more smaller and lower gallium accumulations than planar imaging. Thus, SPECT imaging is useful in gallium scintigraphy.

  6. Prognosis of normal stress-only gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria João Vidigal; Cunha, Maria João; Albuquerque, Anabela; Moreira, Ana Paula; Ramos, Domingos; Costa, Gracinda; Lima, João; Pego, Mariano

    2013-10-01

    It has been advocated that using the stress followed by rest protocol, if the stress images were normal there is no need of rest images, reducing radiation exposure and costs. Our purpose was to assess the prognosis of a group of patients with normal stress-only gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. This was retrospective study that includes 790 patients with normal myocardial stress only perfusion gated SPECT images. Images were considered as normal if a homogeneous myocardial distribution of the tracer was associated with a normal ejection fraction. The mean follow-up was of 42.8 ± 13.3 months. The considered events were death of all causes, myocardial infarction and myocardial revascularization. During this period there were 85 events (10.8 %), including 57 deaths of all causes (67.1 %), 9 myocardial infarctions (10.6 %), 19 revascularizations (2.4 %). In the first year of follow-up there were 32 events (4.0 %) and excluding non cardiac deaths there were 8 events (1.0 %). Using Cox survival analysis, diabetes (HR = 2.2; CI = 1.4-3.4; p ≤ 0.0005), the history of coronary artery disease (CAD) (HR = 2.1; CI = 1.3-3.2; p ≤ 0.001), age (HR = 1.0; CI = 1.0-1.0; p ≤ 0.05) and type of stress protocol were related with events (exercise test vs. adenosine) (Exercise test: HR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-0.8; p ≤ 0.01). In a multivariate analysis the independent predictors were diabetes, CAD and the type of stress protocol. Based on these results, normal stress-only images are associated with an excellent prognosis even in patients at higher risk, diabetics and patients with known CAD.

  7. Pre-operative prediction of cervical nodal metastasis in papillary thyroid cancer by 99mTc-MIBI SPECT/CT; a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tangjaturonrasme, Napadon; Vasavid, Pataramon; Sombuntham, Premsuda; Keelawat, Somboon

    2013-06-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer has a high prevalence of cervical nodal metastasis. There is no "gold standard" imaging for pre-operative diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of pre-operative 99mTc-MBI SPECT/CT in diagnosis of cervical nodal metastasis in patients with papillary thyroid cancer Fifteen patients were performed 99Tc-MlBI SPECT/CT pre-operatively. Either positive pathological report of neck dissection or positive post-treatment I-131 whole body scan with SPECT/CT of neck was concluded for definite neck metastasis. The PPV, NPV, and accuracy of 99mTc-MIBI SPECT/CT were analyzed. The PPV NPV and accuracy were 80%, 88.89%, and 85.71%, respectively. 99mTc-MIBI SPECT/CT could localize the abnormal lymph nodes groups correctly in most cases when compared with pathological results. However the authors found one false positive case with caseating granulomatous lymphadenitis and one false negative case with positive post-treatment 1-131 whole body scan with SPECT/CT of neck on cervical nodes zone II and IV CONCLUSION: 99mTc-MIBI SPECT/CTseem promising for pre-operative staging of cervical nodal involvement in patients with papillary thyroid cancer without the need of using iodinated contrast that may complicate subsequence 1-131 treatment. However, false positive result in granulomatous inflammatory nodes should be aware of especially in endemic areas. 99mTc-MIBI SPECT/CT scan shows a good result when compared with previous study of CT or MRI imaging. The comparative study between different imaging modality and the extension of neck dissection according to MIBI result seems interesting.

  8. Transient global amnesia: a study with Tc-99m ECD SPECT shortly after symptom onset and after recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Cho, Sang Soo; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Young Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Transient global amnesia (TGA) is characterized by sudden loss of memory of recent events, transient inability to retain new information, and retrograde amnesia. We investigated the changes of regional cerebral blood flow in patients with TGA shortly after symptom onset and after recovery using Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (Tc-99m ECD SPECT) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. METHODS Six right-handed patients with TGA were studied using Tc-99m ECD SPECT shortly after symptom onset and after recovery. As a control group, six healthy individuals were also studied. Images were analyzed using SPM8 using voxel-based analysis to estimate the differences between TGA patients and controls. RESULTS There was significant hypoperfusion in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and bilateral cerebellum. In the follow-up SPECT scan, hypoperfusion in hippocampus and thalamus were restored, while hypoperfusion was noted in the temporoparietal region. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism of TGA may be temporary ischemia in the hippocampus and thalamus. There was significant restoration of perfusion in the hippocampus and thalamus after recovery from TGA. PMID:27535207

  9. A study on the change in image quality before and after an attenuation correction with the use of a CT image in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Kim, Woo-Hyun; Shim, Dong-Oh; Kim, Ho-Sung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) images before and after applying an attenuation correction by using the CT (computed tomography) image in a SPECT/CT scan and examined depending of the change in image quality on the CT dose. A flangeless Esser PET (positron emission tomography) Phantom was used to evaluate the image quality for the Precedence 16 SPECT/CT system manufactured by Philips. The experimental method was to obtain a SPECT image and a CT image of a flangeless Esser PET Phantom to acquire an attenuation-corrected SPECT image. A ROI (region of interest) was then set up at a hot spot of the acquired image to measure the SNR (signal to noise ratio) and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) and to compare the image quality with that of an unattenuation-corrected SPECT image. To evaluate the quality of a SPECT image, we set the ROI as a cylinder diameter (25, 16, 12, and 8 mm) and the BKG (background) radioactivity of the phantom images was obtained when each CT condition was changed. Subsequently, the counts were compared to measure the SNR. The FWHM of the smallest cylinder (8 mm) was measured to compare the image quality. A comparison of the SPECT images with and without attenuation correction revealed 5.01-fold, 4.77 fold, 4.43-fold, 4.38-fold, and 5.13-fold differences in SNR for the 25-mm cylinder, 16-mm cylinder, 12-mm cylinder, 8-mm cylinder, and BKG, respectively. In the phantom image obtained when the CT dose was changed, the FWHM of the 8-mm cylinder showed almost no difference under each condition regardless of the changes in kVp and mAs.

  10. Effects of video game playing on cerebral blood flow in young adults: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Yang, Bang-Hung; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Lin, Chun-Lung; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chien Chang, Alice; Lee, Shin-Min

    2013-04-30

    To study the impact of video game playing on the human brain, the effects of two video games playing on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in young adults were determined. Thirty healthy subjects comprising 18 males and 12 females who were familiar with video game playing were recruited. Each subject underwent three sessions of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a bolus injection of 20 mCi (99m)Tc ECD IV to measure their CBF. The first measurement was performed as baseline, the second and third measurements were performed after playing two different video games for 30 min, respectively. Statistic parametric mapping (SPM2) with Matlab 6.5 implemented on a personal computer was used for image analysis. CBF was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex and significantly increased in the temporal and occipital cortices after both video games playing. Furthermore, decreased CBF in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) which was significantly correlated with the number of killed characters was found after the violent game playing. The major finding of hypo-perfusion in prefrontal regions after video game playing is consistent with a previous study showing reduced or abnormal prefrontal cortex functions after video game playing. The second finding of decreased CBF in the ACC after playing the violent video game provides support for a previous hypothesis that the ACC might play a role in regulating violent behavior.

  11. Model observers to predict human performance in LROC studies of SPECT reconstruction using anatomical priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehovich, Andre; Gifford, Howard C.; King, Michael A.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the use of linear model observers to predict human performance in a localization ROC (LROC) study. The task is to locate gallium-avid tumors in simulated SPECT images of a digital phantom. Our study is intended to find the optimal strength of smoothing priors incorporating various degrees of anatomical knowledge. Although humans reading the images must perform a search task, our models ignore search by assuming the lesion location is known. We use area under the model ROC curve to predict human area under the LROC curve. We used three models, the non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF), the channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). All models have access to noise-free reconstructions, which are used to compute the signal template. The NPWMF model does a poor job of predicting human performance. The CNPW and CHO model do a somewhat better job, but still do not qualitatively capture the human results. None of the models accurately predicts the smoothing strength which maximizes human performance.

  12. Evaluation of penetration and scattering components in conventional pinhole SPECT: phantom studies using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloar, Hossain M.; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2003-04-01

    In quantitative pinhole SPECT, photon penetration through the collimator edges (penetration), and photon scattering by the object (object scatter) and collimator (collimator scatter) have not been investigated rigorously. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate these three physical processes for different tungsten knife-edge pinhole collimators using uniform, hotspot and donut phantoms filled with 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I and 131I solutions. For the hotspot phantom, the penetration levels with respect to total counts for a 1 mm pinhole aperture were 78%, 28% and 23% for 131I, 123I and 99mTc, respectively. For a 2 mm aperture, these values were 65% for 131I, 16% for 123I and 12% for 99mTc. For all pinholes, 201Tl penetration was less than 4%. The evaluated scatter (from object and collimator) with a hotspot phantom for the 1 mm pinhole was 24%, 16%, 18% and 13% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I and 131I, respectively. Summation of the object and collimator scatter for the uniform phantom was approximately 20% higher than that for the hotspot phantom. Significant counts due to penetration and object and collimator scatter in the reconstructed image were observed inside the core of the donut phantom. The collimator scatter can be neglected for all isotopes used in this study except for 131I. Object scatter correction for all radionuclides used in this study is necessary and correction for the penetration contribution is necessary for all radionuclides but 201Tl.

  13. Parametric Cerebrovascular Reserve Images Using Acetazolamide (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT: A Feasibility Study of Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Yoo, Min Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2013-09-01

    Basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used for evaluation of hemodynamics; however, qualitative and subjective visual assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) has been performed in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to generate parametric CVR images and evaluate its feasibility of quantification. Basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT data from 17 patients who underwent bypass surgery or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were used. Spatial normalization was performed and parametric CVR images were generated using relative CVR (rCVR) of each voxel proportional to CVR of the whole brain. Binary parametric maps to show area of relatively reduced CVR were generated also using threshold of rCVR < 90 %. We calculated rCVR of internal carotid artery (ICA) using the parametric CVR images and probabilistic maps for ICA territory. Pre- and postprocedural parametric CVR images were obtained and quantitative rCVRs were compared. The rCVRs were evaluated according to visual grades for regional decreased CVR. Postprocedural rCVR obtained from parametric CVR images increased significantly from preprocedural rCVR. The rCVR was significantly correlated with visual grades of reduced CVR for each side of ICA territories. We generated parametric CVR images for basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT. As a quantitative measurement, rCVR obtained from the parametric image was feasibly assessed hemodynamic abnormalities with preserved anatomical information.

  14. Quantitative image reconstruction for dual-isotope parathyroid SPECT/CT: phantom experiments and sample patient studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Chamoiseau, S.; Celler, A.

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the quantitative accuracy of the model-based dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (DI-SPECT) reconstructions that use Klein-Nishina expressions to estimate the scattered photon contributions to the projection data. Our objective was to examine the ability of the method to recover the absolute activities pertaining to both radiotracers: Tc-99m and I-123. We validated our method through a series of phantom experiments performed using a clinical hybrid SPECT/CT camera (Infinia Hawkeye, GE Healthcare). Different activity ratios and different attenuating media were used in these experiments to create cross-talk effects of varying severity, which can occur in clinical studies. Accurate model-based corrections for scatter and cross-talk with CT attenuation maps allowed for the recovery of the absolute activities from DI-SPECT/CT scans with errors that ranged 0-10% for both radiotracers. The unfavorable activity ratios increased the computational burden but practically did not affect the resulting accuracy. The visual analysis of parathyroid patient data demonstrated that our model-based processing improved adenoma/background contrast and enhanced localization of small or faint adenomas.

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  17. [SPECT radiopharmaceuticals -- novelties and new possibilities].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Lajos; Polyák, András; Pöstényi, Zita; Haász, Veronika; Dabasi, Gabriella; Jóba, Róbert; Bús, Katalin; Jánoki, Gergely; Thuróczy, Julianna; Zámbó, Katalin; Garai, Ildikó; Környei, József; Jánoki, Gyõzõ

    2014-12-01

    Actual state of affairs and future perspectives of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals regarding local and international data were summarized. Beyond conventional gamma-emitting radioisotopes, localization studies with beta emitting therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals hold increasing importance. Extension of hybrid (SPECT/CT) equipments has modified conventional scintigraphic and SPECT methods as well but more important changes come into the world through novel ligands for specific diagnoses and therapy.

  18. PET AND SPECT STUDIES IN CHILDREN WITH HEMISPHERIC LOW-GRADE GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Csaba; Bosnyák, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in the pre-treatment evaluation of low-grade gliomas. While glucose positron emission tomography (PET) can be helpful to differentiate low-grade from high-grade tumors, PET imaging with amino acid radiotracers has several advantages, such as better differentiation between tumors and non-tumorous lesions, optimized biopsy targeting and improved detection of tumor recurrence. This review provides a brief overview of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies followed by a more detailed review of clinical applications of glucose and amino acid PET imaging in low-grade hemispheric gliomas. We discuss key differences in the performance of the most commonly utilized PET radiotracers and highlight the advantage of PET/MRI fusion to obtain optimal information about tumor extent, heterogeneity and metabolism. Recent data also suggest that simultaneous acquisition of PET/MR images and the combination of advanced MRI techniques with quantitative PET can further improve the pre- and post-treatment evaluation of pediatric brain tumors. PMID:27659825

  19. A study to improve the image quality in low-dose computed tomography (SPECT) using filtration.

    PubMed

    Kheruka, Sc; Naithani, Uc; Maurya, Ak; Painuly, Nk; Aggarwal, Lm; Gambhir, S

    2011-01-01

    The output of the X-ray tube used in computed tomography (CT) provides a spectrum of photon energies. Low-energy photons are preferentially absorbed in tissue; the beam spectrum shifts toward the higher energy end as it passes through more tissue, thereby changing its effective attenuation coefficient and producing a variety of artifacts (beam-hardening effects) in images. Filtering of the beam may be used to remove low-energy photon component. The accuracy of attenuation coefficient calculation by bilinear model depends highly upon accuracy of Hounsfield units. Therefore, we have made an attempt to minimize the beam-hardening effects using additional copper filter in the X-ray beam. The quantitative evaluation were made to see the effect of additional filters on resulting CT images. This study was performed on dual-head SPECT (HAWKEYE 4, GE Healthcare) with low-dose CT which acquires images at peak voltages of 120/140 kV and a tube current of 2.5 mA. For the evaluation of image quality, we used CT QA Phantom (PHILIPS) having six different density pins of Water, Polyethylene, Nylon (Aculon), Lexan, Acrylic (Perspex) and Teflon. The axial images were acquired using copper filters of various thicknesses ranging from 1 to 5 mm in steps of 1 mm. The copper filter was designed in such a manner that it fits exactly on the collimator cover of CT X-ray tube. Appropriate fixation of the copper filter was ensured before starting the image acquisition. As our intention was only to see the effect of beam hardening on the attenuation map, no SPECT study was performed. First set of images was acquired without putting any filter into the beam. Then, successively, filters of different thicknesses were placed into the beam and calibration of the CT scanner was performed before acquiring the images. The X-ray tube parameters were kept the same as that of unfiltered X-ray beam. All the acquired image sets were displayed using Xeleris 2 (GE Healthcare) on a high-resolution monitor

  20. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  1. [Feasibility study of SPECT quantification using CdTe semiconductor detector].

    PubMed

    Takayama, T; Hiwatashi, K; Nakamura, N; Motomura, N; Mori, I; Ohno, R

    2000-07-01

    Quantification of SPECT using CdTe semiconductors as a detector head in nuclear medicine equipment was investigated. A prototype of semiconductor detectors with an effective field-of-view as small as 2.54 cm x 5.08 cm was constructed, and a cylindrical phantom containing four spherical phantoms with capacities 71, 56, 42, and 15 ml, was used. Water was placed in three of these spherical phantoms (71, 56, and 42 ml), and 8.362 MBq of 99mTc was poured into the remaining 15 ml phantom. In the outer cylindrical phantom, 925 MBq (6200 ml) of 99mTc was placed. A Toshiba LEHR (Low Energy High Resolution) collimator was attached to the semiconductor detectors, and SPECT acquisition with a rotation radius 132 mm was performed. It was found that in the data thus acquired using the semiconductor detector, the amount of scattered gamma-rays decreased by 33% as compared to data acquired using NaI(Tl) scintillators under the same condition. Moreover, when attenuation correction was applied to SPECT data from the CdTe semiconductor detector, the measurement accuracy of radioactivity improved by 16% as compared to SPECT data from NaI(Tl) scintillators with the same acquisition and post-correction conditions. Finally, the CdTe detector data with only attenuation correction was found to have almost the same grade of accuracy as NaI scintillator data with both attenuation and TEW scatter corrections.

  2. Dopamine D2 receptor imaging with SPECT: Studies in different neuropsychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Bruecke, T.P.; Podreka, I.; Angelberger, P.; Wenger, S.; Topitz, A.; Kuefferle, B.M.; Mueller, C.D.; Deecke, L. )

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to visualize and quantify dopamine D2 receptors in the living human brain using an 123I-labeled ligand and the single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) technique. S-(-)-Iodobenzamide (S-(-)-IBZM) has been shown to be a highly selective ligand with high affinity for D2 receptors in experimental studies. Five millicuries (185 MBq) of 123I-labeled S-(-)-IBZM was administered intravenously to 12 control subjects, 22 parkinsonian patients under L-Dopa therapy, 12 parkinsonian patients without L-Dopa, 10 unmedicated patients with Huntington's disease, and 12 patients under different neuroleptics. Data collection with a rotating double-head scintillation camera started 1 h after injection and lasted for 50 min. In a semiquantitative approach, a ratio was calculated between mean counts per pixel in the striatum and a region in the lateral frontal cortex, which was 1.74 +/- 0.10 in the control group. A marked reduction of this ratio was found in patients with Huntington's disease (1.38 +/- 0.12; p = 0.0001), no significant changes in untreated parkinsonian patients (1.67 +/- 0.14), but a reduction in L-Dopa-treated cases (1.59 +/- 0.13; p = 0.0014). A curvilinear relationship was found between total daily dose of neuroleptics and the reduction of this ratio. Estimated receptor blockade under full neuroleptic treatment was 75-80%. S-(-)-IBZM binding was reduced with increasing age (p less than 0.01). Specific binding was reduced markedly when the racemic mixture of IBZM was used, and no specific binding was seen with the R-(+)-isomer, demonstrating the stereoselectivity of IBZM binding.

  3. The frequency of late reversibility in SPECT thallium-201 stress-redistribution studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, L D; Berman, D S; Kiat, H; Resser, K J; Friedman, J D; Rozanski, A; Maddahi, J

    1990-02-01

    The frequency of thallium-201 late reversibility was prospectively assessed in 118 patients who had stress-redistribution thallium-201 studies by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These patients demonstrated two or more segments with nonreversible defects at 4 h imaging and underwent late (18 to 72 h) redistribution imaging. When the criterion of late reversibility was defined as greater than or equal to 1 segment with 4 h nonreversible defects demonstrating late reversibility, it was present in 62 (53%) of the 118 patients and 164 (22%) of 762 segments. When the criterion of greater than or equal to 2 segments was used, late reversibility was found in 41 (35%) of 118 patients and 143 (19%) of 762 segments. The frequency of detected reversible defects increased from 27% at 4 h imaging to 43% at combined 4 h and late imaging (p less than 0.0001) and was significantly increased in all myocardial regions. In comparing the efficacy of initial and late imaging alone versus performing initial, 4 h and late imaging for the identification of reversible defects, 421 (94%) of 449 segments classified as reversible by the latter protocol were also correctly identified by the early and late imaging only approach, with the remaining 6% (28 segments) comprising those segments demonstrating the reversible pattern at 4 h and the nonreversible pattern at late imaging. No major differences were noted with respect to clinical, stress electrocardiographic and scintigraphic variables between the 118 patients undergoing late imaging and 98 additional randomly selected patients with two or more nonreversible defects at 4 h, who did not have late imaging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. A Channelized Hotelling Observer Study of Lesion Detection in SPECT MAP Reconstruction Using Anatomical Priors

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, S.; Khurd, P.; Hsiao, I.; Zhou, L.; Gindi, G.

    2010-01-01

    In emission tomography, anatomical side information, in the form of organ and lesion boundaries, derived from intra-patient coregistered CT or MR scans can be incorporated into the reconstruction. Our interest is in exploring the efficacy of such side information for lesion detectability. To assess detectability we used the SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer and a signal-known exactly/background known exactly detection task. In simulation studies we incorporated anatomical side information into a SPECT MAP (maximum a posteriori) reconstruction by smoothing within but not across organ or lesion boundaries. A non-anatomical prior was applied by uniform smoothing across the entire image. We investigated whether the use of anatomical priors with organ boundaries alone or with perfect lesion boundaries alone would change lesion detectability relative to the case of a prior with no anatomical information. Furthermore, we investigated whether any such detectability changes for the organ-boundary case would be a function of the distance of the lesion to the organ boundary. We also investigated whether any detectability changes for the lesion-boundary case would be a function of the degree of proximity, i.e. a difference in the radius of the true functional lesion and the radius of the anatomical lesion boundary. Our results showed almost no detectability difference with vs without organ boundaries at any lesion-to-organ boundary distance. Our results also showed no difference in lesion detectability with and without lesion boundaries, and no variation of lesion detectability with degree of proximity. PMID:17664562

  5. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. K. H.; Ramogida, C. F.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, C.; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Effective use of the {}225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both {}225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the {}225Ac decay chain: {}221Fr (218 keV) and {}213Bi (440 keV). Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous {}221Fr and {}213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to simultaneously image dynamic {}221Fr and {}213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a {}213Bi generator from {}225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy were observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both {}221Fr and {}213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in {}213Bi images and only rods  ⩾1.3 mm were resolved in {}221Fr images. After eluting the {}213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the {}225Ac decay chain. The feasibility of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the {}225Ac decay chain in vivo has been demonstrated. This presented method requires the use of a high-performance high-energy collimator.

  6. 3D-OSEM and FP-CIT SPECT quantification: benefit for studies with a high radius of rotation?

    PubMed

    Koch, Walter; Bartenstein, Peter; la Fougère, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Dopamine transporter imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for both clinical routine and research studies. Recently, it was found that the image quality could be improved by introduction of the three-dimensional ordered subset expectation maximization (3D-OSEM) reconstruction algorithm, which provides resolution recovery. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential benefits of 3D-OSEM in comparison with 2D-OSEM under critical imaging conditions, for example, scans with a high radius of rotation. Monte Carlo simulation scans of a digital brain phantom with various disease states and different radii of rotation ranging from 13 to 30 cm were reconstructed with both 2D-OSEM and 3D-OSEM algorithms. Specific striatal binding and putamen-to-caudate ratios were determined and compared with true values in the phantom. The percentage recovery of true striatal binding was similar between both reconstruction algorithms at the minimum rotational radius; however, at the maximum rotational radius, it decreased from 53 to 43% for 3D-OSEM and from 52 to 26% for 2D-OSEM. 3D-OSEM matched the true putamen-to-caudate ratios more closely than did 2D-OSEM in scans with high SPECT rotation radii. 3D-OSEM offers a promising image quality gain. It outperforms 2D-OSEM, particularly in studies with limited resolutions (such as scans acquired with a high radius of rotation) but does not improve the accuracy of the putamen-to-caudate ratios. Whether the benefits of better recovery in studies with higher radii of rotation could potentially increase the diagnostic power of dopamine transporter SPECT in patients with borderline striatal radiotracer binding, however, needs to be further examined.

  7. Studying Spatial Resolution of CZT Detectors Using Sub-Pixel Positioning for SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montémont, Guillaume; Lux, Silvère; Monnet, Olivier; Stanchina, Sylvain; Verger, Loïck

    2014-10-01

    CZT detectors are the basic building block of a variety of new SPECT systems. Their modularity allows adapting system architecture to specific applications such as cardiac, breast, brain or small animal imaging. In semiconductors, a high number of electron-hole pairs is produced by a single interaction. This direct conversion process allows better energy and spatial resolutions than usual scintillation detectors based on NaI(Tl). However, it remains often unclear if SPECT imaging can really benefit of that performance gain. We investigate the system performance of a detection module, which is based on 5 mm thick CZT with a segmented anode having a 2.5 mm pitch by simulation and experimentation. This pitch allows an easy assembly of the crystal on the readout board and limits the space occupied by electronics without significantly degrading energy and spatial resolution.

  8. Use of fusion images of I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine, SPECT, and magnetic resonance studies to identify a malignant pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Hyodoh, H; Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, K; Furuse, M; Kanazawa, K

    2000-06-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a chromaffin tumor in which 10% are extra-adrenal and 10% are malignant. I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy has an important role in the identification of these tumors and investigation of metastatic lesions. The authors describe a 36-year-old woman who underwent resection of a malignant left adrenal pheochromocytoma who was thought to have metastases in the liver and para-aortic lymph nodes. Fusion images of I-131 MIBG SPECT and magnetic resonance studies were obtained to properly identify the metastatic lesions. These fusion images helped greatly in subsequent surgery.

  9. Design and assessment of a novel SPECT system for desktop open-gantry imaging of small animals: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Rahmim, Arman; Sarkar, Saeed; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Given increasing efforts in biomedical research utilizing molecular imaging methods, development of dedicated high-performance small-animal SPECT systems has been growing rapidly in the last decade. In the present work, we propose and assess an alternative concept for SPECT imaging enabling desktop open-gantry imaging of small animals. Methods: The system, PERSPECT, consists of an imaging desk, with a set of tilted detector and pinhole collimator placed beneath it. The object to be imaged is simply placed on the desk. Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical simulations were utilized to accurately model and evaluate the proposed concept and design. Furthermore, a dedicated image reconstruction algorithm, finite-aperture-based circular projections (FABCP), was developed and validated for the system, enabling more accurate modeling of the system and higher quality reconstructed images. Image quality was quantified as a function of different tilt angles in the acquisition and number of iterations in the reconstruction algorithm. Furthermore, more complex phantoms including Derenzo, Defrise, and mouse whole body were simulated and studied. Results: The sensitivity of the PERSPECT was 207 cps/MBq. It was quantitatively demonstrated that for a tilt angle of 30°, comparable image qualities were obtained in terms of normalized squared error, contrast, uniformity, noise, and spatial resolution measurements, the latter at ∼0.6 mm. Furthermore, quantitative analyses demonstrated that 3 iterations of FABCP image reconstruction (16 subsets/iteration) led to optimally reconstructed images. Conclusions: The PERSPECT, using a novel imaging protocol, can achieve comparable image quality performance in comparison with a conventional pinhole SPECT with the same configuration. The dedicated FABCP algorithm, which was developed for reconstruction of data from the PERSPECT system, can produce high quality images for small-animal imaging via accurate modeling of the system as

  10. Feasibility study of SPECT system for online dosimetry imaging in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Hales, B; Katabuchi, T; Hayashizaki, N; Terada, K; Igashira, M; Kobayashi, T

    2014-06-01

    A single collimator version of a proposed PG-SPECT system was manufactured and experimentally tested. Combining this experimental data with Monte Carlo simulation, the viability of Ge and CdTe semiconductors detectors was calculated. It was determined that the best detector of the ones compared would be a CdTe detector of 2-3mm, aided by the benefit of adding a Compton-suppression anti-coincidence timing detector. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. MO-G-17A-02: Computer Simulation Studies for On-Board Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Prostate Using a Robotic Multi-Pinhole SPECT System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Yan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate prostate imaging onboard radiation therapy machines using a novel robotic, 49-pinhole Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. Methods: Computer-simulation studies were performed for region-of-interest (ROI) imaging using a 49-pinhole SPECT collimator and for broad cross-section imaging using a parallel-hole SPECT collimator. A male XCAT phantom was computersimulated in supine position with one 12mm-diameter tumor added in the prostate. A treatment couch was added to the phantom. Four-minute detector trajectories for imaging a 7cm-diameter-sphere ROI encompassing the tumor were investigated with different parameters, including pinhole focal length, pinhole diameter and trajectory starting angle. Pseudo-random Poisson noise was included in the simulated projection data, and SPECT images were reconstructed by OSEM with 4 subsets and up to 10 iterations. Images were evaluated by visual inspection, profiles, and Root-Mean- Square-Error (RMSE). Results: The tumor was well visualized above background by the 49-pinhole SPECT system with different pinhole parameters while it was not visible with parallel-hole SPECT imaging. Minimum RMSEs were 0.30 for 49-pinhole imaging and 0.41 for parallelhole imaging. For parallel-hole imaging, the detector trajectory from rightto- left yielded slightly lower RMSEs than that from posterior to anterior. For 49-pinhole imaging, near-minimum RMSEs were maintained over a broader range of OSEM iterations with a 5mm pinhole diameter and 21cm focal length versus a 2mm diameter pinhole and 18cm focal length. The detector with 21cm pinhole focal length had the shortest rotation radius averaged over the trajectory. Conclusion: On-board functional and molecular prostate imaging may be feasible in 4-minute scan times by robotic SPECT. A 49-pinhole SPECT system could improve such imaging as compared to broadcross-section parallel-hole collimated SPECT imaging. Multi-pinhole imaging can be improved by

  12. Including anatomical and functional information in MC simulation of PET and SPECT brain studies. Brain-VISET: a voxel-based iterative method.

    PubMed

    Marti-Fuster, Berta; Esteban, Oscar; Thielemans, Kris; Setoain, Xavier; Santos, Andres; Ros, Domenec; Pavia, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation provides a flexible and robust framework to efficiently evaluate and optimize image processing methods in emission tomography. In this work we present Brain-VISET (Voxel-based Iterative Simulation for Emission Tomography), a method that aims to simulate realistic [ (99m) Tc]-SPECT and [ (18) F]-PET brain databases by including anatomical and functional information. To this end, activity and attenuation maps generated using high-resolution anatomical images from patients were used as input maps in a MC projector to simulate SPECT or PET sinograms. The reconstructed images were compared with the corresponding real SPECT or PET studies in an iterative process where the activity inputs maps were being modified at each iteration. Datasets of 30 refractory epileptic patients were used to assess the new method. Each set consisted of structural images (MRI and CT) and functional studies (SPECT and PET), thereby allowing the inclusion of anatomical and functional variability in the simulation input models. SPECT and PET sinograms were obtained using the SimSET package and were reconstructed with the same protocols as those employed for the clinical studies. The convergence of Brain-VISET was evaluated by studying the behavior throughout iterations of the correlation coefficient, the quotient image histogram and a ROI analysis comparing simulated with real studies. The realism of generated maps was also evaluated. Our findings show that Brain-VISET is able to generate realistic SPECT and PET studies and that four iterations is a suitable number of iterations to guarantee a good agreement between simulated and real studies.

  13. Study on measuring device arrangement of array-type CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Masanobu; Nakamura, Soichiro; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Aim To design the measuring device arrangement of array-type CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT. Background In a boron neutron capture therapy, a very serious unsolved problem exists, namely that the treatment effect for BNCT cannot be known during irradiation in real time. Therefore, we have been developing a so-called BNCT-SPECT with a CdTe detector, which can obtain a three-dimensional image for the BNCT treatment effect by measuring 478 keV gamma-rays emitted from the excited state of 7Li nucleus created by the 10B(n,α) reaction. However, no practical uses were realized at present, because BNCT-SPECT requires very severe conditions for spatial resolution, measuring time, statistical accuracy and energy resolution. Materials and methods The design study was performed with numerical simulations carried out by a 3-dimenaional transport code, MCNP5 considering the detector assembly, irradiation room and even arrangement of arrayed CdTe crystals. Results The estimated count rate of 478 keV gamma-rays was sufficiently large being more than the target value of over 1000 counts/h. However, the S/N ratio did not meet the target of S/N > 1. We confirmed that deterioration of the S/N ratio was caused by the influence of Compton scattering especially due to capture gamma-rays of hydrogen. Theoretical calculations were thereafter carried out to find out whether anti-Compton measurement in an array-type CdTe detector could decrease the noise due to Compton scatterings. Conclusions The calculation result showed that the anti-coincidence would possibly increase the S/N ratio. In the next phase, an arrayed detector with two CdTe crystals will be produced to test removal possibility of the anti-coincident event. PMID:26933391

  14. Pulmonary hypertension leads to a loss of gravity dependent redistribution of regional lung perfusion: a SPECT/CT study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund Mt; Bailey, Dale L; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Torzillo, Paul J; Roach, Paul J; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Corte, Tamera J; Celermajer, David S

    2014-01-01

    Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is characterised by progressive pulmonary vascular obliteration and loss of vascular reserves. In health, regional lung perfusion redistributes under the influence of gravity due to the presence of recruitable vessels. We investigated a combined single photon emission computed tomography/CT (SPECT/CT) method for assessing the pulmonary circulation by quantifying the gravity dependent redistribution of lung perfusion. Characterisation of patients versus healthy controls. 15 patients with pre-capillary PHT and 11 healthy controls. University hospital clinic. Regional lung perfusion was measured using SPECT/CT in two different postures (supine vs upright). A perfusion redistribution index (PRI) was used to quantify the cranial-caudal shift in regional lung perfusion resulting from gravitational (postural) change. PRI was compared between cases and controls, and correlated with markers of disease severity in cases. Patients with pre-capillary PHT had notably reduced PRI compared to controls (0.02±0.06 vs. 0.28±0.15 normalised perfusion/cm, p<0.0001). PRI was significantly associated with prognostic parameters such as 6 min walk distance (r=0.60, p=0.018), functional class (p=0.008), and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r=0.58, p=0.022). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that PRI differentiated patients with pre-capillary PHT from controls with AUC=0.94 (p<0.001). With SPECT/CT, gravity dependent redistribution of lung perfusion can be quantified using the PRI derived from supine and upright perfusion analysis. The potential utility of PRI for the non-invasive detection of PHT and assessment of disease severity warrants further study.

  15. Association between non-perfusion parameters and presence of ischemia in gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Peix, Amalia; Cabrera, Lázaro O; Padrón, Kenia; Rodríguez, Lydia; Fernández, Jesús; López, Giselle; Carrillo, Regla; Mena, Erick; Fernández, Yoel; Dondi, Maurizio; Páez, Diana

    2016-11-17

    Combined assessment of perfusion and function improves diagnostic and prognostic power of gated-SPECT in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of stress-induced ischemia is associated with abnormal resting left ventricular (LV) function and intraventricular dyssynchrony. Gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) at rest and 15 min post-stress was performed in 101 patients, who were divided into three groups: those with stress-induced ischemia (Group 1, n = 58), those with normal scans (Group 2, n = 28), and those with scar but no ischemia (Group 3, n = 15). More extensive perfusion defects were found in patients of Groups 1 and 3 [Summed stress score (SSS): 13 ± 8 and 21 ± 9, respectively]. In Group 2, the mean SSS was 1.5. The mean change in LV ejection fraction (LVEF at stress - LVEF at rest) was higher in Group 1 v. Group 2 patients: -5.54% ± 6.24% vs -2.46% ± 5.56%, p = 0.02. Group 3 patients also had higher values, similar to Group 1: -6.47% ± 8.82%. Patients with ischemia had almost 50% higher end-diastolic volumes than patients with normal MPI. Similarly, end-systolic volumes were almost twice as high in this group (p < 0.0001). In addition, the histogram bandwidth, a measure of intraventricular dyssynchrony, was greater in Group 1. Baseline differences in left ventricular volumes and degree of dyssynchrony are associated with inducible ischemia on stress testing in a gated-SPECT MPI. Stress-induced ischemia increases the degree of intraventricular dyssynchrony.

  16. Comparison of image quality, myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function between standard imaging and single-injection ultra-low-dose imaging using a high-efficiency SPECT camera: the MILLISIEVERT study.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Blankstein, Ron; Andrews, Howard; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Qureshi, Mehreen; Rakotoarivelo, Harivony; Slomka, Piotr; Nakazato, Ryo; Bokhari, Sabahat; Di Carli, Marcello; Berman, Daniel S

    2014-09-01

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging plays a central role in coronary artery disease diagnosis, but concerns exist regarding its radiation burden. Compared with standard Anger SPECT (A-SPECT) cameras, new high-efficiency (HE) cameras with specialized collimators and solid-state cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors offer potential to maintain image quality (IQ), while reducing administered activity and thus radiation dose to patients. No previous study has compared IQ, interpretation, total perfusion deficit (TPD), or ejection fraction (EF) in patients receiving both ultra-low-dose (ULD) imaging on an HE SPECT camera and standard low-dose (SLD) A-SPECT imaging. We compared ULD HE SPECT with SLD A-SPECT imaging by dividing the rest dose in 101 patients at 3 sites scheduled to undergo clinical A-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging using a same day rest-stress (99m)Tc protocol. Patients underwent HE SPECT imaging after an initial approximately 130-MBq (3.5 mCi) dose and SLD-A-SPECT imaging after the remainder of the planned dose. Images were scored visually by 2 masked readers for IQ and summed rest score. TPD and EF were assessed quantitatively. Mean activity was 134 MBq (3.62 mCi) for ULD HE SPECT (effective dose, 1.15 mSv) and 278 MBq (7.50 mCi, 2.39 mSv) for SLD A-SPECT. Overall IQ was superior for ULD HE SPECT (P < 0.0001), with twice as many studies graded excellent quality. Extracardiac activity and overall perfusion assessment were similar. Between-method correlations were high for summed rest score (r = 0.87), TPD (r = 0.91), and EF (r = 0.88). ULD HE SPECT rest imaging correlates highly with SLD A-SPECT. It has improved image quality, comparable extracardiac activity, and achieves radiation dose reduction to 1 mSv for a single injection. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  17. SPECT/CT with a hybrid imaging system in the study of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with technetium-99m red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, O; Spanu, A; Tagliabue, L; Filippi, L; Danieli, R; Palumbo, B; Del Sole, A; Madeddu, G

    2009-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a complex clinical problem that requires disciplined evaluation for successful management. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding undergoing scintigraphy with 99mTc-labelled red blood cells (RBC), and to assess the additional clinical value of fused images when compared to the standard radionuclide scan. Twenty-seven patients presenting with acute lower GI tract hemorrhage were studied with conventional dynamic and planar 99mTc-RBC imaging. In 19 patients with positive findings on scans taken within 6 hours, a SPECT/CT study was immediately performed using a hybrid system composed of a dual-head, variable angle gamma camera and an X-ray tube. The number of patients in whom SPECT/CT changed the scintigraphic interpretation with regard to the presence or site of GI blood loss as confirmed by other diagnostic or therapeutical procedures was recorded. Image fusion was easy and successful in all patients showing perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data and allowing precise anatomical localization of the sites of 99mTc-RBC extravasation. SPECT/CT had significant impact on the scintigraphic results in 7/19 patients (36.8%): in 6 patients it precisely localized the bleeding foci whose location could not be identified in standard scans and in one it excluded the presence of an active GI hemorrhage. SPECT/CT with a hybrid system is feasible and useful for facilitating imaging interpretation and improving the accuracy of 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy in patients with acute lower GI bleeding.

  18. Potential advantage of studying the lymphatic drainage by sentinel node technique and SPECT-CT image fusion for pelvic irradiation of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco . E-mail: krengli@med.unipmn.it; Ballare, Andrea; Cannillo, Barbara; Rudoni, Marco; Kocjancic, Ervin; Loi, Gianfranco; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Frea, Bruno

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the in vivo drainage of lymphatic spread by using the sentinel node (SN) technique and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-computed tomography (CT) image fusion, and to analyze the impact of such information on conformal pelvic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three prostate cancer patients, candidates for radical prostatectomy already included in a trial studying the SN technique, were enrolled. CT and SPECT images were obtained after intraprostate injection of 115 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, allowing identification of SN and other pelvic lymph nodes. Target and nontarget structures, including lymph nodes identified by SPECT, were drawn on SPECT-CT fusion images. A three-dimensional conformal treatment plan was performed for each patient. Results: Single-photon emission computed tomography lymph nodal uptake was detected in 20 of 23 cases (87%). The SN was inside the pelvic clinical target volume (CTV{sub 2}) in 16 of 20 cases (80%) and received no less than the prescribed dose in 17 of 20 cases (85%). The most frequent locations of SN outside the CTV{sub 2} were the common iliac and presacral lymph nodes. Sixteen of the 32 other lymph nodes (50%) identified by SPECT were found outside the CTV{sub 2}. Overall, the SN and other intrapelvic lymph nodes identified by SPECT were not included in the CTV{sub 2} in 5 of 20 (25%) patients. Conclusions: The study of lymphatic drainage can contribute to a better knowledge of the in vivo potential pattern of lymph node metastasis in prostate cancer and can lead to a modification of treatment volume with consequent optimization of pelvic irradiation.

  19. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Andrew K H; Ramogida, Caterina; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-03-31

    Purpose: Effective use of the 225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both 225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the 225Ac decay chain: 221Fr (218 keV) and 213Bi (440 keV). Methods: Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous 221Fr and 213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to image dynamic 221Fr and 213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a 213Bi generator from 225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Results: Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both 221Fr and 213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in 213Bi images and only rods ≥1.3 mm were resolved in 221Fr images. After eluting the 213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the 225Ac decay chain. Conclusion: A novel imaging method with potential to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the 225

  20. The Effect of Electromagnetic Field Generated by a Mobile Phone on the Performance of a SPECT Scanner: A Quantitative Study.

    PubMed

    Pashazadeh, Ali Mahmoud; Dehkordi, Forough Jafarian; Tanha, Kaveh; Assadi, Majid

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current attempt was quantitative investigation of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) of a mobile phone with the function of a SPECT gamma camera during data acquisition. We tested the effect of a mobile phone, in both ringing mode and standby mode, on one SPECT gamma camera during scanning a cylindrical phantom containing 5.4 mCi (99m)Tc. The experiment was performed for different distances of 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 25, and 30 cm between mobile phone and head of the scanner, and for different head angles of 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 degrees. A RF-EMF meter measured strength of electromagnetic field throughout the study. Statistically significant decrease in count number was considered to be electromagnetic interference. There was significant reduction in the recorded counts during ringing of the mobile phone in all studied distances. For gamma camera, fixed at a distance, there was no uniform pattern of reduction of the counts at different angles between two operation modes of the mobile phone. A mobile phone, at close distance, can be a sensible source of electromagnetic field, disturbing the normal function of a gamma camera.

  1. A Postprocessing Method for Compensation of Scatter and Collimator Blurring in SPECT: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Zeng, Gengsheng Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Attenuation, scatter, and blurring are 3 major contributors to SPECT image degradation. Image reconstruction without compensation for these degradations results in reduced contrast and reduced quantitative accuracy. In this proof-of-concept study, we present an efficient postprocessing method to compensate for the scatter and blurring effect in SPECT. Methods A raw image is first reconstructed with attenuation correction only. Then, a 2-dimensional (2D) point spread function (PSF) in the image domain is estimated to model the scatter and blurring. This spatially variant 2D PSF is fitted with an asymmetric gaussian function. The accuracy of the estimated 2D PSF is compared with that estimated from the Monte Carlo simulations and the scatter response functions in the projection domain. A further-blurring-and-deconvolution method is used to restore images with the spatially variant 2D PSF. Results The method is tested using computer simulations and a phantom experiment. The preliminary results demonstrate an improvement in image quality, with increased image contrast and quantitative accuracy, and the feasibility of this postprocessing method. Conclusion We present a proof-of-concept study for a postprocessing method to compensate for scatter and blurring. Our results indicate that the method is a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art compensation methods thanks to its easy and fast implementation. PMID:19447851

  2. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  3. Biodistribution study of nanometric hybrid gadolinium oxide particles as a multimodal SPECT/MR/optical imaging and theragnostic agent.

    PubMed

    Kryza, David; Taleb, Jacqueline; Janier, Marc; Marmuse, Laurence; Miladi, Imen; Bonazza, Pauline; Louis, Cédric; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire

    2011-06-15

    Nanometric hybrid gadolinium oxide particles (Gado-6Si-NP) for diagnostic and therapeutic applications (mean diameter 3-4 nm) were obtained by encapsulating Gd(2)O(3) cores within a polysiloxane shell, which carries organic fluorophore (Cy 5) and is derivatized by a hydrophilic carboxylic layer. As residency time in the living body and methods of waste elimination are crucial to defining a good nanoparticle candidate and moving forward with steps for validation, this study was aimed at evaluating the biodistribution of these multimodal Gado-6Si-NP in rodents. Gado-6Si-NP were imaged following intravenous injection in control Wistar rats and mice using MRI (7 T), optical fluorescent imaging, and SPECT. A clear correlation was observed among MRI, optical imaging, and SPECT regarding the renal elimination. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles circulated freely in the blood pool and were rapidly cleared by renal excretion without accumulation in liver and RES uptake. These results demonstrate that Gado-6Si-NP display optimal biodistribution properties, enabling them to be developed as multimodal agents for in vivo imaging and theragnostics, especially in oncological applications.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, V. I. Medvedeva, A. A. Zelchan, R. V. Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99}mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal {sup 199}Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of {sup 199}Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was 95%. The {sup 199}Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  5. Correction of hysteretic respiratory motion in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: Simulation and patient studies.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Paul K R; Könik, Arda; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Johnson, Karen L; Segars, William P; Shazeeb, Mohammed S; King, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Amplitude-based respiratory gating is known to capture the extent of respiratory motion (RM) accurately but results in residual motion in the presence of respiratory hysteresis. In our previous study, we proposed and developed a novel approach to account for respiratory hysteresis by applying the Bouc-Wen (BW) model of hysteresis to external surrogate signals of anterior/posterior motion of the abdomen and chest with respiration. In this work, using simulated and clinical SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies, we investigate the effects of respiratory hysteresis and evaluate the benefit of correcting it using the proposed BW model in comparison with the abdomen signal typically employed clinically. The MRI navigator data acquired in free-breathing human volunteers were used in the specially modified 4D NCAT phantoms to allow simulating three types of respiratory patterns: monotonic, mild hysteresis, and strong hysteresis with normal myocardial uptake, and perfusion defects in the anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal locations of the mid-ventricular wall. Clinical scans were performed using a Tc-99m sestamibi MPI protocol while recording respiratory signals from thoracic and abdomen regions using a visual tracking system (VTS). The performance of the correction using the respiratory signals was assessed through polar map analysis in phantom and 10 clinical studies selected on the basis of having substantial RM. In phantom studies, simulations illustrating normal myocardial uptake showed significant differences (P < 0.001) in the uniformity of the polar maps between the RM uncorrected and corrected. No significant differences were seen in the polar map uniformity across the RM corrections. Studies simulating perfusion defects showed significantly decreased errors (P < 0.001) in defect severity and extent for the RM corrected compared to the uncorrected. Only for the strong hysteretic pattern, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) among

  6. Pre- and Postsynaptic Dopamine SPECT in Idiopathic Parkinsonian Diseases: A Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, Lars; Holmberg, Henrik; Larsson, Anne; Riklund, Katrine

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic contribution of 123I-FP-Cit (DAT) and 123I-IBZM (IBZM) SPECT in 29 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (74.4 ± 4.2 years) and 28 patients with atypical parkinsonian diseases (APD) (74.3 ± 9.2 years). Twelve had multiple system atrophy (MSA) and 16 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Sixteen age-matched healthy controls (HC) were included. DAT and IBZM SPECTs were made at baseline and after 1 year in all PD patients and in 20 (DAT) and 18 (IBZM) of the APD patients, and after 3 years in 22 (DAT) and 17 (IBZM) of the PD patients and in 10 (DAT) and 10 (IBZM) of the APD patients. The relative DAT uptake decrease was faster in PD and PSP than in HC and MSA. In PSP the DAT uptake was lower than in MSA after 1 year but not after 3 years. Baseline IBZM uptake was not significantly different between patients and HC or between PD and APD. One year after initiated dopaminergic treatment the mean IBZM uptake in the MSA patients remained high compared to PSP and after 3 years compared to PD, PSP, and HC. Thus, the pattern of uptake of these ligands over time may be of value in discriminating between these diagnoses. PMID:24163811

  7. SPECT in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, J.C.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Yudd, A.P.

    1985-05-01

    Tc99m labeled red blood cell blood flow and delayed static blood pool imaging is widely accepted as a reliable, accurate method for the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomata. The purpose of this study is to assess the relative value of SPECT blood pool imaging in the evaluation of hepatic hemangionata. A total of 68 patients, including 21 patients with proven hepatic cavernous hemangiomas, were studied using both planar and SPECT imaging techniques. All patients underwent multi-phase evaluation which included a hepatic flow study, immediate planar images of the liver, followed by a 360/sup 0/ tomographic (SPECT) study and subsequent 60 minute delayed static planar hepatic blood pool images. All 21 patients with proven hepatic hemangiomas had a positive SPECT exam and 17 of the 21 (81%) patients had a positive planar exam. In the 21 patients, there were a total of 36 hemangiomas ranging in size from .7 cm to 13 cm. The SPECT imaging technique correctly identified all 36 lesions (100%) where as planar imaging detected 25 of the 36 lesions (69.4%). In all the remaining patients (10-normal, 17-metastatic disease, 12-hepatocellular disease, 6-hepatoma, 2-liver cysts), both the planar and SPECT imaging techniques were interpreted as showing no evidence of focal sequestration of red blood cells. SPECT hepatic blood pool imaging represents an improvement in the evaluation of hepatic hemangioma as a result of a reduction in imaging time (less than thirty minutes), improved spatial resolution and greater overall accuracy.

  8. Diagnoses behind patients with hard-to-classify tremor and normal DaT-SPECT: a clinical follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-González, Manuel; Tavares, Francisco; Zeidan, Nahla; Salas-Pacheco, José M.; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The [123I]ioflupane—a dopamine transporter radioligand—SPECT (DaT-SPECT) has proven to be useful in the differential diagnosis of tremor. Here, we investigate the diagnoses behind patients with hard-to-classify tremor and normal DaT-SPECT. Therefore, 30 patients with tremor and normal DaT-SPECT were followed up for 2 years. In 18 cases we were able to make a diagnosis. The residual 12 patients underwent a second DaT-SPECT, were then followed for additional 12 months and thereafter the diagnosis was reconsidered again. The final diagnoses included cases of essential tremor, dystonic tremor, multisystem atrophy, vascular parkinsonism, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, fragile X–associated tremor ataxia syndrome, psychogenic parkinsonism, iatrogenic parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease. However, for 6 patients the diagnosis remained uncertain. Larger series are needed to better establish the relative frequency of the different conditions behind these cases. PMID:24744729

  9. The influence of number of counts in the myocardium in the determination of reproducible functional parameters in gated-SPECT studies simulated with GATE.

    PubMed

    Vieira, L; Costa, D C; Almeida, P

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion gated-single photon emission computed tomography (gated-SPECT) imaging is used for the combined evaluation of myocardial perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of counts/pixel and concomitantly the total counts in the myocardium for the calculation of myocardial functional parameters. Gated-SPECT studies were performed using a Monte Carlo GATE simulation package and the NCAT phantom. The simulations of these studies use the radiopharmaceutical (99m)Tc-labeled tracers (250, 350, 450 and 680 MBq) for standard patient types, effectively corresponding to the following activities of myocardium: 3, 4.2, 5.4-8.2 MBq. All studies were simulated using 15 and 30s/projection. The simulated data were reconstructed and processed by quantitative-gated-SPECT software, and the analysis of functional parameters in gated-SPECT images was done by using Bland-Altman test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. In studies simulated using different times (15 and 30s/projection), it was noted that for the activities for full body: 250 and 350 MBq, there were statistically significant differences in parameters Motility and Thickness. For the left ventricular ejection fractio n (LVEF), end-systolic volume (ESV) it was only for 250 MBq, and 350 MBq in the end-diastolic volume (EDV), while the simulated studies with 450 and 680MBq showed no statistically significant differences for global functional parameters: LVEF, EDV and ESV. The number of counts/pixel and, concomitantly, the total counts per simulation do not significantly interfere with the determination of gated-SPECT functional parameters, when using the administered average activity of 450 MBq, corresponding to the 5.4 MBq of the myocardium, for standard patient types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-01

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts—the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  11. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-21

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of (176)Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts-the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  12. Recent advances in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    1998-08-28

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a medical imaging modality that combines conventional nuclear medicine imaging technique and methods of computed tomography (CT). From images that represent the biodistribution of the injected radiopharmaceutical in the patient, SPECT provides functional information that is unique. The first SPECT system was developed in the sixties. However, early progress of SPECT was hampered by the lack of adequate image reconstruction methods. The development of x-ray CT and image reconstruction methods in the seventies spurred a renewed interest in SPECT. In 1981, the first commercial SPECT system based on a single rotating camera was available for clinical use. Today, most modern SPECT systems consist of multiple cameras that rotate around the patients. They have better spatial resolution and higher detection efficiency as compared to the earlier single camera systems. Recently, a new generation of dual camera systems allowing for coincidence imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals has emerged in the commercial market. Additionally, new quantitative image reconstruction methods are under development. They compensate for image degrading factors including attenuation, collimator-detector blurring and scatter. Also, they result in SPECT images with improved image quality and more accurately represent the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution in the patient. Such advances in radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation, image reconstruction, compensation methods, and clinical applications have fueled a steady growth of SPECT as an important diagnostic tool in patient management.

  13. CT-based SPECT attenuation correction and assessment of infarct size: results from a cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Nekolla, Stephan Gerhard; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Grubinger, Thomas; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Schwaiger, Markus

    2017-09-21

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a commonly performed, well established, clinically useful procedure for the management of patients with coronary artery disease. However, the attenuation of photons from myocardium impacts the quantification of infarct sizes. CT-Attenuation Correction (AC) potentially resolves this problem. This contention was investigated by analyzing various parameters for infarct size delineation in a cardiac phantom model. A thorax phantom with a left ventricle (LV), fillable defects, lungs, spine and liver was used. The defects were combined to simulate 6 infarct sizes (5-20% LV). The LV walls were filled with 100120 kBq/ml (99m)Tc and the liver with 10-12 kBq/ml (99m)Tc. The defects were filled with water of 50% LV activity to simulate transmural and non-transmural infarction, respectively. Imaging of the phantom was repeated for each configuration in a SPECT/CT system. The defects were positioned in the anterior as well as in the inferior wall. Data were acquired in two modes: 32 views, 30 s/view, 180° and 64 views, 15 s/view, 360° orbit. Images were reconstructed iteratively with scatter correction and resolution recovery. Polar maps were generated and defect sizes were calculated with variable thresholds (40-60%, in 5% steps). The threshold yielding the best correlation and the lowest mean deviation from the true extents was considered optimal. AC data showed accurate estimation of transmural defect extents with an optimal threshold of 50% [non attenuation correction (NAC): 40%]. For the simulation of non-transmural defects, a threshold of 55% for AC was found to yield the best results (NAC: 45%). The variability in defect size due to the location (anterior versus inferior) of the defect was reduced by 50% when using AC data indicating the benefit from using AC. No difference in the optimal threshold was observed between the different orbits. Cardiac SPECT/CT shows an improved capability for quantitative defect size assessment in phantom

  14. Quantitative cardiac SPECT in three dimensions: validation by experimental phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z.; Ye, J.; Cheng, J.; Li, J.; Harrington, D.

    1998-04-01

    A mathematical framework for quantitative SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) reconstruction of the heart is presented. An efficient simultaneous compensation approach to the reconstruction task is described. The implementation of the approach on a digital computer is delineated. The approach was validated by experimental data acquired from chest phantoms. The phantoms consisted of a cylindrical elliptical tank of Plexiglass, a cardiac insert made of Plexiglass, a spine insert of packed bone meal and lung inserts made of styrofoam beads alone. Water bags were added to simulate different body characteristics. Comparison between the quantitative reconstruction and the conventional FBP (filtered backprojection) method was performed. The FBP reconstruction had a poor quantitative accuracy and varied for different body configurations. Significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy by the quantitative approach was demonstrated with a moderate computing time on a currently available desktop computer. Furthermore, the quantitative reconstruction was robust for different body characteristics. Therefore, the quantitative approach has the potential for clinical use.

  15. Role of PET and SPECT in the Study of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Pagani, Marco; Valentini, Maria Consuelo; Mansi, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has been defined as a “heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative syndromes characterized by progressive muscle paralysis caused by the degeneration of motor neurons allocated in primary motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord.” A comprehensive diagnostic workup for ALS usually includes several electrodiagnostic, clinical laboratory and genetic tests. Neuroimaging exams, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and spinal cord myelogram, may also be required. Nuclear medicine, with PET and SPECT, may also play a role in the evaluation of patients with ALS, and provide additional information to the clinicians. This paper aims to offer to the reader a comprehensive review of the different radiotracers for the assessment of the metabolism of glucose (FDG), the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), or the evaluation of neurotransmitters, astrocytes, and microglia by means of newer and not yet clinically diffuse radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:24818133

  16. Cannabis use and striatal D2 receptor density in untreated first-episode psychosis: an in vivo SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Safont, Gemma; Corripio, Iluminada; Escartí, María J; Portella, Maria J; Pérez, Víctor; Ferrer, Marc; Camacho, Valle; Sauras, Rosa B; Alonso, Anna; Grasa, Eva M; Arranz, Belén; San, Luis; Dueñas, Rosa; Carrió, Ignasi; Álvarez, Enric

    2011-07-01

    The biological basis of the association between cannabis-induced dopamine dysregulation and psychosis remains poorly understood. This (123)I-IBZM SPECT study assessed striatal dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) binding in 37 untreated first-episode psychosis (FEP) subjects, and 18 healthy controls. The aim was to examine if there were differences between FEP subjects with (n=14) and without (n=23) cannabis use in uptake ratios in the D2R. Striatal/Frontal cortex (S/F) uptake ratios were obtained. Healthy controls showed the lowest D2R binding ratios. No differences were found in S/F ratios between users and non-users, suggesting similar dopaminergic mechanisms underlying psychotic symptoms in both groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An easy Z-score imaging system for discrimination between very early Alzheimer's disease and controls using brain perfusion SPECT in a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mizumura, Sunao; Nagao, Takehiko; Ota, Tsuneyoshi; Iizuka, Tomomichi; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Kimura, Michihiro; Tateno, Amane; Ishiwata, Akiko; Kuji, Ichiei; Arai, Heii; Homma, Akira

    2007-03-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus has been reported to decrease even at a very early stage. We performed a multicentre SPECT study to evaluate the discrimination ability of an easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) by detecting an rCBF decrease in this area with a common normal database between very early AD patients at the stage of mild cognitive impairment and age-matched healthy volunteers. Brain perfusion SPECT images of 40 Alzheimer's disease patients and 40 healthy volunteers were acquired from four gamma camera systems in different institutions. Systematic differences of SPECT images between different gamma cameras were corrected using conversion maps calculated from the SPECT images of the same brain phantom. Ten observers with various degrees of expertise graded eZIS results for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. ROC curves for a positive Z-score in the volume of interest (VOI) of the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus were also analysed. An area under the ROC curve value (AZ) for ten observers showed the highest value of 0.866 on average with the smallest standard deviation of 0.027 in the condition of the lower threshold of a Z-score map of 2 without superimposition of VOI. Automated analysis of a Z-score in the VOI showed an AZ value of 0.895. Since the degree of expertise of the observers with respect to reading eZIS did not influence the performance and an eZIS can use a common normal database by converting site-specific SPECT data to the core data, the eZIS was considered to be very useful for diagnosing early AD in routine studies in many institutions.

  18. A multivendor phantom study comparing the image quality produced from three state-of-the-art SPECT-CT systems.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Tyler; Celler, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Ongoing advancements in single photon emission computed tomography with on-board X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) hardware and software raise important questions regarding the relative performances of various cameras and their respective image-processing software. This phantom-based study compares images produced from three state-of-the-art cameras using four image quality measurements. A thorax phantom modeling the spine, lungs, a healthy heart, and three tumors (cylindrical bottles) was scanned using the following SPECT-CT systems: Philips' Precedence (PP), GE's Infinia-Hawkeye (GH), and Siemens' Symbia-T6 (SS). For each scan, Tc-99m solutions were injected into the heart, three bottles, and thorax to yield activity concentration ratios of roughly 6:1 for both heart:thorax and tumor:thorax. The data were reconstructed using the most advanced software available on the cameras, namely, Evolution for Bone and Evolution for Cardiac (EVB and EVC, respectively), Astonish (AST), and Flash3D (FLA) for GH, PP, and SS, respectively. In addition, all sets of data were reconstructed using our in-house software. The mean values of activity error, uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast error were used as figures of merit (FOM). No significant differences were observed for all FOM between all in-house reconstructions using PP, GH, and SS acquisition data. The mean activity error for the AST reconstruction (-24.0±1.6%) was significantly closer to the truth relative to EVB (-38.0±1.6%), EVC (-34.5±2.3%), and FLA (-33.8±1.6%). No significant differences were found between EVC and FLA for all FOM. In this phantom-based study, Philips' AST provided the most quantitatively accurate and highest contrast images, whereas Siemens' FLA and GE's EVC provided relatively higher signal-to-noise ratios and more uniform images.

  19. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  20. On-board SPECT for localizing functional targets: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Roper, Justin; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-05-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was investigated for imaging on-board radiation therapy machines in order to localize functional and molecular targets. A computer-simulated female NCAT phantom was positioned supine on a flat-top treatment couch. Twenty tumor locations were defined in the upper torso. The eight lung tumors were subject to the effects of respiratory motion. Tumor diameters of 10.8, 14.4, and 21.6 mm were simulated for tumor-to-background ratios of 3:1 and 6:1 that are characteristic of the radiotracer 99mTc-sestamibi. Projection images representing scan times of 4, 8, and 20 min were simulated for an anterior, half-circular trajectory. Images were reconstructed with attenuation correction by ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) using six subsets and five iterations. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated from ensembles of 25 images. Cross correlation with a noise-free tumor template was used to select the most suspicious tumor location within a 14.4-mm-radius search volume surrounding each tumor, with only that one tumor in each search volume. Localization accuracy was assessed by calculating average distances between measured and true tumor locations. Localization accuracy and CNRs were strongly affected by tumor location relative to the detector trajectory. For example, CNR values near the chest wall were greater by a factor of 3.5 than for tumors near the spine and posterior ribs, a much greater effect than the factor of 1.6 difference in CNR between 6:1 and 3:1 tumor uptakes. Typically, tumors of 6:1 uptake were localized as accurately with 4 min of scan time as tumors of 3:1 uptake that had been imaged for 20 min. Using 4 min scans, 14.4 and 21.6 mm anterior tumors of 6:1 uptake were localized within 2 mm. These results suggest that SPECT, on-board radiation therapy machines, may be a viable modality for localizing certain functional and molecular targets using relatively short scan times.

  1. Cerebral SPECT imaging: Impact on clinical management

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.; Jacobs, S.; Pozniakof, T.

    1994-05-01

    Although cerebral SPECT has been reported to be of value in a variety of neurologic disorders, there is limited data available on the value of SPECT relative to clinical management decisions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cerebral SPECT imaging on patient management. A total of 94 consecutive patients referred for clinical evaluation with brain SPECT were included in this study. Patients were assigned to one of nine groups depending on the clinical indication for the study. These groups included transient ischemia (16), stroke (20), dementia (18), seizures (5), hemorrhage (13), head trauma (6), arteriovenous malformations (6), encephalopathy (6) and a miscellaneous (4) group. All patients were injected with 99mTc HMPAO in doses ranging from 15 mCi to 22 mCi (555 MBq to 814 MBq) and scanned on a triple headed SPECT gamma camera. Two weeks after completion of the study, a standardized interview was conducted between the nuclear and referring physicians to determine if the SPECT findings contributed to an alteration in patient management. Overall, patient management was significantly altered in 47% of the cases referred. The greatest impact on patient management occurred in the group evaluated for transient ischemia, where a total of 13/16 (81%) of patients had their clinical management altered as a result of the cerebral SPECT findings. Clinical management was altered in 61% of patients referred for evaluation of dementia, 67% of patients evaluated for arteriovenous malformations, and 50% of patients with head trauma. In the remainder of the patients, alteration in clinical management ranged from 17% to 50% of patients. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of cerebral SPECT imaging since in a significant number of cases clinical management was altered as a result of the examination. Long term follow up will be necessary to determine patient outcome.

  2. ADAPTIVE SMALL-ANIMAL SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Furenlid, L.R.; Moore, J.W.; Freed, M.; Kupinski, M.A.; Clarkson, E.; Liu, Z.; Wilson, D.W.; Woolfenden, J.M.; Barrett, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    We are exploring the concept of adaptive multimodality imaging, a form of non-linear optimization where the imaging configuration is automatically adjusted in response to the object. Preliminary studies suggest that substantial improvement in objective, task-based measures of image quality can result. We describe here our work to add motorized adjustment capabilities and a matching CT to our existing FastSPECT II system to form an adaptive small-animal SPECT/CT. PMID:26617457

  3. Evaluation of Efficacy of Bone Scan With SPECT/CT in the Management of Low Back Pain: A Study Supported by Differential Diagnostic Local Anesthetic Blocks.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anuj; Jain, Suruchi; Agarwal, Anil; Gambhir, Sanjay; Shamshery, Chetna; Agarwal, Amita

    2015-12-01

    Conventional radiologic modalities provide details only about the anatomic aspect of the various structures of the spine. Frequently the structures that show abnormal morphology may not be the cause of low back pain (LBP). Functional imaging in the form of bone scan along with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) may be helpful in identifying structures causing pain, whether morphologically normal or not. The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of bone scan with SPECT/CT in management of patients with LBP. This is randomized double-blinded controlled study performed on 80 patients with LBP aged 20 to 80 years, ASA physical status I to III. Patients were randomized into bone scan and control groups consisting of 40 patients each. On the basis of the clinical features and radiologic findings a clinical diagnosis was made. After making a clinical diagnosis, the patients in bone scan group were subjected to bone scan with SPECT/CT. On the basis of the finding of the bone scan and SPECT/CT, a new working diagnosis was made and intervention was performed according to the new working diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks in the control group were given based on clinical diagnosis. Controlled comparative diagnostic blocks were performed with local anesthetic. The pain score just after the diagnostic block and at the time of discharge (approximately 4 h later) was recorded; the pain relief was recorded in percentage. In both the groups, sacroilitis was the most common diagnosis followed by facet joint arthropathy. The number of patients obtaining pain relief of >50% was significantly higher in the bone scan-positive group as compared with the control group. Three new clinical conditions were identified in the bone scan group. These conditions were multiple myeloma, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and ankylosing spondylitis. Bone scan with SPECT/CT was found to complement the clinical workup of patients with LBP. Inclusion of bone scan with

  4. Ventilation-perfusion SPECT with 99mTc-DTPA versus Technegas: a head-to-head study in obstructive and nonobstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Jonson, Björn; Ekberg, Marie; Bajc, Marika

    2010-05-01

    Lung scintigraphy is primarily used to diagnose pulmonary embolism. Ventilation imaging is often performed using (99m)Tc-DTPA or Technegas, an ultrafine dispersion of (99m)Tc-labeled carbon. Despite the common use of these radioaerosols, they have not been compared in an intraindividual study, and not with ventilation-perfusion (V/P) SPECT. The aim of the present head-to-head study was to systematically investigate differences in ventilation studies performed with (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) and Technegas. Sixty-three patients, 28 without and 35 with obstructive lung disease, were examined with V/P SPECT using both (99m)Tc-DTPA and Technegas. V/P SPECT images were randomized and assessed independently by 2 masked physicians according to a predefined scoring system. A paired comparison was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In both obstructive and nonobstructive disease, the overall unevenness of radiotracer deposition and the degree of central deposition were more pronounced in (99m)Tc-DTPA than Technegas studies. Because of better peripheral penetration, the extent of reverse mismatch was less when Technegas was used. Additionally, in obstructive disease, the degree of focal deposition in distal airways was more pronounced with (99m)Tc-DTPA. Mismatched perfusion defects were more frequently found with Technegas in obstructive disease. This intraindividual comparative study shows that Technegas is the preferred radioaerosol, particularly in obstructive disease.

  5. Brain SPECT quantitation in clinical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    Methods to quantitate SPECT data for clinical diagnosis should be chosen so that they take advantage of the lessons learned from PET data. This is particularly important because current SPECT high-resolution brain imaging systems now produce images that are similar in resolution to those generated by the last generation PET equipment (9 mm FWHM). These high-resolution SPECT systems make quantitation of SPECT more problematic than earlier. Methodology validated on low-resolution SPECT systems may no longer be valid for data obtained with the newer SPECT systems. For example, in patients with dementia, the ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity often was studied. However, with new instruments, the cerebellum appears very different: discrete regions are more apparent. The large cerebellar regions usually used with older instrumentation are of an inappropriate size for the new equipment. The normal range for any method of quantitation determined using older equipment probably changes for data obtained with new equipment. It is not surprising that Kim et al. in their simulations demonstrated that because of the finite resolution of imaging systems, the ability to measure pure function is limited, with {open_quotes}anatomy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}function{close_quotes} coupled in a {open_quotes}complex nonlinear way{close_quotes}. 11 refs.

  6. Incremental value of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT over whole-body planar scintigraphy and SPECT in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Trogrlic, Mate; Težak, Stanko

    2017-06-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the additional value of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT over planar whole-body (WB) scintigraphy and SPECT alone in the detection and accurate localisation of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) lesions. This study included 65 patients with a definitive histological diagnosis of NET prior to scintigraphy. Planar WB scintigraphy, SPECT, and SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4 h post-administration of 670 MBq (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC. Additional SPECT images at 10 min after tracer administration were also acquired. Clinical and imaging follow-up findings were considered as the reference standards (minimum follow-up period, 15 months). Patient and lesion-based analyses of the efficacies of the imaging modalities were performed. While 38 patients exhibited metastasis of NETs, 27 presented no evidence of metastasis. Upon patient-based analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT/CT were found to be 88.9 and 79.3 %, respectively. The diagnostic accuracies of WB scintigraphy, 4h-SPECT, and SPECT/CT were 72.3, 73.8, and 84.6 %, respectively. The area under curve (AUC) value for SPECT/CT (0.84) was the highest, followed by those for 4h-SPECT (0.75) and WB scintigraphy (0.74). The accuracy and AUC values of SPECT/CT were significantly better compared to those of WB scintigraphy (p < 0.001), 10 min-SPECT (p < 0.001), and 4 h-SPECT (p = 0.001). The findings of SPECT/CT led to the change in treatment plan of 11 patients (16.9 %). The sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of SPECT/CT in the evaluation of NET lesions outperforms planar WB imaging or SPECT alone.

  7. I-123 Iofetamine SPECT scan in children with neurological disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Flamini, J.R.; Konkol, R.J.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-10-01

    I-123 Iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain in 42 patients (ages 14 days to 23 years) was compared with other localizing studies in children with neurological diseases. All had an EEG and at least one imaging study of the brain (computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had an EEG within 24-72 hours of the IMP-SPECT scan. Thirty-five (83%) had a history of seizures, and the remainder had other neurological conditions without a history of seizures. In most cases, a normal EEG reading with normal CT or MRI result predicted a normal SPECT study. When the EEG was abnormal the majority of the IMP-SPECT scans were abnormal and localized the abnormality to the same region. A comparison with CT and MRI showed that structural abnormalities involving the cortex were usually well demonstrated with IMP-SPECT imaging. Structural lesions confined to the white matter were generally not detectable with IMP-SPECT. In a few cases, SPECT scans revealed abnormalities in deep brain areas not identified by EEG. IMP-SPECT imaging is a valuable technique for the detection and localization of abnormal cerebral metabolic activity in children with seizure disorders. A correlation with CT or MRI is essential for proper interpretation of abnormalities detected with IMP SPECT imaging.

  8. Role of Brain Perfusion SPECT with 99mTc HMPAO in the Assessment of Response to Drug Therapy in Patients with Autoimmune Vasculitis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Liberatore; Manuela, Morreale; Valentina, Megna; Sara, Collorone; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maria, Drudi Francesco; Christos, Anagnostou; Liana, Civitelli; Ada, Francia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of vasculitis in the brain remains a quite difficult achievement. To the best of our knowledge, there is no imaging method reported in literature which is capable of reaching to a diagnosis of vasculitis with very high sensitivity. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be usefully employed in monitoring the treatment of vasculitis, allowing treating only potentially responder patients and avoiding the side effects on patients who do not respond. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (two males and 18 females) suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 5), Behcet's disease (BD; n = 5), undifferentiated vasculitis (UV; n = 5), and Sjogren's syndrome (SS; n = 5) were included in the study. All patients underwent a wide neurological anamnestic investigation, a complete objective neurological examination and SPECT of the brain with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO). The brain SPECT was then repeated after appropriate medical treatment. The neurological and neuropsychiatric follow-up was performed at 6 months after the start of the treatment. Results: Overall, the differences between the scintigraphic results obtained after and before the medical treatment indicated a statistically significant increase of the cerebral perfusion (CP). In 19 out of 200 regions of interest (ROI) studied, the difference between pre- and post treatment percentages had negative sign, indicating a worsening of CP. This latter event has occurred six times (five in the same patients) in the UV, 10 times (eight in the same patients) in the SLE, never in BD, and three times (two in the same patient) in the SS. Conclusion: The reported results seem to indicate the possibility of identifying, by the means of a brain SPECT, responder and nonresponder (unchanged or worsened CP) patients, affected by autoimmune vasculitis, to the therapy. PMID:25973400

  9. Comparison of photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging: Monte carlo simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-05-01

    The photon counting detector based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging modality that provides many benefits compared to conventional scintillation detectors. By using a pinhole collimator with the photon counting detector, we were able to improve both the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. We designed five pinhole SPECT systems of two types: one type with a CdTe photon counting detector and the other with a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. We conducted simulation studies and evaluated imaging performance. The results demonstrated that the spatial resolution of the CdTe photon counting detector was 0.38 mm, with a sensitivity 1.40 times greater than that of a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for the same detector thickness. Also, the average scatter fractions of the CdTe photon counting and the conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors were 1.93% and 2.44%, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully evaluated various pinhole SPECT systems for small animal imaging.

  10. Segmental and global left ventricular function assessment using gated SPECT with a semiconductor Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) camera: phantom study and clinical validation vs cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Bailliez, Alban; Blaire, Tanguy; Mouquet, Frédéric; Legghe, R; Etienne, B; Legallois, Damien; Agostini, Denis; Manrique, Alain

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated gated-SPECT using a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) camera for assessing global and regional left ventricular (LV) function. A phantom study evaluated the accuracy of wall thickening assessment using systolic count increase on both Anger and CZT (Discovery 530NMc) cameras. The refillable phantom simulated variable myocardial wall thicknesses. The apparent count increase (%CI) was compared to the thickness increase (%Th). CZT gated-SPECT was compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in 27 patients. Global and regional LV function (wall thickening and motion) were quantified and compared between SPECT and CMR data. In the phantom study using a 5-mm object, the regression between %CI and %Th was significantly closer to the line of identity (y = x) with the CZT (R (2) = 0.9955) than the Anger (R (2) = 0.9995, P = .03). There was a weaker correlation for larger objects (P = .003). In patients, there was a high concordance between CZT and CMR for ESV, EDV, and LVEF (all CCC >0.80, P < .001). CZT underestimated %CI and wall motion (WM) compared to CMR (P < .001). The agreement to CMR was better for WM than wall thickening. The Discovery 530NMc provided accurate measurements of global LV function but underestimated regional wall thickening, especially in patients with increased wall thickness.

  11. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Comparison study of temporal regularization methods for fully 5D reconstruction of cardiac gated dynamic SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2012-09-01

    Temporal regularization plays a critical role in cardiac gated dynamic SPECT reconstruction, of which the goal is to obtain an image sequence from a single acquisition which simultaneously shows both cardiac motion and tracer distribution change over the course of imaging (termed 5D). In our recent work, we explored two different approaches for temporal regularization of the dynamic activities in gated dynamic reconstruction without the use of fast camera rotation: one is the dynamic EM (dEM) approach which is imposed on the temporal trend of the time activity of each voxel, and the other is a B-spline modeling approach in which the time activity is regulated by a set of B-spline basis functions. In this work, we extend the B-spline approach to fully 5D reconstruction and conduct a thorough quantitative comparison with the dEM approach. In the evaluation of the reconstruction results, we apply a number of quantitative measures on two major aspects of the reconstructed dynamic images: (1) the accuracy of the reconstructed activity distribution in the myocardium and (2) the ability of the reconstructed dynamic activities to differentiate perfusion defects from normal myocardial wall uptake. These measures include the mean square error (MSE), bias-variance analysis, accuracy of time-activity curves (TAC), contrast-to-noise ratio of a defect, composite kinetic map of the left ventricle wall and perfusion defect detectability with channelized Hotelling observer. In experiments, we simulated cardiac gated imaging with the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom and Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent, where acquisition with the equivalent of only three full camera rotations was used during the imaging period. The results show that both dEM and B-spline 5D could achieve similar overall accuracy in the myocardium in terms of MSE. However, compared to dEM 5D, the B-spline approach could achieve a more accurate reconstruction of the voxel TACs; in particular, B-spline 5D could

  13. A pilot study of SPECT/CT-based mixed-reality navigation towards the sentinel node in patients with melanoma or Merkel cell carcinoma of a lower extremity.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Nynke S; Engelen, Thijs; Brouwer, Oscar R; Mathéron, Hanna M; Valdés-Olmos, Renato A; Nieweg, Omgo E; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2016-08-01

    To explore the feasibility of an intraoperative navigation technology based on preoperatively acquired single photon emission computed tomography combined with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images during sentinel node (SN) biopsy in patients with melanoma or Merkel cell carcinoma. Patients with a melanoma (n=4) or Merkel cell carcinoma (n=1) of a lower extremity scheduled for wide re-excision of the primary lesion site and SN biopsy were studied. Following a Tc-nanocolloid injection and lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT/CT images were acquired with a reference target (ReTp) fixed on the leg or the iliac spine. Intraoperatively, a sterile ReTp was placed at the same site to enable SPECT/CT-based mixed-reality navigation of a gamma ray detection probe also containing a reference target (ReTgp).The accuracy of the navigation procedure was determined in the coronal plane (x, y-axis) by measuring the discrepancy between standard gamma probe-based SN localization and mixed-reality-based navigation to the SN. To determine the depth accuracy (z-axis), the depth estimation provided by the navigation system was compared to the skin surface-to-node distance measured in the computed tomography component of the SPECT/CT images. In four of five patients, it was possible to navigate towards the preoperatively defined SN. The average navigational error was 8.0 mm in the sagittal direction and 8.5 mm in the coronal direction. Intraoperative sterile ReTp positioning and tissue movement during surgery exerted a distinct influence on the accuracy of navigation. Intraoperative navigation during melanoma or Merkel cell carcinoma surgery is feasible and can provide the surgeon with an interactive 3D roadmap towards the SN or SNs in the groin. However, further technical optimization of the modality is required before this technology can become routine practice.

  14. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Razali, Azhani Mohd Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  15. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  16. SPECT-CT-Guided Thoracoscopic Biopsy of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in the Internal Mammary Chain in Patients With Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Piato, José Roberto Morales; Filassi, José Roberto; Dela Vega, Alberto Jorge Monteiro; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Aguiar, Fernando Nalesso; Porciuncula, Ligia Maria Teixeira Pereira; Dória, Maíra Teixeira; Soares, José Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the use of single-photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography (SPECT-CT) on thoracoscopic biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in the internal mammary chain in patients with breast cancer by evaluating resultant changes in staging and their clinical implications. Between September 2010 and January 2014, we performed lymphoscintigraphy-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy of the internal mammary chain SLN in 20 patients with breast cancer. Single-photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography was also used in 13 of these patients. The sentinel nodes were surgically identified with the aid of a gamma probe. Sentinel lymph nodes were identified surgically in 19 of 20 patients. In the 13 patients in whom SPECT-CT was used, it readily identified SLNs, especially when they were located over an intercostal space. Change of staging occurred in three patients (15%), two of whom accordingly received adjuvant radiotherapy to the internal thoracic chain. Compared with lymphoscintigraphy alone, the use of SPECT-CT improves localization of the SLN in the internal mammary chain, allowing more accurate planning of each individual's treatment.

  17. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidi, H.

    1996-06-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang`s algorithm. The dual window method was used for scatter subtraction. The author used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of (1) fixed thresholding, (2) automatic thresholding, (3) attenuation, (4) scatter, and (5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are performed. The relative error is within 7% for the GLH method combined with attenuation and scatter corrections.

  18. Hypoperfusion of the Cerebellum and Aging Effects on Cerebral Cortex Blood Flow in Abstinent Alcoholics: A SPECT Study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Gordon J.; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Gansler, A.; Streeter, Chris; Lewis, Robert F.; Ahmed, Iqbal; Achong, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated hypotheses concerning alcoholism, aging, and the relationship between cerebral hypoperfusion and residual deficits in the functioning of cerebellar and neocortical brain systems. Methods The participants were 10 healthy abstinent alcoholics (9 men, 1 woman) and 12 nonalcoholic controls (10 men, 2 women) ranging in age from 35 to 67 years. Cerebral blood flow was observed through the use of regionally specific computer-derived quantitative analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion images. Cerebellar perfusion was measured and compared with cerebral cortex perfusion in age-equivalent subgroups of alcoholics and controls (under 55 years; 55 years and over). Results In abstinent alcoholics under age 55, cerebellar perfusion ratios were significantly reduced compared with the controls. In alcoholics and nonalcoholic controls 55 years old and older, this relationship was reversed, probably as a result of diminished cortical perfusion with aging in the alcoholics and of cerebellar decline in the controls. Conclusions The findings support hypotheses that the residual effects of alcoholism include cerebellar brain abnormalities and that aging combined with long-term alcoholism leads to cerebral cortical decline. PMID:10443989

  19. [The group study of diagnostic efficacy of cerebro-vascular disease by I-123 IMP SPECT images obtained with ring type SPECT scanner--the ROC analysis on the diagnosis of perfusion defect and redistribution].

    PubMed

    Machida, K; Matsumoto, T; Honda, N; Mamiya, T; Takahashi, T; Takishima, T; Kamano, T; Tamaki, S; Iinuma, T A; Tateno, Y

    1991-11-01

    We performed two image reading experiments in order to investigate the diagnostic capability of I-123 IMP SPECT obtained by the ring type SPECT scanner in cerebro-vascular disease. Fourteen physicians diagnosed SPECT images of 55 cases with reference to clinical neurological informations, first without brain XCT images and second with XCT images. Each physician detected perfusion defects and redistributions of I-123 IMP and assigned a confidence level of abnormality for these SPECT findings by means of five rating method. From results obtained by ROC analysis, we concluded as follows: (1) Generally, I-123 IMP SPECT is a stable diagnostic modality in the diagnosis of cerebro-vascular disease and the image reading of XCT had no effects on the diagnosis of SPECT on the whole of physician, (2) However, there were unnegligible differences among individuals in the detectability of findings and the effect of XCT image reading, (3) Detectability of redistribution of I-123 IMP was lower than that of perfusion defect and inter-observer variation in the diagnostic performance for redistribution was larger than that of perfusion defect. The results suggest that it is necessary to standardize diagnostic criteria among physicians for redistribution of I-123 IMP.

  20. IQ-SPECT for thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: effect of normal databases on quantification.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Matsuo, Shinro; Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Kinuya, Seigo

    2017-07-01

    Although IQ-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides rapid acquisition and attenuation-corrected images, the unique technology may create characteristic distribution different from the conventional imaging. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of IQ-SPECT using Japanese normal databases (NDBs) with that of the conventional SPECT for thallium-201 ((201)Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). A total of 36 patients underwent 1-day (201)Tl adenosine stress-rest MPI. Images were acquired with IQ-SPECT at approximately one-quarter of the standard time of conventional SPECT. Projection data acquired with the IQ-SPECT system were reconstructed via an ordered subset conjugate gradient minimizer method with or without scatter and attenuation correction (SCAC). Projection data obtained using the conventional SPECT were reconstructed via a filtered back projection method without SCAC. The summed stress score (SSS) was calculated using NDBs created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group, and scores were compared between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT using the acquisition condition-matched NDBs. The diagnostic performance of the methods for the detection of coronary artery disease was also compared. SSSs were 6.6 ± 8.2 for the conventional SPECT, 6.6 ± 9.4 for IQ-SPECT without SCAC, and 6.5 ± 9.7 for IQ-SPECT with SCAC (p = n.s. for each comparison). The SSS showed a strong positive correlation between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT (r = 0.921 and p < 0.0001), and the correlation between IQ-SPECT with and without SCAC was also good (r = 0.907 and p < 0.0001). Regarding diagnostic performance, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80.8, 78.9, and 79.4%, respectively, for the conventional SPECT; 80.8, 80.3, and 82.0%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT without SCAC; and 88.5, 86.8, and 87.3%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT with SCAC, respectively. The area under the curve obtained via receiver operating

  1. Performance evaluation of D-SPECT: a novel SPECT system for nuclear cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Kacperski, Krzysztof; van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F.

    2009-05-01

    D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is a novel SPECT system for cardiac perfusion studies. Based on CZT detectors, region-centric scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery, it offers potential advantages over conventional systems. A series of measurements were made on a β-version D-SPECT system in order to evaluate its performance in terms of energy resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, count rate capability and resolution. Corresponding measurements were also done on a conventional SPECT system (CS) for comparison. The energy resolution of the D-SPECT system at 140 keV was 5.5% (CS: 9.25%), the scatter fraction 30% (CS: 34%), the planar sensitivity 398 s-1 MBq-1 per head (99mTc, 10 cm) (CS: 72 s-1 MBq-1), and the tomographic sensitivity in the heart region was in the range 647-1107 s-1 MBq-1 (CS: 141 s-1 MBq-1). The count rate increased linearly with increasing activity up to 1.44 M s-1. The intrinsic resolution was equal to the pixel size, 2.46 mm (CS: 3.8 mm). The average reconstructed resolution using the standard clinical filter was 12.5 mm (CS: 13.7 mm). The D-SPECT has superior sensitivity to that of a conventional system with similar spatial resolution. It also has excellent energy resolution and count rate characteristics, which should prove useful in dynamic and dual radionuclide studies.

  2. Performance evaluation of D-SPECT: a novel SPECT system for nuclear cardiology.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Kacperski, Krzysztof; van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F

    2009-05-07

    D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is a novel SPECT system for cardiac perfusion studies. Based on CZT detectors, region-centric scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery, it offers potential advantages over conventional systems. A series of measurements were made on a beta-version D-SPECT system in order to evaluate its performance in terms of energy resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, count rate capability and resolution. Corresponding measurements were also done on a conventional SPECT system (CS) for comparison. The energy resolution of the D-SPECT system at 140 keV was 5.5% (CS: 9.25%), the scatter fraction 30% (CS: 34%), the planar sensitivity 398 s(-1) MBq(-1) per head ((99m)Tc, 10 cm) (CS: 72 s(-1) MBq(-1)), and the tomographic sensitivity in the heart region was in the range 647-1107 s(-1) MBq(-1) (CS: 141 s(-1) MBq(-1)). The count rate increased linearly with increasing activity up to 1.44 M s(-1). The intrinsic resolution was equal to the pixel size, 2.46 mm (CS: 3.8 mm). The average reconstructed resolution using the standard clinical filter was 12.5 mm (CS: 13.7 mm). The D-SPECT has superior sensitivity to that of a conventional system with similar spatial resolution. It also has excellent energy resolution and count rate characteristics, which should prove useful in dynamic and dual radionuclide studies.

  3. Density of striatal D2 receptors in untreated first-episode psychosis: an I123-IBZM SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Corripio, Iluminada; Escartí, María J; Portella, Maria J; Pérez, Víctor; Grasa, Eva; Sauras, Rosa B; Alonso, Anna; Safont, Gemma; Camacho, M Valle; Dueñas, Rosa; Arranz, Belén; San, Luis; Catafau, Ana M; Carrió, Ignasi; Alvarez, Enric

    2011-12-01

    There is as yet no definite prognostic marker to determine whether a first-episode psychosis will become schizophrenia or not. The aim of the present study is to address whether the mechanism of sensitization of the subcortical dopaminergic pathway - yielding to an increase of the postsynaptic D2 receptors - may serve as a prognostic marker of clinical outcome in drug naïve patients with a first-episode psychosis, by means of a prospective and multicentric study with untreated first-episode psychosis patients (n=37). 123I-IBZM SPECT was performed at the time of the inclusion in the study, before antipsychotic medication was initiated. One year later, patients were assessed again so as to determine their diagnosis. There was a significant group effect at baseline in D2 Striatal/Frontal (S/F) ratios (F=10.2, p<0.001). Bonferroni posthoc comparisons attested significant differences between diagnosis (p=0.006), and between schizophrenia and control groups (p<0.001) but no differences between non-schizophrenia and control groups (p=0.9). The logistic regression model showed that D2R binding (p=0.02) and PAS (Premorbid Adjustment Scale) adulthood score (p=0.03) were predictive of the final diagnosis (schizophrenia/non-schizophrenia; Nagelkerke R(2)=0.59; X(2)=11.08, p=0.001). These findings replicate previous results on the usefulness of D2R binding as an objective prognostic parameter, together with the evaluation of premorbid adjustment, of the evolution of first-episode psychosis. In this regard, the results may provide a new view in the approach of early and personalized treatment in the debut of a psychosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  4. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and built a small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ~35 keV photons from the decay of 125I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1×1×5 mm3/pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five 1 mm diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications. PMID:19701447

  5. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2013-10-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector's and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution.

  6. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector’s and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  7. Usefulness of the novel risk estimation software, Heart Risk View, for the prediction of cardiac events in patients with normal myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Tomohiko; Shimoo, Satoshi; Takamatsu, Kazuaki; Kyodo, Atsushi; Tsuji, Yumika; Mera, Kayoko; Koide, Masahiro; Isodono, Koji; Tsubakimoto, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Akiko; Inoue, Keiji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) can predict cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease with high accuracy; however, pseudo-negative cases sometimes occur. Heart Risk View, which is based on the prospective cohort study (J-ACCESS), is a software for evaluating cardiac event probability. We examined whether Heart Risk View was useful to evaluate the cardiac risk in patients with normal myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). We studied 3461 consecutive patients who underwent MPS to detect myocardial ischemia and those who had normal MPS were enrolled in this study (n = 698). We calculated cardiac event probability by Heart Risk View and followed-up for 3.8 ± 2.4 years. The cardiac events were defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and heart failure requiring hospitalization. During the follow-up period, 21 patients (3.0 %) had cardiac events. The event probability calculated by Heart Risk View was higher in the event group (5.5 ± 2.6 vs. 2.9 ± 2.6 %, p < 0.001). According to the receiver-operating characteristics curve, the cut-off point of the event probability for predicting cardiac events was 3.4 % (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.72, and AUC 0.85). Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that a higher event rate was observed in the high-event probability group by the log-rank test (p < 0.001). Although myocardial perfusion SPECT is useful for the prediction of cardiac events, risk estimation by Heart Risk View adds more prognostic information, especially in patients with normal MPS.

  8. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Validation of a short-scan-time imaging protocol for thallium-201 myocardial SPECT with a multifocal collimator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Yoriko; Ueda, Tomohiro; Shiomori, Tomofumi; Kanna, Masahiko; Matsushita, Hirooki; Kawaminami, Tomoko; Sudo, Yuta; Kikuchi, Shinnosuke; Sasaki, Ryo; Hoshimiya, Jun; Morita, Yukiko

    2014-10-01

    IQ-SPECT (Siemens AG, Munich, Germany) is a highly sensitive single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) system that uses a multifocal collimator. We searched for a suitable protocol for short-time imaging by IQ-SPECT in thallium-201 (Tl-201) MPI by evaluating phantom images and also by comparing human IQ-SPECT images with conventional SPECT images as reference standards. We assessed the image quality using the normalized mean square error (NMSE) and drew up count profiles in Tl-201 SPECT images acquired with IQ-SPECT in a phantom study. We also performed Tl-201 stress myocardial SPECT/CT in 21 patients and compared delayed images acquired by using IQ-SPECT with 36 or 17 views per head with images obtained by using conventional SPECT. The NMSE of SPECT images from IQ-SPECT with 36 views was approximately one-fifth of that with 17 views. The myocardial count profile of images with 17 views was lower than those of images with 36 or 104 views in some regions. Defect scores were significantly lower, and image quality scores higher, in images from conventional SPECT than in those from IQ-SPECT with 17 views. Defect scores and image quality scores were equivalent in images from conventional SPECT and those from IQ-SPECT with 36 views. Agreement with the results of conventional SPECT in terms of coronary artery territory-based defect judgment was the best in IQ-SPECT with 36 views with computed tomography-derived attenuation correction (CTAC): the kappa values for IQ-SPECT with 36 views were 0.76 (without CTAC) and 0.83 (with CTAC), and those for IQ-SPECT with 17 views were 0.62 (without CTAC) and 0.59 (with CTAC). The difference in quantitative tracer uptake between conventional SPECT images and IQ-SPECT images was significantly greater for IQ-SPECT images with 17 views than for those with 36 views. Scanning with 36 views per head with CTAC may be appropriate for Tl-201 MPI using IQ-SPECT, because it provides images equivalent to

  10. Patient doses from hybrid SPECT-CT procedures.

    PubMed

    Avramova-Cholakova, S; Dimcheva, M; Petrova, E; Garcheva, M; Dimitrova, M; Palashev, Y; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate patient doses from hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The study involved all four SPECT-CT systems in Bulgaria. Effective dose was estimated for about 100 patients per system. Ten types of examinations were considered, representing all diagnostic procedures performed in the SPECT-CT systems. Effective doses from the SPECT component were calculated applying the ICRP 53 and ICRP 80 conversion coefficients. Computed tomography dose index and dose length product were retrospectively obtained from the archives of the systems, and effective doses from the CT component were calculated with CT-Expo software. Parallel estimation of CT component contribution with the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) conversion coefficients was performed where applicable. Large variations were found in the current practice of SPECT-CT imaging. Optimisation actions and diagnostic reference levels were proposed.

  11. Diagnostic role of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for early and atypical bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Liang; Li, Qian; Cao, Lin; Jiang, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The bone metastasis appeared early before the bone imaging for most of the above patients. (99)Tc(m)-MDP ((99)Tc(m) marked methylene diphosphonate) bone imaging could diagnosis the bone metastasis with highly sensitivity, but with lower specificity. The aim of this study is to explore the diagnostic value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for the early period atypical bone metastases. 15 to 30 mCi (99)Tc(m)-MDP was intravenously injected to the 34 malignant patients diagnosed as doubtful early bone metastases. SPECT, CT and SPECT/CT images were captured and analyzed consequently. For the patients diagnosed as early period atypical bone metastases by SPECT/CT, combining the SPECT/CT and MRI together as the SPECT/MRI integrated image. The obtained SPECT/MRI image was analyzed and compared with the pathogenic results of patients. The results indicated that 34 early period doubtful metastatic focus, including 34 SPECT positive focus, 17 focus without special changes by using CT method, 11 bone metastases focus by using SPECT/CT method, 23 doubtful bone metastases focus, 8 doubtful bone metastases focus, 14 doubtful bone metastases focus and 2 focus without clear image. Totally, SPECT/CT combined with SPECT/MRI method diagnosed 30 bone metastatic focus and 4 doubtfully metastatic focus. In conclusion, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging shows a higher diagnostic value for the early period bone metastases, which also enhances the diagnostic accuracy rate.

  12. Improved diagnostic accuracy of lung perfusion imaging using Tc-99m MAA SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Golish, J.A.; Go, R.T.; Risius, B.; Graor, R.A.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Feiglin, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The addition of emission tomography (SPECT) to pulmonary perfusion imaging should improve diagnostic accuracy by detecting perfusion defects otherwise masked by superimposition of normal lung activity and by reducing problems with interpretation of defects that result from overlying soft tissue or pleural effusions. In order to examine the contribution of SPECT in the scintigraphic evaluation for pulmonary embolus (PE), the authors have obtained both planar and SPECT studies in 94 cases of suspected PE. All studies employed 3-4 mCi of Tc-99m MAA and standard six-view planar image acquisition. SPECT raw data of 64 images were then acquired over a 360 degree transaxial rotation with subsequent computer reconstruction. Xe-133 ventilation studies were performed when clinically indicated and tolerated by the patient. For 19 studies angiographic (AN) correlation was obtained within 24 hours. In 16/19 planar and SPECT both gave a high probability of PE but SPECT gave better segmental localization and showed better agreement with the number of defects seen at AN. In 3 indeterminate planar scans, 2 were low probability with SPECT and had negative AN. The third, a patient with Wegener's vasculitis, remained indeterminate with SPECT and had negative AN. Five patients with PE had repeat planar/SPECT/AN studies to evaluate response to treatment. SPECT correlated better with AN findings in each case. The authors conclude that SPECT perfusion imaging provides better anatomic accuracy for defects representing PE and is the non-invasive technique of choice for documenting response to therapy.

  13. Erythropoietin Pretreatment of Transplanted Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Enhances Recovery in a Cerebral Ischemia Model by Increasing Their Homing Ability: A SPECT/CT Study.

    PubMed

    Garrigue, Philippe; Hache, Guillaume; Bennis, Youssef; Brige, Pauline; Stalin, Jimmy; Pellegrini, Lionel; Velly, Lionel; Orlandi, Francesca; Castaldi, Elena; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence; Guillet, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy of ischemic diseases, as less than 10% of patients with an ischemic stroke are eligible for thrombolysis. We previously reported that erythropoietin priming of ECFCs increased their in vitro and in vivo angiogenic properties in mice with hindlimb ischemia. The present study used SPECT/CT to evaluate whether priming of ECFCs with erythropoietin could enhance their homing to the ischemic site after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion in rats and potentiate their protective or regenerative effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, cerebral apoptosis, and cerebral blood flow (CBF).

  14. The Effect of Parallel-hole Collimator Material on Image and Functional Parameters in SPECT Imaging: A SIMIND Monte Carlo Study.

    PubMed

    Azarm, Ahmadreza; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharepapagh, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a critical component of the imaging system and plays an impressive role in the imaging quality. In this study, the effect of the collimator material on the radioisotopic image and its functional parameters was studied. The simulating medical imaging nuclear detectors (SIMIND) Monte Carlo program was used to simulate a Siemens E.CAM SPECT (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) system equipped with a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator. The simulation and experimental data from the SPECT imaging modality using (99m)Tc were obtained on a point source and Jaszczak phantom. Seventeen high atomic number materials were considered as LEHR collimator materials. In order to determine the effect of the collimator material on the image and functional parameters, the energy resolution, spatial resolution, contrast, and collimator characteristics parameters such as septal penetration and scatter-to-primary ratio were investigated. Energy spectra profiles, full width at half maximums (FWHMs) (mm) of the point spread function (PSF) curves, system sensitivity, and contrast of cold spheres of the Jaszczak phantom for the simulated and experiment systems have acceptability superimposed. The results of FWHM and energy resolution for the 17 collimators showed that the collimator made of 98% lead and 2% antimony could provide the best FWHM and energy resolution, 7.68 mm and 9.87%, respectively. The LEHR collimator with 98% lead and 2% antimony offers the best resolution and contrast when compared to other high atomic number metals and alloys.

  15. The Effect of Parallel-hole Collimator Material on Image and Functional Parameters in SPECT Imaging: A SIMIND Monte Carlo Study

    PubMed Central

    Azarm, Ahmadreza; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharepapagh, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a critical component of the imaging system and plays an impressive role in the imaging quality. In this study, the effect of the collimator material on the radioisotopic image and its functional parameters was studied. The simulating medical imaging nuclear detectors (SIMIND) Monte Carlo program was used to simulate a Siemens E.CAM SPECT (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) system equipped with a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator. The simulation and experimental data from the SPECT imaging modality using 99mTc were obtained on a point source and Jaszczak phantom. Seventeen high atomic number materials were considered as LEHR collimator materials. In order to determine the effect of the collimator material on the image and functional parameters, the energy resolution, spatial resolution, contrast, and collimator characteristics parameters such as septal penetration and scatter-to-primary ratio were investigated. Energy spectra profiles, full width at half maximums (FWHMs) (mm) of the point spread function (PSF) curves, system sensitivity, and contrast of cold spheres of the Jaszczak phantom for the simulated and experiment systems have acceptability superimposed. The results of FWHM and energy resolution for the 17 collimators showed that the collimator made of 98% lead and 2% antimony could provide the best FWHM and energy resolution, 7.68 mm and 9.87%, respectively. The LEHR collimator with 98% lead and 2% antimony offers the best resolution and contrast when compared to other high atomic number metals and alloys. PMID:26420985

  16. Radiography, 99mTc-HDP, and 111In labeled vitamin B12 SPECT of canine osteosarcoma: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Robert; Steyn, Phillip; Collins, Douglas; Powers, Barbara; Urigh, John

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article was to compare radiography, planar bone scintigraphy, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to determine the size of osteosarcomas in long bones of dogs. Ten dogs with osteosarcoma in six radii, two humeri, one tibia, and one ulna were evaluated. Macroslides, mediolateral radiographs, planar scintigrams, and sagittal images from SPECT scans were used to obtain measurements. On the scintigraphic images, the edges of the tumor were established using the activity profile imaging tool. The radiographic magnification was factored. The mean percentage of tumor size overestimation was 9.29% on mediolateral radiographs, 5.35% on planar scintigrams, and 33.25% on SPECT images. The correlation coefficient adjusted for sample size was significantly higher (P<0.01) for technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) hydroxyethylene diphosphonate (HDP) (75.5%) and radiography (61.3%) compared with indium 111-vitamin B(12) (28.3%). The correlation coefficient for (99m)Tc-HDP was higher than that obtained for radiographs; however, statistical difference between the two variables was not demonstrated (P>0.05). (99m)Tc bone scan is a good estimator of intramedullary size of osteosarcoma in long bones when the activity profile tool to determine the margin of the tumor is used.

  17. SU-E-I-80: Quantification of Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Effect in SPECT Acquisitions Using Anthropomorphic Models: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kostou, T; Kagadis, G; Loudos, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify, evaluate the impact of cardiac and respiratory motion on clinical nuclear imaging protocols. Common SPECT and scintigraphic scans are studied using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, comparing the resulted images with and without motion. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and the XCAT anthropomorphic phantom as a reference model for human anatomy. Three different radiopharmaceuticals based on 99mTc were studied, namely 99mTc-MDP, 99mTc—N—DBODC and 99mTc—DTPA-aerosol for bone, myocardium and lung scanning respectively. The resolution of the phantom was set to 3.5 mm{sup 3}. The impact of the motion on spatial resolution was quantified using a sphere with 3.5 mm diameter and 10 separate time frames, in the ECAM modeled SPECT scanner. Finally, respiratory motion impact on resolution and imaging of lung lesions was investigated. The MLEM algorithm was used for data reconstruction, while the literature derived biodistributions of the pharmaceuticals were used as activity maps in the simulations. Results: FWHM was extracted for a static and a moving sphere which was ∼23 cm away from the entrance of the SPECT head. The difference in the FWHM was 20% between the two simulations. Profiles in thorax were compared in the case of bone scintigraphy, showing displacement and blurring of the bones when respiratory motion was inserted in the simulation. Large discrepancies were noticed in the case of myocardium imaging when cardiac motion was incorporated during the SPECT acquisition. Finally the borders of the lungs are blurred when respiratory motion is included resulting to a dislocation of ∼2.5 cm. Conclusion: As we move to individualized imaging and therapy procedures, quantitative and qualitative imaging is of high importance in nuclear diagnosis. MC simulations combined with anthropomorphic digital phantoms can provide an accurate tool for applications like motion correction

  18. Collimator and energy window optimization for ⁹⁰Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging: A SIMIND Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Hoda Rezaei; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharepapagh, Esmaeil; Azarm, Ahmadreza; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2016-02-01

    Treatment efficacy of radioembolization using Yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres is assessed by the (90)Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging following radioembolization. The radioisotopic image has the potential of providing reliable activity map of (90)Y microspheres distribution. One of the main reasons of the poor image quality in (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging is the continuous and broad energy spectrum of the related bremsstrahlung photons. Furthermore, collimator geometry plays an impressive role in the spatial resolution, sensitivity and image contrast. Due to the relatively poor quality of the (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT images, we intend to optimize the medium-energy (ME) parallel-hole collimator and energy window. The Siemens e.cam gamma camera equipped with a ME collimator and a voxelized phantom was simulated by the SImulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors (SIMIND) program. We used the SIMIND Monte Carlo program to generate the (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT projection of the digital Jaszczak phantom. The phantom consist of the six hot spheres ranging from 9.5 to 31.8mm in diameter, which are used to evaluate the image contrast. In order to assess the effect of the energy window on the image contrast, three energy windows ranging from 60 to 160 KeV, 160 to 400 KeV, and 60 to 400 KeV were set on a (90)Y bremsstrahlung spectrum. As well, the effect of the hole diameter of a ME collimator on the image contrast and bremsstrahlung spectrum were investigated. For the fixed collimator and septa thickness values (3.28 cm and 1.14 mm, respectively), a hole diameter range (2.35-3.3mm) was chosen based on the appropriate balance between the spatial resolution and sensitivity. The optimal energy window for (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging was extended energy window from 60 to 400 KeV. Besides, The optimal value of the hole diameter of ME collimator was obtained 3.3mm. Geometry of the ME parallel-hole collimator and energy

  19. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  20. A Monte Carlo simulation study of the feasibility of a high resolution parallel-hole collimator with a CdTe pixelated semiconductor SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-J.; Park, S.-J.; Lee, S.-W.; Kim, D.-H.; Kim, Y.-S.; Jo, B.-D.; Kim, H.-J.

    2013-03-01

    It is recommended that a pixelated parallel-hole collimator in which the hole and pixel sizes are equal be used to improve the sensitivity and spatial resolution when using a small pixel size and a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with pixelated semiconductor detector materials (e.g., CdTe and CZT). However, some significant problems arise in the manufacturing of a pixelated parallel-hole collimator. Therefore, we sought to simulate a pixelated semiconductor SPECT system with various collimator geometric designs. The purpose of this study was to compare the quality of images generated with a pixelated semiconductor SPECT system simulated with pixelated parallel-hole collimators of various geometric designs. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of the various collimator geometric designs with varying septal heights and hole sizes were measured. Moreover, to evaluate the overall performance of the imaging system, a hot-rod phantom was designed using a Monte Carlo simulation. According to the results, the average sensitivity using a 15 mm septal height was 1.80, 2.87, and 4.16 times higher than that obtained with septal heights of 20, 25, and 30 mm, respectively. Also, the average spatial resolution using the 30 mm septal height was 44.33, 22.08, and 9.26% better than that attained with 15, 20, and 25 mm septal heights, respectively. When the results acquired with 0.3 and 0.6 mm hole sizes were compared, the average sensitivity with the 0.6 mm hole size was 3.97 times higher than that obtained with the 0.3 mm hole size, and the average spatial resolution with the 0.3 mm hole size was 45.76% better than that with the 0.6 mm hole size. We have presented the pixelated parallel-hole collimators of various collimator geometric designs and evaluations. Our results showed that the effect of various collimator geometric designs can be investigated by Monte Carlo simulation so as to evaluate the feasibility of a high resolution parallel

  1. Three-dimensional personalized dosimetry for 188Re liver selective internal radiation therapy based on quantitative post-treatment SPECT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Grimes, J.; Bator, A.; Cwikla, J. B.; Celler, A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate patient-specific distributions of microspheres labeled with 188Re and resulting absorbed doses can be obtained from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies performed after 188Re selective internal radiation therapy when accurate correction methods are employed in image reconstruction. Our quantitative image reconstruction algorithm includes corrections for attenuation, resolution degradations and scatter as well as a window-based compensation for contamination. The procedure has been validated using four phantom experiments containing an 18 ml cylindrical source (82-93 MBq of 188Re activity) simulating a liver tumor. In addition, we applied our approach to post-therapy SPECT studies of ten patients with progressive primary or metastatic liver carcinomas. Our quantitative algorithm accurately (within 9%) recovered 188Re activity from four phantom experiments. In addition, for two patients that received three scans, deviations remained consistent between the measured and the reconstructed activities that were determined from studies with differing severity of the dead-time effect. The analysis of absorbed doses for patient studies allowed us to hypothesize that D90 (the minimum dose received by 90% of the tumor volume) may be a reliable metric relating therapy outcomes to the calculated doses. Among several considered metrics, only D90 showed statistically significant correlation with the overall survival.

  2. NOTE: Comparison of correction techniques for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging: a dog study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef

    2000-11-01

    We compared two correction methods for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Both approaches use the information from the third energy window placed between the photopeak windows of the 201Tl and 99mTc. The first approach, described by Moore et al, corrects only for the contribution of the 99mTc to the 201Tl primary 70 keV window. We developed the three-window transformation dual-isotope correction method, which is a simultaneous cross-talk correction. The two correction methods were compared in a simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc sestamibi cardiac dog study. Three separate acquisitions were performed in this dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope acquisition. The 201Tl single-isotope images were used as references. The total number of counts, and the contrast between the left ventricular cavity (LVC) and the myocardium, were used in 70 keV short-axis slices as parameters for evaluating the results of the dual-isotope correction methods. Three consecutive short-axis slices were used to calculate averaged contrast and the averaged total number of counts. The total number of the counts was 667 000 ± 500 and 414 500 ± 400 counts for the dual-isotope (201Tl + 99mTc) and single-isotope (201Tl-only) 70 keV images, respectively. The corrected dual-isotope images had 514 700 ± 700 and 368 000 ± 600 counts for Moore's correction and our approach, respectively. Moore's method improved contrast in the dual-isotope 70 keV image to 0.14 ± 0.03 from 0.11 ± 0.02, which was the value in the 70 keV non-corrected dual-isotope image. Our method improved the same contrast to 0.22 ± 0.03. The contrast in the 201Tl single-isotope 70 keV image was 0.28 ± 0.02. Both methods improved the 70 keV dual-isotope images. However, our approach provided slightly better images than Moore's correction when compared with 201Tl-only 70 keV images.

  3. Three-minute SPECT/CT is sufficient for the assessment of bone metastasis as add-on to planar bone scintigraphy: prospective head-to-head comparison to 11-min SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Manresa, José A Biurrun; Aleksyniene, Ramune; Ejlersen, June A; Fledelius, Joan; Bertelsen, Henrik; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether ultra-fast acquisition SPECT/CT (UF-SPECT/CT) can replace standard SPECT/CT (std-SPECT/CT) as "add-on" to whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB-BS) for the investigation of bone metastases. Consecutive cancer patients referred for WB-BS who underwent SPECT/CT in addition to WB-BS were included. Std-SPECT, UF-SPECT, and low-dose CT were performed (std-SPECT: matrix 128 × 128, zoom factor 1, 20 s/view, 32 views; UF-SPECT: identical parameters except for 10 s/view and 16 views, reducing the acquisition time from 11 to 3 min). A consensus diagnosis was reached by two observers for each set of images (WB-BS + standard SPECT/CT or WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT) using a three-category evaluation scale: M0: no bone metastases; M1: bone metastases; and Me: equivocal findings. Among the 104 included patients, most presented with prostate cancer (n = 71) or breast cancer (n = 28). Using WB-BS + std-SPECT/CT, 71 (68%) patients were classified as M0, 19 (18%) as M1, and 14 (14%) as Me. Excellent agreement was observed between WB-BS + std-SPECT/CT and WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT using the three-category scale: kappa = 0.91 (95% CI 0.84-0.97). No difference in observer agreement between cancer types was detected. SPECT/CT provided a definitive classification in 90 of 104 cases in which WB-BS was not entirely diagnostic. To investigate potential bone metastases, UF-SPECT/CT can be conducted as add-on to WB-BS to notably reduce the SPECT acquisition time without compromising diagnostic confidence.

  4. Correction for scatter and septal penetration using convolution subtraction methods and model-based compensation in 123I brain SPECT imaging-a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Anne; Ljungberg, Michael; Mo, Susanna Jakobson; Riklund, Katrine; Johansson, Lennart

    2006-11-21

    Scatter and septal penetration deteriorate contrast and quantitative accuracy in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this study four different correction techniques for scatter and septal penetration are evaluated for 123I brain SPECT. One of the methods is a form of model-based compensation which uses the effective source scatter estimation (ESSE) for modelling scatter, and collimator-detector response (CDR) including both geometric and penetration components. The other methods, which operate on the 2D projection images, are convolution scatter subtraction (CSS) and two versions of transmission dependent convolution subtraction (TDCS), one of them proposed by us. This method uses CSS for correction for septal penetration, with a separate kernel, and TDCS for scatter correction. The corrections are evaluated for a dopamine transporter (DAT) study and a study of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), performed with 123I. The images are produced using a recently developed Monte Carlo collimator routine added to the program SIMIND which can include interactions in the collimator. The results show that the method included in the iterative reconstruction is preferable to the other methods and that the new TDCS version gives better results compared with the other 2D methods.

  5. Correction for scatter and septal penetration using convolution subtraction methods and model-based compensation in 123I brain SPECT imaging—a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Anne; Ljungberg, Michael; Jakobson Mo, Susanna; Riklund, Katrine; Johansson, Lennart

    2006-11-01

    Scatter and septal penetration deteriorate contrast and quantitative accuracy in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this study four different correction techniques for scatter and septal penetration are evaluated for 123I brain SPECT. One of the methods is a form of model-based compensation which uses the effective source scatter estimation (ESSE) for modelling scatter, and collimator-detector response (CDR) including both geometric and penetration components. The other methods, which operate on the 2D projection images, are convolution scatter subtraction (CSS) and two versions of transmission dependent convolution subtraction (TDCS), one of them proposed by us. This method uses CSS for correction for septal penetration, with a separate kernel, and TDCS for scatter correction. The corrections are evaluated for a dopamine transporter (DAT) study and a study of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), performed with 123I. The images are produced using a recently developed Monte Carlo collimator routine added to the program SIMIND which can include interactions in the collimator. The results show that the method included in the iterative reconstruction is preferable to the other methods and that the new TDCS version gives better results compared with the other 2D methods.

  6. Creation of an ensemble of simulated cardiac cases and a human observer study: tools for the development of numerical observers for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Gifford, Howard C.; Licho, Robert; Joffe, Samuel; McGuiness, Matthew; Mehurg, Shannon; Zacharias, Michael; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2012-02-01

    Our previous Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) research explored the utility of numerical observers. We recently created two hundred and eighty simulated SPECT cardiac cases using Dynamic MCAT (DMCAT) and SIMIND Monte Carlo tools. All simulated cases were then processed with two reconstruction methods: iterative ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and filtered back-projection (FBP). Observer study sets were assembled for both OSEM and FBP methods. Five physicians performed an observer study on one hundred and seventy-nine images from the simulated cases. The observer task was to indicate detection of any myocardial perfusion defect using the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) 17-segment cardiac model and the ASNC five-scale rating guidelines. Human observer Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) studies established the guidelines for the subsequent evaluation of numerical model observer (NO) performance. Several NOs were formulated and their performance was compared with the human observer performance. One type of NO was based on evaluation of a cardiac polar map that had been pre-processed using a gradient-magnitude watershed segmentation algorithm. The second type of NO was also based on analysis of a cardiac polar map but with use of a priori calculated average image derived from an ensemble of normal cases.

  7. Added value of SPECT/CT in patients suspected of having bone infection: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Horger, Marius; Eschmann, Susanne Martina; Pfannenberg, Christina; Storek, Dieter; Vonthein, Reinhard; Claussen, Claus D; Bares, Roland

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated the contribution of SPECT/CT as an adjunct to combined three-phase bone scintigraphy (planar and SPECT) for diagnosing and localizing bone infection. Subsequently, the diagnostic performance of SPECT/CT was compared to visual fusion of SPECT with data of additional CT, X-ray, or MRI studies (SPECT + CT/X-ray/MRI). Thirty-one patients suspected of bone infection, presenting pathological findings on triple-phase bone scintigraphy, underwent additional SPECT/CT. The SPECT/CT-technology combines the acquisition of SPECT and CT data with the same imaging device enabling perfect overlay of anatomical and functional images. (99m)Tc-DPD was used as radiopharmaceutical in all patients. For data analysis findings of bone scintigraphy (planar scans as well as SPECT) were categorized as positive, negative, or equivocal for the presence of osteomyelitis. In a second step, they were compared with SPECT/CT and SPECT + CT/X-ray/MRI with respect to localization and classification of lesions. Validation was achieved by surgery, biopsy, or by clinical follow up over at least 9 months including microbiological and radiological findings. Three-phase bone scan (incl. SPECT) correctly classified 7 lesions as positive and 11 lesions as negative for osteomyelitis. Six scans were interpreted false positive, two false negative, and five as equivocal. Rating the latter as positive for osteomyelitis, sensitivity of bone scan was (78%), specificity (50%). SPECT/CT was true positive in 7 patients, and true negative in 19. There were two false positive and two false negative findings, one scan was equivocal (sensitivity 78%, specificity 86%). Definition of anatomical localization of inflammatory foci was much easier by SPECT/CT due to better depiction of underlying anatomical details. SPECT + CT/X-ray/MRI yielded the highest sensitivity (100% compared to 78% of SPECT/CT), if equivocal findings (5/31 compared to 1/31 for SPECT/CT) are rated as true positive for osteomyelitis. Among

  8. Problems created in attenuation-corrected SPECT images by artifacts in attenuation maps: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Celler, Anna; Dixon, Katherine L; Chang, Zheng; Blinder, Stephan; Powe, John; Harrop, Ronald

    2005-02-01

    The importance of accurate attenuation correction, especially for imaging of the thorax region, is widely acknowledged. Appropriate compensation methods have been developed and introduced into clinical practice. Most of these methods use attenuation maps obtained using various transmission scanning systems. However, when maps are inaccurate, the correction procedure may introduce artifacts into the final images that can be difficult to identify and might inadvertently alter diagnosis and study outcome. As a result, attenuation correction is often avoided in clinical practice. Our objective was to examine issues related to the quality of attenuation maps and the effects that map artifacts may have on attenuation-corrected emission images. The topics that are investigated include the problem of low transmission counts, cross-talk contributions from the emission isotope, truncation of the transmission data, and methods of map reconstruction and segmentation. Examples of patient studies displaying specific problems guided our investigations, but, because truth in these studies is seldom known, analytic and Monte Carlo-simulated data were used in the analysis. Attenuation maps and final emission images were visually checked for artifacts and for the presence of perfusion defects. In addition, quantitative evaluation of map uniformity, defect visibility, and size variation was performed. The statistical paired-sample t test showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement of relative SD for attenuation maps reconstructed with iterative methods as compared with filtered backprojection and for maps created with higher photon fluxes. When maps with artifacts were used to correct emission data, an increase in myocardial infarct size and creation of false heart defects were observed. Our study strongly recommends that at least a visual inspection of the quality of attenuation maps be performed before their use in compensation procedures. To improve image quality, remove artifacts

  9. SPECT gallium imaging in abdominal lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, K.A.; Friefeld, G.D.; Waldron, J.A. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    A case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen studied by gallium SPECT imaging is reported. The tomographic slices accurately demonstrated the location of residual disease after chemotherapy in the region of the transverse mesocolon. Previous transmission CT had shown considerable persistent retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, but was not helpful in determining the presence of viable lymphoma.

  10. [The Optimal Reconstruction Parameters by Scatter and Attenuation Corrections Using Multi-focus Collimator System in Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Study].

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Funayama, Risa; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Konishi, Takahiro; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the optimal reconstruction parameters of ordered subset conjugates gradient minimizer (OSCGM) by no correction (NC), attenuation correction (AC), and AC+scatter correction (ACSC) using IQ-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial phantom acquired two patterns, with or without defect. Myocardial images were performed 5-point scale visual score and quantitative evaluations using contrast, uptake, and uniformity about the subset and update (subset×iteration) of OSCGM and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter by three corrections. We decided on optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM by three corrections. The number of subsets to create suitable images were 3 or 5 for NC and AC, 2 or 3 for ACSC. The updates to create suitable images were 30 or 40 for NC, 40 or 60 for AC, and 30 for ACSC. Furthermore, the FWHM of Gaussian filters were 9.6 mm or 12 mm for NC and ACSC, 7.2 mm or 9.6 mm for AC. In conclusion, the following optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM were decided; NC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 9.6 mm, AC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 7.2 mm, ACSC: subset 3, iteration 10 and FWHM 9.6 mm.

  11. Simulation study on a stationary data acquisition SPECT system with multi-pinhole collimators attached to a triple-head gamma camera system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Koichi; Ichimura, Yuta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a new SPECT system that makes it possible to acquire projection data stationary using a triple-head gamma camera system. We evaluated several data acquisition geometry with multi-pinhole collimators attached to a triple-head gamma camera system. The number of pinholes for each camera was three to twelve, and we located these holes on collimator plates adequately. These collimator holes were tilted by predefined angles to efficiently cover the field of view of the data acquisition system. Acquired data were reconstructed with the OS-EM method. In the simulations, we used a three-dimensional point source phantom, brain phantom, and myocardial phantom. Attenuation correction was conducted with the x-ray CT image of the corresponding slice. Reconstructed images of the point source phantom showed that the spatial resolution could be improved with the small number of pinholes. On the other hand, reconstructed images of the brain phantom showed that the large number of pinholes yielded images with less artifact. The results of the simulations with the myocardial phantom showed that more than eight pinholes could yield an accurate distribution of activity when the source was distributed only in the myocardium. The results of the simulations confirmed that more than eight pinholes for each detector were required to reconstruct an artifact free image in the triple-head SPECT system for imaging of brain and myocardium.

  12. Brain areas involved in acupuncture needling sensation of de qi: a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Rong; Li, Gan-Long; Zhang, Gui-Feng; Huang, Yong; Wang, Shu-Xia; Lu, Na

    2012-12-01

    De qi is a sensory response elicited by acupuncture stimulation. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), de qi is essential for clinical efficacy. However, the understanding of the neurobiological basis of de qi is still limited. To investigate the relationship between brain activation and de qi by taking a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan while applying acupuncture at TE5. A total of 24 volunteers were randomly divided into 4 groups, and received verum or sham acupuncture at true acupuncture point TE5 or a nearby sham point according to grouping. All subjects then received a (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT scan. All six subjects in the verum acupuncture at true acupuncture point group experienced de qi sensation; in contrast, all six subjects in the sham acupuncture at the sham point group responded with nothing other than non-sensation. Compared to the scan results from subjects who experienced non-sensation, SPECT scans from subjects with de qi sensation demonstrated significant activated points mainly located in brodmann areas 6, 8, 19, 21, 28, 33, 35, 37, 47, the parahippocampal gyrus, lentiform nucleus, claustrum and red nucleus; deactivated points were seen in brodmann areas 9 and 25. Verum acupuncture at true acupuncture points is more likely to elicit de qi sensation. De qi sensations mainly resulted in brain area activations, but not deactivations. These brain areas are related to the curative effect of Te5. The acupuncture needle sensations of de qi and sharp pain are associated with different patterns of activations and deactivations in the brain.

  13. [Electroconvulsive therapy in depression: insights from fMRI, PET and SPECT studies].

    PubMed

    Depping, M S; Wolf, R C; Nolte, H M; Palm, E; Hirjak, D; Thomann, P A

    2014-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most potent and rapidly acting of all antidepressant treatments in major depressive disorder (MDD). Nuclear and functional magnetic (fMRI) brain imaging studies of ECT have substantially contributed to the neurobiological understanding of this treatment modality. Neuroimaging methods may also validate potential mechanisms of antidepressant action. Models of neural dysfunction in MDD suggest impaired modulation of activity within a cortico-limbic circuitry, along with alterations in the functional organisation of multiple brain networks implicated in emotional processes. Nuclear imaging techniques have demonstrated consistent patterns of ECT-induced ictal changes in brain activity that appear to be linked to efficacy and side effects of ECT. Interictally, widespread alterations of brain function have been reported, however, results remain inconclusive. FMRI studies of ECT have demonstrated longer-lasting, interictal changes of neural activity in multiple cerebral regions that are in accordance with functional neuroanatomical models of mood disorders. Future research detailing ECT interactions with brain pathophysiology in MDD could potentially provide a clinically useful framework to better predict ECT treatment response and/or side effects, and may also facilitate the development of more focused brain stimulation techniques. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. A prototype PET/SPECT/X-rays scanner dedicated for whole body small animal studies.

    PubMed

    Rouchota, Maritina; Georgiou, Maria; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios; Fragogeorgi, Eirini; Mikropoulos, Konstantinos; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Kagadis, George; Loudos, George

    2017-01-01

    To present a prototype tri-modal imaging system, consisting of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPET), a positron emission tomography (PET), and a computed tomography (CT) subsystem, evaluated in planar mode. The subsystems are mounted on a rotating gantry, so as to be able to allow tomographic imaging in the future. The system, designed and constructed by our group, allows whole body mouse imaging of competent performance and is currently, to the best of our knowledge, unequaled in a national and regional level. The SPET camera is based on two Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT), coupled to a pixilated Sodium Iodide activated with Thallium (NaI(Tl)) scintillator, having an active area of 5x10cm(2). The dual head PET camera is also based on two pairs of PSPMT, coupled to pixelated berillium germanium oxide (BGO) scintillators, having an active area of 5x10cm(2). The X-rays system consists of a micro focus X-rays tube and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) detector, having an active area of 12x12cm(2). The scintigraphic mode has a spatial resolution of 1.88mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 107.5cpm/0.037MBq at the collimator surface. The coincidence PET mode has an average spatial resolution of 3.5mm (FWHM) and a peak sensitivity of 29.9cpm/0.037MBq. The X-rays spatial resolution is 3.5lp/mm and the contrast discrimination function value is lower than 2%. A compact tri-modal system was successfully built and evaluated for planar mode operation. The system has an efficient performance, allowing accurate and informative anatomical and functional imaging, as well as semi-quantitative results. Compared to other available systems, it provides a moderate but comparable performance, at a fraction of the cost and complexity. It is fully open, scalable and its main purpose is to support groups on a national and regional level and provide an open technological platform to study different detector components and

  15. System Integration of FastSPECT III, a Dedicated SPECT Rodent-Brain Imager Based on BazookaSPECT Detector Technology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Moore, Stephen K.; Barber, H. Bradford; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    FastSPECT III is a stationary, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager designed specifically for imaging and studying neurological pathologies in rodent brain, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons’s disease. Twenty independent BazookaSPECT [1] gamma-ray detectors acquire projections of a spherical field of view with pinholes selected for desired resolution and sensitivity. Each BazookaSPECT detector comprises a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, image-intensifier, optical lens, and fast-frame-rate CCD camera. Data stream back to processing computers via firewire interfaces, and heavy use of graphics processing units (GPUs) ensures that each frame of data is processed in real time to extract the images of individual gamma-ray events. Details of the system design, imaging aperture fabrication methods, and preliminary projection images are presented. PMID:21218137

  16. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  17. Right prefrontal rTMS treatment for refractory auditory command hallucinations - a neuroSPECT assisted case study.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Dannon, Pinhas N; Goshen, Elinor; Amiaz, Revital; Zwas, Tzila S; Grunhaus, Leon

    2002-11-30

    Auditory command hallucinations probably arise from the patient's failure to monitor his/her own 'inner speech', which is connected to activation of speech perception areas of the left cerebral cortex and to various degrees of dysfunction of cortical circuits involved in schizophrenia as supported by functional brain imaging. We hypothesized that rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), by increasing cortical activation of the right prefrontal brain region, would bring about a reduction of the hallucinations. We report our first schizophrenic patient affected with refractory command hallucinations treated with 10 Hz rTMS. Treatment was performed over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, with 1200 magnetic stimulations administered daily for 20 days at 90% motor threshold. Regional cerebral blood flow changes were monitored with neuroSPECT. Clinical evaluation and scores on the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale demonstrated a global improvement in the patient's condition, with no change in the intensity and frequency of the hallucinations. NeuroSPECT performed at intervals during and after treatment indicated a general improvement in cerebral perfusion. We conclude that right prefrontal rTMS may induce a general clinical improvement of schizophrenic brain function, without directly influencing the mechanism involved in auditory command hallucinations.

  18. Generating Dynamic System Matrices for Dynamic SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the computer program is to generate system matrices that model data acquisition process in dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The application is for the reconstruction of dynamic data from projection measurements that provide the time evolution of activity uptake and wash out in an organ of interest. The measurement of the time activity in the blood and organ tissue provide time-activity curves (TACs) that are used to estimate kinetic parameters. The program provides a correct model of the in vivo spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive in organs. The model accounts for the attenuation of the internal emitting radioactivity, it accounts for the vary point response of the collimators, and correctly models the time variation of the activity in the organs. One important application where the software is being used in a measuring the arterial input function (AIF) in a dynamic SPECT study where the data are acquired from a slow camera rotation. Measurement of the arterial input function (AIF) is essential to deriving quantitative estimates of regional myocardial blood flow using kinetic models. A study was performed to evaluate whether a slowly rotating SPECT system could provide accurate AIF's for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Methods: Dynamic cardiac SPECT was first performed in human subjects at rest using a Phillips Precedence SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of Tc-99m-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 minutes. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. Results: The spatiotemporal 4D ML-EM reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions that did standard frame-by-frame 3D ML-EM reconstructions. From additional computer simulations and phantom studies, it was determined that a 1 minute infusion with a SPECT system rotation speed

  19. Freehand SPECT in low uptake situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Tobias; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Navab, Nassir

    2011-03-01

    3D functional imaging in the operating room can be extremely useful for some procedures like SLN mapping or SLN biopsies. Freehand SPECT is an example of such an imaging modality, combining manually scanned, hand-held 1D gamma detectors with spatial positioning systems in order to reconstruct localized 3D SPECT images, for example in the breast or neck region. Standard series expansion methods are applied together with custom physical models of the acquisition process and custom filtering procedures to perform 3D tomographic reconstruction from sparse, limited-angle and irregularly sampled data. A Freehand SPECT system can easily be assembled on a mobile cart suitable for use in the operating room. This work addresses in particular the problem of objects with low uptake (like sentinel lymph nodes), where reconstruction tends to be difficult due to low signal to noise ratio. In a neck-like phantom study, we show that four simulated nodes of 250 microliter volume with 0.06% respectively 0.03% uptake of a virtual 70MBq injection of Tc99m (the typical activity for SLN procedures at our hospital) in a background of water can be reconstructed successfully using careful filtering procedures in the reconstruction pipeline. Ten independent Freehand SPECT scans of the phantom were performed by several different operators, with an average scan duration of 5.1 minutes. The resulting reconstructions show an average spatial accuracy within voxel dimensions (2.5mm) compared to CT and exhibit correct relative quantification.

  20. Towards personalized interventional SPECT-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gardiazabal, José; Esposito, Marco; Matthies, Philipp; Okur, Asli; Vogel, Jakob; Kraft, Silvan; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2014-01-01

    The development of modern robotics and compact imaging detectors allows the transfer of diagnostic imaging modalities to the operating room, supporting surgeons to perform faster and safer procedures. An intervention that currently suffers from a lack of interventional imaging is radioembolization, a treatment for hepatic carcinoma. Currently, this procedure requires moving the patient from an angiography suite for preliminary catheterization and injection to a whole-body SPECT/CT for leakage detection, necessitating a second catheterization back in the angiography suite for the actual radioembolization. We propose an imaging setup that simplifies this procedure using a robotic approach to directly acquire an interventional SPECT/CT in the angiography suite. Using C-arm CT and a co-calibrated gamma camera mounted on a robotic arm, a personalized trajectory of the gamma camera is generated from the C-arm CT, enabling an interventional SPECT reconstruction that is inherently co-registered to the C-arm CT. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of this personalized interventional SPECT/CT imaging approach in a liver phantom study.

  1. Comparison of planar and SPECT thallium imaging in men and women

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Fintel, D.F.; Becker, L.C.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied the overall accuracy of planar and SPECT Tl imaging in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 85 subjects (65 males, 20 females; 52 with angiographic CAD, 33 without CAD), and then separately analyzed men and women to see if factors such as breast attenuation significantly alter the accuracy. All subjects were exercised to symptom-limit or peak heart rate achievement, and injected with 2 mCi Tl-201. Planar and SPECT stress studies were acquired in a random order, with delayed studies acquired 3 hours after injection. The studies were viewed in a blinded, random order, and interpreted on a 5 point scale by consensus of 3 observers (1: definitely normal, 2: probably normal, 3: equivocal, 4: probably abnormal, 5: definitely abnormal). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for overall planar and SPECT, and then separately for male planar, male SPECT, female planar, female SPECT. The overall SPECT curve was above the overall planar curve. The overall SPECT curve was above the overall planar curve. At a specificity of 90%, SPECT sensitivity was 93%, planar was 80%. For both males and females, the SPECT curves were above the planar curves. However, both planar and SPECT male curves were above both female curves. At a specificity of 90%, sensitivities were male planar, 83%; male SPECT, 97%; female planar, 50%; female SPECT, 80%. This difference in accuracy between males and females was not due to adequacy of exercise (peak exercise heart rate in CAD pts: males, 145 +- 28 bpm; females, 151 +- 28; p=NS; in normals: 178 bpm for both males and females). SPECT is more accurate than planar imaging in the diagnosis of CAD. However, differences in accuracy exist between men and women, which may be due to breast attenuation.

  2. Design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Hugg, James W.; Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Meier, Dirk; Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a continuing design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals. A first generation prototype SPECT system was designed and constructed to fit inside a MRI system with a gradient bore inner diameter of 12 cm. It consists of 3 angularly offset rings of 8 detectors (1"x1", 16x16 pixels MR-compatible solid-state CZT). A matching 24-pinhole collimator sleeve, made of a tungsten-compound, provides projections from a common FOV of ~25 mm. A birdcage RF coil for MRI data acquisition surrounds the collimator. The SPECT system was tested inside a clinical 3T MRI system. Minimal interference was observed on the simultaneously acquired SPECT and MR images. We developed a sparse-view image reconstruction method based on accurate modeling of the point response function (PRF) of each of the 24 pinholes to provide artifact-free SPECT images. The stationary SPECT system provides relatively low resolution of 3-5 mm but high geometric efficiency of 0.5- 1.2% for fast dynamic acquisition, demonstrated in a SPECT renal kinetics study using Tc-99m DTPA. Based on these results, a second generation prototype MR-compatible SPECT system with an outer diameter of 20 cm that fits inside a mid-sized preclinical MRI system is being developed. It consists of 5 rings of 19 CZT detectors. The larger ring diameter allows the use of optimized multi-pinhole collimator designs, such as high system resolution up to ~1 mm, high geometric efficiency, or lower system resolution without collimator rotation. The anticipated performance of the new system is supported by simulation data.

  3. Monte Carlo scatter correction for SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zemei

    The goal of this dissertation is to present a quantitatively accurate and computationally fast scatter correction method that is robust and easily accessible for routine applications in SPECT imaging. A Monte Carlo based scatter estimation method is investigated and developed further. The Monte Carlo simulation program SIMIND (Simulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors), was specifically developed to simulate clinical SPECT systems. The SIMIND scatter estimation (SSE) method was developed further using a multithreading technique to distribute the scatter estimation task across multiple threads running concurrently on multi-core CPU's to accelerate the scatter estimation process. An analytical collimator that ensures less noise was used during SSE. The research includes the addition to SIMIND of charge transport modeling in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Phenomena associated with radiation-induced charge transport including charge trapping, charge diffusion, charge sharing between neighboring detector pixels, as well as uncertainties in the detection process are addressed. Experimental measurements and simulation studies were designed for scintillation crystal based SPECT and CZT based SPECT systems to verify and evaluate the expanded SSE method. Jaszczak Deluxe and Anthropomorphic Torso Phantoms (Data Spectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC, USA) were used for experimental measurements and digital versions of the same phantoms employed during simulations to mimic experimental acquisitions. This study design enabled easy comparison of experimental and simulated data. The results have consistently shown that the SSE method performed similarly or better than the triple energy window (TEW) and effective scatter source estimation (ESSE) methods for experiments on all the clinical SPECT systems. The SSE method is proven to be a viable method for scatter estimation for routine clinical use.

  4. 3D SPECT/CT fusion using image data projection of bone SPECT onto 3D volume-rendered CT images: feasibility and clinical impact in the diagnosis of bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Ode, Kenichi; Matsusaka, Yohji; Katagiri, Mari; Iwabuchi, Yu; Itoh, Kazunari; Ichimura, Akira; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method of image data projection of bone SPECT into 3D volume-rendered CT images for 3D SPECT/CT fusion. The aims of our study were to evaluate its feasibility and clinical usefulness. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB) and SPECT/CT scans were performed in 318 cancer patients using a dedicated SPECT/CT systems. Volume data of bone SPECT and CT were fused to obtain 2D SPECT/CT images. To generate our 3D SPECT/CT images, colored voxel data of bone SPECT were projected onto the corresponding location of the volume-rendered CT data after a semi-automatic bone extraction. Then, the resultant 3D images were blended with conventional volume-rendered CT images, allowing to grasp the three-dimensional relationship between bone metabolism and anatomy. WB and SPECT (WB + SPECT), 2D SPECT/CT fusion, and 3D SPECT/CT fusion were evaluated by two independent reviewers in the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The inter-observer variability and diagnostic accuracy in these three image sets were investigated using a four-point diagnostic scale. Increased bone metabolism was found in 744 metastatic sites and 1002 benign changes. On a per-lesion basis, inter-observer agreements in the diagnosis of bone metastasis were 0.72 for WB + SPECT, 0.90 for 2D SPECT/CT, and 0.89 for 3D SPECT/CT. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for the diagnostic accuracy of bone metastasis showed that WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT had an area under the curve of 0.800, 0.983, and 0.983 for reader 1, 0.865, 0.992, and 0.993 for reader 2, respectively (WB + SPECT vs. 2D or 3D SPECT/CT, p < 0.001; 2D vs. 3D SPECT/CT, n.s.). The durations of interpretation of WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT images were 241 ± 75, 225 ± 73, and 182 ± 71 s for reader 1 and 207 ± 72, 190 ± 73, and 179 ± 73 s for reader 2, respectively. As a result, it took shorter time to read 3D SPECT/CT images than 2D SPECT/CT (p < 0.0001) or WB + SPECT

  5. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  6. Behavioural and psychosocial sequelae of severe closed head injury and regional cerebral blood flow: a SPECT study.

    PubMed Central

    Oder, W; Goldenberg, G; Spatt, J; Podreka, I; Binder, H; Deecke, L

    1992-01-01

    Thirty six patients (31 male, 5 female) who had suffered severe closed head injury were re-examined at an average of 39.3 (SD 12.8, range 7-66) months after the injury. Behavioural symptoms were measured using the Giessen test. The relatives' reports were used for data analysis to ensure that results were valid. The neurophysical impairment subscale of the Glasgow assessment schedule was completed by two neurologists, and the number connection test was completed by each patient. The adjective mood scale was completed by each relative. All patients were investigated by single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT). Exploratory factor analysis using the principal components method was carried out separately for SPECT results and psychological measures and correlations were sought between the resulting factors. Factor analysis of the data from the Giessen test identified social isolation, disinhibition, and aggressive behaviour as major components of post-traumatic personality changes; it indicates that these behavioural features are independent of the level of neurological and neuropsychological impairment, which loaded on a single independent factor. Relatives' psychic health seemed to be relatively resistant to physical and cognitive disability and was mainly affected by disinhibitive behaviour. The highest correlation was between frontal flow indices and disinhibitive behaviour (p less than 0.01): the severity of disinhibition increased with lower frontal flow rates. There was a significant but somewhat weaker correlation (p less than 0.05) between flow indices of the left cerebral hemisphere and social isolation. Low flow values of the right brain regions were related to aggressive behaviour (p less than 0.05). Neurological and cognitive impairment correlated negatively with the thalamus; worse neurological and cognitive performance indicate by raised scores on the neurophysical scale and on the number connection test was associated with low thalamic

  7. Performance evaluation of advanced industrial SPECT system with diverging collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    An advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-fold-array diverging collimator was developed for flow visualization in industrial reactors and was discussed in the previous study. The present paper describes performance evaluation of the SPECT system under both static- and dynamic- flow conditions. Under static conditions, the movement of radiotracer inside the test reactor was compared with that of color tracer (blue ink) captured with a high-speed camera. The comparison of the reconstructed images obtained with the radiotracer and the SPECT system showed fairly good agreement with video-frames of the color tracer obtained with the camera. Based on the results of the performance evaluation, it is concluded that the SPECT system is suitable for investigation and visualization of flows in industrial flow reactors.

  8. Initial Investigation of Preclinical Integrated SPECT and MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, Mark J.; Ha, Seunghoon; Roeck, Werner W.; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Meier, Dirk; Patt, Bradley E.; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide specific functional information while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-spatial resolution anatomical information as well as complementary functional information. In this study, we utilized a dual modality SPECT/MRI (MRSPECT) system to investigate the integration of SPECT and MRI for improved image accuracy. The MRSPECT system consisted of a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) nuclear radiation detector interfaced with a specialized radiofrequency (RF) coil that was placed within a whole-body 4 T MRI system. The importance of proper corrections for non-uniform detector sensitivity and Lorentz force effects was demonstrated. MRI data were utilized for attenuation correction (AC) of the nuclear projection data and optimized Wiener filtering of the SPECT reconstruction for improved image accuracy. Finally, simultaneous dual-imaging of a nude mouse was performed to demonstrated the utility of co-registration for accurate localization of a radioactive source. PMID:20082527

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and SPECT/low-dose computerized tomography did not increase sensitivity or specificity compared to planar bone scintigraphy for detection of bone metastases in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haraldsen, Ate; Bluhme, Henrik; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Hansen, Eva Boysen; Nellemann, Hanne; Rasmussen, Finn; Morsing, Anni

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the diagnostic performance of whole-body planar bone scintigraphy (WBS), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), SPECT/low-dose computerized tomography (SPECT/ldCT) and SPECT/contrast enhanced diagnostic CT (SPECT/cdCT) in the staging of patients with advanced breast cancer. Seventy-eight patients with recurrence of biopsy-proven breast cancer and suspicion of disseminated disease were investigated with WBS, SPECT, SPECT/ldCT, SPECT/cdCT and MRI performed on the same day in this prospective study. Images were separately analysed in a blinded fashion by radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians regarding the presence of pathological findings. MRI served as reference standard. According to reference standard, 38 of 73 patients had bone metastases. The sensitivity was 87%, 87%, 79%, and 84% and specificity 63%, 71%, 63% and 83% for WBS, SPECT, SPECT/ldCT and SPECT/cdCT. A significantly increased specificity of SPECT/cdCT compared to WBS and SPECT/ldCT was found, and other parameters did not differ significantly between modalities. Additional two patients had bone metastases solely located outside the MRI scan field and seven patients had soft tissue metastases, but no skeletal changes on MRI. WBS, SPECT and SPECT/ldCT were less sensitive than MRI and equally specific for the detection of bone metastases in patients with advanced breast cancer. Based on our findings, we suggest that initial staging include WBS, MRI of the spine and CT for soft tissue evaluation. Further studies may clarify the potential benefits of whole-body MRI and 18F-NaF PET/CT or 18F-FDG PET/CT. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular and renal events in patients with chronic kidney disease: results from first year of follow-up of the Gunma-CKD SPECT multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Sato, Makito; Sano, Hirokazu; Ueda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Toyoshi; Nakahara, Takehiro; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tsushima, Yoshito; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardio-cerebrovascular events. We examined whether stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides reliable prognostic markers for these patients. In this multicenter, prospective cohort trial from the Gunma-CKD SPECT study protocol, patients with CKD [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 min/ml per 1.73 m(2)] undergoing stress (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT for suspected or possible ischemic heart disease were initially followed for 1 year, with the following study endpoints: primary, the occurrence of cardiac deaths (CDs), and secondary, major adverse cardiac, cerebrovascular, and renal events (MACCREs). The summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) were estimated with the standard 17-segment, 5-point scoring model. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction were measured using electrocardiogram-gated SPECT. During the first year of follow-up, 69 of 299 patients experienced MACCREs (CD, n = 7; non-fatal myocardial infarction, n = 3; hospitalization for heart failure, n = 13; cerebrovascular accident, n = 1; need for revascularization, n = 38; and renal failure, i.e., hemodialysis initiation, n = 7). ESV and SSS were associated with CDs (p < 0.05), and eGFR and SDS were associated with MACCREs (p < 0.05), in multivariate logistic analysis. Patients with high ESV and high SSS had a significantly higher CD rate during the first year than the other CKD patient subgroups (p < 0.05). Patients with low eGFR and high SDS had a significantly higher MACCRE rate than the other subgroups (p < 0.05). Myocardial perfusion SPECT can provide reliable prognostic markers for patients with CKD.

  11. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  12. Improved outcomes using brain SPECT-guided treatment versus treatment-as-usual in community psychiatric outpatients: a retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Thornton, John F; Schneider, Howard; McLean, Mary K; van Lierop, Muriel J; Tarzwell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans indirectly show functional activity via measurement of regional cerebral blood flow. Thirty patients at a community-based psychiatric clinic underwent brain SPECT scans. Changes in scoring of before-treatment and after-treatment scans correlated well with changes in patient Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores before treatment and after treatment. Patients were retrospectively matched with controls with similar diagnoses and pretreatment GAF scores, and those who underwent SPECT-guided treatment improved significantly more than the control patients.

  13. Phase 2 Study of (99m)Tc-Trofolastat SPECT/CT to Identify and Localize Prostate Cancer in Intermediate- and High-Risk Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy and Extended Pelvic LN Dissection.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Karolien E; Joniau, Steven; Tenke, Peter; Slawin, Kevin; Klein, Eric A; Stambler, Nancy; Strack, Thomas; Babich, John; Armor, Thomas; Wong, Vivien

    2017-09-01

    (99m)Tc-trofolastat ((99m)Tc-MIP-1404), a small-molecule inhibitor of prostate-specific membrane antigen, shows high potential to detect prostate cancer (PCa) noninvasively using SPECT. We therefore wanted to assess the performance of (99m)Tc-trofolastat SPECT/CT in a phase 2 multicenter, multireader prospective study in patients with intermediate- and high-grade PCa, before radical prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection, with histopathology as the gold standard. Methods: PCa patients (n = 105) with an increased risk of LN involvement (LNI) underwent pelvic (99m)Tc-trofolastat SPECT/CT before radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic LN dissection. The sensitivity of (99m)Tc-trofolastat for detection of PCa on a patient and lobe basis, using visual and semiquantitative (tumor-to-background ratio [TBR]) scores, and of LNI was evaluated as well as the correlation of uptake within the gland to Gleason scores (GS) and assessment of the predictive potential of (99m)Tc-trofolastat uptake for LNI. Results: PCa was detected in 98 patients (94%) with acceptable variability between readers. There was a significantly higher visual score and TBR in positive lobes compared with tumor-negative lobes. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that visual scores more accurately discriminated lobes with GS ≤ 3 + 3 from ≥ 3 + 4, whereas TBRs discriminated high-grade disease from normal lobes better. Visual scores and TBRs correlated significantly with GS. (99m)Tc-trofolastat SPECT/CT detected LNI with a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 87%, and TBR values significantly predicted LNI with a sensitivity of 90%. Conclusion:(99m)Tc-trofolastat SPECT/CT detects PCa with high sensitivity in patients with intermediate- and high-risk PCa compared with histology. It has the potential to be used as a surrogate marker for GS and predict LNI. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. Performance evaluation of high-resolution square parallel-hole collimators with a CZT room temperature pixelated semiconductor SPECT system: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kang, W.

    2015-07-01

    The pixelated semiconductor based on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging device that provides many benefits compared with conventional scintillation detectors. By using a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a pixelated semiconductor detector, we were able to improve both sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we present a simulation of a CZT pixleated semiconductor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator using various geometric designs of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm X-axis hole size. We performed a simulation study of the eValuator-2500 (eV Microelectronics Inc., Saxonburg, PA, U.S.A.) CZT pixelated semiconductor detector using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). To evaluate the performances of these systems, the sensitivity and spatial resolution was evaluated. Moreover, to evaluate the overall performance of the imaging system, a hot-rod phantom was designed. Our results showed that the average sensitivity of the 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 1.34, 1.95, and 3.92 times higher than that of the 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. Also, the average spatial resolution of the 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 28.69, 44.65, and 55.73% better than that of the 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. We discuss the high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator of various collimator geometric designs and our evaluations. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a CZT pixelated semiconductor SPECT system.

  15. [Variables that influence the indication of a second myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT after a normal stress-rest gated SPECT].

    PubMed

    Romero-Farina, G; Candell-Riera, J; Aguadé-Bruix, S; Cuberas-Borrós, G; Pizzi, M N; Santos, A; de León, G; García-Dorado, D

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate predictor variables at the moment of normal stress-rest myocardial perfusion gated SPECT for indication of a second gated SPECT. A prospective, single center cohort study was conducted. We evaluated 2326 consecutive patients (age 63.6 ± 13 years, 57.3% females) without perfusion defects and with normal left ventricular ejection fraction on a myocardial perfusion gated SPECT. Clinical and stress test variables were studied to predict indication of a second gated SPECT and presence of reversible perfusion defects in the second gated SPECT. During a mean follow-up of 3.6 ± 2 years a second gated SPECT was performed in 286 patients (12.3%). Independent predictor variables of a second gated SPECT were presence of three or more cardiovascular risk factors (χ(2): 5.510; HR: 1.4; p=0.019), previous acute myocardial infarction (χ(2): 3.867; HR: 1.4; p=0.049), previous coronary revascularization (χ(2): 41.081; HR: 2.5; p<0.001), and a positive stress test (χ(2): 8.713; HR: 1.5; p=0.003). Observation of perfusion defects in the 280 patients in whom a second stress-rest gated SPECT was performed was more likely in male patients (χ(2): 4.322; HR: 1.9; p=0.038) who had a first pure pharmacological gated-SPECT (χ(2): 7.182; HR: 2.6; p=0.007). In patients with a first normal myocardial perfusion gated SPECT, various clinical factors and variables derived from the stress test affect the indication of a second gated SPECT and the presence of ischemia in the latter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. Reducing Multiplexing Artifacts in Multi-Pinhole SPECT with a Stacked Silicon-Germanium System: a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E

    2015-01-01

    In pinhole SPECT, multi-pinhole collimators can increase sensitivity but may lead to projection overlap, or multiplexing, which can cause image artifacts. In this work we explore whether a stacked-detector configuration with a germanium and a silicon detector, used with 123I (27–32, 159 keV), where little multiplexing occurs in the Si projections, can reduce image artifacts caused by highly-multiplexed Ge projections. Simulations are first used to determine a reconstruction method that combines the Si and Ge projections to maximize image quality. Next, simulations of different pinhole configurations (varying projection multiplexing) in conjunction with digital phantoms are used to examine whether additional Si projections mitigate artifacts from the multiplexing in the Ge projections. Reconstructed images using both Si and Ge data are compared to those using Ge data alone. Normalized mean-square error and normalized standard deviation provide a quantitative evaluation of reconstructed images’ error and noise, respectively, and are used to evaluate the impact of the additional non-multiplexed data on image quality. For a qualitative comparison, the differential point response function is used to examine multiplexing artifacts. Results show that in cases of highly-multiplexed Ge projections, the addition of low-multiplexed Si projections helps to reduce image artifacts both quantitatively and qualitatively. PMID:25055382

  17. Reducing multiplexing artifacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with a stacked silicon-germanium system: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E

    2014-12-01

    In pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), multi-pinhole collimators can increase sensitivity but may lead to projection overlap, or multiplexing, which can cause image artifacts. In this work, we explore whether a stacked-detector configuration with a germanium and a silicon detector, used with 123I (27-32, 159 keV), where little multiplexing occurs in the Si projections, can reduce image artifacts caused by highly-multiplexed Ge projections. Simulations are first used to determine a reconstruction method that combines the Si and Ge projections to maximize image quality. Next, simulations of different pinhole configurations (varying projection multiplexing) in conjunction with digital phantoms are used to examine whether additional Si projections mitigate artifacts from the multiplexing in the Ge projections. Reconstructed images using both Si and Ge data are compared to those using Ge data alone. Normalized mean-square error and normalized standard deviation provide a quantitative evaluation of reconstructed images' error and noise, respectively, and are used to evaluate the impact of the additional nonmultiplexed data on image quality. For a qualitative comparison, the differential point response function is used to examine multiplexing artifacts. Results show that in cases of highly-multiplexed Ge projections, the addition of low-multiplexed Si projections helps to reduce image artifacts both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  18. Discrepancies in brain perfusion SPECT findings between Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD: evaluation using dynamic SPECT in patients with hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, N; Koizumi, K; Mitsuka, S; Nukui, H

    1998-10-01

    Discrepancies have been reported between the findings of Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT imaging. This study investigated the discrepancies in the accumulation of these tracers using dynamic SPECT to detect the super early phase of distribution. Thirteen patients with luxury perfusion or high flow states were studied with both dynamic and standard SPECT using Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD within 1-3 days. Standard SPECT showed discrepancies in 6 of 13 patients. Patients with meningioma and cerebral thrombosis had increased accumulation of Tc-99m HMPAO and decreased uptake of Tc-99m ECD. Patients with arteriovenous malformation, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and cavernous angioma had decreased accumulation of both tracers, but to different degrees. Dynamic SPECT showed increased or normal accumulation (i.e., essentially no discrepancy) in the first few minutes. However, Tc-99m HMPAO had a longer retention time than Tc-99m ECD in the ensuing 5-10 minutes. Dynamic SPECT revealed a similar accumulation pattern but different washout rates for the two tracers. Tc-99m HMPAO might be a more suitable tracer to detect high flow states or luxury perfusion because the findings on standard SPECT were more in agreement with those of dynamic SPECT using this tracer.

  19. Can hybrid SPECT-CT overcome the limitations associated with poor imaging properties of 131I-MIBG?: Comparison with planar scintigraphy and SPECT in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Dhull, Varun Singh; Jeph, Sunil; Reddy, Rama Mohan; Singh, Harmandeep; Naswa, Niraj; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incremental value of (131)I-MIBG hybrid SPECT-CT over planar scintigraphy (PS) and SPECT alone in patients with clinical or biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma. A total of 126 adrenals of 63 patients (mean [SD] age, 28.6 [15.7] years; male patients, n = 34; female patients, n = 29) with clinical or biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had undergone (131)I-MIBG SPECT-CT of adrenal region. The PS, SPECT, and SPECT-CT images were independently evaluated by 2 nuclear medicine physicians with 6 years (R1) and 2 years (R2) experience and in separate sessions 1 week apart. A scoring scale of 1 to 5 was used, in which 1 is definitely abnormal, 2 is probably abnormal, 3 is indeterminate, 4 is probably normal, and 5 is definitely normal. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values were calculated taking a score 2 or less as abnormal. With receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for each modality and compared. Histopathology and/or clinical/imaging follow-up were taken as reference standard. Of the 126 adrenals evaluated, 29 were indeterminate on PS for R1 and 48 for R2, 39 were indeterminate on SPECT for both, and on SPECT-CT, 1 was indeterminate for R1 and 2 for R2. SPECT-CT correctly characterized 28 of 29 indeterminate adrenals on PS and 37 of 39 indeterminate adrenals on SPECT for R1. Similarly, for R2, SPECT-CT correctly characterized 45 of 48 indeterminate adrenals on PS and 33 of 39 indeterminate adrenals on SPECT. On ROC comparison, PS was inferior to SPECT (P = 0.040 for R1; P < 0.001 for R2) and SPECT-CT (P = 0.001 for R1; P < 0.001 for R2) for both the observers. Moreover, SPECT was inferior to SPECT-CT for both the observers (P = 0.017 for R1 and P = 0.001 for R2). Accuracy of SPECT-CT (R1, 97.6%; R2, 97.6%) was higher than PS (R1, 91.2%; R2, 84.1%) and SPECT (R1, 94.4%; R2, 86.5%). Interobserver agreement was

  20. Effect of caffeine on SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging during regadenoson pharmacologic stress: rationale and design of a prospective, randomized, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tejani, Furqan H; Thompson, Randall C; Iskandrian, Ami E; McNutt, Bruce E; Franks, Billy

    2011-02-01

    Caffeine attenuates the coronary hyperemic response to adenosine by competitive A₂(A) receptor blockade. This study aims to determine whether oral caffeine administration compromises diagnostic accuracy in patients undergoing vasodilator stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with regadenoson, a selective adenosine A(2A) agonist. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study includes patients with suspected coronary artery disease who regularly consume caffeine. Each participant undergoes three SPECT MPI studies: a rest study on day 1 (MPI-1); a regadenoson stress study on day 3 (MPI-2), and a regadenoson stress study on day 5 with double-blind administration of oral caffeine 200 or 400 mg or placebo capsules (MPI-3; n = 90 per arm). Only participants with ≥ 1 reversible defect on the second MPI study undergo the subsequent stress MPI test. The primary endpoint is the difference in the number of reversible defects on the two stress tests using a 17-segment model. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses will evaluate the effect of caffeine on the regadenoson exposure-response relationship. Safety will also be assessed. The results of this study will show whether the consumption of caffeine equivalent to 2-4 cups of coffee prior to an MPI study with regadenoson affects the diagnostic validity of stress testing (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00826280).

  1. A prospective study comparing (99m)Tc-HDP planar bone scintigraphy and whole-body SPECT/CT with (18)F-fluoride PET/CT and (18)F-fluoride PET/MRI for diagnosing bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Johan; Mortensen, Jann; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Madsen, Claus; Loft, Annika; Hansen, Adam Espe; Oturai, Peter; Jensen, Karl Erik; Mørk, Mette Louise; Reichkendler, Michala; Højgaard, Liselotte; Fischer, Barbara M

    2017-08-10

    We prospectively evaluate and compare the diagnostic performance of (99m)Tc-HDP planar bone scintigraphy (pBS), (99m)Tc-HDP SPECT/CT, (18)F-NaF PET/CT and (18)F-NaF PET/MRI for the detection of bone metastases. Methods: 117 patients with histologically proven malignancy referred for clinical pBS were prospectively enrolled. pBS and whole-body SPECT/CT were performed followed by (18)F-NaF PET/CT within 9 days. (18)F-NaF PET/MRI was also performed in 46 patients. A "truth panel" including clinical follow-up served as standard of reference. Results: Bone metastases were confirmed in 16 patients and excluded in 101. When equivocal readings were excluded no statistically significant difference in sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV or overall accuracy were found when comparing the different imaging techniques. With a pessimistic analysis, interpreting equivocal scans as positive, (18)F-NaF-PET showed a significant higher specificity and accuracy than pBS (93.1% vs 81.2%, P = 0.012 and 91.5% vs. 79.5%, P = 0.011). With an optimistic analysis, interpreting equivocal scans as negative, (18)F-NaF-PET showed significant higher accuracy than SPECT/CT (94.9% vs. 88.0%, P = 0.039) but not compared to pBS. The number of equivocal scans were significantly higher for pBS than for SPECT/CT and PET/CT (18 vs 5 and 6 respectively, P = 0.004 resp. P = 0.01). Conclusion:(18)F-NaF PET/CT and whole body SPECT/CT resulted in a significant reduction of equivocal readings compared to pBS which implies an improved diagnostic confidence. However, this large prospective study could not verify prior published results on (18)F-NaF-PET/CT superior overall accuracy compared to neither pBS nor whole-body SPECT/CT. The subgroup analysis of 46 patients with (18)F-NaF-PET/MRI failed to demonstrate significantly improved overall diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  2. Implementation of technetium-99m MIBI SPECT imaging guidelines: optimizing the two day stress-rest protocol.

    PubMed

    Lavalaye, J M; Schroeder-Tanka, J M; Tiel-van Buul, M M; van der Wall, E E; Lie, K I; van Royen, E A

    1997-08-01

    In a previous study in 460 patients, we found that in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease undergoing stress-rest technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging, rest SPECT imaging could be withhold in approximately 20% of patients because of a completely normal stress study. The present study was set up to evaluate the consequences of the implementation of this finding in a subsequent population of patients, and to set standards for the variety of protocols now used for MIBI SPECT imaging. Within a period of 4 months, 235 consecutive patients referred for MIBI SPECT scintigraphy were studied. All patients had stable cardiac chest pain and underwent symptom-limited exercise MIBI SPECT perfusion imaging. The stress SPECT images were reconstructed and evaluated immediately after acquisition of the images. In case of a clearly normal stress SPECT study, rest imaging was cancelled. Twenty-six of 235 patients (11%) had a completely normal stress MIBI SPECT study and the rest SPECT imaging procedure could be subsequently cancelled. In 20 patients (9%) the stress SPECT was inconclusive, and in 189 (80%) of patients stress imaging was clearly abnormal. In the first month of the study, the nuclear medicine physicians and cardiologists would interprete only 6% of the stress images as normal, while this number increased to 13% after 9 weeks, with a mean of 11% for the whole investigation period of 4 months. In patients undergoing stress MIBI SPECT imaging, it was found justified to cancel rest MIBI SPECT imaging in at least 11% of patients because of a completely normal stress SPECT. As 9% of the images were inconclusive, the number of normal stress images could theoretically increase to 20% if reliable measures are taken to improve reading accuracy. This number is in close agreement with the number of normal stress studies previously reported by our institution and would lead to a considerable reduction of radiation dose, costs, and

  3. A combined static-dynamic single-dose imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT.

    PubMed

    Sciammarella, Maria; Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Gullberg, Grant T; Botvinick, Elias H

    2017-08-03

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a clinical mainstay that is typically performed with static imaging protocols and visually or semi-quantitatively assessed for perfusion defects based upon the relative intensity of myocardial regions. Dynamic cardiac SPECT presents a new imaging technique based on time-varying information of radiotracer distribution, which permits the evaluation of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). In this work, a preliminary feasibility study was conducted in a small patient sample designed to implement a unique combined static-dynamic single-dose one-day visit imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT for improving the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifteen patients (11 males, four females, mean age 71 ± 9 years) were enrolled for a combined dynamic and static SPECT (Infinia Hawkeye 4, GE Healthcare) imaging protocol with a single dose of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin administered at rest and a single dose administered at stress in a one-day visit. Out of 15 patients, eleven had selective coronary angiography (SCA), 8 within 6 months and the rest within 24 months of SPECT imaging, without intervening symptoms or interventions. The extent and severity of perfusion defects in each myocardial region was graded visually. Dynamically acquired data were also used to estimate the MBF and CFR. Both visually graded images and estimated CFR were tested against SCA as a reference to evaluate the validity of the methods. Overall, conventional static SPECT was normal in ten patients and abnormal in five patients, dynamic SPECT was normal in 12 patients and abnormal in three patients, and CFR from dynamic SPECT was normal in nine patients and abnormal in six patients. Among those 11 patients with SCA, conventional SPECT was normal in 5, 3 with documented CAD on SCA with an overall accuracy of 64%, sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 83%. Dynamic SPECT image

  4. Task-Based Evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM Image Reconstruction Method for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT using a Human Observer Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  5. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  6. Myocardial blood flow measurement with a conventional dual-head SPECT/CT with spatiotemporal iterative reconstructions - a clinical feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Alhassen, Fares; Nguyen, Nhan; Bains, Sukhkarn; Gould, Robert G; Seo, Youngho; Bacharach, Stephen L; Song, Xiyun; Shao, Lingxiong; Gullberg, Grant T; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras typically rotate too slowly around a patient to capture changes in the blood pool activity distribution and provide accurate kinetic parameters. A spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction method to overcome these limitations was investigated. Dynamic rest/stress 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) SPECT/CT was performed along with reference standard rest/stress dynamic positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 13N-NH3 in five patients. The SPECT data were reconstructed using conventional and spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction methods. The spatiotemporal reconstruction yielded improved image quality, defined here as a statistically significant (p<0.01) 50% contrast enhancement. We did not observe a statistically significant difference between the correlations of the conventional and spatiotemporal SPECT myocardial uptake K 1 values with PET K 1 values (r=0.25, 0.88, respectively) (p<0.17). These results indicate the clinical feasibility of quantitative, dynamic SPECT/CT using 99mTc-MIBI and warrant further investigation. Spatiotemporal reconstruction clearly provides an advantage over a conventional reconstruction in computing K 1. PMID:24380045

  7. Evaluation of the effect of reconstructed image pixel size on defect detectability in Tl-201 fan-beam SPECT by an observer performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoriou, G. K.; Gsui, B. M. W.; Gullberg, G. T.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of reconstructed image pixel size in the fan-beam filtered backprojection method in myocardial defect detection was investigated using an observer performance study and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A mathematical phantom of the human torso was used to model the anatomy and Thallium-201 (Tl-201) uptake in humans. Realistic projections from the phantom were simulated using a low-energy high resolution fan-beam collimator that incorporated the effects of photon attenuation, spatially varying detector response, scatter, and Poison noise. For a fan-beam collimator with a focal length of 55 cm and with a radius of rotation of 25 cm, the magnification at the center of rotation was two and the maximum magnification in the reconstructed region of interest was three. Myocardial defects were simulated as Gaussian-shaped decreases in Tl-201 uptake distribution. By changing the reconstructed image pixel size, five different classes of reconstructed images resulted, with projection bin width to reconstructed image pixel size (PBIP) ratios of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The results from the observer study indicate that the reconstructed image pixel size has a significant effect on myocardial defect detection in reconstructed Tl-201 SPECT images. Moreover, the study indicated that in order to ensure maximum defect detectability the PBIP ratio should be at least as large as the maximum possible magnification within the reconstructed image array.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of reconstructed image pixel size on defect detectability in Tl-201 fan-beam SPECT by an observer performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriou, G.K.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of reconstructed image pixel size in the fan-beam filtered backprojection method in myocardial defect detection was investigated using an observer performance study and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A mathematical phantom of the human torso was used to model the anatomy and Thallium-201 (TI-201) uptake in humans. Realistic projections from the phantom were simulated using a low-energy high resolution fan-beam collimator that incorporated the effects of photon attenuation, spatially varying detector response, scatter, and Poison noise. For a fan beam collimator with a focal length of 55 cm and with a radius of rotation of 25 cm, the magnification at the center of rotation was two and the maximum magnification in the reconstructed region of interest was three. Myocardial defects were simulated as Gaussian-shaped decreases in Tl-201 uptake distribution. By changing the reconstructed image pixel size, five different classes of reconstructed images resulted, with projection bin width to reconstructed image pixel size (PBIP) ratios of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The results from the observer study indicate that the reconstructed image pixel size has a significant effect on myocardial defect detection in reconstructed Tl-201 SPECT images. Moreover, the study indicated that in order to ensure maximum defect delectability the PBIP ratio should be at least as large as the maximum possible magnification within the reconstructed image array.

  9. Using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system technique for crosstalk correction in simultaneous 99mTc/201Tl SPECT imaging: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidary, Saeed; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a simulation based study by Monte Carlo which uses two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) for cross talk compensation of simultaneous 99mTc/201Tl dual-radioisotope SPECT imaging. We have compared two neuro-fuzzy systems based on fuzzy c-means (FCM) and subtractive (SUB) clustering. Our approach incorporates eight energy-windows image acquisition from 28 keV to 156 keV and two main photo peaks of 201Tl (77±10% keV) and 99mTc (140±10% keV). The Geant4 application in emission tomography (GATE) is used as a Monte Carlo simulator for three cylindrical and a NURBS Based Cardiac Torso (NCAT) phantom study. Three separate acquisitions including two single-isotopes and one dual isotope were performed in this study. Cross talk and scatter corrected projections are reconstructed by an iterative ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm which models the non-uniform attenuation in the projection/back-projection. ANFIS-FCM/SUB structures are tuned to create three to sixteen fuzzy rules for modeling the photon cross-talk of the two radioisotopes. Applying seven to nine fuzzy rules leads to a total improvement of the contrast and the bias comparatively. It is found that there is an out performance for the ANFIS-FCM due to its acceleration and accurate results.

  10. Design and assessment of cardiac SPECT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chih-Jie

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a modality widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. Objectively assessing and comparing different SPECT systems is important so that the best detectability of cardiac defects can be achieved. Whitaker, Clarkson, and Barrett's study on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses overall hardware performance independent by any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, we will show that the run time of image-quality studies is significantly reduced. Several systems derived from the GE CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, were assessed using the performance of the SLO for the task of detecting cardiac defects and estimating the properties of the defects. Clinically, hearts can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA). One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can correctly predict in which territory the defect exists. A good estimation of the defect extent from the images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this dissertation, both locations and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and system performance was assessed using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) / estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curves. Area under LROC curve (AULC) / area under EROC curve (AUEC) and true positive fraction (TPF) at specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the gures of merit (FOMs). As the results will show, a

  11. Silent myocardial ischemia detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and risk of cardiac events among asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Li, Hong; Zhang, Simin; Jaacks, Lindsay M; Li, Yufeng; Ji, Linong

    2014-01-01

    To assess the value of detecting silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in predicting risk of cardiac events among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who do not have overt cardiac symptoms. Electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and others) and original article references were systematically searched through February 1, 2013. A fixed-effects model was applied to pooled data to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Ten prospective studies with follow-up ranging from 1 to 6 years were identified. Among the total of 1360 asymptomatic patients with T2DM screened by SPECT, the cumulative prevalence rate of SMI was 26.1%. Patients with SMI were at increased risk of experiencing endpoints relative to patients without SMI: RR (95% CI) for cardiac death, 4.60 (1.78-11.84); non-fatal cardiac events, 3.48 (2.30-5.28); total cardiac events, 3.48 (2.59-4.68); and all-cause mortality, 2.20 (1.14-4.25). The risk of cardiac death and non-fatal cardiac events increased with increasing severity of SPECT-detected abnormalities. SMI detected by SPECT is associated with increased risk of cardiac death, all-cause mortality, and non-fatal cardiac events in T2DM patients without overt cardiac symptoms. Advanced intervention procedures including intensive drug management should be implemented to reduce the risk of cardiac events for SMI-positive T2DM patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lower availability of midbrain serotonin transporter between healthy subjects with and without a family history of major depressive disorder - a preliminary two-ligand SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, P C; Chen, K C; Yeh, T L; Lee, I H; Chen, P S; Yao, W J; Chiu, N-T; Chen, C-C; Liao, M-H; Yang, Y K

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and dopamine transporter (DAT) levels differ in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who are in a depressed state in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, a family history of depression is a potent risk factor for developing depression, and inherited vulnerability to serotonergic and dopaminergic dysfunction is suspected in this. The aim of this study was to examine the availabilities of midbrain SERT and striatal DAT in healthy subjects with and without a first-degree family history of MDD. Eight healthy subjects with first-degree relatives with MDD and 16 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were recruited. The availabilities of SERT and DAT were approximated using SPECT, employing [¹²³I] 2-((2-((dimethylamino) methyl) phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM) and [(⁹⁹m)Tc] TRODAT-1 as the ligands, respectively. There are missing data for one participant with a first-degree family history of MDD from the ADAM study, due to a lack of the radio-ligand at the time of experiment. SERT availability in the midbrain was significantly lower in subjects with a first-degree family history of MDD than in healthy subjects. However, DAT availability was no different between two groups. The results with regard to the midbrain SERT level suggest the heritability of MDD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Progress in BazookaSPECT.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Barber, H Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R; Moore, Stephen K; Barrett, Harrison H

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress on a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray and x-ray imager called BazookaSPECT is presented. BazookaSPECT is an example of a new class of scintillation detectors based on integrating detectors such as CCD(charge-coupled device) or CMOS(complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors. BazookaSPECT is unique in that it makes use of a scintillator in close proximity to a microchannel plate-based image intensifier for up-front optical amplification of scintillation light. We discuss progress made in bringing about compact BazookaSPECT modules and in real-time processing of event data using graphics processing units (GPUs). These advances are being implemented in the design of a high-resolution rodent brain imager called FastSPECT III. A key benefit of up-front optical gain is that any CCD/CMOS sensor can now be utilized for photon counting. We discuss the benefits and feasibility of using CMOS sensors as photon-counting detectors for digital radiography, with application in mammography and computed tomography (CT). We present as an appendix a formal method for comparing various photon-counting integrating detectors using objective statistical criteria.

  14. Progress in BazookaSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Moore, Stephen K.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress on a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray and x-ray imager called BazookaSPECT is presented. BazookaSPECT is an example of a new class of scintillation detectors based on integrating detectors such as CCD(charge-coupled device) or CMOS(complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors. BazookaSPECT is unique in that it makes use of a scintillator in close proximity to a microchannel plate-based image intensifier for up-front optical amplification of scintillation light. We discuss progress made in bringing about compact BazookaSPECT modules and in real-time processing of event data using graphics processing units (GPUs). These advances are being implemented in the design of a high-resolution rodent brain imager called FastSPECT III. A key benefit of up-front optical gain is that any CCD/CMOS sensor can now be utilized for photon counting. We discuss the benefits and feasibility of using CMOS sensors as photon-counting detectors for digital radiography, with application in mammography and computed tomography (CT). We present as an appendix a formal method for comparing various photon-counting integrating detectors using objective statistical criteria. PMID:21297897

  15. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquiz, Juan Manuel

    method was also assessed in 201Tl clinical SPECT studies. Phantom results demonstrated that the multiresolution algorithm compensated the liver spillover artifact, yielded uniform polar maps and improved significantly the accuracy in calculating myocardial defect size. The procedure does not require operator intervention and can be easily implemented in the clinical setting by using Fourier transform techniques. Finally, the extension of the multiresolution method to other SPECT procedures is discussed and recommended.

  16. [Effects of prolonged endocardial stimulation on left ventricular mechanical synchrony. A pilot study applying gated-SPECT phase analysis. Endocardial stimulation and dyssynchrony].

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Castagnetto, Federico; Ricca-Mallada, Roberto; Vidal, Alejandro; Ferrando, Rodolfo

    2017-01-25

    To evaluate left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) associated to prolonged right ventricular pacing through an innovative imaging technique, as a pilot study in Uruguay. We performed 99mTc-MIBI gated-SPECT and phase analysis in 12 patients with pacemakers implanted at least one year before scintigraphy due to advanced atrioventricular block. Clinical data, QRS duration, rate, mode and site of pacing in right ventricle, chamber diameters, presence and extension of myocardial scar and ischemia and rest LVEF were recorded. Using V-Sync of Emory Cardiac Toolbox we obtained standard deviation (PSD) and bandwidth (PBW) from rest phase histogram and then we compared these indexes with controls in the subgroups of patients with LVEF≥and<50%. Patients with prolonged RV endocardial pacing exhibited marked LVMD. More severe dyssynchrony was found in patients with impaired LVEF than in patients with preserved LVEF (PSD: 46.67(o) vs. 26.81(o), P<.05; PBW: 144.33(o) vs. 77.41(o), P<.05). Higher left ventricle diameters, extensive infarct or significant ischemia were found in patients with impaired LVEF. Chronic right ventricular pacing was invariably associated with LVMD, even when systolic function was preserved. Phase analysis could be a potentially useful technique to evaluate LMVD associated with myocardial scar in patients with pacemanker and to decide promptly the upgrading to biventricular pacing. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantifying the optical properties of turbid media using polarization sensitive hyperspectral imaging (SkinSpect): two-layer optical phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2015-03-01

    A polarization-sensitive hyperspectral imaging system (SkinSpect) has been built and evaluated using two-layer tissue phantoms, fabricated to mimic the optical properties of melanin in different epidermal thickness and hemoglobin in dermal layers. Multiple tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying top layer thicknesses were measured for optical system calibration and performance testing. Phantom properties were characterized and validated using SkinSpect. The resulting analysis shows that the proposed system is capable of distinguishing and differentiating the layer-dependent absorption spectra and the depths at which this absorption occurs.

  18. Financial and clinical implications of low-energy CT combined with 99m Technetium-sestamibi SPECT for primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pata, Giacomo; Casella, Claudio; Magri, Gian Carlo; Lucchini, Silvia; Panarotto, Maria Beatrice; Crea, Nicola; Giubbini, Raffaele; Salerni, Bruno

    2011-09-01

    (99m)Technetium-sestamibi hybrid SPECT/CT has been favored over conventional SPECT in preoperative evaluation of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) patients. However, the financial implications of CT-image acquisition have never before been published. This prompted us to perform a cost analysis of the aforementioned nuclear procedures. A total of 55 PHPT patients operated on between 2004 and 2009 were studied. Overall, 27 patients underwent SPECT and 28 SPECT/CT. Localization results, as well as diagnostic and clinical cost variations between SPECT and SPECT/CT patients, were compared. SPECT/CT revealed higher sensitivity than SPECT (96.7 vs 79.3%; P = .011), as well as higher specificity (96.4 vs 82.4%; P = .037) and positive predictive value (PPV) (96.7 vs 83%; P = .038) for correctly identifying the neck-side affected by PHPT. Likewise, SPECT/CT disclosed higher sensitivity (86.7 vs 61.1%; P < .0001), specificity (97.4 vs 90%; P = .022), and PPV (86.7 vs 65.7%; P = .0001) for correct neck-quadrant identification. The mean operative time decreased from 62 min following SPECT to 36 min following SPECT/CT (P < .0001), yielding a mean surgical expense saving of 109.9 /patient (updated at 2009/2010 billing database). SPECT/CT actually ensures a mean expenditure reduction of 98.7 /patient (95% CI: 47.96 -149.42 ), diagnostic costs variation amounting to 11.2 /procedure. SPECT/CT ensures better focus for the surgical exploration, shortens surgical times, and eventually cuts costs when used for localization of parathyroid adenomas.

  19. Performance Evaluation of a Bedside Cardiac SPECT System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Gilland, David R.; Parker, Jason G.; Hammond, B.; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Popov, Vladimir

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on the initial performance evaluation of a bedside cardiac PET/SPECT system. The system was designed to move within a hospital to image critically-ill patients, for example, those in intensive care unit (ICU) or emergency room settings, who cannot easily be transported to a conventional SPECT or PET facility. The system uses two compact (25 cm times 25 cm) detectors with pixilated NaI crystals and position sensitive PMTs. The performance is evaluated for both 140 keV (Tc-99m) and 511 keV (F-18) emitters with the system operating in single photon counting (SPECT) mode. The imaging performance metrics for both 140 keV and 511 keV included intrinsic energy resolution, spatial resolution (intrinsic, system, and reconstructed SPECT), detection sensitivity, count rate capability, and uniformity. Results demonstrated an intrinsic energy resolution of 31% at 140 keV and 23% at 511 keV, a planar intrinsic spatial resolution of 5.6 mm full width half-maximum (FWHM) at 140 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 511 keV, and a sensitivity of 4.15 countsmiddotmuCi-1 ldr s-1 at 140 keV and 0.67 counts ldr muCi-1 ldr s-1 at 511 keV. To further the study, a SPECT acquisition using a dynamic cardiac phantom was performed, and the resulting reconstructed images are presented.

  20. SPECT/CT: an update on technological developments and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Pretorius, P Hendrik

    2017-01-16

    Functional nuclear medicine imaging with single-photon emission CT (SPECT) in combination with anatomical CT has been commercially available since the beginning of this century. The combination of the two modalities has improved both the sensitivity and specificity of many clinical applications and CT in conjunction with SPECT that allows for spatial overlay of the SPECT data on good anatomy images. Introduction of diagnostic CT units as part of the SPECT/CT system has also potentially allowed for a more cost-efficient use of the equipment. Most of the SPECT systems available are based on the well-known Anger camera principle with NaI(Tl) as a scintillation material, parallel-hole collimators and multiple photomultiplier tubes, which, from the centroid of the scintillation light, determine the position of an event. Recently, solid-state detectors using cadmium-zinc-telluride became available and clinical SPECT cameras employing multiple pinhole collimators have been developed and introduced in the market. However, even if new systems become available with better hardware, the SPECT reconstruction will still be affected by photon attenuation and scatter and collimator response. Compensation for these effects is needed even for qualitative studies to avoid artefacts leading to false positives. This review highlights the recent progress for both new SPECT cameras systems as well as for various data-processing and compensation methods.

  1. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun Ozsahin, D.; Bläckberg, L.; El Fakhri, G.; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  2. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  3. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers.

  4. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Rodriguez, F.; Arevila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-28

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162{+-}37 g and 169{+-}34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  5. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-Morales, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, F.; Arévila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-01

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162±37 g and 169±34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  6. Comparative evaluation of MRS and SPECT in prognostication of patients with mild to moderate head injury.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Sharma, Anurag; Sharma, Karamchand; Das, Lakshman

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have only been individually studied in patients with head injury. This study aimed to comparatively assess both in patients with mild to moderate head injury. Patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 9-14 who underwent MRS and/or SPECT were evaluated in relation to various clinical factors and neurological outcome at 3months. There were 56 SPECT (Tc99m-ethylcysteinate dimer [ECD]) studies and 41 single voxel proton MRS performed in 53 patients, with 41 patients having both. Of the 41 who underwent MRS, 13 had a lower N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio, 14 had a higher choline (Cho)/Cr ratio, 19 were normal, and nine had bilateral MRS abnormalities. Of the 56 who underwent SPECT, 22 and 19 had severe and moderate hypoperfusion, respectively. Among those in Traumatic Coma Data Bank CT scan category 1 and 2, 50% had MRS abnormalities, whereas 64% had SPECT hypoperfusion, suggesting greater incremental validity of SPECT over MRS. In univariate analyses, GCS, moderate/severe hypoperfusion and bilateral SPECT changes were found to have significant association with unfavorable outcome (odds ratio 13.2, 15.9, and 4.4, and p values <0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively). Patients with lower NAA/Cr ratio in MRS had more unfavorable outcomes, however this was not significant. In multivariate analysis employing binary logistic regression, GCS and severe hypoperfusion on SPECT were noted to have significant association with unfavorable outcome, independent of age, CT scan category, and MRS abnormalities (p values=0.02 and 0.04, respectively). To conclude, ECD-SPECT seems to have greater sensitivity, incremental validity and prognostic value than single voxel proton MRS in select patients with head injury, with only severe hypoperfusion in SPECT significantly associated with unfavorable outcome independent of other confounding factors.

  7. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  8. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  9. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography and SPECT/computed tomography in oncologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Brandon, David; Alazraki, Adina; Halkar, Raghuveer K; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2011-02-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras have emerged as a dominant technology providing invaluable tools in the diagnosis, staging, therapy planning, and treatment monitoring of multiple cancers over the past decade. In the same way that positron emission tomography (PET) benefited from the addition of CT, functional SPECT and anatomic CT data obtained as a single study have shown improvements in diagnostic imaging sensitivity and specificity by improving lesion conspicuity, reducing false positives, and clarifying indeterminate lesions. Furthermore, the anatomic imaging better localizes the functional data, which can be critical in surgical and therapy planning. As more disease-specific imaging agents become available, the role of SPECT/CT in the new paradigms of molecular imaging for personalized medicine will expand. Established and emerging uses of SPECT/CT in a wide variety of oncologic diseases, as well as radiation exposure issues, are reviewed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Impact of injected dose and acquisition time on a normal database by use of 3D-SSP in SPECT images: quantitative simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideo; Hatazawa, Jun; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Ito, Kengo; Ha-Kawa, Sang Kil; Masuda, Yasuhiko; Sugibayashi, Keiichi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Kei; Katsuta, Noboru

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to validate the accuracy of normal databases (NDBs) with respect to variable injected doses and acquisition times by use of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) in N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (I-123-IMP) brain perfusion images. We constructed NDBs based on brain SPECT images obtained from 29 healthy volunteers. Each NDB was rebuilt under simulated unique conditions by use of dynamic acquisition datasets and comprised injected doses (222, 167, and 111 MBq) and acquisition times (30, 20, and 15 min). We selected seven of 29 datasets derived from the volunteers to simulate patients' data (PD). The simulated PD were designed to include regions of hypoperfusion. The study comprised protocol A (same conditions for PD and NDB) and protocol B (mismatched conditions for PD and NDB). We used 3D-SSP to compare with the Z score and detection error. The average Z scores were decreased significantly in protocol A [PD (High)-NDB (High) vs. PD (Low)-NDB (Low); PD (30 m)-NDB (30 m) vs. PD (15 m)-NDB (15 m) and PD (20 m)-NDB (20 m)].The average Z scores of PD (High) and PD (Medium) with NDB (High) did not differ significantly in protocol B, whereas all others were decreased significantly. The error of detection increased 6.65 % (protocol A) and 32.05 % (protocol B). The Z scores were specific to the injected dose and acquisition time used in 3D-SSP studies, and the calculated Z scores were affected by mismatched injected doses and acquisition times between PD and selected NDBs.

  11. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.05). The left ventricular ejection fraction from IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a

  12. Associations of blood lead levels with reproductive hormone levels in men and postmenopausal women: Results from the SPECT-China Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi; Wang, Ningjian; Zhai, Hualing; Nie, Xiaomin; Sun, Honglin; Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Cheng, Jing; Xia, Fangzhen; Zhao, Li; Zheng, Yanjun; Shen, Zhoujun; Lu, Yingli

    2016-11-01

    We examined whether blood lead levels (BLLs) were associated with reproductive hormone levels in a cross-sectional study using data from the SPECT-China study. We selected 2286 men and 1571 postmenopausal women without hormone replacement therapy. BLLs, blood cadmium, total testosterone (TT), oestradiol (E2), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex hormone binding globulin(SHBG) levels were measured. The results showed that median values (interquartile range) of BLLs were 44.00 μg/L (29.00–62.30) for men and 41.00 μg/L (27.00–59.81) for postmenopausal women. In linear regression, after adjusting for age, current smoking status, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and blood cadmium level, TT (P for trend = 0.001) and SHBG (P for trend < 0.001) levels were still positively associated with BLLs in men. Meanwhile, significant positive associations were found for BLLs with SHBG (P for trend = 0.002), FSH (P for trend = 0.001) and LH (P for trend = 0.026) levels in postmenopausal women. Additionally, the association between BLL and SHBG was modified by dysglycaemia (P for interaction = 0.03) in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, BLLs were associated with reproductive hormone levels in the general population of Chinese men and postmenopausal women, which may have important implications for human health. Concerted efforts to reduce adult lead exposure are warranted.

  13. Associations of blood lead levels with reproductive hormone levels in men and postmenopausal women: Results from the SPECT-China Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi; Wang, Ningjian; Zhai, Hualing; Nie, Xiaomin; Sun, Honglin; Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Cheng, Jing; Xia, Fangzhen; Zhao, Li; Zheng, Yanjun; Shen, Zhoujun; Lu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether blood lead levels (BLLs) were associated with reproductive hormone levels in a cross-sectional study using data from the SPECT-China study. We selected 2286 men and 1571 postmenopausal women without hormone replacement therapy. BLLs, blood cadmium, total testosterone (TT), oestradiol (E2), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex hormone binding globulin(SHBG) levels were measured. The results showed that median values (interquartile range) of BLLs were 44.00 μg/L (29.00–62.30) for men and 41.00 μg/L (27.00–59.81) for postmenopausal women. In linear regression, after adjusting for age, current smoking status, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and blood cadmium level, TT (P for trend = 0.001) and SHBG (P for trend < 0.001) levels were still positively associated with BLLs in men. Meanwhile, significant positive associations were found for BLLs with SHBG (P for trend = 0.002), FSH (P for trend = 0.001) and LH (P for trend = 0.026) levels in postmenopausal women. Additionally, the association between BLL and SHBG was modified by dysglycaemia (P for interaction = 0.03) in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, BLLs were associated with reproductive hormone levels in the general population of Chinese men and postmenopausal women, which may have important implications for human health. Concerted efforts to reduce adult lead exposure are warranted. PMID:27898110

  14. The effect of high-resolution parallel-hole collimator materials with a pixelated semiconductor SPECT system at equivalent sensitivities: Monte Carlo simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-04-01

    In nuclear medicine, the use of a pixelated semiconductor detector with cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) is of growing interest for new devices. Especially, the spatial resolution can be improved by using a pixelated parallel-hole collimator with equal holes and pixel sizes based on the above-mentioned detector. High-absorption and high-stopping-power pixelated parallel-hole collimator materials are often chosen because of their good spatial resolution. Capturing more gamma rays, however, may result in decreased sensitivity with the same collimator geometric designs. Therefore, a trade-off between spatial resolution and sensitivity is very important in nuclear medicine imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare spatial resolutions using a pixelated semiconductor single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with lead, tungsten, gold, and depleted uranium pixelated parallel-hole collimators at equal sensitivity. We performed a simulation study of the PID 350 (Ajat Oy Ltd., Finland) CdTe pixelated semiconductor detector (pixel size: 0.35 × 0.35 mm2) by using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation. Spatial resolutions were measured with different collimator materials at equivalent sensitivities. Additionally, hot-rod phantom images were acquired for each source-to-collimator distance by using a GATE simulation. At equivalent sensitivities, measured averages of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) using lead, tungsten, and gold were 4.32, 2.93, and 2.23% higher than that of depleted uranium, respectively. Furthermore, for the full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), measured averages when using lead, tungsten, and gold were 6.29, 4.10, and 2.65% higher than that of depleted uranium, respectively. Although, the spatial resolution showed little differences among the different pixelated parallel-hole collimator materials, lower absorption and stopping power materials such as lead and tungsten had

  15. Filtering in SPECT Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi

    2011-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is widely implemented in nuclear medicine as its clinical role in the diagnosis and management of several diseases is, many times, very helpful (e.g., myocardium perfusion imaging). The quality of SPECT images are degraded by several factors such as noise because of the limited number of counts, attenuation, or scatter of photons. Image filtering is necessary to compensate these effects and, therefore, to improve image quality. The goal of filtering in tomographic images is to suppress statistical noise and simultaneously to preserve spatial resolution and contrast. The aim of this work is to describe the most widely used filters in SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality. The choice of the filter type, the cut-off frequency and the order is a major problem in clinical routine. In many clinical cases, information for specific parameters is not provided, and findings cannot be extrapolated to other similar SPECT imaging applications. A literature review for the determination of the mostly used filters in cardiac, brain, bone, liver, kidneys, and thyroid applications is also presented. As resulting from the overview, no filter is perfect, and the selection of the proper filters, most of the times, is done empirically. The standardization of image-processing results may limit the filter types for each SPECT examination to certain few filters and some of their parameters. Standardization, also, helps in reducing image processing time, as the filters and their parameters must be standardised before being put to clinical use. Commercial reconstruction software selections lead to comparable results interdepartmentally. The manufacturers normally supply default filters/parameters, but these may not be relevant in various clinical situations. After proper standardisation, it is possible to use many suitable filters or one optimal filter. PMID:21760768

  16. Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: the role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after (99m)Tc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity.

  17. Blood Cadmium Level Associates with Lower Testosterone and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Chinese men: from SPECT-China Study, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Wang, Ningjian; Nie, Xiaomin; Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Zhai, Hualing; Zhu, Chunfang; Chen, Yingchao; Xia, Fangzhen; Lu, Meng; Lin, Dongping; Lu, Yingli

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant. We aimed to determine whether blood cadmium level (BCL) associates with reproductive hormones in a cross-sectional study. Our data were from SPECT-China. We selected 5690 participants (2286 men and 3404 women), aged 18 years and older, among whom 1589 were postmenopausal women. BCL, blood lead level, total testosterone (TT), estradiol (E2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone were measured. Results showed that BCL was significantly higher in men (median 1.90 μg/L) than that in women (median 1.56 μg/L). The median level of cadmium in postmenopausal women was 1.40 μg/L. In men, BCL was negatively correlated with TT (Spearmen coefficient = -0.057, P < 0.01) and SHBG (Spearmen coefficient = -0.098, P < 0.01), but in postmenopausal women, this correlation was not observed. In linear regression, after full adjustment for blood lead level, age, body mass index, residence area, economic status, and smoking, TT and SHBG were still negatively associated with BCL in men. Additionally, the association between BCL and TT levels was modified by BMI group (P for interaction = 0.041). However, from base model to fully adjusted model, BCL was not associated with TT and E2 in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, men had higher BCL than women in China, and BCL was associated with TT and SHBG in Chinese men, which may have important implications for male reproductive health. Concerted efforts are warranted to reduce adult cadmium exposure.

  18. Bayesian learning for cardiac SPECT image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Jarosław P; Goodenday, Lucy S; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a system for automating the diagnosis of myocardial perfusion from single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of male and female hearts. Initially we had several thousand of SPECT images, other clinical data and physician-interpreter's descriptions of the images. The images were divided into segments based on the Yale system. Each segment was described by the physician as showing one of the following conditions: normal perfusion, reversible perfusion defect, partially reversible perfusion defect, fixed perfusion defect, defect showing reverse redistribution, equivocal defect or artifact. The physician's diagnosis of overall left ventricular (LV) perfusion, based on the above descriptions, categorizes a study as showing one or more of eight possible conditions: normal, ischemia, infarct and ischemia, infarct, reverse redistribution, equivocal, artifact or LV dysfunction. Because of the complexity of the task, we decided to use the knowledge discovery approach, consisting of these steps: problem understanding, data understanding, data preparation, data mining, evaluating the discovered knowledge and its implementation. After going through the data preparation step, in which we constructed normal gender-specific models of the LV and image registration, we ended up with 728 patients for whom we had both SPECT images and corresponding diagnoses. Another major contribution of the paper is the data mining step, in which we used several new Bayesian learning classification methods. The approach we have taken, namely the six-step knowledge discovery process has proven to be very successful in this complex data mining task and as such the process can be extended to other medical data mining projects.

  19. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT 2015 in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Burchert, Wolfgang; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine presents the results of the 7th survey of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) of the reporting year 2015. Method 268 questionnaires (173 practices [PR], 67 hospitals [HO], 28 university hospitals [UH]) were evaluated. Results of the last survey from 2012 are set in squared brackets. Results MPS of 121 939 [105 941] patients were reported. 98 % [95 %] of all MPS were performed with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and 2 % [5 %] with Tl-201. 78 % [79 %] of all patients were studied in PR, 14 % [15 %] in HO, and 8 % [6 %] in UH. A pharmacological stress test was performed in 43 % [39 %] (22 % [24 %] adenosine, 20 % [9 %] regadenoson, 1% [6 %] dipyridamole or dobutamine). Attenuation correction was applied in 25 % [2009: 10 %] of MPS. Gated SPECT was performed in 78 % [70 %] of all rest MPS, in 80 % [73 %] of all stress and in 76 % [67 %] of all stress and rest MPS. 53 % [33 %] of all nuclear medicine departments performed MPS scoring by default, whereas 24 % [41 %] did not apply any quantification. 31 % [26 %] of all departments noticed an increase in their counted MPS and 29 % [29 %] no changes. Data from 89 departments which participated in all surveys showed an increase in MPS count of 11.1 % (PR: 12.2 %, HO: 4.8 %, UH: 18.4 %). 70 % [60 %] of the MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists. Conclusion The 2015 MPS survey reveals a high-grade adherence of routine MPS practice to current guidelines. The positive trend in MPS performance and number of MPS already observed in 2012 continues. Educational training remains necessary in the field of SPECT scoring. PMID:27909712

  20. Effect of reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy of 99mTc sestamibi SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kenneth J; Tronco, Gene G; Palestro, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The superiority of SPECT/CT over SPECT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid imaging often is assumed to be due to improved lesion localization provided by the anatomic component (computed tomography) of the examination. It also is possible that this superiority may be related to the algorithms used for SPECT data reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of SPECT reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy of MIBI SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging. We retrospectively analyzed preoperative MIBI SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging studies performed on 106 patients. SPECT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and by iterative reconstruction with corrections for collimator resolution recovery and attenuation (IRC). Two experienced readers independently graded lesion detection certainty on a 5-point scale without knowledge of each other’s readings, reconstruction methods, other test results or final diagnoses. All patients had surgical confirmation of the final diagnosis, including disease limited to the neck, and location and weight of excised lesion(s). There were 135 parathyroid lesions among the 106 patients. For FBP SPECT/CT and IRC SPECT/CT sensitivity was 76% and 90% (p = 0.003), specificity was 87% and 87% (p = 0.90), and accuracy was 83% and 88% (p = 0.04), respectively. Inter-rater agreement was significantly higher for IRC than for FBP (kappa = 0.76, “good agreement”, versus kappa = 0.58, “moderate agreement”, p < 0.0001). We conclude that the improved accuracy of MIBI SPECT/CT compared to MIBI SPECT for preoperative parathyroid lesion localization is due in part to the use of IRC for SPECT data reconstruction. PMID:25973340

  1. SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) Scan

    MedlinePlus

    SPECT scan Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scan lets your doctor analyze the function of some of your internal organs. A SPECT scan is a type of nuclear imaging test, ...

  2. CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT treatment plans are comparable to SPECT ventilation functional image-based plans.

    PubMed

    Kida, Satoshi; Bal, Matthieu; Kabus, Sven; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Shan, Xin; Loo, Billy W; Keall, Paul J; Yamamoto, Tokihiro

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans designed to avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions are comparable to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation functional image-based plans. Three IMRT plans were created for eight thoracic cancer patients using: (1) CT ventilation functional images, (2) SPECT ventilation functional images, and (3) anatomic images (no functional images). CT ventilation images were created by deformable image registration of 4D-CT image data sets and quantitative analysis. The resulting plans were analyzed for the relationship between the deviations of CT-functional plan metrics from anatomic plan metrics (ΔCT-anatomic) and those of SPECT-functional plans (ΔSPECT-anatomic), and moreover for agreements of various metrics between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plans. The relationship between ΔCT-anatomic and ΔSPECT-anatomic was strong (e.g., R=0.94; linear regression slope 0.71). The average differences and 95% limits of agreement between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plan metrics (except for monitor units) for various structures were mostly less than 1% and 2%, respectively. This study demonstrated a reasonable agreement between the CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans and SPECT-functional plans, suggesting the potential for CT ventilation imaging to serve as a surrogate for SPECT ventilation in functional image-guided radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  4. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  5. Small hepatocellular carcinomas in chronic liver disease: Detection with SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, M.; Hirasa, M.; Takakuwa, H.; Ibuki, Y.; Fujimi, K.; Miyamura, M.; Tomita, S.; Komori, H.; Todo, A.; Kitaura, Y.

    1986-06-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed using a rotating gamma camera was compared with ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) assay, conventional liver scintigraphy, ultrasound (US) imaging, computed tomography (CT), and selective celiac angiography in 40 patients with a total of 50 small hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs;<5 cm). The detection rates of US and CT were determined on an initial screening study and on a second, more precisely focused study. The detection rate of small HCCs by the various modalities was as follows: AFP, 13%; liver scintigraphy, 36%; SPECT, 72%; initial screening US, 80%; second, more precise US studies, 94%; initial screening CT, 64%; second, more precise CT study, 82%; angiography, 88%. Although SPECT was inferior to the initial screening US examination in detecting HCCs less than 2 cm in size, its sensitivity was identical to that of the initial screening US study for detecting HCCs of 2-5 cm. The combination of SPECT and US was an excellent method for the early detection of HCCs, yielding a detection rate of 94%.

  6. Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT lung scintigraphy and computed tomography pulmonary angiography in patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Bravo, S; Banzo, I; Quirce, R; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Jiménez-Bonilla, J; Martínez-Amador, N; Parra, J A; González-Macías, J; Carril, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare ventilation/perfusion SPECT lung scintigraphy (V/Q-SPECT) and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE). This prospectively designed study included 53 patients with intermediate or high clinical probability of PE. A V/Q-SPECT and CTPA was performed on all patients. The V/Q-SPECT was interpreted according to the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (EANMMI) guidelines. CTPA was reported as positive, negative, or indeterminate. CTPA was positive in 22 cases, negative in 28, and indeterminate in 3. V/Q-SPECT was positive in 27 cases, negative in 24, and non-diagnostic in 2. In the 22 with positive CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 18, negative in 3, and non-diagnostic in 1. In the 28 with negative CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 8, negative in 19, and non-diagnostic in 1. In the 3 with indeterminate CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 1 and negative in 2. In the 2 non-diagnostic cases V/Q-SPECT, CTPA was positive in 1 and negative in one. In the 10 high clinical probabilities, CTPA and V/Q-SPECT were positive in 7, negative in 2, and in 1, CTPA was positive and V/Q-SPECT negative. In the 38 intermediate probability group, CTPA and V/Q-SPECT were positive in 11, negative in 17, with CTPA negative and V/Q-SPECT positive in 8, and in 2 CTPA was positive and V/Q-SPECT negative. The results show that V/Q-SPECT detected PE in 5 patients more than CTPA. Our results show a 77% concordance of both techniques. Overall V/Q-SPECT detected PE in 18% more patients than CTPA in the intermediate group. Both techniques have a complementary role when a diagnosis cannot be made with one of them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. A noninvasive dose estimation system for clinical BNCT based on PG-SPECT--conceptual study and fundamental experiments using HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Ishikawa, M

    2000-09-01

    A noninvasive method for measuring the absorbed dose distribution during the administration of clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using an online three-dimensional (3D) imaging system is presented. This system is designed to provide more accurate information for treatment planning and dosimetry. The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technique is combined with prompt gamma-ray analysis (PGA) to provide an ideal dose estimation system for BNCT. This system is termed PG-SPECT. The fundamental feasibility of the PG-SPECT system for BNCT is confirmed under the following conditions: (1) a voxel size of 1 x 1 x 1 cm3, comparable to the spatial resolution of our standard dosimetric technique using gold wire activation, where data are available for every 5-10 mm of wire length; (2) a reaction rate of 10B(n,alpha)7Li within the measurement volume is greater than 1.1 x l0(6) interactions/cm3/s, corresponding to a thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10(8) n/cm2/s and a 10B concentration of greater than 10 ppm for the deepest part of the tumor volume under typical BNCT clinical conditions; (3) statistical uncertainty of the count rate for 10B(n,alpha)7Li prompt gamma rays is 10% or less. The desirable characteristics of a detector for the PG-SPECT system were determined by basic experiments using both HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors. The CdTe semiconductor detector has the greatest potential for this system because of its compactness and simplicity of maintenance.

  8. Liver function assessment using 99mTc-GSA single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging in hilar bile duct cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Hata, Yasuhiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Kouno, Michihiko; Miyagawa, Kazuyuki; Tokorodani, Ryotaro; Saisaka, Yuichi; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Morita, Sojiro

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of Tc-99m-diethylenetriamine-penta-acetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging for posthepatectomy remnant liver function assessment in hilar bile duct cancer patients. Thirty hilar bile duct cancer patients who underwent major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection were retrospectively analyzed. Indocyanine green plasma clearance rate (KICG) value and estimated KICG by (99m)Tc-GSA scintigraphy (KGSA) and volumetric and functional rates of future remnant liver by (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging were used to evaluate preoperative whole liver function and posthepatectomy remnant liver function, respectively. Remnant (rem) KICG (= KICG × volumetric rate) and remKGSA (= KGSA × functional rate) were used to predict future remnant liver function; major hepatectomy was considered unsafe for values <0.05. The correlation of remKICG and remKGSA with posthepatectomy mortality and morbidity was determined. Although remKICG and remKGSA were not significantly different (median value: 0.071 vs 0.075), functional rates of future remnant liver were significantly higher than volumetric rates (median: 0.54 vs 0.46; P < .001). Hepatectomy was considered unsafe in 17% and 0% of patients using remKICG and remKGSA, respectively. Postoperative liver failure and mortality did not occur in the patients for whom hepatectomy was considered unsafe based on remKICG. remKGSA showed a stronger correlation with postoperative prothrombin time activity than remKICG. (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging enables accurate assessment of future remnant liver function and suitability for hepatectomy in hilar bile duct cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contribution of V/Q SPECT to planar scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Quirce, R; Ibáñez-Bravo, S; Jiménez-Bonilla, J; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Martínez-Amador, N; Ortega-Nava, F; Lavado-Pérez, C; Bravo-Ferrer, Z; Carril, J M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of V/Q SPECT and analyze its contribution to planar V/Q lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). A total of 109 patients with suspected PE showing Wells score>2 and elevated D-dimer were studied. The V/Q could not be completed in 7 patients, so they were excluded. Ventilation and perfusion scans were done using Technegas and (99m)Tc-MAA. Planar study included 8 projections on a 256×256 matrix and 128 projections on a 128×128 matrix were acquired for the SPECT study, applying an iterative method. Planar images were interpreted according to modified PIOPED criteria, and SPECT by the guidelines of the EANMMI. The results with both techniques were compared. V/Q planar scintigraphy and SPECT could be performed in 102 patients. V/Q planar scintigraphy was considered "diagnostic" in 39 of the 102 patients, and "non-diagnostic" in 63. Of the 39 "diagnostic" studies, 31 were reported as high probability of PE and 8 as normal. Of the 63 "non-diagnostic", 26 corresponded to intermediate, 29 to low, and 8 to very low probability. The SPECT study was "diagnostic" in 97 and indeterminate in only 5. All patients with a high probability planar scintigraphy had a positive SPECT. In the 8 patients with a normal planar scintigraphy SPECT was negative in 5 and positive in 3. In the 63 patients with a "non-diagnostic" planar scintigraphy SPECT was "diagnostic" in 58 of them, positive in 17 and negative in 41. V/Q SPECT is a feasible technique as it was performed in 102 of the 109 patients who were enrolled in the study (94%). The addition of V/Q SPECT to planar V/Q decreases the number of "non-diagnostic" reports from 62% in planar scintigraphy to 4.9% in SPECT. Therefore, V/Q SPECT should be included in the diagnosis approach of PE due to its high diagnostic yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. V/P SPECT as a diagnostic tool for pregnant women with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Olsson, Berit; Gottsäter, Anders; Hindorf, Cecilia; Jögi, Jonas

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and other lung diseases among pregnant women with suspected PE and to calculate the radiation exposure to patient and fetus in this population. As a secondary aim, we evaluated the negative predictive value of a normal ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/P SPECT) examination in pregnancy. We studied all 127 pregnant women who had suspected PE and had undergone V/P SPECT at our institution in the course of a 5-year period. Radiation exposure to patient and fetus and the negative predictive value of a normal V/P SPECT examination were also measured. V/P SPECT identified PE in 11 women (9%). Moreover, in 15 women (12%) the examination revealed pneumonia (in 2 cases in addition to PE) and in 1 woman signs of airway obstruction were revealed. Among the 116/127 women (91%) where PE was ruled out by V/P SPECT, none was diagnosed subsequently with PE or deep venous thrombosis (DVT) during the same pregnancy or puerperal period. For P SPECT, the calculated fetal absorbed dose was < 0.6 mGy,and the calculated breast absorbed dose 0.6 mGy. For V SPECT, the calculated fetal absorbed dose was < 0.014 mGy and the breast absorbed dose 0.25 mGy. The prevalence of PE was low (9%) among pregnant women with suspected disease. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 12% of patients. The negative predictive value of V/P SPECT was high, and the radiation exposure from V/P SPECT was low both for fetus and patient.

  11. Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  13. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  14. Noninvasive Nuclear SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation to Guide Management for Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Jong, Bor-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Che; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Ing-Jou; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2017-09-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT has been validated to enhance the detection of multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) and conclude equivocal SPECT myocardial perfusion study. This advance opened an important clinical application to utilize the tool in guiding CAD management for area where myocardial perfusion tracers for PET are unavailable or unaffordable. We present a clinical patient with ongoing recursive angina who underwent multiple nuclear stress tests for a sequence of CAD evaluation in 26 months and demonstrated that SPECT myocardial blood flow quantitation properly guided CAD management to warrant patient outcome.

  15. Assessment of an intermediate reprojection technique transitioning from planar to SPECT radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Jim; Rojas Fisher, Bruno; Price, Jonathan Mark; Wechalekar, Kshama

    2014-10-01

    The technique of SPECT-RNV (radionuclide ventriculography) offers a greater amount of clinically usable data than its planar counterpart (P-RNV). In transitioning from planar to SPECT-only acquisition methodologies, reprojection of the SPECT data can provide a planar dataset which can be used as an interim technique. The aim of this study was to test if reprojected planar images could be used as a surrogate for true planar images in SPECT-only setting. We performed SPECT-RNV and P-RNV on 47 patients on traditional sodium iodide (NaI) cameras, determining left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) for planar (EFP) and SPECT (EFS) techniques. We reprojected the SPECT-RNV data along the best septal separation angle determined from planar scanning. This creates a further planar dataset denoted 'reprojected P-RNV' (rP-RNV) giving a reprojected ejection fraction (EFR) which can be used as a validation variable in transitioning to SPECT-only acquisition. Performing t tests showed no statistical difference between EFP and EFR (P > .017) but bias was observed in EFS results compared to EFP and EFS compared to EFR results. An unblinded, comparison of parametric data between the three datasets for a subset of ten patients showed good clinical concordance. False negative and false positive rates were low for rP-RNV compared to P-RNV. The reprojected planar LVEF correlates well to P-RNV EF values. The rP-RNV dataset can aid clinicians in transitioning from planar RNV to SPECT-only acquisition.

  16. Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT for diagnostics of pulmonary embolism in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bajc, M; Olsson, B; Palmer, J; Jonson, B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to illustrate clinical utility and impact of pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnostics of up to date Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT (V/P (SPECT)) applying holistic interpretation criteria. During a 2-year period 2328 consecutive patients referred to V/P(SPECT) for clinically suspected PE were examined. Final diagnosis was established by physicians clinically responsible for patient care. To establish the performance of V/P(SPECT) negative for PE, patients were followed up by medical records for 6 months. Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT was feasible in 99% of the patients. Data for follow-up were available in 1785 patients (77%). PE was reported in 607 patients (34%). Normal pattern was described in 420 patients (25%). Pathology other than PE such as a pneumonia, left heart failure, obstructive lung disease, tumour was described in 724 patients (41%). Report was nondiagnostic in 19 patients (1%). Six cases were classified as falsely negative because PE was diagnosed at follow-up and was fatal in one case. Six cases were classified as falsely positive because the clinician decided not to treat. In 608 patients with final PE diagnosis, 601 patients had positive V/P(SPECT) (99%). In 1177 patients without final PE diagnosis 1153 patients had negative V/P(SPECT) (98%). Holistic interpretation of V/P(SPECT,) yields high negative and positive predictive values and only 1% of nondiagnostic findings and was feasible in 99% of patients. It is a responsibility and a challenge of nuclear medicine to provide optimal care of patients with suspected PE by making V/P(SPECT) available.

  17. Quantitative Comparison of PET and Bremsstrahlung SPECT for Imaging the In Vivo Yttrium-90 Microsphere Distribution after Liver Radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Elschot, Mattijs; Vermolen, Bart J.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; de Keizer, Bart; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background After yttrium-90 (90Y) microsphere radioembolization (RE), evaluation of extrahepatic activity and liver dosimetry is typically performed on 90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT images. Since these images demonstrate a low quantitative accuracy, 90Y PET has been suggested as an alternative. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare SPECT and state-of-the-art PET on the ability to detect small accumulations of 90Y and on the accuracy of liver dosimetry. Methodology/Principal Findings SPECT/CT and PET/CT phantom data were acquired using several acquisition and reconstruction protocols, including resolution recovery and Time-Of-Flight (TOF) PET. Image contrast and noise were compared using a torso-shaped phantom containing six hot spheres of various sizes. The ability to detect extra- and intrahepatic accumulations of activity was tested by quantitative evaluation of the visibility and unique detectability of the phantom hot spheres. Image-based dose estimates of the phantom were compared to the true dose. For clinical illustration, the SPECT and PET-based estimated liver dose distributions of five RE patients were compared. At equal noise level, PET showed higher contrast recovery coefficients than SPECT. The highest contrast recovery coefficients were obtained with TOF PET reconstruction including resolution recovery. All six spheres were consistently visible on SPECT and PET images, but PET was able to uniquely detect smaller spheres than SPECT. TOF PET-based estimates of the dose in the phantom spheres were more accurate than SPECT-based dose estimates, with underestimations ranging from 45% (10-mm sphere) to 11% (37-mm sphere) for PET, and 75% to 58% for SPECT, respectively. The differences between TOF PET and SPECT dose-estimates were supported by the patient data. Conclusions/Significance In this study we quantitatively demonstrated that the image quality of state-of-the-art PET is superior over Bremsstrahlung SPECT for the assessment of the 90Y

  18. Evaluation of SPECT quantification of radiopharmaceutical distribution in canine myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianying; Jaszczak, R.L.; Greer, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    This study evaluates the quantitative accuracy of SPECT for in vivo distributions of {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals using fanbeam (FB) and parallel-beam (PB) collimators and compares uniform and nouniform attenuation correction methods in terms of quantitative accuracy. SPECT quantification of canine myocardial radioactivity was performed followed by well counter measurements of extracted myocardial tissue samples. Transmission scans using a line source and an FB collimator were performed to generate nonuniform attenuation maps of the canine thorax. Emission scans with two energy windows were acquired. Images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm, with a dual-window scatter subtraction combined with either no attenuation compensation or single iteration Chang attenuation compensation based on a uniform attenuation map {mu}=0.152 cm{sup -1} or the nonuniform transmission map. The measured mean counts from the SPECT images were converted using the well counter. The experimental results demonstrate that, compared with well counter values, the in vivo distributions of {sup 99m}Tc were most accurately determined in FB and PB SPECT reconstructions with nonuniform attenuation compensation, under-estimated without attenuation compensation and overestimated with uniform attenuation compensation. 37 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Practical reconstruction protocol for quantitative (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Siman, W; Mikell, J K; Kappadath, S C

    2016-09-01

    To develop a practical background compensation (BC) technique to improve quantitative (90)Y-bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) using a commercially available imaging system. All images were acquired using medium-energy collimation in six energy windows (EWs), ranging from 70 to 410 keV. The EWs were determined based on the signal-to-background ratio in planar images of an acrylic phantom of different thicknesses (2-16 cm) positioned below a (90)Y source and set at different distances (15-35 cm) from a gamma camera. The authors adapted the widely used EW-based scatter-correction technique by modeling the BC as scaled images. The BC EW was determined empirically in SPECT/CT studies using an IEC phantom based on the sphere activity recovery and residual activity in the cold lung insert. The scaling factor was calculated from 20 clinical planar (90)Y images. Reconstruction parameters were optimized in the same SPECT images for improved image quantification and contrast. A count-to-activity calibration factor was calculated from 30 clinical (90)Y images. The authors found that the most appropriate imaging EW range was 90-125 keV. BC was modeled as 0.53× images in the EW of 310-410 keV. The background-compensated clinical images had higher image contrast than uncompensated images. The maximum deviation of their SPECT calibration in clinical studies was lowest (<10%) for SPECT with attenuation correction (AC) and SPECT with AC + BC. Using the proposed SPECT-with-AC + BC reconstruction protocol, the authors found that the recovery coefficient of a 37-mm sphere (in a 10-mm volume of interest) increased from 39% to 90% and that the residual activity in the lung insert decreased from 44% to 14% over that of SPECT images with AC alone. The proposed EW-based BC model was developed for (90)Y bremsstrahlung imaging. SPECT with AC + BC gave improved lesion detectability and activity quantification compared to SPECT with AC

  20. Lymphoma: evaluation with Ga-67 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Rosenthal, D.S.; Kaplan, W.D.; English, R.J.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-07-01

    To determine the value of gallium-67 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in imaging patients with lymphoma, the authors compared Ga-67 planar images and SPECT images in 40 consecutive patients, using radiologic examinations and/or medical records to confirm the presence or absence of disease. Thirty-three patients had Hodgkin disease, and seven had non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Fifty-four examinations were performed. Of 57 sites of lymphoma in the chest, planar imaging depicted 38, while SPECT depicted 55, resulting in sensitivities of 0.66 and 0.96 for planar and SPECT imaging, respectively. In eight sites, both modalities were truly negative, but SPECT was negative in four additional sites that were equivocal on planar imaging, resulting in specificities of 0.66 and 1.00 for planar and SPECT imaging, respectively. In the abdomen, the sensitivities of planar and SPECT imaging were 0.69 and 0.85, and the specificities 0.87 and 1.00, respectively. SPECT was more accurate in depicting foci of gallium-avid lymphoma in the chest and abdomen and in excluding disease when planar imaging was equivocal.

  1. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI.

    PubMed

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-11-01

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations show sufficient axial

  2. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. Methods: The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. Results: The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations

  3. Iodine-131 Therapy and Lacrimal Drainage System Toxicity: Nasal Localization Studies Using Whole Body Nuclear Scintigraphy and SPECT-CT.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Vyakaranam, Achyut Ram; Rao, Jyotsna Eleshwarapu; Prasad, Giri; Reddy, Palkonda Vijay Anand

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of dose on nasal localization of radioactive iodine-131 (I-131) following therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Retrospective evaluation of all patients who underwent post-therapy I-131 whole body scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography was performed. Patients were divided into 2 groups; group A were treated with 100 millicurie (mCi) and group B with ≥150 mCi. Databases were reviewed for demographics, diagnosis, and administered dosage of I-131. Whole body scintigraphy images were retrieved and nasal uptake was analyzed and classified as nil to trace, low, moderate, and high uptake and corresponding single photon emission CTs were analyzed for radioactive nasal activity. A total of 100 patients were studied, 50 in each of the groups. The M:F ratio was 1.1:1 (27:23) in group A and 1.5:1 (30:20) in group B. The mean age was 43.12 years and 54.6 years in groups A and B, respectively. Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid was the most common type accounting for 82% (41/50) of patients in group A and 62% (31/50) in group B. Imaging studies revealed nil to trace nasal activity in 80% (40/50) in group A as compared with 56% (28/50) in group B. None of the patients in group A showed high nasal uptake, whereas 4% (2/50) in group B demonstrated such high activity. Intranasal localization of radioactive I-131 was significant in patients receiving a dose of ≥150 mCi. Intranasal localization may partly explain toxicity to nasolacrimal duct and may be a risk factor for subsequent development of nasolacrimal duct obstructions.

  4. Preliminary Characterization and In Vivo Studies of Structurally Identical 18F- and 125I-Labeled Benzyloxybenzenes for PET/SPECT Imaging of β-Amyloid Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanping; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Cui, Mengchao; Zhang, Jinming; Guo, Zhide; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Xianzhong; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-01-01

    With the assistance of molecular docking and 3D-QSAR models established previously, structurally identical 18F- and 125I-labeled benzyloxybenzene derivatives were designed to achieve the early detection of Aβ plaques by PET/SPECT imaging. In competition binding assay, ligands 7a and 12a displayed high binding affinities to Aβ42 aggregates with Ki values of 19.5 nM and 23.9 nM, respectively. Specific plaque labeling was observed on the in vitro autoradiography of brain sections from AD patients and Tg mice. In biodistribution, [125I]7a, [18F]7a, [125I]12a and [18F]12a all exhibited high initial brain uptakes (>5% ID/g at 2 min). [125I]7a and [125I]12a cleared fast from the normal brain regions, while corresponding [18F]7a and [18F]12a showed slow washout rates. Dynamic microPET/CT and microSPECT/CT imaging data in normal ICR mice were in accordance with in vivo biodistribution results. In vivo metabolism results indicated that the different clearance profiles between the structurally identical 18F- and 125I-labeled tracers could be attributed to different biochemical characteristics of the radiometabolites. Radioiodinated benzyloxybenzene derivatives exhibited good in vivo biostability in brain. Ex vivo autoradiography further confirmed the strong in vivo Aβ labeling ability of [125I]7a. These new fluorinated and iodinated benzyloxybenzenes can develop into PET/SPECT dual imaging agents targeting Aβ plaques. PMID:26170205

  5. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  6. Clinical application of SPECT in adrenal imaging with iodine-131 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura, J.; Kawanaka, M.; Fukuchi, M.

    1989-04-01

    Forty-one patients with or without adrenocortical disorders were studied to evaluate the clinical usefulness of SPECT in adrenal imaging with I-131 Adosterol. In the SPECT images from this study, all glands with either normally functioning or hyperfunctioning adrenal cortices could be detected, while those glands with hypofunctioning adrenal cortices could not be detected. Particularly in transaxial and sagittal slices, the adrenal gland was identified posteriorly and was clearly distinguished from the gallbladder. In preliminary results using SPECT by a standard method, uptake in 68 detectable glands ranged from 1.7% to 4.9% in four glands with Cushing's syndrome, from 1.1% to 1.3% in seven glands with primary aldosteronism, and were distributed below 1.0% in the remaining glands with normally functioning adrenal cortices. These data show that it is possible to evaluate the adrenocortical functioning status simply by analyzing the SPECT images of the adrenal.

  7. Changes in cerebral blood flow after cognitive behavior therapy in patients with panic disorder: a SPECT study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ho-Jun; Choi, Young Hee; Chung, Yong-An; Rho, Wangku; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Aim Inconsistent results continue to be reported in studies that examine the neural correlates of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder. We examined the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) associated with the alleviation of anxiety by CBT in panic patients. Methods The change in rCBF and clinical symptoms before and after CBT were assessed using single photon emission computed tomography and various clinical measures were analyzed. Results Fourteen subjects who completed CBT showed significant improvements in symptoms on clinical measures, including the Panic and Agoraphobic Scale and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised. After CBT, increased rCBF was detected in the left postcentral gyrus (BA 43), left precentral gyrus (BA 4), and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9 and BA 47), whereas decreased rCBF was detected in the left pons. Correlation analysis of the association between the changes in rCBF and changes in each clinical measure did not show significant results. Conclusion We found changes in the rCBF associated with the successful completion of CBT. The present findings may help clarify the effects of CBT on changes in brain activity in panic disorder. PMID:24790449

  8. Cognitive reserve: a SPECT study of 132 Alzheimer's disease patients with an education range of 0-19 years.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Teng, Evenly Lee; Lee, Yi-Chung; Wang, Pei-Ning; Lin, Ker-Neng; Chung, Chih-Ping; Liu, Hsiu-Chih

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the associations between education, cerebral perfusion, and cognitive test performance among 132 patients with Alzheimer's disease. The participants had had between 0 and 19 years of formal schooling, and had either mild or moderate dementia according to the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale. Cerebral perfusion was evaluated by the (99m)Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission computed tomography. The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument were used to assess cognitive performance. For patients at each clinical dementia severity level, statistical parametric mapping was used to examine voxel by voxel the association between education and cerebral perfusion, and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between education and cognitive test scores. Years of formal schooling had negative associations with cerebral perfusion and positive associations with cognitive test scores. The brain regions showing a significant education effect on perfusion involved bilateral posterior association areas in mild dementia, and bilateral parieto-temporo-frontal areas in moderate dementia. The present findings indicate that the cognitive reserve effect starts at the low end of the education range. They also suggest that the main effect of more education is a more facile use of alternative brain circuits instead of locally increased synaptic connections.

  9. The measurement of regional cerebral blood flow during the complex cognitive task of meditation: a preliminary SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Newberg, A; Alavi, A; Baime, M; Pourdehnad, M; Santanna, J; d'Aquili, E

    2001-04-10

    This study measured changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during the complex cognitive task of meditation using single photon emission computed tomography. Eight experienced Tibetan Buddhist meditators were injected at baseline with 7 mCi HMPAO and scanned 20 min later for 45 min. The subjects then meditated for 1 h at which time they were injected with 25 mCi HMPAO and scanned 20 min later for 30 min. Values were obtained for regions of interest in major brain structures and normalized to whole brain activity. The percentage change between meditation and baseline was compared. Correlations between structures were also determined. Significantly increased rCBF (P<0.05) was observed in the cingulate gyrus, inferior and orbital frontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and thalamus. The change in rCBF in the left DLPFC correlated negatively (P<0.05) with that in the left superior parietal lobe. Increased frontal rCBF may reflect focused concentration and thalamic increases overall increased cortical activity during meditation. The correlation between the DLPFC and the superior parietal lobe may reflect an altered sense of space experienced during meditation. These results suggest a complex rCBF pattern during the task of meditation.

  10. Perfusion SPECT, SISCOM and PET (18)F-FDG in the assessment of drug- refractory epilepsy patients candidates for epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Piñera, M; Mestre-Fusco, A; Ley, M; González, S; Medrano, S; Principe, A; Mojal, S; Conesa, G; Rocamora, R

    2015-01-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT (ictal-interictal), SPECT images and subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) and (18)F-FDG-PET (interictal), play an important role in the pre-surgical diagnosis of patients with medically refractory epilepsy. This study aimed to establish: the reproducibility of visual ictal-interictal SPECT and SISCOM analysis altogether with the capacity of SPECT, SISCOM and PET to determine the epileptogenic zone. (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT ictal-interictal and SISCOM (Analyze 7.0) were performed on 47 refractory epilepsy patients (24 F, 19-60 yrs). In 13 patients, SISCOM was also performed using a new program (Focus DET). Ictal-interictal SPECT and SISCOM images were analysed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians (observer 1 and 2). Kappa concordance coefficient was used to evaluate the reproducibility. In sixteen patients, SPECT, SISCOM and PET findings were compared with the resected area during the surgery, and surgical outcome using Engel scale or with the stereo EEG-(SEEG). The ictal-interictal SPECT interobserver agreement was 91%, Kappa index 0.86, SISCOM (Analyze 7.0) interobserver agreement percentage was 82%, Kappa index 0.80, Analyze 7.0 showed a higher inconclusive results than visual SPECT analysis. SISCOM FocusDET interobserver agreement was 92%, Kappa index 0.87, with lower inconclusive results than Analyze 7.0. SPECT, SISCOM and PET combined findings identified 87% seizure onset zone: 79% temporal, 26% parieto-temporal and 7% frontal. Ictal-interictal SPECT and SISCOM showed a high reproducibility in this sample of patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. SPECT,SISCOM and PET combined findings improved detection of epileptogenic zone in comparison with the individual assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. C-SPECT - a Clinical Cardiac SPECT/Tct Platform: Design Concepts and Performance Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei; Ordonez, Caesar E.; Liang, Haoning; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Jingai

    2013-01-01

    Because of scarcity of photons emitted from the heart, clinical cardiac SPECT imaging is mainly limited by photon statistics. The sub-optimal detection efficiency of current SPECT systems not only limits the quality of clinical cardiac SPECT imaging but also makes more advanced potential applications difficult to be realized. We propose a high-performance system platform - C-SPECT, which has its sampling geometry optimized for detection of emitted photons in quality and quantity. The C-SPECT has a stationary C-shaped gantry that surrounds the left-front side of a patient’s thorax. The stationary C-shaped collimator and detector systems in the gantry provide effective and efficient detection and sampling of photon emission. For cardiac imaging, the C-SPECT platform could achieve 2 to 4 times the system geometric efficiency of conventional SPECT systems at the same sampling resolution. This platform also includes an integrated transmission CT for attenuation correction. The ability of C-SPECT systems to perform sequential high-quality emission and transmission imaging could bring cost-effective high-performance to clinical imaging. In addition, a C-SPECT system could provide high detection efficiency to accommodate fast acquisition rate for gated and dynamic cardiac imaging. This paper describes the design concepts and performance potential of C-SPECT, and illustrates how these concepts can be implemented in a basic system. PMID:23885129

  12. Acute pulmonary embolism detection with ventilation/perfusion SPECT combined with full dose CT: What is the best option?

    PubMed

    Milà, M; Bechini, J; Vázquez, A; Vallejos, V; Tenesa, M; Espinal, A; Fraile, M; Monreal, M

    To compare diagnostic accuracy of Ventilation/Perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) combined with simultaneous full-dose CT with a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner versus planar ventilation/perfusion (V/P) SPECT and CT angiography (CTA) in patients suspected with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Between 2009 and 2011, consecutive patients suspected of acute PE were referred for V/P SPECT/CT (reviewed board approved study). A contrast agent was administered to patients who had no contraindications. Non-contrast V/P SPECT/CT was performed on the remaining patients. All patients were followed-up for at least 3 months. A total of 314 patients were available during the study period, with the diagnosis of PE confirmed in 70 (22.29%) of them. The overall population sensitivity and specificity was 90.91% and 92.44%, respectively for V/P SPECT, 80% and 99.15%, respectively, for CTA, and 95.52% and 97.08% for V/P SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT performed better than V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0419, P=0.0043, 95% CI; 0.0131-0.0706) and CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259)). Comparing imaging modalities when contrast agent could be administered, sensitivity and specificity increased and V/P SPECT/CT was significantly better than CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259) and V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0659, P=0.0052, 95% CI; 0.0197-0.1121). In case of non-contrast enhancement, there was non-significant increase of specificity. Secondary findings on CT impacted patient management in 14.65% of cases. Our study shows that combined V/P SPECT/CT scanning has a higher diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute PE than V/P SPECT and CTA alone. When feasible, V/P SPECT/CT with contrast enhancement is the best option. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  13. Pre-reconstruction restoration of SPECT projection images by a neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the projection images obtained at view angles surrounding the patient are degraded due to the geometric response of the imaging system (a spatially-variant blur), Compton scatter, Poisson noise, and other factors. Various methods have been proposed for compensating for the spatially varying geometric response of the camera. In this study the authors examine restoration of SPECT projection images using an artificial neural network. A three layer feed-forward neural network is trained to compute the spatially-variant standard deviations of a symmetric Gaussian blur. A Hopfield network is then used to restore the projection images in which the restoration problem is formulated as a minimization of an error function of the network. Results from applying this restoration procedure on SPECT projection images are presented and the resulting SPECT reconstruction are analyzed.

  14. Clinical Usefulness of SPECT-CT in Patients with an Unexplained Pain in Metal on Metal (MOM) Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berber, Reshid; Henckel, Johann; Khoo, Michael; Wan, Simon; Hua, Jia; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-04-01

    SPECT-CT is increasingly used to assess painful knee arthroplasties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of SPECT-CT in unexplained painful MOM hip arthroplasty. We compared the diagnosis and management plan for 19 prosthetic MOM hips in 15 subjects with unexplained pain before and after SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT changed the management decision in 13 (68%) subjects, Chi-Square=5.49, P=0.24. In 6 subjects (32%) pain remained unexplained however the result reassured the surgeon to continue with non-operative management. SPECT-CT should be reserved as a specialist test to help identify possible causes of pain where conventional investigations have failed. It can help reassure surgeons making management decisions for patients with unexplained pain following MOM hip arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation risk and protection of patients in clinical SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Nekolla, Elke A; Borowski, Markus; Noßke, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that hybrid single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT for various diagnostic issues has an added value as compared to SPECT alone. However, the combined acquisition of functional and anatomical images can substantially increase radiation exposure to patients, in particular when using a hybrid system with diagnostic CT capabilities. It is, therefore, essential to carefully balance the diagnostic needs and radiation protection requirements. To this end, the evidence on health effects induced by ionizing radiation is outlined. In addition, the essential concepts for estimating radiation doses and lifetime attributable cancer risks associated with SPECT/CT examinations are presented taking into account both the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as well as the most recent radiation risk models. Representative values of effective dose and lifetime attributable risk are reported for ten frequently used SPECT radiopharmaceuticals and five fully diagnostic partial-body CT examinations. A diagnostic CT scan acquired as part of a combined SPECT/CT examination contributes considerably to, and for some applications even dominates, the total patient exposure. For the common SPECT and CT examinations considered in this study, the lifetime attributable risk of developing a radiation-related cancer is less than 0.27 %/0.37 % for men/women older than 16 years, respectively, and decreases markedly with increasing age at exposure. Since there is no clinical indication for a SPECT/CT examination unless an emission scan has been indicated, the issue on justification comes down to the question of whether it is necessary to additionally acquire a low-dose CT for attenuation correction and anatomical localization of tracer uptake or even a fully diagnostic CT. In any case, SPECT/CT studies have to be optimized, e.g. by adapting dose reduction measures from state-of-the-art CT practice, and

  16. Assessment of fatty acid metabolism in taxan-induced myocardial damage with iodine-123 BMIPP SPECT: comparative study with myocardial perfusion, left ventricular function, and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimimasa; Takeda, Kan; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Imai, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takao; Kamikura, Yuko

    2003-09-01

    We investigated myocardial fatty acid metabolism in taxan-induced myocardial damage in patients with advanced lung cancer. Twenty-five patients with non-small-cell lung cancer were treated with taxan combined with carboplatin intravenously for three cycles. Myocardial SPECT imaging using 99mTc-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) and 123I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) was performed successively before and after chemotherapy. Regional uptake scores of BMIPP and MIBI were visually assessed and total uptake scores and the number of abnormal segments were calculated. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained by first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography using MIBI. Postmortem pathological examination was performed in 5 patients. Total BMIPP uptake scores after chemotherapy were significantly lower than those before chemotherapy (23.4 +/- 3.4 vs. 26.6 +/- 0.8; p < 0.001). Mean LVEF showed a significant decrease after chemotherapy. Of the 25 patients, 4 exhibited a decrease in LVEF of more than 10%, 1 had a decrease in LVEF to below 50%, and 1 developed congestive heart failure. These 6 patients had significant decreases in total BMIPP uptake scores and increases in the number of abnormal segments as compared with the other 19 patients. Histopathological examination of myocardial tissue showed interstitial edema and disarrayed myocardial cells. Taxan impairs myocardial fatty acid metabolism. 123I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT is useful for evaluating the cardiotoxicity induced by taxan.

  17. Preliminary Monte Carlo study of (18)F-FDG SPECT imaging with LaBr(3):Ce Crystal-based Gamma Cameras.

    PubMed

    Alzimami, Khalid S; Sassi, Salem A; Alkhorayef, Mohammed A; Spyrou, Nicholas M

    2010-01-01

    The utility of (18)F-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in oncology, cardiology, and neurology has generated great interest in a more economical ways of imaging (18)F-FDG than conventional PET scanners. The main thrust of this work is to investigate the potential use of LaBr(3):Ce materials in a low-cost FDG-SPECT system compared to NaI(Tl) using GATE Monte Carlo simulation. System performance at 140 keV and 511 keV was assessed using energy spectra, system sensitivity and count rate performance. Comparison of the LaBr(3):Ce and NaI(Tl) crystal-based systems showed 4.5% and 8.9% higher system sensitivity for the LaBr(3):Ce at 140 keV and 511 keV, respectively. The LaBr(3):Ce scintillator significantly improves intrinsic count rate performance due to its fast decay time with respect to NaI(Tl). In conclusion, because LaBr(3):Ce crystal combines excellent intrinsic count rate performance with slightly increased system sensitivity, it has the potential to be used for (18)F-FDG -SPECT systems.

  18. [Value of thallium 201-SPECT in typing brain space-occupying lesions].

    PubMed

    Martínez del Valle Torres, M D; Gómez Rio, M; Rodríguez Fernández, A; Sabatel Hernandez, G; Ortega Lozano, S; Ramos Font, C; Bellon Guardia, M; López Ramírez, E; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography with Tl-201 (SPECT Tl-201) to establish the tumoral or non-tumoral nature of brain space occupying lesions in comparison with usual diagnostic techniques. The study population consisted of 37 patients, 24 men (64.9 %) and 13 women (35.1 %), mean age 48 +/- 16 years. After establishing the clinical and radiological diagnosis of brain lesion, all patients underwent SPECT Tl-201, evaluating it only by subjective analysis and blinded to neuroestructural techniques. After surgical resection all patients were evaluated anatomopathologically to establish the histologic nature. The sensitivity of SPECT Tl-201 (0.87) was higher than standard neuroimaging techniques (0.78). Specificity (0.43), positive (0.87) and negative (0.43) predictive values of SPECT were similar to neuroestructural procedures (MRI and CT scan) with 0.43, 0.82 and 0.38 values. Tumoral disease prevalence was 0.81. Neuroestructural procedures were non-conclusive in 18.9 % of the studies. No non-conclusive results were obtained with SPECT Tl-201. SPECT Tl-201 is a diagnostic procedure of high sensitivity to establish the tumoral nature of brain lesions, with poor specificity, similar to structural X-ray techniques.

  19. Optimized 3D stitching algorithm for whole body SPECT based on transition error minimization (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinhua; Xu, Xiaoyin; Voss, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    Standard Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has a limited field of view (FOV) and cannot provide a 3D image of an entire long whole body SPECT. To produce a 3D whole body SPECT image, two to five overlapped SPECT FOVs from head to foot are acquired and assembled using image stitching. Most commercial software from medical imaging manufacturers applies a direct mid-slice stitching method to avoid blurring or ghosting from 3D image blending. Due to intensity changes across the middle slice of overlapped images, direct mid-slice stitching often produces visible seams in the coronal and sagittal views and maximal intensity projection (MIP). In this study, we proposed an optimized algorithm to reduce the visibility of stitching edges. The new algorithm computed, based on transition error minimization (TEM), a 3D stitching interface between two overlapped 3D SPECT images. To test the suggested algorithm, four studies of 2-FOV whole body SPECT were used and included two different reconstruction methods (filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM)) as well as two different radiopharmaceuticals (Tc-99m MDP for bone metastases and I-131 MIBG for neuroblastoma tumors). Relative transition errors of stitched whole body SPECT using mid-slice stitching and the TEM-based algorithm were measured for objective evaluation. Preliminary experiments showed that the new algorithm reduced the visibility of the stitching interface in the coronal, sagittal, and MIP views. Average relative transition errors were reduced from 56.7% of mid-slice stitching to 11.7% of TEM-based stitching. The proposed algorithm also avoids blurring artifacts by preserving the noise properties of the original SPECT images.

  20. Iterative restoration of SPECT projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, S. J.; Xia, Weishi

    1997-04-01

    Photon attenuation and the limited nonstationary spatial resolution of the detector can reduce both qualitative and quantitative image quality in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper, a reconstruction approach is described which can compensate for both of these degradations. The approach involves processing the projection data with Bellini's method for attenuation compensation followed by an iterative deconvolution technique which uses the frequency distance principle (FDP) to model the distance-dependent camera blur. Modeling of the camera blur with the FDP allows an efficient implementation using fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods. After processing of the projection data, reconstruction is performed using filtered backprojection. Simulation studies using two different brain phantoms show that this approach gives reconstructions with a favorable bias versus noise tradeoff, provides no visually undesirable noise artifacts, and requires a low computational load.

  1. Dobutamine stress echocardiography versus quantitative technetium-99m sestamibi SPECT for detecting residual stenosis and multivessel disease after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lancellotti, P; Benoit, T; Rigo, P; Pierard, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the relative accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) and quantitative technetium-99m sestamibi single photon emission computed tomography (mibi SPECT) for detecting infarct related artery stenosis and multivessel disease early after acute myocardial infarction.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
SETTING—University hospital.
METHODS—75 patients underwent simultaneous DSE and mibi SPECT at (mean (SD)) 5 (2) days after a first acute myocardial infarct. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed in all patients after imaging studies.
RESULTS—Significant stenosis (> 50%) of the infarct related artery was detected in 69 patients. Residual ischaemia was identified by DSE in 55 patients and by quantitative mibi SPECT in 49. The sensitivity of DSE and mibi SPECT for detecting significant infarct related artery stenosis was 78% and 70%, respectively, with a specificity of 83% for both tests. The combination of DSE and mibi SPECT did not change the specificity (83%) but increased the sensitivity to 94%. Mibi SPECT was more sensitive than DSE for detecting mild stenosis (73% v 9%; p = 0.008). The sensitivity of DSE for detecting moderate or severe stenosis was greater than mibi SPECT (97% v 74%; p = 0.007). Wall motion abnormalities with DSE and transient perfusion defects with mibi SPECT outside the infarction zone were sensitive (80% v 67%; NS) and highly specific (95% v 93%; NS) for multivessel disease.
CONCLUSIONS—DSE and mibi SPECT have equivalent accuracy for detecting residual infarct related artery stenosis of ⩾ 50% and multivessel disease early after acute myocardial infarction. DSE is more predictive of moderate or severe infarct related artery stenosis. Combined imaging only improves the detection of mild stenosis.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; dobutamine echocardiography; single photon emission computed tomography; SPECT; myocardial ischaemia PMID:11602542

  2. The AdaptiSPECT Imaging Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Moore, Jared W.; Van Holen, Roel; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the imaging aperture of an adaptive SPECT imaging system being developed at the Center for Gamma Ray Imaging (AdaptiSPECT). AdaptiSPECT is designed to automatically change its configuration in response to preliminary data, in order to improve image quality for a particular task. In a traditional pinhole SPECT imaging system, the characteristics (magnification, resolution, field of view) are set by the geometry of the system, and any modification can be accomplished only by manually changing the collimator and the distance of the detector to the center of the field of view. Optimization of the imaging system for a specific task on a specific individual is therefore difficult. In an adaptive SPECT imaging system, on the other hand, the configuration can be conveniently changed under computer control. A key component of an adaptive SPECT system is its aperture. In this paper, we present the design, specifications, and fabrication of the adaptive pinhole aperture that will be used for AdaptiSPECT, as well as the controls that enable autonomous adaptation. PMID:27019577

  3. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  4. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, Matthias N; Kreuger, Rob; Buckle, Tessa; Mahn, Wendy A; Bunschoten, Anton; Josephson, Lee; van Leeuwen, Fijs Wb; Beekman, Freek J

    2014-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images.

  5. Integration of AdaptiSPECT, a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Kovalsky, Stephen; Kosmider, Matthew; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical adaptive SPECT imaging system under final development at the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. The system incorporates multiple adaptive features: an adaptive aperture, 16 detectors mounted on translational stages, and the ability to switch between a non-multiplexed and a multiplexed imaging configuration. In this paper, we review the design of AdaptiSPECT and its adaptive features. We then describe the on-going integration of the imaging system. PMID:26347197

  6. SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Brian F.

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is widely used as a means of imaging the distribution of administered radiotracers that have single-photon emission. The most widely used SPECT systems are based on the Anger gamma camera, usually involving dual detectors that rotate around the patient. Several factors affect the quality of SPECT images (e.g., resolution and noise) and the ability to perform absolute quantification (e.g., attenuation, scatter, motion, and resolution). There is a trend to introduce dual-modality systems and organ-specific systems, both developments that enhance diagnostic capability.

  7. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Rouchota, Maritina; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.

  8. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ploussi, Agapi; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast. PMID:24804144

  9. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation.

  10. Final Report: A CdZnTe detector for MRI-compatible SPECT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2012-12-27

    The key objective of this project is to develop the enabling technology for future MRI-compatible nuclear (e.g. SPECT) imaging system, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous MR and SPECT imaging studies of the same object. During the past three years, we have developed (a) a MRI-compatible ultrahigh resolution gamma ray detector and associated readout electronics, (b) a theoretical approach for modeling the effect of strong magnetic field on SPECT image quality, and (c) a maximum-likelihood (ML) based reconstruction routine with correction for the MR-induced distortion. With this support, we have also constructed a four-head MR-compatible SPECT system and tested the system inside a 3-T clinical MR-scanner located on UI campus. The experimental results obtained with this system have clearly demonstrated that sub-500um spatial resolution can be achieved with a SPECT system operated inside a 3-T MRI scanner. During the past three years, we have accomplished most of the major objectives outlined in the original proposal. These research efforts have laid out a solid foundation the development of future MR-compatible SPECT systems for both pre-clinical and clinical imaging applications.

  11. [Current developments in SPECT/CT systems using 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    2007-01-01

    The 3 foundations of nuclear medicine are radiation conscious personnel, specific radiopharmaceuticals and equipment. The trend in molecular radiopharmacy is to develop new radiopharmaceuticals targeting peptides and receptors. 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals give important clinical and molecular information especially in endocrinology, oncology and cardiology. The basic equipment has relied on crystal scintillation detector gamma cameras and the obtained images represent organ function provided by the specific radiopharmaceutical. Gamma cameras for single emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be added to an X-ray computed tomography (CT) equipment to form a hybrid (SPECT/ CT). The system is coupled to computer algorithms and special software to acquire and process the separate studies and fuse the two images to give a 3-D image of organ function plus anatomy. The new semiconductor or solid state detectors are a big improvement in commercial hybrid scintillation cameras and micro-SPECT/CT. Fused images obtained with SPECT/CT have been very useful in almost all medical areas and play an important role in preclinical research. The aim of this work is to present the current status and future trends of SPECT/CT systems in the clinical practice of nuclear medicine using technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals. The development of molecular, functional and genetic imaging tools aided by new technology and SPECT/CT image fusion will enhance accurate diagnoses, and understanding of molecular mechanisms of disease and their respective response to radiopharmaceutical therapy.

  12. Development of an MR-compatible SPECT system (MRSPECT) for simultaneous data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Mark J; Ha, Seunghoon; Roeck, Werner W; Muftuler, L Tugan; Wagenaar, Douglas J; Meier, Dirk; Patt, Bradley E; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2010-03-21

    In medical imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide specific functional information while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high spatial resolution anatomical information as well as complementary functional information. In this study, we developed a miniaturized dual-modality SPECT/MRI (MRSPECT) system and demonstrated the feasibility of simultaneous SPECT and MRI data acquisition, with the possibility of whole-body MRSPECT systems through suitable scaling of components. For our MRSPECT system, a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) nuclear radiation detector was interfaced with a specialized radiofrequency (RF) coil and placed within a whole-body 4 T MRI system. Various phantom experiments characterized the interaction between the SPECT and MRI hardware components. The metallic components of the SPECT hardware altered the B(0) field and generated a non-uniform reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MR images. The presence of a magnetic field generated a position shift and resolution loss in the nuclear projection data. Various techniques were proposed to compensate for these adverse effects. Overall, our results demonstrate that accurate, simultaneous SPECT and MRI data acquisition is feasible, justifying the further development of MRSPECT for either small-animal imaging or whole-body human systems by using appropriate components.

  13. SPECT attenuation correction: an essential tool to realize nuclear cardiology's manifest destiny.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2007-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging has attained widespread clinical acceptance as a standard of care for cardiac patients. Yet, physical phenomena degrade the accuracy of how our cardiac images are visually interpreted or quantitatively analyzed. This degradation results in cardiac images in which brightness or counts are not necessarily linear with tracer uptake or myocardial perfusion. Attenuation correction (AC) is a methodology that has evolved over the last 30 years to compensate for this degradation. Numerous AC clinical trials over the last 10 years have shown increased diagnostic accuracy over non-AC SPECT for detecting and localizing coronary artery disease, particularly for significantly increasing specificity and normalcy rate. This overwhelming evidence has prompted our professional societies to issue a joint position statement in 2004 recommending the use of AC to maximize SPECT diagnostic accuracy and clinical usefulness. Phantom and animal studies have convincingly shown how SPECT AC recovers the true regional myocardial activity concentration, while non-AC SPECT does not. Thus, AC is also an essential tool for extracting quantitative parameters from all types of cardiac radionuclide distributions, and plays an important role in establishing cardiac SPECT for flow, metabolic, innervation, and molecular imaging, our manifest destiny.

  14. [Brain SPECT in a case of Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hervás-Benito, I; Pérez-Velasco, R

    In this article we report a 44 year old male with chronic alcoholism as antecedent and Wernicke Korsakoff s syndrome, studied with brain CT, MR and SPECT. In this work we review the different conclusion obtained with different studies and in different stages of the chronic alcoholism disease. Although several authors have described impaired frontal blood flow in the Wernicke Korsakoff s syndrome, in our case the parietal, temporal and occipital cortex were the most affected.

  15. SU-E-J-104: Single Photon Image From PET with Insertable SPECT Collimator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J; Yoon, D; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one positron emission tomography (PET) module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the BNCT. Methods: Data from the PET module, neutron source, and collimator was entered in the Monte Carlo n-particle extended (MCNPX) source code. The coincidence events were first compiled on the PET detector, and then, the events of the prompt gamma ray were collected after neutron emission by using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) collimator on the PET. The obtaining of full width at half maximum (FWHM) values from the energy spectrum was performed to collect effective events for reconstructed image. In order to evaluate the images easily, five boron regions in a brain phantom were used. The image profiles were extracted from the region of interest (ROI) of a phantom. The image was reconstructed using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm. The image profiles and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were compiled for quantitative analysis from the two kinds of reconstructed image. Results: The prompt gamma ray energy peak of 478 keV appeared in the energy spectrum with a FWHM of 41 keV (6.4%). On the basis of the ROC curve in Region A to Region E, the differences in the area under the curve (AUC) of the PET and SPECT images were found to be 10.2%, 11.7%, 8.2% (center, Region C), 12.6%, and 10.5%, respectively. Conclusion: We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Future Planning (MSIP)(Grant No

  16. Comparison of a pixelated semiconductor detector and a non-pixelated scintillation detector in pinhole SPECT system for small animal study.

    PubMed

    Iida, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate a pixelated semiconductor detector and non-pixelated scintillation detector in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging. We assumed two pixelated CdTe semiconductor detectors (a monolithic type and a modular type) and two non-pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors (a conventional type and a large detector field type). For the monolithic semiconductor detector we assumed that the size of a pixel was 1.0 × 1.0 mm², the thickness 1 mm, and an effective detector field 128 × 128 mm². For the modular-type semiconductor detector we assumed that the size of a pixel was 2.5 × 2.5 mm², the thickness 5 mm, and an effective detector field 320 × 320 mm². For the two scintillation detectors we assumed that the size of a pixel was 1.4 × 1.4 mm² and the intrinsic spatial resolution 4.0 mm FWHM, and the thickness 9 mm. For the conventional scintillation detector we assumed that the effective detector field was 179.2 × 179.2 mm², and for the large field scintillation detector 358.2 × 358.2 mm² and the magnification factor two. In the simulation we used a pinhole collimator with a pinhole size of 0.3 mm. We reconstructed SPECT images of hot-rod and cold-channel phantoms with projection data calculated with a Monte Carlo method assuming a fixed data acquisition time, and evaluated the image quality with respect to contrast and spatial resolution. In addition, we calculated the scatter fraction to compare the amount of scattered photons between the pixelated and non-pixelated detectors. The image quality of the modular-type pixelated detector was similar to that of the non-pixelated detector operated with a twofold magnified data acquisition. The scattered photons and the parallax effect in the pixelated detector were small and similar to those in the non-pixelated detector. The performance of a modular-type pixelated semiconductor detector was almost the same as that of a non-pixelated scintillation detector with a magnified

  17. Cerebral blood flow imaging with thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    van Royen, E.A.; de Brune, J.F.H.; Hill, T.C.; Vyth, A.; Limburg, M.; Byse, B.L.; O'Leary, D.H.; de Jong, J.M.; Hijdra, A.; van der Schoot, J.B.

    1987-02-01

    Thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate ((/sup 201/TI)DDC) was studied in humans as an agent for cerebral blood flow imaging. Brain uptake proved to be complete 90 sec after injection with no appreciable washout or redistribution for hours. Intracarotid injection suggested an almost 100% extraction during the first passage. Whole-body distribution studies demonstrated a brain uptake of 4.3% of the dose compared with 0.9% for (/sup 201/TI)chloride. No differences were found in the distribution of (/sup 201/TI)DDC versus (/sup 201/TI)chloride in other organs. After the injection of 3 mCi /sup 201/TI, good quality single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain were obtained with both a rotating gamma camera and a multidetector system. In ischemic brain disease, perfusion defects were easily demonstrated. We conclude that (/sup 201/TI)DDC is a suitable radiopharmaceutical for SPECT studies of cerebral blood flow.

  18. Reduced 123I Ioflupane Binding in Bilateral Diabetic Chorea: Findings With 18F FDG PET, 99mTc ECD SPECT, and 123I MIBG Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kenichiro; Hida, Ayumi; Kameyama, Masashi; Morooka, Miyako; Takeuchi, Sousuke

    2016-06-01

    We report a 64-year-old man with diabetic chorea whom we investigated with dopamine transporter SPECT, F FDG PET, Tc ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT, and I metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Dopamine transporter SPECT revealed reduced I ioflupane binding in the bilateral striatum. F FDG PET showed metabolic dysfunction in the bilateral striatum, as shown in earlier studies. Tc ECD SPECT revealed reduced brain perfusion in the bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen. I MIBG scintigraphy revealed no cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction. Our case suggests a possible nigrostriatal presynaptic dopaminergic involvement in diabetic chorea.

  19. Thallium-201 SPECT imaging of brain tumors: Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Black, K.L.; Marciano, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Guze, B.H.; Grafton, S.; Hawkins, R.A.; Becker, D.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) planar scans of brain tumors more accurately reflect viable tumor burden than CT, MRI, or radionuclide studies with other single-photon emitting compounds. We have previously reported the utility of {sup 201}Tl SPECT index in distinguishing low- from high-grade gliomas elsewhere. Here we describe the technical considerations of deriving a simple {sup 201}Tl index, based on uptake in the tumor normalized to homologous contralateral tissue, from SPECT images of brain tumors. We evaluated the importance of consistently correcting for tissue attenuation, as it may achieve better lesion discrimination on qualitative inspection, and the methodologic limitations imposed by partial volume effects at the limits of resolution.

  20. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  1. Noninvasive stress testing of myocardial perfusion defects: head-to-head comparison of thallium-201 SPECT to MRI perfusion.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Gabriella; Nkoulou, René; Steiner, Charles; Imperiano, Hestia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Mach, François; Ratib, Osman; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Schindler, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion in the assessment of flow-limiting epicardial stenosis in a head-to-head comparison with abnormal thallium-201 ((201)TI) single photon emission tomography (SPECT) studies in patients with predominantly known coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients (mean age 65 +/- 10 years) with reversible myocardial perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT images during dipyridamole-stimulated hyperemia were recruited for study purpose. Within 5 days of the (201)TI-SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was studied again with MRI during dipyridamole stimulation and at rest. Overall, (201)TI-SPECT identified 30 reversible regional perfusion defects. The sensitivity to detect hypoperfused segments was 70% (21/30) with the GRE-MRI perfusion analysis with (201)TI-SPECT as reference. When patients were subgrouped according to the extent of regional reversible perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT, mild- (SDS: 2-4), moderate- (SDS: 5-8), and severe- (SDS > 8) perfusion defects were also identified by GRE-MRI perfusion analysis in 75% (6/8), in 56% (9/16) and 100% (6/6), respectively. GRE-MRI first-pass stress perfusion imaging may not identify up to 30% of mild-to-moderate perfusion defects in a group of preselected patients with predominantly known CAD and abnormal (201)TI-SPECT studies.

  2. The role of cognitive group therapy and happiness training on cerebral blood flow using 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT: a quasi-experimental study of depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M; Bahrieniain, S A; Baghdasarians, A; Emamipur, S; Azizmohammadi, Z; Qutbi, S M; Javadi, H; Assadi, M; Asli, I N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of cognitive group therapy and happiness training objectively in the local cerebral blood flow of patients with major depression (MD). The present research is semi-experimental to pre- and post-test with a control group. Three groups were formed, and this number was incorporated in each group: 12 patients were chosen randomly; the first group of depressed patients benefited from the combination of pharmacotherapy and sessions of cognitive group therapy; the second group used a combination of pharmacotherapy and sessions of happiness training; and a third group used only pharmacotherapy. We compared cognitive-behavioural therapy and happiness training efficacy with only pharmacotherapy in MD patients. We performed brain perfusion SPECT in each group, before and after each trial. The study was conducted on 36 patients with MD (32 women and 4 men; mean age: 41.22 ± 9.08; range: 27-65 years). There were significant differences regarding the two trial effects into two experimental groups (p < 0/001) before and after trials, while such differences were not significant in the control group (p > 0.05). In addition, there was significant difference among the regional cerebral blood flow in the frontal and prefrontal regions into two experimental groups before and after trials (p < 0/001), while such differences were not significant in the control group (p > 0.05). This study demonstrated decreased cerebral perfusion in the frontal regions in MD patients, which increased following cognitive group therapy and happiness training. Because of its availability, low costs, easy performance, and the objective semi-quantitative information supplied, brain perfusion SPECT scanning might be useful to assess the diagnosis and therapy efficacy. Further exploration is needed to validate its clinical role.

  3. A unique matched quadruplet of terbium radioisotopes for PET and SPECT and for α- and β- radionuclide therapy: an in vivo proof-of-concept study with a new receptor-targeted folate derivative.

    PubMed

    Müller, Cristina; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Dorrer, Holger; Hohn, Alexander; van der Walt, Nico T; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2012-12-01

    Terbium offers 4 clinically interesting radioisotopes with complementary physical decay characteristics: (149)Tb, (152)Tb, (155)Tb, and (161)Tb. The identical chemical characteristics of these radioisotopes allow the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals with identical pharmacokinetics useful for PET ((152)Tb) and SPECT diagnosis ((155)Tb) and for α- ((149)Tb) and β(-)-particle ((161)Tb) therapy. The goal of this proof-of-concept study was to produce all 4 terbium radioisotopes and assess their diagnostic and therapeutic features in vivo when labeled with a folate-based targeting agent. (161)Tb was produced by irradiation of (160)Gd targets with neutrons at Paul Scherrer Institute or Institut Laue-Langevin. After neutron capture, the short-lived (161)Gd decays to (161)Tb. (149)Tb, (152)Tb, and (155)Tb were produced by proton-induced spallation of tantalum targets, followed by an online isotope separation process at ISOLDE/CERN. The isotopes were purified by means of cation exchange chromatography. For the in vivo studies, we used the DOTA-folate conjugate cm09, which binds to folate receptor (FR)-positive KB tumor cells. Therapy experiments with (149)Tb-cm09 and (161)Tb-cm09 were performed in KB tumor-bearing nude mice. Diagnostic PET/CT ((152)Tb-cm09) and SPECT/CT ((155)Tb-cm09 and (161)Tb-cm09) studies were performed in the same tumor mouse model. Carrier-free terbium radioisotopes were obtained after purification, with activities ranging from approximately 6 MBq (for (149)Tb) to approximately 15 MBq (for (161)Tb). The radiolabeling of cm09 was achieved in a greater than 96% radiochemical yield for all terbium radioisotopes. Biodistribution studies showed high and specific uptake in FR-positive tumor xenografts (23.8% ± 2.5% at 4 h after injection, 22.0% ± 4.4% at 24 h after injection, and 18.4% ± 1.8% at 48 h after injection). Excellent tumor-to-background ratios at 24 h after injection (tumor to blood, ≈ 15; tumor to liver, ≈ 5.9; and tumor to kidney,

  4. Probing the association between dexamethasone-induced cortisol suppression and serotonin transporter availability among drug-free patients with major depressive disorder--a small-sample SPECT study with [¹²³I]ADAM.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsin Chun; Lin, Shih-Hsien; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Chen, Kao Chin; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yao, Wei Jen; Chiu, Nan-Tsing; Lu, Ru-Band; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2013-11-01

    The association between hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and the serotonergic system could be involved in the mechanism of depression. However, neuroimaging evidence is scarce. The aim of the present study was to probe the association between dexamethasone suppression test response and serotonin transporter (SERT) availability in drug-free patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Seventeen MDD patients (five males and twelve females) were recruited. SPECT with [(123)I] ADAM was used to measure the midbrain SERT availability, and HPA axis function was measured by the dexamethasone suppression test (DST). The association was significant when considering all participants (ρ=0.69, p=0.002). This association may have clinical implications for the treatment of MDD.

  5. Awake animal SPECT: Overview and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A G; Majewski, S; McKisson, J; Popov, V; Proffitt, J; Stolin, A; Baba, J S; Goddard, J S; Lee, S J; Smith, M F; Tsui, B; Pomper, M

    2009-02-01

    A SPECT / X-ray CT system configured at Johns Hopkins University to image the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals in unrestrained, un-anesthetized mice has been constructed and tested on awake mice. The system was built by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. SPECT imaging is accomplished using two gamma cameras, 10 cm × 20 cm in size based on a 2 × 4 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. A real-time optical tracking system utilizing three infrared cameras provides time stamped pose data of an awake mouse head during a SPECT scan. The six degrees of freedom (three translational and three rotational) pose data are used for motion correction during 3-D tomographic list-mode iterative image reconstruction. SPECT reconstruction of awake, unrestrained mice with motion compensation for head movement has been accomplished.

  6. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  7. Clinical Utility of SPECT Neuroimaging in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Raji, Cyrus A.; Tarzwell, Robert; Pavel, Dan; Schneider, Howard; Uszler, Michael; Thornton, John; van Lierop, Muriel; Cohen, Phil; Amen, Daniel G.; Henderson, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This systematic review evaluated the clinical utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods After defining a PICO Statement (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome Statement), PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) criteria were applied to identify 1600 articles. After screening, 374 articles were eligible for review. Inclusion for review was focus on SPECT in the setting of mild, moderate, or severe TBI with cerebral lobar specificity of SPECT findings. Other inclusion criteria were comparison modalities in the same subjects and articles in English. Foreign language articles, SPECT studies that did not include comparison modalities, and case reports were not included for review. Results We identified 19 longitudinal and 52 cross-sectional studies meeting inclusion criteria. Three longitudinal studies examined diagnostic predictive value. The first showed positive predictive value increases from initial SPECT scan shortly after trauma to one year follow up scans, from 59% to 95%. Subsequent work replicated these results in a larger cohort. Longitudinal and cross sectional studies demonstrated SPECT lesion localization not detected by CT or MRI. The most commonly abnormal regions revealed by SPECT in cross-sectional studies were frontal (94%) and temporal (77%) lobes. SPECT was found to outperform both CT and MRI in both acute and chronic imaging of TBI, particularly mild TBI. It was also found to have a near 100% negative predictive value. Conclusions This review demonstrates Level IIA evidence (at least one non-randomized controlled trial) for the value of SPECT in TBI. Given its advantages over CT and MRI in the detection of mild TBI in numerous studies of adequate quality, and given its excellent negative predictive value, it may be an important second test in settings where CT or MRI are negative after a closed head injury with post

  8. Molecular Imaging of Hydrolytic Enzymes Using PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Brian P.; Price, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a large class of biological catalysts that play a vital role in a plethora of critical biochemical processes required to maintain human health. However, the expression and/or activity of these important enzymes can change in many different diseases and therefore represent exciting targets for the development of positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers. This review focuses on recently reported radiolabeled substrates, reversible inhibitors, and irreversible inhibitors investigated as PET and SPECT tracers for imaging hydrolytic enzymes. By learning from the most successful examples of tracer development for hydrolytic enzymes, it appears that an early focus on careful enzyme kinetics and cell-based studies are key factors for identifying potentially useful new molecular imaging agents. PMID:28927325

  9. A novel SPECT camera for molecular imaging of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Alan; Gilland, David; Su, Li-Ming; Wagenaar, Douglas; Bahadori, Amir

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an improved SPECT camera for dedicated prostate imaging. Complementing the recent advancements in agents for molecular prostate imaging, this device has the potential to assist in distinguishing benign from aggressive cancers, to improve site-specific localization of cancer, to improve accuracy of needle-guided prostate biopsy of cancer sites, and to aid in focal therapy procedures such as cryotherapy and radiation. Theoretical calculations show that the spatial resolution/detection sensitivity of the proposed SPECT camera can rival or exceed 3D PET and further signal-to-noise advantage is attained with the better energy resolution of the CZT modules. Based on photon transport simulation studies, the system has a reconstructed spatial resolution of 4.8 mm with a sensitivity of 0.0001. Reconstruction of a simulated prostate distribution demonstrates the focal imaging capability of the system.

  10. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  11. Evaluation of attenuation corrections using Monte Carlo simulated lung SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Agnetha; Bake, Björn; Jacobsson, Lars; Johansson, Åke; Ljungberg, Michael; Moonen, Michaela

    1998-08-01

    SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images are distorted by photon attenuation. The effect is complex in the thoracic region due to different tissue densities. This study compares the effect on the image homogeneity of two different methods of attenuation correction in lung SPECT; one pre-processing and one post-processing method. This study also investigates the impact of attenuation correction parameters such as lung contour, body contour, density of the lung tissue and effective attenuation coefficient. The Monte Carlo technique was used to simulate SPECT studies of a digital thorax phantom containing a homogeneous activity distribution in the lung. Homogeneity in reconstructed images was calculated as the coefficient of variation (CV). The isolated effect of the attenuation correction was assessed by normalizing pixel values from the attenuation corrected lung by pixel values from the lung with no attenuation effects. Results show that the CV decreased from 12.8% with no attenuation correction to 4.4% using the post-processing method and true densities in the thoracic region. The impact of variations in the definition of the body contour was found to be marginal while the corresponding effect of variations in the lung contour was substantial.

  12. Clinical utility of MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of cognitive impairment referred to memory clinic.

    PubMed

    Guinane, John; Ng, Boon Lung

    2017-09-07

    Despite of their limited availability and potential for significant variation between and within each modality, this is the first study to prospectively measure the clinical utility of MRI and/or SPECT brain scanning in addition to the routine diagnostic workup of patients presenting to memory clinic. A single center study was conducted over a convenience of 12-month sampling period. For each patient referred for MRI and/or SPECT scanning, the primary geriatrician or psychogeriatrician was asked to assign an initial diagnosis. The initial diagnosis was then compared with the final consensus diagnosis after any scans or neuropsychology testing had been completed. During the 12-month study period, 66 patients (26%) were referred for scans out of a total of 253 patients included in the study. There were 16/44 (36%) positive MRI outcomes and 13/35 (37%) positive SPECT outcomes. The diagnosis changed consistent with the MRI scan findings in 11/44 (25%) and changed consistent with the SPECT scan findings in 9/35 (26%). Potentially reversible pathology was identified in a single patient, 1/50 (2%), via an MRI scan that suggested normal pressure hydrocephalus. The number needed to test for one positive outcome was 3.8 (95% CI 2.0-23.3), 6.0 (95% CI NA), and 1.7 (95% CI 1.3-2.5) for MRI only, SPECT only, and MRI and SPECT together, respectively. The clinical utility of MRI and/or SPECT scanning in this study may be broadly superior to the available international evidence, and further research is needed to identify predictors of positive scan outcomes.

  13. Dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom for functional SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Celler, A.; Lyster, D.; Farncombe, T.

    1996-12-31

    We have designed and built a dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom to be used as a primary tool during the experimental verification of the performance of the quantitative dynamic functional imaging method we are developing for standard rotating single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras. The phantom consists of two independent parts (i) a dynamic heart model with the possibility of mounting {open_quotes}defects{close_quotes} inside it and (ii) a non-uniform thorax model with lungs and spinal cord, and uses the fact that the washout of a tracer by dilution is governed by a linear first order equation, the same type of equation as is used to model time-activity distribution in myocardial viability studies. Tests of the dynamic performance of the phantom in planar scanning mode have confirmed the validity of these assumptions. Also the preliminary results obtained in SPECT mode show that the values of characteristic times could be experimentally determined and that these values agreed well with the values preset on the phantom. We consider that the phantom is ready for extensive use in studies into development of the dynamic SPECT method.

  14. Invisible Base Electrode Coordinates Approximation for Simultaneous SPECT and EEG Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, L.; Goszczynska, H.; Zalewska, E.; Bajera, A.; Krolicki, L.

    2014-04-01

    This work was performed as part of a larger research concerning the feasibility of improving the localization of epileptic foci, as compared to the standard SPECT examination, by applying the technique of EEG mapping. The presented study extends our previous work on the development of a method for superposition of SPECT images and EEG 3D maps when these two examinations are performed simultaneously. Due to the lack of anatomical data in SPECT images it is a much more difficult task than in the case of MRI/EEG study where electrodes are visible in morphological images. Using the appropriate dose of radioisotope we mark five base electrodes to make them visible in the SPECT image and then approximate the coordinates of the remaining electrodes using properties of the 10-20 electrode placement system and the proposed nine-ellipses model. This allows computing a sequence of 3D EEG maps spanning on all electrodes. It happens, however, that not all five base electrodes can be reliably identified in SPECT data. The aim of the current study was to develop a method for determining the coordinates of base electrode(s) missing in the SPECT image. The algorithm for coordinates approximation has been developed and was tested on data collected for three subjects with all visible electrodes. To increase the accuracy of the approximation we used head surface models. Freely available model from Oostenveld research based on data from SPM package and our own model based on data from our EEG/SPECT studies were used. For data collected in four cases with one electrode not visible we compared the invisible base electrode coordinates approximation for Oostenveld and our models. The results vary depending on the missing electrode placement, but application of the realistic head model significantly increases the accuracy of the approximation.

  15. A 3-dimensional mathematic cylinder phantom for the evaluation of the fundamental performance of SPECT.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideo; Motomura, Nobutoku; Takahashi, Masaaki; Yanagisawa, Masamichi; Ogawa, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    Degradation of SPECT images results from various physical factors. The primary aim of this study was the development of a digital phantom for use in the characterization of factors that contribute to image degradation in clinical SPECT studies. A 3-dimensional mathematic cylinder (3D-MAC) phantom was devised and developed. The phantom (200 mm in diameter and 200 mm long) comprised 3 imbedded stacks of five 30-mm-long cylinders (diameters, 4, 10, 20, 40, and 60 mm). In simulations, the 3 stacks and the background were assigned radioisotope concentrations and attenuation coefficients. SPECT projection datasets that included Compton scattering effects, photoelectric effects, and gamma-camera models were generated using the electron gamma-shower Monte Carlo simulation program. Collimator parameters, detector resolution, total photons acquired, number of projections acquired, and radius of rotation were varied in simulations. The projection data were formatted in Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and imported to and reconstructed using commercial reconstruction software on clinical SPECT workstations. Using the 3D-MAC phantom, we validated that contrast depended on size of region of interest (ROI) and was overestimated when the ROI was small. The low-energy general-purpose collimator caused a greater partial-volume effect than did the low-energy high-resolution collimator, and contrast in the cold region was higher using the filtered backprojection algorithm than using the ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm in the SPECT images. We used imported DICOM projection data and reconstructed these data using vendor software; in addition, we validated reconstructed images. The devised and developed 3D-MAC SPECT phantom is useful for the characterization of various physical factors, contrasts, partial-volume effects, reconstruction algorithms, and such, that contribute to image degradation in clinical SPECT studies.

  16. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.

    PubMed

    Acampa, Wanda; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Nicolai, Emanuele; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Petretta, Mario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2010-02-01

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest (99m)Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.

  17. Accurate Coregistration between Ultra-High-Resolution Micro-SPECT and Circular Cone-Beam Micro-CT Scanners.

    PubMed

    Ji, Changguo; van der Have, Frans; Gratama van Andel, Hugo; Ramakers, Ruud; Beekman, Freek

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Spatially registering SPECT with CT makes it possible to anatomically localize SPECT tracers. In this study, an accurate method for the coregistration of ultra-high-resolution SPECT volumes and multiple cone-beam CT volumes is developed and validated, which does not require markers during animal scanning. Methods. Transferable animal beds were developed with an accurate mounting interface. Simple calibration phantoms make it possible to obtain both the spatial transformation matrix for stitching multiple CT scans of different parts of the animal and to register SPECT and CT. The spatial transformation for image coregistration is calculated once using Horn's matching algorithm. Animal images can then be coregistered without using markers. Results. For mouse-sized objects, average coregistration errors between SPECT and CT in X, Y, and Z directions are within 0.04 mm, 0.10 mm, and 0.19 mm, respectively. For rat-sized objects, these numbers are 0.22 mm, 0.14 mm, and 0.28 mm. Average 3D coregistration errors were within 0.24 mm and 0.42 mm for mouse and rat imaging, respectively. Conclusion. Extending the field-of-view of cone-beam CT by stitching is improved by prior registration of the CT volumes. The accuracy of registration between SPECT and CT is typically better than the image resolution of current ultra-high-resolution SPECT.

  18. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: application in cardiovascular research

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Wu, Chao; Tio, René A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Petrov, Artiom D.; Beekman, Freek J.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical cardiovascular research using noninvasive radionuclide and hybrid imaging systems has been extensively developed in recent years. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is based on the molecular tracer principle and is an established tool in noninvasive imaging. SPECT uses gamma cameras and collimators to form projection data that are used to estimate (dynamic) 3-D tracer distributions in vivo. Recent developments in multipinhole collimation and advanced image reconstruction have led to sub-millimetre and sub-half-millimetre resolution SPECT in rats and mice, respectively. In this article we review applications of microSPECT in cardiovascular research in which information about the function and pathology of the myocardium, vessels and neurons is obtained. We give examples on how diagnostic tracers, new therapeutic interventions, pre- and postcardiovascular event prognosis, and functional and pathophysiological heart conditions can be explored by microSPECT, using small-animal models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20069298

  19. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J. . Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Anatomy guided automated SPECT renal seed point estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Shekhar; Kumar, Sailendra

    2010-04-01

    Quantification of SPECT(Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) images can be more accurate if correct segmentation of region of interest (ROI) is achieved. Segmenting ROI from SPECT images is challenging due to poor image resolution. SPECT is utilized to study the kidney function, though the challenge involved is to accurately locate the kidneys and bladder for analysis. This paper presents an automated method for generating seed point location of both kidneys using anatomical location of kidneys and bladder. The motivation for this work is based on the premise that the anatomical location of the bladder relative to the kidneys will not differ much. A model is generated based on manual segmentation of the bladder and both the kidneys on 10 patient datasets (including sum and max images). Centroid is estimated for manually segmented bladder and kidneys. Relatively easier bladder segmentation is followed by feeding bladder centroid coordinates into the model to generate seed point for kidneys. Percentage error observed in centroid coordinates of organs from ground truth to estimated values from our approach are acceptable. Percentage error of approximately 1%, 6% and 2% is observed in X coordinates and approximately 2%, 5% and 8% is observed in Y coordinates of bladder, left kidney and right kidney respectively. Using a regression model and the location of the bladder, the ROI generation for kidneys is facilitated. The model based seed point estimation will enhance the robustness of kidney ROI estimation for noisy cases.

  1. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  2. Single photon emission photography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI) visualization for frontal-lobe-damaged regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokking, Rik; Zuiderveld, Karel J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Viergever, Max A.

    1994-09-01

    We present multi-modality visualization strategies to convey information contained in registered Single Photon Emission Photography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the brain. Multi-modality visualization provides a means to retrieve valuable information from the data which might otherwise remain obscured. Here we use MRI as an anatomical framework for functional information acquired with SPECT. This is part of clinical research studying the change of functionality caused by a frontal lobe damaged region. A number of known and newly developed techniques for the integrated visualization of SPECT and MR images will be discussed.

  3. Comparison of 8-frame and 16-frame thallium-201 gated myocardial perfusion SPECT for determining left ventricular systolic and diastolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Sumimoto, Yoji; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ishibashi, Ken; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-07-01

    The myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography synchronized with the electrocardiogram (gated SPECT) has been widely used for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions using Quantitative gated SPECT. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 8-frame and 16-frame thallium-201 (Tl-201) gated SPECT for determining LV systolic and diastolic parameters. The study population included 42 patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent gated SPECT by clinical indication. LV systolic and diastolic parameters were assessed on 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPECT. There were good correlations in end-diastolic volume (r = 0.99, p < 0.001), end-systolic volume (ESV) (r = 0.97, p < 0.001) and ejection fraction (EF) (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) between 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPECT. Bland-Altman plot showed a significant negative slope of -0.08 in EDV indicating a larger difference for larger EDV. Eight-frame gated SPECT overestimated ESV by 2.3 ml, and underestimated EF by -4.2% than 16-frame gated SPECT. There were good correlations in peak filling rate (PFR) (r = 0.87, p < 0.001), one third mean filling rate (r = 0.87, p < 0.001) and time to PFR (r = 0.61, p < 0.001) between 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPECT. Eight-frame gated SPECT underestimated PFR by -0.22 than 16-frame gated SPECT. Eight-frame gated SPECT estimated as much MFR/3 and TPFR as 16-frame gated SPECT. According to the data, the study suggested that 8-frame Tl-201 gated SPECT could underestimate systolic and/or diastolic parameter when compared with 16-frame gated SPECT.

  4. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P < 0.05). (99m)Tc- RBC SPECT/CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  5. Effects of voxel size and iterative reconstruction parameters on the spatial resolution of 99mTc SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Kappadath, S Cheenu

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of voxel size and iterative reconstruction parameters on the radial and tangential resolution for 99mTc SPECT as a function of radial distance from isocenter. SPECT/CT scans of eight coplanar point sources of size smaller than 1 mm3 containing high concentration 99mTc solution were acquired on a SPECT/CT system with 5/8 inch NaI(Tl) detector and low-energy, high-resolution collimator. The tomographic projection images were acquired in step-and-shoot mode for 360 views over 360° with 250,000 counts per view, a zoom of 2.67, and an image matrix of 256 × 256 pixels that resulted in a 0.9 × 0.9 × 0.9 mm3 SPECT voxel size over 230 mm field-of-view. The projection images were also rebinned to image matrices of 128 × 128 and 64 × 64 to yield SPECT voxel sizes of 1.8 × 1.8 × 1.8 and 3.6 × 3.6 × 3.6 mm3, respectively. The SPECT/CT datasets were reconstructed using the vendor-supplied iterative reconstruction software that incorporated collimator-specific resolution recovery, CT-based attenuation correction, and dual-energy window-based scatter correction using different combinations of iterations and subsets. SPECT spatial resolution was estimated as the full width at half maximum of the radial and tangential profiles through the center of each point source in reconstructed SPECT images. Both radial and tangential resolution improved with higher iterations and subsets, and with smaller voxel sizes. Both radial and tangential resolution also improved with radial distance further away from isocenter. The magnitude of variation decreased for smaller voxel sizes and for higher number of iterations and subsets. Tangential resolution was found not to be equal to the radial resolution, and the nature of the anisotropy depended on the distribution of the radionuclide and on the reconstruction parameters used. The tangential resolution converged faster than the radial resolution, with higher iterations and subsets

  6. Direction-dependent localization errors in SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Justin; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is being investigated for imaging inside radiation therapy treatment rooms to localize biological targets. Here, computer simulations were used to analyze locational and directional dependencies in localization errors and to assess the effects of spatial resolution modeling and observer normalization on localization performance. Methods: SPECT images of the XCAT phantom, containing 12 hot tumors, were reconstructed with detector response function compensation (DRC) and without DRC (nDRC). Numerical observers were forced to select the most suspicious tumor location, using normalized cross correlation (NXC) or un-normalized cross correlation (XC), from 3 cm diameter search volumes that each contained only one tumor. For each tumor site, localization was optimized as a function of the iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing. Localization error, the distance between true and estimated tumor positions, was calculated across the ensembles of 80 images. Direction-dependent localization bias and precision were estimated from the image ensemble. Results: For the six superficial tumors in close proximity to the detector trajectory, mean localization errors were <2 mm and were lowest or comparable using DRC-NXC, though differences from DRC-XC and nDRC-NXC were not statistically significant. DRC-NXC did provide statistically significantly better localization than nDRC-XC for five of these six tumors. At the other six sites where attenuation was more severe and the distance was generally greater between the tumor and detector, DRC typically did not show better localization than nDRC. Observer normalization improved the localization substantially for a tumor near the hotter heart. Localization errors were anisotropic and dependent on tumor location relative to the detector trajectory. Conclusions: This computer-simulation study compared localization performance for normalized and un-normalized numerical

  7. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  8. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L J; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Lam, Marnix G E H; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Viergever, Max A; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2013-11-01

    Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ((166)Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative (166)Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum. A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of (166)Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full (166)Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A(est)) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six (166)Ho RE patients. At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥ 17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96-106.21 ml were improved from 32%-63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%-80% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 76%-103% (SPECT-fMC). Furthermore

  9. Simulated Design Strategies for SPECT Collimators to Reduce the Eddy Currents Induced by MRI Gradient Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoudi, Amine M.; Van Audenhaege, Karen; Vermeeren, Günter; Verhoyen, Gregory; Martens, Luc; Van Holen, Roel; Joseph, Wout

    2015-10-01

    Combining single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the insertion of highly conductive SPECT collimators inside the MRI scanner, resulting in an induced eddy current disturbing the combined system. We reduced the eddy currents due to the insert of a novel tungsten collimator inside transverse and longitudinal gradient coils. The collimator was produced with metal additive manufacturing, that is part of a microSPECT insert for a preclinical SPECT/MRI scanner. We characterized the induced magnetic field due to the gradient field and adapted the collimators to reduce the induced eddy currents. We modeled the x-, y-, and z-gradient coil and the different collimator designs and simulated them with FEKO, a three-dimensional method of moments / finite element methods (MoM/FEM) full-wave simulation tool. We used a time analysis approach to generate the pulsed magnetic field gradient. Simulation results show that the maximum induced field can be reduced by 50.82% in the final design bringing the maximum induced magnetic field to less than 2% of the applied gradient for all the gradient coils. The numerical model was validated with measurements and was proposed as a tool for studying the effect of a SPECT collimator within the MRI gradient coils.

  10. Registration and display of brain SPECT and MRI using external markers.

    PubMed

    Pohjonen, H; Nikkinen, P; Sipilä, O; Launes, J; Salli, E; Salonen, O; Karp, P; Ylä-Jääski, J; Katila, T; Liewendahl, K

    1996-02-01

    Accurate anatomical localisation of abnormalities observed in brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is difficult, but can be improved by correlating data from SPECT and other tomographic imaging modalities. For this purpose we have developed software to register, analyse and display 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime SPECT and 1.0 T MRI of the brain. For registration of SPECT and MRI data external skin markers containing 99mTc (220 kBq) in 50 microliters of coconut butter were used. The software is coded in the C programming language, and the X Window system and the OSF/Motif standards are used for graphics and definition of the user interface. The registration algorithm follows a noniterative least-squares method using singular value decomposition of a 3 x 3 covariance matrix. After registration, the image slices of both data sets are shown at identical tomographic levels. The registration error in phantom studies was on average 4 mm. In the two-dimensional display mode the orthogonal cross-sections of the data sets are displayed side by side. In the three-dimensional mode MRI data are displayed as a surface-shaded 3 D reconstruction and SPECT data as cut planes. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated in patients with cerebral infarcts, brain tumour, herpes simplex encephalitis and epilepsy.

  11. SPECT quantitation of iodine-131 concentration in phantoms and human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, O.; Iosilevsky, G.; Front, D.; Bettman, L.; Frenkel, A.; Ish-Shalom, S.; Steiner, M.; Ben-Harush, M.; Kolodny, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The validity of SPECT measurement of iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) concentration was tested in vitro in phantoms and in vivo by measuring bladder urine concentrations. Phantom studies comparing known and SPECT measured concentrations showed a good correlation for {sup 131}I (r = 0.98, s.e.e. = 20.94 counts/voxel) for phantoms of 25 to 127 cc and concentrations of 0.13 to 9.5 microCi/cc. The in vivo, in vitro correlation of {sup 131}I concentrations in the urine was also good (r = 0.98, s.e.e. = 0.677 microCi/cc). Quantitative SPECT was used to calculate the effective half-life and dosimetry of radioiodine in 12 sites of thyroid carcinoma in seven patients. SPECT was also used to determine the dosimetry of ({sup 131}I)MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) in two patients with carcinoid, two with neuroblastoma, and one with pheochromocytoma. The radiation dose for thyroid carcinoma metastases varied between 6.3 and 276.9 rad/mCi. The dose from MIBG varied between 13.4 and 57.8 rad/mCi. These results indicate the validity of quantitative SPECT for in vivo measurement of {sup 131}I and the need to measure the concentration of {sup 131}I in individual human tumor sites.

  12. Myocardial perfusion imaging parameters: IQ-SPECT and conventional SPET system comparison.

    PubMed

    Havel, Martin; Kolacek, Michal; Kaminek, Milan; Dedek, Vladimir; Kraft, Otakar; Sirucek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancement in hardware and software development in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) leads to the shortening of acquisition time and reduction of the radiation burden to patients. We compared semiquantitative perfusion results and functional parameters of the left ventricle between new dedicated cardiac system with astigmatic collimators called IQ-SPECT (Siemens Medical Solutions, USA) and conventional single photon emission tomography (SPET) system equipped with standard low energy high resolution collimators. A group of randomly selected 81 patients underwent consecutively the MPI procedure on IQ-SPECT and on conventional SPET systen, both without attenuation correction. The summed scores and the values of the functional parameters of the left ventricle: ejection fraction (EF), end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes (ESV, EDV) received from the automatic analysis software were compared and statistically analyzed. Our results showed that summed scores values were significantly higher for the IQ-SPECT system in comparison to the conventional one. Calculated EF were significantly lower for IQ-SPECT, whereas evaluated left ventricular volumes (LVV) were significantly higher for this system. In conclusion, we recorded significant differences in automatically calculated semiquantitative perfusion and functional parameters when compared uncorrected studies obtained by the IQ-SPECT with the conventional SPET system.

  13. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  14. Thallium-201 myocardial SPECT in a patient with mirror-image dextrocardia and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Bülent; Kitapci, Mehmet T; Temiz, N Hakan; Unlü, Mustafa; Erselcan, Taner

    2003-09-01

    A 53-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of situs inversus with mirror-image dextrocardia underwent thallium-201 (Tl-201) stress-redistribution myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Electrocardiogram (ECG) obtained on right hemithorax revealed constant complete left bundle branch block. Tl-201 stress-redistribution SPECT images revealed abnormal perfusion with reversible ischemia in the anteroseptal, septal and inferoseptal walls. Coronary angiography performed 1 month after SPECT study was normal. This case illustrates that false positive reversible perfusion defects can be seen in patients with mirror-image dextrocardia associated with constant complete left bundle branch block. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mirror-image dextrocardia and constant complete left bundle branch block with false positive Tl-201 SPECT findings.

  15. Automatic estimation of detector radial position for contoured SPECT acquisition using CT images on a SPECT/CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruijie Rachel; Erwin, William D.

    2006-08-15

    An algorithm was developed to estimate noncircular orbit (NCO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detector radius on a SPECT/CT imaging system using the CT images, for incorporation into collimator resolution modeling for iterative SPECT reconstruction. Simulated male abdominal (arms up), male head and neck (arms down) and female chest (arms down) anthropomorphic phantom, and ten patient, medium-energy SPECT/CT scans were acquired on a hybrid imaging system. The algorithm simulated inward SPECT detector radial motion and object contour detection at each projection angle, employing the calculated average CT image and a fixed Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold. Calculated radii were compared to the observed true radii, and optimal CT threshold values, corresponding to patient bed and clothing surfaces, were found to be between -970 and -950 HU. The algorithm was constrained by the 45 cm CT field-of-view (FOV), which limited the detected radii to {<=}22.5 cm and led to occasional radius underestimation in the case of object truncation by CT. Two methods incorporating the algorithm were implemented: physical model (PM) and best fit (BF). The PM method computed an offset that produced maximum overlap of calculated and true radii for the phantom scans, and applied that offset as a calculated-to-true radius transformation. For the BF method, the calculated-to-true radius transformation was based upon a linear regression between calculated and true radii. For the PM method, a fixed offset of +2.75 cm provided maximum calculated-to-true radius overlap for the phantom study, which accounted for the camera system's object contour detect sensor surface-to-detector face distance. For the BF method, a linear regression of true versus calculated radius from a reference patient scan was used as a calculated-to-true radius transform. Both methods were applied to ten patient scans. For -970 and -950 HU thresholds, the combined overall average root-mean-square (rms) error

  16. Comparison of SPECT/CT and MRI in Diagnosing Symptomatic Lesions in Ankle and Foot Pain Patients: Diagnostic Performance and Relation to Lesion Type

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seunggyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Yeon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Arya, Amitabh; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of SPECT/CT and MRI in patients with ankle and foot pain, with regard to the lesion types. Materials and Methods Fifty consecutive patients with ankle and foot pain, who underwent 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Symptomatic lesions were determined based on clinical examination and response to treatment. On MRI and SPECT/CT, detected lesions were classified as bone, ligament/tendon, and joint lesions. Uptake on SPECT/CT was assessed using a 4-grade system. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of SPECT/CT and MRI were evaluated in all detected lesions and each lesion type. Diagnostic value of uptake grade was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and diagnostic performance was compared using Chi-square or McNemar tests. Results In overall lesions, the sensitivity, PPV and NPV of SPECT/CT for symptomatic lesions were 93%, 56%, 91%, and they were 98%, 48%, 95% for MRI. There was no significant difference between SPECT/CT and MRI. However, the specificity of SPECT/CT was significantly higher than that of MRI (48% versus 24%, P = 0.016). Uptake grade on SPECT/CT was significantly higher in symptomatic lesions (P < 0.001), and its area under curve on ROC analysis was 0.787. In the analysis of each lesion type, the specificity of SPECT/CT was poor in joint lesions compared with other lesion types and MRI (P < 0.001, respectively). MRI exhibited lower specificity than SPECT/CT in bone lesions (P = 0.004) and ligament/tendon lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions SPECT/CT has MRI-comparable diagnostic performance for symptomatic lesions in ankle and foot pain patients. SPECT/CT and MRI exhibit different diagnostic specificity in different lesion types. SPECT/CT may be used as a complementary imaging method to MRI for enhancing diagnostic specificity. PMID:25668182

  17. The Value of Attenuation Correction in Hybrid Cardiac SPECT/CT on Inferior Wall According to Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Tamam, Muge; Mulazimoglu, Mehmet; Edis, Nurcan; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of attenuation-corrected single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on the inferior wall compared to uncorrected (NC) SPECT MPI between obese and nonobese patients. A total of 157 consecutive patients (122 males and 35 females, with median age: 57.4 ± 11 years) who underwent AC technetium 99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (AC Tc99m-sestamibi) SPECT MPI were included to the study. A hybrid SPECT and transmission computed tomography (CT) system was used for the diagnosis with 1-day protocol, and stress imaging was performed first. During attenuation correction (AC) processing on a Xeleris Workstation using Myovation cardiac software with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), iterative reconstruction with attenuation correction (IRAC) and NC images filtered back projection (FBP) were used. For statistical purposes, P < 0.05 was considered significant. This study included 73 patients with body mass index (BMI) <30 and 84 patients with BMI ≥ 30. In patients with higher BMI, increased amount of both visual and semiquantitative attenuation of the inferior wall was detected. IRAC reconstruction corrects the diaphragm attenuation of the inferior wall better than FBP. AC with OSEM iterative reconstruction significantly improves the diagnostic value of stress-only SPECT MPI in patients with normal weight and those who are obese, but the improvements are significantly greater in obese patients. Stress-only SPECT imaging with AC provides shorter and lower radiation exposure. PMID:26912974

  18. The Value of Attenuation Correction in Hybrid Cardiac SPECT/CT on Inferior Wall According to Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Muge; Mulazimoglu, Mehmet; Edis, Nurcan; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of attenuation-corrected single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on the inferior wall compared to uncorrected (NC) SPECT MPI between obese and nonobese patients. A total of 157 consecutive patients (122 males and 35 females, with median age: 57.4 ± 11 years) who underwent AC technetium 99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (AC Tc99m-sestamibi) SPECT MPI were included to the study. A hybrid SPECT and transmission computed tomography (CT) system was used for the diagnosis with 1-day protocol, and stress imaging was performed first. During attenuation correction (AC) processing on a Xeleris Workstation using Myovation cardiac software with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), iterative reconstruction with attenuation correction (IRAC) and NC images filtered back projection (FBP) were used. For statistical purposes, P < 0.05 was considered significant. This study included 73 patients with body mass index (BMI) <30 and 84 patients with BMI ≥ 30. In patients with higher BMI, increased amount of both visual and semiquantitative attenuation of the inferior wall was detected. IRAC reconstruction corrects the diaphragm attenuation of the inferior wall better than FBP. AC with OSEM iterative reconstruction significantly improves the diagnostic value of stress-only SPECT MPI in patients with normal weight and those who are obese, but the improvements are significantly greater in obese patients. Stress-only SPECT imaging with AC provides shorter and lower radiation exposure.

  19. SuSPect: Enhanced Prediction of Single Amino Acid Variant (SAV) Phenotype Using Network Features

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christopher M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Sternberg, Michael J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome and exome sequencing studies reveal many genetic variants between individuals, some of which are linked to disease. Many of these variants lead to single amino acid variants (SAVs), and accurate prediction of their phenotypic impact is important. Incorporating sequence conservation and network-level features, we have developed a method, SuSPect (Disease-Susceptibility-based SAV Phenotype Prediction), for predicting how likely SAVs are to be associated with disease. SuSPect performs significantly better than other available batch methods on the VariBench benchmarking dataset, with a balanced accuracy of 82%. SuSPect is available at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/suspect. The Web site has been implemented in Perl and SQLite and is compatible with modern browsers. An SQLite database of possible missense variants in the human proteome is available to download at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/suspect/download.html. PMID:24810707

  20. SuSPect: enhanced prediction of single amino acid variant (SAV) phenotype using network features.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christopher M; Filippis, Ioannis; Kelley, Lawrence A; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2014-07-15

    Whole-genome and exome sequencing studies reveal many genetic variants between individuals, some of which are linked to disease. Many of these variants lead to single amino acid variants (SAVs), and accurate prediction of their phenotypic impact is important. Incorporating sequence conservation and network-level features, we have developed a method, SuSPect (Disease-Susceptibility-based SAV Phenotype Prediction), for predicting how likely SAVs are to be associated with disease. SuSPect performs significantly better than other available batch methods on the VariBench benchmarking dataset, with a balanced accuracy of 82%. SuSPect is available at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/suspect. The Web site has been implemented in Perl and SQLite and is compatible with modern browsers. An SQLite database of possible missense variants in the human proteome is available to download at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/suspect/download.html. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. [Regional cerebral blood flow-SPECT "OFF-ON": a case report of catatonia].

    PubMed

    Moreno Caballero, M; Corchos González, N; De Antonio Rubio, I; Gómez-Río, M; Guerrero Velázquez, J F; Rodríguez Fernández, A; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a long history of dysthymia and major depressive episodes requiring repeated hospitalization. We describe the most recent episode, associated with catatonia symptomatology and features suggestive of cognitive impairment. The absence of a clear initial psychopharmacological response alongside the clinical severity made the patient a potential candidate for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A regional cerebral blood flow SPECT (SPECT-rCBF), performed to rule out concomitant Alzheimer disease (AD), revealed a markedly decreased neocortical uptake, with no definitive pattern of concomitant primary cognitive impairment. Because a gradual clinical improvement was observed in the patient, with evidence of enhanced cerebral reperfusion in a second SPECT-rCBF study at two weeks after admission, the application of ECT was discounted and an expectant attitude was adopted.

  2. An EM algorithm for estimating SPECT emission and transmission parameters from emissions data only.

    PubMed

    Krol, A; Bowsher, J E; Manglos, S H; Feiglin, D H; Tornai, M P; Thomas, F D

    2001-03-01

    A maximum-likelihood (ML) expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm (called EM-IntraSPECT) is presented for simultaneously estimating single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) emission and attenuation parameters from emission data alone. The algorithm uses the activity within the patient as transmission tomography sources, with which attenuation coefficients can be estimated. For this initial study, EM-IntraSPECT was tested on computer-simulated attenuation and emission maps representing a simplified human thorax as well as on SPECT data obtained from a physical phantom. Two evaluations were performed. First, to corroborate the idea of reconstructing attenuation parameters from emission data, attenuation parameters (mu) were estimated with the emission intensities (lambda) fixed at their true values. Accurate reconstructions of attenuation parameters were obtained. Second, emission parameters lambda and attenuation parameters mu were simultaneously estimated from the emission data alone. In this case there was crosstalk between estimates of lambda and mu and final estimates of lambda and mu depended on initial values. Estimates degraded significantly as the support extended out farther from the body, and an explanation for this is proposed. In the EM-IntraSPECT reconstructed attenuation images, the lungs, spine, and soft tissue were readily distinguished and had approximately correct shapes and sizes. As compared with standard EM reconstruction assuming a fix uniform attenuation map, EM-IntraSPECT provided more uniform estimates of cardiac activity in the physical phantom study and in the simulation study with tight support, but less uniform estimates with a broad support. The new EM algorithm derived here has additional applications, including reconstructing emission and transmission projection data under a unified statistical model.

  3. SPECT Imaging of 2-D and 3-D Distributed Sources with Near-Field Coded Aperture Collimation: Computer Simulation and Real Data Validation.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhiping; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    The imaging of distributed sources with near-field coded aperture (CA) remains extremely challenging and is broadly considered unsuitable for single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). This study proposes a novel CA SPECT reconstruction approach and evaluates the feasibilities of imaging and reconstructing distributed hot sources and cold lesions using near-field CA collimation and iterative image reconstruction. Computer simulations were designed to compare CA and pinhole collimations in two-dimensional radionuclide imaging. Digital phantoms were created and CA images of the phantoms were reconstructed using maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM). Errors and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated and image resolution was evaluated. An ex vivo rat heart with myocardial infarction was imaged using a micro-SPECT system equipped with a custom-made CA module and a commercial 5-pinhole collimator. Rat CA images were reconstructed via the three-dimensional (3-D) MLEM algorithm developed for CA SPECT with and without correction for a large projection angle, and 5-pinhole images were reconstructed using the commercial software provided by the SPECT system. Phantom images of CA were markedly improved in terms of image quality, quantitative root-mean-squared error, and CNR, as compared to pinhole images. CA and pinhole images yielded similar image resolution, while CA collimation resulted in fewer noise artifacts. CA and pinhole images of the rat heart were well reconstructed and the myocardial perfusion defects could be clearly discerned from 3-D CA and 5-pinhole SPECT images, whereas 5-pinhole SPECT images suffered from severe noise artifacts. Image contrast of CA SPECT was further improved after correction for the large projection angle used in the rat heart imaging. The computer simulations and small-animal imaging study presented herein indicate that the proposed 3-D CA SPECT imaging and reconstruction approaches worked reasonably

  4. [Value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT in clinical decision-making for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and a comparison of the values of different imaging techniques for diagnosing skull-base bone invasion].

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zhang, R S; Zhang, L Q; Lu, B G; Fu, W H

    2017-02-23

    examination methods of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In addition, in view of its greater diagnostic value, MRI combined with SPECT should be the focus of future imaging studies.

  5. Comparison of ( sup 99m Tc)HMPAO SPECT with ( sup 18 F)fluoromethane PET in cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D.; Herholz, K.; Podreka, I.; Neubauer, I.; Pietrzyk, U. )

    1990-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of (18F)fluoromethane (FM) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) of (99mTc)hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) were performed under identical conditions within 2 h in 22 patients suffering from cerebrovascular disease (8 ischemic infarction, 2 intracerebral hemorrhages, 7 transient ischemic attacks, and 5 multi-infarct syndrome). While gross pathological changes could be seen in the images of either procedure, focal abnormalities corresponding to transient ischemic deficits or to lesions in multi-infarct syndrome and areas of functional deactivation were sometimes missed on SPECT images. Overall, HMPAO SPECT images showed less contrast between high and low activity regions than the FM PET images, and differences between lesions and contralateral regions were less pronounced (6.4 vs 13.3% difference). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated from FM PET studies in 14 large territorial regions and the pathological lesion, and the regional values relative to mean flow were compared to the relative HMPAO uptake in an identical set of regions defined on the SPECT images. Among individual patients, the Spearman rank-correlation coefficient between relative rCBF and HMPAO uptake varied between 0.48 and 0.89, with a mean of 0.70. While an underestimation of high flow with SPECT--which was demonstrated in a curvilinear relationship between all relative regional PET and SPECT values--could be corrected by linearization taking into account HMPAO efflux from the brain before metabolic trapping, correspondence of SPECT data with PET rCBF values was not improved since this procedure also increased the variance in high flow areas. In the cerebellum, however, a high HMPAO uptake in SPECT always overestimated CBF in relation to forebrain values; this finding might be due to high capillary density in the cerebellum.

  6. Comparison of I-123 MIBG planar imaging and SPECT for the detection of decreased heart uptake in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Song, In-Uk; Kim, Joong-Seok; Chung, Yong-An

    2015-10-01

    Decreased myocardial uptake of I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an important finding for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study compared I-123 MIBG SPECT and planar imaging with regard to their diagnostic yield for PD. 52 clinically diagnosed PD patients who also had decreased striatal uptake on FP-CIT PET/CT were enrolled. 16 normal controls were also included. All underwent cardiac MIBG planar scintigraphy and SPECT separately. Myocardial I-123 MIBG uptake was interpreted on planar and SPECT/CT images separately by visual and quantitative analysis. The final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. Kappa analyses were performed to determine inter-observer agreement for both methods. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared with McNemar's test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 84.6, 100, and 88.2% for planar images and 96.2, 100 and 97.1% for SPECT, respectively, with a significant difference between the two imaging methods (p < 0.031). All inter-observer agreements were almost perfect (planar scintigraphy: κ = 0.82; SPECT: κ = 0.93). Heart-to-mediastinum ratios from PD patients with negative planar and positive SPECT scans (group A) and patients with positive planar and positive SPECT scans (group B) were 1.69 ± 0.16 (1.59-1.85) and 1.41 ± 0.15 (1.20-1.53), respectively, and showed significant difference (p = 0.023). Lung-to-mediastinum ratios for groups A and B were 2.16 ± 0.20 (1.96-2.37) and 1.6 ± 0.19 (1.3-1.78), respectively, and were significantly higher in the former (p = 0.001). I-123 MIBG SPECT has a significantly higher diagnostic performance for PD than planar images. Increased lung uptake may cause false-negative results on planar imaging.

  7. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise

  8. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p<0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p<0.05) compared to EXG SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the

  9. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on

  10. A fast cardiac gamma camera with dynamic SPECT capabilities: design, system validation and future potential

    PubMed Central

    Blevis, Ira M.; Tsukerman, Leonid; Shrem, Yigal; Kovalski, Gil; Volokh, Lana

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study is to present the Discovery NM 530c (DNM), a cardiac SPECT camera, interfacing multi-pinhole collimators with solid-state modules, aiming at slashing acquisition time without jeopardizing quality. DNM resembles PET since it enables 3-D SPECT without detector motion. We further envision how these novel capabilities may help with current and future challenges of cardiac imaging. Methods DNM sensitivity, spatial resolution (SR) and energy resolution (ER), count rate response, cardiac uniformity and cardiac defect contrast were measured and compared to a dedicated cardiac, dual-head standard SPECT (S-SPECT) camera. Results DNM sensitivity was more than threefold higher while SR was notably better. Significantly, SR was the same for 99mTc and 201Tl. ER was improved on DNM and allowed good separation of 99mTc and 123I spectral peaks. Count rate remained linear on DNM up to 612 kcps, while S-SPECT showed severe dead time limitations. Phantom studies revealed comparable uniformity and defect contrast, notwithstanding significantly shorter acquisition time for the DNM. First patient images, including dynamic SPECT, are also presented. Conclusion DNM is raising the bar for expedition and upgrade of practice. It features high sensitivity as well as improved SR, temporal resolution and ER. It enables reduction of acquisition time and fast protocols. Importantly, it is potentially capable of dynamic 3-D acquisition. The new technology is potentially upgradeable and may become a milestone in the evolution of nuclear cardiology as it assumes its key role in molecular imaging of the heart. PMID:20585775

  11. Validation of an automatic dose injection system for Ictal SPECT in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Setoain, Xavier; Pavía, Javier; Serés, Eulalia; Garcia, Ramiro; Carreño, Maria Mar; Donaire, Antonio; Rubí, Sebastià; Bargalló, Nuria; Rumià, Jordi; Boget, Teresa; Pintor, Luís; Fuster, David; Pons, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the performance and clinical usefulness of an automated injector system (AIS) that administers an automated injection for ictal SPECT after calculating the volume of tracer to be injected over time. To test the AIS, repeated injections were performed at different times after tracer preparation. The clinical study consisted of 56 patients with drug-resistant, complex partial seizures. Tracer for ictal SPECT was injected using automated injection in 27 patients and manual injection (MI) in the remaining 29. Injection time (T(I)) was measured in seconds from seizure onset to the end of volume injection. The SISCOM (Subtraction Ictal Spect Co-registered to MRI) procedure was used to locate the epileptogenic seizure focus with SPECT. The definition of seizure focus was made by consensus of the epilepsy unit using conventional diagnostic methods. During the experimental phase, there were no system failures, and the error in injected doses when using automated injection was lower than with MI. During the clinical phase, T(I) using manual injection was 41 s with a range of 14-103 s, compared with an AIS average of 33 s with a range of 19-63 s (P < 0.05). Ictal SPECT and SISCOM successfully localized the seizure focus in 21 of the 27 patients (78%) by AIS and in 19 of the 29 patients (65%) by MI (P = 0.14). Furthermore, nursing staff found the AIS method more convenient than the MI method. An AIS can improve the quality of work of the nursing staff in the neurology ward and allow a finer adjustment of the injection dose. Early results using an AIS would indicate a reduction in injection time and improved SPECT accuracy.

  12. SPECT/CT for SLN dissection in vulvar cancer: Improved SLN detection and dissection by preoperative three-dimensional anatomical localisation.

    PubMed

    Klapdor, R; Länger, F; Gratz, K F; Hillemanns, P; Hertel, H

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we assessed the feasibility and clinical advantages of single photon emission computed tomography with CT (SPECT/CT) for sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in vulvar cancer. This is a unicentric prospective trial. Vulvar cancer patients underwent preoperative SLN marking (10MBq Technetium (TC)-99m-nanocolloid) and subsequent planar lymphoscintigraphy (LSG) and SPECT/CT for SLN visualization. Directly before surgery, a patent blue dye was injected. We assessed detection rates of SPECT/CT and those of planar LSG and intraoperative detection. We analyzed the sensitivity, negative predictive value and false negative rate. At Hannover Medical School, 40 vulvar cancer patients underwent SLN dissection after preoperative LSG and SPECT/CT. The mean diameter of all tumors in final histology was 2.23 (0.1-10.5) cm with a mean tissue infiltration of 3.93 (0.25-11) mm. In preoperative imaging, SPECT/CT identified significantly more SLNs (mean 8.7 (1-35) LNs per patient) compared to LSG (mean 5.9 (0-22) LNs, p<0.01). In addition, SPECT/CT led to a high spatial resolution and anatomical localization of SLNs. Thus, SPECT/CT identified aberrant lymphatic drainage in 7/40 (17.5%) patients. There were no significant differences, but significant correlation was found between SPECT/CT and intraoperative SLN identification. Regarding inguino-femoral LNs, for all patients who underwent complete groin dissection, sensitivity was 100%, NPV was 100% and false negative rate was 0%. SPECT/CT leads to higher SLN identification compared to LSG in vulvar cancer. Due to its higher spatial resolution and three-dimensional anatomical localisation of SLNs, SPECT/CT provides the surgeon with important additional information, facilitates intraoperative SLN detection and predicts aberrant lymphatic drainage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Flurpiridaz F 18 PET: Phase II Safety and Clinical Comparison with SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging for Detection of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Daniel S.; Maddahi, Jamshid; Tamarappoo, B. K.; Czernin, Johannes; Taillefer, Raymond; Udelson, James E.; Gibson, C. Michael; Devine, Marybeth; Lazewatsky, Joel; Bhat, Gajanan; Washburn, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phase II trial to assess flurpiridaz F 18 for safety and compare its diagnostic performance for PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to Tc-99m SPECT-MPI regarding image quality, interpretative certainty, defect magnitude and detection of coronary artery disease (CAD)(≥ 50% stenosis) on invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Background In preclinical and phase I studies, flurpiridaz F 18 has shown characteristics of an essentially ideal MPI tracer. Methods 143 patients from 21 centers underwent rest-stress PET and Tc-99m SPECT-MPI. Eighty-six patients underwent ICA, and 39 had low-likelihood of CAD. Images were scored by 3 independent, blinded readers. Results A higher % of images were rated as excellent/good on PET vs. SPECT on stress (99.2% vs. 88.5%, p<0.01) and rest (96.9% vs. 66.4, p<0.01) images. Diagnostic certainty of interpretation (% cases with definitely abnormal/normal interpretation) was higher for PET vs. SPECT (90.8% vs. 70.9%, p<0.01). In 86 patients who underwent ICA, sensitivity of PET was higher than SPECT [78.8% vs. 61.5%, respectively (p=0.02)]. Specificity was not significantly different (PET:76.5% vs. SPECT:73.5%). Receiver operating characteristic curve area was 0.82±0.05 for PET and 0.70±0.06 for SPECT (p=0.04). Normalcy rate was 89.7% with PET and 97.4% with SPECT (p=NS). In patients with CAD on ICA, the magnitude of reversible defects was greater with PET than SPECT (p=0.008). Extensive safety assessment revealed that flurpiridaz F 18 was safe in this cohort. Conclusions In this Phase 2 trial, PET MPI using flurpiridaz F 18 was safe and superior to SPECT MPI for image quality, interpretative certainty, and overall CAD diagnosis. PMID:23265345

  14. Multifocal inflammatory leukoencephalopathy: use of thallium-201 SPECT and proton MRS.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yang Ha; Suh, Chung Kyu; Park, Sung Pa

    2003-01-01

    In a patient receiving 5-fluorouracil and levamisole, neurologic deficits suggest the cerebral demyelinating syndrome as a differential diagnosis. The authors report a patient diagnosed as multifocal inflammatory leukoencephalopathy for which thallium-201 (201Tl) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were employed as noninvasive diagnostic tools. 201Tl SPECT study was negative and proton MRS showed an increase of choline and lactate and well preserved N-acetylaspartate. These findings support histopathologic findings of multifocal inflammatory leukoencephalopathy revealing demyelination with relative axonal sparing in the patient. PMID:12923348

  15. Multi-slice SPECT/CT vs. lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma ray probe for sentinel node mapping in HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Meerwein, C M; Sekine, T; Veit-Haibach, P; Bredell, M G; Huber, G F; Huellner, M W

    2017-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic potential of multi-slice single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for preoperative sentinel node (SN) mapping in early stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Retrospective case-control study including data of consecutive HNSCC patients treated between November 2011 and December 2015. The diagnostic accuracy of multi-slice SPECT/CT was assessed with regard to the gold standard intraoperative gamma ray detection probe, using McNemar's test and calculating the area under the ROC curve. Additionally, the hot spot yield of SPECT/CT and planar lymphoscintigraphy (LS) was compared. Compared to the intraoperative gold standard, SPECT/CT showed an overall positive predictive value of 60.3% [confidence interval (CI) 46.6-73.0%)], a negative predictive value of 96.3% (CI 93.6-98.1%), and an accuracy of 90.8% (CI 89.1-92.4%). SPECT/CT detected more hot spots than LS and provided detailed anatomical information as well as relevant additional findings with potential impact on further patient management. Sentinel lymph node biopsy proved to be a reliable and safe procedure with an excellent SN excision rate (97%). Multi-slice SPECT/CT is a highly accurate diagnostic test and matches the gold standard intraoperative gamma ray detection probe.

  16. Role of SPECT-CT in sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients diagnosed with head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, E; García-Gómez, F J; Álvarez-Pérez, R M; Martínez-Castillo, R; Borrego-Dorado, I; Fernández-Ortega, P; Zulueta-Dorado, T

    2016-01-01

    Assess the role of SPECT-CT in sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in the accurate anatomical location of the SNL in patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. A retrospective study was conducted from February 2010 to June 2013 on 22 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of cutaneous head and neck melanoma (9 female, 13 male), with a mean age of 55 years old and who met the inclusion criteria for SLN biopsy. Patients underwent preoperative scanning after peri-scar injection of (99m)Tc-labeled-nanocolloid. Planar images of the injection-site, whole-body, and SPECT-CT scanning were acquired. Detection rate of SLN reached up to 91% (20/22 patients) by planar lymphoscintigraphy and 95.4% (21/22 patients) by SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT provided an accurate location of SLN in 14/22 patients, enabling to improve the surgical approach (clinical impact: 63.6%). SLN was positive for metastatic cells in 9.1% patients. SPECT-CT provides detailed anatomical SLN location and allows detecting a higher number of SLN than planar lymphoscintigraphy. Routine use of SPECT-CT is recommended in order to optimise the SLN detection and location in patients with head and neck melanoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Dopamine transporter SPECT in patients with mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Minnerop, M; Kornblum, C; Joe, A; Tatsch, K; Kunz, W; Klockgether, T; Wullner, U; Reinhardt, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective : To investigate the dopaminergic system in patients with known mitochondrial disorders and complex I deficiency. Methods: Dopamine transporter density was studied in 10 female patients with mitochondrial complex I deficiency by 123I-FP-CIT (N-ß-fluoropropyl-2ß-carbomethyl-3ß-(4-iodophenyl)-nortropane) SPECT. Results: No differences in 123I-FP-CIT striatal binding ratios were observed and no correlation of the degree of complex I deficiency and striatal binding ratios could be detected. Conclusions: These data argue against the possibility that mitochondrial complex I deficiency by itself is sufficient to elicit dopaminergic cell loss. PMID:15608010

  18. Impact of subcortical white matter lesions on dopamine transporter SPECT.

    PubMed

    Funke, Elisabeth; Kupsch, Andreas; Buchert, Ralph; Brenner, Winfried; Plotkin, Michail

    2013-07-01

    Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) can affect the nigrostriatal system and presumably cause vascular parkinsonism (VP). However, in patients with SAE, the differentiation of VP from idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPS) is challenging. The aim of the present study was to examine the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density in patients with parkinsonism and SAE. Fifteen consecutive patients with parkinsonian symptoms displayed SAE, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifteen retrospectively chosen, matched patients with diagnosis of IPS without any abnormalities in MRI served as a reference group. DAT SPECT was performed using the tracer ¹²³I-FP-CIT. Scans were acquired on a triple-head SPECT system (Multispect 3, Siemens) and analysed using the investigator-independent BRASS™ software (HERMES). In the SAE group, a DAT deficit was observed in 9/15 patients. In contrast, all patients from the IPS group showed a reduced DAT binding (p = 0.008). The specific binding ratios (BR) of putamen contralateral to the side of the more affected limb versus occipital lobe were in trend higher in patients with SAE versus patients in the IPS-group (p = 0.053). Indices for putaminal asymmetry (p = 0.036) and asymmetry caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.026) as well as the ratio caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in IPS patients having no SAE. DAT deficit was less pronounced in patients with SAE and parkinsonism than in patients with IPS without any abnormalities in the MRI. A potential role of DAT SPECT in the differential diagnosis of VP and IPS requires more assessments within prospective studies.

  19. Evaluation of MR perfusion abnormalities in organophosphorus poisoning and its correlation with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bhanu, K Uday; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Vyas, Sameer; Singh, Paramjeet; Prabhakar, Anuj; Mittal, B R; Bhalla, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) pesticide poisoning causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many imaging modalities, such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain, have been used for quantitative assessment of the acute brain insult caused by acute OP poisoning. Perfusion defects on SPECT in acutely poisoned patients with OPs have been described, however, MR perfusion abnormalities have not been described in the literature. MR perfusion Imaging has the advantage of having higher spatial resolution, no radiation, and better availability. In this prospective study, 20 patients who ingested OP compounds were included. All the patients underwent brain SPECT on a dual head SPECT gamma camera and MRI brain on a 1.5T MR system. Neurocognitive tests were performed for all patients. SPECT showed perfusion defects in 7 patients and total number of perfusion defects were 29. On MR perfusion, based on the cut-off values of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) ratios and normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) ratios, the total number of patients showing perfusion defects were 6 and 8; and the total number of perfusion defects were 29 and 45, respectively. There was significant difference of the nCBV ratios and nCBF ratios between the control group (n = 20) and positive patients group (n = 6 and n = 8, respectively) (P > 0.05). All the defects seen on SPECT were well appreciated on nCBF maps (MRI perfusion) suggestive of 100% correlation. MR perfusion imaging can be used as an effective modality for evaluation in acute OP poisoning.

  20. Relationship Between Coronary Contrast-Flow Quantitative Flow Ratio and Myocardial Ischemia Assessed by SPECT MPI.

    PubMed

    Smit, Jeff M; Koning, Gerhard; van Rosendael, Alexander R; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; Mertens, Bart J; Jukema, J Wouter; Delgado, Victoria; Reiber, Johan H C; Bax, Jeroen J; Scholte, Arthur J

    2017-07-06

    A new method has been developed to calculate fractional flow reserve (FFR) from invasive coronary angiography, the so-called "contrast-flow quantitative flow ratio (cQFR)". Recently, cQFR was compared to invasive FFR in intermediate coronary lesions showing an overall diagnostic accuracy of 85%. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cQFR and myocardial ischemia assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI). Patients who underwent SPECT MPI and coronary angiography within 3 months were included. The cQFR computation was performed offline, using dedicated software. The cQFR computation was based on 3-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and computational fluid dynamics. The standard 17-segment model was used to determine the vascular territories. Myocardial ischemia was defined as a summed difference score ≥2 in a vascular territory. A cQFR of ≤0.80 was considered abnormal. Two hundred and twenty-four coronary arteries were analysed in 85 patients. Overall accuracy of cQFR to detect ischemia on SPECT MPI was 90%. In multivariable analysis, cQFR was independently associated with ischemia on SPECT MPI (OR per 0.01 decrease of cQFR: 1.10; 95% CI 1.04-1.18, p = 0.002), whereas clinical and QCA parameters were not. Furthermore, cQFR showed incremental value for the detection of ischemia compared to clinical and QCA parameters (global chi square 48.7 to 62.6; p <0.001). A good relationship between cQFR and SPECT MPI was found. cQFR was independently associated with ischemia on SPECT MPI and showed incremental value to detect ischemia compared to clinical and QCA parameters.

  1. Prognostic evaluation in obese patients using a dedicated multipinhole cadmium-zinc telluride SPECT camera.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Andrea; Peclat, Thais; Amaral, Ana Carolina; Lima, Ronaldo S L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of myocardial perfusion SPECT obtained in CZT cameras (CZT-SPECT) with multipinhole collimation in obese patients. CZT-SPECT may be technically challenging in the obese, and its prognostic value remains largely unknown. Patients underwent single-day, rest/stress (supine and prone) imaging. Images were visually inspected and graded as poor, fair or good/excellent. Summed stress and difference scores (SSS and SDS, respectively) were converted into percentages of total perfusion defect and of ischemic defect by division by the maximum possible score. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and classified as class I (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), II (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m(2)), or III (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2)). Patients were followed-up by telephone interview for the occurrence of all-cause death, myocardial infarction or revascularization. A Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess the independent predictors of death. Among 1396 patients, 365 (26.1 %) were obese (mean BMI 33.9 ± 3.6; 17.5 % class I, 3.4 % class II, and 3.4 % class III). Image quality was good/excellent in 94.5 % of the obese patients. The annualized mortality rates were not significantly different among obese and non-obese patients, being <1 % with normal CZT-SPECT, and increased with the degree of scan abnormality in both obese and non-obese patients. Age, the use of pharmacologic stress and an abnormal CZT-SPECT, but not obesity, were independent predictors of death. In obese patients, single-day rest/stress CZT-SPECT with a multipinhole camera provides prognostic discrimination with high image quality.

  2. SPECT Imaging as a Tool for Testing and Challenging Assumptions About Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysey, S. M.; DeVol, T. A.; Tornai, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging has shown promise for unraveling the influence of physical, chemical and biological processes on contaminant transport. Micro-CT scans, for instance, are increasingly utilized to image the pore-scale structure of rocks and soils, which can subsequently be used within modeling studies. A disadvantage of micro-CT, however, is that this imaging modality does not directly detect contaminants. In contrast, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) can provide the three-dimensional distribution of gamma emitting materials and is thus ideal for imaging the transport of radionuclides. SPECT is of particular interest as a tool for both directly imaging the behavior of long-lived radionuclides of interest, e.g., 99Tc and 137Cs, as well as monitoring shorter-lived isotopes as in-situ tracers of flow and biogeochemical processes. We demonstrate the potential of combining CT and SPECT imaging to improve the mechanistic understanding of flow and transport processes within a heterogeneous porous medium. In the experiment, a column was packed with 0.2mm glass beads with a cylindrical zone of 2mm glass beads embedded near the outlet; this region could be readily identified within the CT images. The column was injected with a pulse of NaCl solution spiked with 99mTcO4- and monitored using SPECT while aliquots of the effluent were used to analyze the breakthrough of both solutes. The breakthrough curves could be approximately replicated by a one-dimensional transport model, but the SPECT data revealed that the tracers migrated around the inclusion of larger beads. Although the zone of large-diameter beads was expected to act as a preferential pathway, the observed behavior could only be replicated in numerical transport simulations if this region was treated as a low-permeability zone relative to the rest of the column. This simple experiment demonstrates the potential of SPECT for investigating flow and transport phenomena within a porous medium.

  3. Clinical value of stress-only Tc-99m SPECT imaging: importance of attenuation correction.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shishir; Heller, Gary V; Bateman, Timothy M; Ruffin, Richard; Yekta, Arshad; Katten, Deborah; Alluri, Nitya; Ahlberg, Alan W

    2013-02-01

    In selected patients, stress-only SPECT imaging has been proposed as an alternative to rest-stress SPECT imaging to improve laboratory efficiency and reduce radiation exposure. The impact of attenuation correction (AC) upon interpretation, post-test patient management and cardiac risk stratification in relation to stress-only imaging is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical value for laboratory throughput and predicting outcomes of normal and abnormal stress-only SPECT imaging with AC in a consecutive series of clinically referred patients. A retrospective analysis of 1,383 consecutive patients who were scheduled for stress-only SPECT imaging for symptom assessment of suspected myocardial ischemia was performed. All images had been interpreted and categorized using the standard 17-segment model without AC followed by AC. Follow-up data for 2.1 ± 1.3 years after SPECT imaging for the occurrence of cardiac events (non-fatal MI, cardiac death, and cardiac revascularization) previously collected by routine methods were reviewed. Non-AC SPECT image interpretation revealed that 58% (802/1383) of patients had abnormal stress images. AC image interpretation of the abnormal non-AC images re-classified 83% (666/802) of these as normal. Among patients with abnormal stress images after AC (136/1383), 63% (86/136) returned for additional rest scans, while the remaining 37% (50/136) were clinically managed without further rest images. The incidence of cardiac death or non-fatal MI was very low in patients with normal stress-only scans (0.7%). A strategy of stress-only imaging with AC in symptomatic patients is an efficient method which appropriately identifies at risk and low-risk patients yielding a low percentage requiring rest imaging. Clinical decisions can be made based on abnormal stress-only imaging without further rest imaging if clinically appropriate.

  4. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 05: Calibration of a SPECT/CT camera for quantitative SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, Émilie; Montégiani, Jean-François; Després, Philippe; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-08-15

    While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. {sup 99m}Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVE was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with {sup 99m}Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications.

  5. A multipinhole small animal SPECT system with submillimeter spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Tobias; Despres, Philippe; Barber, William C.; Shah, Kanai S.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2006-05-15

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an important technology for molecular imaging studies of small animals. In this arena, there is an increasing demand for high performance imaging systems that offer improved spatial resolution and detection efficiency. We have designed a multipinhole small animal imaging system based on position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) detectors with the goal of submillimeter spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, which will allow us to minimize the radiation dose to the animal and to shorten the time needed for the imaging study. Our design will use 8x24 mm{sup 2} PSAPD detector modules coupled to thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] scintillators, which can achieve an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.5 mm at 140 keV. These detectors will be arranged in rings of 24 modules each; the animal is positioned in the center of the 9 stationary detector rings which capture projection data from the animal with a cylindrical tungsten multipinhole collimator. The animal is supported on a bed which can be rocked about the central axis to increase angular sampling of the object. In contrast to conventional SPECT pinhole systems, in our design each pinhole views only a portion of the object. However, the ensemble of projection data from all of the multipinhole detectors provide angular sampling that is sufficient to reconstruct tomographic data from the object. The performance of this multipinhole PSAPD imaging system was simulated using a ray tracing program that models the appropriate point spread functions and then was compared against the performance of a dual-headed pinhole SPECT system. The detection efficiency of both systems was simulated and projection data of a hot rod phantom were generated and reconstructed to assess spatial resolution. Appropriate Poisson noise was added to the data to simulate an acquisition time of 15 min and an activity of 18.5 MBq distributed in the phantom. Both sets of data

  6. Multipinhole collimator with 20 apertures for a brain SPECT application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Ellin, Justin R.; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho; Huang, Qiu; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Several new technologies for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation with parallel-hole collimation have been proposed to improve detector sensitivity and signal collection efficiency. Benefits from improved signal efficiency include shorter acquisition times and lower dose requirements. In this paper, the authors show a possibility of over an order of magnitude enhancement in photon detection efficiency (from 7.6 × 10{sup −5} to 1.6 × 10{sup −3}) for dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging of the striatum over the conventional SPECT parallel-hole collimators by use of custom-designed 20 multipinhole (20-MPH) collimators with apertures of 0.75 cm diameter. Methods: Quantifying specific binding ratio (SBR) of {sup 123}I-ioflupane or {sup 123}I-iometopane’s signal at the striatal region is a common brain imaging method to confirm the diagnosis of the Parkinson’s disease. The authors performed imaging of a striatal phantom filled with aqueous solution of I-123 and compared camera recovery ratios of SBR acquired between low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimators and 20-MPH collimators. Results: With only two-thirds of total acquisition time (20 min against 30 min), a comparable camera recovery ratio of SBR was achieved using 20-MPH collimators in comparison to that from the LEHR collimator study. Conclusions: Their systematic analyses showed that the 20-MPH collimator could be a promising alternative for the DaT SPECT imaging for brain over the traditional LEHR collimator, which could give both shorter scan time and improved diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Impact of reconstruction parameters on quantitative I-131 SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gils, C. A. J.; Beijst, C.; van Rooij, R.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy using I-131 is widely used for treatment of thyroid disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Monitoring treatment by accurate dosimetry requires quantitative imaging. The high energy photons however render quantitative SPECT reconstruction challenging, potentially requiring accurate correction for scatter and collimator effects. The goal of this work is to assess the effectiveness of various correction methods on these effects using phantom studies. A SPECT/CT acquisition of the NEMA IEC body phantom was performed. Images were reconstructed using the following parameters: (1) without scatter correction, (2) with triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction and (3) with Monte Carlo-based scatter correction. For modelling the collimator-detector response (CDR), both (a) geometric Gaussian CDRs as well as (b) Monte Carlo simulated CDRs were compared. Quantitative accuracy, contrast to noise ratios and recovery coefficients were calculated, as well as the background variability and the residual count error in the lung insert. The Monte Carlo scatter corrected reconstruction method was shown to be intrinsically quantitative, requiring no experimentally acquired calibration factor. It resulted in a more accurate quantification of the background compartment activity density compared with TEW or no scatter correction. The quantification error relative to a dose calibrator derived measurement was found to be  <1%,-26% and 33%, respectively. The adverse effects of partial volume were significantly smaller with the Monte Carlo simulated CDR correction compared with geometric Gaussian or no CDR modelling. Scatter correction showed a small effect on quantification of small volumes. When using a weighting factor, TEW correction was comparable to Monte Carlo reconstruction in all measured parameters, although this approach is clinically impractical since this factor may be patient dependent. Monte Carlo based scatter correction including accurately simulated CDR

  8. Impact of reconstruction parameters on quantitative I-131 SPECT.

    PubMed

    van Gils, C A J; Beijst, C; van Rooij, R; de Jong, H W A M

    2016-07-21

    Radioiodine therapy using I-131 is widely used for treatment of thyroid disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Monitoring treatment by accurate dosimetry requires quantitative imaging. The high energy photons however render quantitative SPECT reconstruction challenging, potentially requiring accurate correction for scatter and collimator effects. The goal of this work is to assess the effectiveness of various correction methods on these effects using phantom studies. A SPECT/CT acquisition of the NEMA IEC body phantom was performed. Images were reconstructed using the following parameters: (1) without scatter correction, (2) with triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction and (3) with Monte Carlo-based scatter correction. For modelling the collimator-detector response (CDR), both (a) geometric Gaussian CDRs as well as (b) Monte Carlo simulated CDRs were compared. Quantitative accuracy, contrast to noise ratios and recovery coefficients were calculated, as well as the background variability and the residual count error in the lung insert. The Monte Carlo scatter corrected reconstruction method was shown to be intrinsically quantitative, requiring no experimentally acquired calibration factor. It resulted in a more accurate quantification of the background compartment activity density compared with TEW or no scatter correction. The quantification error relative to a dose calibrator derived measurement was found to be  <1%,-26% and 33%, respectively. The adverse effects of partial volume were significantly smaller with the Monte Carlo simulated CDR correction compared with geometric Gaussian or no CDR modelling. Scatter correction showed a small effect on quantification of small volumes. When using a weighting factor, TEW correction was comparable to Monte Carlo reconstruction in all measured parameters, although this approach is clinically impractical since this factor may be patient dependent. Monte Carlo based scatter correction including accurately simulated CDR

  9. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  10. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT PhantomTM), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  11. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  12. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  13. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of −180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 × 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 × 10−4 with the energy window of ±10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  14. SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chiron, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Surgery of focal epilepsies in childhood has largely benefited from the recent advances of the noninvasive functional imaging techniques, particularly SPECT which presurgically contributes to the localization of the seizure onset zone, in order to select the patients, decide the optimal placement of intracranial electrodes, and plan the resection. Peri-ictal SPECT (ictal and postictal) proved especially useful when video-EEG is not contributory, when MRI looks normal or shows multiple abnormalities, or in cases of discrepant findings within the presurgery workup. Because of a poor temporal resolution, peri-ictal SPECT must be coupled with video-EEG. Multimodal imaging so-called SISCOM (peri-ictal - interictal SPECT subtraction image superimposed on MRI) increases the sensitivity of peri-ictal SPECT by about 70% and makes it a good predictor of seizure-free outcome after surgery. In addition, interictal SPECT occasionally provides some interesting results regarding functional cortical maturation and learning disorders in childhood.

  15. Brain SPECT findings of anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Fereshteh; Dedousi, Eleni; Baloyannis, Ioannis; Tegos, Thomas; Costa, Vasiliki; Dimitriadis, Athanasios S; Baloyannis, Stavros J

    2010-01-01

    Anosognosia is a common symptom of dementia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of different regions of the brain to anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Forty-two patients with AD were included in this study. After clinical interviews with the patients and their relatives, the patients were divided into two groups: Anosognosia and No-anosognosia. The patients were studied regarding the severity of dementia. They underwent SPECT with HMPAO and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured. Regional CBF significantly differed between Anosognosia and No-anosognosia groups in right prefrontal (P < or = 0.02), right inferior parietal (P < or = 0.00), and right (P < or = 0.01) and left (P < or = 0.01) medial temporal cortex. There was a significant correlation between the severity of dementia and rCBF in medial temporal regions. When comparisons were made between mild and moderate stages separately, the 'right inferior parietal region' was the common region which showed hypoperfusion in both anosognosia subgroups. We conclude that anosognosia may be a reflection of functional impairment in right prefrontal, right frontal and especially right inferior parietal regions in AD.

  16. Utility of TL-201 SPECT in clarifying false-positive FDG-PET findings due to osteoradionecrosis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsiu; Liang, Ji-An; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Yang, Shih-Neng; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Sun, Shung-Shung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether Tl-201 single photon emission CT (SPECT) is potentially useful in differentiating false-positive fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings caused by osteoradionecrosis (ORN) from recurrent head and neck cancer after radiotherapy. Five patients were recruited. Dual-phase FDG-PET and dual-phase Tl-201 SPECT were performed for each patient. All 5 patients proved to have ORN without recurrent cancer. By visual interpretation, the results were 4 positive versus 1 negative for PET, and 4 negative versus 1 positive for Tl-201 SPECT. The Tl-201 SPECT clarified 3 of the 4 false-positive PETs to be ORN. Dual-phase semiquantitative studies showed decreased standardized uptake value (SUV) over time in 3 of the 4 false-positive PETs and decreased lesion/background ratio over time in the false-positive Tl-201 SPECT. The Tl-201 SPECT may help clarify suspected false-positive FDG uptake caused by ORN. Dual-phase FDG-PET and dual-phase Tl-201 SPECT may also have some value.

  17. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ∼10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime

  18. Technological Development and Advances in SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngho; Aparici, Carina Mari; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    SPECT/CT has emerged over the past decade as a means of correlating anatomical information from CT with functional information from SPECT. The integration of SPECT and CT in a single imaging device facilitates anatomical localization of the radiopharmaceutical to differentiate physiological uptake from that associated with disease and patient-specific attenuation correction to improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of the SPECT image. The first clinically available SPECT/CT systems performed emission-transmission imaging using a dual-headed SPECT camera and a low-power x-ray CT sub-system. Newer SPECT/CT systems are available with high-power CT sub-systems suitable for detailed anatomical diagnosis, including CT coronary angiography and coronary calcification that can be correlated with myocardial perfusion measurements. The high-performance CT capabilities also offer the potential to improve compensation of partial volume errors for more accurate quantitation of radionuclide measurement of myocardial blood flow and other physiological processes and for radiation dosimetry for radionuclide therapy. In addition, new SPECT technologies are being developed that significantly improve the detection efficiency and spatial resolution for radionuclide imaging of small organs including the heart, brain, and breast, and therefore may provide new capabilities for SPECT/CT imaging in these important clinical applications. PMID:18396178

  19. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG PET and ictal SPECT.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D. S.; Lee, S. K.; Lee, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Epileptogenic zones can be localized by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) and ictal single-photon emission computed tomography(SPECT). In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG PET or ictal SPECT is excellent, however, the sensitivity of MRI is so high that the incremental sensitivity by FDG PET or ictal SPECT has yet to be proven. When MRI findings are ambiguous or normal, or discordant with those of ictal EEG, FDG PET and ictal SPECT are helpful for localization without the need for invasive ictal EEG. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, because almost a half of the patients are normal on MRI, FDG PET and ictal SPECT are helpful for localization or at least for lateralization in these non-lesional epilepsies in order to guide the subdural insertion of electrodes. Interpretation of FDG PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods confirmed the performance of previous visual interpretation results. Ictal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods(coregistered to MRI) and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, HMPAO versus ECD, and repeated ictal SPECT, which remain the technical issues of ictal SPECT, are detailed. PMID:11748346

  20. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhinav K; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2015-04-13

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method provided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  1. Role of 99mTc-ECD SPECT in the Management of Children with Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Das, Rashmi Ranajn; Malhotra, Arun; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Dwivedi, Sadanand

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Report. There is a paucity of data on correlation of various imaging modalities with clinical findings in craniosynostosis. Moreover, no study has specifically reported the role of 99mTc-ECD SPECT in a large number of subjects with craniosynostosis. Materials and Methods. We prospectively analyzed a cohort of 85 patients with craniosynostosis from year 2007 to 2012. All patients underwent evaluation with 99mTc-ECD SPECT and the results were correlated with radiological and surgical findings. Results. 99mTc-ECD SPECT revealed regional perfusion abnormalities in the cerebral hemisphere corresponding to the fused sutures preoperatively that disappeared postoperatively in all the cases. Corresponding to this, the mean mental performance quotient (MPQ) increased significantly (P < 0.05) postoperatively only in those children with absent perfusion defect postoperatively. Conclusions. Our study suggests that early surgery and release of craniosynostosis in patients with preoperative perfusion defects (absent on 99mTc-ECD SPECT study) are beneficial, as theylead to improved MPQ after surgery. PMID:24987670

  2. Inappropriate utilization of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging on the USA-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Lalude, Omosalewa O; Gutarra, Mell F; Pollono, Eduardo N; Lee, Soyoung; Tarwater, Patrick M

    2014-06-01

    The American College of Cardiology/American Society of Nuclear Cardiology published revised appropriate use criteria (AUC) for SPECT MPI in 2009. We assessed adherence to these guidelines and factors associated with inappropriate utilization at the University Medical Center. The AUC was applied retrospectively to 420 SPECT MPI studies. Two-sample t test, Fisher's exact test, and multivariable logistic regression models were used for analysis. There were 322 appropriate (86%) and 54 (14%) inappropriate studies. The odds of having an inappropriate test increased with younger age (P < .001) and female gender (P < .001). Subjects with diabetes (P = .007) and chest pain (P < .001) were less likely to have an inappropriate test. Academic outpatients were three times more likely to have an inappropriate study (P = .123), while community PCPs were 5.6 times (P = .011) and community cardiologists eight times more likely to order inappropriate tests (P = .031). Inappropriate SPECT MPI in low risk younger women is an important issue on the USA-Mexico border. Initiatives to reduce inappropriate SPECT MPI should focus on a few indications and evaluation of cardiovascular symptoms in younger age women in outpatient/community practices.

  3. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  4. Silicon Detectors for PET and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Eric R.

    Silicon detectors use state-of-the-art electronics to take advantage of the semiconductor properties of silicon to produce very high resolution radiation detectors. These detectors have been a fundamental part of high energy, nuclear, and astroparticle physics experiments for decades, and they hold great potential for significant gains in both PET and SPECT applications. Two separate prototype nuclear medicine imaging systems have been developed to explore this potential. Both devices take advantage of the unique properties of high resolution pixelated silicon detectors, designed and developed as part of the CIMA collaboration and built at The Ohio State University. The first prototype is a Compton SPECT imaging system. Compton SPECT, also referred to as electronic collimation, is a fundamentally different approach to single photon imaging from standard gamma cameras. It removes the inherent coupling of spatial resolution and sensitivity in mechanically collimated systems and provides improved performance at higher energies. As a result, Compton SPECT creates opportunities for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals based on higher energy isotopes as well as opportunities to expand the use of current isotopes such as 131I due to the increased resolution and sensitivity. The Compton SPECT prototype consists of a single high resolution silicon detector, configured in a 2D geometry, in coincidence with a standard NaI scintillator detector. Images of point sources have been taken for 99mTc (140 keV), 131I (364keV), and 22Na (511 keV), demonstrating the performance of high resolution silicon detectors in a Compton SPECT system. Filtered back projection image resolutions of 10 mm, 7.5 mm, and 6.7 mm were achieved for the three different sources respectively. The results compare well with typical SPECT resolutions of 5-15 mm and validate the claims of improved performance in Compton SPECT imaging devices at higher source energies. They also support the potential of

  5. Enhanced diagnosis of coronary artery disease in women by dobutamine thallium-201 ST-segment/heart rate slope and thallium-201 myocardial SPECT.

    PubMed

    Yeih, Dong-Feng; Huang, Por-Jau; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2007-10-01

    The diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in women presents a great challenge because of poor exercise capacity and inadequate heart rate response during stress test. The clinical significance of stress-related ST-segment/heart rate slope (ST/HR slope) value for evaluating CAD in women remains controversial. Therefore, we conducted the present study to assess the diagnostic performance of dobutamine ST/HR slope in women, compared with myocardial perfusion study using thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (Tl-201 SPECT). A total of 51 female patients with suspected CAD underwent simultaneous 12-lead electrocardiographic recording during 3-minute stages of dobutamine infusion as well as Tl-201 SPECT, and coronary angiography was performed within 2 weeks post Tl-201 SPECT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of dobutamine ST/HR slope and Tl-201 SPECT were assessed, and the results of coronary angiography were used as a gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of dobutamine ST/HR slope in detecting CAD were 43%, 83% and 61%, and those of Tl-201 SPECT were 71%, 87% and 78%, respectively. However, using both positive results of Tl-201 SPECT and ST/HR slope for detecting CAD, the diagnostic specificity increased from 87% to 96%. Using both negative results of Tl-201 SPECT and ST/HR slope to exclude CAD, the negative predictive value increased from 71% to 85%. The accuracy of dobutamine ST/HR slope in detecting CAD was not affected by the use of beta-blockers. Dobutamine ST/HR slope is less sensitive and less accurate than Tl-201 SPECT for detecting CAD in women. However, it adds diagnostic benefit to Tl-201 SPECT with only a little extra calculation.

  6. New routine for nuclear medicine technologists to determine when to add SPECT/CT to a whole-body bone scan.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Asal; Thorsson, Ola; Edenbrandt, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Bone scintigraphy is usually obtained as a whole-body scan producing 2 images: an anterior view and a posterior view. Sometimes abnormal findings in the spine are difficult to distinguish on whole-body bone scans. SPECT/CT may be performed to localize and interpret a lesion correctly and to help differentiate between benign and metastatic lesions. The assessment of whether SPECT/CT is needed is usually made by a physician. The aim of this study was to evaluate our new routine for nuclear medicine technologists to determine when to add SPECT/CT to whole-body bone scintigraphy. A 3-part educational course was developed for the nuclear medicine technologists. The first part was to learn criteria for when SPECT/CT should be added to a whole-body bone scan. The second part was to review a selection of training whole-body bone scans illustrating the criteria. The third part was to pass a test of whether whole-body bone scans should be supplemented by SPECT/CT. The nuclear medicine technologists and the physicians agreed that SPECT/CT was required in 63 cases and not required in 27 cases. The resulting percentage agreement was 90%, and the κ value was 0.77. There was disagreement in 10 cases. In 6 of these cases only the nuclear medicine technologists wanted to add SPECT/CT, and in 4 of these cases only the physicians wanted to add SPECT/CT. After participating in the training course developed in this project, the nuclear medicine technologists were able to decide whether a SPECT/CT study is needed. An implication of this result is that the effectiveness of the nuclear medicine department should be improved after our new routine is implemented. The successful outcome of this project may stimulate departments to take on similar quality-improvement projects in the future.

  7. New Approaches in SPECT Breast Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    the use of their breast and torso phantoms. The software package, "SPECTER", developed by Tim Turkington, was used to analyze and display the phantom...breast images. The software package, "SPECT-MAP", developed by James Bowsher, was used for reconstructions. VI. REFERENCES [1] Tornai MP, Bowsher JE...based software . and standard errors of the mean. No attenuation or scatter corrections were taken into account in For a given statistical ensemble of

  8. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  9. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: (99m) Tc, (111)In and (131)I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational

  10. Combining FDG-PET and 99mTc-SPECT to predict functional outcome after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Miia; Schildt, Jukka; Ahonen, Aapo; Nikkinen, Päivi; Lauerma, Kirsi; Sinisalo, Juha; Kankuri, Esko; Vento, Antti; Pätilä, Tommi; Harjula, Ari

    2015-09-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are suggested to improve clinical decision-making in ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Here, we present a unique cohort of patients who underwent nuclear medicine studies and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) both before and 1 year after coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery to assess benefit from surgery. Before CABG, we applied three quantitative techniques using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET and (99m)technetium-tetrofosmin-SPECT with a software tool to measure defects with hypoperfused but viable and non-viable myocardium in 15 patients. One method used solely PET, two others combined PET and SPECT at different thresholds. As a reference, we used change in left-ventricular (LV) function and volume by MRI. Preoperatively, ischaemic but viable areas detected by the method with a 10% threshold combining PET-SPECT and the PET-only method correlated significantly with preoperative regional wall thickening (WT; P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). When compared with global functional outcome (change in LV ejection fraction) and LV remodelling (change in end-diastolic volume) 1 year postoperatively, no correlation appeared with preoperative PET- or PET-SPECT-derived viable or non-viable tissue. Neither was any correlation observable between local change in WT and local preoperative defect size evaluated by any of these three methods. Preoperatively, PET and PET-SPECT with 10% threshold detected dysfunctional myocardium, but all analysis methods failed to predict 1-year functional outcome assessed by MRI. In patients with three-vessel disease and heart failure, SPECT perfusion and PET viability study results show substantial heterogeneity; this should be considered when selecting patients for revascularization. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Brain SPECT can differentiate between essential tremor and early-stage tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Song, In-Uk; Park, Jeong-Wook; Chung, Sung-Woo; Chung, Yong-An

    2014-09-01

    There are no confirmatory or diagnostic tests or tools to differentiate between essential tremor (ET) and tremor in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Although a number of imaging studies have indicated that there are differences between ET and PD, the functional imaging study findings are controversial. Therefore, we analyzed regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by perfusion brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to identify differences between ET and tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease (TPD). We recruited 33 patients with TPD, 16 patients with ET, and 33 healthy controls. We compared the severity of tremor symptoms by comparing the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin rating scale (FTM) score and the tremor score from Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) between TPD and ET patients. Subjects were evaluated by neuropsychological assessments, MRI and perfusion SPECT of the brain. Total FTM score was significantly higher in ET patients than TPD patients. However, there was no significant difference in FTM Part A scores between the two patient groups, while the scores for FTM Part B and C were significantly higher in ET patients than TPD patients. Brain SPECT analysis of the TPD group demonstrated significant hypoperfusion of both the lentiform nucleus and thalamus compared to the ET group. Brain perfusion SPECT may be a useful clinical method to differentiate between TPD and ET even during early-phase PD, because the lentiform nucleus and thalamus show differences in regional perfusion between these two groups during this time period. Additionally, we found evidence of cerebellar dysfunction in both TPT and ET.

  12. Imaging analysis of Parkinson’s disease patients using SPECT and tractography

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seong-Jin; Kim, Mansu; Park, Hyunjin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder that affects the central nervous system. PD-related alterations in structural and functional neuroimaging have not been fully explored. This study explored multi-modal PD neuroimaging and its application for predicting clinical scores on the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). Multi-modal imaging that combined 123I-Ioflupane single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were adopted to incorporate complementary brain imaging information. SPECT and DTI images of normal controls (NC; n = 45) and PD patients (n = 45) were obtained from a database. The specific binding ratio (SBR) was calculated from SPECT. Tractography was performed using DTI. Group-wise differences between NC and PD patients were quantified using SBR of SPECT and structural connectivity of DTI for regions of interest (ROIs) related to PD. MDS-UPDRS scores were predicted using multi-modal imaging features in a partial least-squares regression framework. Three regions and four connections within the cortico-basal ganglia thalamocortical circuit were identified using SBR and DTI, respectively. Predicted MDS-UPDRS scores using identified regions and connections and actual MDS-UPDRS scores showed a meaningful correlation (r = 0.6854, p < 0.001). Our study provided insight on regions and connections that are instrumental in PD. PMID:27901100

  13. The use of spect/ct in the evaluation of heterotopic ossification in para/tetraplegics

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Maurício Coelho; Passarelli, Marcus Ceregati; Dario, Virgílio; Lebani, Bruno Rodrigues; Monteiro, Paulo Henrique Silva; Ramos, Celso Darío

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the stage of maturation and the metabolism of neurogenic heterotopic ossification by using SPECT/CT. Methods: A total of 12 medical records of patients with spinal cord injury, all of them classified according to the ASIA protocol (disability scale from the American Spinal Injury Association) in complete lesion (A) and partial lesions (B, C and D) and registered at the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, were submitted to SPECT/CT evaluation. Results: Sixteen hips with heterotopic ossification observed in X-ray were studied and only two (12.5%) had high osteoblastic activity. Five hips showed medium activity, three (18.75%) low activity and six (37.5%) did not present any activity detected by SPECT/CT. Conclusion: SPECT/CT helps to determinate which patients have a greater risk of relapse after surgical resection, proving to be a useful imaging study in preoperative evaluation that can be used to determinate the postoperative prognosis of these patients. Level of Evidence III, Investigating a Diagnostic Test. PMID:24644413

  14. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-09-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the pro-gression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code.

  15. Development of PET and SPECT Probes for Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    l-Glutamate and its receptors (GluRs) play a key role in excitatory neurotransmission within the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Impaired regulation of GluRs has also been implicated in various neurological disorders. GluRs are classified into two major groups: ionotropic GluRs (iGluRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels, and metabotropic GluRs (mGluRs), which are coupled to heterotrimeric guanosine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins). Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of GluRs could provide a novel view of CNS function and of a range of brain disorders, potentially leading to the development of new drug therapies. Although no satisfactory imaging agents have yet been developed for iGluRs, several PET ligands for mGluRs have been successfully employed in clinical studies. This paper reviews current progress towards the development of PET and SPECT probes for GluRs. PMID:25874256

  16. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code. PMID:26190884

  17. SPECT reconstruction using DCT-induced tight framelet regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiahan; Li, Si; Xu, Yuesheng; Schmidtlein, C. R.; Lipson, Edward D.; Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Wavelet transforms have been successfully applied in many fields of image processing. Yet, to our knowledge, they have never been directly incorporated to the objective function in Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) image reconstruction. Our aim has been to investigate if the ℓ1-norm of non-decimated discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of the estimated radiotracer distribution could be effectively used as the regularization term for the penalized-likelihood (PL) reconstruction, where a regularizer is used to enforce the image smoothness in the reconstruction. In this study, the ℓ1-norm of 2D DCT wavelet decomposition was used as a regularization term. The Preconditioned Alternating Projection Algorithm (PAPA), which we proposed in earlier work to solve penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction with non-differentiable regularizers, was used to solve this optimization problem. The DCT wavelet decompositions were performed on the transaxial reconstructed images. We reconstructed Monte Carlo simulated SPECT data obtained for a numerical phantom with Gaussian blobs as hot lesions and with a warm random lumpy background. Reconstructed images using the proposed method exhibited better noise suppression and improved lesion conspicuity, compared with images reconstructed using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm with Gaussian post filter (GPF). Also, the mean square error (MSE) was smaller, compared with EM-GPF. A critical and challenging aspect of this method was selection of optimal parameters. In summary, our numerical experiments demonstrated that the ℓ1-norm of discrete cosine transform (DCT) wavelet frame transform DCT regularizer shows promise for SPECT image reconstruction using PAPA method.

  18. Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    New developments have been made in optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging that measures 3D position and orientation (pose) for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system. Ongoing SPECT imaging research has been directed towards head motion measurement for brain studies in awake, unrestrained mice. In contrast to previous results using external markers, this work extracts and tracks intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computes relative pose from the tracked features over time. Motion tracking thus far has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to the mouse s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the additional animal handling required to attach the markers is undesirable. A significant improvement in the procedure is achieved by measuring the pose of the head without extrinsic markers using only the external surface appearance. This approach is currently being developed with initial results presented here. The intrinsic features measurement extracts discrete, sparse natural features from 2D images such as eyes, nose, mouth and other visible structures. Stereo correspondence between features for a camera pair is determined for calculation of 3D positions. These features are also tracked over time to provide continuity for surface model fitting. Experimental results from live images are presented.

  19. Precise fusion of MRI and dual energy 111In WBC/99mTc HDP SPECT/CT in the diabetic foot using companion CT: an example of SPECT/MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Knešaurek, K; Kolker, D; Vatti, S; Heiba, S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to correctly fuse MRI and SPECT ¹¹¹In WBC and ⁹⁹m Tc HDP images using companion CT images. The fused images could be used to assess proper surgical approach in treatment of the diabetic foot. Nine patients who had dual energy ¹¹¹In WBC/ ⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT/CT and MRI studies within a week were investigated in an ongoing project. A GE Infinia SPECT/CT camera and Siemens MAGNETOM 1.5T MR system were used in this study. First, the MRI and corresponding CT images were coregistrated using a transformation based on normalized mutual information. The transformation was saved and used for MRI and ¹¹¹In WBC/ ⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT fusion. A Jaszczak phantom study was also performed in order to estimate accuracy of MRI/ SPECT fusion. The Jaszczak phantom study with 3.7 MBq ¹¹¹In hot sphere showed that MRI/SPECT alignment using the approach described above produced registration with 0.7 ± 0.4 mm accuracy in all three dimensions (3D). The nine clinical cases were visually evaluated and showed 1-2 mm 3D fusion accuracy. MRI provides almost perfect anatomy of soft tissue and bony structures but it may exaggerate the extent of infection. ¹¹¹In WBC/⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT imaging is more accurate for infection detection but lacks anatomical reference. Combination of these images proved an essential adjunct to diagnosis. A clinical utility of the approach is illustrated in two clinical examples. The CT in dual energy ¹¹¹In WBC/⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT/CT studies can be used to accurately fuse and compare ¹¹¹In WBC/⁹⁹m Tc HDP SPECT and MRI images of the diabetic foot. This can significantly help in conservative treatment planning and limb salvage procedures in treatment of diabetic foot infections.

  20. Reconstruction of dynamic gated cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Mingwu; Yang Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2006-11-15

    In this paper we propose an image reconstruction procedure which aims to unify gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dynamic SPECT into a single method. We divide the cardiac cycle into a number of gate intervals as in gated SPECT, but treat the tracer distribution for each gate as a time-varying signal. By using both dynamic and motion-compensated temporal regularization, our reconstruction procedure will produce an image sequence that shows both cardiac motion and time-varying tracer distribution simultaneously. To demonstrate the proposed reconstruction method, we simulated gated cardiac perfusion imaging using the gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) phantom with Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent. Our results show that the proposed method can produce more accurate reconstruction of gated dynamic images than independent reconstruction of individual gate frames with spatial smoothness alone. In particular, our results show that the former could improve the contrast to noise ratio of a simulated perfusion defect by as much as 100% when compared to the latter.

  1. SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, George; Giamouzis, Gregory; Karagiannis, Georgios; Butler, Javed; Tsougos, Ioannis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Giannakoulas, George; Dimakopoulos, Nikolaos; Xanthopoulos, Andrew; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2017-02-02

    Heart failure is a common clinical syndrome associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of heart failure, at least in the industrialized countries. Proper diagnosis of the syndrome and management of patients with heart failure require anatomical and functional information obtained through various imaging modalities. Nuclear cardiology techniques play a main role in the evaluation of heart failure. Myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with thallium-201 or technetium-99 m labelled tracers offer valuable data regarding ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, viability, and intraventricular synchronism. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) permits accurate evaluation of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and viability, providing high-quality images and the ability of quantitative analysis. As these imaging techniques assess different parameters of cardiac structure and function, variations of sensitivity and specificity have been reported among them. In addition, the role of SPECT and PET guided therapy remains controversial. In this comprehensive review, we address these controversies and report the advances in patient's investigation with SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure. Furthermore, we present the innovations in technology that are expected to strengthen the role of nuclear cardiology modalities in the investigation of heart failure.

  2. SPECT and PET Imaging of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue. PMID:22623896

  3. SPECT and PET imaging of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue.

  4. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-07

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  5. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  6. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  7. The improved accuracy of planar bone scintigraphy by adding single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) to detect skeletal metastases from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, L C; O'Kelly, F; O'Brien, C; Sheikh, M; Feeney, J; Torreggiani, W; Thornhill, J A

    2016-02-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) is a standard radiological technique to detect skeletal metastases from prostate cancer (PC), the addition of SPECT-CT to PBS improves its diagnostic accuracy. The aim of this study was to assess the additional value of targeted SPECT-CT with PBS in detecting skeletal metastasis form prostate cancer, considering resource implications in an Irish hospital setting. 54 PC patients with increased radiotracer uptake on PBS were retrospectively recruited from 2012 to 2013. All underwent targeted evaluation with SPECT-CT. PBS and SPECT-CT images were reviewed by two nuclear medicine radiologists and reported independently. The final diagnosis was made based on the CT finding corresponding to the area of radiotracer uptake. The mean age was 70.9 years (48-88 years) and median PSA at presentation was 13.9 ng/ml (4.2-215 ng/ml). 68.5 % (n = 37) men received treatment for PC while 31.5 % (n = 17) patients had not received treatment prior to PBS. 164 areas of increased radiotracer uptake were identified on PBS; 13 areas were characterised as metastatic on SPECT-CT; iliac bone (n = 3), ribs (n = 1), skull (n = 2), sacrum (n = 1), ischium (n = 1), femur (n = 3), thoracic spine (n = 1) and cervical spine (n = 1). 151 areas were characterised as benign on SPECT-CT. One area of increased radiotracer uptake in the ribs was subsequently described as indeterminate after evaluation with SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT improves the diagnostic accuracy of PBS in detecting skeletal metastasis from PC and is superior to PBS alone in differentiating benign from malignant lesions. Notwithstanding resource implications of increased cost, specialist equipment and specialist manpower hours; we recommend the use of SPECT-CT in conjunction with PBS for targeted evaluation of suspicious bony lesions in this cohort of patients.

  8. Comparison of ventilation-perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) versus dual-energy CT perfusion and angiography (DECT) after 6 months of pulmonary embolism (PE) treatment.

    PubMed

    Meysman, M; Everaert, H; Buls, N; Nieboer, K; de Mey, J

    2015-09-01

    The natural evolution of treated symptomatic pulmonary embolism shows often incomplete resolution of pulmonary thrombi. The prevalence of perfusion defects depend on the image modality used. This study directly compares V/Q SPECT with DECT. A single-center prospective observational cohort study of patients with intermediate risk PE, reassessed at the end of treatment with V/Q SPECT. Abnormal V/Q SPECT images were compared with DECT. We compared DECT en V/Q SPECT in 28 consecutive patients with persistent V/Q mismatch on V/Q SPECT, 13 men and 15 woman, mean age 60 (+17), range 23-82 year. One patient was excluded from the final analysis due to inferior quality DECT. In 18/27 (66.7%) the results were concordant between CTPA (persistent embolus visible), DECT (segmentary defects on iodine map) and V/Q SPECT (segmentary ventilation-perfusion mismatch). In 3/18 (11.1% of the total group) the partialy matched V/Q SPECT defect could be explained on DECT lung images by lung infarction. In 6/27 (22.1%) only hypoperfusion was seen on DECT iodine map. In 3/27 (11.1%) results were discordant between V/Q SPECT and DECT images. Six months after diagnosis of first or recurrent PE, residual pulmonary perfusion-defects encountered on V/Q-SPECT corresponds in the majority of patients with chronic thromboembolic disease seen on DECT. In 22.1% of patients V/Q SPECT mismatch only corresponds with hypoperfusion on iodine map DECT scan. Some (11.1%) of the chronic thromboembolic lesions seen on V/Q SPECT can not be explained by DECT results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography and thallium-201 SPECT imaging for detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Schwaiger, M.; Molina, E.; Popma, J.; Gacioch, G.M.; Kalus, M.; Squicciarini, S.; al-Aouar, Z.R.; Schork, A.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The diagnostic performance of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) positron emission tomography (PET) and thallium-201 (Tl-201) single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) for detecting coronary artery disease was investigated in 81 patients (52 men, 29 women). PET studies using 60 mCi of Rb-82 were performed at baseline and after intravenous infusion of 0.56 mg/kg dipyridamole in conjunction with handgrip stress. Tl-201 SPECT was performed after dipyridamole-handgrip stress and, in a subset of patients, after treadmill exercise. Sensitivity, specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy were assessed using both visually and quantitatively interpreted coronary angiograms. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET for detection of coronary artery disease (greater than 50% diameter stenosis) were 84, 88 and 85%, respectively. In comparison, the performance of SPECT revealed a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 53% (p less than 0.05 vs PET) and accuracy of 79%. Similar results were obtained using either visual or quantitative angiographic criteria for severity of coronary artery disease. In 43 patients without prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity for detection of disease was 71 and 73%, respectively, similar for both PET and SPECT. There was no significant difference in diagnostic performance between imaging modalities when 2 different modes of stress (exercise treadmill vs intravenous dipyridamole plus handgrip) were used with SPECT imaging. Thus, Rb-82 PET provides improved specificity compared with Tl-201 SPECT for identifying coronary artery disease, most likely due to the higher photon energy of Rb-82 and attenuation correction provided by PET. However, post-test referral cannot be entirely excluded as a potential explanation for the lower specificity of Tl-201 SPECT.

  10. Dual-isotope SPECT/CT impact on hospitalized patients with suspected diabetic foot infection: saving limbs, lives, and resources.

    PubMed

    Heiba, Sherif; Kolker, Dov; Ong, Leonard; Sharma, Shalini; Travis, Arlene; Teodorescu, Victoria; Ellozy, Sharif; Kostakoglu, Lale; Savitch, Ina; Machac, Josef

    2013-09-01

    Foot ulcer with suspected infection is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and a major factor contributing to morbidity and high healthcare-related expenses among diabetic patients. Many patients will require amputation; however, major amputation is associated with an alarmingly high 5-year mortality rate. In this study, we assess the diagnosis and management of suspected foot infection in diabetic patients using dual-isotope (DI) single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) compared with conventional imaging. The diagnostic accuracy in and management of 227 patients who had undergone DI SPECT/CT was compared with that of 232 similar patients who had undergone conventional imaging including plain radiography, CT, planar bone scanning, planar indium-111 white blood cell scanning, and MRI. The duration of hospitalization was additionally compared between these two groups of patients after excluding patients with other active comorbidities. Soft-tissue infection, osteomyelitis with or without soft-tissue infection, and other bony pathologies were more accurately and confidently identified with DI SPECT/CT than with conventional imaging. DI SPECT/CT use was associated with significantly fewer major amputations and more selective bony resection as well as with shorter duration of hospitalization when compared with conventional imaging. In this large population of diabetic patients with suspected foot infection DI SPECT/CT was more accurate in diagnosing and localizing infection compared with conventional imaging. In addition, DI SPECT/CT provided clear guidance and promoted many limb salvage procedures. Of equal importance to health economics, DI SPECT/CT use was associated with considerably reduced length of hospitalization compared with conventional imaging.

  11. Radiation dose comparison between V/P-SPECT and CT-angiography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Isidoro, Jorge; Gil, Paulo; Costa, Gracinda; Pedroso de Lima, João; Alves, Caseiro; Ferreira, Nuno C

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two routine protocols at our institution, CTPA and V/P-SPECT, in terms of radiation dose to the most exposed organs (lungs and breast) and to the embryo/fetus in the case of pregnant patients. At our institution, the CTPA protocol includes a contrast enhanced CT (scan parameters: 100kVp, 700mA, 0.5s/rot, pitch 0.984) and in some cases a non-contrast enhanced CT acquisition (120kVp, 400mA, 0.5s/rot, pitch 1.375). In the V/P-SPECT protocol, ventilation SPECT was performed after inhalation of 99mTc-Technegas, reaching 30MBq in the lungs; perfusion was performed after intravenous administration of 60-120MBq of 99mTc-MAA. The absorbed doses (mGy) to lungs and breast from CTPA were estimated using the "ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator". The embryo/fetus dose was estimated for different gestational stages (0-7, 8-12, 13-25 and 26-40weeks) using the web based calculation tool "COnceptus Dose Estimation" (CODE). Doses to organs and embryo/fetus from V/P-SPECT were estimated based on published dose data normalized to administered activity (mGy/MBq). Embryo/fetus absorbed doses are similar for CTPA and V/P-SPECT and bellow 1mGy. The calculated dose to the lungs (breast) was 1.3-10.6 (27-136) times higher from CTPA when compared with V/P-SPECT. For the diagnosis of PE in women, if both imaging modalities are available, it is recommended to proceed with V/P-SPECT rather than CTPA due to the considerably lower radiation dose to the breast. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-Efficiency SPECT MPI: Comparison of Automated Quantification, Visual Interpretation, and Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, W. Lane; Slomka, Piotr J.; Gerlach, Jim R.; Sweeny, Joseph M.; Baber, Usman; Croft, Lori B.; Guma, Krista A.; George, Titus; Henzlova, Milena J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently introduced high-efficiency (HE) SPECT cameras with solid-state CZT detectors have been shown to decrease imaging time and reduce radiation exposure to patients. An automated, computer derived quantification of HE MPI has been shown to correlate well with coronary angiography on one HE SPECT camera system (D-SPECT), but has not been compared to visual interpretation on any of the HE SPECT platforms. Methods Patients undergoing a clinically indicated Tc-99m sestamibi HE SPECT (GE Discovery 530c with supine and prone imaging) study over a one year period followed by a coronary angiogram within 2 months were included. Only patients with a history of CABG surgery were excluded. Both MPI studies and coronary angiograms were reinterpreted by blinded readers. One hundred and twenty two very low (risk of CAD < 5%) or low (risk of CAD < 10%) likelihood subjects with normal myocardial perfusion were used to create normal reference limits. Computer derived quantification of the total perfusion deficit (TPD) at stress and rest was obtained with QPS software. The visual and automated MPI quantification were compared to coronary angiography (≥ 70% luminal stenosis) by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. Results Of the 3,111 patients who underwent HE SPECT over a one year period, 160 patients qualified for the correlation study (66% male, 52% with a history of CAD). The ROC area under the curve (AUC) was similar for both the automated and visual interpretations using both supine only and combined supine and prone images (0.69-0.74). Using thresholds determined from sensitivity and specificity curves, the automated reads showed higher specificity (59-67% versus 27-60%) and lower sensitivity (71-72% versus 79-93%) than the visual reads. By including prone images sensitivity decreased slightly but specificity increased for both. By excluding patients with known CAD and cardiomyopathies, AUC and specificity increased for both techniques (0.72-0.82). The use

  13. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, J. P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  14. SPECT imaging with the long bore collimator: Loss in sensitivity vs improved contrast resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, S.; Polak, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Eisner, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    A long bore (LB) collimator (16 cm thick) was compared with the standard low energy all purpose (LEAP) collimator for SPECT imaging. Line spread functions at various depths were measured in scatter material (planar imaging). Both collimators have similar full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) values yet the LB has less resolution loss with distance and consistently lower full-width-at-tenth-maximum (FWTM) values. An assessment of overall performance was made by planar imaging of the Rollo phantom with both collectors. Performance was judged by calculating the chi-square for the observed and expected contrasts of spherical cold targets (2.54, 1.91, 1.27 and 0.95 cm diameter). In all cases, LB scored consistently better than the LEAP. SPECT imaging of a bar phantom (spacing 2.25 cm) filled with I-123 (p,2n) confirmed the superior contrast resolution of the LB. Using SPECT data from 5 clinical I-123 IMP brain studies and from measurements of % rms noise as a function of total slice counts in a cylindrical phantom, the authors calculate that LB images would have a % rms noise of 8.7% compared to 5.7% for LEAP images acquired over the same time interval. The authors conclude that SPECT of the brain with the LB would lead to improved contrast resolution and a minimal increase in % rms noise despite a significant loss in sensitivity.

  15. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  16. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  17. Wiener filtering improves quantification of regional myocardial perfusion with thallium-201 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Jeremy, R.W.; Dyer, S.M.; Frank, T.L.; Becker, L.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Quantitation of myocardial perfusion with thallium-201 (201Tl) SPECT is limited by finite resolution and image noise. This study examined whether Wiener filtering could improve quantitation of the severity of myocardial perfusion deficits. In 19 anesthetized dogs, adjustable stenoses were placed on the left anterior descending (LAD, n = 12) or circumflex (LCx, n = 7) arteries. Thallium-201 SPECT images were acquired during maximal coronary vasodilation with dipyridamole, and simultaneous measurements of myocardial blood flow were made with microspheres. The relationship between SPECT and microsphere flow deficits in the LAD region was significantly better (p less than 0.05) with Wiener filtering (Y = 0.90X + 0.03, r = 0.78) than with conventional Hanning filtering (Y = 0.66X + 0.34, r = 0.61). Similarly, in the LCx region the relationship between SPECT and microsphere perfusion deficits was better (p less than 0.01) with the Wiener filter (Y = 0.91X + 0.07, r = 0.66) than with the Hanning filter (Y = 0.36X + 0.50, r = 0.40). Wiener filtering improves quantitation of the severity of regional myocardial perfusion deficits, allowing better assessment of the functional significance of coronary artery stenoses.

  18. A practical correction of scatter-related artifacts in SPECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hongwei; Krol, Andrzej; Lipson, Edward D.; Kunniyur, Vikram R.; Lee, Wei; Feiglin, David H.

    2007-03-01

    We have observed that an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm applied to SPECT reconstruction may produce hotspot artifacts of varying intensity. Our hypothesis was that scatter caused these artifacts. To test this assumption, we studied the performance of forward- and back-projection procedures in the EM algorithm for simulated and experimental SPECT data. First, synthetic scatter-free projections and projections with only one scattered photon in each view were created for a simulated simple object, and reconstructed with a fully 3D ordered-subsets EM (OSEM) algorithm. Then, Monte Carlo simulated brain SPECT (with no scatter and with scatter present), a mini-Defrise phantom, and patient SPECT were reconstructed. We confirmed our hypothesis: hot-spot artifacts appeared only in the reconstruction from noisy projections but not in the reconstruction from scatter-free projections. We investigated a practical and simple method, critical path-length control (CPLC), for suppression of the hot-spot artifacts. To this end we performed reconstructions with or without CPLC and quantitatively evaluated the results including estimation of accuracy, bias, contrast-to-noise ratio, and uniformity. We found that the OSEM-with-CPLC method significantly reduced hot-spot artifacts, and yielded a similar or improved image quality. We conclude that the CPLC method provides a useful yet simple tool to reduce scatter-related hot-spot artifacts.

  19. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function indices assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Dadpour, Bita; Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid R; Afshari, Reza; Dorri-Giv, Masoumeh; Mohajeri, Seyed A R; Ghahremani, Somayeh

    2016-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is associated with alterations of cardiac structure and function, although it is less known. In this study, we assessed possible abnormality in myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Fifteen patients with MA abuse, on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) MA dependency determined by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, underwent 2-day dipyridamole stress/rest Tc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. An average daily dose of MA use was 0.91±1.1 (0.2-4) g. The duration of MA use was 3.4±2.1 (1-7) years. In visual and semiquantitative analyses, all patients had normal gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, with no perfusion defects. In all gated SPECT images, there was no abnormality in left ventricular wall motion and thickening. All summed stress scores and summed rest scores were below 3. Calculated left ventricular functional indices including the end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were normal. Many cardiac findings because of MA mentioned in previous reports are less likely because of significant epicardial coronary artery stenosis.

  20. Superior diagnostic performance of perfusion-cardiovascular magnetic resonance versus SPECT to detect coronary artery disease: The secondary endpoints of the multicenter multivendor MR-IMPACT II (Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Myocardial Perfusion Assessment in Coronary Artery Disease Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Perfusion-cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is generally accepted as an alternative to SPECT to assess myocardial ischemia non-invasively. However its performance vs gated-SPECT and in sub-populations is not fully established. The goal was to compare in a multicenter setting the diagnostic performance of perfusion-CMR and gated-SPECT for the detection of CAD in various populations using conventional x-ray coronary angiography (CXA) as the standard of reference. Methods In 33 centers (in US and Europe) 533 patients, eligible for CXA or SPECT, were enrolled in this multivendor trial. SPECT and CXA were performed within 4 weeks before or after CMR in all patients. Prevalence of CAD in the sample was 49% and 515 patients received MR contrast medium. Drop-out rates for CMR and SPECT were 5.6% and 3.7%, respectively (ns). The study was powered for the primary endpoint of non-inferiority of CMR vs SPECT for both, sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CAD (using a single-threshold reading), the results for the primary endpoint were reported elsewhere. In this article secondary endpoints are presented, i.e. the diagnostic performance of CMR versus SPECT in subpopulations such as multi-vessel disease (MVD), in men, in women, and in patients without prior myocardial infarction (MI). For diagnostic performance assessment the area under the receiver-operator-characteristics-curve (AUC) was calculated. Readers were blinded versus clinical data, CXA, and imaging results. Results The diagnostic performance (= area under ROC = AUC) of CMR was superior to SPECT (p = 0.0004, n = 425) and to gated-SPECT (p = 0.018, n = 253). CMR performed better than SPECT in MVD (p = 0.003 vs all SPECT, p = 0.04 vs gated-SPECT), in men (p = 0.004, n = 313) and in women (p = 0.03, n = 112) as well as in the non-infarct patients (p = 0.005, n = 186 in 1–3 vessel disease and p = 0.015, n = 140 in MVD). Conclusion

  1. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, Eric; Taïeb, David; Cammilleri, Serge; Lussato, David; de Laforte, Catherine; Niboyet, Jean; Mundler, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 ( p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  2. Long-term mortality following normal exercise myocardial perfusion SPECT according to coronary disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Alan; Gransar, Heidi; Min, James K; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Thomson, Louise E J; Berman, Daniel S

    2014-04-01

    While normal exercise myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) is a robust predictor of low short-term clinical risk, there is increasing interest in ascertaining how clinical factors influence long-term risk following SPECT-MPI. We evaluated the predictors of outcome from clinical data obtained at the time of testing in 12,232 patients with normal exercise SPECT-MPI studies. All-cause mortality (ACM) was assessed at a mean of 11.2 ± 4.5 years using the Social Security Death Index. The ACM rate was 0.8%/year, but varied markedly according to the presence of CAD risk factors. Hypertension, smoking, diabetes, exercise capacity, dyspnea, obesity, higher resting heart rate, an abnormal ECG, LVH, atrial fibrillation, and LVEF < 45% were all predictors of increased mortality. Risk factors were synergistic in predicting mortality: annualized age and gender-adjusted ACM rates ranged from only 0.2%/year among patients exercising for >9 minutes having none of three significant risk factors (among hypertension, diabetes, and smoking) to 1.6%/year among patients exercising <6 minutes and having ≥ 2 of these three risk factors. The age and gender-adjusted hazard ratio for mortality was increased by 7.3 (95% confidence interval 5.5-9.7) in the latter patients compared to those patients who exercised >9 minutes and had no significant risk factors (P < .001). Long-term mortality risk varies markedly in accordance with baseline CAD risk factors and functional capacity among patients with normal exercise SPECT-MPI studies. Further study is indicated to determine whether the prospective characterization of both short-term and long-term risks following the performance of stress SPECT-MPI leads to improved clinical management.

  3. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  4. Comparison between segmental wall motion and wall thickening in patients with coronary artery disease using quantitative gated SPECT software.

    PubMed

    Imran, M B; Morita, K; Adachi, I; Konno, M; Kubo, N; Mochizuki, T; Katoh, C; Kohya, T; Kitabatake, A; Tsukamoto, E; Tamaki, N

    2000-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate regional wall motion (WM) and wall thickening (WT) using gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to determine their similarity and disparity in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 44 patients underwent 1 day stress/rest (MIBI) gated SPECT. Commercially available quantitative analysis of gated SPECT (QGS) software was used to generate 3D surface display and cine-mode SPECT display. Left ventricle was divided into nine segments to score WM and WT from 0 (no abnormality) to 4 (severe abnormality) by six independent observers. Finally a mean score was calculated for each segment from the scores of six observers. There was fairly good correlation between WM and WT of individual segments (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001). Concordance rate (IWM - WTI < 1) was 85%. A large difference between WM and WT (WM - WT > or = 2) was observed in 15 segments, including 12 segments with greater WM abnormalities and 3 segments with greater WT abnormalities (lateral and inferior walls). Greater WM abnormalities were most commonly observed in anteroseptal segments especially in post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients. In conclusion, WM and WT showed similarity on QGS studies. However, these two parameters may be determined separately in gated SPECT studies for comprehensive and robust evaluation of the functional status of myocardium. Analyses based on WM assessment alone may lead to erroneous results especially in septal regions.

  5. Characteristics of images of angiographically proven normal coronary arteries acquired by adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT with CT attenuation correction changed stepwise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Haruki; Kozono, Nami; Tanakamaru, Yoshiki; Idei, Naomi; Ohashi, Norihiko; Ohtsubo, Hideki; Okada, Takenori; Yasunobu, Yuji; Kaseda, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    Although several studies have shown the diagnostic and prognostic value of CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD), this issue remains a matter of debate. To clarify the characteristics of CT-AC SPECT images that might potentially improve diagnostic performance, we analyzed images acquired using adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT equipped with IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT (SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT) from patients with angiographically proven normal coronary arteries after changing the CT attenuation correction (CT-AC) in a stepwise manner. We enrolled 72 patients (Male 36, Female 36) with normal coronary arteries according to findings of invasive coronary angiography or CT-angiography within three months after a SPECT/CT study. Projection images were reconstructed at CT-AC values of (-), 40, 60, 80 and 100 % using a CT number conversion program according to our definition and analyzed using polar maps according to sex. CT attenuation corrected segments were located from the mid- and apical-inferior spread through the mid- and apical-septal regions and finally to the basal-anterior and basal- and mid-lateral regions in males, and from the mid-inferior region through the mid-septal and mid-anterior, and mid-lateral regions in females as the CT-AC values increased. Segments with maximal mean counts shifted from the apical-anterior to mid-anterolateral region under both stress and rest conditions in males, whereas such segments shifted from the apical-septal to the mid-anteroseptal region under both stress and rest conditions in females. We clarified which part of the myocardium and to which degree CT-AC affects it in adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT images by changing the CT-AC value stepwise. We also identified sex-specific shifts of segments with maximal mean counts that changed as

  6. Impact of image processing in the detection of ischaemia using CZT-SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Daniëlle; van Dalen, Jorn A; Slump, Cornelis H; Lots, Dimitri; Timmer, Jorik R; Jager, Pieter L

    2015-01-01

    The new multipinhole cardiac single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors are highly sensitive and produce images of high quality but rely on complex dedicated reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of various processing steps on image formation and in the detection of ischaemia in CZT-SPECT/CT both with and without attenuation correction (AC). Data on 20 consecutive patients who underwent a 1-day protocol stress-rest SPECT/CT using 99mTc-tetrofosmin were processed twice by three experienced operators, yielding 120 AC and 120 noncorrected (NC) data sets. Processing steps included selection and determination of myocardial axes, manual SPECT/CT coregistration for AC and myocardial masking. Using the 17-segment cardiac model, differences between stress and rest segmental uptake (%) were calculated for NC and AC image sets. Both interoperator and intraoperator variations were considered significant for the diagnosis of ischaemia when greater than 5%. The mean interoperator variations were 2.4±1.4% (NC) and 3.8±1.9% (AC) (P<0.01). In 6% (NC) and 23% (AC) of the 120 processed cases, operator variation was larger than 5% and therefore potentially clinically interfering with the diagnosis of ischaemia. Differences between interoperator and intraoperator variations were nonsignificant. Operator variations in the processing of myocardial perfusion image data using CZT-SPECT/CT are significant and may influence the diagnosis of ischaemia, especially when AC is applied. Clearer guidelines for image processing are necessary to improve the reproducibility of the studies and to obtain a more reliable diagnosis of ischaemia.

  7. Thallium SPECT-based stereotactic targeting for brain tumor biopsies. A technical note.

    PubMed

    Hemm, S; Vayssiere, Nathalie; Zanca, Michel; Ravel, Patrice; Coubes, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    MR or CT images acquired under stereotactic conditions are often used to plan and guide brain tumor biopsies. The objective of this study was to design and test a methodology to increase target selection reliability by acquiring stereotactic 201Tl-SPECT data and by integrating them into the surgical planning. The three-headed Philips gamma camera system (Prism 3000) was adapted to stereotactic acquisitions (patient pallet, headholder). A software was developed for the stereotactic target determination based on SPECT images (pixel with the highest metabolic activity inside the tumor). The whole system accuracy was tested with the Elekta phantom adapted to SPECT imaging. The methodology was applied to one brain tumor biopsy. Comparison of the specific phantom coordinates evaluated in SPECT with the theoretical ones did not reveal any significant difference. In this way, our methodology including our homemade software (identification of the stereotactic frame, determination of the pixel with highest metabolic activity within the tumor in the stereotactic coordinate system) was validated. No significant geometric deformations were detected. Clinical feasibility was confirmed in 1 patient with a brain glioma. This study illustrates the feasibility and the accuracy of SPECT acquisitions with the stereotactic Leksell G-frame. The clinical relevance of this methodology is under evaluation. This definition of the target, based on the point with the highest metabolic activity within the tumor, might lead to improved diagnosis in biopsies and patient management. Furthermore, it might prepare the future for therapy aimed at delivering a therapeutic agent within a tumor. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. PSMA-targeted SPECT agents: mode of binding effect on in vitro performance.

    PubMed

    Nedrow-Byers, Jessie R; Moore, Adam L; Ganguly, Tanushree; Hopkins, Mark R; Fulton, Melody D; Benny, Paul D; Berkman, Clifford E

    2013-03-01

    The enzyme-biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an active target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. The internalization of PSMA has been shown to vary with inhibitors' mode of binding: irreversible, slowly reversible, and reversible. In the present study, PSMA-targeted clickable derivatives of an irreversible phosphoramidate inhibitor DBCO-PEG(4) -CTT-54 (IC(50) = 1.0 nM) and a slowly reversible phosphate inhibitor, DBCO-PEG(4) -CTT-54.2 (IC(50) = 6.6 nM) were clicked to (99m) Tc(CO)(3) -DPA-azide to assemble a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent. The selectivity, percent uptake, and internalization of these PSMA-targeted SPECT agents were evaluated in PSMA-positive and PSMA-negative cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that PSMA-targeted SPECT agents exhibited selective cellular uptake in the PSMA-positive LNCaP cells compared to PSMA-negative PC3 cells. More importantly, it was found that (99m) Tc(CO)(3) -DPA-DBCO-PEG(4) -CTT-54 based on an irreversible PSMA inhibitor core, exhibited greater uptake and internalization than (99m) Tc(CO)(3) -DPA-DBCO-PEG(4) -CTT-54.2 constructed from a slowly reversible PSMA inhibitor core. We have demonstrated that a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent can be assembled efficiently using copper-less click chemistry. In addition, we demonstrated that mode of binding has an effect on internalization and percent uptake of PSMA-targeted SPECT agents; with the irreversible targeting agent demonstrating superior uptake and internalization in PSMA+ cells. The approach demonstrated in this work now supports a modular approach for the assembly of PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. PSMA-targeted SPECT agents: Mode of Binding effect on in vitro Performance

    PubMed Central

    Nedrow-Byers, Jessie R.; Moore, Adam L.; Ganguly, Tanushree; Hopkins, Mark R.; Fulton, Melody D.; Benny, Paul; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The enzyme-biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an active target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. The internalization of PSMA has been shown to vary with inhibitors’ mode of binding: irreversible, slowly reversible and reversible. METHODS In the present study, PSMA-targeted clickable derivatives of an irreversible phosphoramidate inhibitor DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54 (IC50 = 1.0 nM) and a slowly reversible phosphate inhibitor, DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54.2 (IC50 = 6.6 nM) were clicked to 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-azide to assemble a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent. The selectivity, percent uptake, and internalization of these PSMA-targeted SPECT agents were evaluated in PSMA-positive and PSMA-negative cells. RESULTS In vitro studies demonstrated that PSMA-targeted SPECT agents exhibited selective cellular uptake in the PSMA-positive LNCaP cells compared to PSMA-negative PC3 cells. More importantly, it was found that 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54 based on an irreversible PSMA inhibitor core, exhibited greater uptake and internalization than 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54.2 constructed from a slowly-reversible PSMA inhibitor core. CONCLUSIONS We have demonstrated that a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent can be assembled efficiently using copper-less click chemistry. In addition, we demonstrated that mode of binding has an effect on internalization and percent uptake of PSMA-targeted SPECT agents; with the irreversible targeting agent demonstrating superior uptake and internalization in PSMA+ cells. The approach demonstrated in this work now supports a modular approach for the assembly of PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:22911263

  10. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanfei; Yu, Zhicong; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. Methods: A gate (geant4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Results: Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. Conclusions: The gate Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac

  11. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Yanfei; Yu, Zhicong; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. Methods: A GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Results: Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. Conclusions: The GATE Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac

  12. Increased bone tracer uptake in symptomatic patients with ACL graft insufficiency: a correlation of MRI and SPECT/CT findings.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Dominic T; Hirschmann, Anna; Falkowski, Anna L; Kiekara, Tommi; Amsler, Felix; Rasch, Helmut; Hirschmann, Michael T

    2017-05-27

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computerised tomography/computerised tomography (SPECT/CT) are used as diagnostic tools in symptomatic patients after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The benefit of SPECT/CT in comparison with MRI is under debate. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how bone tracer uptake (BTU) intensity and distribution in SPECT/CT correlate with MRI findings in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction. Twenty-nine patients (male:female = 22:7, mean age ± SD 26 ± 10 years) with symptoms of pain and instability after ACL reconstruction were retrospectively investigated using prospectively acquired SPECT/CT and MRI. On MRI graft tear, graft signal intensity, bone marrow oedema, tunnel cyst formation, roof impingement, roof osteophytes, local arthrofibrosis, joint effusion and synovial thickness were analysed by two readers blinded to the BTU results. BTU was anatomically localised and volumetrically quantified. Spearman's rho test was used for correlation of BTU in SPECT/CT and MRI findings (p < 0.05). SPECT/CT showed increased femoral and tibial BTU in patients with MRI-confirmed graft tear, signal hyperintensity of the intraarticular graft section, joint effusion, synovial thickening, roof osteophytes and bone marrow oedema. Cyst formation in the femoral tunnel results in significantly reduced BTU in femur and tibia. No correlation of increased BTU was found for graft impingement and graft arthrofibrosis. Bone tracer uptake in SPECT/CT and defined MRI findings in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction were correlated. Both imaging modalities have a definite role in post-operative diagnostic and have established their value in those patients. This study provides a better understanding of the clinical value of SPECT/CT versus MRI in the clinical decision-making process. SPECT/CT provides a window into the in vivo loading of the joint as well as bone

  13. Correlation between clinical severity of central nervous system (CNS) lupus and findings on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, I.E.; Zeit, R.M.; Von Feldt, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosis (SLE) commonly causes significant neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the brain SPECT studies of SLE patients with clinical evidence of CNS involvement and determine whether there is a correlation between the findings on SPECT images and the clinical manifestations of this serious phase of the disease. We enrolled 19 SLE patients and 12 normal controls in this study. The level of each patient`s disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), an established method of scoring disease severity which is heavily weighted toward neuropsychiatric symptomatology, for 15 of the 19 SLE patients. The SLEDAI was calculated within a 10 day window of the date when the SPECT scan was obtained. SPECT scans were performed 30 minutes following the intravenous administration of 99mTc-HMPAO. Results are discussed.

  14. Integration of SimSET photon history generator in GATE for efficient Monte Carlo simulations of pinhole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Yuchuan; Lee, Jason J. S.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2008-01-01

    The authors developed and validated an efficient Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) workflow to facilitate small animal pinhole SPECT imaging research. This workflow seamlessly integrates two existing MCS tools: simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET) and GEANT4 application for emission tomography (GATE). Specifically, we retained the strength of GATE in describing complex collimator∕detector configurations to meet the anticipated needs for studying advanced pinhole collimation (e.g., multipinhole) geometry, while inserting the fast SimSET photon history generator (PHG) to circumvent the relatively slow GEANT4 MCS code used by GATE in simulating photon interactions inside voxelized phantoms. For validation, data generated from this new SimSET-GATE workflow were compared with those from GATE-only simulations as well as experimental measurements obtained using a commercial small animal pinhole SPECT system. Our results showed excellent agreement (e.g., in system point response functions and energy spectra) between SimSET-GATE and GATE-only simulations, and, more importantly, a significant computational speedup (up to ∼10-fold) provided by the new workflow. Satisfactory agreement between MCS results and experimental data were also observed. In conclusion, the authors have successfully integrated SimSET photon history generator in GATE for fast and realistic pinhole SPECT simulations, which can facilitate research in, for example, the development and application of quantitative pinhole and multipinhole SPECT for small animal imaging. This integrated simulation tool can also be adapted for studying other preclinical and clinical SPECT techniques. PMID:18697552

  15. Tl-201 and Tc-99m-Sestamibi SPECT for brain tumor detection: Comparison using MRI coregistration

    SciTech Connect

    Darcourt, J.; Itti, L.; Chang, L.

    1994-05-01

    Tl-201 (Tl) brain SPECT has been validated for the differential diagnosis of high versus low grade gliomas and recurrence versus radiation necrosis. We compared this technique to Tc-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT in 9 patients (pts) with brain tumors using MRI coregistration. Pts were injected with 4 mCi of Tl and brain SPECT was performed using a dedicated brain system. This was immediately following by an injection of 20 mCi of MIBI and a brain SPECT using the same camera and with the pt in the same position. Four pts were studied for the diagnosis of radiation necrosis vs. tumor recurrence (2 had biopsy proven recurrence); 5 pts were studied for primary tumor evaluation: 2 meningiomas, 1 oligodendroglioma, 1 low-grade astrocytoma, 1 cysticercosis. Coregistration was performed for every pt by 3D surface fitting of the inner skull MIBI contour to the MRI brain surface extracted automatically. ROIs were drawn on the MRI and applied to the coregistered MIBI and Tl images for tumor to non-tumor ratios T/NT calculations. There was a tight correlation between MIBI and Tl T/NT (r-0.96) and a 1.5 threshold separated radiation necrosis from recurrence and low from high grade primary tumors. Therefore, the data already available on Tl brain tumor imaging can be used with MIBI SPECT with the advantage of a better image quality (2.5 to 4 times more counts).

  16. Integration of SimSET photon history generator in GATE for efficient Monte Carlo simulations of pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Yuchuan; Lee, Jason J S; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2008-07-01

    The authors developed and validated an efficient Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) workflow to facilitate small animal pinhole SPECT imaging research. This workflow seamlessly integrates two existing MCS tools: simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET) and GEANT4 application for emission tomography (GATE). Specifically, we retained the strength of GATE in describing complex collimator/detector configurations to meet the anticipated needs for studying advanced pinhole collimation (e.g., multipinhole) geometry, while inserting the fast SimSET photon history generator (PHG) to circumvent the relatively slow GEANT4 MCS code used by GATE in simulating photon interactions inside voxelized phantoms. For validation, data generated from this new SimSET-GATE workflow were compared with those from GATE-only simulations as well as experimental measurements obtained using a commercial small animal pinhole SPECT system. Our results showed excellent agreement (e.g., in system point response functions and energy spectra) between SimSET-GATE and GATE-only simulations, and, more importantly, a significant computational speedup (up to approximately 10-fold) provided by the new workflow. Satisfactory agreement between MCS results and experimental data were also observed. In conclusion, the authors have successfully integrated SimSET photon history generator in GATE for fast and realistic pinhole SPECT simulations, which can facilitate research in, for example, the development and application of quantitative pinhole and multipinhole SPECT for small animal imaging. This integrated simulation tool can also be adapted for studying other preclinical and clinical SPECT techniques.

  17. [Sensitivity of neurochemical dementia diagnostics in CSF compared to 99mTc-SPECT in Alzheimer's dementia].

    PubMed

    Weih, M; Krinninger, M; Zimmermann, R; Lewczuk, P; Svitek, J; Schaller, G; Degirmenci, U; Richter-Schmidinger, T; Wiltfang, J; Kuwert, T; Kornhuber, J; Schmidt, D

    2009-07-01

    The diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia is currently changing from a late and exclusion diagnosis towards a pathophysiology-based early and positive diagnosis. Especially advances in neuro-chemical dementia diagnostics in the cerebrospinal fluid (NDD-CSF) and imaging techniques like PET, SPECT or MRI are of particular interest. Unfortunately, many studies investigated only either one or other technique. In the present study 56 patients (average 67.1 years; average mini-mental status test (MMST) 22.2) were examined with the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia. All patients both underwent NDD-CSF as well as 99mTc-SPECT. Only the SPECT, but not the NDD-CSF correlated with disease severity. Sensitivity of NDD-CSF was 89 % and SPECT 48 % for all patients and 93 % resp. 61 % for patients with MMST < 24. Below MMST 20 both methods had equal sensitivity. Both diagnostic techniques showed no statistic coherence (p = 0.27), neither after correction for subgroups like disease severity or the APOE genotype. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis that the NDD-CSF reflects beta-amyloid-aggregation and Tau-Protein pathology as a pathophysiologic biomarker. Our results suggest that SPECT is rather a state parameter for the rCBF changes following cortical neurodegeneration.

  18. Glob