Science.gov

Sample records for spectral edge frequency

  1. Fermi edge singularity and finite-frequency spectral features in a semi-infinite one-dimensional wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhan, A.; Snyman, I.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically study a charge qubit interacting with electrons in a semi-infinite one-dimensional wire. The system displays the physics of the Fermi edge singularity. Our results generalize known results for the Fermi edge system to the regime where excitations induced by the qubit can resolve the spatial structure of the scattering region. We find resonant features in the qubit tunneling rate as a function of the qubit level splitting. They occur at integer multiples of hvF/l. Here vF is the Fermi velocity of the electrons in the wire, and l is the distance from the tip of the wire to the point where it interacts with the qubit. These features are due to the constructive interference of the amplitudes for creating single coherent left- or right-moving charge fluctuation (plasmon) in the electron gas. As the coupling between the qubit and the wire is increased, the resonances are washed out. This is a clear signature of the increasingly violent Fermi sea shake-up, associated with the creation of many plasmons whose individual energies are too low to meet the resonance condition.

  2. Comparative study of Poincaré plot analysis using short electroencephalogram signals during anaesthesia with spectral edge frequency 95 and bispectral index.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Yamada, T; Sawa, T

    2015-03-01

    The return or Poincaré plot is a non-linear analytical approach in a two-dimensional plane, where a timed signal is plotted against itself after a time delay. Its scatter pattern reflects the randomness and variability in the signals. Quantification of a Poincaré plot of the electroencephalogram has potential to determine anaesthesia depth. We quantified the degree of dispersion (i.e. standard deviation, SD) along the diagonal line of the electroencephalogram-Poincaré plot (named as SD1/SD2), and compared SD1/SD2 values with spectral edge frequency 95 (SEF95) and bispectral index values. The regression analysis showed a tight linear regression equation with a coefficient of determination (R(2) ) value of 0.904 (p < 0.0001) between the Poincaré index (SD1/SD2) and SEF95, and a moderate linear regression equation between SD1/SD2 and bispectral index (R(2)  = 0.346, p < 0.0001). Quantification of the Poincaré plot tightly correlates with SEF95, reflecting anaesthesia-dependent changes in electroencephalogram oscillation.

  3. New applications of Spectral Edge image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alex E.; Montagna, Roberto; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present new applications of the Spectral Edge image fusion method. The Spectral Edge image fusion algorithm creates a result which combines details from any number of multispectral input images with natural color information from a visible spectrum image. Spectral Edge image fusion is a derivative-based technique, which creates an output fused image with gradients which are an ideal combination of those of the multispectral input images and the input visible color image. This produces both maximum detail and natural colors. We present two new applications of Spectral Edge image fusion. Firstly, we fuse RGB-NIR information from a sensor with a modified Bayer pattern, which captures visible and near-infrared image information on a single CCD. We also present an example of RGB-thermal image fusion, using a thermal camera attached to a smartphone, which captures both visible and low-resolution thermal images. These new results may be useful for computational photography and surveillance applications.

  4. Spectral methods in edge-diffraction theories

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Spectral methods for the construction of uniform asymptotic representations of the field diffracted by an aperture in a plane screen are reviewed. These are separated into contrasting approaches, roughly described as physical and geometrical. It is concluded that the geometrical methods provide a direct route to the construction of uniform representations that are formally identical to the equivalent-edge-current concept. Some interpretive and analytical difficulties that complicate the physical methods of obtaining uniform representations are analyzed. Spectral synthesis proceeds directly from the ray geometry and diffraction coefficients, without any intervening current representation, and the representation is uniform at shadow boundaries and caustics of the diffracted field. The physical theory of diffraction postulates currents on the diffracting screen that give rise to the diffracted field. The difficulties encountered in evaluating the current integrals are throughly examined, and it is concluded that the additional data provided by the physical theory of diffraction (diffraction coefficients off the Keller diffraction cone) are not actually required for obtaining uniform asymptotics at the leading order. A new diffraction representation that generalizes to arbitrary plane-convex apertures a formula given by Knott and Senior [Proc. IEEE 62, 1468 (1974)] for circular apertures is deduced. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Line edge roughness frequency analysis for SAQP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Levi, Shimon; Ge, Adam; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Wenhui; Krishnan, Navaneetha; Chen, Yulu; Verduijn, Erik; Kim, Ryoung-han

    2016-03-01

    The line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) transfer in a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) process is shown for the first time. Three LER characterization methods, including conventional standard deviation method, power spectral density (PSD) method and frequency domain 3-sigma method, are used in the analysis. The wiggling is also quantitatively characterized for each SAQP step with a wiggling factor. This work will benefit both process optimization and process monitoring.

  6. Red edge spectral measurements from sugar maple leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, J. E.; Rock, B. N.; Moss, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Many sugar maple stands in the northeastern United States experienced extensive insect damage during the 1988 growing season. Chlorophyll data and high spectral resolution spectrometer laboratory reflectance data were acquired for multiple collections of single detached sugar maple leaves variously affected by the insect over the 1988 growing season. Reflectance data indicated consistent and diagnostic differences in the red edge portion (680-750 nm) of the spectrum among the various samples and populations of leaves. These included differences in the red edge inflection point (REIP), a ratio of reflectance at 740-720 nm (RE3/RE2), and a ratio of first derivative values at 715-705 nm (D715/D705). All three red edge parameters were highly correlated with variation in total chlorophyll content. Other spectral measures, including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Simple Vegetation Index Ratio (VI), also varied among populations and over the growing season, but did not correlate well with total chlorophyll content. Leaf stacking studies on light and dark backgrounds indicated REIP, RE3/RE2 and D715/D705 to be much less influenced by differences in green leaf biomass and background condition than either NDVI or VI.

  7. Spectral CT Using Multiple Balanced K-Edge Filters

    PubMed Central

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; Fakhri, Georges El; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral CT system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  8. Simulation of spectral stabilization of high-power broad-area edge emitting semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Holly, Carlo; Hengesbach, Stefan; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    The simulation of spectral stabilization of broad-area edge-emitting semiconductor diode lasers is presented in this paper. In the reported model light-, temperature- and charge carrier-distributions are solved iteratively in frequency domain for transverse slices along the semiconductor heterostructure using wide-angle finite-difference beam propagation. Depending on the operating current the laser characteristics are evaluated numerically, including near- and far-field patterns of the astigmatic laser beam, optical output power and the emission spectra, with central wavelength and spectral width. The focus of the model lies on the prediction of influences on the spectrum and power characteristics by frequency selective feedback from external optical resonators. Results for the free running and the spectrally stabilized diode are presented.

  9. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-08-11

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  10. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  11. Spectral characteristics of edge magnetic turbulence in COMPASS-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W. E.; Thyagaraja, A.; Fielding, S. J.; Valovic, M.

    2000-02-01

    Edge fluctuation data from both COMPASS-D and calculations with the large-eddy simulation code CUTIE have been analysed with a number of techniques, revealing coherent structures which exhibit high-frequency, standing-wave oscillations; some of those observed during edge localized modes (ELMs) have an `inverse-chirp' character and these are related to a disturbance of the plasma boundary in the lower-inboard quadrant of the poloidal plane. A `precursor' mode, seen in Ohmic discharges at about 220 kHz just before large ELMs, appears to be outward ballooning in character. Although the CUTIE calculations do not yet include ELM simulations, the results seem to correspond qualitatively with those seen between ELMs or during ELM-free periods on COMPASS-D.

  12. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  13. Frequency-domain optical mammography: edge effect corrections.

    PubMed

    Fantini, S; Franceschini, M A; Gaida, G; Gratton, E; Jess, H; Mantulin, W W; Moesta, K T; Schlag, P M; Kaschke, M

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the problem of edge effects in laser-beam transillumination scanning of the human breast. Edge effects arise from tissue thickness variability along the scanned area, and from lateral photon losses through the sides of the breast. Edge effects can be effectively corrected in frequency-domain measurements by employing a two-step procedure: (1) use of the phase information to calculate an effective tissue thickness for each pixel location; (2) application of the knowledge of tissue thickness to calculate an edge-corrected optical image from the ac signal image. The measurements were conducted with a light mammography apparatus (LIMA) designed for feasibility tests in the clinical environment. Operating in the frequency-domain (110 MHz), this instrument performs a transillumination optical scan at two wavelengths (685 and 825 nm). We applied the proposed two-step procedure to data from breast phantoms and from human breasts. The processed images provide higher contrast and detectability in optical mammography with respect to raw data breast images.

  14. Simultaneous spectral/spatial detection of edges for hyperspectral imagery: the HySPADE algorithm revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmini, Ronald G.

    2012-06-01

    The hyperspectral/spatial detection of edges (HySPADE) algorithm, originally published in 2004 [1], has been modified and applied to a wider diversity of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) data. As originally described in [1], HySPADE operates by converting the naturally two-dimensional edge detection process based on traditional image analysis methods into a series of one-dimensional edge detections based on spectral angle. The HySPADE algorithm: i) utilizes spectral signature information to identify edges; ii) requires only the spectral information of the HSI scene data and does not require a spectral library nor spectral matching against a library; iii) facilitates simultaneous use of all spectral information; iv) does not require endmember or training data selection; v) generates multiple, independent data points for statistical analysis of detected edges; vi) is robust in the presence of noise; and vii) may be applied to radiance, reflectance, and emissivity data--though it is applied to radiance and reflectance spectra (and their principal components transformation) in this report. HySPADE has recently been modified to use Euclidean distance values as an alternative to spectral angle. It has also been modified to use an N x N-pixel sliding window in contrast to the 2004 version which operated only on spatial subset image chips. HySPADE results are compared to those obtained using traditional (Roberts and Sobel) edge-detection methods. Spectral angle and Euclidean distance HySPADE results are superior to those obtained using the traditional edge detection methods; the best results are obtained by applying HySPADE to the first few, information-containing bands of principal components transformed data (both radiance and reflectance). However, in practice, both the Euclidean distance and spectral angle versions of HySPADE should be applied and their results compared. HySPADE results are shown; extensions of the HySPADE concept are discussed as are applications for Hy

  15. SENTINEL-2A red-edge spectral indices suitability for discriminating burn severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Manso, Alfonso; Fernández-Manso, Oscar; Quintano, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Fires are a problematic and recurrent issue in Mediterranean ecosystems. Accurate discrimination between burn severity levels is essential for the rehabilitation planning of burned areas. Sentinel-2A MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI) record data in three red-edge wavelengths, spectral domain especially useful on agriculture and vegetation applications. Our objective is to find out whether Sentinel-2A MSI red-edge wavelengths are suitable for burn severity discrimination. As study area, we used the 2015 Sierra Gata wildfire (Spain) that burned approximately 80 km2. A Copernicus Emergency Management Service (EMS)-grading map with four burn severity levels was considered as reference truth. Cox and Snell, Nagelkerke and McFadde pseudo-R2 statistics obtained by Multinomial Logistic Regression showed the superiority of red-edge spectral indices (particularly, Modified Simple Ratio Red-edge, Chlorophyll Index Red-edge, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Red-edge) over conventional spectral indices. Fisher's Least Significant Difference test confirmed that Sentinel-2A MSI red-edge spectral indices are adequate to discriminate four burn severity levels.

  16. Spectral analysis of oscillation instabilities in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippincott, S.

    1970-01-01

    Phase and frequency fluctuations, inherent in oscillators used as frequency standards, are measured over spectral frequency range of 1 Hz to 5 kHz. Basic measurement system consists of electromechanical phase-locked loop that extracts phase and frequency fluctuations and error multiplier that extends threshold sensitivity.

  17. PT -symmetric spectral singularity and negative-frequency resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Guo, Yu; Khosravi, Farhad; Jacob, Zubin

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum consists of a bath of balanced and symmetric positive- and negative-frequency fluctuations. Media in relative motion or accelerated observers can break this symmetry and preferentially amplify negative-frequency modes as in quantum Cherenkov radiation and Unruh radiation. Here, we show the existence of a universal negative-frequency-momentum mirror symmetry in the relativistic Lorentzian transformation for electromagnetic waves. We show the connection of our discovered symmetry to parity-time (PT ) symmetry in moving media and the resulting spectral singularity in vacuum fluctuation-related effects. We prove that this spectral singularity can occur in the case of two metallic plates in relative motion interacting through positive- and negative-frequency plasmonic fluctuations (negative-frequency resonance). Our work paves the way for understanding the role of PT -symmetric spectral singularities in amplifying fluctuations and motivates the search for PT symmetry in novel photonic systems.

  18. Spectral distribution of infrared synchrotron radiation by an insertion device and its edges: A comparison between experimental and simulated spectra

    PubMed

    Roy; Guidi Cestelli M; Nucara; Marcouille; Calvani; Giura; Paolone; Mathis; Gerschel

    2000-01-17

    The first measurements of the spectral distribution of infrared radiation emitted by an undulator are reported. They are compared with calculations including both velocity and acceleration terms. Measurements have been performed at the beam line SIRLOIN (Spectroscopie en InfraRouge Lointain). The agreement between the observations and this first exact numerical solution shows that the inclusion of the velocity term in the submillimeter frequency range is necessary. Moreover, structures due to undulator edges are observed in the far infrared and mid-infrared range, while the interference pattern due to redshifted harmonics of the undulator is dominating in the mid-infrared to near infrared.

  19. Joint demosaicking and zooming using moderate spectral correlation and consistent edge map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dengwen; Dong, Weiming; Chen, Wengang

    2014-07-01

    The recently published joint demosaicking and zooming algorithms for single-sensor digital cameras all overfit the popular Kodak test images, which have been found to have higher spectral correlation than typical color images. Their performance perhaps significantly degrades on other datasets, such as the McMaster test images, which have weak spectral correlation. A new joint demosaicking and zooming algorithm is proposed for the Bayer color filter array (CFA) pattern, in which the edge direction information (edge map) extracted from the raw CFA data is consistently used in demosaicking and zooming. It also moderately utilizes the spectral correlation between color planes. The experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm produces an excellent performance on both the Kodak and McMaster datasets in terms of both subjective and objective measures. Our algorithm also has high computational efficiency. It provides a better tradeoff among adaptability, performance, and computational cost compared to the existing algorithms.

  20. On the location of spectral edges in \\ {Z}-periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Pavel; Kuchment, Peter; Winn, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Periodic second-order ordinary differential operators on \\ {R} are known to have the edges of their spectra to occur only at the spectra of periodic and anti-periodic boundary value problems. The multi-dimensional analog of this property is false, as was shown in a 2007 paper by some of the authors of this paper. However, one sometimes encounters the claims that in the case of a single periodicity (i.e., with respect to the lattice \\ {Z}), the 1D property still holds, and spectral edges occur at the periodic and anti-periodic spectra only. In this work, we show that even in the simplest case of quantum graphs this is not true. It is shown that this is true if the graph consists of a 1D chain of finite graphs connected by single edges, while if the connections are formed by at least two edges, the spectral edges can already occur away from the periodic and anti-periodic spectra. This paper is dedicated to the memory of P Duclos.

  1. Time frequency analysis of Jovian and Saturnian radio spectral patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Al-Haddad, Emad; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Prominent radio spectral patterns were observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment (RPWS) principally at Jupiter and Saturn. The spectral shapes are displayed in the usual dynamic spectra showing the flux density versus the time and the frequency. Those patterns exhibit well-organized shapes in the time-frequency plane connected with the rotation of the planet. We consider in this analysis the auroral emissions which occurred in the frequency range between 10 kHz and approximately 3 MHz. It concerns the Jovian hectometric emission (HOM) and the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). We show in the case of Jupiter's HOM that the spectral patterns are well-arranged arc structures with curvatures depending on the Jovian rotation. Regarding the SKR emission, the spectral shapes exhibit generally complex patterns, and only sometimes arc structures are observed. We emphasize the curve alterations from vertex-early to vertex-late arcs (and vice versa) and we study their dependences, or not, on the planetary rotations. We also discuss the common physical process at the origin of the HOM and SKR emissions, specifically the spectral patterns created by the interaction between planetary satellites (e.g. Io or Dione) and the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres.

  2. Cell Edge Capacity Improvement by Using Adaptive Base Station Cooperation in Cellular Networks with Fractional Frequency Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yamamoto, Koji; Murata, Hidekazu; Yoshida, Susumu

    The present paper focuses on the application of the base station cooperation (BSC) technique in fractional frequency reuse (FFR) networks. Fractional frequency reuse is considered to be a promising scheme for avoiding the inter-cell interference problem in OFDMA cellular systems, such as WiMAX, in which the edge mobile stations (MSs) of adjacent cells use different subchannels for separate transmission. However, the problem of FFR is that the cell edge spectral efficiency (SE) is much lower than that of the cell center. The BSC technique, in which adjacent BSs perform cooperative transmission for one cell edge MS with the same channel, may improve the cell edge SE. However, since more BSs transmit signals for one cell edge MS, the use of BSC can also increase the inter-cell interference, which might degrade the network performance. In this paper, with a focus on this tradeoff, we propose an adaptive BSC scheme in which BSC is only performed for the cell edge MSs that can achieve a significant capacity increase with only a slight increase in inter-cell interference. Moreover, a channel reallocation scheme is proposed in order to further improve the performance of the adaptive BSC scheme. The simulation results reveal that, compared to the conventional FFR scheme, the proposed schemes are effective for improving the performance of FFR networks.

  3. [The frequency features and application of edge detection differential operators in medical image].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Ding, Hui; Wang, Guangzhi; Ding, Haishu; Zhou, Yiyi

    2005-02-01

    Edge detection is an absolutely necessary step in medical image processing, and the use of differential operators to detect edge is one of the most common and effective methods. In this paper are analyzed the frequency features of the Roberts operator, Prewitt operator, Sobel operator and Laplacian operator from the viewpoint of frequency domain, and it is proposed that the frequency features of the differential operators should be considered when differential operator is being used and/or constructed. Because edge detection operator is sensitive to the edge type, the appropriate operator should be adopted in different edge type detection. Finally, the importance and necessity of selecting edge detection operator are validated in the MRI image edge processing.

  4. Non-Equilibrium Allele Frequency Spectra Via Spectral Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Jody; Chen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in the analysis of population genomics data consists of isolating signatures of natural selection from background noise caused by random drift and gene flow. Analyses of massive amounts of data from many related populations require high-performance algorithms to determine the likelihood of different demographic scenarios that could have shaped the observed neutral single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency spectrum. In many areas of applied mathematics, Fourier Transforms and Spectral Methods are firmly established tools to analyze spectra of signals and model their dynamics as solutions of certain Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). When spectral methods are applicable, they have excellent error properties and are the fastest possible in high dimension; see [15]. In this paper we present an explicit numerical solution, using spectral methods, to the forward Kolmogorov equations for a Wright-Fisher process with migration of K populations, influx of mutations, and multiple population splitting events. PMID:21376069

  5. Measurement of microresonator frequency comb coherence by spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Jang, J K; Anthony, J; Coen, S; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-15

    We experimentally investigate the spectral coherence of microresonator optical frequency combs. Specifically, we use a spectral interference method, typically used in the context of supercontinuum generation, to explore the variation of the magnitude of the complex degree of first-order coherence across the full comb bandwidth. We measure the coherence of two different frequency combs and observe wholly different coherence characteristics. In particular, we find that the observed dynamical regimes are similar to the stable and unstable modulation instability regimes reported in previous theoretical studies. Results from numerical simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. In addition to demonstrating a new technique to assess comb stability, our results provide strong experimental support for previous theoretical analyses.

  6. Convergence of oscillator spectral estimators for counted-frequency measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A common intermediary connecting frequency-noise calibration or testing of an oscillator to useful applications is the spectral density of the frequency-deviating process. In attempting to turn test data into predicts of performance characteristics, one is naturally led to estimation of statistical values by sample-mean and sample-variance techniques. However, sample means and sample variances themselves are statistical quantities that do not necessarily converge (in the mean-square sense) to actual ensemble-average means and variances, except perhaps for excessively large sample sizes. This is especially true for the flicker noise component of oscillators. This article shows, for the various types of noises found in oscillators, how sample averages converge (or do not converge) to their statistical counterparts. The convergence rate is shown to be the same for all oscillators of a given spectral type.

  7. Laser heterodyne interferometric signal processing method based on rising edge locking with high frequency clock signal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enzheng; Chen, Benyong; Yan, Liping; Yang, Tao; Hao, Qun; Dong, Wenjun; Li, Chaorong

    2013-02-25

    A novel phase measurement method composed of the rising-edge locked signal processing and the digital frequency mixing is proposed for laser heterodyne interferometer. The rising-edge locked signal processing, which employs a high frequency clock signal to lock the rising-edges of the reference and measurement signals, not only can improve the steepness of the rising-edge, but also can eliminate the error counting caused by multi-rising-edge phenomenon in fringe counting. The digital frequency mixing is realized by mixing the digital interference signal with a digital base signal that is different from conventional frequency mixing with analogue signals. These signal processing can improve the measurement accuracy and enhance anti-interference and measurement stability. The principle and implementation of the method are described in detail. An experimental setup was constructed and a series of experiments verified the feasibility of the method in large displacement measurement with high speed and nanometer resolution.

  8. Spectral Trends of Solar Bursts at Sub-THz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Kudaka, A. S.; Marun, A.; Pereyra, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous sub-THz studies were derived from single-event observations. We here analyze for the first time spectral trends for a larger collection of sub-THz bursts. The collection consists of a set of 16 moderate to small impulsive solar radio bursts observed at 0.2 and 0.4 THz by the Solar Submillimeter-wave Telescope (SST) in 2012 - 2014 at El Leoncito, in the Argentinean Andes. The peak burst spectra included data from new solar patrol radio telescopes (45 and 90 GHz), and were completed with microwave data obtained by the Radio Solar Telescope Network, when available. We critically evaluate errors and uncertainties in sub-THz flux estimates caused by calibration techniques and the corrections for atmospheric transmission, and introduce a new method to obtain a uniform flux scale criterion for all events. The sub-THz bursts were searched during reported GOES soft X-ray events of class C or larger, for periods common to SST observations. Seven out of 16 events exhibit spectral maxima in the range 5 - 40 GHz with fluxes decaying at sub-THz frequencies (three of them associated to GOES class X, and four to class M). Nine out of 16 events exhibited the sub-THz spectral component. In five of these events, the sub-THz emission fluxes increased with a separate frequency from that of the microwave spectral component (two classified as X and three as M), and four events have only been detected at sub-THz frequencies (three classified as M and one as C). The results suggest that the THz component might be present throughout, with the minimum turnover frequency increasing as a function of the energy of the emitting electrons. The peculiar nature of many sub-THz burst events requires further investigations of bursts that are examined from SST observations alone to better understand these phenomena.

  9. A novel edge-preserving nonnegative matrix factorization method for spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenxing; Ma, Ruishi

    2015-12-01

    Spectral unmixing technique is one of the key techniques to identify and classify the material in the hyperspectral image processing. A novel robust spectral unmixing method based on nonnegative matrix factorization(NMF) is presented in this paper. This paper used an edge-preserving function as hypersurface cost function to minimize the nonnegative matrix factorization. To minimize the hypersurface cost function, we constructed the updating functions for signature matrix of end-members and abundance fraction respectively. The two functions are updated alternatively. For evaluation purpose, synthetic data and real data have been used in this paper. Synthetic data is used based on end-members from USGS digital spectral library. AVIRIS Cuprite dataset have been used as real data. The spectral angle distance (SAD) and abundance angle distance(AAD) have been used in this research for assessment the performance of proposed method. The experimental results show that this method can obtain more ideal results and good accuracy for spectral unmixing than present methods.

  10. Edge technique for measurement of laser frequency shifts including the Doppler shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, Larry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the frequency shift in a laser system by transmitting an outgoing laser beam. An incoming laser beam having a frequency shift is received. A first signal is acquired by transmitting a portion of the incoming laser beam to an energy monitor detector. A second signal is acquired by transmitting a portion of the incoming laser beam through an edge filter to an edge detector, which derives a first normalized signal which is proportional to the transmission of the edge filter at the frequency of the incoming laser beam. A second normalized signal is acquired which is proportional to the transmission of the edge filter at the frequency of the outgoing laser beam. The frequency shift is determined by processing the first and second normalized signals.

  11. Coupling an ICRF core spectral solver to an edge FEM code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Shiraiwa, S.

    2015-12-01

    The finite element method (FEM) and the spectral approaches to simulation of ion cyclotron (IC) waves in toroidal plasmas each have strengths and weaknesses. For example, the spectral approach (eg TORIC) has a natural algebraic representation of the parallel wavenumber and hence the wave dispersion but does not easily represent complex geometries outside the last closed flux surface, whereas the FEM approach (eg LHEAF) naturally represents arbitrary geometries but does not easily represent thermal corrections to the plasma dispersion. The two domains: thermal core with flux surfaces and cold edge plasma with open field lines may be combined in such as way that each approach is used where it works naturally. Among the possible ways of doing this, we demonstrate the method of mode matching. This method provides an easy way of combining the two linear systems without significant modifications to the separate codes. We will present proof of principal cases and initial applications to minority heating.

  12. Coupling an ICRF core spectral solver to an edge FEM code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John; Shirwaiwa, Syunichi; RF SciDAC Team

    2015-11-01

    The finite element method (FEM) and the spectral approaches to simulation of ion cyclotron (IC) waves in toroidal plasmas each have strengths and weaknesses. For example, the spectral approach (eg TORIC) has a natural algebraic representation of the parallel wavenumber and hence the wave dispersion but does not easily represent complex geometries outside the last closed flux surface, whereas the FEM approach (eg LHEAF) naturally represents arbitrary geometries but does not easily represent thermal corrections to the plasma dispersion. The two domains: thermal core with flux surfaces and cold edge plasma with open field lines may be combined in such as way that each approach is used where it works naturally. Among the possible ways of doing this, we demonstrate the method of mode matching. This method provides an easy way of combining the two linear systems without significant modifications to the separate codes. We will present proof of principal cases and initial applications to minority heating.

  13. Spectral effectiveness of engineered thermal cloaks in the frequency regime

    PubMed Central

    Petiteau, David; Guenneau, Sebastien; Bellieud, Michel; Zerrad, Myriam; Amra, Claude

    2014-01-01

    We analyse basic thermal cloaks designed via different geometric transforms applied to thermal cloaking. We evaluate quantitatively the effectiveness of these heterogeneous anisotropic thermal cloaks through the calculation of the standard deviation of the isotherms. The study addresses the frequency regime and we point out the cloak's spectral effectiveness. We find that all these cloaks have comparable effectiveness irrespective of whether or not they have singular conductivity at their inner boundary. However, approximate cloaking with multi-layered cloak critically depends upon the homogenization algorithm and it is shown that the standard deviation varies linearly with the inverse of the number of layers. PMID:25486981

  14. Spectrally narrowed edge emission from leaky waveguide modes in organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhengqing; Tian, Yun; Lynch, David W.; Kang, Ji-hun; Park, Q-Han; and Shinar, Joseph

    2009-11-03

    A dramatic spectral line narrowing of the edge emission at room temperature from tris(quinolinolate) Al (Alq{sub 3}), N,N{prime}-diphenyl-N,N{prime}-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1{prime}-biphenyl-4,4{prime}-diamine (NPD), 4,4{prime}-bis(2,2{prime}-diphenyl-vinyl)-,1{prime}-biphenyl (DPVBi), and some guest-host small molecular organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass, is described. In all but the DPVBi OLEDs, the narrowed emission band emerges above a threshold thickness of the emitting layer, and narrows down to a full width at half maximum of only 5-10 nm. The results demonstrate that this narrowed emission is due to irregular waveguide modes that leak from the ITO to the glass substrate at a grazing angle. While measurements of variable stripe length l devices exhibit an apparent weak optical gain 0 {le} g {le} 1.86 cm{sup -1}, there is no observable threshold current or bias associated with this spectral narrowing. In addition, in the phosphorescent guest-host OLEDs, there is no decrease in the emission decay time of the narrowed edge emission relative to the broad surface emission. It is suspected that the apparent weak optical gain is due to misalignment of the axis of the waveguided mode and the axis of the collection lens of the probe.

  15. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Spectral and spectral-frequency methods of investigating atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, Vladimir V.; Prokof'eva-Mikhailovskaya, Valentina V.; Bochkov, Valerii V.

    2007-06-01

    A method of reflectance spectrophotometry of atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system, its specificity, and the means of eliminating basic spectral noise are considered. As a development, joining the method of reflectance spectrophotometry with the frequency analysis of observational data series is proposed. The combined spectral-frequency method allows identification of formations with distinctive spectral features, and estimations of their sizes and distribution on the surface of atmospherelss celestial bodies. As applied to investigations of asteroids 21 Lutetia and 4 Vesta, the spectral frequency method has given us the possibility of obtaining fundamentally new information about minor planets.

  16. Spectrally narrowed leaky waveguide edge emission and transient electrluminescent dynamics of OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengqing, Gan

    2010-01-01

    In summary, there are two major research works presented in this dissertation. The first research project (Chapter 4) is spectrally narrowed edge emission from Organic Light Emitting Diodes. The second project (Chapter 5) is about transient electroluminescent dynamics in OLEDs. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of OLEDs. Chapter 2 is a general introduction of organic semiconductor lasers. Chapter 3 is a description of the thermal evaporation method for OLED fabrication. The detail of the first project was presented in Chapter 4. Extremely narrowed spectrum was observed from the edge of OLED devices. A threshold thickness exists, above which the spectrum is narrow, and below which the spectrum is broad. The FWHM of spectrum depends on the material of the organic thin films, the thickness of the organic layers, and length of the OLED device. A superlinear relationship between the output intensity of the edge emission and the length of the device was observed, which is probably due to the misalignment of the device edge and the optical fiber detector. The original motivation of this research is for organic semiconductor laser that hasn't been realized due to the extremely high photon absorption in OLED devices. Although we didn't succeed in fabricating an electrically pumped organic laser diode, we made a comprehensive research in edge emission of OLEDs which provides valuable results in understanding light distribution and propagation in OLED devices. Chapter 5 focuses on the second project. A strong spike was observed at the falling edge of a pulse, and a long tail followed. The spike was due to the recombination of correlated charge pair (CCP) created by trapped carriers in guest molecules of the recombination zone. When the bias was turned off, along with the decreasing of electric field in the device, the electric field induced quenching decreases and the recombination rate of the CCP increases which result in the spike. This research project provides a

  17. Bulk-edge correspondence, spectral flow and Atiyah-Patodi-Singer theorem for the Z2-invariant in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Wu, Yong-Shi; Xie, Xincheng

    2017-03-01

    We study the bulk-edge correspondence in topological insulators by taking Fu-Kane spin pumping model as an example. We show that the Kane-Mele invariant in this model is Z2 invariant modulo the spectral flow of a single-parameter family of 1 + 1-dimensional Dirac operators with a global boundary condition induced by the Kramers degeneracy of the system. This spectral flow is defined as an integer which counts the difference between the number of eigenvalues of the Dirac operator family that flow from negative to non-negative and the number of eigenvalues that flow from non-negative to negative. Since the bulk states of the insulator are completely gapped and the ground state is assumed being no more degenerate except the Kramers, they do not contribute to the spectral flow and only edge states contribute to. The parity of the number of the Kramers pairs of gapless edge states is exactly the same as that of the spectral flow. This reveals the origin of the edge-bulk correspondence, i.e., why the edge states can be used to characterize the topological insulators. Furthermore, the spectral flow is related to the reduced η-invariant and thus counts both the discrete ground state degeneracy and the continuous gapless excitations, which distinguishes the topological insulator from the conventional band insulator even if the edge states open a gap due to a strong interaction between edge modes. We emphasize that these results are also valid even for a weak disordered and/or weak interacting system. The higher spectral flow to categorize the higher-dimensional topological insulators is expected.

  18. Spectral tomography with diffuse near-infrared light: inclusion of broadband frequency domain spectral data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) region-based spectroscopy is examined for accuracy with spectral recovery using frequency domain data at a discrete number of wavelengths, as compared to that with broadband continuous wave data. Data with more wavelengths in the frequency domain always produce superior quantitative spectroscopy results with reduced noise and error in the chromophore concentrations. Performance of the algorithm in the situation of doing region-guided spectroscopy within the MRI is also considered, and the issue of false positive prior regions being identified is examined to see the effect of added wavelengths. The results indicate that broadband frequency domain data are required for maximal accuracy. A broadband frequency domain experimental system was used to validate the predictions, using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser for the source between 690- and 850-nm wavelengths. The 80-MHz pulsed signal is heterodyned with photomultiplier tube detection, to lower frequency for data acquisition. Tissue-phantom experiments with known hemoglobin absorption and tissue-like scatter values are used to validate the system, using measurements every 10 nm. More wavelengths clearly provide superior quantification of total hemoglobin values. The system and algorithms developed here should provide an optimal way to quantify regions with the goal of image-guided breast tissue spectroscopy within the MRI. PMID:19021313

  19. Application of frequency domain line edge roughness characterization methodology in lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Beique, Genevieve; Wood, Obert; Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2015-03-01

    A frequency domain 3 sigma LER characterization methodology combining the standard deviation and power spectral density (PSD) methods is proposed. In the new method, the standard deviation is calculated in the frequency domain instead of the spatial domain as in the conventional method. The power spectrum of the LER is divided into three regions: low frequency (LF), middle frequency (MF) and high frequency (HF) regions. The frequency region definition is based on process visual comparisons. Three standard deviation numbers are used to characterize the LER in the three frequency regions. Pattern wiggling can be detected quantitatively with a wiggling factor which is also proposed in this paper.

  20. Laser line shape and spectral density of frequency noise

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, G.M.; Blin, S.; Besnard, P.; Tam, T.T.; Tetu, M.

    2005-04-01

    Published experimental results show that single-mode laser light is characterized in the microwave range by a frequency noise which essentially includes a white part and a 1/f (flicker) part. We theoretically show that the spectral density (the line shape) which is compatible with these results is a Voigt profile whose Lorentzian part or homogeneous component is linked to the white noise and the Gaussian part to the 1/f noise. We measure semiconductor laser line profiles and verify that they can be fit with Voigt functions. It is also verified that the width of the Lorentzian part varies like 1/P where P is the laser power while the width of the Gaussian part is more of a constant. Finally, we theoretically show from first principles that laser line shapes are also described by Voigt functions where the Lorentzian part is the laser Airy function and the Gaussian part originates from population noise.

  1. High resolution atomic coherent control via spectral phase manipulation of an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Matthew C; Cruz, Flavio C; Marian, Adela; Ye, Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  2. High Resolution Atomic Coherent Control via Spectral Phase Manipulation of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Marian, Adela; Ye Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  3. Line edge roughness frequency analysis during pattern transfer in semiconductor fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Beique, Genevieve; Sung, Min Gyu; Wood, Obert R.; Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2015-07-01

    Line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) are analyzed based on the frequency domain 3σ LER characterization methodology during pattern transfer in a self-aligned double patterning (SADP) process. The power spectrum of the LER/LWR is divided into three regions: low frequency, middle frequency, and high frequency regions. Three standard deviation numbers are used to characterize the LER/LWR in the three frequency regions. Pattern wiggling is also detected quantitatively during LER/LWR transfer in the SADP process.

  4. Small Pitch Transition-Edge Sensors with Broadband High Spectral Resolution for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Eckart, M. E.; Smith, Adams; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chevenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small pitch transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for solar astronomy. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates with embedded Cu heat-sink layer. We use 35 x 35 square micrometers Mo/Au TESs with 4.5 micrometer thick Au absorbers. We have tested devices with different geometric absorber stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area. This allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between thc stem contact area and a broadening in the spectral line shape indicative of athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained exceptional broadband spectral resolution of 1.28 plus or minus 0.03 eV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.58 plus or minus 0.07 eV at 5.9 keV and 1.96 plus or minus 0.08 eV at 8 keV. The linearity in the measured gain scale is understood in the context of the longitudinal proximity effect from the electrical bias leads resulting in transition characteristics that are strongly dependent upon TES size.

  5. High Broadband Spectral Resolving Transition-Edge Sensors for High Count-Rate Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We are developing arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for high count-rate solar astronomy applications where characterizing the high velocity motions of X-ray jets in solar flares is of particular interest. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates and consist of 35x35micron^2 TESs with 4.5micron thick, 60micron pitch, electroplated absorbers. We have tested devices fabricated with different geometric stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area, which allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between the stem contact area and a non-Gaussian broadening in the spectral line shape consistent with athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained remarkable board-band spectral resolving capabilities of 1.3 plus or minus 0.leV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.6 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 5.9 keV and 2.0 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 8 keV. This, coupled with a capability of accommodating 100's of counts per second per pixel makes these devices an exciting prospect of future x-ray astronomy applications.

  6. Low Frequency Spectral Structure of X-shaped Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, D. V.; Rao, A. P.

    2005-12-01

    X-shaped radio galaxies are attributed to be formed by galactic mergers as the black holes of two galaxies fall into the merged system and form a bound system. Recent analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope low frequency data for an X-shaped source, 3C 223.1 has revealed an unusual result (Lal & Rao 2004). The radio morphologies of it at 240 and 610 MHz show well defined X-shape with a pair of active jets along the north-south axis and a pair of wings along the east-west axis, that pass symmetrically through the undetected radio core. The wings (or low surface brightness jets) have flatter spectral indices with respect to the high surface brightness jets, which confirms the earlier marginal result obtained at high frequency by Dennett-Thorpe et al. (2002). Although unusual, it is a valuable result which puts stringent constraints on the formation models and nature of these sources. We present preliminary results for two such sources.

  7. Simultaneous multi-frequency topological edge modes between one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ka Hei; Ling, C W; Lee, K F; Tsang, Y H; Fung, Kin Hung

    2016-04-01

    We show theoretically that, in the limit of weak dispersion, one-dimensional binary centrosymmetric photonic crystals can support topological edge modes in all photonic bandgaps. By analyzing their bulk band topology, these "harmonic" topological edge modes can be designed in a way that they exist at all photonic bandgaps opened at the center of the Brillouin zone, at all gaps opened at the zone boundaries, or both. The results may suggest a new approach to achieve robust multi-frequency coupled modes for applications in nonlinear photonics, such as frequency upconversion.

  8. Investigation of the mica x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectral features at the Al K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Mottana, A.; Della Ventura, G.

    2003-10-01

    Near-edge features of Al x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra in aluminosilicate compounds with mixed coordination number are usually assigned to a fourfold coordinated site contribution followed by a sixfold coordinated site contribution that is displaced towards higher energy because of the increasing ligand nucleus potentials, neglecting possible contributions due to bond distance variations and local geometrical distortion. Here we present and discuss the Al K-edge XANES spectra of synthetic micas with either fourfold coordinated Al (phlogopite), or with sixfold coordinated Al (polylithionite), as well as with mixed coordination (preiswerkite). Multiple scattering simulations of XANES spectra demonstrate that octahedral contributions may overlap the tetrahedral ones so that the lower energy structures in mixed coordination compounds may be associated with the octahedral sites. This unexpected behaviour can be described as due to the effect of a significant reduction of the ligand field strength (i.e. large local distortion and Al-O bond distances).

  9. Suppression of edge localized mode crashes by multi-spectral non-axisymmetric fields in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Park, Gunyoung; Bae, Cheonho; Yoon, Siwoo; Han, Hyunsun; Yoo, Min-Gu; Park, Young-Seok; Ko, Won-Ha; Juhn, June-Woo; Na, Yong Su; The KSTAR Team

    2017-02-01

    Among various edge localized mode (ELM) crash control methods, only non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (NAMPs) yield complete suppression of ELM crashes beyond their mitigation, and thus attract more attention than others. No other devices except KSTAR, DIII-D, and recently EAST have successfully achieved complete suppression with NAMPs. The underlying physics mechanisms of these successful ELM crash suppressions in a non-axisymmetric field environment, however, still remain uncertain. In this work, we investigate the ELM crash suppression characteristics of the KSTAR ELMy H-mode discharges in a controlled multi-spectral field environment, created by both n=2 middle reference and n=1 top/bottom proxy in-vessel control coils. Interestingly, the attempts have produced a set of contradictory findings, one expected (ELM crash suppression enhancement with the addition of n  =  1 to the n  =  2 field at relatively low heating discharges) and another unexpected (ELM crash suppression degradation at relatively high heating discharges) from the earlier findings in DIII-D. This contradiction indicates the dependence of the ELM crash suppression characteristics on the heating level and the associated kink-like plasma responses. Preliminary linear resistive MHD plasma response simulation shows the unexpected suppression performance degradation to be likely caused by the dominance of kink-like plasma responses over the island gap-filling effects.

  10. Edge states, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and thermodynamic and spectral properties in a two-dimensional electron gas with an antidot

    SciTech Connect

    Bogachek, E.N.; Landman, U.

    1995-11-15

    The thermodynamic and spectral properties of a two-dimensional electron gas with an antidot in a strong magnetic field, {ital r}{sub {ital c}}{le}{ital r}{sub 0}, where {ital r}{sub {ital c}} is the cyclotron radius and {ital r}{sub 0} is the antidot effective radius, are studied via a solvable model with the antidot confinement potential {ital U}{similar_to}1/{ital r}{sup 2}. The edge states localized at the antidot boundary result in an Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillatory dependence of the magnetization as a function of the magnetic field flux through the antidot. These oscillations are superimposed on the de Haas--van Alphen oscillations. In the strong-field limit, {h_bar}{omega}{sub {ital c}}{similar_to}{epsilon}{sub {ital F}}, where {omega}{sub {ital c}} is the cyclotron frequency and {epsilon}{sub {ital F}} is the Fermi energy, the amplitude of the Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations of the magnetization due to the contribution of the lowest edge state is {similar_to}{mu}{sub {ital B}}{ital k}{sub {ital F}}{ital r}{sub {ital c}} ({mu}{sub {ital B}} is the Bohr magneton and {ital k}{sub {ital F}} is the Fermi wave vector). When the magnetic field is decreased, higher edge states can contribute to the magnetization, leading to the appearance of a beating pattern in the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. The role of temperature in suppressing the oscillatory contribution due to higher edge states is analyzed. Rapid oscillations of the magnetization as a function of the Aharonov-Bohm flux, occurring on a scale of a small fraction of the flux quantum {ital hc}/{ital e}, are demonstrated. The appearance of a manifold of non- equidistant frequencies in the magneto-optical-absorption spectrum, due to transitions between electronic edge states localized near the antidot boundary, is predicted.

  11. Potential of the Sentinel-2 Red Edge Spectral Bands for Estimation of Eco-Physiological Plant Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Homolova, Lucie; Janoutova, Ruzena; Landier, Lucas; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Berthelot, Beatrice; Huck, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated importance of the space- borne instrument Sentinel-2 red edge spectral bands and reconstructed red edge position (REP) for retrieval of the three eco-physiological plant parameters, leaf and canopy chlorophyll content and leaf area index (LAI), in case of maize agricultural fields and beech and spruce forest stands. Sentinel-2 spectral bands and REP of the investigated vegetation canopies were simulated in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Their potential for estimation of the plant parameters was assessed through training support vector regressions (SVR) and examining their P-vector matrices indicating significance of each input. The trained SVR were then applied on Sentinel-2 simulated images and the acquired estimates were cross-compared with results from high spatial resolution airborne retrievals. Results showed that contribution of REP was significant for canopy chlorophyll content, but less significant for leaf chlorophyll content and insignificant for leaf area index estimations. However, the red edge spectral bands contributed strongly to the retrievals of all parameters, especially canopy and leaf chlorophyll content. Application of SVR on Sentinel-2 simulated images demonstrated, in general, an overestimation of leaf chlorophyll content and an underestimation of LAI when compared to the reciprocal airborne estimates. In the follow-up investigation, we will apply the trained SVR algorithms on real Sentinel-2 multispectral images acquired during vegetation seasons 2015 and 2016.

  12. The spectral evolution of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Broderick, J. J.; Odell, S. L.; Mitchell, K. J.; Altschuler, D. R.; Payne, H. E.; Condon, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic spectra of several low frequency extragalactic radio sources are presented. The observations were made at 318, 430, 606, 880, and 1400 MHz at several different radio observatories around the U.S. Two outbursts were observed in AO 0235 + 16 at 1.4 GHz, followed by a diminished variation at the lower frequencies. The dynamic frequencies of NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3 do not fit the same pattern. These radio sources displayed the following characteristics: (1) departure from straight or curved spectra at the frequencies of variation; (2) no obvious frequency drifting; and (3) negligible variation at 1.4 GHz. Possible explanations for this behavior are briefly discussed.

  13. Self-similar spectral structures and edge-locking hierarchy in open-boundary spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Masudul

    2010-07-15

    For an anisotropic Heisenberg (XXZ) spin chain, we show that an open boundary induces a series of approximately self-similar features at different energy scales, high up in the eigenvalue spectrum. We present a nonequilibrium phenomenon related to this fractal structure, involving states in which a connected block near the edge is polarized oppositely to the rest of the chain. We show that such oppositely polarized blocks can be 'locked' to the edge of the spin chain and that there is a hierarchy of edge-locking effects at various orders of the anisotropy. The phenomenon enables dramatic control of quantum-state transmission and magnetization control.

  14. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  15. Spectral estimation of plasma fluctuations. II. Nonstationary analysis of edge localized mode spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, K.S.; Sidorenko, A. ); Bretz, N. ); Thomson, D.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Several analysis methods for nonstationary fluctuations are described and applied to the edge localized mode (ELM) instabilities of limiter H-mode plasmas. The microwave scattering diagnostic observes poloidal [ital k][sub [theta

  16. Implementation of Spectral Maxima Sound Processing for Cochlear Implants by Using Bark Scale Frequency Band Partition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1 Implementation of Spectral Maxima Sound processing for cochlear implants by using Bark scale Frequency band partition Han xianhua1 Nie...new method on the basis of Bark scale frequency-band partition was presented to improve the recognition performance of cochlear implants . In the...nature of physics, it consists with human’s cochlea filter properties. Also the mechanism of a cochlear implant and its spectral maxima sound

  17. Spatio-temporal saliency perception via hypercomplex frequency spectral contrast.

    PubMed

    Li, Ce; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning; Lan, Xuguang; Tian, Zhiqiang

    2013-03-12

    Salient object perception is the process of sensing the salient information from the spatio-temporal visual scenes, which is a rapid pre-attention mechanism for the target location in a visual smart sensor. In recent decades, many successful models of visual saliency perception have been proposed to simulate the pre-attention behavior. Since most of the methods usually need some ad hoc parameters or high-cost preprocessing, they are difficult to rapidly detect salient object or be implemented by computing parallelism in a smart sensor. In this paper, we propose a novel spatio-temporal saliency perception method based on spatio-temporal hypercomplex spectral contrast (HSC). Firstly, the proposed HSC algorithm represent the features in the HSV (hue, saturation and value) color space and features of motion by a hypercomplex number. Secondly, the spatio-temporal salient objects are efficiently detected by hypercomplex Fourier spectral contrast in parallel. Finally, our saliency perception model also incorporates with the non-uniform sampling, which is a common phenomenon of human vision that directs visual attention to the logarithmic center of the image/video in natural scenes. The experimental results on the public saliency perception datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach compared to eleven state-of-the-art approaches. In addition, we extend the proposed model to moving object extraction in dynamic scenes, and the proposed algorithm is superior to the traditional algorithms.

  18. Operators associated with soft and hard spectral edges from unitary ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Using Hankel operators and shift-invariant subspaces on Hilbert space, this paper develops the theory of the integrable operators associated with soft and hard edges of eigenvalue distributions of random matrices. Such Tracy-Widom operators are realized as controllability operators for linear systems, and are reproducing kernels for weighted Hardy spaces, known as Sonine spaces. Periodic solutions of Hill's equation give a new family of Tracy-Widom type operators. This paper identifies a pair of unitary groups that satisfy the von Neumann-Weyl anti-commutation relations and leave invariant the subspaces of L2 that are the ranges of projections given by the Tracy-Widom operators for the soft edge of the Gaussian unitary ensemble and hard edge of the Jacobi ensemble.

  19. Precision spectral peak frequency measurement using a window leakage ratio function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, David C.

    2015-03-01

    For power spectra of signals consisting of stationary sinusoids mixed with random noise, the frequency and amplitude of a spectral peak can be estimated with greater accuracy than the nearest frequency bin of the Fourier transform by exploiting the spectral leakage characteristics for the particular data window used. Techniques such as linear interpolation or an amplitude weighted average have inadequate precision due to the nonlinear leakage into adjacent bins and the dependence on data window type. This paper offers a new general algorithm presented using the Fourier coefficients ck of the input data window to produce a function which is the ratio of the side-bin amplitudes of the window in the frequency domain. The ratio function allows one to use the amplitudes of the adjacent bins of a spectral peak to precisely estimate the peak frequency and amplitude when the frequency does not lie exactly on a frequency bin (in between the discrete bins of a Fourier transform). Examples are provided for a number of popular data windows. The ratio function can be most easily implemented using a simplified log-ratio function for the window side bin magnitudes. A statistical analysis provides a useful frequency estimation error estimate given the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral peak based on an approximation of the ratio of non-zero mean Gaussian variables. The benefits of this technique are not just improved estimation accuracy for amplitude and frequency, but also allow large spectral data files to be accurately reduced in size for remote monitoring of vibration spectra. An example is given of a methodology for reduction of spectral data file size without the loss of important signals for analysis where the file size is reduced by 88% with only a few percent error, which is mostly confined to the background noise in the reconstructed spectrum.

  20. [Spectral analysis of nitrofurantoin in the terahertz frequency range].

    PubMed

    Kang, Xu-Sheng; Hou, Di-Bo; Zhang, Guang-Xin; Chen, Xi-Ai; Yue, Fei-Heng; Huang, Ping-Jie; Zhou, Ze-Kui

    2012-07-01

    The present article measured the absorption coefficient spectra and refractive index spectra of nitrofurantoin original drug, which is one kind of nitrofuran drugs, in the terahertz frequency range from 0.2 to 1.8 THz using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The results showed that there exist a number of characteristic absorption peaks of nitrofurantoin with different intensity in the range and the absorption coefficient spectra can be used to identify nitrofurantoin. The article also simulated absorption coefficient spectra of nitrofurantoin molecule within 0.2 - 1.8 THz using density functional theory by Gaussian software, and vibrational modes of some peaks in the experimental absorption coefficient spectra were analyzed and identified. The results show that the experimental absorption peaks at 1.25 and 1.60 THz correspond with the theoretical peaks at 1.30 and 1.67 THz, and these experimental peaks were caused by intramolecular vibrational modes of nitrofurantoin.

  1. Odd-frequency triplet superconductivity at the helical edge of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, François; Burset, Pablo; Trauzettel, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Nonlocal pairing processes at the edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator in proximity to an s -wave superconductor are usually suppressed by helicity. However, the additional proximity of a ferromagnetic insulator can substantially influence the helical constraint and therefore open a new conduction channel by allowing for crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) processes. We show a one-to-one correspondence between CAR and the emergence of odd-frequency triplet superconductivity. Hence, nonlocal transport experiments that identify CAR in helical liquids yield smoking-gun evidence for unconventional superconductivity. Interestingly, we identify a setup—composed of a superconductor flanked by two ferromagnetic insulators—that allows us to favor CAR over electron cotunneling, which is known to be a difficult but essential task to be able to measure CAR.

  2. Application of spectral methods for high-frequency financial data to quantifying states of market participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2008-06-01

    Empirical analysis of the foreign exchange market is conducted based on methods to quantify similarities among multi-dimensional time series with spectral distances introduced in [A.-H. Sato, Physica A 382 (2007) 258-270]. As a result it is found that the similarities among currency pairs fluctuate with the rotation of the earth, and that the similarities among best quotation rates are associated with those among quotation frequencies. Furthermore, it is shown that the Jensen-Shannon spectral divergence is proportional to a mean of the Kullback-Leibler spectral distance both empirically and numerically. It is confirmed that these spectral distances are connected with distributions for behavioural parameters of the market participants from numerical simulation. This concludes that spectral distances of representative quantities of financial markets are related into diversification of behavioural parameters of the market participants.

  3. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  4. Recognition of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded sentences with additional unprocessed low-frequency speech

    PubMed Central

    Başkent, Deniz; Chatterjee, Monita

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of periodically interrupted sentences (with an interruption rate of 1.5 Hz, 50% duty cycle) was investigated under conditions of spectral degradation, implemented with a noiseband vocoder, with and without additional unprocessed low-pass filtered speech (cutoff frequency 500 Hz). Intelligibility of interrupted speech decreased with increasing spectral degradation. For all spectral-degradation conditions, however, adding the unprocessed low-pass filtered speech enhanced the intelligibility. The improvement at 4 and 8 channels was higher than the improvement at 16 and 32 channels: 19% and 8%, on average, respectively. The Articulation Index predicted an improvement of 0.09, in a scale from 0 to 1. Thus, the improvement at poorest spectral-degradation conditions was larger than what would be expected from additional speech information. Therefore, the results implied that the fine temporal cues from the unprocessed low-frequency speech, such as the additional voice pitch cues, helped perceptual integration of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded speech, especially when the spectral degradations were severe. Considering the vocoder processing as a cochlear-implant simulation, where implant users’ performance is closest to 4 and 8-channel vocoder performance, the results support additional benefit of low-frequency acoustic input in combined electric-acoustic stimulation for perception of temporally degraded speech. PMID:20817081

  5. A parametric model of the spectral periodicity of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineton, Ben; Lutman, Mark E.

    2003-08-01

    A model for estimating the spectral period of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) is presented. The model characterizes the frequency spectrum of an SFOAE in terms of four parameters which can be directly related to cochlear mechanical quantities featuring in the theory of SFOAE generation proposed by Zweig and Shera [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 2018-2047 (1995)]. The results of applying the parametric model to SFOAEs generated by cochlear models suggest that it gives a sensitive measure of spectral period. It is concluded that the parametric model may be a useful tool for detecting small changes in cochlear function using SFOAE measurements.

  6. Frequency Calibration of Spectral Observation System of the TM65m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Li; Ya-jun, Wu; Hai-hua, Qiao; Jun-zhi, Wang; Xiu-ting, Zuo

    2016-10-01

    In order to carry out the spectral observation with the TM65m radio telescope, the frequency calibration and test of DIBAS (Digital Backend System) are performed, it is found that it has a good performance. First, by injecting the PCAL signals, the frequency resolution, frequency drift and the stability of frequency interval between two spectral lines of the DIBAS backend are measured. It is found that in one hour, the maximum frequency drift of a single spike is 0.03 channel, the maximum fluctuation of spike interval is 0.05 channel. Then, by the observations on the H2CO maser and absorbtion lines of massive star formation regions, and the comparison with the results observed by the GBT (Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope), it is shown that the results of frequency calibration are correct. Finally, by the OH maser observations in more than one hour toward W3(OH), and the methanol maser observations in more than 5 hours, it is found that the spectral profiles keep consistent, and the observational noise is consistent with the theoretical value, indicating the stability and reliability of the frequency calibration program.

  7. Cutting Edge of Traumatic Maculopathy with Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Sílvia; Campos, António; Campos, Joana; Neves, Arminda; Beselga, Diana; Fernandes, Cristina; Castro Sousa, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews clinically relevant data regarding traumatic maculopathy (TM), frequently observed in clinical practice, especially due to sport or traffic accident injuries. It is characterized by transient gray-whitish retinal coloration and reduction of visual acuity (VA) with closed, blunt object globe trauma of their prior. It may be limited to the posterior pole (Berlin’s edema), or peripheral areas of the retina. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) provides detail insight using high resolution cross-sectional tomographs of the ocular tissue. It is a potent non-invasive tool for the clinician to follow-up. Clinicians are, thereby empowered with a tool that enables evaluation of the retinal status and allows for prediction of the prognosis. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography supports the idea that the major site of injury is in the photoreceptor and layers of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Depending on the severity of the trauma, SD-OCT may reveal differential optical densities of intraretinal spaces ranging from disappearance of the thin hyporeflective optical space in mild lesions, or areas of disruption of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction and hyperreflectivity of the overlying retina, pigment disorders and retinal atrophy, in more severe cases. The prognosis for recovery of vision is generally good, and improvement occurs within 3-4 weeks. PMID:26060831

  8. Fourier-spectral element approximation of the ion–electron Braginskii system with application to tokamak edge plasma in divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Minjeaud, Sebastian; Pasquetti, Richard

    2016-09-15

    Due to the extreme conditions required to produce energy by nuclear fusion in tokamaks, simulating the plasma behavior is an important but challenging task. We focus on the edge part of the plasma, where fluid approaches are probably the best suited, and our approach relies on the Braginskii ion–electron model. Assuming that the electric field is electrostatic, this yields a set of 10 strongly coupled and non-linear conservation equations that exhibit multiscale and anisotropy features. The computational domain is a torus of complex geometrical section, that corresponds to the divertor configuration, i.e. with an “X-point” in the magnetic surfaces. To capture the complex physics that is involved, high order methods are used: The time-discretization is based on a Strang splitting, that combines implicit and explicit high order Runge–Kutta schemes, and the space discretization makes use of the spectral element method in the poloidal plane together with Fourier expansions in the toroidal direction. The paper thoroughly describes the algorithms that have been developed, provides some numerical validations of the key algorithms and exhibits the results of preliminary numerical experiments. In particular, we point out that the highest frequency of the system is intermediate between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies.

  9. Laser frequency stabilization to spectral hole burning frequency references in erbium-doped crystals: Material and device optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottger, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Narrow spectral holes in the absorption lines of Er3+ doped crystals have been explored as references for frequency stabilizing external cavity diode lasers at the important 1.5 mum optical communication wavelength. Allan deviations of the beat signal between two independent stabilized lasers as low as 200 Hz over 10 ms integration time have been achieved using regenerative spectral holes in Er3+:Y2SiO5 and Er3+:KTP, while drift was reduced to ˜7 kHz/min by incorporating the inhomogeneous absorption line as a fixed reference. During active stabilization, the transient spectral hole was continuously regenerated as hole burning balanced relaxation. In contrast, persistent spectral holes in Er3+:D-:CaF2, with lifetimes of several weeks, provided programmable and transportable secondary frequency references that maintained sub-kilohertz stability over several seconds and enabled 6 kHz stability over 1.6 x 103 s. The error signal was derived from the spectral hole transmission using frequency modulation spectroscopy. A servo amplifier applied fast frequency corrections to the injection current of the laser diode and slower adjustments to the piezo-driven feedback prism plate. These stabilized lasers provide ideal sources for spectral hole burning applications based on optical coherent transients, where laser stability is required over the storage time of the material. Since the lifetime of the frequency reference is exactly the material storage time, this requirement is automatically met by using our technique. This was demonstrated in Er 3+:Y2SiO5 and successfully transferred to high-bandwidth signal processing applications. The material Er3+:Y2SiO5 was optimized for these applications. The 4I15/2 and 4 I13/2 crystal field levels were site-selectively determined by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state lifetime was measured to be 11.4 ms for site 1 and 9.2 ms for site 2. Zeeman experiments and two-pulse photon echo spectroscopy as a function of

  10. A silicon detector in edge-on configuration for (spectral) Computed Tomography: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, M.; Visser, J.; Koffeman, E.; Herrmann, C.

    2016-12-01

    This project focuses on a hybrid silicon pixel detector for Computed Tomography. In order to improve the attenuation efficiency of silicon for high energies, the active volume per unit area is increased by using the detector in edge-on configuration. In this geometry the sensor is illuminated from the side, with the pixel matrix parallel to the X-ray beam direction. Our setup consists of a 500 μm thick silicon sensor, bump-bonded to a chip from the Medipix family. Aim of the project is to test the feasibility of this geometry, finding its benefits and limitations. In particular, in this paper we show an important advantage of this configuration: energy discrimination along the detector depth. We propose a method to exploit this information, by including the beam hardening model both in the forward and in the backprojector of an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The first results, obtained on simulated data, show convergence and prove the feasibility of such an approach.

  11. Coastline change mapping using a spectral band method and Sobel edge operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mansoori, Saeed; Al-Marzouqi, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Coastline extraction has become an essential activity in wake of the natural disasters taking place in some regions such as tsunami, flooding etc. Salient feature of such catastrophes is lack of reaction time available for combating emergency, thus it is the endeavor of any country to develop constant monitoring mechanism of shorelines. This is a challenging task because of the magnitude of changes taking place to the coastline regularly. Previous research findings highlight a need of formulating automation driven methodology for timely and accurate detection of alterations in the coastline impacting sustainability of mankind operating in the coastal zone. In this study, we propose a new approach for automatic extraction of the coastline using remote sensing data. This approach is composed of three main stages. Firstly, classifying pixels of the image into two categories i.e. land and water body by applying two normalized difference indices i.e. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). Then, the process of binary conversion of classified image takes place using a local threshold method. Finally, the coastline is extracted by applying Sobel edge operator with a pair of (3×3) kernels. The approach is tested using 2.5m DubaiSat-1 (DS1) and DubaiSat-2 (DS2) images captured to detect and monitor the changes occurring along Dubai coastal zone within a period of six years from 2009 till 2015. Experimental results prove that the approach is capable of extracting the coastlines from DS1 and DS2 images with moderate human interaction. The results of the study show an increase of 6% in Dubai shoreline resulting on account of numerous man-made infrastructure development projects in tourism and allied sectors.

  12. Spectral element method for elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linlin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jia-Min; Zhuang, Mingwei; Liu, Na; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Numerical techniques in time domain are widespread in seismic and acoustic modeling. In some applications, however, frequency-domain techniques can be advantageous over the time-domain approach when narrow band results are desired, especially if multiple sources can be handled more conveniently in the frequency domain. Moreover, the medium attenuation effects can be more accurately and conveniently modeled in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present a spectral-element method (SEM) in frequency domain to simulate elastic and acoustic waves in anisotropic, heterogeneous, and lossy media. The SEM is based upon the finite-element framework and has exponential convergence because of the use of GLL basis functions. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer is employed to truncate the boundary for unbounded problems. Compared with the conventional finite-element method, the number of unknowns in the SEM is significantly reduced, and higher order accuracy is obtained due to its spectral accuracy. To account for the acoustic-solid interaction, the domain decomposition method (DDM) based upon the discontinuous Galerkin spectral-element method is proposed. Numerical experiments show the proposed method can be an efficient alternative for accurate calculation of elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain.

  13. Changes in EEG mean frequency and spectral purity during spontaneous alpha blocking.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, I I; Barlow, J S

    1990-09-01

    Spontaneously occurring brief periods of lower voltage irregular activity occurring amid a background of alpha activity (i.e., alpha blocking) in eyes-closed resting occipital EEG recordings from 32 healthy human subjects have been investigated to determine the extent of changes of mean frequency and of spectral purity (degree of regularity/irregularity of the EEG activity) during such periods. New methods for determining mean frequency and spectral purity (the latter as a new measure, the Spectral Purity Index, which has a maximum value of 1.0 for a pure sine wave) permit their conjoint evaluation over a 0.5 sec window that is advanced along the EEG in 0.1 sec steps, thus permitting almost continuous feature extraction. The findings indicate that, although spectral purity invariably decreased during the periods of lower voltage irregular activity, the mean frequency remained relatively unaltered, i.e., it remained unchanged or it increased or decreased slightly but at most by 2.5 Hz. These results suggest that, at least for the periods of lower voltage irregular activity occurring spontaneously amid an alpha background during eyes-closed occipital EEG recordings, it may be inaccurate (as some authors have already suggested) to use the term 'low-voltage fast (or beta) activity.'

  14. Harmonic spectral modulation of an optical frequency comb to control the ultracold molecules formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-11-01

    A method for creation of ultracold molecules by stepwise adiabatic passage from the Feshbach state to the fundamentally ground state using an optical frequency comb is presented within a semiclassical multilevel model. The sine modulation of the spectral phase of the comb leads to the creation of a quasi-dark dressed state. An insignificant population of the excited state manifold in this dark state provides an efficient way of mitigating decoherence in the system. In contrast, the cosine modulation does not lead to the quasi-dark state formation. The results demonstrate the importance of the parity of the spectral chirp in quantum control.

  15. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan T. Kristensen; John F. Beausang; David M. DePoy

    2003-12-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1mm to 100mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  16. Extending the effective imaging depth in spectral domain optical coherence tomography by dual spatial frequency encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Qingqing; Liu, Youwen; Wang, Jiming

    2016-03-01

    We present a spatial frequency domain multiplexing method for extending the imaging depth range of a SDOCT system without any expensive device. This method uses two reference arms with different round-trip optical delay to probe different depth regions within the sample. Two galvo scanners with different pivot-offset distances in the reference arms are used for spatial frequency modulation and multiplexing. While simultaneously driving the galvo scanners in the reference arms and the sample arm, the spatial spectrum of the acquired two-dimensional OCT spectral interferogram corresponding to the shallow and deep depth of the sample will be shifted to the different frequency bands in the spatial frequency domain. After data filtering, image reconstruction and fusion the spatial frequency multiplexing SDOCT system can provide an approximately 1.9 fold increase in the effective ranging depth compared with that of a conventional single-reference-arm full-range SDOCT system.

  17. Spectral analysis of the line-width and line-edge roughness transfer during self-aligned double patterning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Pargon, E.; Fouchier, M.; Grampeix, H.; Pradelles, J.; Darnon, M.; Pimenta-Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Joubert, O.

    2015-03-01

    We report a 20 nm half-pitch self-aligned double patterning (SADPP) process based on a resist-core approach. Line/space 20/20 nm features in silicon are successfully obtained with CDvariation, LWR and LER of 0.7 nm, 2.4 nm and 2.3 nm respectively. The LWR and LER are characterized at each technological step of the process using a power spectral density fitting method, which allows a spectral analysis of the roughness and the determination of unbiased roughness values. Although the SADP concept generates two asymmetric populations of lines, the final LLWR and LER are similar. We show that this SADP process allows to decrease significantly the LWR and the LER of about 62% and 48% compared to the initial photoresist patterns. This study also demonstrates that SADP is a very powerful concept to decrease CD uniformity and LWR especially in its low-frequency components to reach sub-20 nm node requirements. However, LER low-frequency components are still high and remain a key issue tot address for an optimized integration.

  18. Influence of mesa edge capacitance on frequency behavior of millimeter-wave AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yong; Bai, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yang; Feng, Zhihong; Dun, Shaobo; Yu, Qi

    2017-03-01

    The influence of mesa edge capacitance on the frequency characteristics of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs with 90 nm gate length was studied in this paper. To extract mesa edge capacitances, a small-signal equivalent circuit model considering mesa edge capacitances was provided. Based on the model, the intrinsic gate capacitances of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs with 2 × 20 μm, 2 × 30 μm, 2 × 40 μm, and 2 × 50 μm gate widths were extracted, respectively. Through linear fitting along gate width for the extracted results and simulations, 8.06 fF/μm2 of mesa edge capacitances at Vgs = -4.5 V and Vds = 8 V in the devices with 2 × 20 μm gate width was obtained, which can be about 33.2% of the total gate capacitance. Mesa edge capacitances results in a significant drop of current-gain cut-off frequency (fT), and the effect is more serious in the shorter gate length devices.

  19. The Lockman Hole project: LOFAR observations and spectral index properties of low-frequency radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Brienza, M.; Best, P. N.; Brüggen, M.; Calistro Rivera, G.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Harwood, J. J.; Heald, G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mandal, S.; Miley, G. K.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Sabater, J.; Tasse, C.; van Velzen, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; White, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Lockman Hole is a well-studied extragalactic field with extensive multi-band ancillary data covering a wide range in frequency, essential for characterizing the physical and evolutionary properties of the various source populations detected in deep radio fields (mainly star-forming galaxies and AGNs). In this paper, we present new 150-MHz observations carried out with the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), allowing us to explore a new spectral window for the faint radio source population. This 150-MHz image covers an area of 34.7 square degrees with a resolution of 18.6 × 14.7 arcsec and reaches an rms of 160 μJy beam-1 at the centre of the field. As expected for a low-frequency selected sample, the vast majority of sources exhibit steep spectra, with a median spectral index of α _{150}^{1400}=-0.78± 0.015. The median spectral index becomes slightly flatter (increasing from α _{150}^{1400}=-0.84 to α _{150}^{1400}=-0.75) with decreasing flux density down to S150 ˜10 mJy before flattening out and remaining constant below this flux level. For a bright subset of the 150-MHz selected sample, we can trace the spectral properties down to lower frequencies using 60-MHz LOFAR observations, finding tentative evidence for sources to become flatter in spectrum between 60 and 150 MHz. Using the deep, multi-frequency data available in the Lockman Hole, we identify a sample of 100 ultra-steep-spectrum sources and 13 peaked-spectrum sources. We estimate that up to 21 per cent of these could have z > 4 and are candidate high-z radio galaxies, but further follow-up observations are required to confirm the physical nature of these objects.

  20. Red-Edge Spectral Reflectance as an Indicator of Surface Moisture Content in an Alaskan Peatland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPartland, M.; Kane, E. S.; Turetsky, M. R.; Douglass, T.; Falkowski, M. J.; Montgomery, R.; Edwards, J.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic and boreal peatlands serve as major reservoirs of terrestrial organic carbon (C) because Net Primary Productivity (NPP) outstrips C loss from decomposition over long periods of time. Peatland productivity varies as a function of water table position and surface moisture content, making C storage in these systems particularly vulnerable to the climate warming and drying predicted for high latitudes. Detailed spatial knowledge of how aboveground vegetation communities respond to changes in hydrology would allow for ecosystem response to environmental change to be measured at the landscape scale. This study leverages remotely sensed data along with field measurements taken at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site to examine relationships between plant solar reflectance and surface moisture. APEX is a decade-long experiment investigating the effects of hydrologic change on peatland ecosystems using water table manipulation treatments (raised, lowered, and control). Water table levels were manipulated throughout the 2015 growing season, resulting in a maximum separation of 35 cm between raised and lowered treatment plots. Water table position, soil moisture content, depth to seasonal ice, soil temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), CO2 and CH4 fluxes were measured as predictors of C loss through decomposition and NPP. Vegetation was surveyed for percent cover of plant functional types. Remote sensing data was collected during peak growing season, when the separation between treatment plots was at maximum difference. Imagery was acquired via a SenseFly eBee airborne platform equipped with a Canon S110 red-edge camera capable of detecting spectral reflectance from plant tissue at 715 nm band center to within centimeters of spatial resolution. Here, we investigate empirical relationships between spectral reflectance, water table position, and surface moisture in relation to peat carbon balance.

  1. A family of repeating low-frequency earthquakes at the downdip edge of tremor and slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Justin R.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Houston, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    analyze an isolated low-frequency earthquake (LFE) family located at the downdip edge of the main episodic tremor and slip (ETS) zone beneath western Washington State. The 9000 individual LFEs from this repeating family cluster into 198 swarms that recur roughly every week. Cumulative LFE seismic moment for each swarm correlates strongly with the time until the next swarm, suggesting that these LFE swarms are time predictable. Precise double-difference relative locations for 700 individual LFEs within this family show a distribution that is approximately 2 km long and 500 m wide, elongated parallel to the relative plate convergence direction. The distribution of locations (<300 m vertical spread) lies within a few hundred meters of two different plate interface models and has a similar dip. Peak-to-peak LFE S wave amplitudes range from 0.2 to 18 nm. Individual LFEs exhibit a trend of increasing magnitude during swarms, with smaller events at the beginning and the largest events toward the end. The largest LFEs cluster in a small area (300 m radius) coincident with maximum LFE density. We propose that the less-concentrated smaller LFEs act to unlock this patch core, allowing it to fully rupture in the largest LFEs, usually toward the end of a swarm. We interpret the patch responsible for producing these LFEs as a subducted seamount on the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate. LFE locking efficiency (slip estimated during 5 years from summing LFE seismic moment divided by plate-rate-determined slip) is at most 20% and is highly concentrated in two ˜50 m radius locations in the larger patch core. Estimated individual LFE stress drops range from 1 to 20 kPa, but could also be significantly larger.

  2. [Excitation energy and frequency of transition spectral line of electron in an asymmetry quantum dot].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In an asymmetry quantum dot, the properties of the electron, which is strongly coupled with phonon, were investigated. The variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were studied by using a linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. Numerical calculations for the variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were performed and the results show that the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will strongly increase with decreasing the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length. The first internal excited state energy of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will decrease with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength. The excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will increase with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  3. Using Spectral Methods to Quantify Changes in Temperature Variability across Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; McInerney, D.; Stein, M.; Leeds, W.; Poppick, A. N.; Nazarenko, L.; Schmidt, G. A.; Moyer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in future surface temperature variability are of great scientific and societal interest. Since the impact of variability on human society depends on not only the magnitude but also the frequency of variations, shifts in the marginal distribution of temperatures do not provide enough information for impacts assessment. Leeds et al (2014) proposed a method to quantify changes in variability of temperature at distinct temporal frequencies by estimating the ratio of the spectral densities of temperature between pre-industrial and equilibrated future climates. This spectral ratio functions well as a metric to quantify temperature variability shifts in climate model output. In this study, we apply the method of Leeds et al (2014) to explore the temperature variability changes under increased radiative forcing. We compare changes in variability in higher-CO2 climates across two different climate models (CCSM3 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research and GISS-E2-R from NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies), and changes driven by two different forcing agents (CO2 and solar radiation) within the same model (CCSM3). In all cases we use only the equilibrium stages of model runs extended several thousand years after an abrupt forcing change is imposed. We find a number of results. First, changes in temperature variability differ by frequency in most regions, confirming the need for spectral methods. Second, changes are similar regardless of forcing agents. In experiments with abruptly increased CO2 and solar forcing designed to produce the same change in global mean temperature, the distributions and magnitudes of spectral ratio changes are nearly identical. Finally, projections of variability changes differ across models. In CCSM3, temperature variability decreases in most regions and at most frequencies. Conversely, in GISS-E2-R, temperature variability tends to increase over land. The discrepancy between CCSM3 and the GISS-E-R highlights the need for

  4. Molecular Electronics for Frequency Domain Optical Storage. Persistent Spectral Hole-Burning. A Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-25

    if applicable) Office of Naval Research IBM Almaden Research Center Chemistry Division, Code 1113 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b...NOTATION Journal of Molecular Electronics 17. .* COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse of necessary and identify by block number) FIEL GRUP SB...GOUP Molecular electronics, spectral hole-burning, frequency I I domain. optical storage, solid state photo chemistry , * I photon gating. 19. ABSTRACT

  5. Photonic analog-to-digital converter using soliton self-frequency shift and interleaving spectral filters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chris; Liu, Xiang

    2003-06-15

    We propose a novel ultrafast photonic analog-to-digital converter that uses the soliton self-frequency shift in an optical fiber as an optical power-to-frequency conversion mechanism and a set of interleaving spectral filters as the optical comparators. Our method does all the signal processing in the optical domain and requires binary receivers in only the electronic domain. In contrast to the usual exponential scaling, the simultaneous binary search architecture that we propose results in a flash analog-to-digital converter with remarkable linear scaling between the number of comparators and the number of bits resolved.

  6. Phase Difference Correction Method for Phase and Frequency in Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Ming, X.; Xiaofei, Z.

    2000-09-01

    A new method, phase difference corrections method is developed to correct the frequency and phase of spectrum peak. The continuous time-domain signal is separated into two segments and fast Fourier translation (FFT) is carried out for them, respectively. The frequency and phase are corrected using the phase difference of corresponding discrete spectral lines. Furthermore, the amplitude can also be rectified using the formula of window function spectrum. This method, with good adaptability, high speed and accuracy, is theoretically simple. It can resolve the frequency by means of phase difference directly without the formula of window function. Simulation shows that the single-component frequency, phase and amplitude of theoretical signal can be corrected satisfactorily, with frequency error less than 0.0002 frequency resolution, phase 0.1° and amplitude 0.0002. If the signal involves noise, the mean corrected errors are less than 0.001 frequency resolution, 1° for phase, and 0.01 for amplitude, respectively, and the maximum corrected errors of one segment are less than 0.01 frequency resolution, 1° and 0.03, respectively.

  7. Low radio frequency observations and spectral modelling of the remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Zanardo, G.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Hancock, P. J.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A.; For, B.-Q.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-10-01

    We present Murchison Widefield Array observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A between 72 and 230 MHz, representing the lowest frequency observations of the source to date. This large lever arm in frequency space constrains the properties of the circumstellar medium created by the progenitor of SNR 1987A when it was in its red supergiant phase. As of late 2013, the radio spectrum of SNR 1987A between 72 MHz and 8.64 GHz does not show any deviation from a non-thermal power law with a spectral index of -0.74 ± 0.02. This spectral index is consistent with that derived at higher frequencies, beneath 100 GHz, and with a shock in its adiabatic phase. A spectral turnover due to free-free absorption by the circumstellar medium has to occur below 72 MHz, which places upper limits on the optical depth of ≤0.1 at a reference frequency of 72 MHz, emission measure of ≲13 000 cm-6 pc, and an electron density of ≲110 cm-3. This upper limit on the electron density is consistent with the detection of prompt radio emission and models of the X-ray emission from the supernova. The electron density upper limit implies that some hydrodynamic simulations derived a red supergiant mass-loss rate that is too high, or a wind velocity that is too low. The mass-loss rate of ˜5 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 and wind velocity of 10 km s-1 obtained from optical observations are consistent with our upper limits, predicting a current turnover frequency due to free-free absorption between 5 and 60 MHz.

  8. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  9. Spectral analysis of GEOS-3 altimeter data and frequency domain collocation. [to estimate gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eren, K.

    1980-01-01

    The mathematical background in spectral analysis as applied to geodetic applications is summarized. The resolution (cut-off frequency) of the GEOS 3 altimeter data is examined by determining the shortest wavelength (corresponding to the cut-off frequency) recoverable. The data from some 18 profiles are used. The total power (variance) in the sea surface topography with respect to the reference ellipsoid as well as with respect to the GEM-9 surface is computed. A fast inversion algorithm for matrices of simple and block Toeplitz matrices and its application to least squares collocation is explained. This algorithm yields a considerable gain in computer time and storage in comparison with conventional least squares collocation. Frequency domain least squares collocation techniques are also introduced and applied to estimating gravity anomalies from GEOS 3 altimeter data. These techniques substantially reduce the computer time and requirements in storage associated with the conventional least squares collocation. Numerical examples given demonstrate the efficiency and speed of these techniques.

  10. The impact of spatial and spectral frequencies in structured light imaging of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jessie Ruth

    This research focuses on development of structured light imaging (SLI), a new optical imaging technique based on spatial frequency domain modulation. The goal of this method is to quantitatively measure and map tissue optical properties, absorption and scattering, to determine tissue biochemical structure and composition. The work presented here extends the technology's spatial and spectral frequency impact. First, to expand the depth sectioning capability of spatial frequency modulation, a layered tissue model was developed, validated and shown to accurately recover in vivo parameters in skin (epidermis and dermis), effectively filtering out signal from the underlying subcutaneous tissue. Next, to expand the impact of spectral frequency information, the SLI system was combined with a Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which eliminates the need to scan through wavelengths when gathering multispectral information. A single SLI-CTIS measurement gathers 36 absorption maps and 36 scattering maps, with a resulting measurement speed ˜30 times faster than the liquid crystal tunable filter method currently employed in multispectral SLI systems. The multispectral information can be used to determine the concentrations of multiple tissue chromophores and the relative density of the tissue. This is immediately useful for monitoring the brain for signs of trauma, including monitoring of oxygen delivery across the brain, mapping of hemoglobin concentration to detect hemorrhage, mapping of water content to monitor edema, and mapping of tissue density to monitor swelling. A simple in vivo brain injury example is presented to demonstrate recovery of these parameters. Finally, to demonstrate the spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of the SLI-CTIS system, measurements were performed on in vivo mouse brain during seizure with electroencephalography (EEG) confirmation.

  11. Frequency interleaving towards spectrally efficient directly detected optical OFDM for next-generation optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Mehedy, Lenin; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai

    2010-10-25

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze and demonstrate that spectral efficiency of a conventional direct detection based optical OFDM system (DDO-OFDM) can be improved significantly using frequency interleaving of adjacent DDO-OFDM channels where OFDM signal band of one channel occupies the spectral gap of other channel and vice versa. We show that, at optimum operating condition, the proposed technique can effectively improve the spectral efficiency of the conventional DDO-OFDM system as much as 50%. We also show that such a frequency interleaved DDO-OFDM system, with a bit rate of 48 Gb/s within 25 GHz bandwidth, achieves sufficient power budget after transmission over 25 km single mode fiber to be used in next-generation time-division-multiplexed passive optical networks (TDM-PON). Moreover, by applying 64- quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM), the system can be further scaled up to 96 Gb/s with a power budget sufficient for 1:16 split TDM-PON.

  12. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads.

    PubMed

    Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A; Diamessis, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number.

  13. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  14. Reconfiguration of spectral absorption features using a frequency-chirped laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingzhen; Chang, Tiejun; Merkel, Kristian D; Babbitt, W Randall

    2011-12-20

    A technique is proposed to manipulate atomic population in an inhomogeneously broadened medium, which can set an arbitrary absorption spectrum to a uniform transparency (erasure) or to a nearly complete inversion. These reconfigurations of atomic spectral distribution are achieved through excitation of electronic transitions using a laser pulse with chirped frequency, which precisely affects selected spectral regions while leaving the rest of the spectrum unperturbed. An erasure operation sets the final atomic population inversion to zero and the inversion operation flips the population between the ground and the excited states, regardless of the previously existing population distribution. This technique finds important applications both in optical signal processing, where fast, recursive processing and high dynamic range are desirable and in quantum memory and quantum computing, which both require high efficiency and high fidelity in quantum state preparation of atomic ensembles. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed in a rare-earth doped crystal.

  15. Maximum entropy analytic continuation for frequency-dependent transport coefficients with nonpositive spectral weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymbaut, A.; Gagnon, A.-M.; Bergeron, D.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2017-03-01

    The computation of transport coefficients, even in linear response, is a major challenge for theoretical methods that rely on analytic continuation of correlation functions obtained numerically in Matsubara space. While maximum entropy methods can be used for certain correlation functions, this is not possible in general, important examples being the Seebeck, Hall, Nernst, and Reggi-Leduc coefficients. Indeed, positivity of the spectral weight on the positive real-frequency axis is not guaranteed in these cases. The spectral weight can even be complex in the presence of broken time-reversal symmetry. Various workarounds, such as the neglect of vertex corrections or the study of the infinite frequency or Kelvin limits, have been proposed. Here, we show that one can define auxiliary response functions that allow one to extract the desired real-frequency susceptibilities from maximum entropy methods in the most general multiorbital cases with no particular symmetry. As a benchmark case, we study the longitudinal thermoelectric response and corresponding Onsager coefficient in the single-band two-dimensional Hubbard model treated with dynamical mean-field theory and continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo. We thereby extend the maximum entropy analytic continuation with auxiliary functions (MaxEntAux method), developed for the study of the superconducting pairing dynamics of correlated materials, to transport coefficients.

  16. Spectrally efficient polarization multiplexed direct-detection OFDM system without frequency gap.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Chien; Zeng, Wei-Siang; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a spectrally efficient direct-detection orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (DD-OFDM) system. In addition to polarization-division multiplexing, removing the frequency gap further improves the spectral efficiency of the OFDM system. The frequency gap between a reference carrier and OFDM subcarriers avoids subcarrier-to-subcarrier beating interference (SSBI) in traditional DD-OFDM systems. Without dynamic polarization control, the resulting interference after square-law direct detection in the proposed gap-less system is polarization-dependent and composed of linear inter-carrier interference (ICI) and nonlinear SSBI. Thus, this work proposes an iterative multiple-input multiple-output detection scheme to remove the mixed polarization-dependent interference. Compared to the previous scheme, which only removes ICI, the proposed scheme can further eliminate SSBI to achieve the improvement of ∼ 7 dB in signal-to-noise ratio. Without the need for polarization control, we successfully utilize 7-GHz bandwidth to transmit a 39.5-Gbps polarization multiplexed OFDM signal over 100 km.

  17. Spectral analysis to assess exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields in cars.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Barberá, Jorge

    2017-01-31

    A type of contamination that has been little studied in cars comes from the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields generated by the vehicle's electrical devices and the magnetized metal in the tyres. The magnetic fields in cars are frequently analysed with broadband meters sensitive to a frequency range above 30Hz. This has the disadvantage that they neither detect the magnetic field of the spinning tyres nor give any information on the spectral components, which makes it impossible to adequately assess exposure. The objective of the present study was to perform spectral analyses of ELF magnetic fields in cars, to identify their frequencies, and to assess exposure based on the ICNIRP regulatory guidelines. To do this, a meter and a spectrum analyser sensitive to magnetic fields in the 5Hz-2kHz frequency range were used. Spectra were acquired for different seats, heights, and speeds, and spatially averaged exposure coefficients were calculated. The results indicated that the main emissions were detected in the 5-100Hz range, where the wheel rotation frequencies and their harmonics are found. The intensity of the rest of the emissions were negligible in comparison. The exposure quotient increases with speed, and is approximately twice as great at foot level as at head level. The magnetic field levels are lower than the reference levels (the maximum represents 3% of the ICNIRP standard), but higher than those found in residential environments and than the cut-off threshold used by the IARC to classify ELF magnetic fields in Group 2B.

  18. Measurement of the spatial frequency response (SFR) of digital still-picture cameras using a modified slanted-edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Feng; Hsu, Yun C.; Chuang, Kai W.

    2000-06-01

    Spatial resolution is one of the main characteristics of electronic imaging devices such as the digital still-picture camera. It describes the capability of a device to resolve the spatial details of an image formed by the incoming optical information. The overall resolving capability is of great interest although there are various factors, contributed by camera components and signal processing algorithms, affecting the spatial resolution. The spatial frequency response (SFR), analogous to the MTF of an optical imaging system, is one of the four measurements for analysis of spatial resolution defined in ISO/FDIS 12233, and it provides a complete profile of the spatial response of digital still-picture cameras. In that document, a test chart is employed to estimate the spatial resolving capability. The calculations of SFR were conducted by using the slanted edge method in which a scene with a black-to- white or white-to-black edge tilted at a specified angle is captured. An algorithm is used to find the line spread function as well as the SFR. We will present a modified algorithm in which no prior information of the angle of the tilted black-to-white edge is needed. The tilted angle was estimated by assuming that a region around the center of the transition between black and white regions is linear. At a tilted angle of 8 degree the minimum estimation error is about 3%. The advantages of the modified slanted edge method are high accuracy, flexible use, and low cost.

  19. Spectral linewidth preservation in parametric frequency combs seeded by dual pumps.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-07-30

    We demonstrate new technique for generation of programmable-pitch, wideband frequency combs with low phase noise. The comb generation was achieved using cavity-less, multistage mixer driven by two tunable continuous-wave pump seeds. The approach relies on phase-correlated continuous-wave pumps in order to cancel spectral linewidth broadening inherent to parametric comb generation. Parametric combs with over 200-nm bandwidth were obtained and characterized with respect to phase noise scaling to demonstrate linewidth preservation over 100 generated tones.

  20. Spectral Analyses of High-Frequency Pn, Sn Phases from Very Shallow Focus Earthquakes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    off at about -24 diB/octave over 1971). the range of 0.3 to 6 Is. Between 3 and 15 R . . 62 McCreary et al.: P and Noise Spectra on Wake Hydrophones...D., C. McCreary . G. Sutton, and F. western Pacific: Structure of oceanic litho- Duennebier, Spectral analyses of high-frequency sphere revealed by...received. The time, in Julian days through milliseconds, is output in parallel BCD format through 45 pins of a 50 pin connector. This connector also

  1. Vortex families near a spectral edge in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a two-dimensional periodic potential.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Tomáš; Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    2012-02-01

    We examine numerically vortex families near band edges of the Bloch wave spectrum for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with two-dimensional periodic potentials and for the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that besides vortex families that terminate at a small distance from the band edges via fold bifurcations, there exist vortex families that are continued all the way to the band edges.

  2. Single-frequency TEA CO2 laser with a bleaching spectral intracavity filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorochenko, V. R.

    2017-02-01

    The regime of single-frequency operation is realised in a TEA CO2 laser with a spectral filter inside the cavity (a cell filled with SF6) on P(12)–P(24) lines of the 10P band. The minimal scatter of the peak powers of the laser pulses in a series of ‘shots’ and the maximal ratio of the output energies in the single-frequency and free running regimes (greater than 0.84) are obtained on the P(16) line at an optimal SF6 pressure in the cell. Experimental results qualitatively agree with the absorption spectrum of SF6 calculated from the SPECTRA information-analytical system. It is shown that the high ratio of energies in two regimes is achived due to gas bleaching in the cell.

  3. Numerical 3D analysis of cloud cavitation shedding frequency on a circular leading edge hydrofoil with a barotropic cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, M.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    A compressible density-based time-explicit low Mach number consistent viscous flow solver is utilised in combination with a barotropic cavitation model for the analysis of cloud cavitation on a circular leading edge (CLE) hydrofoil. For 5° angle of attack, cloud structure and shedding frequency for different cavitation numbers are compared to experimental data. A strong grid sensitivity is found in particular for high cavitation numbers. On a fine grid, a very good agreement with validation data is achieved even without explicit turbulence model. The neglect of viscous effects as well as a two-dimensional set-up lead to a less realistic prediction of cloud structures and frequencies. Comparative simulations with the Sauer-Schnerr cavitation model and modified pre-factors of the mass transfer terms underestimate the measured shedding frequency.

  4. A generalization of the double-corner-frequency source spectral model and its use in the SCEC BBP validation exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Di Alessandro, Carola; Abrahamson, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    The stochastic method of simulating ground motions requires the specification of the shape and scaling with magnitude of the source spectrum. The spectral models commonly used are either single-corner-frequency or double-corner-frequency models, but the latter have no flexibility to vary the high-frequency spectral levels for a specified seismic moment. Two generalized double-corner-frequency ω2 source spectral models are introduced, one in which two spectra are multiplied together, and another where they are added. Both models have a low-frequency dependence controlled by the seismic moment, and a high-frequency spectral level controlled by the seismic moment and a stress parameter. A wide range of spectral shapes can be obtained from these generalized spectral models, which makes them suitable for inversions of data to obtain spectral models that can be used in ground-motion simulations in situations where adequate data are not available for purely empirical determinations of ground motions, as in stable continental regions. As an example of the use of the generalized source spectral models, data from up to 40 stations from seven events, plus response spectra at two distances and two magnitudes from recent ground-motion prediction equations, were inverted to obtain the parameters controlling the spectral shapes, as well as a finite-fault factor that is used in point-source, stochastic-method simulations of ground motion. The fits to the data are comparable to or even better than those from finite-fault simulations, even for sites close to large earthquakes.

  5. Extracting the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches in measured head related impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raykar, Vikas C.; Duraiswami, Ramani; Yegnanarayana, B.

    2005-07-01

    The head related impulse response (HRIR) characterizes the auditory cues created by scattering of sound off a person's anatomy. The experimentally measured HRIR depends on several factors such as reflections from body parts (torso, shoulder, and knees), head diffraction, and reflection/diffraction effects due to the pinna. Structural models (Algazi et al., 2002; Brown and Duda, 1998) seek to establish direct relationships between the features in the HRIR and the anatomy. While there is evidence that particular features in the HRIR can be explained by anthropometry, the creation of such models from experimental data is hampered by the fact that the extraction of the features in the HRIR is not automatic. One of the prominent features observed in the HRIR, and one that has been shown to be important for elevation perception, are the deep spectral notches attributed to the pinna. In this paper we propose a method to robustly extract the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches from the measured HRIR, distinguishing them from other confounding features. The method also extracts the resonances described by Shaw (1997). The techniques are applied to the publicly available CIPIC HRIR database (Algazi et al., 2001c). The extracted notch frequencies are related to the physical dimensions and shape of the pinna.

  6. Spectral Energy Distribution and Radio Halo of NGC 253 at Low Radio Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapińska, A. D.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Crocker, R.; Meurer, G. R.; Bhandari, S.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A. R.; Hanish, D. J.; Seymour, N.; Ekers, R. D.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Procopio, P.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Carroll, P.; Dillon, J. S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Jacobs, D. J.; Kim, H.-S.; Kittiwisit, P.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Neben, A. R.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Riding, J.; Sethi, S. K.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, N.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Webster, R. L.; Wyithe, S. B.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Srivani, K. S.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2017-03-01

    We present new radio continuum observations of NGC 253 from the Murchison Widefield Array at frequencies between 76 and 227 MHz. We model the broadband radio spectral energy distribution for the total flux density of NGC 253 between 76 MHz and 11 GHz. The spectrum is best described as a sum of a central starburst and extended emission. The central component, corresponding to the inner 500 pc of the starburst region of the galaxy, is best modeled as an internally free–free absorbed synchrotron plasma, with a turnover frequency around 230 MHz. The extended emission component of the spectrum of NGC 253 is best described as a synchrotron emission flattening at low radio frequencies. We find that 34% of the extended emission (outside the central starburst region) at 1 GHz becomes partially absorbed at low radio frequencies. Most of this flattening occurs in the western region of the southeast halo, and may be indicative of synchrotron self-absorption of shock-reaccelerated electrons or an intrinsic low-energy cutoff of the electron distribution. Furthermore, we detect the large-scale synchrotron radio halo of NGC 253 in our radio images. At 154–231 MHz the halo displays the well known X-shaped/horn-like structure, and extends out to ∼8 kpc in the z-direction (from the major axis).

  7. Homogeneous spectral spanning of terahertz semiconductor lasers with radio frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, W J; Li, H; Zhou, T; Cao, J C

    2017-03-08

    Homogeneous broadband and electrically pumped semiconductor radiation sources emitting in the terahertz regime are highly desirable for various applications, including spectroscopy, chemical sensing, and gas identification. In the frequency range between 1 and 5 THz, unipolar quantum cascade lasers employing electron inter-subband transitions in multiple-quantum-well structures are the most powerful semiconductor light sources. However, these devices are normally characterized by either a narrow emission spectrum due to the narrow gain bandwidth of the inter-subband optical transitions or an inhomogeneous broad terahertz spectrum from lasers with heterogeneous stacks of active regions. Here, we report the demonstration of homogeneous spectral spanning of long-cavity terahertz semiconductor quantum cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum and resonant phonon design under radio frequency modulation. At a single drive current, the terahertz spectrum under radio frequency modulation continuously spans 330 GHz (~8% of the central frequency), which is the record for single plasmon waveguide terahertz lasers with a bound-to-continuum design. The homogeneous broadband terahertz sources can be used for spectroscopic applications, i.e., GaAs etalon transmission measurement and ammonia gas identification.

  8. Homogeneous spectral spanning of terahertz semiconductor lasers with radio frequency modulation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, W. J.; Li, H.; Zhou, T.; Cao, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Homogeneous broadband and electrically pumped semiconductor radiation sources emitting in the terahertz regime are highly desirable for various applications, including spectroscopy, chemical sensing, and gas identification. In the frequency range between 1 and 5 THz, unipolar quantum cascade lasers employing electron inter-subband transitions in multiple-quantum-well structures are the most powerful semiconductor light sources. However, these devices are normally characterized by either a narrow emission spectrum due to the narrow gain bandwidth of the inter-subband optical transitions or an inhomogeneous broad terahertz spectrum from lasers with heterogeneous stacks of active regions. Here, we report the demonstration of homogeneous spectral spanning of long-cavity terahertz semiconductor quantum cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum and resonant phonon design under radio frequency modulation. At a single drive current, the terahertz spectrum under radio frequency modulation continuously spans 330 GHz (~8% of the central frequency), which is the record for single plasmon waveguide terahertz lasers with a bound-to-continuum design. The homogeneous broadband terahertz sources can be used for spectroscopic applications, i.e., GaAs etalon transmission measurement and ammonia gas identification. PMID:28272492

  9. Homogeneous spectral spanning of terahertz semiconductor lasers with radio frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, W. J.; Li, H.; Zhou, T.; Cao, J. C.

    2017-03-01

    Homogeneous broadband and electrically pumped semiconductor radiation sources emitting in the terahertz regime are highly desirable for various applications, including spectroscopy, chemical sensing, and gas identification. In the frequency range between 1 and 5 THz, unipolar quantum cascade lasers employing electron inter-subband transitions in multiple-quantum-well structures are the most powerful semiconductor light sources. However, these devices are normally characterized by either a narrow emission spectrum due to the narrow gain bandwidth of the inter-subband optical transitions or an inhomogeneous broad terahertz spectrum from lasers with heterogeneous stacks of active regions. Here, we report the demonstration of homogeneous spectral spanning of long-cavity terahertz semiconductor quantum cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum and resonant phonon design under radio frequency modulation. At a single drive current, the terahertz spectrum under radio frequency modulation continuously spans 330 GHz (~8% of the central frequency), which is the record for single plasmon waveguide terahertz lasers with a bound-to-continuum design. The homogeneous broadband terahertz sources can be used for spectroscopic applications, i.e., GaAs etalon transmission measurement and ammonia gas identification.

  10. The distribution of spectral index of magnetic field and ion velocity in Pi2 frequency band in BBFs: THEMIS statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Du, A. M.; Volwerk, M.; Wang, G. Q.

    2016-09-01

    A statistical study of the THEMIS FGM and ESA data is performed on turbulence of magnetic field and velocity for 218 selected 12 min intervals in BBFs. The spectral index α in the frequency range of 0.005-0.06 Hz are Gaussian distributions. The peaks indexes of total ion velocity Vi and parallel velocity V‖ are 1.95 and 2.07 nearly the spectral index of intermittent low frequency turbulence with large amplitude. However, most probable α of perpendicular velocity V⊥ is about 1.75. It is a little bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The peak indexes of total magnetic field BT is 1.70 similar to V⊥. Compression magnetic field B‖ are 1.85 which is smaller than 2 and bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The most probable spectral index of shear B⊥ is about 1.44 which is close to 3/2 of Kraichnan (1965). Max V⊥ have little effect on the power magnitude of VT and V‖ but is positively correlated to spectral index of V⊥. The spectral power of BT, B‖ and B⊥ increase with max perpendicular velocity but spectral indexes of them are negatively correlated to V⊥. The spectral index and the spectral power of magnetic field over the frequency interval 0.005-0.06 Hz is very different from that over 0.08-1 Hz.

  11. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; Parks, P. B.; Chrystal, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Makowski, M. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T.; Shiraki, D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3-0.9 mm, speed of 50-120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9 mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3 mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for the entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3-5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Overall, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is needed to determine whether the projected heat flux reduction required for ITER can be met.

  12. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; Parks, P. B.; Chrystal, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Makowski, M. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T.; Shiraki, D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-04-08

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9mm, speed of 50–120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for the entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Altogether, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is need

  13. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; ...

    2016-04-08

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9mm, speed of 50–120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for themore » entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Altogether, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is need« less

  14. Assessing the high frequency behavior of non-polarizable electrodes for spectral induced polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulsamad, Feras; Florsch, Nicolas; Schmutz, Myriam; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    During the last decades, the usage of spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements in hydrogeology and detecting environmental problems has been extensively increased. However, the physical mechanisms which are responsible for the induced polarization response over the usual frequency range (typically 1 mHz to 10-20 kHz) require better understanding. The phase shift observed at high frequencies is sometimes attributed to the so-called Maxwell-Wagner polarization which takes place when charges cross an interface. However, SIP measurements of tap water show a phase shift at frequencies higher than 1 kHz, where no Maxwell-Wagner polarization may occur. In this paper, we enlighten the possible origin of this phase shift and deduce its likely relationship with the types of the measuring electrodes. SIP Laboratory measurements of tap water using different types of measuring electrodes (polarizable and non-polarizable electrodes) are carried out to detect the origin of the phase shift at high frequencies and the influence of the measuring electrodes types on the observed complex resistivity. Sodium chloride is used to change the conductivity of the medium in order to quantify the solution conductivity role. The results of these measurements are clearly showing the impact of the measuring electrodes type on the measured phase spectrum while the influence on the amplitude spectrum is negligible. The phenomenon appearing on the phase spectrum at high frequency (> 1 kHz) whatever the electrode type is, the phase shows an increase compared to the theoretical response, and the discrepancy (at least in absolute value) increases with frequency, but it is less severe when medium conductivity is larger. Additionally, the frequency corner is shifted upward in frequency. The dependence of this phenomenon on the conductivity and the measuring electrodes type (electrode-electrolyte interface) seems to be due to some dielectric effects (as an electrical double layer of small

  15. Polarization control efficiency manipulation in resonance-mediated two-photon absorption by femtosecond spectral frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunhua; Cheng, Wenjing; Zheng, Ye; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Pei; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong; Zhang, Shian

    2017-04-01

    The femtosecond laser polarization modulation is considered as a very simple and efficient method to control the multi-photon absorption process. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the polarization control efficiency in the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be artificially manipulated by modulating the femtosecond spectral frequency components. We theoretically demonstrate that the on- and near-resonant parts in the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption process depend on the different femtosecond spectral frequency components, and therefore their contributions in the whole excitation process can be controlled by properly designing the femtosecond spectral frequency components. The near-resonant two-photon absorption is correlated with the femtosecond laser polarization while the on-resonant two-photon absorption is independent of it, and thus the polarization control efficiency in the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be manipulated by the femtosecond spectral frequency modulation. We experimentally verify these theoretical results by performing the laser polarization control experiment in the Dy3+-doped glass sample under the modulated femtosecond spectral frequency components, and the experimental results show that the polarization control efficiency can be increased when the central spectral frequency components are cut off, while it is decreased when both the low and high spectral frequency components are cut off, which is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Our works can provide a feasible pathway to understand and control the resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process under the femtosecond laser field excitation, and also may open a new opportunity to the related application areas.

  16. Co-analysis of Solar Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectral Evolutions. I. In Two Frequency or Energy Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiwu; Huang, Guangli; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Solar microwave and hard X-ray spectral evolutions are co-analyzed in the 2000 June 10 and 2002 April 10 flares, and are simultaneously observed by the Owens-Valley Solar Array in the microwave band and by Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope or RHESSI in the hard X-ray band, with multiple subpeaks in their light curves. The microwave and hard X-ray spectra are fitted by a power law in two frequency ranges of the optical thin part and two photon energy ranges, respectively. Similar to an earlier event in Shao & Huang, the well-known soft-hard-soft pattern of the lower energy range changed to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern of the higher energy range during the spectral evolution of each subpeak in both hard X-ray flares. This energy dependence is actually supported by a positive correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower energy range, while it becomes an anti-correlation in the higher energy range. Regarding microwave data, the HSH pattern appears in the spectral evolution of each subpeak in the lower frequency range, which is somewhat similar to Huang & Nakajima. However, it returns back to the well-known pattern of soft-hard-harder for the overall spectral evolution in the higher frequency range of both events. This frequency dependence is confirmed by an anti-correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower frequency range, but it becomes a positive correlation in the higher frequency range. The possible mechanisms are discussed, respectively, for reasons why hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions have different patterns in different energy and frequency intervals.

  17. Characteristics of high-frequency precursors to edge-localized activity in the PBX-M tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Manickam, J.; Bell, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; Paul, S.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Asakura, N. ); Lau, Y.T. )

    1990-03-01

    High {beta}{sub pol} H-mode plasmas in the PBX-M tokamak often exhibit periods of Edge Localized Mode (ELM) activity, with each ELM preceded by a short duration ({le} 350 {mu}sec) burst of high frequency (200 to 250 kHz) magnetic activity. The burst grows on a time scale of 10 {mu}sec, and disappears just prior to the rapid increase in the D{sub {alpha}} emission that is characteristic of the ELM. The burst of activity is observed at all poloidal locations, with the largest amplitudes seen on the coils on the inner major radius side, indicating that the mode is not outward ballooning in character. Stability calculations indicate that a likely candidate for this high frequency ELM precursor is the pressure-driven ideal kink. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Comparing Broad-Band and Red Edge-Based Spectral Vegetation Indices to Estimate Nitrogen Concentration of Crops Using Casi Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Liao, Qinhong; Yang, Guijun; Feng, Haikuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Yue, Jibo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, many spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) have been proposed to estimate the leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) of crops. However, most of these indices were based on the field hyperspectral reflectance. To test whether they can be used in aerial remote platform effectively, in this work a comparison of the sensitivity between several broad-band and red edge-based SVIs to LNC is investigated over different crop types. By using data from experimental LNC values over 4 different crop types and image data acquired using the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) sensor, the extensive dataset allowed us to evaluate broad-band and red edge-based SVIs. The result indicated that NDVI performed the best among the selected SVIs while red edge-based SVIs didn't show the potential for estimating the LNC based on the CASI data due to the spectral resolution. In order to search for the optimal SVIs, the band combination algorithm has been used in this work. The best linear correlation against the experimental LNC dataset was obtained by combining the 626.20nm and 569.00nm wavebands. These wavelengths correspond to the maximal chlorophyll absorption and reflection position region, respectively, and are known to be sensitive to the physiological status of the plant. Then this linear relationship was applied to the CASI image for generating an LNC map, which can guide farmers in the accurate application of their N fertilization strategies.

  19. Spectral and angular characteristics of dielectric resonator metasurface at optical frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Longfang; López-García, Martin; Oulton, Ruth; Klemm, Maciej; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Fumeaux, Christophe; Shah, Charan M.; Mitchell, Arnan; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath

    2014-11-10

    The capability of manipulating light at subwavelength scale has fostered the applications of flat metasurfaces in various fields. Compared to metallic structure, metasurfaces made of high permittivity low-loss dielectric resonators hold the promise of high efficiency by avoiding high conductive losses of metals at optical frequencies. This letter investigates the spectral and angular characteristics of a dielectric resonator metasurface composed of periodic sub-arrays of resonators with a linearly varying phase response. The far-field response of the metasurface can be decomposed into the response of a single grating element (sub-array) and the grating arrangement response. The analysis also reveals that coupling between resonators has a non-negligible impact on the angular response. Over a wide wavelength range, the simulated and measured angular characteristics of the metasurface provide a definite illustration of how different grating diffraction orders can be selectively suppressed or enhanced through antenna sub-array design.

  20. Cross-spectral coherence between geomagnetic disturbance and human cardiovascular variables at non-societal frequencies.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Hillman, D C; Otsuka, K; Bingham, C; Breus, T K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1994-01-01

    A 35-year-old cardiologist monitored himself with an automatic ABPM-630 (Colin Electronics) monitor, mostly at 15-minute intervals around-the-clock for three years with a few interruptions. In this subject with a family history of high blood pressure and stroke, a cross-spectral analysis revealed a statistically significant coherence at 27.7 days between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate vs. the geomagnetic disturbance index, Kp. A lesser peak in coherence was found for systolic blood pressure with Kp at a trial period of 4.16 days (P = 0.046). These results suggest that changes in geomagnetism may influence the human circulation, at least in the presence of familial cardiovascular disease risk, and they may do so at frequencies that have no precise human-made cyclic worldwide match.

  1. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  2. Commissioning of a multiple-frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion demonstration system on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Dorrer, C.; Okishev, A. V.; Waxer, L. J.; Balonek, G.; Begishev, I. A.; Bittle, W.; Consentino, A.; Cuffney, R.; Hill, E.; Marozas, J. A.; Moore, M.; Roides, R. G.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-02-01

    A one-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) demonstration system for smoothing focal-spot nonuniformities using multiple modulation frequencies (multi-FM SSD) was commissioned on one long-pulse beamline of OMEGA EP—the first use of such a system in a high-energy laser. System models of frequency modulation-to-amplitude modulation (FM-to-AM) conversion in the OMEGA EP beamline and final optics were used to develop an AM budget. The AM budget in turn provided a UV power limit of 0.85 TW, based on accumulation of B-integral in the final optics. The front end of the demonstration system utilized a National Ignition Facility preamplifier module (PAM) with a custom SSD grating inserted into the PAM's multipass amplifier section. The dispersion of the SSD grating was selected to cleanly propagate the dispersed SSD bandwidth through various pinholes in the system while maintaining sufficient focal-spot smoothing performance. A commissioning plan was executed that systematically introduced the new features of the demonstration system into OMEGA EP. Ultimately, the OMEGA EP beamline was ramped to the UV power limit with various pulse shapes. The front-end system was designed to provide flexibility in pulse shaping. Various combinations of pickets and nanosecond-scale drive pulses were demonstrated, with multi-FM SSD selectively applied to portions of the pulse. Analysis of the dispersion measured by the far-field diagnostics at the outputs of the infrared beamline and the frequency-conversion crystals indicated that the SSD modulation spectrum was maintained through both the beamline and the frequency-conversion process. At the completion of the plan, a series of equivalent-target-plane measurements with distributed phase plates installed were conducted that confirmed the expected timeintegrated smoothing of the focal spot.

  3. The Features of the Frequency-Modulation Method When Studying the Shapes of the Spectral Lines of Nonlinear Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Belov, S. P.; Lapinov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We briefly consider the method of the frequency (phase) modulation and signal detection at the second harmonic of the modulation frequency for recording and analyzing the spectral-line shapes. The precision sub-Doppler spectrometer in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave ranges, which operated in the regime of nonlinear saturation of the spectral transitions in a standing wave (the Lamb-dip method), was used during the measurements. The influence of the saturation degree on the value and shape of the recorded frequency-modulated signals in the quadrature channels during the synchronous detection is demonstrated. Variation in the relationships among the signals determined by dispersion and absorption was observed. The necessity of allowance for the influence of the group-velocity dispersion and coherent effects on the shape of the recorded spectral lines is experimentally shown.

  4. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  5. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  6. Spectral analysis of temperature and Brunt-Vaisala frequency fluctuations observed by radiosondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuda, T.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that vertical wave number spectra of wind velocity and temperture fluctuations in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere are fairly well explained by a saturated gravity wave spectrum. But N(2) (N:Brunt-Vaisala (BV) frequency) spectra seem to be better for testing the scaling of the vertical wave number spectra in layers with different stratifications, beause its energy density is proportional only to the background value of N(2), while that for temperature depends on both the BV frequency and the potential temperature. From temperature profiles observed in June to August 1987 over the MU Observatory, Japan, by using a radiosonde with 30 m height resolution, N(2) spectra are determined in the 2 to 8.5 km (troposphere) and 18.5 to 25 km (lower stratosphere) ranges. Although individual spectra show fairly large day-by-day variability, the slope of the median of 34 spectra agrees reasonably with the theoretical value of -1 in the wave number range of 6 x 10(-4) similar to 3 x 10(-3) (c/m). The ratio of the spectral energy between these two height regions is about equal to the ratio of N(2), consistent with the prediction of saturated gravity wave theory.

  7. Applications of spectral analysis and filter design in laser frequency locking for Na Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John A.; Chu, Xinzhao; Huang, Wentao; Tan, Bo

    2009-10-01

    A dye ring laser is stabilized to a D2a Doppler-free feature of sodium vapor using a LabVIEW®-based, phase-sensitive servo. Locking precision and stability, at better than +/-1 MHz, are suitable for Na lidar applications. This performance was achieved with improved digital filtering and new approaches to the problem. The inverse (type II) Chebyshev discrete filter employed demonstrates superior filtering and computational efficiency plus improved flexibility. New approaches include the determination of optimum modulation frequency, laser-tuning sensitivity, and bandwidth requirements via spectral analyses of the noise spectrum, derivative scan, and modulated spectrum. This practice guides a user in selecting the system operation parameters and negotiating the trade-offs involved when expanding the filter's passband. Allan deviation plots provide a quantitative description of the short- and long-term frequency excursions. A comparison of Allan deviation plots before and after locking shows a substantial improvement in stability throughout time scales from 0.10 to 10 s.

  8. Effects of Torsion Frequencies on Rotor Performance and Structural Loads with Trailing Edge Flap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-24

    Introduction Next generation rotorcraft require a significant increase in speed , range, and payload capabilities. Active rotor control technologies [1...0.0826 Blade tip sweep, aft, deg. 20 Airfoils SC1095/SC1094R8 Nominal rotor speed , , rpm 258 First torsional frequency, /rev 4.53 Pre-twist, deg. −18...Jacklin S A and Sheikman A 2002 Low - speed wind tunnel investigation of a full-scale UH-60 rotor system American Helicopter Society 58th Annual Forum Proc

  9. Centaur feedline dynamics study using power spectral methods. [fundamental mode resonant frequencies of RL-10 oxygen and hydrogen feed lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the dynamic characteristics of the Centaur/RL-10 oxygen and hydrogen feedlines. The fundamental-mode resonant frequencies were determined by applying power spectral methods to noise-generated data from hot firings of the RL-10 engine. The effect of net positive suction pressure of the main feed pumps on resonant frequency characteristics was determined to be a straight-line relation. Power spectral methods were also used to determine the dynamic characteristics of the boost pumps.

  10. Collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, Anatolii M

    2011-11-30

    Using the eikonal approximation, we have calculated effective collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines. We have established the relation between the probabilities of absorption and stimulated emission and the characteristics of the radiation and elementary scattering event. The example of the power interaction potential shows that quantum mechanical calculation of the collision frequencies in the eikonal approximation and previously known spectral line wing theory give similar results for the probability of radiation absorption.

  11. Power spectral density and scaling exponent of high frequency global solar radiation sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calif, Rudy; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2013-04-01

    The part of the solar power production from photovlotaïcs systems is constantly increasing in the electric grids. Solar energy converter devices such as photovoltaic cells are very sensitive to instantaneous solar radiation fluctuations. Thus rapid variation of solar radiation due to changes in the local meteorological condition can induce large amplitude fluctuations of the produced electrical power and reduce the overall efficiency of the system. When large amount of photovoltaic electricity is send into a weak or small electricity network such as island network, the electric grid security can be in jeopardy due to these power fluctuations. The integration of this energy in the electrical network remains a major challenge, due to the high variability of solar radiation in time and space. To palliate these difficulties, it is essential to identify the characteristic of these fluctuations in order to anticipate the eventuality of power shortage or power surge. The objective of this study is to present an approach based on Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to highlight the scaling properties of global solar irradiance data G(t). The scale of invariance is detected on this dataset using the Empirical Mode Decomposition in association with arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis, a generalization of (HHT) or Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA). The first step is the EMD, consists in decomposing the normalized global solar radiation data G'(t) into several Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) Ci(t) without giving an a priori basis. Consequently, the normalized original solar radiation sequence G'(t) can be written as a sum of Ci(t) with a residual rn. From all IMF modes, a joint PDF P(f,A) of locally and instantaneous frequency f and amplitude A, is estimated. To characterize the scaling behavior in amplitude-frequency space, an arbitrary-order Hilbert marginal spectrum is defined to: Iq(f) = 0 P (f,A)A dA (1) with q × 0 In case of scale

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of RXTE Data from Cyg X-1. Spectral Index-Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency-Luminosity Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2006-01-01

    We present timing and spectral analysis of approx. 2.2 Ms of Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) archival data from Cyg X-1. Using the generic Comptonization model we reveal that the spectrum of Cyg X-1 consists of three components: a thermal seed photon spectrum, a Comptonized part of the seed photon spectrum and the iron line. We find a strong correlation between 0.1-20 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power-law index. Presence of two spectral phases (states) are clearly seen in the data when the spectral indices saturate at low and high values of QPO frequencies. This saturation effect was discovered earlier in a number of black hole candidate (BHC) sources and now we strongly confirm this phenomenon in Cyg X-1. In the soft state this index- QPO frequency correlation shows a saturation of the photon index Gamma approx. 2.1 at high values of the low frequency upsilon(sub L). The saturation level of Gamma approx. 2.1 is the lowest value found yet in BHCs. The bolometric luminosity does not show clear correlation with the index. We also show that Fe K(sub alpha) emission line strength (equivalent width, EW) correlates with the QPO frequency. EW increases from 200 eV in the low/hard state to 1.5 keV in the high/soft state. The revealed observational correlations allow us to propose a scenario for the spectral transition and iron line formation which occur in BHC sources. We also present the spectral state (the power-law index) evolution for eight years of Cyg X-1 observations by RXTE.

  13. The Effects of High Frequency ULF Wave Activity on the Spectral Characteristics of Coherent HF Radar Returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Woodfield, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is now a common practice to employ ground-based radars in order to distinguish between those regions of the Earth's upper atmosphere which are magnetically conjugate to open and closed field lines. Radar returns from ionospheric irregularities inside the polar cap and cusp regions generally exhibit large spectral widths in contrast to those which exist on closed field lines at lower latitudes. It has been suggested that the so-called Spectral Width Boundary (SWB) might act as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary (OCFLB), which would then be an invaluable tool for investigating reconnection rates in the magnetosphere. The exact cause of the increased spectral widths observed at very high latitudes is still subject to considerable debate. Several mechanisms have been proposed. This paper compares a dusk-sector interval of coherent HF radar data with measurements made by an induction coil magnetometer located at Tromso, Norway (66° N geomagnetic). On this occasion, a series of transient regions of radar backscatter exhibiting large spectral widths are accompanied by increases in spectral power of ULF waves in the Pc1-2 frequency band. These observations would then, seem to support the possibility that high frequency magnetospheric wave activity at least contribute to the observed spectral characteristics and that such wave activity might play a significant role in the cusp and polar cap ionospheres.

  14. Frequency-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex depends on the spectral variance in the acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    In auditory cortex, activation and subsequent adaptation is strongest for regions responding best to a stimulated tone frequency and less for regions responding best to other frequencies. Previous attempts to characterize the spread of neural adaptation in humans investigated the auditory cortex N1 component of the event-related potentials. Importantly, however, more recent studies in animals show that neural response properties are not independent of the stimulation context. To link these findings in animals to human scalp potentials, we investigated whether contextual factors of the acoustic stimulation, namely, spectral variance, affect the spread of neural adaptation. Electroencephalograms were recorded while human participants listened to random tone sequences varying in spectral variance (narrow vs. wide). Spread of adaptation was investigated by modeling single-trial neural adaptation and subsequent recovery based on the spectro-temporal stimulation history. Frequency-specific neural responses were largest on the N1 component, and the modeled neural adaptation indices were strongly predictive of trial-by-trial amplitude variations. Yet the spread of adaption varied depending on the spectral variance in the stimulation, such that adaptation spread was broadened for tone sequences with wide spectral variance. Thus the present findings reveal context-dependent auditory cortex adaptation and point toward a flexibly adjusting auditory system that changes its response properties with the spectral requirements of the acoustic environment.

  15. Unified treatment and measurement of the spectral resolution and temporal effects in frequency-resolved sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-14

    The emergence of sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BBSFG-VS) [Velarde et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 241102] has offered new opportunities in obtaining and understanding the spectral lineshape and temporal effects on the surface vibrational spectroscopy. Particularly, the high accuracy in the HR-BBSFG-VS spectral lineshape measurement provides detailed information on the complex coherent vibrational dynamics through spectral measurement. Here we present a unified formalism of the theoretical and experimental approaches for obtaining the accurate lineshape of the SFG response, and then present a analysis on the higher and lower spectral resolution SFG spectra as well as their temporal effects of the cholesterol molecules at the air/water interface. With the high spectral resolution and accurate lineshape, it is shown that the parameters from the sub-wavenumber resolution SFG spectra can be used not only to understand but also to quantitatively reproduce the temporal effects in the lower resolution SFG measurement. These not only provide a unified picture in understanding both the frequency-domain and the time-domain SFG response of the complex molecular interface, but also provide novel experimental approaches that can directly measure them.

  16. Combined spectrally encoded confocal microscopy and optical frequency domain imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, DongKyun; Suter, Melissa J.; Boudoux, Caroline; Yachimski, Patrick S.; Bouma, Brett E.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-02-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) are two reflectancebased imaging technologies that may be utilized for high-resolution microscopic screening of internal organs. SECM provides en face images of tissues with a high lateral resolution of 1-2 μm, and a penetration depth of up to 300 μm. OFDI generates cross-sectional images of tissue architecture with a resolution of 10-20 μm and a penetration depth of 1- 2 mm. Since the two technologies yield complementary microscopic information on two different size scales (SECM-cellular and OFDI-architectural) that are commonly used for histopathologic evaluation, their combination may allow for more accurate optical diagnosis. Here, we report the integration of these two imaging modalities in a single bench top system. SECM images of swine small intestine showed the presence of goblet cells, and OFDI images revealed the finger-shaped villous architecture. In clinical study of 9 gastroesophageal biopsies from 8 patients, a diverse set of architectural and cellular features was observed, including squamous mucosa with mild hyperplasia and gastric antral mucosa with gastric pits and crypts. The capability of this multimodality device to enable the visualization of microscopic features on these two size scales supports our hypothesis that improved diagnostic accuracy may be obtained by merging these two technologies into a single instrument.

  17. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  18. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  19. Spectral line decomposition and frequency shifts in Al Heα group emission from laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, O.; Adámek, P.; Angelo, P.; Dalimier, E.; Förster, E.; Krousky, E.; Rosmej, F. B.; Schott, R.

    2006-05-01

    Precise spectroscopic observations of K-shell emission from highly stripped Al ions immersed in dense, constrained-flow laser-produced plasma is reported. By using a vertical dispersion Johann spectrometer, the time-integrated spectra of the Al Heα group were measured with a high spectral and spatial resolution. The complex spectral profiles modified by the satellite formation, line broadening and frequency shifts were decomposed into individual pseudo-Voigt components by using a code GASPED based on a problem-dependent genetic algorithm. The method uses eight operators tailored to the problem of spectral decomposition and variable-size genomes to fit the data with a varying number of spectral lines. The spectra fitting was based on anticipatory theoretical knowledge of the satellite structure simulated by the multilevel collisional-radiative code MARIA and on an assumption of the aggregate plasma-induced shift of the parent lines and their satellites. The analysis of the spectral profiles revealed systematic red shifts of the resonance and the intercombination lines. Their magnitude is commensurate with predictions of the atomic data and spectral line shape codes combined with the 1D hydrodynamic modeling of the plasma conditions and independent electron density measurements. The results obtained corroborate the feasibility of an accurate decomposition of the spectral profiles encompassing optically thick and thin lines overlapped by a strong satellite emission.

  20. Frequency-Poloidal Wave Number Spectral Analysis of Turbulence in QH-mode plasmas Measured with BES on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Burrell, K. H.; Chen, X.

    2016-10-01

    Quiescent H-mode (QH) is an ELM-free scenario with good energy confinement, constant density, and radiated power, with a pedestal localized electromagnetic mode (edge harmonic oscillation, EHO) providing continuous particle transport. The features and characteristics of QH-mode plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain are crucial to understanding the mechanisms and dynamics of the enhanced particle transport. Frequency-wavenumber spectral analysis was applied to localized density fluctuation data measured with BES on DIII-D in the region of 0.8 < ρ < 1.0 . In the analysis, a Maximum Entropy Method is applied in the space domain, instead of an FFT, to estimate a well resolved k-spectrum spectrum from truncated data. The fundamental frequency of the EHO was typically 10 kHz with long poloidal wavelength (kθ 0.02cm-1), while broadband turbulence was observed in the range of 50-200 kHz with correlation lengths of a few cm. The broadband turbulence measured at ρ 0.9 was found to have poloidal phase velocity of 10 km/s, which corresponds to the E ×B velocity. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. Generation of blue light by sum-frequency generation of a spectrally combined broad-area diode laser array.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhanda; Jiang, Menghua; Yu, Haoyang; Hui, Yongling; Lei, Hong; Li, Qiang

    2016-10-15

    We present the first demonstration of a spectrally beam combined diode laser array with subsequent sum-frequency generation (SFG). The combined beam of the diode laser array with 19 emitters has the same beam quality as a single emitter, and the wavelength of each emitter is different. The blue light is generated by sum-frequency mixing of pairs of emitters in the diode laser array. About 93 mW of blue light power is produced using a PPLN crystal. Compared with the SFG of two emitters, this approach can increase the number of lasers participating in nonlinear frequency conversion. Thus, it can enhance the available power.

  2. Mode-Selective Photon Counting Via Quantum Frequency Conversion Using Spectrally-Engineered Pump Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manurkar, Paritosh

    phase of each spectral frequency from an optical frequency comb. The latter is generated using a cascaded configuration of phase and amplitude modulators. We characterize the mode selectivity using classical signals by arranging the six TMs into two orthogonal signal sets. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that mode selectivity is preserved if we use sub-photon signals (weak coherent light). Thus, this work supports the idea that QFC has the basic properties needed for advanced multi-dimensional quantum measurements given that we have demonstrated for the first time the ability to move to high dimensions (d=4), measure coherent superposition modes, and measure sub-photon signal levels. In addition to mode-selective photon counting, we also experimentally demonstrate a method of reshaping optical pulses based on QFC. Such a method has the potential to serve as the interface between quantum memories and the existing fiber infrastructure. At the same time, it can be employed in all-optical systems for optical signal regeneration.

  3. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; ...

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  4. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  5. Evaluation of frequency and time-frequency spectral analysis of heart rate variability as a diagnostic marker of the sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hilton, M F; Bates, R A; Godfrey, K R; Chappell, M J; Cayton, R M

    1999-11-01

    The sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) elicits a unique heart rate rhythm that may provide the basis for an effective screening tool. The study uses the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) to assess the diagnostic potential of spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) using two methods, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and the discrete harmonic wavelet transform (DHWT). These two methods are compared over different sleep stages and spectral frequency bands. The HRV results are subsequently compared with those of the current screening method of oximetry. For both the DFT and the DHWT, the most diagnostically accurate frequency range for HRV spectral power calculations is found to be 0.019-0.036 Hz (denoted by AB2). Using AB2, 15 min sections of non-REM sleep data in 40 subjects produce ROC areas, for the DFT, DHWT and oximetry, of 0.94, 0.97 and 0.67, respectively. In REM sleep, ROC areas are 0.78, 0.79 and 0.71, respectively. In non-REM sleep, spectral analysis of HRV appears to be a significantly better indicator of the SAHS than the current screening method of oximetry, and, in REM sleep, it is comparable with oximetry. The advantage of the DHWT over the DFT is that it produces a greater time resolution and is computationally more efficient. The DHWT does not require the precondition of stationarity or interpolation of raw HRV data.

  6. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R.; Funsten, H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiple noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.

  7. Spectral two-dimensional inversion of frequency-domain induced polarization data from a mining slag heap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Thomas; Martin, Tina

    2016-12-01

    Abandoned mining waste dumps may become potential resources for mineral reuse. For evaluating such structures, their spatial extension, the mineral content and predominating grain size needs to be determined. Amongst geophysical prospection methods, induced polarization (IP) is particularly suited since ore minerals show significant polarization characteristics. From laboratory measurements it is known that there is a relation between mineral concentration and chargeability, whereas the frequency content is mainly dominated by grain size. Spectral IP (SIP) field data using a range of measuring frequencies can potentially map these quantities spatially. Instead of inverting the individual frequencies independently, we introduce a scheme where adjacent frequencies are constrained to each other. We test it using a synthetic model based on the Cole-Cole model with a body containing two parts of differing time constants. The inversion approach is able to reliably recover the Cole-Cole parameters. We apply the method to a field data set from a slag dump containing melting residuals from different minerals. The resulting models exhibit distinct zones of decreased conductivity and increased polarization that are not fully coincident. Furthermore, we observe a significant change in the spectral content. Taking into account recent laboratory investigations, the obtained chargeabilities hint to the occurrence of sufficient mineral concentration. In comparison with direct current resistivity, there is a clear benefit from using SIP field data in general and spectral analysis in particular.

  8. Magnetic Fe stripes created by self-organized MnAs template: Stripe edge pinning and high-frequency properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Gubbiotti, G.; Marangolo, M.; Milano, J.; Breitwieser, R.; Etgens, V. H.; Stamps, R. L.; Pini, M. G.

    2009-10-01

    Self-organization is an interesting route to the fabrication of nanostructured magnetic materials. Here we show that, near room temperature, an ultrathin Fe film deposited on a suitable MnAs template spontaneously breaks into a “lateral” superlattice of magnetic stripes. The magnetic superstructure originates from the temperature-dependent morphological change in the substrate: an epitaxially grown MnAs/GaAs(001) film, whose groove-ridge structure was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. Owing to the stray magnetic fields produced by the underlying MnAs template, the Fe stripe domains have opposite magnetizations, and behave essentially as independent magnetic entities because of strong stripe edge pinning. This is shown dramatically in terms of a split microwave resonance that can be controlled with an external magnetic field, as proved by Brillouin light-scattering data and analysis of the Fe spin-wave frequencies. Additionally, the potential for device applications of such lateral magnetic superlattices, displaying an “inverse” exchange-spring behavior, is discussed.

  9. Spectral linewidth and resonant frequency characteristics of InGaAsP/InP multiquantum well lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sasai, Y.; Ohya, J.; Ogura, M.

    1989-04-01

    The spectral linewidth and resonant frequency characteristics of 1.3 ..mu..m InGaAsP/InP multiquantum well (MQW) lasers grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) were investigated, compared to those of the conventional double heterostructure (DH) lasers. The result showed a decrease in spectral linewidth and an increase in resonant frequency f/sub r/ with decreasing well thickness. Moreover, it was recognized that the linewidth enhancement factor became smaller in well thicknesses of less than -- 200 A, namely, the factor ..cap alpha.. reduced to -- 2, while that of the DH laser was -- 6. The f/sub r/ of 9 GHz, which is about twice as large as that of conventional DH lasers, was achieved at an optical power of 5.3 mW/facet.

  10. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  11. Frequency analysis of tick quotes on the foreign exchange market and agent-based modeling: A spectral distance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2007-08-01

    High-frequency financial data of the foreign exchange market (EUR/CHF, EUR/GBP, EUR/JPY, EUR/NOK, EUR/SEK, EUR/USD, NZD/USD, USD/CAD, USD/CHF, USD/JPY, USD/NOK, and USD/SEK) are analyzed by utilizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between two normalized spectrograms of the tick frequency and the generalized Jensen-Shannon divergence among them. The temporal structure variations of the similarity between currency pairs is detected and characterized. A simple agent-based model in which N market participants exchange M currency pairs is proposed. The equation for the tick frequency is approximately derived theoretically. Based on the analysis of this model, the spectral distance of the tick frequency is associated with the similarity of the behavior (perception and decision) of the market participants in exchanging these currency pairs.

  12. LASERS: Low-frequency power and pointing noises of a spectrally-selective external-cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruevich, V. V.; Elizarov, S. G.; Parashchuk, D. Yu

    2006-05-01

    The spectral density of low-frequency power noise and pointing noises of an external cavity AlGaAs/GaAs laser in Littman—Metcalf configuration is studied in the frequency region up to 1 kHz. The relative level of the power and pointing noises in the laser operating on a single longitudinal mode of the external resonator was ~10-6 Hz-1/2 and did not change substantially when the feedback was switched off. Long-term intensity fluctuations caused by intermode switchings did not exceed 2%.

  13. The optical properties and spectral features of malignant skin melanocytes in the terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachuk, A. A.; Begaeva, V. A.; Khodzitsky, M. K.; Truloff, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The samples of cells of mice's melanocytes have been investigated. Their optical properties and spectral features were investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) in transmission mode. It was found that the optical properties of oncological melanocytes and normal cells are different and oncological cells have spectral features of absorption coefficient so it can be concluded that it is easy to discriminate mice's oncological skin melanocytes by using THz TDS.

  14. Edge-filter technique and dominant frequency analysis for high-speed railway monitoring with fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, Georges; Kinet, Damien; Mendoza, Edgar; Dupuy, Julien; Moeyaert, Véronique; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Structural health and operation monitoring are of growing interest in the development of railway networks. Conventional systems of infrastructure monitoring already exist (e.g. axle counters, track circuits) but present some drawbacks. Alternative solutions are therefore studied and developed. In this field, optical fiber sensors, and more particularly fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, are particularly relevant due to their immunity to electromagnetic fields and simple wavelength-division-multiplexing capability. Field trials conducted up to now have demonstrated that FBG sensors provide useful information about train composition, positioning, speed, acceleration and weigh-in-motion estimations. Nevertheless, for practical deployment, cost-effectiveness should be ensured, specifically at the interrogator side that has also to be fast (>1 kHz repetition rate), accurate (∼1 pm wavelength shift) and reliable. To reach this objective, we propose in this paper to associate a low cost and high-speed interrogator coupled with an adequate signal-processing algorithm to dynamically monitor cascaded wavelength-multiplexed FBGs and to accurately capture the parameters of interest for railway traffic monitoring. This method has been field-tested with a Redondo Optics Inc. interrogator based on the well-known edge-filter demodulation technique. To determine the train speed from the raw data, a dominant frequency analysis has been implemented. Using this original method, we show that we can retrieve the speed of the trains, even when the time history strain signature is strongly affected by the measurement noise. The results are assessed by complimentary data obtained from a spectrometer-based FBG interrogator.

  15. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  16. High-frequency ultrasound detection of cell death: Spectral differentiation of different forms of cell death in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Maurice M.; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Ranieri, Shawn M.; Giles, Anoja; Oelze, Michael L.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    High frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques were investigated to characterize different forms of cell death in vitro. Suspension-grown acute myeloid leukemia cells were treated to cause apoptosis, oncosis, mitotic arrest, and heat-induced death. Samples were scanned with 20 and 40 MHz ultrasound and assessed histologically in terms of cellular structure. Frequency-domain analysis of 20 MHz ultrasound data demonstrated midband fit changes of 6.0 ± 0.7 dBr, 6.2 ± 1.8 dBr, 4.0 ± 1.0 dBr and −4.6 ± 1.7 dBr after 48-hour cisplatinum-induced apoptosis, 48-hour oncotic decay, 36-hour colchicine-induced mitotic arrest, and heat treatment compared to control, respectively. Trends from 40 MHz ultrasound were similar. Spectral slope changes obtained from 40 MHz ultrasound data were reflective of alterations in cell and nucleus size. Chromatin pyknosis or lysis trends suggested that the density of nuclear material may be responsible for observed changes in ultrasound backscatter. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed the modes of cell death and supported midband fit trends in ultrasound data. Scatterer-size and concentration estimates obtained from a fluid-filled sphere form factor model further corresponded with spectral analysis and histology. Results indicate quantitative ultrasound spectral analysis may be used for probing anti-cancer response and distinguishing various modes of cell death in vitro. PMID:28050578

  17. Spectral Analysis and Sonification of Simulation Data Generated in a Frequency Domain Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    multiples of the fundamental frequencies in the sound. Fundamental frequencies are similar to notes on the musical scale. Fundamental frequencies are...Perceptually, we consider the complexity of a sound as timbre . 45 For example, the timbre of a violin is different than the timbre of a flute, even...two sounds that have the same intensity and timbre for the human ear to distinguish the two sounds as different 50 percent of the time. Similarly

  18. Development of Chip-Based Frequency Combs for Spectral and Timing Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    surrounding the pump wavelength. In our experiment, we amplify a tunable single-frequency laser centered at 1064 nm with a ytterbium-doped fiber ...clock. Generation and stabilization of optical frequency combs have traditionally relied on modelocked solid-state and fiber lasers , which are...has been demonstrated successfully with various solid-state and fiber laser platforms. The wavelengths of the optical frequency combs cover the

  19. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz). In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects’ heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz) significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (<1 kHz) also caused significant measurement errors. We conclude that the contact impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection. PMID:28107524

  20. Selective ensemble modeling load parameters of ball mill based on multi-scale frequency spectral features and sphere criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Yu, Wen; Chai, Tianyou; Liu, Zhuo; Zhou, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to model multi-frequency signal, such as mechanical vibration and acoustic signals of wet ball mill in the mineral grinding process. In this paper, these signals are decomposed into multi-scale intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique. A new adaptive multi-scale spectral features selection approach based on sphere criterion (SC) is applied to these IMFs frequency spectra. The candidate sub-models are constructed by the partial least squares (PLS) with the selected features. Finally, the branch and bound based selective ensemble (BBSEN) algorithm is applied to select and combine these ensemble sub-models. This method can be easily extended to regression and classification problems with multi-time scale signal. We successfully apply this approach to a laboratory-scale ball mill. The shell vibration and acoustic signals are used to model mill load parameters. The experimental results demonstrate that this novel approach is more effective than the other modeling methods based on multi-scale frequency spectral features.

  1. Spatial resolution dependence on spectral frequency in human speech cortex electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Leah; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Edwards, Erik; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has become an important tool in human neuroscience and has tremendous potential for emerging applications in neural interface technology. Electrode array design parameters are outstanding issues for both research and clinical applications, and these parameters depend critically on the nature of the neural signals to be recorded. Here, we investigate the functional spatial resolution of neural signals recorded at the human cortical surface. We empirically derive spatial spread functions to quantify the shared neural activity for each frequency band of the electrocorticogram. Approach. Five subjects with high-density (4 mm center-to-center spacing) ECoG grid implants participated in speech perception and production tasks while neural activity was recorded from the speech cortex, including superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. The cortical surface field potential was decomposed into traditional EEG frequency bands. Signal similarity between electrode pairs for each frequency band was quantified using a Pearson correlation coefficient. Main results. The correlation of neural activity between electrode pairs was inversely related to the distance between the electrodes; this relationship was used to quantify spatial falloff functions for cortical subdomains. As expected, lower frequencies remained correlated over larger distances than higher frequencies. However, both the envelope and phase of gamma and high gamma frequencies (30-150 Hz) are largely uncorrelated (<90%) at 4 mm, the smallest spacing of the high-density arrays. Thus, ECoG arrays smaller than 4 mm have significant promise for increasing signal resolution at high frequencies, whereas less additional gain is achieved for lower frequencies. Significance. Our findings quantitatively demonstrate the dependence of ECoG spatial resolution on the neural frequency of interest. We demonstrate that this relationship is consistent across patients and

  2. An online algorithm for least-square spectral analysis: Applied to time-frequency analysis of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Leong, Philip H W

    2015-08-01

    We propose a novel online algorithm for computing least-square based periodograms, otherwise known as the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram. Our spectral analysis technique has been shown to be superior to traditional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods, and we introduce an algorithm which has O(N) time complexity per input sample. The technique is suitable for real-time embedded implementations and its utility is demonstrated through an application to the high resolution time-frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV).

  3. Efficient spectral hole-burning and atomic frequency comb storage in Nd3+:YLiF4

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Quan; Wang, Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    We present spectral hole-burning measurements of the 4I9/2 → 4F3/2 transition in Nd3+:YLiF4. The isotope shifts of Nd3+ can be directly resolved in the optical absorption spectrum. We report atomic frequency comb storage with an echo efficiency of up to 35% and a memory bandwidth of 60 MHz in this material. The interesting properties show the potential of this material for use in both quantum and classical information processing. PMID:24067549

  4. On-chip multi spectral frequency standard replication by stabilizing a microring resonator to a molecular line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zektzer, Roy; Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-07-01

    Stabilized laser lines are highly desired for myriad of applications ranging from precise measurements to optical communications. While stabilization can be obtained by using molecular or atomic absorption references, these are limited to specific frequencies. On the other hand, resonators can be used as wide band frequency references. Unfortunately, such resonators are unstable and inaccurate. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a chip-scale multispectral frequency standard replication operating in the spectral range of the near IR. This is obtained by frequency locking a microring resonator (MRR) to an acetylene absorption line. The MRR consists of a Si3N4 waveguides with microheater on top of it. The thermo-optic effect is utilized to lock one of the MRR resonances to an acetylene line. This locked MRR is then used to stabilize other laser sources at 980 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. By beating the stabilized laser to another stabilized laser, we obtained frequency instability floor of 4 ×10-9 at around 100 s in terms of Allan deviation. Such stable and accurate chip scale sources are expected to serve as important building block in diverse fields such as communication and metrology.

  5. Spectral broadening and inhibition of amplitude and frequency modulation in Nd: glass regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Pan, Xue; Wang, Jiangfeng; Li, Xuechun

    2014-11-01

    In order to broaden the spectrum of laser pulse and reduce the gain narrowing effect in Nd:glass regenerative amplifier to realize the ambition of inhibiting amplitude and frequency modulation, proper quartz birefringence crystal plate is inserted into the cavity. The influence factors of central wavelength, depth of modulation and range of modulation are obtained theoretically. The width of the spectrum is broadened by controlling all the factors. Two kinds of thickness, 5mm and 6mm, are inserted into the regenerative amplifier cavity. The results of theoretical calculation and experiment both show that the effect of spectrum widening is evident, which reduces the gain narrowing effect to some extent. The amplitude and frequency modulation resulted from gain narrowing effect is inhibited when the central wavelength deflects. The simulated results show that inhibited effect of amplitude and frequency modulation is remarkable. And the method is a potential effective technique for amplitude and frequency modulation inhibition.

  6. Twin peak high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations as a spectral imprint of dual oscillation modes of accretion tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakala, P.; Goluchová, K.; Török, G.; Šrámková, E.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Vincent, F. H.; Mazur, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    Context. High-frequency (millisecond) quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) are observed in the X-ray power-density spectra of several microquasars and low-mass X-ray binaries. Two distinct QPO peaks, so-called twin peak QPOs, are often detected simultaneously exhibiting their frequency ratio close or equal to 3:2. A widely discussed class of proposed QPOs models is based on oscillations of accretion toroidal structures orbiting in the close vicinity of black holes or neutron stars. Aims: Following the analytic theory and previous studies of observable spectral signatures, we aim to model the twin peak QPOs as a spectral imprint of specific dual oscillation regime defined by a combination of the lowest radial and vertical oscillation mode of slender tori. We consider the model of an optically thick slender accretion torus with constant specific angular momentum. We examined power spectra and fluorescent Kα iron line profiles for two different simulation setups with the mode frequency relations corresponding to the epicyclic resonance HF QPOs model and modified relativistic precession QPOs model. Methods: We used relativistic ray-tracing implemented in the parallel simulation code LSDplus. In the background of the Kerr spacetime geometry, we analyzed the influence of the distant observer inclination and the spin of the central compact object. Relativistic optical projection of the oscillating slender torus is illustrated by images in false colours related to the frequency shift. Results: We show that performed simulations yield power spectra with the pair of dominant peaks that correspond to the frequencies of radial and vertical oscillation modes and with the peak frequency ratio equal to the proper value 3:2 on a wide range of inclinations and spin values. We also discuss exceptional cases of a very low and very high inclination, as well as unstable high spin relativistic precession-like configurations that predict a constant frequency ratio equal to 1:2. We

  7. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  8. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers.

    PubMed

    Leger, Joel D; Nyby, Clara M; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V; Burtsev, Viacheslav D; Qasim, Layla N; Rubtsov, Grigory I; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2014-08-01

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm(-1) to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ~70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10(-4) cm(-1) was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  9. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, Joel D.; Nyby, Clara M.; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I.; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V.; Burtsev, Viacheslav D.; Qasim, Layla N.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Rubtsov, Grigory I.

    2014-08-15

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm{sup −1} to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ∼70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10{sup −4} cm{sup −1} was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  10. Deep multi-frequency radio imaging in the Lockman Hole - II. The spectral index of submillimetre galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibar, Edo; Ivison, R. J.; Best, P. N.; Coppin, K.; Pope, A.; Smail, Ian; Dunlop, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have employed the Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope and the Very Large Array to map the Lockman Hole. At 610 and 1400MHz, we reach noise levels of 15 and 6μJybeam-1, respectively, with well-matched resolutions (~5arcsec). At this depth, we obtained reliable detections for about half of the known sub-mm galaxies (SMGs) in the field. For radio-identified SMGs, which are typically at z ~ 2, we measure a mean radio spectral index of α1400610 = -0.75 +/- 0.06 (where Sν ~ να) and standard deviation of 0.29, between approximate rest-frame frequencies of 1.8 and 4.2GHz. The slope of their continuum emission is indistinguishable from that of local star-forming galaxies and suggests that extended optically thin synchrotron emission dominates the radio output of SMGs. Cooling effects by synchrotron emission and Inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic microwave background do not seem to affect their radio spectral energy distributions. For those SMGs judged by Spitzer mid-infrared colours and spectroscopy to host obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN), we find a clear deviation from the rest of the sample - they typically have steeper radio spectral indices, α1400610 <~ -1.0. These findings suggest these mid-IR-/AGN-selected SMGs may have an intrinsically different injection mechanism for relativistic particles, or they might reside in denser environments. This work provides a reliable spectral template for the estimation of far-IR/radio photometric redshifts, and will enable accurate statistical K-corrections for the large samples of SMGs expected with SCUBA-2 and Herschel.

  11. Sensitivity of a frequency-selective electrode based on spatial spectral properties of the extracellular AP of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Cathébras, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In the context of functional electrical stimulation, neural recording is one of the main issues. For instance, the control of the limbs in people with motor deficiencies needs information about the muscle lengths and speeds that can be extracted from electroneurograms (ENG) carried on afferent peripheral nerves. The aim of this study is to propose an non-invasive and spatial-selective electrode (because specific informations are carried into different fascicles). To do so, we investigate the spatial properties of an extracellular action potential (AP). This properties are described qualitatively and quantitatively using analytical study on an inhomogeneous an anisotropic nerve model. Then, a spectral analysis on this spatial signal discriminates the different frequency components. Low spatial frequencies represent the global shape of the signal, whereas high frequencies are related to the type of fibers. We show that the latter is rapidly attenuated with the distance and thus, being a local phenomenon, can be used as a selective measurement. Finally, we propose a spatial filtering based on electrode design and an electronic architecture to extract this high frequencies.

  12. [Study on spectral gain characterization of FWM processes with multi-frequency pumps in photonic crystal fiber].

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhan-Qiang

    2011-10-01

    Spectral gain induced by four-wave-mixing with multi-frequency pump was investigated by exploiting the data signal and continue lights co-propagation in dispersion flattened high nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The effects of wavelength drift of pump lights, polarization state of orthogonal or parallel of pump lights, polarization mismatch of signal light versus orthogonal pump lights, total power of signal and probe light on the spectrum gain were analyzed. The results show that good FWM gain effects with multi-frequency pump can be obtained in 36.4 nm wavelength range when power ratio of pump to probe light is appropriate and with identical polarization. Furthermore, the gain of FWM with multi-frequency pump is very sensitive to polarization fluctuation and the different idle waves obtain different gain with the variation in signal polarization state. Moreover, the impact of pump numbers was investigated. The obtained results would be helpful for further research on ultrahigh-speed all optical signal processing devices exploiting the FWM with multi-frequency pump in PCF for future photonics network.

  13. Frequency spectral analysis of GPR data over a crude oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, B.L.; Olhoeft, G.R.; Powers, M.H.; ,

    2004-01-01

    A multi-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR) dataset was acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The dataset consists of two, parallel profiles, each with 17 transmitter-receiver offsets ranging from 0.60 to 5.15m. One profile was acquired over a known oil pool floating on the water table, and the other profile was acquired over an uncontaminated area. The data appear to be more attenuated, or at least exhibit less reflectivity, in the area over the oil pool. In an attempt to determine the frequency dependence of this apparent attenuation, several attributes of the frequency spectra of the data were analyzed after accounting for the effects on amplitude of the radar system (radiation pattern), changes in antenna-ground coupling, and spherical divergence. The attributes analyzed were amplitude spectra peak frequency, 6 dB down, or half-amplitude, spectrum width, and the low and high frequency slopes between the 3 and 9 dB down points. The most consistent trend was observed for Fourier transformed full traces at offsets 0.81, 1.01, and 1.21m which displayed steeper low frequency slopes over the area corresponding to the oil pool. The Fourier-transformed time-windowed traces, where each window was equal to twice the airwave wavelet length, exhibited weakly consistent attribute trends from offset to offset and from window to window. The fact that strong, consistent oil indicators are not seen in this analysis indicates that another mechanism due to the presence of the oil, such as a gradient in the electromagnetic properties, may simply suppress reflections over the contaminated zone.

  14. Long-term, high-frequency water quality monitoring in an agricultural catchment: insights from spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Alice; Kirchner, James; Faucheux, Mikael; Merot, Philippe; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2013-04-01

    The choice of sampling frequency is a key issue in the design and operation of environmental observatories. The choice of sampling frequency creates a spectral window (or temporal filter) that highlights some timescales and processes, and de-emphasizes others (1). New online measurement technologies can monitor surface water quality almost continuously, allowing the creation of very rich time series. The question of how best to analyze such detailed temporal datasets is an important issue in environmental monitoring. In the present work, we studied water quality data from the AgrHys long-term hydrological observatory (located at Kervidy-Naizin, Western France) sampled at daily and 20-minute time scales. Manual sampling has provided 12 years of daily measurements of nitrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chloride and sulfate (2), and 3 years of daily measurements of about 30 other solutes. In addition, a UV-spectrometry probe (Spectrolyser) provides one year of 20-minute measurements for nitrate and DOC. Spectral analysis of the daily water quality time series reveals that our intensively farmed catchment exhibits universal 1/f scaling (power spectrum slope of -1) for a large number of solutes, confirming and extending the earlier discovery of universal 1/f scaling in the relatively pristine Plynlimon catchment (3). 1/f time series confound conventional methods for assessing the statistical significance of trends. Indeed, conventional methods assume that there is a clear separation of scales between the signal (the trend line) and the noise (the scatter around the line). This is not true for 1/f noise, since it overestimates the occurrence of significant trends. Our results raise the possibility that 1/f scaling is widespread in water quality time series, thus posing fundamental challenges to water quality trend analysis. Power spectra of the 20-minute nitrate and DOC time series show 1/f scaling at frequencies below 1/day, consistent with the longer-term daily

  15. Spectral characteristics and linear-nonlinear synchronization changes of different EEG frequency bands during the CNV.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Márk; Csuhaj, Roland; Gaál, Zsófia Anna; Czigler, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Boha, Roland; Kondákor, István

    2008-05-01

    During the CNV recorded in a simple auditory working memory task, task-specific decrease of the relative delta band and a transient increase of the absolute theta band were seen, accompanied by an increase of the absolute alpha1 and alpha2 bands in the posterior region. The decreased delta power probably corresponds to increased task-evoked arousal, whereas the transient theta power increase corresponds to working memory demand and possibly to the orienting response. The increased alpha1 and alpha2 power may be a manifestation of a top-down mechanism revealing control over the execution of a response. The area-specific, task-related, and frequency-dependent changes of EEG complexity measures indicate frontally increasing complexity during the early part of the CNV in the beta frequency bands, which underscores the importance of this region in the mechanisms of anticipatory behavior.

  16. Frequency-fluctuation model applied to Stark-Zeeman spectral line shapes in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mosse, C.; Mouret, L.; Talin, B.; Gigosos, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Lisitsa, V.

    2011-08-15

    A very fast method for calculating line shapes in the presence of an external magnetic field accounting for charge particle dynamics is proposed. It is based on a reformulation of the frequency fluctuation model, which provides an expression of the dynamic line shape as a functional of the static distribution function of frequencies. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the distribution of intensity and polarization of the emission depends on the angle between the observation line and the magnetic field's direction. Comparisons with numerical simulations and experimental results for various plasma conditions show very good agreement. Results on hydrogen lines in the context of magnetic fusion and the Lyman-{alpha} line, accounting for fine structure, emitted by argon in the context of inertial fusion, are also presented.

  17. High-frequency poly(vinylidene fluoride) copolymer transducers used for spectral characterization of settled microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandsø, Frank; Wagle, Sanat; Decharat, Adit; Habib, Anowarul; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency ultrasonic polymer transducers are used to investigate backscattering from spherical microparticles. These microspheres are immersed in water and allowed to settle on a polymer substrate acting as an ultrasonic contact material between the immersion fluid and the transducer. The experimental study is complemented with a three-dimensional (3D) numerical investigation; both yield rather long scattered waveforms in the time domain for the largest microparticles. The corresponding frequency spectra typically contain a number of minima values arising from wave resonances in the microparticles. The locations of these resonances, or eigenvalues, correlate strongly to the particle size. Good agreement is obtained between the experiment and the numerical model, which will help to identify the wave mode responsible for the extended scattering.

  18. Nine years of multi-frequency monitoring of the blazar PKS 0048-097: spectral and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzcholska, Alicja

    2015-08-01

    Context. Blazars are highly variable, radio-loud active galactic nuclei with jets oriented at a small angle to the line of sight. The observed emission of these sources covers the whole electromagnetic spectrum from radio frequencies up to the high or even very high energy gamma-ray range. To understand the complex physics of these objects, multi-wavelength observations and studies on the variability and correlations between different wavelengths are therefore essential. Aims: The long-term multi-frequency observations of PKS 0048-097 are analysed here to investigate its spectral and temporal features. The studies includes nine years of observations of the blazar, which is well studied in the optical and radio domain, but not in the other frequencies. Methods: Multi-wavelength data collected with OVRO, KAIT, Catalina, Swift/UVOT, Swift/XRT, and Fermi/LAT were studied. Results: The performed analysis revealed strong variability in all wavelengths that is most clearly manifested in the X-ray range. The correlation studies do not exhibit any relation between different wavelengths, except for the very strong positive correlation between the optical emission in V and R bands.

  19. Dual-frequency radar Doppler spectral retrieval of rain drop size distributions and entangled dynamics variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tridon, F.; Battaglia, A.

    2015-06-01

    A novel technique based on Ka-W band dual-wavelength Doppler spectra has been developed for the simultaneous retrieval of binned rain drop size distributions (DSD) and air state parameters like vertical wind and air broadening caused by turbulence and wind shear. The rationale underpinning the method consists in exploiting the peculiar features observed in Doppler spectra caused by the wavelength dependence of scattering and absorption properties. A notional study based on a large data set of DSDs measured by a two-dimensional video disdrometer demonstrates that the retrieval performs best for small/moderate air broadening spectral width and when mean volume diameters exceed at least 1 mm. The retrieval is also limited to ranges below cloud base and where the signal-to-noise ratio of both radars exceed 10 dB, which rules out regions affected by strong attenuation. Broadly speaking, it is applicable to rain rates comprised between roughly 1 and 30 mm h-1. Preliminary retrieval for observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site shows very good agreement with independent reflectivity measurements from a 0.915 GHz wind profiler. The proposed methodology shows great potential in linking microphysics to dynamics in rainfall studies.

  20. Generation of Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Waves by Spectrally Broad Intense Laser Pulses in a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsintsadze, L. N.; Tajima, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Koga, J. K.; Nakagawa, K.; Kishimoto, Y.

    A new mechanism for the emission of low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves, including the generation of a quasistatic magnetic field, by a relativistically intense laser pulse with a wide spectrum is presented. The emission is due to modulational and filamentational instabilities of the photon gas in a plasma. The generation of the magnetic field is associated with a significant change in the laser pulse shape during the propagation. This process is identified in our 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a high intensity (1019

  1. Control of Four-Level Quantum Coherence via Discrete Spectral Shaping of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Peer, Avi; Ye Jun

    2008-05-23

    We present experiments demonstrating high-resolution and wide-bandwidth coherent control of a four-level atomic system in a diamond configuration. A femtosecond frequency comb is used to excite a specific pair of two-photon transitions in cold {sup 87}Rb. The optical-phase-sensitive response of the closed-loop diamond system is studied by controlling the phase of the comb modes with a pulse shaper. Finally, the pulse shape is optimized resulting in a 256% increase in the two-photon transition rate by forcing constructive interference between the mode pairs detuned from an intermediate resonance.

  2. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  3. Blue light generated by intra-cavity frequency doubling of an edge-emitting diode laser with a periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Yao, Aiyun; Copner, N J; Gawith, C B E; Knight, Ian G; Pfeiffer, Hans-Ulrich; Musk, Bob

    2009-11-23

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge intra-cavity frequency doubling (ICFD) of an edge-emitter diode laser using a 10 mm-long 5.0 microm periodically poled LiNbO(3) (PPLN) crystal. An optical output power of 33 mW second harmonic blue light at 490.5 nm is generated at 1.0 A injection current, equivalent to an overall wall-plug efficiency of 1.8%. The measured M(2) values of blue beam are 1.7 and 2.4 along the fast and slow axis.

  4. Broadband frequency-domain near-infrared spectral tomography using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-domain near-infrared (NIR) diffuse spectral tomography with a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is presented, providing tunable multiwavelength quantitative spectroscopy with maximal power for thick tissue imaging. The system was developed to show that intrinsically high stability can be achieved with many wavelengths in the NIR range, using a mode-locked signal of 80 MHz with heterodyned lock-in detection. The effect of cumulative noise from multiple wavelengths of data on the reconstruction process was studied, and it was shown that inclusion of more wavelengths can reduce skew in the noise distribution. This normalization of the data variance then minimizes errors in estimation of chromophore concentrations. Simulations and tissue phantom experiments were used to quantify this improvement in image accuracy for recovery of tissue hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. PMID:19340109

  5. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    PubMed

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse < 1 with a strong continuous light field at 1403 nm in a periodically poled Zn:LiNbO3 ridge waveguide an internal conversion efficiency of ∼ 73% is achieved. We further investigate the noise properties of the process by measuring the output spectrum. Our results indicate that by narrow spectral filtering a quantum interface should be feasible which bridges the wavelength gap between quantum emitters like color centers in diamond emitting in the red part of the spectrum and low-loss fiber-optic telecommunications wavelengths.

  6. Relative velocity measurement from the spectral phase of a match-filtered linear frequency modulated pulse.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Holland, Charles W

    2016-08-01

    Linear frequency modulated signals are commonly used to perform underwater acoustic measurements since they can achieve high signal-to-noise ratios with relatively low source levels. However, such signals present a drawback if the source or receiver or target is moving. The Doppler effect affects signal amplitude, delay, and resolution. To perform a correct match filtering that includes the Doppler shift requires prior knowledge of the relative velocity. In this paper, the relative velocity is extracted directly from the Doppler cross-power spectrum. More precisely, the quadratic coefficient of the Doppler cross-power-spectrum phase is proportional to the relative velocity. The proposed method achieves velocity estimates that compare favorably with Global Positioning System ground truth and the ambiguity method.

  7. Auditory Time-Frequency Masking for Spectrally and Temporally Maximally-Compact Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Laback, Bernhard; Savel, Sophie; Ystad, Sølvi; Balazs, Peter; Meunier, Sabine; Kronland-Martinet, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many audio applications perform perception-based time-frequency (TF) analysis by decomposing sounds into a set of functions with good TF localization (i.e. with a small essential support in the TF domain) using TF transforms and applying psychoacoustic models of auditory masking to the transform coefficients. To accurately predict masking interactions between coefficients, the TF properties of the model should match those of the transform. This involves having masking data for stimuli with good TF localization. However, little is known about TF masking for mathematically well-localized signals. Most existing masking studies used stimuli that are broad in time and/or frequency and few studies involved TF conditions. Consequently, the present study had two goals. The first was to collect TF masking data for well-localized stimuli in humans. Masker and target were 10-ms Gaussian-shaped sinusoids with a bandwidth of approximately one critical band. The overall pattern of results is qualitatively similar to existing data for long maskers. To facilitate implementation in audio processing algorithms, a dataset provides the measured TF masking function. The second goal was to assess the potential effect of auditory efferents on TF masking using a modeling approach. The temporal window model of masking was used to predict present and existing data in two configurations: (1) with standard model parameters (i.e. without efferents), (2) with cochlear gain reduction to simulate the activation of efferents. The ability of the model to predict the present data was quite good with the standard configuration but highly degraded with gain reduction. Conversely, the ability of the model to predict existing data for long maskers was better with than without gain reduction. Overall, the model predictions suggest that TF masking can be affected by efferent (or other) effects that reduce cochlear gain. Such effects were avoided in the experiment of this study by using maximally

  8. Determination of Black Hole Mass in Cyg X-1 by Scaling of Spectral Index-QPO Frequency Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that timing and spectral properties of Galactic Black Hole (BH) X-ray binaries (XRB) are strongly correlated. In particular, it has been shown that low frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) nu(sub low) - photon index GAMMA correlation curves have a specific pattern. In a number of the sources studied the shape of the index-low frequency QPO correlations are self-similar with a position offset in the nu(sub low) - GAMMA plane determined by a BH mass M(sub BH). Specifically, Titarchuk & Fiorito (2004) gave strong theoretical and observational arguments that the QPO frequency values in this nu(sub low) - GAMMA correlation should be inversely proportional to M(sub BH). A simple translation of the correlation for a given source along frequency axis leads to the observed correlation for another source. As a result of this translation one can obtain a scaling factor which is simply a BH mass ratio for these particular sources. This property of the correlations offers a fundamentally new method for BH mass determination in XRBs. Here we use the observed QPO-index correlations observed in three BH sources: GRO J1655-40, GRS 1915+105 and Cyg X-1. The BH mass of (6.3 plus or minus 0.5) solar mass in GRO J1655-40 is obtained using optical observations. RXTE observations during the recent 2005 outburst yielded sufficient data to establish the correlation pattern during both rise and decay of the event. We use GRO J1655-40 as a standard reference source to measure the BH mass in Cyg X-1. We also revisit the GRS 1915+105 data as a further test of our scaling method. We obtain the BH mass in Cyg X-1 in the range 7.6-9.9.

  9. Rapid frequency control of sonar sounds by the FM bat, Miniopterus fuliginosus, in response to spectral overlap.

    PubMed

    Hase, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Takara; Kobayasi, Kohta I; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of multiple flying conspecifics, echolocating bats avoid jamming by adjusting the spectral and/or temporal features of their vocalizations. However, little is known about how bats alter their pulse acoustic characteristics to adapt to an acoustically jamming situation during flight. We investigated echolocation behavior in a bat (Miniopterus fuliginosus) during free flight under acoustic jamming conditions created by downward FM jamming sounds mimicking bat echolocation sounds. In an experimental chamber, the flying bat was exposed to FM jamming sounds with different terminal frequencies (TFs) from loudspeakers. Echolocation pulses emitted by the flying bat were recorded using a telemetry microphone (Telemike) mounted on the back of the bat. The bats immediately (within 150ms) shifted the TFs of emitted pulses upward when FM jamming sounds were presented. Moreover, the amount of upward TF shift differed depending on the TF ranges of the jamming sounds presented. When the TF range was lower than or overlapped the bat's mean TF, the bat TF shifted significantly upward (by 1-2kHz, Student's t-test, P<0.05), corresponding to 3-5% of the total bandwidth of their emitted pulses. These findings indicate that bats actively avoid overlap of the narrow frequency band around the TF.

  10. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Transient Free Radicals in the Mid-Infrared Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjork, Bryce J.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Changala, Bryan; Bui, Thinh Quoc; Cossel, Kevin; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of transient free radicals, such as HOCO and Criegee intermediates, play important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. Establishing accurate kinetics models for these complex systems require knowledge of the reaction rates and lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. However, standard spectroscopic techniques lack a combination of sensitivity, frequency resolution, and adequate temporal resolution to survey these reactions on the μs timescale. To answer this challenge, we have developed time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS). This novel technique allows for the detection of transient intermediates with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We demonstrate this technique in the mid-infrared spectral region, at 3.7 μm, by studying the photolysis of deuterated acrylic acid. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of photoproducts trans-DOCO, HOD, and D_2O, identified through their unique rovibrational structure, with 5 × 1010 molecules cm-3 sensitivity, and with a time resolution of 25 μs. We aim to apply this technique to detect directly the formation of the DOCO intermediate in the OD + CO chemical reaction at atmospherically relevant pressures, in order to validate statistical rate models of this reaction.

  11. Spectral EEG features for evaluating cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Zarjam, Pega; Epps, Julien; Chen, Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate spectral features derived from EEG signals for measuring cognitive load. Measurements of this kind have important commercial and clinical applications for optimizing the performance of users working under high mental load conditions, or as cognitive tests. Based on EEG recordings for a reading task in which three different levels of cognitive load were induced, it is shown that a set of spectral features--the spectral entropy, weighted mean frequency and its bandwidth, and spectral edge frequency--are all able to discriminate the three load levels effectively. An interesting result is that spectral entropy, which reflects the distribution of spectral energy rather than its magnitude, provides very good discrimination between cognitive load levels. We also report those EEG channels for which statistical significance between load levels was achieved. The effect of frequency bands on the spectral features is also investigated here. The results indicate that the choice of optimal frequency band can be dependent on the spectral feature extracted.

  12. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes equations approach to acoustic propagation in flow ducts with sharp edges.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Axel; Boij, Susann; Efraimsson, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in flow ducts is commonly modeled with time-domain non-linear Navier-Stokes equation methodologies. To reduce computational effort, investigations of a linearized approach in frequency domain are carried out. Calculations of sound wave propagation in a straight duct are presented with an orifice plate and a mean flow present. Results of transmission and reflections at the orifice are presented on a two-port scattering matrix form and are compared to measurements with good agreement. The wave propagation is modeled with a frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes equation methodology. This methodology is found to be efficient for cases where the acoustic field does not alter the mean flow field, i.e., when whistling does not occur.

  13. Third order spectral analysis robust to mixing artifacts for mapping cross-frequency interactions in EEG/MEG

    PubMed Central

    Chella, F.; Marzetti, L.; Pizzella, V.; Zappasodi, F.; Nolte, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to the third order spectral analysis, commonly called bispectral analysis, of electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data for studying cross-frequency functional brain connectivity. The main obstacle in estimating functional connectivity from EEG and MEG measurements lies in the signals being a largely unknown mixture of the activities of the underlying brain sources. This often constitutes a severe confounder and heavily affects the detection of brain source interactions. To overcome this problem, we previously developed metrics based on the properties of the imaginary part of coherency. Here, we generalize these properties from the linear to the nonlinear case. Specifically, we propose a metric based on an antisymmetric combination of cross-bispectra, which we demonstrate to be robust to mixing artifacts. Moreover, our metric provides complex-valued quantities that give the opportunity to study phase relationships between brain sources. The effectiveness of the method is first demonstrated on simulated EEG data. The proposed approach shows a reduced sensitivity to mixing artifacts when compared with a traditional bispectral metric. It also exhibits a better performance in extracting phase relationships between sources than the imaginary part of cross-spectrum for delayed interactions. The method is then applied to real EEG data recorded during resting state. A cross-frequency interaction is observed between brain sources at 10 Hz and 20 Hz, i.e., for alpha and beta rhythms. This interaction is then projected from signal to source level by using a fit-based procedure. This approach highlights a 10–20 Hz dominant interaction localized in an occipito-parieto-central network. PMID:24418509

  14. Third order spectral analysis robust to mixing artifacts for mapping cross-frequency interactions in EEG/MEG.

    PubMed

    Chella, F; Marzetti, L; Pizzella, V; Zappasodi, F; Nolte, G

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel approach to the third order spectral analysis, commonly called bispectral analysis, of electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data for studying cross-frequency functional brain connectivity. The main obstacle in estimating functional connectivity from EEG and MEG measurements lies in the signals being a largely unknown mixture of the activities of the underlying brain sources. This often constitutes a severe confounder and heavily affects the detection of brain source interactions. To overcome this problem, we previously developed metrics based on the properties of the imaginary part of coherency. Here, we generalize these properties from the linear to the nonlinear case. Specifically, we propose a metric based on an antisymmetric combination of cross-bispectra, which we demonstrate to be robust to mixing artifacts. Moreover, our metric provides complex-valued quantities that give the opportunity to study phase relationships between brain sources. The effectiveness of the method is first demonstrated on simulated EEG data. The proposed approach shows a reduced sensitivity to mixing artifacts when compared with a traditional bispectral metric. It also exhibits a better performance in extracting phase relationships between sources than the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum for delayed interactions. The method is then applied to real EEG data recorded during resting state. A cross-frequency interaction is observed between brain sources at 10Hz and 20Hz, i.e., for alpha and beta rhythms. This interaction is then projected from signal to source level by using a fit-based procedure. This approach highlights a 10-20Hz dominant interaction localized in an occipito-parieto-central network.

  15. Reduction of edge localized mode intensity on DIII-D by on-demand triggering with high frequency pellet injection and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Futatani, S.

    2013-08-15

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12× the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized β operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  16. Reduction of Edge Localized Mode Intensity on DIII-D by On-demand triggering with High Frequency Pellet Injection and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Isler, Ralph C; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T.A.; Futantani, S.

    2013-01-01

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12 the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12 lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  17. Comparison of Very High-Frequency Ultrasound and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Corneal and Epithelial Thickness Maps

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Raksha; Lloyd, Harriet O.; Reinstein, Dan Z.; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare measurements of corneal thickness (CT) and epithelial thickness (ET) in maps obtained by the RTVue spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system with those obtained from the Artemis 2 immersion arc-scanning very high-frequency ultrasound system. Setting Department of Ophthalmology of the Columbia University Medical Center Design A method-comparison study design to examine the agreement between two systems for measurement and mapping of CT and ET. Methods Both eyes of 12 normal volunteers were scanned with RTVue followed by Artemis and then by repeated RTVue. For each map, the minimum CT and mean values of CT and ET in the 3 mm radius zone and in 0.5 mm-wide concentric annuli of up to 3 mm radius around the corneal vertex were determined. Results The CT values from both devices were highly correlated and in the 3-mm radius zone (R>0.96) they were not statistically significantly different. There was no statistically significant change in ET or CT in RTVue measurements made before versus after immersion ultrasound. While highly correlated (R>0.76), RTVue ET values were systematically thinner (1.7 ± 2.1 µm) than Artemis 2 measurements (p<0.01) in the 3 mm radius zone. Conclusions Artemis and RTVue CT measurements in the 3 mm radius zone are equivalent in normal eyes. While correlated, Artemis ET measurements were systemically thicker than RTVue values. PMID:26948783

  18. Scaling of the frequencies of the type one edge localized modes and their effect on the tungsten source in JET ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Meyer, O.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    A database of 250 pulses taken randomly during the experimental campaigns of JET with the ITER-like wall (ILW) is used to study the frequency dependences of the type I edge localized modes (ELM). A scaling of the ELM frequency is presented as a function of the pedestal density drop dN ped and a very simple model to interpret this scaling is discussed. In this model, the frequency of the ELMs is governed by the time needed by the neutral flux to refill the density of the pedestal. The filling rate is the result of a small imbalance between the neutral flux filling the pedestal and the outward flux that expels the particles to the SOL. The ELM frequency can be governed by such a mechanism if the recovery time of the temperature of the pedestal in JET occurs before or at the same time as the one of the density. This is observed to be the case. An effect of the fuelling is measured when the number of injected particles is less than 1  ×  1022 particles s-1. In that case an increase of the inter-ELM time is observed which is related to the slower recovery of the density pedestal. Additionally, a scaling is found for the source of tungsten during the ELMs. The number of tungsten atoms eroded by the ELMs per second is proportional to dN ped multiplied by the ELM frequency. This is possible only if the tungsten sputtering yield is independent of the energy of the impinging particle hitting the divertor. This result is in agreement with Guillemault et al (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 085006) and is compatible with the D+  ions hitting the divertor having energies above 2 keV. Finally, by plotting the Wcontent/Wsource ratio during ELM crash, a global decreasing behaviour with the ELM frequency is found. However at frequencies below 40 Hz a scatter towards upper values is found. This scatter is found to correlate with the gas injection level. In a narrow ELM frequency band around 20 Hz, it is found that both the ratio Wcontent/Wsource and Wsource

  19. Calculation of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure at finite temperatures: spectral signatures of hydrogen bond breaking in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Balázs; De Angelis, Filippo; Giannozzi, Paolo; Car, Roberto

    2004-05-08

    We calculate the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure of H(2)O in the gas, hexagonal ice, and liquid phases using heuristic density-functional based methods. We present a detailed comparison of our results with experiment. The differences between the ice and water spectra can be rationalized in terms of the breaking of hydrogen bonds around the absorbing molecule. In particular the increase in the pre-edge absorption feature from ice to water is shown to be due to the breaking of a donor hydrogen bond. We also find that in water approximately 19% of hydrogen bonds are broken.

  20. Short-delayed self-heterodyne interferometer combined with time-frequency analysis for measuring dynamic spectral properties of tunable lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang; An, Ying; Li, Jinyi; Du, Zhenhui

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic spectral properties of Continuous Wave (CW) semiconductor lasers during continuous wavelength current tuning process (i.e. slope efficiency, dynamic wavelength current tuning rate and dynamic linewidth) are of utmost significance to high resolution molecular spectroscopy and trace gas detection. In this paper, a system for measuring dynamic spectral properties was setup based on a short-delayed self-heterodyne interferometry with different Optical Path Difference (OPD). And the dynamic spectral properties of different Distributed Feedback (DFB) semiconductor lasers were tested respectively by the system combined with a special time-frequency analysis method. The dynamic slope efficiency unveils nonlinear optical intensity that can't be neglected in dealing with Residual Amplitude Modulation (RAM). The dynamic wavelength current tuning rate can be used to calibrate laser wavelength. The dynamic linewidth of a laser can be used to evaluate the spectral resolution in gas detecting. The system was demonstrated to simultaneously measure the dynamic spectral properties of different types of tunable lasers with a wavelength range in 2 μm 8 μm during the tuning process. These dynamic spectral properties were distinctly different with the properties while the laser operates at a stable state, which may lay a foundation for deep research and enrichment the highly-precise spectrum database in gas sensing fields.

  1. Field demonstration of simultaneous wind and temperature measurements from 5 to 50 km with a Na double-edge magneto-optic filter in a multi-frequency Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wentao; Chu, Xinzhao; Wiig, Johannes; Tan, Bo; Yamashita, Chihoko; Yuan, T; Yue, J; Harrell, S D; She, C-Y; Williams, B P; Friedman, J S; Hardesty, R M

    2009-05-15

    We report the first (to our knowledge) field demonstration of simultaneous wind and temperature measurements with a Na double-edge magneto-optic filter implemented in the receiver of a three-frequency Na Doppler lidar. Reliable winds and temperatures were obtained in the altitude range of 10-45 km with 1 km resolution and 60 min integration under the conditions of 0.4 W lidar power and 75 cm telescope aperture. This edge filter with a multi-frequency lidar concept can be applied to other direct-detection Doppler lidars for profiling both wind and temperature simultaneously from the lower to the upper atmosphere.

  2. Illuminating the Transition Between Steady Sliding and Episodic Tremor and Slow Slip Using Low Frequency Earthquakes at the Downdip Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.

    2012-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments, we have identified eight Low-Frequency Earthquake (LFE) families on the subduction plate interface, under the Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. We analyze the time history of each during the time interval 2007-2012. The updip-most family (LFE1) only lights up during the well-known northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events that recur every 15 months. The recurrence intervals shorten from updip LFE1 to the downdip-most family (LFE4), which repeats every 14 days; 30 times more frequently. This presentation focuses on the downdip family. See the Sweet presentation, this session, for an analysis of the updip-most LFE family. LFEs from family 4 typically have durations of about one hour, with as many as 100 repeats during that time. Unlike their updip counterparts, they occur as discrete events without other LFEs or tremor visible during that time. They are strongly modulated by tidal shear stress. Twice as many LFEs occur during encouraging shear stress as during discouraging times. In contrast, these same LFEs occur when tidal normal stress is compressive which should inhibit slip. To reconcile LFE occurrence with favorable tidal Coulomb stress requires that the friction coefficient be less than 0.2 .This extreme sensitivity to very small shear stresses also suggests near lithostatic pore fluid pressures. We propose that the bursts of LFEs in this family correspond to discrete slow-slip events that occur with remarkable regularity. To add up to plate rates, each burst would correspond to a little more than 1 mm of slip, and each individual LFE to a little less than 0.1 mm, assuming all the slip occurs in the form of LFE activity and each LFE ruptures the same spot. One of these event sequences was captured by our 1-km aperture 80-element Big Skidder Array in 2008. Careful stacked correlation functions from 32 LFEs relative to a reference event showed S-P times varied only up to 0.02s, which

  3. Modelling the spectral induced polarization response of water-saturated sands in the intermediate frequency range (102-105 Hz) using mechanistic and empirical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Thomas; Schmutz, Myriam; Leroy, Philippe; Agrinier, Pierre; Maineult, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The intermediate frequency range 102-105 Hz forms the transition range between the spectral induced polarization frequency domain and the dielectric spectroscopy frequency domain. Available experimental data showed that the spectral induced polarization response of sands fully saturated with water was particularly sensitive to variations of the saturating water electrical conductivity value in the intermediate frequency range. An empirical and a mechanistic model have been developed and confronted to this experimental data. This confrontation showed that the Maxwell Wagner polarization alone is not sufficient to explain the observed signal in the intermediate frequency range. The SIP response of the media was modelled by assigning relatively high dielectric permittivity values to the sand particle or high effective permittivity values to the media. Such high values are commonly observed in the dielectric spectroscopy literature when entering the intermediate frequency range. The physical origin of these high dielectric permittivity values is discussed (grain shape, electromagnetic coupling), and a preliminary study is presented which suggests that the high impedance values of the non-polarizable electrodes might play a significant role in the observed behaviour.

  4. A valence state evaluation of a positive electrode material in an Li-ion battery with first-principles K- and L-edge XANES spectral simulations and resonance photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubobuchi, Kei; Mogi, Masato; Matsumoto, Masashi; Baba, Teruhisa; Yogi, Chihiro; Sato, Chikai; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Imai, Hideto

    2016-10-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis is an element-specific method for proving electronic state mostly in the field of applied physics, such as battery and catalysis reactions, where the valence change plays an important role. In particular, many results have been reported for the analysis of positive electrode materials of Li-ion batteries, where multiple transition materials contribute to the reactions. However, XANES analysis has been limited to identifying the valence state simply in comparison with reference materials. When the shape of XANES spectra shows complicated changes, we were not able to identify the valence states or estimate the valence quantitatively, resulting in insufficient reaction analysis. To overcome such issues, we propose a valence state evaluation method using K- and L-edge XANES analysis with first-principles simulations. By using this method, we demonstrated that the complicated reaction mechanism of Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 can be successfully analyzed for distinguishing each contribution of Ni, Co, Mn, and O to the redox reactions during charge operation. In addition to the XANES analysis, we applied resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (RPES) and diffraction anomalous fine structure spectroscopy (DAFS) with first-principles calculations to the reaction analysis of Co and Mn, which shows no or very little contribution to the redox. The combination of RPES and first-principles calculations successfully enables us to confirm the contribution of Co at high potential regions by electively observing Co 3d orbitals. Through the DAFS analysis, we deeply analyzed the spectral features of Mn K-edges and concluded that the observed spectral shape change for Mn does not originate from the valence change but from the change in distribution of wave functions around Mn upon Li extraction.

  5. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  6. Spectral characteristics of a laser emitter designed for pumping and detecting a reference quantum transition of a caesium frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A V; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Romantsevich, V I; Chernov, Roman V; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Volkov, N A; Zholnerov, V S

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and calculated spectral characteristics of a diode laser with a Bragg grating soldered on a thermoelectric cooler are presented. A model of the laser is developed, which takes into account the pressure arising after soldering the Bragg grating on the thermoelectric cooler, as well as temperature and dispersion. Theoretical and experimental spectral characteristics of the laser are compared and their satisfactory agreement is shown. (control of radiation parameters)

  7. Time-varying spectral power of resting-state fMRI networks reveal cross-frequency dependence in dynamic connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yaesoubi, Maziar; Miller, Robyn L.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2017-01-01

    Brain oscillations and synchronicity among brain regions (brain connectivity) have been studied in resting-state (RS) and task-induced settings. RS-connectivity which captures brain functional integration during an unconstrained state is shown to vary with the frequency of oscillations. Indeed, high temporal resolution modalities have demonstrated both between and cross-frequency connectivity spanning across frequency bands such as theta and gamma. Despite high spatial resolution, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) suffers from low temporal resolution due to modulation with slow-varying hemodynamic response function (HRF) and also relatively low sampling rate. This limits the range of detectable frequency bands in fMRI and consequently there has been no evidence of cross-frequency dependence in fMRI data. In the present work we uncover recurring patterns of spectral power in network timecourses which provides new insight on the actual nature of frequency variation in fMRI network activations. Moreover, we introduce a new measure of dependence between pairs of rs-fMRI networks which reveals significant cross-frequency dependence between functional brain networks specifically default-mode, cerebellar and visual networks. This is the first strong evidence of cross-frequency dependence between functional networks in fMRI and our subject group analysis based on age and gender supports usefulness of this observation for future clinical applications. PMID:28192457

  8. Improved EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET ITER-like wall L-mode discharges utilising poloidal VUV/visible spectral emission profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, K. D.; Groth, M.; Belo, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Książek, I.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Meigs, A. G.; Menmuir, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    A discrepancy in the divertor radiated powers between EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations, both with and without drifts, and JET-ILW experiments employing a set of NBI-heated L-mode discharges with step-wise density variation is investigated. Results from a VUV/visible poloidally scanning spectrometer are used together with bolometric measurements to determine the radiated power and its composition. The analysis shows the importance of D line radiation in contributing to the divertor radiated power, while contributions from D radiative recombination are smaller than expected. Simulations with W divertor plates underestimate the Be content in the divertor, since no allowance is made for Be previously deposited on the plates being re-eroded. An improved version of EDGE2D-EIRENE is used to test the importance of the deposited layer in which the sputtering yield from supposed pure Be divertor plates is reduced to match the spectroscopic signals, while keeping the sputtering yield for the Be main chamber walls unchanged.

  9. Close-packed Arrays of Transition-edge X-ray Microcalorimeters with High Spectral Resolution at 5.9 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal metal-features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition, and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  10. Close-packed arrays of transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters with high spectral resolution at 5.9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-07

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal-metal features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  11. Persistent Spectral Hole Burning Materials for Time-and- Frequency-Domain Optical Memories and Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    spectral hole burning, optical material, rare earth , photon echo, optical correlator, laser, optical, spectroscopy, coherent transient 17. SECURITY...that determine material performance, emphasizing parameters relevant to device development. Attention was focused on rare earth and transition metal...Er3+ ions and optimized their hole burning and coherent transient properties. Crystal composition and rare earth ion concentration were tailored to

  12. Intrinsic chirality and prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-limonene interfaces: spectral signatures with interference chiral sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhe-Hao; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We report in this work detailed measurements of the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050 cm(-1)) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the RS racemic mixture (50/50 equal amount mixture), show that the corresponding molecular groups of the R and S enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit a spectral signature from the chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and a spectral signature from the prochiral response of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-(+)-limonene to S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and disappears for the RS racemic mixture surface. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and also surprisingly remains the same for the RS racemic mixture surface. Therefore, the structures of the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the liquid interfaces are nevertheless not mirror images to each other, even though the corresponding groups have the same tilt angle from the interfacial normal, i.e., the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the surface are diastereomeric instead of enantiomeric. These results provide detailed information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces and demonstrate the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as a unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  13. Decrease of pulse-contrast in nonlinear chirped-pulse amplification systems due to high-frequency spectral phase ripples.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian; Seise, Enrico; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-06-09

    It is analytically shown that weak initial spectral phase modulations cause a pulse-contrast degradation at the output of nonlinear chirped-pulse amplification systems. The Kerr-nonlinearity causes an energy-transfer from the main pulse to side-pulses during nonlinear amplification. The relative intensities of these side-pulses can be described in terms of Bessel-functions. It is shown that the intensities of the pulses are dependent on the magnitude of the accumulated nonlinear phase-shift (i.e., the B-integral), the depth and period of the initial spectral phase-modulation and the slope of the linear stretching chirp. The results are applicable to any type of laser amplifier that is based on the technique of chirped-pulse amplification. The analytical results presented in this paper are of particular importance for high peak-power laser applications requiring high pulse-contrasts, e.g. high field physics.

  14. Spectral anomalies of the light-induced drift of rubidium atoms caused by the velocity dependence of transport collision frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The spectral features of the light-induced drift (LID) velocity for rubidium atoms (85Rb and 87Rb) in an argon buffer medium and in binary buffer mixtures of noble gases (Ne + Ar, Ne + Kr, Ne + Xe, He + Ar, He + Kr, and He + Xe) have been investigated theoretically. A strong temperature dependence of the spectral shape of the LID signal for Rb atoms in an Ar atmosphere is predicted in the temperature range 450 K < T < 800 K. It is shown that the anomalous LID of Rb atoms in binary buffer mixtures of noble gases can be observed at almost any temperature (including the room one) depending on the fractions of neon or helium in these mixtures. The results obtained enable a highly accurate testing of the interatomic interaction potentials used to calculate the drift velocity for anomalous LID in LID experiments.

  15. Fibre laser system providing generation of frequency-modulated pulses with a spectral width exceeding the gain linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Stoliarov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose an improved scheme of an amplifier similariton laser with a spectral width of the output significantly exceeding the gain linewidth. In the system, an additional dispersion element is inserted into the cavity to provide a local increase in the peak pulse power. The proposed scheme allows a reduction of pulse duration and an increase in peak power of the output pulse after compression.

  16. Use of the characteristic Raman lines of toluene (C7 H8) as a precise frequency reference on the spectral analysis of gasoline-ethanol blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Clavero, Valentin; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Weber, Andreas; Schröder, Werner; Curticapean, Dan; Meyrueis, Patrick P.

    2014-09-01

    In order to reduce some of the toxic emissions produced by internal combustion engines, the fossil-based fuels have been combined with less harmful materials in recent years. However, the fuels used in the automotive industry generally contain different additives, such as toluene, as anti-shock agents and as octane number enhancers. These materials can cause certain negative impact, besides the high volatility implied, on public health or environment due to its chemical composition. Toluene, among several other chemical compounds, is an additive widely used in the commercially-available gasoline-ethanol blends. Despite the negative aspects in terms of toxicity that this material might have, the Raman spectral information of toluene can be used to achieve certain level of frequency calibration without using any additional chemical marker in the sample or any other external device. Moreover, the characteristic and well-defined Raman line of this chemical compound at 1003 cm-1 (even at low v/v content) can be used to quantitatively determine certain aspects of the gasoline-ethanol blend under observation. By using an own-designed Fourier-Transform Raman spectrometer (FT-Raman), we have collected and analyzed different commercially-available and laboratory-prepared gasoline-ethanol blends. By carefully observing the main Raman peaks of toluene in these fuel blends, we have determined the frequency accuracy of the Raman spectra obtained. The spectral information has been obtained in the range of 0 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of 1.66 cm-1. The Raman spectra obtained presented only reduced frequency deviations in comparison to the standard Raman spectrum of toluene provided by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

  17. Variation in high-frequency wave radiation from small repeating earthquakes as revealed by cross-spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Norishige; Uchida, Naoki; Matsuzawa, Toru; Okada, Tomomi; Nakajima, Junichi; Matsushima, Takeshi; Kono, Toshio; Hirahara, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We examined the variation in the high-frequency wave radiation for three repeating earthquake sequences (M = 3.1-4.1) in the northeastern Japan subduction zone by waveform analyses. Earthquakes in each repeating sequence are located at almost the same place and show low-angle thrust type focal mechanisms, indicating that they represent repeated ruptures of a seismic patch on the plate boundary. We calculated cross-spectra of the waveforms and obtained the phases and coherences for pairs of events in the respective repeating sequences in order to investigate the waveform differences. We used waveform data sampled at 1 kHz that were obtained from temporary seismic observations we conducted immediately after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake near the source area. For two repeating sequences, we found that the interevent delay times for the two waveforms in a frequency band higher than the corner frequencies are different from those in a lower frequency band for particular event pairs. The phases and coherences show that there are coherent high-frequency waves for almost all the repeaters regardless of the high-frequency delays. These results indicate that high-frequency waves are always radiated from the same vicinity (subpatch) for these events but the time intervals between the ruptures of the subpatch and the centroid times can vary. We classified events in the sequence into two subgroups according to the high-frequency band interevent delays relative to the low-frequency band. For one sequence, we found that all the events that occurred just after (within 11 days) larger nearby earthquakes belong to one subgroup while other events belong to the other subgroup. This suggests that the high-frequency wave differences were caused by stress perturbations due to the nearby earthquakes. In summary, our observations suggest that high-frequency waves from the repeating sequence are radiated not from everywhere but from a long-duration subpatch within the seismic slip area. The

  18. Low PAPR space frequency block coding for multiuser MIMO SC-FDMA systems: specific issues for users with different spectral allocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciochina, Cristina; Mottier, David; Castelain, Damien

    2011-12-01

    Single-carrier space frequency block coding (SC-SFBC) is an innovative mapping scheme suitable for implementing transmit diversity in single-carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) systems. The main advantage of SC-SFBC is that it preserves the low envelope variations of SC-FDMA, which is particularly interesting for the uplink of wireless communications systems. In this article, we apply the SC-SFBC concept in a multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) scenario. We introduce a novel algorithm allowing the optimization of the parameters of SC-SFBC to enable low-complexity decoding at the receiver side and to maximize the overall spectral occupancy in MU-MIMO SC-FDMA systems, and we show the good performance of the proposed MU scheme.

  19. How to Distinguish Neutron Star and Black Hole X-ray Binaries? Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nickolai

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed strong correlations between 1-10 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources when seen in the low/hard state, the steep power-law (soft) state, and in transition between these states. In the soft state these index-QPO frequency correlations show a saturation of the photon index GAMMA approximately equal to 2.7 at high values of the low frequency nu(sub L). This saturation effect was previously identified as a black hole signature. In this paper we argue that this saturation does not occur, at least for one neutron star (NS) source 4U 1728-34, for which the index GAMMA monotonically increases with nu(sub L) to the values of 6 and higher. We base this conclusion on our analysis of approximately 1.5 Msec of RXTE archival data for 4U 1728-34. We reveal the spectral evolution of the Comptonized blackbody spectra when the source transitions from the hard to soft states. The hard state spectrum is a typical thermal Comptonization spectrum of the soft photons which originate in the disk and the NS outer photospheric layers. The hard state photon index is GAMMA approximately 2. The soft state spectrum consists of two blackbody components which are only slightly Comptonized. Thus we can claim (as expected from theory) that in NS sources thermal equilibrium is established for the soft state. To the contrary in BH sources, the equilibrium is never established due to the presence of the BH horizon. The emergent BH spectrum, even in the high/soft state, has a power law component. We also identify the low QPO frequency nu(sub L) as a fundamental frequency of the quasi-spherical component of the transition layer (presumably related to the corona and the NS and disk magnetic closed field lines). The lower frequency nu(sub SL) is identified as the frequency of oscillations of a quasi-cylindrical configuration of the TL (presumably related to the NS and disk magnetic

  20. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft

  1. Multi-Frequency Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J. E.; Sault, R. J.

    Introduction; Image Fidelity; Multi-Frequency Synthesis; Spectral Effects; The Spectral Expansion; Spectral Dirty Beams; First Order Spectral Errors; Second Order Spectral Errors; The MFS Deconvolution Problem; Nature of The Problem; Map and Stack; Direct Assault; Data Weighting Methods; Double Deconvolution; The Sault Algorithm; Multi-Frequency Self-Calibration; Practical MFS; Conclusions

  2. Spectral characterization of human EHG frequency components based on the extraction and reconstruction of the ridges in the scalogram.

    PubMed

    Terrien, J; Marque, C; Karlsson, B

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have observed and analyzed the external electrical activity of the uterus, the so-called electrohysterogram (EHG), associated with contractions during pregnancy and labor. The EHG is mainly composed of two distinct frequency components, FWL (Fast Wave Low, low frequency component) and FWH (Fast Wave High, high frequency component). It has been suggested that FWH is mainly associated with uterine cell excitability and FWL with the propagation of this activity. This hypothesis is still unproven. We compared two procedures for ridge extraction/reconstruction of the EHG scalogram, with the objective of analyzing the propagation of the EHG on FWH and FWL separately. The performance of the methods under investigation was tested on both synthetic and real signals. The results indicate that the EHG can be characterized by two distinct continuous ridges, supposed to be FWH and FWL, with a low reconstruction error. We have also shown that the extracted ridges have different energy, temporal characteristics and bandwidths.

  3. Time-frequency spectral analysis of TMS-evoked EEG oscillations by means of Hilbert-Huang transform.

    PubMed

    Pigorini, Andrea; Casali, Adenauer G; Casarotto, Silvia; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Baselli, Giuseppe; Mariotti, Maurizio; Massimini, Marcello; Rosanova, Mario

    2011-06-15

    A single pulse of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) generates electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillations that are thought to reflect intrinsic properties of the stimulated cortical area and its fast interactions with other cortical areas. Thus, a tool to decompose TMS-evoked oscillations in the time-frequency domain on a millisecond timescale and on a broadband frequency range may help to understand information transfer across cortical oscillators. Some recent studies have employed algorithms based on the Wavelet Transform (WT) to study TMS-evoked EEG oscillations in healthy and pathological conditions. However, these methods do not allow to describe TMS-evoked EEG oscillations with high resolution in time and frequency domains simultaneously. Here, we first develop an algorithm based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to compute statistically significant time-frequency spectra of TMS-evoked EEG oscillations on a single trial basis. Then, we compared the performances of the HHT-based algorithm with the WT-based one by applying both of them to a set of simulated signals. Finally, we applied both algorithms to real TMS-evoked potentials recorded in healthy or schizophrenic subjects. We found that the HHT-based algorithm outperforms the WT-based one in detecting the time onset of TMS-evoked oscillations in the classical EEG bands. These results suggest that the HHT-based algorithm may be used to study the communication between different cortical oscillators on a fine time scale.

  4. Relevance of different spectral techniques to describe estuarine suspended sediment dynamics based on a high-frequency, long-term turbidity dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón Rojas, Isabel; Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Sediment dynamics in estuaries are complex and strongly variable over time scales ranging from seconds to years. Various forcings (turbulence, tides, river inflow, wind waves, morphological and climatic changes) may cause the temporal and spatial variability of suspended sediment (SS) concentrations. The evaluation of these SS dynamics by in-situ measurements have traditionally faced three difficulties: (1) the quantification of low-frequency variability that requires continuous measures over long time periods; (2) inevitable gaps in data limiting the post-processing; (3) the need for recording other environmental variables in the same period and at a coherent sampling frequency. To record a high-frequency and long-term turbidity dataset, an automatic monitoring network (MAGEST) has been implemented in the Gironde estuary, a macrotidal and highly turbid system in the South-West France, in 2004. This 10-year turbidity time series is rather unique in European estuaries, enabling the evaluation of SS dynamics at all the significant time scales in one single analysis of the dataset. To achieve this, several methodologies of data analysis using different approaches are available, but their relevance, especially for the more recently developed ones, is almost unexplored. In this work, we present the test of four spectral techniques to the analysis of a high-frequency turbidity time series of an estuary such as the Gironde, to discuss advantages and limitations of each method. We compare the Power Spectral Analysis (PSA), the Singular Spectral Analysis (SSA), the Wavelet Transform (WT) and the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Advantages and limitations of each method are evaluated on the basis of five criteria: efficiency for incomplete time series, appropriateness for time-varying analysis, ability to recognize processes without the need of complementary environmental variables, capacity to calculate the relative importance of processes, and capacity to identify long

  5. More systematic errors in the measurement of power spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2015-07-01

    Power spectral density (PSD) analysis is an important part of understanding line-edge and linewidth roughness in lithography. But uncertainty in the measured PSD, both random and systematic, complicates interpretation. It is essential to understand and quantify the sources of the measured PSD's uncertainty and to develop mitigation strategies. Both analytical derivations and simulations of rough features are used to evaluate data window functions for reducing spectral leakage and to understand the impact of data detrending on biases in PSD, autocovariance function (ACF), and height-to-height covariance function measurement. A generalized Welch window was found to be best among the windows tested. Linear detrending for line-edge roughness measurement results in underestimation of the low-frequency PSD and errors in the ACF and height-to-height covariance function. Measuring multiple edges per scanning electron microscope image reduces this detrending bias.

  6. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  7. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  8. Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

  9. Topologically universal spectral hierarchies of quasiperiodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Itzhack

    2014-05-01

    Topological properties of energy spectra of general one-dimensional quasiperiodic systems, describing also Bloch electrons in magnetic fields, are studied for an infinity of irrational modulation frequencies corresponding to irrational numbers of flux quanta per unit cell. These frequencies include well-known ones considered in works on Fibonacci quasicrystals. It is shown that the spectrum for any such frequency exhibits a self-similar hierarchy of clusters characterized by universal (system-independent) values of Chern topological integers which are exactly determined. The cluster hierarchy provides a simple and systematic organization of all the spectral gaps, labeled by universal topological numbers which are exactly determinable, thus avoiding their numerical evaluation using rational approximants of the irrational frequency. These numbers give both the quantum Hall conductance of the system and the winding number of the edge-state energy traversing a gap as a Bloch quasimomentum is varied.

  10. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further.

  11. Programmable broadband radio-frequency transversal filter with compact fiber-optics and digital microelectromechanical system-based optical spectral control.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-20

    To the best of our knowledge, for the first time a programmable broadband rf transversal filter is proposed that operates on the principle of broadband optical spectral control implemented with a spatial light modulator input rf signal time delay and weight selection over a near-continuous signal space. Specifically, the filter uses a chirped fiber Bragg grating in combination with a two-dimensional digital micromirror device to enable a programmable rf filter. As a first step, a two-tap rf notch filter is demonstrated with a tuning range of 0.563-6.032 GHz with a 25-dB notch depth at test notch frequencies of 845 and 905 MHz. The proposed filter can find applications in diverse fields such as radar, communications, medicine, and test and measurement.

  12. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for complex molecular surfaces and interfaces: Spectral lineshape measurement and analysis plus some controversial issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) was first developed in the 1980s and it has been proven a uniquely sensitive and surface/interface selective spectroscopic probe for characterization of the structure, conformation and dynamics of molecular surfaces and interfaces. In recent years, there has been significant progress in the development of methodology and instrumentation in the SFG-VS toolbox that has significantly broadened the application to complex molecular surfaces and interfaces. In this review, after presenting a unified view on the theory and methodology focusing on the SFG-VS spectral lineshape, as well as the new opportunities in SFG-VS applications with such developments, some of the controversial issues that have been puzzling the community are to be discussed. The aim of this review is to present to the researchers and students interested in molecular surfaces and interfacial sciences up-to-date perspectives complementary to the existing textbooks and reviews on SFG-VS.

  13. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for complex molecular surfaces and interfaces: Spectral lineshape measurement and analysis plus some controversial issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) was first developed in the 1980s and it has been proven a uniquely sensitive and surface/interface selective spectroscopic probe for characterization of the structure, conformation and dynamics of molecular surfaces and interfaces. In recent years, there have been many progresses in the development of methodology and instrumentation in the SFG-VS toolbox that have significantly broadened the application to complex molecular surfaces and interfaces. In this review, after presenting a unified view on the theory and methodology focusing on the SFG-VS spectral lineshape, as well as the new opportunities in SFG-VS applications with such developments, some of the controversial issues that have been puzzling the community are discussed. The aim of this review is to present to the researchers and students interested in molecular surfaces and interfacial sciences up-to-date perspectives complementary to the existing textbooks and reviews on SFG-VS.

  14. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma

  15. High-Frequency X-Ray Oscillations and X-Ray Spectral Evolution in Galactic Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Morgan, E. H.; Muno, M.

    2002-12-01

    There are now 5 Galactic black hole candidates that have exhibited quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) in X-rays in the range of 67 to 300 Hz. The rms amplitudes are near 1 % of the average flux, and in two cases there are significant changes in the QPO frequency. The short timescales and origin in X-rays suggest that these QPOs signify inner accretion disk oscillations rooted in General Relativity, but the particular mechanism is uncertain. For two of these cases, GRO J1655-40 and GRS 1915+105, we trace the conditions under which these QPOs appear in terms of the division of luminosity between the X-ray components due to the accretion disk and the hard X-ray power law. In this context, the fast QPOs are most likely to occur when there is high luminosity in both the disk and the X-ray power-law component. On the other hand, the QPOs are not seen when the X-ray spectrum resembles either a pure disk or a dominant power-law component associated with a radio jet. The results imply a closer kinship for these QPOs than might be concluded from considerations of the gross shape of the X-ray spectrum.

  16. Effect of high-frequency spectral components in computer recognition of dysarthric speech based on a Mel-cepstral stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Polur, Prasad D; Miller, Gerald E

    2005-01-01

    Computer speech recognition of individuals with dysarthria, such as cerebral palsy patients, requires a robust technique that can handle conditions of very high variability and limited training data. In this study, a hidden Markov model (HMM) was constructed and conditions investigated that would provide improved performance for a dysarthric speech (isolated word) recognition system intended to act as an assistive/control tool. In particular, we investigated the effect of high-frequency spectral components on the recognition rate of the system to determine if they contributed useful additional information to the system. A small-size vocabulary spoken by three cerebral palsy subjects was chosen. Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients extracted with the use of 15 ms frames served as training input to an ergodic HMM setup. Subsequent results demonstrated that no significant useful information was available to the system for enhancing its ability to discriminate dysarthric speech above 5.5 kHz in the current set of dysarthric data. The level of variability in input dysarthric speech patterns limits the reliability of the system. However, its application as a rehabilitation/control tool to assist dysarthric motor-impaired individuals such as cerebral palsy subjects holds sufficient promise.

  17. Estimation of Mass of Compact Object in H 1743-322 from 2010 and 2011 Outbursts using TCAF Solution and Spectral Index–QPO Frequency Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, Aslam Ali; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak; Mondal, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    The well-known black hole candidate (BHC) H 1743-322 exhibited temporal and spectral variabilities during several outbursts. The variation of the accretion rates and flow geometry that change on a daily basis during each of the outbursts can be very well understood using the recent implementation of the two-component advective flow solution of the viscous transonic flow equations as an additive table model in XSPEC. This has dramatically improved our understanding of accretion flow dynamics. Most interestingly, the solution allows us to treat the mass of the BHC as a free parameter and its mass could be estimated from spectral fits. In this paper, we fitted the data of two successive outbursts of H 1743-322 in 2010 and 2011 and studied the evolution of accretion flow parameters, such as two-component (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian) accretion rates, shock location (i.e., size of the Compton cloud), etc. We assume that the model normalization remains the same across the states in both these outbursts. We used this to estimate the mass of the black hole and found that it comes out in the range of 9.25{--}12.86 {M}ȯ . For the sake of comparison, we also estimated mass using the Photon index versus Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency correlation method, which turns out to be 11.65+/- 0.67 {M}ȯ using GRO J1655-40 as a reference source. Combining these two estimates, the most probable mass of the compact object becomes {11.21}-1.96+1.65 {M}ȯ .

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic interference with the edge pedestal motional Stark effect diagnostic on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Makowski, M. A.; Holcomb, C. T.; Allen, S. L.; Hill, D. N.; Meyer, W. H.; Geer, R.; La Haye, R. J.; Petty, C. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Turco, F.; Rhodes, T. L.; Morse, E. C.

    2011-03-15

    Accurate measurement of internal magnetic field direction using motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry in the edge pedestal is desired for nearly all tokamak scenario work. A newly installed 500 kHz 32-channel digitizer on the MSE diagnostic of DIII-D allows full spectral information of the polarimeter signal to be recovered for the first time. Fourier analysis of this data has revealed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the plasma edge pedestal at {rho}{>=} 0.92. By correlating edge localized mode fluctuations seen on lock-in amplifier outputs with MSE spectrograms, it has been shown that edge pedestal tearing mode fluctuations cause interference with MSE second harmonic instrument frequencies. This interference results in unrecoverable errors in the real-time polarization angle measurement that are more than an order of magnitude larger than typical polarimeter uncertainties. These errors can cause as much as a 38% difference in local q. By using a redundant measure of the linear polarization found at the fourth harmonic photo-elastic modulator (PEM) frequency, MHD interference can be avoided. However, because of poorer signal-to-noise the fourth harmonic signal computed polarization angle shows no improvement over the MHD polluted second harmonics. MHD interference could be avoided in future edge pedestal tokamak polarimeters by utilizing PEMs with higher fundamental frequencies and a greater separation between their frequencies.

  19. Edge Detection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    PROJECT. T ASK0 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA It WORK UNIT NUMBERS V 545 Technology Square ( Cambridge, HA 02139 I I* CONTOOL1LIN@4OFFICE NAME...ARD-A1t62 62 EDGE DETECTION(U) NASSACNUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE 1/1 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB E C HILDRETH SEP 85 AI-M-8 N99SI4-8S-C-6595...used to carry out this analysis. cce~iO a N) ’.~" D LI’BL. P p ------------ Sj. t i MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY i ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  20. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimetre spectrally resolved CT system on high- and low-frequency imaging tasks: a simulation.

    PubMed

    Yveborg, Moa; Danielsson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans

    2012-04-21

    We are developing a photon-counting silicon strip detector with 0.4 × 0.5 mm² detector elements for clinical CT applications. Except for the limited detection efficiency of approximately 0.8 for a spectrum of 80 kVp, the largest discrepancies from ideal spectral behaviour have been shown to be Compton interactions in the detector and electronic noise. Using the framework of cascaded system analysis, we reconstruct the 3D MTF and NPS of a silicon strip detector including the influence of scatter and charge sharing inside the detector. We compare the reconstructed noise and signal characteristics with a reconstructed 3D MTF and NPS of an ideal energy-integrating detector system with unity detection efficiency, no scatter or charge sharing inside the detector, unity presampling MTF and 1 × 1 mm² detector elements. The comparison is done by calculating the dose-normalized detectability index for some clinically relevant imaging tasks and spectra. This work demonstrates that although the detection efficiency of the silicon detector rapidly drops for the acceleration voltages encountered in clinical computed tomography practice, and despite the high fraction of Compton interactions due to the low atomic number, silicon detectors can perform on a par with ideal energy-integrating detectors for routine imaging tasks containing low-frequency components. For imaging tasks containing high-frequency components, the proposed silicon detector system can perform approximately 1.1-1.3 times better than a fully ideal energy-integrating system.

  1. Efficient edge-guided full-waveform inversion by Canny edge detection and bilateral filtering algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shiming; Zhang, Haijiang

    2016-11-01

    It is known full-waveform inversion (FWI) is generally ill-conditioned and various strategies including pre-conditioning and regularizing the inversion system have been proposed to obtain a reliable estimation of the velocity model. Here, we propose a new edge-guided strategy for FWI in frequency domain to efficiently and reliably estimate velocity models with structures of the size similar to the seismic wavelength. The edges of the velocity model at the current iteration are first detected by the Canny edge detection algorithm that is widely used in image processing. Then, the detected edges are used for guiding the calculation of FWI gradient as well as enforcing edge-preserving total variation (TV) regularization for next iteration of FWI. Bilateral filtering is further applied to remove noise but keep edges of the FWI gradient. The proposed edge-guided FWI in the frequency domain with edge-guided TV regularization and bilateral filtering is designed to preserve model edges that are recovered from previous iterations as well as from lower frequency waveforms when FWI is conducted from lower to higher frequencies. The new FWI method is validated using the complex Marmousi model that contains several steeply dipping fault zones and hundreds of horizons. Compared to FWI without edge guidance, our proposed edge-guided FWI recovers velocity model anomalies and edges much better. Unlike previous image-guided FWI or edge-guided TV regularization strategies, our method does not require migrating seismic data, thus is more efficient for real applications.

  2. Microwave spectral line listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency, intensity, and identification of 9615 spectral lines belonging to 75 molecules are tabulated in order of increasing frequency. Measurements for all 75 molecules were made in the frequency range from 26500 to 40000 MHz by a computer controlled spectrometer. Measurements were also made in the 18000 to 26500 MHz range for some of the molecules.

  3. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation; computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on 4-hydroxypteridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, M.; Karabacak, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1 and 400-4000 cm-1 respectively, for 4-hydroxypteridine (C6H4N4O, 4HDPETN) molecule. The potential energy curve shows that 4HDPETN molecule has two stable structures. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of the 4HDPETN as the S1 structure. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensities of the vibrational bands were interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio HF methods and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other method. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential, nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties of the title compound were performed. Mulliken and natural charges of the title molecule were also calculated and interpreted.

  4. Fabry-Pérot resonator: spectral line shapes, generic and related Airy distributions, linewidths, finesses, and performance at low or frequency-dependent reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur; Kores, Cristine Calil; Geskus, Dimitri; Pollnau, Markus

    2016-07-25

    We systematically characterize the Fabry-Pérot resonator. We derive the generic Airy distribution of a Fabry-Pérot resonator, which equals the internal resonance enhancement factor, and show that all related Airy distributions are obtained by simple scaling factors. We analyze the textbook approaches to the Fabry-Pérot resonator and point out various misconceptions. We verify that the sum of the mode profiles of all longitudinal modes is the fundamental physical function that characterizes the Fabry-Pérot resonator and generates the Airy distribution. Consequently, the resonator losses are quantified by the linewidths of the underlying Lorentzian lines and not by the measured Airy linewidth. Therefore, we introduce the Lorentzian finesse which provides the spectral resolution of the Lorentzian lines, whereas the usually considered Airy finesse only quantifies the performance of the Fabry-Pérot resonator as a scanning spectrometer. We also point out that the concepts of linewidth and finesse of the Airy distribution of a Fabry-Pérot resonator break down at low reflectivity. Furthermore, we show that a Fabry-Pérot resonator has no cut-off resonance wavelength. Finally, we investigate the influence of frequency-dependent mirror reflectivities, allowing for the direct calculation of its deformed mode profiles.

  5. Pulsed laser spectral measurement using a Fabry-Perot interferometer: Limits to resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notari, Anthony; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a Doppler lidar system using the edge technique to measure atmospheric wind profiles. The edge technique requires a laser with a narrow spectral bandwidth and a high resolution optical filter. The lidar system will use a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 microns and a high resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer for the edge filter. The Doppler shift measurement is made by locating the laser on the edge of the filter's spectral response function. Due to the steep slope on the edge, large changes in the filter transmission will be observed for small changes in frequency. The Doppler shift can be determined from a measurement of this change in filter transmission if the filter spectral response function in the region of the measurement is well known. Recently developed injection seeded solid state lasers have made near transform limited laser output readily available for lidar work. Injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser exhibit single mode output with smooth Gaussian temporal pulse shapes. Results of an experiment we conducted to evaluate the effects of a short Gaussian temporal input pulse on the spectral response of a high resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer are presented.

  6. Cascade trailing-edge noise modeling using a mode-matching technique and the edge-dipole theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; François, Benjamin; Moreau, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    An original analytical approach is proposed to model the broadband trailing-edge noise produced by high-solidity outlet guide vanes in an axial turbomachine. The model is formulated in the frequency domain and first in two dimensions for a preliminary assessment of the method. In a first step the trailing-edge noise sources of a single vane are shown to be equivalent to the onset of a so-called edge dipole, the direct field of which is expanded in a series of plane-wave modes. A criterion for the distance of the dipole to the trailing-edge and a scaling of its amplitude is defined to yield a robust model. In a second step the diffraction of each plane-wave mode is derived considering the cascade as an array of bifurcated waveguides and using a mode-matching technique. The cascade response is finally synthesized by summing the diffracted fields of all cut-on modes to yield upstream and downstream sound power spectral densities. The obtained spectral shapes are physically consistent and the present results show that upstream radiation is typically 3 dB higher than downstream radiation, which has been experimentally observed previously. Even though the trailing-edge noise sources are not vane-to-vane correlated their radiation is strongly determined by a cascade effect that consequently must be accounted for. The interest of the approach is that it can be extended to a three-dimensional annular configuration without resorting to a strip theory approach. As such it is a promising and versatile alternative to previously published methods.

  7. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  8. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  9. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  10. Scaling relationship between corner frequencies and seismic moments of ultra micro earthquakes estimated with coda-wave spectral ratio -the Mponeng mine in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, N.; Kawakata, H.; Murakami, O.; Doi, I.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Miyakawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Ide, S.; Igarashi, T.; Morema, G.; Pinder, E.; Ogasawara, H.

    2011-12-01

    Scaling relationship between corner frequencies, fc, and seismic moments, Mo is an important clue to understand the seismic source characteristics. Aki (1967) showed that Mo is proportional to fc-3 for large earthquakes (cubic law). Iio (1986) claimed breakdown of the cubic law between fc and Mo for smaller earthquakes (Mw < 2), and Gibowicz et al. (1991) also showed the breakdown for the ultra micro and small earthquakes (Mw < -2). However, it has been reported that the cubic law holds even for micro earthquakes (-1 < Mw > 4) by using high quality data observed at a deep borehole (Abercrombie, 1995; Ogasawara et al., 2001; Hiramatsu et al., 2002; Yamada et al., 2007). In order to clarify the scaling relationship for smaller earthquakes (Mw < -1), we analyzed ultra micro earthquakes using very high sampling records (48 kHz) of borehole seismometers installed within a hard rock at the Mponeng mine in South Africa. We used 4 tri-axial accelerometers of three-component that have a flat response up to 25 kHz. They were installed to be 10 to 30 meters apart from each other at 3,300 meters deep. During the period from 2008/10/14 to 2008/10/30 (17 days), 8,927 events were recorded. We estimated fc and Mo for 60 events (-3 < Mw < -1) within 200 meters from the seismometers. Assuming the Brune's source model, we estimated fc and Mo from spectral ratios. Common practice is using direct waves from adjacent events. However, there were only 5 event pairs with the distance between them less than 20 meters and Mw difference over one. In addition, the observation array is very small (radius less than 30 m), which means that effects of directivity and radiation pattern on direct waves are similar at all stations. Hence, we used spectral ratio of coda waves, since these effects are averaged and will be effectively reduced (Mayeda et al., 2007; Somei et al., 2010). Coda analysis was attempted only for relatively large 20 events (we call "coda events" hereafter) that have coda energy

  11. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  12. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  13. Tunable two-mode Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser with a frequency-noise spectral density of 0.03 Hz Hz{sup -1/2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gubin, Mikhail A; Kireev, A N; Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Korostelin, Yurii V; Pnev, A B; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Tyurikov, D A; Frolov, M P; Shelestov, D A; Shelkovnikov, Aleksandr S

    2012-06-30

    An optically pumped cw laser on a Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe crystal with a tunable (in the range of 2.3 - 2 .6 mm) wavelength, operating with generation of two axial modes, has been developed. It is shown that the minimum laser frequency-noise spectral density does not exceed 0.03 Hz Hz{sup -1/2}. Application of this laser in problems of Doppler and Doppler-free spectroscopy makes it possible to detect spectral absorption lines of gases with sensitivities of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, respectively (averaging time {tau} = 1 s). Having stabilised this laser with respect to the Doppler-free resonances of saturated dispersion of methane molecule, one can obtain a short-term frequency stability of 10{sup -15} - 10{sup -16} ({tau} = 1 s).

  14. Comparison of edges detected at different polarisations in MAESTRO data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, Ronald G.; Harley, Peter J.; Quegan, Shaun

    1992-01-01

    Edge detection would appear to be a crucial tool for analyzing multi-polarized, multi-frequency, and multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Edge structure provides a simple means for comparing different polarizations and frequencies, and for detecting changes over time. Due to the fact that edges and segments (homogeneous regions) are dual concepts, edge detection has an important role to play in identifying segments within which mean backscatter measurements for use in image classification can be made. As part of a general investigation into edge detection in SAR imagery, an initial investigation was carried out into the detectability and nature of edges in multi-polarized and multi-frequency SAR images. The contrast ratio (CR) operator was used to detect edges. This operator was previously shown to perform well at detecting edges in single-polarized and single-frequency SAR images.

  15. Multi-dimensional edge detection operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sungwook; Lee, Chulhee

    2014-05-01

    In remote sensing, modern sensors produce multi-dimensional images. For example, hyperspectral images contain hundreds of spectral images. In many image processing applications, segmentation is an important step. Traditionally, most image segmentation and edge detection methods have been developed for one-dimensional images. For multidimensional images, the output images of spectral band images are typically combined under certain rules or using decision fusions. In this paper, we proposed a new edge detection algorithm for multi-dimensional images using secondorder statistics. First, we reduce the dimension of input images using the principal component analysis. Then we applied multi-dimensional edge detection operators that utilize second-order statistics. Experimental results show promising results compared to conventional one-dimensional edge detectors such as Sobel filter.

  16. Liquid-Crystal Light Valve Enhances Edges In Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show liquid-crystal light valve (LCLV) exhibits operating mode in which it enhances edges in images projected on it. Operates in edge-enhancing mode (or in combination of edge-enhancing and normal modes) by suitably adjusting bias voltage and frequency. Enhancement of edges one of most important preprocessing steps in optical pattern-recognition systems. Incorporated into image-processing system to enhance edges without introducing excessive optical noise.

  17. Maturational changes in automated EEG spectral power analysis in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Jennekens, Ward; Pasman, Jaco W; Katgert, Titia; Van Pul, Carola; Gavilanes, Antonio W D; Kramer, Boris W; Zimmermann, Luc J; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Andriessen, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Our study aimed at automated power spectral analysis of the EEG in preterm infants to identify changes of spectral measures with maturation. Weekly (10-20 montage) 4-h EEG recordings were performed in 18 preterm infants with GA <32 wk and normal neurological follow-up at 2 y, resulting in 79 recordings studied from 27(+4) to 36(+3) wk of postmenstrual age (PMA, GA + postnatal age). Automated spectral analysis was performed on 4-h EEG recordings. The frequency spectrum was divided in delta 1 (0.5-1 Hz), delta 2 (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz), and beta (13-30 Hz) band. Absolute and relative power of each frequency band and spectral edge frequency were calculated. Maturational changes in spectral measures were observed most clearly in the centrotemporal channels. With advancing PMA, absolute powers of delta 1 to 2 and theta decreased. With advancing PMA, relative power of delta 1 decreased and relative powers of alpha and beta increased, respectively. In conclusion, with maturation, spectral analysis of the EEG showed a significant shift from the lower to the higher frequencies. Computer analysis of EEG will allow an objective and reproducible analysis for long-term prognosis and/or stratification of clinical treatment.

  18. Frequency Comb Cooling Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Aug-2011 18-May-2012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on frequency comb cooling project The views, opinions and/or... frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected average powers above 10 kW. We

  19. Spectral anomalies of the effect of light-induced drift of caesium atoms caused by the velocity dependence of transport collision frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2014-10-31

    The spectral features of the light-induced drift (LID) velocity of caesium atoms in inert buffer gases are studied theoretically. A strong temperature dependence of the spectral LID line shape of Cs atoms in Ar or Kr atmosphere in the vicinity of T ∼ 1000 K is predicted. It is shown that the anomalous LID of Cs atoms in binary buffer mixtures of two different inert gases can be observed at virtually any (including ambient) temperature, depending on the content of the components in these mixtures. The results obtained make it possible to precisely test the interatomic interaction potentials in the experiments on the anomalous LID. (quantum optics)

  20. Spectral anomalies of the effect of light-induced drift of caesium atoms caused by the velocity dependence of transport collision frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral features of the light-induced drift (LID) velocity of caesium atoms in inert buffer gases are studied theoretically. A strong temperature dependence of the spectral LID line shape of Cs atoms in Ar or Kr atmosphere in the vicinity of T ~ 1000 K is predicted. It is shown that the anomalous LID of Cs atoms in binary buffer mixtures of two different inert gases can be observed at virtually any (including ambient) temperature, depending on the content of the components in these mixtures. The results obtained make it possible to precisely test the interatomic interaction potentials in the experiments on the anomalous LID.

  1. Spatial-spectral characterization of focused spatially chirped broadband laser beams.

    PubMed

    Greco, Michael J; Block, Erica; Meier, Amanda K; Beaman, Alex; Cooper, Samuel; Iliev, Marin; Squier, Jeff A; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-11-20

    Proper alignment is critical to obtain the desired performance from focused spatially chirped beams, for example in simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF). We present a simple technique for inspecting the beam paths and focusing conditions for the spectral components of a broadband beam. We spectrally resolve the light transmitted past a knife edge as it was scanned across the beam at several axial positions. The measurement yields information about spot size, M2, and the propagation paths of different frequency components. We also present calculations to illustrate the effects of defocus aberration on SSTF beams.

  2. Edge current in a small chiral superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shu-Ichiro; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    We discuss a theoretical description of the edge current in a chiral superconductor. On the basis of the quasiclassical Green function formalism, we derive a useful expression of the chiral edge current which enable us to understand how Cooper pairs contribute to the electric current. We will show that the chiral edge current is carried by the combinations of two Cooper pairs belonging to different pairing symmetries. One Cooper pair belongs to the usual even-frequency pairing symmetry class. However, the other belongs to the odd-frequency symmetry class.

  3. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  5. Effect of amino acid dopants on the spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of potassium acid phthalate crystals for possible optoelectronic and frequency doubling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph; Gnanaraj, J. Martin Sam; Dhavud, S. Shek; Ekadevasena, S.

    2015-09-01

    Undoped and amino acid (L-Arginine and L-Valine) doped KAP crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The changes in the structural, spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties were observed. The sharp prominent peaks in the indexed powder XRD pattern confirms the crystalline nature of the sample. Optical studies reveal that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible light region. Thermal stability was checked by TG/DTA analysis. The mechanical stability was evaluated from Vicker's microhardness test. The SHG efficiency for the title materials was tested with different particle sizes by the Kurtz and Perry powder method, which established the existence of phase matching.

  6. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  7. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum.

  8. Fundamental Vibration Frequency and Damping Estimation: A Comparison Using the Random Decrement Method, the Empirical Mode Decomposition, and the HV Spectral Ratio Method for Local Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Upegui Botero, F. M.; Pulliam, J.; Willemann, R. J.; Pasyanos, M.; Schmitz, M.; Rojas Mercedes, N.; Louie, J. N.; Moschetti, M. P.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.; Suárez, L.; Huerfano Moreno, V.; Polanco, E.

    2013-12-01

    Site characterization in civil engineering demands to know at least two of the dynamic properties of soil systems, which are: (i) dominant vibration frequency, and (ii) damping. As part of an effort to develop understanding of the principles of earthquake hazard analysis, particularly site characterization techniques using non invasive/non destructive seismic methods, a workshop (Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute: New Frontiers in Geophysical Research: Bringing New Tools and Techniques to Bear on Earthquake Hazard Analysis and Mitigation) was conducted during july 15-25, 2013 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic by the alliance of Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) and Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), jointly supported by Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Preliminary results of the site characterization in terms of fundamental vibration frequency and damping are here presented from data collected during the workshop. Three different methods were used in such estimations and later compared in order to identify the stability of estimations as well as the advantage or disadvantage among these methodologies. The used methods were the: (i) Random Decrement Method (RDM), to estimate fundamental vibration frequency and damping simultaneously; (ii) Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), to estimate the vibration modes, and (iii) Horizontal to Vertical Spectra ratio (HVSR), to estimate the fundamental vibration frequency. In all cases ambient vibration and induced vibration were used.

  9. Geostrophic Turbulence in the Frequency-Wavenumber Domain: Eddy-Driven Low-Frequency Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    oceanic geostrophic turbulence. Our main diagnostics are spectral fluxes and spectral transfers—long utilized in wavenumber space analyses of...isotropic wavenumber–frequency spectral diagnostics . In a companion paper, we analyze spectral diagnostics in the anisotropic wavenumber–frequency domain to...2013), we will also compute spectral diagnostics from a satellite altimeter product. The Archiving, Validation, and Interpretation of Satellite

  10. Nonlinear interaction between edge-localized modes (ELMs) and edge turbulence during ELM-crash-suppression phase under n=1 RMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Yun, Gunsu; Choi, Minjun; Kwon, Jae-Min; Jeon, Young-Mu; Lee, Woochang; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Park, Hyeon K.

    2016-10-01

    Mutual interactions between edge-localized modes (ELMs) and turbulent eddies have been investigated in 2-D by using the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system. ECEI shows that ELM filaments still exist in the edge when the usual large scale collapse of the edge pedestal, i.e., the ELM crash, is completely suppressed by n = 1 resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). Correlation analysis among ECEI channels reveals that the RMP enhances turbulent fluctuations in the edge and that ELM crashes are suppressed when the RMP exceeds a certain threshold. The spectral power distribution of turbulence shows a clear dispersion for a wide range of wavenumber (kθ < 1 cm-1) and frequency (f < 70 kHz). The radial velocity and ECE intensity fluctuations of the turbulent eddies are approximately in-phase and thus the turbulence involves a net radial energy transport. Bispectral analysis indicates the coexisting ELMs and turbulent eddies nonlinearly interact with each other. Both the enhancement of radial transport and the nonlinear interaction with ELMs may be the key to the physics mechanism of ELM-crash-suppression by low-n RMP. This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea under Grant No. NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029865 and NRF-2014M1A7AA03029881.

  11. Improved measurement of the spectral index of the diffuse radio background between 90 and 190 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozdzen, T. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Monsalve, R. A.; Rogers, A. E. E.

    2017-02-01

    We report absolutely calibrated measurements of diffuse radio emission between 90 and 190 MHz from the Experiment to Detect the Global EoR Signature (EDGES). EDGES employs a wide beam zenith-pointing dipole antenna centred on a declination of -26.7°. We measure the sky brightness temperature as a function of frequency averaged over the EDGES beam from 211 nights of data acquired from 2015 July to 2016 March. We derive the spectral index, β, as a function of local sidereal time (LST) and find -2.60 > β > -2.62 ± 0.02 between 0 and 12 h LST. When the Galactic Centre is in the sky, the spectral index flattens, reaching β = -2.50 ± 0.02 at 17.7 h. The EDGES instrument is shown to be very stable throughout the observations with night-to-night reproducibility of σβ < 0.003. Including systematic uncertainty, the overall uncertainty of β is 0.02 across all LST bins. These results improve on the earlier findings of Rogers & Bowman by reducing the spectral index uncertainty from 0.10 to 0.02 while considering more extensive sources of errors. We compare our measurements with spectral index simulations derived from the Global Sky Model (GSM) of de Oliveira-Costa et al. and with fits between the Guzmán et al. 45 MHz and Haslam et al. 408 MHz maps. We find good agreement at the transit of the Galactic Centre. Away from transit, the GSM tends to overpredict (GSM less negative) by 0.05 < Δβ = βGSM - βEDGES < 0.12, while the 45-408 MHz fits tend to overpredict by Δβ < 0.05.

  12. [Calculation of the amount of free water molecules in aqueous solutions by means of spectral parameters from the terahertz frequency domain taking into account processes of screening].

    PubMed

    Pen'kov, N V; Iashin, V A; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we derive a formula to calculate the amount of free water molecules in solution. Physical values in this formula may be obtained by analyzing the spectra of aqueous solutions in the terahertz frequency range. Formula is derived on the basis of considering water polarization process in electric field. It is shown that without processes of shielding the electric field in the water calculations lead to very high estimation of a share of free water molecule.

  13. A uniformly accurate multiscale time integrator spectral method for the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov system in the high-plasma-frequency limit regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhu; Zhao, Xiaofei

    2016-12-01

    A multiscale time integrator sine pseudospectral (MTI-SP) method is presented for discretizing the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov (KGZ) system with a dimensionless parameter 0 < ε ≤ 1, which is inversely proportional to the plasma frequency. In the high-plasma-frequency limit regime, i.e. 0 < ε ≪ 1, the solution of the KGZ system propagates waves with amplitude at O (1) and wavelength at O (ε2) in time and O (1) in space, which causes significantly numerical burdens due to the high oscillation in time. The main idea of the numerical method is to carry out a multiscale decomposition by frequency (MDF) to the electric field component of the solution at each time step and then apply the sine pseudospectral discretization for spatial derivatives followed by using the exponential wave integrator in phase space for integrating the MDF and the equation of the ion density component. The method is explicit and easy to be implemented. Extensive numerical results show that the MTI-SP method converges uniformly and optimally in space with exponential convergence rate if the solution is smooth, and uniformly in time with linear convergence rate at O (τ) for ε ∈ (0 , 1 ] with τ time step size and optimally with quadratic convergence rate at O (τ2) in the regime when either ε = O (1) or 0 < ε ≤ τ. Thus the meshing strategy requirement (or ε-scalability) of the MTI-SP for the KGZ system in the high-plasma-frequency limit regime is τ = O (1) and h = O (1) for 0 < ε ≪ 1, which is significantly better than classical methods in the literatures. Finally, we apply the MTI-SP method to study the convergence rates of the KGZ system to its limiting models in the high-plasma-frequency limit and the interactions of bright solitons of the KGZ system, and to identify certain parameter regimes that the solution of the KGZ system will be blow-up in one dimension.

  14. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  15. High sensitive THz superconducting hot electron bolometer mixers and transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Miao, W.; Zhou, K. M.; Guo, X. H.; Zhong, J. Q.; Shi, S. C.

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz band, which is roughly defined as 0.1 THz to 10 THz, is an interesting frequency region of the electromagnetic spectrum to be fully explored in astronomy. THz observations play key roles in astrophysics and cosmology. High sensitive heterodyne and direct detectors are the main tools for the detection of molecular spectral lines and fine atomic structure spectral lines, which are very important tracers for probing the physical and chemical properties and dynamic processes of objects such as star and planetary systems. China is planning to build an THz telescope at Dome A, Antarctica, a unique site for ground-based THz observations. We are developing THz superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers and transition edge sensors (TES), which are quantum limited and back-ground limited detectors, respectively. Here we first introduce the working principles of superconducting HEB and TES, and then mainly present the results achieved at Purple mountain Observatory.

  16. High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

  17. Spectral power time-courses of human sleep EEG reveal a striking discontinuity at approximately 18 Hz marking the division between NREM-specific and wake/REM-specific fast frequency activity.

    PubMed

    Merica, Helli; Fortune, Ronald D

    2005-07-01

    Spectral power time-courses over the ultradian cycle of the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) provide a useful window for exploring the temporal correlation between cortical EEG and sub-cortical neuronal activities. Precision in the measurement of these time-courses is thus important, but it is hampered by lacunae in the definition of the frequency band limits that are in the main based on wake EEG conventions. A frequently seen discordance between the shape of the beta power time-course across the ultradian cycle and that reported for the sequential mean firing rate of brainstem-thalamic activating neurons invites a closer examination of these band limits, especially since the sleep EEG literature indicates in several studies an intriguing non-uniformity of time-course comportment across the traditional beta band frequencies. We ascribe this tentatively to the sharp reversal of slope we have seen at approximately 18 Hz in our data and that of others. Here, therefore, using data for the first four ultradian cycles from 18 healthy subjects, we apply several criteria based on changes in time-course comportment in order to examine this non-uniformity as we move in 1 Hz bins through the frequency range 14-30 Hz. The results confirm and describe in detail the striking discontinuity of shape at around 18 Hz, with only the upper range (18-30 Hz) displaying a time-course similar to that of the firing-rate changes measured in brainstem activating neurons and acknowledged to engender states of brain activation. Fast frequencies in the lower range (15-18 Hz), on the other hand, are shown to be specific to non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Splitting the beta band at approximately 18 Hz therefore permits a significant improvement in EEG measurement and a more precise correlation with cellular activity.

  18. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  19. Characterization of Flap Edge Noise Radiation from a High-Fidelity Airframe Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David P.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Bahr, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the noise generated by a baseline high-fidelity airframe model are presented. The test campaign was conducted in the open-jet test section of the NASA Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Tunnel on an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream airframe model incorporating a trailing edge flap and main landing gear. Unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained from a series of sensors positioned along the two flap edges, and far field acoustic measurements were obtained using a 97-microphone phased array that viewed the pressure side of the airframe. The DAMAS array deconvolution method was employed to determine the locations and strengths of relevant noise sources in the vicinity of the flap edges and the landing gear. A Coherent Output Power (COP) spectral method was used to couple the unsteady surface pressures measured along the flap edges with the phased array output. The results indicate that outboard flap edge noise is dominated by the flap bulb seal cavity with very strong COP coherence over an approximate model-scale frequency range of 1 to 5 kHz observed between the array output and those unsteady pressure sensors nearest the aft end of the cavity. An examination of experimental COP spectra for the inboard flap proved inconclusive, most likely due to a combination of coherence loss caused by decorrelation of acoustic waves propagating through the thick wind tunnel shear layer and contamination of the spectra by tunnel background noise at lower frequencies. Directivity measurements obtained from integration of DAMAS pressure-squared values over defined geometric zones around the model show that the baseline flap and landing gear are only moderately directional as a function of polar emission angle.

  20. Losing your edge: climate change and the conservation value of range-edge populations.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Evan M; Olivas, Paulo; Stroud, James; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Populations occurring at species' range edges can be locally adapted to unique environmental conditions. From a species' perspective, range-edge environments generally have higher severity and frequency of extreme climatic events relative to the range core. Under future climates, extreme climatic events are predicted to become increasingly important in defining species' distributions. Therefore, range-edge genotypes that are better adapted to extreme climates relative to core populations may be essential to species' persistence during periods of rapid climate change. We use relatively simple conceptual models to highlight the importance of locally adapted range-edge populations (leading and trailing edges) for determining the ability of species to persist under future climates. Using trees as an example, we show how locally adapted populations at species' range edges may expand under future climate change and become more common relative to range-core populations. We also highlight how large-scale habitat destruction occurring in some geographic areas where many species range edge converge, such as biome boundaries and ecotones (e.g., the arc of deforestation along the rainforest-cerrado ecotone in the southern Amazonia), can have major implications for global biodiversity. As climate changes, range-edge populations will play key roles in helping species to maintain or expand their geographic distributions. The loss of these locally adapted range-edge populations through anthropogenic disturbance is therefore hypothesized to reduce the ability of species to persist in the face of rapid future climate change.

  1. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as microcalcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  2. Carrier-envelope offset frequency linewidth narrowing in a Cr:forsterite laser-based frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shun; Tillman, Karl; Washburn, Brian R; Corwin, Kristan L

    2016-12-01

    Cr:forsterite laser-based frequency combs are useful for spectroscopic purposes in the near-IR wavelength region. However, self-referenced Cr:forsterite combs tend to exhibit wide carrier-envelope offset frequency (f0) linewidths, which result in broad comb teeth. This can be attributed to significant frequency noise across the comb's spectral bandwidth. We have stabilized a prism-based Cr:forsterite laser comb and observed narrowing of the f0 linewidth from ∼1.4  MHz down to ∼100  kHz by changing only the prism insertion, and to 23 kHz by inserting a knife edge into the intracavity beam while keeping the same prism insertion. The noise dynamics of the Cr:forsterite laser frequency comb are investigated with the goal of explaining this f0 narrowing phenomenon.

  3. Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes of Poly(glycolic acid) and Thermal Expansion of Crystal Lattice Assigned On the Basis of DFT-Spectral Simulation Aided with a Fragment Method.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Miyada, Mai; Sato, Harumi; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-02-09

    Low-frequency vibrational modes of lamellar crystalline poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) were measured on Raman and far-infrared (FIR) spectra. Among the observed bands, an FIR band at ∼70 cm(-1) and a Raman band at 125 cm(-1) showed a gradual lower-frequency shift with increasing temperature from 20 °C to the melting point at ∼230 °C. Their polarization direction was perpendicular to the chain axis of PGA. Both spectra were quantum-mechanically simulated with the aid of a fragment method, the Cartesian-coordinate tensor transfer, which enabled an explicit consideration of molecular interactions between two adjacent polymer chains. Good agreement was achieved between the experiment and theory in both spectra. The temperature-sensitive bands at ∼70 cm(-1) in FIR and at 125 cm(-1) in Raman comprise the out-of-plane C═O bending motion. The temperature-dependent shifts of the low-frequency bands were successfully simulated by the DFT-spectral calculation, exploring that the main origin of the shifts is the thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. This result indicates that the thermally shifted bands may be used as an indicator of the lattice expansion of PGA. Possible changes in intermolecular interactions of PGA under temperature rising were ascribed on the basis of natural bond orbital theory. The steric repulsion between the carbonyl O atom in one chain and the H-C bond in the adjacent chain will be a dominant interaction in the lattice-expanding process, which would cause the observed thermal shifts of the bending modes. Comparisons of the spectral assignment for PGA obtained in this study and that for poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) reported by us suggest that crystalline polyesters give vibrational modes composed of out-of-plane bending motion of C═O groups between ∼70 and ∼125 cm(-1), the modes of which are sensitive to the thermal expansion of crystal lattice and its concomitant changes in their intermolecular interactions.

  4. Agile robotic edge finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.

    1996-08-01

    Edge finishing processes have seemed like ideal candidates for automation. Most edge finishing processes are unpleasant, dangerous, tedious, expensive, not repeatable and labor intensive. Estimates place the cost of manual edge finishing processes at 12% of the total cost of fabricating precision parts. For small, high precision parts, the cost of hand finishing may be as high as 305 of the total part cost. Up to 50% of this cost could be saved through automation. This cost estimate includes the direct costs of edge finishing: the machining hours required and the 30% scrap and rework rate after manual finishing. Not included in these estimates are the indirect costs resulting from cumulative trauma disorders and retraining costs caused by the high turnover rate for finishing jobs.. Despite the apparent economic advantages, edge finishing has proven difficult to automate except in low precision and/or high volume production environments. Finishing automation systems have not been deployed successfully in Department of Energy defense programs (DOE/DP) production, A few systems have been attempted but have been subsequently abandoned for traditional edge finishing approaches: scraping, grinding, and filing the edges using modified dental tools and hand held power tools. Edge finishing automation has been an elusive but potentially lucrative production enhancement. The amount of time required for reconfiguring workcells for new parts, the time required to reprogram the workcells to finish new parts, and automation equipment to respond to fixturing errors and part tolerances are the most common reasons cited for eliminating automation as an option for DOE/DP edge finishing applications. Existing automated finishing systems have proven to be economically viable only where setup and reprogramming costs are a negligible fraction of overall production costs.

  5. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  6. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  7. Clustered frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Matsko, Andrey B; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Huang, Shu-Wei; Maleki, Lute

    2016-11-01

    We show theoretically that it is feasible to generate a spectrally broad Kerr frequency comb consisting of several spectral clusters phase matched due to interplay among second- and higher-order group velocity dispersion contributions. We validate the theoretical analysis experimentally by driving a magnesium fluoride resonator, characterized with 110 GHz free spectral range, with a continuous wave light at 1.55 μm and observing two comb clusters separated by nearly two-thirds of an octave.

  8. The digital step edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The facet model was used to accomplish step edge detection. The essence of the facet model is that any analysis made on the basis of the pixel values in some neighborhood has its final authoritative interpretation relative to the underlying grey tone intensity surface of which the neighborhood pixel values are observed noisy samples. Pixels which are part of regions have simple grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Pixels which have an edge in them have complex grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Specially, an edge moves through a pixel only if there is some point in the pixel's area having a zero crossing of the second directional derivative taken in the direction of a non-zero gradient at the pixel's center. To determine whether or not a pixel should be marked as a step edge pixel, its underlying grey tone intensity surface was estimated on the basis of the pixels in its neighborhood.

  9. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  10. FOCUSR: Feature Oriented Correspondence using Spectral Regularization–A Method for Precise Surface Matching

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Herve; Grady, Leo; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Cheriet, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods for surface matching are limited by the trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. Here we present an improved algorithm for dense vertex-to-vertex correspondence that uses direct matching of features defined on a surface and improves it by using spectral correspondence as a regularization. This algorithm has the speed of both feature matching and spectral matching while exhibiting greatly improved precision (distance errors of 1.4%). The method, FOCUSR, incorporates implicitly such additional features to calculate the correspondence and relies on the smoothness of the lowest-frequency harmonics of a graph Laplacian to spatially regularize the features. In its simplest form, FOCUSR is an improved spectral correspondence method that nonrigidly deforms spectral embeddings. We provide here a full realization of spectral correspondence where virtually any feature can be used as additional information using weights on graph edges, but also on graph nodes and as extra embedded coordinates. As an example, the full power of FOCUSR is demonstrated in a real case scenario with the challenging task of brain surface matching across several individuals. Our results show that combining features and regularizing them in a spectral embedding greatly improves the matching precision (to a sub-millimeter level) while performing at much greater speed than existing methods. PMID:23868776

  11. FOCUSR: feature oriented correspondence using spectral regularization--a method for precise surface matching.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, Herve; Grady, Leo; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Cheriet, Farida

    2013-09-01

    Existing methods for surface matching are limited by the tradeoff between precision and computational efficiency. Here, we present an improved algorithm for dense vertex-to-vertex correspondence that uses direct matching of features defined on a surface and improves it by using spectral correspondence as a regularization. This algorithm has the speed of both feature matching and spectral matching while exhibiting greatly improved precision (distance errors of 1.4 percent). The method, FOCUSR, incorporates implicitly such additional features to calculate the correspondence and relies on the smoothness of the lowest-frequency harmonics of a graph Laplacian to spatially regularize the features. In its simplest form, FOCUSR is an improved spectral correspondence method that nonrigidly deforms spectral embeddings. We provide here a full realization of spectral correspondence where virtually any feature can be used as an additional information using weights on graph edges, but also on graph nodes and as extra embedded coordinates. As an example, the full power of FOCUSR is demonstrated in a real-case scenario with the challenging task of brain surface matching across several individuals. Our results show that combining features and regularizing them in a spectral embedding greatly improves the matching precision (to a submillimeter level) while performing at much greater speed than existing methods.

  12. Using new edges for anomaly detection in computer networks

    DOEpatents

    Neil, Joshua Charles

    2015-05-19

    Creation of new edges in a network may be used as an indication of a potential attack on the network. Historical data of a frequency with which nodes in a network create and receive new edges may be analyzed. Baseline models of behavior among the edges in the network may be established based on the analysis of the historical data. A new edge that deviates from a respective baseline model by more than a predetermined threshold during a time window may be detected. The new edge may be flagged as potentially anomalous when the deviation from the respective baseline model is detected. Probabilities for both new and existing edges may be obtained for all edges in a path or other subgraph. The probabilities may then be combined to obtain a score for the path or other subgraph. A threshold may be obtained by calculating an empirical distribution of the scores under historical conditions.

  13. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  14. Drift wave turbulence in the edge region of MST reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuecks, D. J.; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of electric field fluctuations reveal activity consistent with drift waves in the edge region of standard-confinement MST plasmas. The fluctuations are broadband and strongly anisotropic, with a power spectral index that is steeper in the direction parallel to the mean magnetic field direction than it is in the perpendicular direction. The power in the fluctuating kinetic energy, 1/2 minivẼ×B0 2 , exceeds the power in magnetic fluctuation energy for frequencies above 80 kHz. At lower frequencies (20-40 kHz), magnetic energy associated with unstable global tearing modes dominates. A lack of equipartition in the turbulent cascade coincides with measured signatures of independent fluctuation activity broadly consistent with drift-wave fluctuations. Statistical coherence measurements reveal mode activity at high frequencies (>=80 kHz) that is compressive, has high coherence in regions of the plasma with strong density gradients, and has a phase speed comparable to the electron drift speed. Elevated coherency associated with this fluctuation feature of the drift wave fluctuations return more quickly following magnetic reconnection events than corresponding coherence associated with the tearing activity. This suggests the drift-wave fluctuations may be excited by the large edge-localized thermal pressure gradient, but they could also be excited nonlinearly in a turbulent cascade driven by the tearing modes. Work supported by DOE and NSF.

  15. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  16. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  17. How Sharp Does a "Knife Edge" Have to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Eric R.; Gash, Philip W.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help understand the effect of the curvature of the laboratory equipment support (cylindrical rod instead of knife-edge) on the frequency of oscillation of pendula. (ZWH)

  18. Near Field Trailing Edge Tone Noise Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.

    2002-01-01

    Blunt trailing edges in a flow often generate tone noise due to wall-jet shear layer and vortex shedding. In this paper, the space-time conservation element (CE/SE) method is employed to numerically study the near-field noise of blunt trailing edges. Two typical cases, namely, flow past a circular cylinder (aeolian noise problem) and flow past a flat plate of finite thickness are considered. The computed frequencies compare well with experimental data. For the aeolian noise problem, comparisons with the results of other numerical approaches are also presented.

  19. Spin Frequency Detection in the Spectral Domain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    ml-(A 0 0 w aK 0 Z x 93 W WO.L WI- m w00 z X X (A mm I -" 0 ae .L aI- 01- 1-I - Ix0 w SX Ř oz L 0 La m 𔃾Z-wla- Zx c IX.aw (nl E a * Z03 0ŗ W- I L.O...W0ZwW=CWo0Z Q.I-W4MY)JLL IL Z(A*.J.JXW= .0+ +9-CL=.0JaLŔ.C CDP -O"- IA ( 0 .a a. a a WI- (LW.4W"WwWW(U~mW WMWWWWWWWWWWW ZII- ’.04XXXXWXZLa.ZXZCM

  20. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  1. Spectral characterization of a photonic bandgap fiber for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Aref, S Hashem; Amezcua-Correac, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Joel P; Frazão, Orlando; Santos, José L; Araújo, Francisco M; Latifi, Hamid; Farahi, Faramarz; Ferreira, Luis A; Knight, Jonathan C

    2010-04-01

    We study the measurand-induced spectral shift of the photonic bandgap edge of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The physical measurands considered are strain, temperature, curvature, and twist. A noticeable sensitivity to strain, temperature, and twist is observed, with a blueshift to increase strain and twist. An increase in temperature induces a redshift. On the other hand, curvature has no observable effect on the spectral position of the photonic bandgap edge.

  2. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  3. The pulsar spectral index distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, S. D.; Lorimer, D. R.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The flux-density spectra of radio pulsars are known to be steep and, to first order, described by a power-law relationship of the form Sν ∝ να, where Sν is the flux density at some frequency ν and α is the spectral index. Although measurements of α have been made over the years for several hundred pulsars, a study of the intrinsic distribution of pulsar spectra has not been carried out. From the result of pulsar surveys carried out at three different radio frequencies, we use population synthesis techniques and a likelihood analysis to deduce what underlying spectral index distribution is required to replicate the results of these surveys. We find that in general the results of the surveys can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution of spectral indices with a mean of -1.4 and unit standard deviation. We also consider the impact of the so-called gigahertz-peaked spectrum pulsars proposed by Kijak et al. The fraction of peaked-spectrum sources in the population with any significant turnover at low frequencies appears to be at most 10 per cent. We demonstrate that high-frequency (>2 GHz) surveys preferentially select flatter spectrum pulsars and the converse is true for lower frequency (<1 GHz) surveys. This implies that any correlations between α and other pulsar parameters (for example age or magnetic field) need to carefully account for selection biases in pulsar surveys. We also expect that many known pulsars which have been detected at high frequencies will have shallow, or positive, spectral indices. The majority of pulsars do not have recorded flux density measurements over a wide frequency range, making it impossible to constrain their spectral shapes. We also suggest that such measurements would allow an improved description of any populations of pulsars with `non-standard' spectra. Further refinements to this picture will soon be possible from the results of surveys with the Green Bank Telescope and LOFAR.

  4. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  5. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  6. An experimental study of airfoil instability tonal noise with trailing edge serrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of trailing edge serrations on airfoil instability noise. Detailed aeroacoustic measurements are presented of the noise radiated by an NACA-0012 airfoil with trailing edge serrations in a low to moderate speed flow under acoustical free field conditions. The existence of a separated boundary layer near the trailing edge of the airfoil at an angle of attack of 4.2 degree has been experimentally identified by a surface mounted hot-film arrays technique. Hot-wire results have shown that the saw-tooth surface can trigger a bypass transition and prevent the boundary layer from becoming separated. Without the separated boundary layer to act as an amplifier for the incoming Tollmien-Schlichting waves, the intensity and spectral characteristic of the radiated tonal noise can be affected depending upon the serration geometry. Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the airfoil wakes for a straight and serrated trailing edge are also reported in this paper. These measurements show that localized normal-component velocity fluctuations that are present in a small region of the wake from the laminar airfoil become weakened once serrations are introduced. Owing to the above unique characteristics of the serrated trailing edges, we are able to further investigate the mechanisms of airfoil instability tonal noise with special emphasis on the assessment of the wake and non-wake based aeroacoustic feedback models. It has been shown that the instability tonal noise generated at an angle of attack below approximately one degree could involve several complex mechanisms. On the other hand, the non-wake based aeroacoustic feedback mechanism alone is sufficient to predict all discrete tone frequencies accurately when the airfoil is at a moderate angle of attack. Larger Δf, which is defined as (fn+1-fn). In other words, a larger margin of velocity increase is required in order to "shift" the fn and fn+1 across fs

  7. Peakfitter — an integrated Excel-based Visual Basic program for processing multiple skewed and shifting Gaussian-like spectral peaks simultaneously: application to radio frequency glow discharge ion trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eanes, Ritchie C.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2000-04-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), a section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text is accompanied by an electronic archive, stored on the SAE homepage at (http://www.elsevier.nl/locate/sabe). The archive contains program and data files. The main article discusses the scientific spectroscopic and instrumental aspects of the subject and explains the purpose of the program and data files. The work deals with a Microsoft Excel Visual Basic program, Peakfitter, which can process multiple Gaussian-shaped spectral peaks quickly and easily. The program employs Microsoft Excel Solver to process any Gaussian-like spectra that can be opened in Microsoft Excel 97. Up to three peaks in one to 225 spectra, each containing up to 2000 data points can be processed per data file to give background corrected peak areas for both raw data and its associated fit data as calculated by the trapezoidal method or by simple successive addition of channel intensities across each peak. Concurrently output also includes fit peak heights for Gaussian-shaped spectral peaks. Use of other statistical distributions such as the Lorentzian model requires only slight modification to a template file. Hence, Peakfitter was actually written as two application programs, 'Gaussfitter' and 'Lorenfitter' to accommodate spectra of Gaussian or Lorentzian character, respectively. Written initially to process data from a radio frequency glow discharge ion trap mass spectrometer (rf-GD/ITMS), the program is useful for processing sequentially acquired spectra, which have a limited number of data points across each peak. The user may examine and manipulate program variables in cases where the raw data is skewed with respect to the fit data. An assessment of Peakfitter is given using rf-GD/ITMS elemental analysis and ion-molecule reaction data. Peakfitter's (i.e. 'Gaussfitter's) utility in processing rf-GD/ITMS spectra is characterized by a slight

  8. Floquet edge states in germanene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, M.; Zhang, Q. Y.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate versatile electronic properties of germanene monolayers under circularly, linearly, and elliptically polarized light. We show for the high frequency regime that the edge states can be controlled by tuning the amplitude of the light and by applying a static electric field. For circularly polarized light the band gap in one valley is reduced and in the other enhanced, enabling single valley edge states. For linearly polarized light spin-split states are found for both valleys, being connected by time reversal symmetry. The effects of elliptically polarized light are similar to those of circularly polarized light. The transport properties of zigzag nanoribbons in the presence of disorder confirm a nontrivial nature of the edge states under circularly and elliptically polarized light. PMID:27550632

  9. How visual edge features influence cuttlefish camouflage patterning.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Ulmer, Kimberly M; Siemann, Liese A; Buresch, Kendra C; Chubb, Charles; Hanlon, Roger T

    2013-05-03

    Rapid adaptive camouflage is the primary defense of soft-bodied cuttlefish. Previous studies have shown that cuttlefish body patterns are strongly influenced by visual edges in the substrate. The aim of the present study was to examine how cuttlefish body patterning is differentially controlled by various aspects of edges, including contrast polarity, contrast strength, and the presence or absence of "line terminators" introduced into a pattern when continuous edges are fragmented. Spatially high- and low-pass filtered white or black disks, as well as isolated, continuous and fragmented edges varying in contrast, were used to assess activation of cuttlefish skin components. Although disks of both contrast polarities evoked relatively weak disruptive body patterns, black disks activated different skin components than white disks, and high-frequency information alone sufficed to drive the responses to white disks whereas high- and low-frequency information were both required to drive responses to black disks. Strikingly, high-contrast edge fragments evoked substantially stronger body pattern responses than low-contrast edge fragments, whereas the body pattern responses evoked by high-contrast continuous edges were no stronger than those produced by low-contrast edges. This suggests that line terminators vs. continuous edges influence expression of disruptive body pattern components via different mechanisms that are controlled by contrast in different ways.

  10. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  11. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  12. Frequency Characteristics of Fluctuating Pressure on Rotor Blade in a Propeller Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Choon-Man; Furukawa, Masato; Inoue, Masahiro

    A wavelet transform is introduced to analyze frequency characteristics of the fluctuating pressure on rotor blade in a propeller fan. The fluctuating pressure on the rotor blade is obtained by using the results of a large eddy simulation. The frequencies having high spectral peaks of the fluctuating pressure are determined by taking the time average of the local absolute modulus of the wavelet. The dominant frequency of the real-time pressure selected at the high pressure fluctuation region corresponds well to that of the fluctuating rotor torque and the experimental result of fan noise. It is mainly generated due to the unsteady behavior of the vortical flow, such as the tip vortex and the leading edge separation vortex, in the propeller fan. A frequency in the separation bubble region on the suction surface is higher than that of the dominant frequency caused by the vortical flow.

  13. Edge fluctuations in the MST (Madison Symmetric Torus) reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Nilles, E.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, J.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. At low frequency (<25 kHz), the mode number spectra of magnetic fluctuations agree very well with theoretical prediction for nonlinearly saturated tearing fluctuations resonant in the core. At high frequency (50 kHz to 100 kHz) the magnetic spectra broaden and the modes become resonant in the reversal region. Nonlinear phenomena are under experimental investigation. The low frequency fluctuations phase-lock together to produce a rotating localized disturbance. Bi-spectral analysis in frequency also reveals nonlinear three-wave mode-coupling at low frequency. Electrostatic fluctuations are substantial and do not appear to obey a Boltzmann relation (i.e. e{tilde {phi}}/kT{sub e} > {tilde p}{sub e}/p{sub e} where {tilde {phi}} and {tilde p}{sub e} are the fluctuating potential and pressure, respectively). From measurements of the fluctuating density, temperature, and potential we infer that the electrostatic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy can be substantial. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  14. The red edge of plant leaf reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the red edge spectral feature of green vegetation based on laboratory reflectance spectrophotometry is presented. A parameter lambda is defined as the wavelength is defined as the wavelength of maximum slope and found to be dependent on chlorophyll concentration. Species, development stage, leaf layering, and leaf water content of vegetation also influences lambda. The maximum slope parameter is found to be independent of simulated ground area coverage. The results are interpreted in terms of Beer's Law and Kubelka-Munk theory. The chlorophyll concentration dependence of lambda seems to be explained in terms of a pure absorption effect, and it is suggested that the existence of two lambda components arises from leaf scattering properties. The results indicate that red edge measurements will be valuable for assessment of vegetative chlorophyll status and leaf area index independently of ground cover variations, and will be particularly suitable for early stress detection.

  15. Edge Minority Heating Experiment in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; J.L. Terry; P. Bonoli; R. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Fiore; G. Schilling; S. Wukitch; J. Hughes; Y. Lin; R. Perkins; M. Porkolab; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2005-03-25

    An attempt was made to control global plasma confinement in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak by applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to the plasma edge in order to deliberately create a minority ion tail loss. In theory, an edge fast ion loss could modify the edge electric field and so stabilize the edge turbulence, which might then reduce the H-mode power threshold or improve the H-mode barrier. However, the experimental result was that edge minority heating resulted in no improvement in the edge plasma parameters or global stored energy, at least at power levels of radio-frequency power is less than or equal to 5.5 MW. A preliminary analysis of these results is presented and some ideas for improvement are discussed.

  16. Geostrophic Turbulence in the Frequency-Wavenumber Domain: Eddy-Driven Low-Frequency Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    linearities in themaintenance of low-frequency variability in oceanic geostrophic turbulence. Our main diagnostics are spectral fluxes and spectral...here. Note that our focus here is on isotropic wavenumber–frequency spectral diagnostics . In a companion paper, we analyze spectral diagnostics in the...features. As in ASFMRS and Arbic et al. (2013), we will also compute spectral diagnostics from a satellite altimeter product. The Archiving, Validation

  17. Near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast for quantitative oximetry in optical mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Liu Ning; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    We present a hybrid continuous-wave, frequency-domain instrument for near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast based on a tandem, planar scanning of one illumination optical fiber and one collection optical fiber configured in a transmission geometry. The spatial sampling rate of 25 points/cm{sup 2} is increased to 400 points/cm{sup 2} by postprocessing the data with a 2D cubic spline interpolation. We then apply a previously developed spatial second-derivative algorithm to an edge-corrected intensity image (N-image) to enhance the visibility and resolution of optical inhomogeneities in breast tissue such as blood vessels and tumors. The spectral data at each image pixel consist of 515-point spectra over the 650-900 nm wavelength range, thus featuring a spectral density of two data points per nanometer. We process the measured spectra with a paired-wavelength spectral analysis method to quantify the oxygen saturation of detected optical inhomogeneities, under the assumption that they feature a locally higher hemoglobin concentration. Our initial measurements on two healthy human subjects have generated high-resolution optical mammograms displaying a network of blood vessels with values of hemoglobin saturation typically falling within the 60%-95% range, which is physiologically reasonable. This approach to spectral imaging and oximetry of the breast has the potential to efficiently exploit the high intrinsic contrast provided by hemoglobin in breast tissue and to contribute a useful tool in the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast pathologies.

  18. Numerical simulation of the edge tone phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Liu, B. L.; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Time accurate Navier-Stokes computations were performed to study a class 2 (acoustic) whistle, the edge tone, and to gain knowledge of the vortex-acoustic coupling mechanisms driving production of these tones. Results were obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible air flow of a two dimensional jet issuing from a slit interacting with a wedge. Cases considered were determined by varying the distance from the slit to the wedge. Flow speed was kept constant at 1,750 cm/s as was the slit thickness of 0.1 cm, corresponding to conditions in the experiments of Brown. The analytical computations revealed edge tones to be present in four harmonic stages of jet flow instability over the wedge as the jet length was varied from 0.3 to 1.6 cm. Excellent agreement was obtained in all four edge tone stage cases between the present computational results and the experimentally obtained frequencies and flow visualization results of Brown. Specific edge tone generation phenomena and further confirmation of certain theories and empirical formulas concerning these phenomena were brought to light in this analytical simulation of edge tones.

  19. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  20. Shape of patch edges affects edge permeability for meadow voles.

    PubMed

    Nams, Vilis O

    2012-09-01

    Human development typically fragments natural habitats into patches, affecting population and metapopulation dynamics via changes in animal behavior. Emigration from one habitat patch to another has a large effect on population and metapopulation dynamics. One factor that affects emigration is permeability of patch edges. This study looks at the effects of edge shape (convex, concave, and straight) on edge permeability for meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus).. I tested five hypotheses for responses of animal movement to patch shape: (1) neutral edge response; (2) edge attraction; (3) edge avoidance; (4) time-minimizing, in which an animal attempts to minimize the time spent in inhospitable matrix, and thus travels as far as possible in the patch before crossing the edge; and (5) protection, in which an animal attempts to maximize protection while in the inhospitable matrix by keeping the patch close by. These hypotheses were tested by an experimental manipulation of meadow vole habitats. A strip was mowed with different edge shapes through an old field, and vole response was measured by tracking plates. Voles crossed edges at concave treatments twice as often compared to convex and straight shapes. Hypotheses (2) and (5) were supported. Although edge attraction causes a passive effect of a decrease in edge-crossing at concavities, this effect was eclipsed by the active effect of voles choosing to cross at concavities. The results can be generalized to edge tortuosity in general. Conservation biologists should consider edge shapes when exploring the effects of habitat fragmentation on animal populations.

  1. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  2. The Effect of Nozzle Trailing Edge Thickness on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Kinzie, Kevin; Haskin, Henry

    2004-01-01

    The effect of nozzle trailing edge thickness on broadband acoustic radiation and the production of tones is investigated for coannular nozzles. Experiments were performed for a core nozzle trailing edge thickness between 0.38 mm and 3.17 mm. The on-set of discrete tones was found to be predominantly affected by the velocity ratio, the ratio of the fan velocity to the core velocity, although some dependency on trailing edge thickness was also noted. For a core nozzle trailing edge thickness greater than or equal to 0.89 mm, tones were produced for velocity ratios between 0.91 and 1.61. For a constant nozzle trailing edge thickness, the frequency varied almost linearly with the core velocity. The Strouhal number based on the core velocity changed with nozzle trailing edge thickness and varied between 0.16 and 0.2 for the core nozzles used in the experiments. Increases in broadband noise with increasing trailing edge thickness were observed for tone producing and non-tone producing conditions. A variable thickness trailing edge (crenellated) nozzle resulted in no tonal production and a reduction of the broadband trailing edge noise relative to that of the corresponding constant thickness trailing edge.

  3. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  4. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral coverage characteristics of the two thematic mapper instruments were determined by analyses of spectral measurements of the optics, filters, and detectors. The following results are presented: (1) band 2 and 3 flatness was slightly below specification, and band 7 flatness was below specification; (2) band 5 upper-band edge was higher than specifications; (3) band 2 band edges were shifted upward about 9 nm relative to nominal; and (4) band 4, 5, and 7 lower band edges were 16 to 18 nm higher then nominal.

  5. Vegetation's red edge: a possible spectroscopic biosignature of extraterrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Seager, S; Turner, E L; Schafer, J; Ford, E B

    2005-06-01

    Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the "red edge," as a tool for astrobiology. We review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge and summarize its use in astronomy: early spectroscopic efforts to search for vegetation on Mars and recent reports of detection of the red edge in the spectrum of Earthshine (i.e., the spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of Earth). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory (New Mexico) to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial "light-harvesting organisms" have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet-characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths); if an extrasolar planet reflectance edge is detected care must be taken with its interpretation.

  6. Differentiator design and performance for edge sharpening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Jeng-Jong; Domingue, Julia O.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional differentiator is useful for edge sharpening in digital image processing. In the design of a differentiator, differentiator coefficients that satisfy the specification of frequency response must be approximated. Four mathematical techniques - the minimax method, least-squares method, nonlinear programming, and linear programming - can be applied to solve the approximation problem. Results indicated that the differentiator derived from linear programming gives the highest resolution. -from Authors

  7. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  8. Basic elements of power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of power spectral analysis with emphasis on the Blackman-Tukey method are presented. Short discussions are included on the topics of pre-whitening, frequency and spectral windows, and statistical reliability. Examples are included whenever possible, and a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating a power spectrum is presented.

  9. Universality in spectral statistics of open quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, B.; Osipov, V. Al.

    2015-06-01

    The quantum evolution maps of closed chaotic quantum graphs are unitary and known to have universal spectral correlations matching predictions of random matrix theory. In chaotic graphs with absorption the quantum maps become nonunitary. We show that their spectral statistics exhibit universality at the soft edges of the spectrum. The same spectral behavior is observed in many classical nonunitary ensembles of random matrices with rotationally invariant measures.

  10. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  11. Wisps in the outer edge of the Keeler Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Arnault, Ethan G.

    2015-11-01

    Superposed upon the relatively smooth outer edge of the Keeler Gap are a system of "wisps," which appear to be ring material protruding inward into the gap, usually with a sharp trailing edge and a smooth gradation back to the background edge location on the leading side (Porco et al. 2005, Science). The radial amplitude of wisps is usually 0.5 to 1 km, and their azimuthal extent is approximately a degree of longitude (~2400 km). Wisps are likely caused by an interplay between Daphnis (and perhaps other moons) and embedded moonlets within the ring, though the details remain unclear.Aside from the wisps, the Keeler Gap outer edge is the only one of the five sharp edges in the outer part of Saturn's A ring that is reasonably smooth in appearance (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS), with occultations indicating residuals less than 1 km upon a possibly non-zero eccentricity (R.G. French, personal communication, 2014). The other four (the inner and outer edges of the Encke Gap, the inner edge of the Keeler Gap, and the outer edge of the A ring itself) are characterized by wavy structure at moderate to high spatial frequencies, with amplitudes ranging from 2 to 30 km (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS).We will present a catalogue of wisp detections in Cassini images. We carry out repeated gaussian fits of the radial edge location in order to characterize edge structure and visually scan those fitted edges in order to detect wisps. With extensive coverage in longitude and in time, we will report on how wisps evolve and move, both within an orbit period and on longer timescales. We will also report on the frequency and interpretation of wisps that deviate from the standard morphology. We will discuss the implications of our results for the origin and nature of wisps, and for the larger picture of how masses interact within Saturn's rings.

  12. Study of a mode-locked erbium-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber laser incorporating a broad bandpass filter: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Zuniga, Luis Alonso; Jeong, Yoonchan

    2013-10-01

    We present rigorous experimental studies on the spectral and temporal behaviors of an erbium-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber laser (FSFL), with respect to various parameters of the laser cavity, including the direction of the frequency-shift mechanism, the quantity of frequency-shift, and the output coupling ratio (OCR) of the cavity. We show that if the filter bandwidth is much broader than the laser linewidth, the laser spectrum tends to split and form a secondary spectral band (SSB) on the shorter or longer wavelength side of the primary spectrum, depending on whether the direction of the frequency-shift mechanism is upward or downward, respectively. We found that the SSB forms a parasitic pulse with much lower peak power traveling on the leading or trailing edge of the primary pulse, which leads to a significant asymmetry in the whole pulse formation in the time domain.

  13. Photoacoustic spectral characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing optical absorbing nanoparticles have been developed for use as theranostic agents (for both imaging and therapy) and as dual-mode contrast agents. Droplets can be used as photoacoustic contrast agents, vaporized via optical irradiation, then the resulting bubbles can be used as ultrasound imaging and therapeutic agents. The photoacoustic signals from micron-sized droplets containing silica coated gold nanospheres were measured using ultra-high frequencies (100-1000 MHz). The spectra of droplets embedded in a gelatin phantom were compared to a theoretical model which calculates the pressure wave from a spherical homogenous liquid undergoing thermoelastic expansion resulting from laser absorption. The location of the spectral features of the theoretical model and experimental spectra were in agreement after accounting for increases in the droplet sound speed with frequency. The agreement between experiment and model indicate that droplets (which have negligible optical absorption in the visible and infrared spectra by themselves) emitted pressure waves related to the droplet composition and size, and was independent of the physical characteristics of the optical absorbing nanoparticles. The diameter of individual droplets was calculated using three independent methods: the time domain photoacoustic signal, the time domain pulse echo ultrasound signal, and a fit to the photoacoustic model, then compared to the diameter as measured by optical microscopy. It was found the photoacoustic and ultrasound methods calculated diameters an average of 2.6% of each other, and 8.8% lower than that measured using optical microscopy. The discrepancy between the calculated diameters and the optical measurements may be due to the difficulty in resolving the droplet edges after being embedded in the translucent gelatin medium.

  14. Majorana edge modes in Kitaev model on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurathi, Manisha; Sengupta, Krishnendu; Sen, Diptiman

    2015-03-01

    We study the Majorana modes, both equilibrium and Floquet, which can appear at the edges of the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice. We first present the analytical solutions known for the equilibrium Majorana edge modes for both zigzag and armchair edges of a semi-infinite Kitaev model and chart the parameter regimes of the model in which they appear. We then examine how edge modes can be generated if the Kitaev coupling on the bonds perpendicular to the edge is varied periodically in time as periodic δ-function kicks. We derive a general condition for the appearance and disappearance of the Floquet edge modes as a function of the drive frequency for a generic d-dimensional integrable system. We confirm this general condition for the Kitaev model with a finite width by mapping it to a one-dimensional model. Our numerical and analytical study of this problem shows that Floquet Majorana modes can appear on some edges in the kicked system even when the corresponding equilibrium Hamiltonian has no Majorana mode solutions on those edges. We support our analytical studies by numerics for finite sized system which show that periodic kicks can generate modes at the edges and the corners of the lattice. We thank CSIR, India and DST, India for financial support.

  15. Variations in the Sea Ice Edge and the Marginal Ice Zone on Different Spatial Scales as Observed from Different Satellite Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Henrichs, John

    2006-01-01

    The Marginal sea Ice Zone (MIZ) and the sea ice edge are the most dynamic areas of the sea ice cover. Knowledge of the sea ice edge location is vital for routing shipping in the polar regions. The ice edge is the location of recurrent plankton blooms, and is the habitat for a number of animals, including several which are under severe ecological threat. Polar lows are known to preferentially form along the sea ice edge because of induced atmospheric baroclinicity, and the ice edge is also the location of both vertical and horizontal ocean currents driven by thermal and salinity gradients. Finally, sea ice is both a driver and indicator of climate change and monitoring the position of the ice edge accurately over long time periods enables assessment of the impact of global and regional warming near the poles. Several sensors are currently in orbit that can monitor the sea ice edge. These sensors, though, have different spatial resolutions, different limitations, and different repeat frequencies. Satellite passive microwave sensors can monitor the ice edge on a daily or even twice-daily basis, albeit with low spatial resolution - 25 km for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) or 12.5 km for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). Although special methods exist that allow the detection of the sea ice edge at a quarter of that nominal resolution (PSSM). Visible and infrared data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provide daily coverage at 1 km and 250 m, respectively, but the surface observations me limited to cloud-free periods. The Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) has a resolution of 15 to 30 m but is limited to cloud-free periods as well, and does not provide daily coverage. Imagery from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments has resolutions of tens of meters to 100 m, and can be used to distinguish open water and sea ice on the basis of surface

  16. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  17. Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin FEM: Spectral Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, R.; Omidi, O.; Clarke, P. L.

    2014-11-01

    Materials in nature demonstrate certain spectral shapes in terms of their material properties. Since successful experimental demonstrations in 2000, metamaterials have provided a means to engineer materials with desired spectral shapes for their material properties. Computational tools are employed in two different aspects for metamaterial modeling: 1. Mircoscale unit cell analysis to derive and possibly optimize material's spectral response; 2. macroscale to analyze their interaction with conventional material. We compare two different approaches of Time-Domain (TD) and Frequency Domain (FD) methods for metamaterial applications. Finally, we discuss advantages of the TD method of Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (FEM) for spectral analysis of metamaterials.

  18. Effective Frequency Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, C. Laurence; Weng, Chi Y.

    2002-01-01

    An effective monochromatic frequency technique is described to represent the effects of finite spectral bandwidth for active and passive measurements centered on an absorption line, a trough region, or a slowly varying spectral feature. For Gaussian and rectangular laser line shapes, the effective frequency is shown to have a simple form which depends only on the instrumental line shape and bandwidth and not on the absorption line profile. The technique yields accuracies better than 0.1% for bandwidths less than 0.2 times the atmospheric line width.

  19. Edge states and phase diagram for graphene under polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi -Xiang; Li, Fuxiang

    2016-03-22

    In this paper, we investigate the topological phase transitions in graphene under the modulation of circularly polarized light, by analyzing the changes of edge states and its topological structures. A full phase diagram, with several different topological phases, is presented in the parameter space spanned by the driving frequency and light strength. We find that the high-Chern number behavior is very common in the driven system. While the one-photon resonance can create the chiral edge states in the π-gap, the two-photon resonance will induce the counter-propagating edge modes in the zero-energy gap. When the driving light strength is strong, the number and even the chirality of the edge states may change in the π-gap. The robustness of the edge states to disorder potential is also examined. We close by discussing the feasibility of experimental proposals.

  20. Edge states and phase diagram for graphene under polarized light

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yi -Xiang; Li, Fuxiang

    2016-03-22

    In this paper, we investigate the topological phase transitions in graphene under the modulation of circularly polarized light, by analyzing the changes of edge states and its topological structures. A full phase diagram, with several different topological phases, is presented in the parameter space spanned by the driving frequency and light strength. We find that the high-Chern number behavior is very common in the driven system. While the one-photon resonance can create the chiral edge states in the π-gap, the two-photon resonance will induce the counter-propagating edge modes in the zero-energy gap. When the driving light strength is strong, themore » number and even the chirality of the edge states may change in the π-gap. The robustness of the edge states to disorder potential is also examined. We close by discussing the feasibility of experimental proposals.« less

  1. Acoustic streaming of a sharp edge.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Zhou, Jianbo; Yalamanchili, Satish

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous acoustic streaming is observed emanating from sharp edges of solid bodies that are vibrating in fluids. The streaming velocities can be orders of magnitude higher than expected from the Rayleigh streaming at similar amplitudes of vibration. Acoustic velocity of fluid relative to a solid body diverges at a sharp edge, giving rise to a localized time-independent body force acting on the fluid. This force results in a formation of a localized jet. Two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to predict acoustic streaming for low amplitude vibration using two methods: (1) Steady-state solution utilizing perturbation theory and (2) direct transient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Both analyses agree with each other and correctly predict the streaming of a sharp-edged vibrating blade measured experimentally. The origin of the streaming can be attributed to the centrifugal force of the acoustic fluid flow around a sharp edge. The dependence of this acoustic streaming on frequency and velocity is examined using dimensional analysis. The dependence law is devised and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  2. Significant reduction in arc frequency biased solar cells: Observations, diagnostics, and mitigation technique(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upschulte, B. L.; Weyl, G. M.; Marinelli, W. J.; Aifer, E.; Hastings, D.; Snyder, D.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of experiments were performed which identify key factors contributing to the arcing of negatively biased high voltage solar cells. These efforts have led to reduction of greater than a factor of 100 in the arc frequency of a single cell following proper remediation procedures. Experiments naturally lead to and focussed on the adhesive/encapsulant that is used to bond the protective cover slip to the solar cell. An image-intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera system recorded UV emission from arc events which occurred exclusively along the interfacial edge between the cover slip and the solar cell. Microscopic inspection of this interfacial region showed a bead of encapsulant along this entire edge. Elimination of this encapsulant bead reduced the arc frequency by two orders of magnitude. Water contamination was also identified as a key contributor which enhances arcing of the encapsulant bead along the solar cell edge. Spectrally resolved measurements of the observable UV light shows a feature assignable to OH(A-X) electronic emission, which is common for water contaminated discharges. Experiments in which the solar cell temperature was raised to 85 C showed a reduced arcing frequency, suggesting desorption of H2O. Exposing the solar cell to water vapor was shown to increase the arcing frequency. Clean dry gases such as O2, N2, and Ar show no enhancement of the arcing rate. Elimination of the exposed encapsulant eliminates any measurable sensitivity to H2O vapor.

  3. The Red Edge Problem in asteroid band parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Sean S.; Dunn, Tasha L.; Emery, Joshua P.; Bowles, Neil E.

    2016-04-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra of S-type asteroids contain two absorptions at 1 and 2 μm (band I and II) that are diagnostic of mineralogy. A parameterization of these two bands is frequently employed to determine the mineralogy of S(IV) asteroids through the use of ordinary chondrite calibration equations that link the mineralogy to band parameters. The most widely used calibration study uses a Band II terminal wavelength point (red edge) at 2.50 μm. However, due to the limitations of the NIR detectors on prominent telescopes used in asteroid research, spectral data for asteroids are typically only reliable out to 2.45 μm. We refer to this discrepancy as "The Red Edge Problem." In this report, we evaluate the associated errors for measured band area ratios (BAR = Area BII/BI) and calculated relative abundance measurements. We find that the Red Edge Problem is often not the dominant source of error for the observationally limited red edge set at 2.45 μm, but it frequently is for a red edge set at 2.40 μm. The error, however, is one sided and therefore systematic. As such, we provide equations to adjust measured BARs to values with a different red edge definition. We also provide new ol/(ol+px) calibration equations for red edges set at 2.40 and 2.45 μm.

  4. Edge Detection Techniques for Automatic Location of Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate, N.; Labrie, K.

    2012-09-01

    To improve the processing of multi-object or cross-dispersed spectroscopic data, especially for systems resulting in curved 2-D spectra, we have implemented in Python edge detection techniques widely used in the photo processing and remote sensing world. The software uses the discontinuity found in a spectral image to precisely locate each dispersed 2-D spectrum on the pixel array. A valid spectrum image edge is defined as continuous and sharp. To this end the best input data is a well illuminated flat field. The algorithm applies a discontinuity detection filter to the image. We find that a 3 × 3 Sobel kernel reliably produces easily traceable edges on our data. Some instruments produce data with large background noise. In those cases, a mild smoothing filter is first applied to reduce noise spikes that would otherwise confuse the edge tracing algorithm. The edges highlighted by the filtering are traced using the SciPy function label. Each edge is represented by a second degree polynomial that follows each slit edge. Currently the software assumes that the spectra are nearly horizontal or nearly vertical. This constraint can easily be lifted with the choice of a different convolution kernel.

  5. Effect of spectral correlations on spectral switches in the diffraction of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro; Lü, Baida

    2003-10-01

    The subject is the spectral characteristics of partially coherent light whose spectral degree of coherence satisfies or violates the scaling law in diffraction by a circular aperture. Three kinds of spectral correlations of the incident light are considered. It is shown that no matter whether the partially coherent light satisfies or violates the scaling law, a spectral switch defined as a rapid transition of spectral shifts is always found in the diffraction field. Different spectral correlations of the incident field in the aperture result in different points at which the spectral switch occurs. With an increment in the correlations, the position at which the spectral switch takes place moves toward the point at which the phase of the center frequency component omega0 becomes singular for illumination by spatially fully coherent light. For light that satisfies the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to the diffraction-induced spectral changes; for partially coherent light that violates the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to both the diffraction-induced spectral changes and the correlation-induced spectral changes.

  6. Multi-Frequency Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sault, R. J.; Conway, J. E.

    Multi-frequency synthesis is the practice of using visibility data measured over a range of frequencies when forming a continuum image. Because observing frequency is easier to vary than antenna location, it is an effective way of filling the (u,v) plane for an observation. Here we consider the artifacts in MFS images caused by source spectral variation. For frequency ranges of about 30%, for observations where only modest dynamic range is required, the artifacts of MFS can be completely ignored. For higher dynamic range observations, some calibration techniques and deconvolution algorithms are described which minimize the artifacts.

  7. Edge Diffraction Coefficients around Critical Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, L.; Harmer, M.; Darmon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The classical GTD (Geometrical Theory of Diffraction) gives a recipe, based on high-frequency asymptotics, for calculating edge diffraction coefficients in the geometrical regions where only diffracted waves propagate. The Uniform GTD extends this recipe to transition zones between irradiated and silent regions, known as penumbra. For many industrial materials, e.g. steels, and frequencies utlized in industrial ultrasonic transducers, that is, around 5 MHz, asymptotics suggested for description of geometrical regions supporting the head waves or transition regions surrounding their boundaries, known as critical rays, prove unsatisfactory. We present a numerical extension of GTD, which is based on a regularized, variable step Simpson's method for evaluating the edge diffraction coefficients in the regions of interference between head waves, diffracted waves and/or reflected waves. In mathematical terms, these are the regions of coalescence of three critical points - a branch point, stationary point and/or pole, respectively. We show that away from the shadow boundaries, near the critical rays the GTD still produces correct values of the edge diffraction coefficients.

  8. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  9. Phosphorus K-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral standards

    PubMed Central

    Ingall, Ellery D.; Brandes, Jay A.; Diaz, Julia M.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Elliott, W. Crawford; Northrup, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens. PMID:21335905

  10. Phosphorus K-edge XANES Spectroscopy of Mineral Standards

    SciTech Connect

    E Ingall; J Brandes; J Diaz; M de Jonge; D Paterson; I McNulty; C Elliott; P Northrup

    2011-12-31

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens.

  11. Carbon K-edge Spectra of Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, J.; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2010-01-01

    Carbon K-edge X-ray spectroscopy has been applied to the study of a wide range of organic samples, from polymers and coals to interstellar dust particles. Identification of carbonaceous materials within these samples is accomplished by the pattern of resonances in the 280-320 eV energy region. Carbonate minerals are often encountered in the study of natural samples, and have been identified by a distinctive resonance at 290.3 eV. Here C K-edge and Ca L-edge spectra from a range of carbonate minerals are presented. Although all carbonates exhibit a sharp 290 eV resonance, both the precise position of this resonance and the positions of other resonances vary among minerals. The relative strengths of the different carbonate resonances also vary with crystal orientation to the linearly polarized X-ray beam. Intriguingly, several carbonate minerals also exhibit a strong 288.6 eV resonance, consistent with the position of a carbonyl resonance rather than carbonate. Calcite and aragonite, although indistinguishable spectrally at the C K-edge, exhibited significantly different spectra at the Ca L-edge. The distinctive spectral fingerprints of carbonates provide an identification tool, allowing for the examination of such processes as carbon sequestration in minerals, Mn substitution in marine calcium carbonates (dolomitization) and serpentinization of basalts.

  12. Are shrubland birds edge specialists?

    PubMed

    Schlossberg, Scott; King, David I

    2008-09-01

    In studies of forest fragmentation, birds of scrubby, early-successional habitats are considered edge specialists. Because these birds are assumed to thrive in fragmented, edge-dominated areas, their landscape ecology has received little attention from ecologists. With populations of shrubland birds declining throughout the eastern United States, the question of whether or not these birds really prefer edge habitats has important conservation implications. We used a meta-analysis to test how edges affect the abundance of shrubland birds in early-successional habitats. We analyzed data for 17 species from seven studies that compared the abundances of birds in the interiors and edges of regenerating clearcuts surrounded by mature forest. The meta-analysis clearly showed that shrubland birds avoid edges. All 17 species tested had higher abundances in patch centers than along edges, and edge effects were significant for 8 of 17 species. The key implication of this result is that small or irregular patches, dominated by edge, are unlikely to provide suitable habitat for shrubland birds. Thus, management for these declining species should involve providing large patches and minimizing edges. These findings demonstrate the importance of testing widely accepted ecological classifications and the need to view landscape ecology from the perspective of non-forest wildlife.

  13. Application of Spectral Ratio Methods to an Investigation of Site Response in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, R.; Polet, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that sedimentary basins can increase the amplification and duration of earthquake ground motion. Past earthquakes have shown that site effects have a major influence on seismic damage and loss in urban areas. However, the response at any given site can vary significantly, even within the LA basin. We aim to investigate site response within the LA Basin through the application of the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio method. This method was applied to 3-component broadband waveforms from the Los Angeles Syncline Seismic Interferometry Experiment (LASSIE). LASSIE is a collaborative, temporary, and dense array of 73 broadband seismometers that were active for a two month period starting October 2014 until November 2014, transecting the Los Angeles basin from Long Beach to La Puente. We use the Geopsy software to measure the fundamental frequency and minimum site amplification at each station. Data analysis and interpretation were conducted in accordance to the Site Effects Assessment Using Ambient Excitations (SESAME) guidelines for implementing the H/V ratio technique for investigations of site effects. Results from our initial data analysis indicate an average fundamental period at the basin center of 6 s - 12 s and peaks in the spectral ratio curves at much shorter periods for sites the basin edge of. We will show maps of the amplification and fundamental frequencies based on our spectral ratio analysis of the LASSIE data and compare our results with damage patterns of historic earthquakes, as well as models of the LA basin.

  14. Raman identification of edge alignment of bilayer graphene down to the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Han, Wen-Peng; Lu, Yan; Shi, Wei; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Mikhaylushkin, Arkady S; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-07-07

    The ideal edges of bilayer graphene (BLG) are that the edges of the top and bottom graphene layers (GLs) of BLG are well-aligned. Actually, the alignment distance between the edges of the top and bottom GLs of a real BLG can be as large as the submicrometer scale or as small as zero, which cannot be distinguished using an optical microscope. Here, we present a detailed Raman study on BLG at its edges. If the alignment distance of the top and bottom GLs of BLG is larger than the laser spot, the measured D mode at the edge of the top GL of BLG shows a similar spectral profile to that of disordered BLG. If the alignment distance is smaller than the laser spot, the D mode at a real BLG edge shows three typical spectral profiles similar to that at the edge of SLG, that of the well-aligned edge of BLG, or a combination of both. We show the sensitivity and ability of Raman spectroscopy to acquire the alignment distance between two edges of top and bottom GLs of BLG as small as several nanometers, which is far beyond the diffraction limit of a laser spot. This work opens the possibility to probe the edge alignment of multi-layer graphene.

  15. Probing the Watson-Crick, wobble, and sugar-edge hydrogen bond sites of uracil and thymine.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Frey, Jann A; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2005-06-16

    The nucleobases uracil (U) and thymine (T) offer three hydrogen-bonding sites for double H-bond formation via neighboring N-H and C=O groups, giving rise to the Watson-Crick, wobble and sugar-edge hydrogen bond isomers. We probe the hydrogen bond properties of all three sites by forming hydrogen bonded dimers of U, 1-methyluracil (1MU), 3-methyluracil (3MU), and T with 2-pyridone (2PY). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 <-- S0 vibronic spectra of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU, 2PY.1MU, and 2PY.T were measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI). The spectra of the Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of 2PY.1MU were separated using UV-UV spectral hole-burning. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) Selective methylation of the uracil N3-H group, which allows formation of the sugar-edge isomer only, and methylation of the N1-H group, which leads to formation of the Watson-Crick and wobble isomers. (2) The experimental S1 <-- S0 origins exhibit large spectral blue shifts relative to the 2PY monomer. Ab initio CIS calculations of the spectral shifts of the different hydrogen-bonded dimers show a linear correlation with experiment. This correlation allows us to identify the R2PI spectra of the weakly populated Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of both 2PY.U and 2PY.T. (3) PW91 density functional calculation of the ground-state binding and dissociation energies De and D0 are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant hydrogen bond isomers of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU and 2PY.T as the sugar-edge form. For 2PY.U, 2PY.T and 2PY.1MU the measured wobble:Watson-Crick:sugar-edge isomer ratios are in good agreement with the calculated ratios, based on the ab initio dissociation energies and gas-phase statistical mechanics. The Watson-Crick and wobble isomers are thereby determined to be several kcal/mol less strongly bound than the sugar-edge isomers. The 36 observed intermolecular frequencies of the nine different H-bonded isomers give

  16. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  17. Localization of the Reflection Sources of Stimulus-Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Moleti, A; Sisto, R

    2016-10-01

    The generation of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) residuals in humans is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally to investigate the relation between the frequency difference between the probe and the suppressor tone and the localization of the residual source. Experimental measurements of the SFOAE residual were performed using suppressors of increasing frequency to separate the otoacoustic response from the probe stimulus. From the response to the probe alone, the SFOAE response was also estimated, using spectral smoothing, and compared with the residuals obtained for different frequency suppressors. A nonlinear delayed-stiffness active cochlear model was used to compute the spatial distribution of the residual sources according to a recent model of the local reflectivity from roughness, as a function of the suppressor frequency. The simulations clarified the role of high-frequency suppressors, showing that in humans, with increasing suppressor frequency, the generation region of the residual is only slightly basally shifted with respect to the case of a near-frequency suppressor, near the basal edge of the peak of the resonant basilar membrane response. As a consequence, the hierarchy among different-delay components correspondingly changes, gradually favoring short-delay components, with increasing suppressor frequency. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical dependence of the level of otoacoustic components of different delay on the frequency shift between probe and suppressor confirms the validity of this interpretation.

  18. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  19. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  20. ENERGY-DEPENDENT POWER SPECTRAL STATES AND ORIGIN OF APERIODIC VARIABILITY IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Wenfei; Zhang Wenda

    2013-06-20

    We found that the black hole candidate MAXI J1659-152 showed distinct power spectra, i.e., power-law noise (PLN) versus band-limited noise (BLN) plus quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) below and above about 2 keV, respectively, in observations with Swift and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2010 outburst, indicating a high energy cutoff of the PLN and a low energy cutoff of the BLN and QPOs around 2 keV. The emergence of the PLN and the fading of the BLN and QPOs initially took place below 2 keV when the source entered the hard intermediate state and settled in the soft state three weeks later. The evolution was accompanied by the emergence of the disk spectral component and decreases in the amplitudes of variability in the soft and hard X-ray bands. Our results indicate that the PLN is associated with an optically thick disk in both hard and intermediate states, and the power spectral state is independent of the X-ray energy spectral state in a broadband view. We suggest that in the hard or intermediate state, the BLN and QPOs emerge from the innermost hot flow subjected to Comptonization, while the PLN originates from the optically thick disk farther out. The energy cutoffs of the PLN and the BLN or QPOs then follow the temperature of the seed photons from the inner edge of the optically thick disk, while the high frequency cutoff of the PLN follows the orbital frequency of the inner edge of the optically thick disk as well.

  1. Measurement of Trailing Edge Noise Using Directional Array and Coherent Output Power Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a directional (or phased) array of microphones for the measurement of trailing edge (TE) noise is described and tested. The capabilities of this method arc evaluated via measurements of TE noise from a NACA 63-215 airfoil model and from a cylindrical rod. This TE noise measurement approach is compared to one that is based on thc cross spectral analysis of output signals from a pair of microphones placed on opposite sides of an airframe model (COP method). Advantages and limitations of both methods arc examined. It is shown that the microphone array can accurately measures TE noise and captures its two-dimensional characteristic over a large frequency range for any TE configuration as long as noise contamination from extraneous sources is within bounds. The COP method is shown to also accurately measure TE noise but over a more limited frequency range that narrows for increased TE thickness. Finally, the applicability and generality of an airfoil self-noise prediction method was evaluated via comparison to the experimental data obtained using the COP and array measurement methods. The predicted and experimental results are shown to agree over large frequency ranges.

  2. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  3. Edge resonant fluctuations and particle transport in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, A.

    1998-12-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch [J. R. Drake et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1997), Vol. 2, pp. 193-199] using a Langmuir probe array. The electrostatic fluctuation, driven particle transport ΓnΦ is derived and found to constitute a large fraction of the total particle transport. The spectral density of all measured quantities exhibits a peak in the frequency range 100-250 kHz, which originates from fluctuations that are resonant close to the edge [n=-(40-80)]. This peak contains only about 10-20% of the total fluctuation power, but is shown to dominate ΓnΦ. The main reason for this is the high toroidal mode number as compared with internally resonant magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations. The edge resonant fluctuations also features a higher coherence (γ=0.5) and close to 90° phase shift between density and potential fluctuations.

  4. Observations of Anisotropic Ion Temperature in the NSTX Edge during RF Heating

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; J.R. Wilson; P.M. Ryan

    2004-10-21

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge with both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during the presence of high-power high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) radio-frequency (RF) heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature roughly twice the toroidal ion temperature. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations are present and have temperatures of 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively. This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (in both He{sup +} and C{sup 2+} ions), and is well correlated with the period of RF power application to the plasma. The temperature of the hot edge ions is observed to increase with the applied RF power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3 MW. The ion heating mechanism is likely to be ion-Bernstein waves (IBW) from nonlinear decay of the launched HHFW.

  5. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  6. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  7. Climate Data Homogenization Using Edge Detection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, A. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of climate data homogenization has predominantly been addressed by testing the likelihood of one or more breaks inserted into a given time series and modeling the mean to be stationary in between the breaks. We recast the same problem in a slightly different form: that of detecting step-like changes in noisy data, and observe that this problem has spawned a large number of approaches to its solution as the "edge detection" problem in image processing. With respect to climate data, we ask the question: How can we optimally separate step-like from smoothly-varying low-frequency signals? We study the hypothesis that the edge-detection approach makes better use of all information contained in the time series than the "traditional" approach (e.g. Caussinus and Mestre, 2004), which we base on several observations. 1) The traditional formulation of the problem reduces the available information from the outset to that contained in the test statistic. 2) The criterion of local steepness of the low-frequency variability, while at least hypothetically useful, is ignored. 3) The practice of using monthly data corresponds, mathematically, to applying a moving average filter (to reduce noise) and subsequent subsampling of the result; this subsampling reduces the amount of available information beyond what is necessary for noise reduction. Most importantly, the tradeoff between noise reduction (better with filters with wide support in the time domain) and localization of detected changes (better with filters with narrow support) is expressed in the well-known uncertainty principle and can be addressed optimally within a time-frequency framework. Unsurprisingly, a large number of edge-detection algorithms have been proposed that make use of wavelet decompositions and similar techniques. We are developing this framework in part to be applied to a particular set of climate data from Greenland; we will present results from this application as well as from tests with

  8. A hybrid classification method using spectral, spatial, and textural features for remotely sensed images based on morphological filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Yamaura, Makoto; Arai, Kohei

    2007-10-01

    "HYCLASS", a new hybrid classification method for remotely sensed multi-spectral images is proposed. This method consists of two procedures, the textural edge detection and texture classification. In the textural edge detection, the maximum likelihood classification (MLH) method is employed to find "the spectral edges", and the morphological filtering is employed to process the spectral edges into "the textural edges" by sharpening the opened curve parts of the spectral edges. In the texture classification, the supervised texture classification method based on normalized Zernike moment vector that the authors have already proposed. Some experiments using a simulated texture image and an actual airborne sensor image are conducted to evaluate the classification accuracy of the HYCLASS. The experimental results show that the HYCLASS can provide reasonable classification results in comparison with those by the conventional classification method.

  9. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics of edge localized mode precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. B.; Wang, Lu; Wang, X. G.

    2015-02-01

    A possible origin of edge-localized-mode (ELM) precursors based on nonlinear ideal peeling-ballooning mode is reported. Via nonlinear variational principle, a nonlinear evolution equation of the radial displacement is derived and solved, analytically. Besides an explosive growth in the initial nonlinear phase, it is found that the local displacement evolves into an oscillating state in the developed nonlinear phase. The nonlinear frequency of the ELM precursors scales as ωpr e˜x1 /3ξ̂ψ,i n 2 /3n , with x position in radial direction, ξ̂ ψ,i n strength of initial perturbation, and n toroidal mode number.

  10. Ultrasharp ministop-band edge for subnanometer tuning resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, N.; Speijcken, N.; Naureen, S.; Li, M. Y.; Swillo, M.; Anand, S.

    2011-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method that enables spectral tuning with subnanometer accuracy, and is based on the transmission ministop-band (MSB) in line-defect multimode photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides. The fabricated MSB filter has ultrasharp edges which show a 30 dB drop in transmission in a 4 nm wavelength span. The use of the ultrasharp MSB edge to (optically) determine PhC fabrication accuracy is demonstrated. The wavelength position of the MSB could be tuned by temperature, with a coefficient of 0.1 nm/°C. The spectral characteristics of the MSB realized in this work are promising for sensing, tuning, and modulation applications.

  11. Wing Leading Edge Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Jerman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    This is a slide presentation showing the Left Wing Leading Edge (WLE) heat damage observations: Heavy "slag" deposits on select RCC panels. Eroded and knife-edged RCC rib sections. Excessive overheating and slumping of carrier panel tiles. Missing or molten attachment bolts but intact bushing. Deposit mainly on "inside" RCC panel. Deposit on some fractured RCC surface

  12. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  13. Improved Edge Performance in MRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorey, Aric; Jones, Andrew; Durnas, Paul; Tricard, Marc

    2004-01-01

    The fabrication of large segmented optics requires a polishing process that can correct the figure of a surface to within a short distance from its edges-typically, a few millimeters. The work here is to develop QED's Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) precision polishing process to minimize residual edge effects.

  14. Microscopic study of the (2)/(5) fractional quantum Hall edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, G. J.; Jolad, Shivakumar; Sen, Diptiman; Jain, Jainendra K.

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports on our study of the edge of the (2)/(5) fractional quantum Hall state, which is more complicated than the edge of the (1)/(3) state because of the presence of edge sectors corresponding to different partitions of composite fermions in the lowest two Λ levels. The addition of an electron at the edge is a nonperturbative process and it is not a priori obvious in what manner the added electron distributes itself over these sectors. We show, from a microscopic calculation, that when an electron is added at the edge of the ground state in the [N1,N2] sector, where N1 and N2 are the numbers of composite fermions in the lowest two Λ levels, the resulting state lies in either [N1+1,N2] or [N1,N2+1] sectors; adding an electron at the edge is thus equivalent to adding a composite fermion at the edge. The coupling to other sectors of the form [N1+1+k,N2-k], k integer, is negligible in the asymptotically low-energy limit. This study also allows a detailed comparison with the two-boson model of the (2)/(5) edge. We compute the spectral weights and find that while the individual spectral weights are complicated and nonuniversal, their sum is consistent with an effective two-boson description of the (2)/(5) edge.

  15. A method to design blended rolled edges for compact range reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    A method to design blended rolled edges for arbitrary rim shape compact range reflectors is presented. The reflectors may be center-fed or offset-fed. The method leads to rolled edges with minimal surface discontinuities. It is shown that the reflectors designed using the prescribed method can be defined analytically using simple expressions. A procedure to obtain optimum rolled edges parameter is also presented. The procedure leads to blended rolled edges that minimize the diffracted fields emanating from the junction between the paraboloid and the rolled edge surface while satisfying certain constraints regarding the reflector size and the minimum operating frequency of the system.

  16. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  17. Measuring fast optical depth variations in cloud edges with a CCD-array spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Josep-Abel; Calbó, Josep; Sanchez-Romero, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    High frequency measurements of direct solar flux have been performed with a CCD spectrometer in six narrowband channels along the visible range. Measurements were performed in 1-sec intervals for conditions ranging from clear sky to scattered-to-broken cloud fields. The comparison between close time measurements allows obtaining information on the fast changes in optical depth associated to the pass of clouds or other changes in atmospheric conditions and constituents. The method used does not depend on the absolute calibration of the instrument, and minimizes the effects of changes in instrumental conditions (as temperature) and in air mass. The variations in optical depth in the sight direction can be associated to cloud and/or aerosol optical depth, provided that other atmospheric constituents, as ozone, remain constant. The aerosol exponent is used to characterize the spectral dependence of the changes in optical depth and for describing the evolution of the conglomerate of particles (either cloud droplets or aerosol particles) along the measurement periods. We found that rates in optical depth variations above 0.1/sec have to be attributed to sunlight occultation by cloud edges, as the spectral exponent drops to values near zero or even slightly negative. Variations in optical depth at rates below 0.01/sec are mainly related to aerosol effects.

  18. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  19. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF LINE STRUCTURE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE EDGE EMISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The temperature dependence of the line structure in Cds edge emission stimulated by UV light was investigated from 4.2 K to 367 K. The spectral... dependence of the primary line groups is a linear function of temperature above 220 K with coefficients of change of 1.27 and 1.8 Angstroms degree K for the...lines observed. Below 220 K the dependence departs from linearity and approaches its limiting value more rapidly with decreasing temperature

  20. Digital Frequency Synthesizer For Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Satorius, Edgar; Robinett, J. Loris, Jr.; Olson, Erlend

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses conceptual digital frequency synthesizer part of programmable local oscillator in radar-astronomy system. Phase must remain continuous during adjustments of frequency, phase noise must be low, and spectral purity must be high. Discusses theory of operation in some mathematical detail and presents new analysis of spectral purity of output.

  1. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  2. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  3. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  4. Wisps in the outer edge of the Keeler Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, M. S.; Arnault, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    The outer part of Saturn's A ring contains five sharp edges: the inner and outer edges of the Encke Gap and of the Keeler Gap (which contain the moons Pan and Daphnis, respectively), and the outer edge of the A ring itself. Four of these five edges are characterized by structure at moderate to high spatial frequencies, with amplitudes ranging from 2 to 30 km (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS). Only the outer edge of the Keeler Gap is reasonably smooth in appearance (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS), with occultations indicating residuals less than 1 km upon a possibly non-zero eccentricity (R.G. French, personal communication, 2014). Superposed upon the relatively smooth outer edge of the Keeler Gap are a system of "wisps," which appear to be ring material protruding inward into the gap, usually with a sharp trailing edge and a smooth gradation back to the background edge location on the leading side (Porco et al. 2005, Science). The radial amplitude of wisps is usually 0.5 to 1 km, and their azimuthal extent is approximately a degree of longitude (~2400 km). Wisps are likely caused by an interplay between Daphnis (and perhaps other moons) and embedded moonlets within the ring, though the details remain unclear. We will present a catalogue of wisp detections in Cassini images. We carry out repeated gaussian fits of the radial edge location in order to characterize edge structure (see Figure, which compares our fitted edge to the figure presented by Porco et al. 2005) and visually scan those fitted edges in order to detect wisps. With extensive coverage in longitude and in time, we will report on how wisps evolve and move, both within an orbit period and on longer timescales. We will also report on the frequency and interpretation of wisps that deviate from the standard morphology. We will discuss the implications of our results for the origin and nature of wisps, and for the larger picture of how masses interact within Saturn's rings.

  5. Nitrogen K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Hiroyuki Minami, Hirotake; Okuizumi, Naoto; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2015-05-07

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) was measured at energies around the N K-edge of the pyrimidine-containing nucleotides, cytidine 5′-monophosphate (CMP), 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate (dTMP), and uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP), in aqueous solutions and in dried films under various pH conditions. The features of resonant excitations below the N K-edge in the XANES spectra for CMP, dTMP, and UMP changed depending on the pH of the solutions. The spectral change thus observed is systematically explained by the chemical shift of the core-levels of N atoms in the nucleobase moieties caused by structural changes due to protonation or deprotonation at different proton concentrations. This interpretation is supported by the results of theoretical calculations using density functional theory for the corresponding nucleobases in the neutral and protonated or deprotonated forms.

  6. Nitrogen K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Minami, Hirotake; Okuizumi, Naoto; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2015-05-07

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) was measured at energies around the N K-edge of the pyrimidine-containing nucleotides, cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP), 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP), and uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP), in aqueous solutions and in dried films under various pH conditions. The features of resonant excitations below the N K-edge in the XANES spectra for CMP, dTMP, and UMP changed depending on the pH of the solutions. The spectral change thus observed is systematically explained by the chemical shift of the core-levels of N atoms in the nucleobase moieties caused by structural changes due to protonation or deprotonation at different proton concentrations. This interpretation is supported by the results of theoretical calculations using density functional theory for the corresponding nucleobases in the neutral and protonated or deprotonated forms.

  7. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  8. The influence of edge and corner evolution on plasmon properties and resonant edge effect in gold nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-Bin; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yu-Ying; Yi, Zao; Li, Xi-Bo; Yi, You-Gen; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2015-01-28

    In this paper a simulation of the properties of surface plasmons on gold nanoplatelets with various cross-sections inscribed in a circle and an investigation of their field distributions to assign multiple SPRs are described. The manipulated propagation can be obtained through the evolution of edges and corners. Furthermore, the particle morphology and the associated spectral positions alone do not uniquely reflect the important details of the local field distribution or the resonance modes. The plasmon modes were investigated and found to be mainly excited along the edges and in the side and sloped side surfaces. The strong field distributions can generally be found around the corners and how the plasmons transmit through the corners to adjacent edges was also investigated. Besides the plasmons excited along the edges as were found for the triangular nanoplatelets, plasmons were excited in the interior region of the triangular surfaces and were also investigated. Despite this in the infrared region, plasmon modes were found to be along the edges for the hexagonal nanoplatelets. Also, it can be seen that the change of nanoplatelet thickness can support different plasmon modes ranging from dipolar resonance mode to quadrupole resonance mode. The thickness far below the skin depth can display complex plasmon modes along the edges and on the side and sloping side surfaces as well as the strong coupling between the top and bottom surfaces. The observed plasmon resonance modes in this simulation reflect the interference of all these contributions including the plasmons along the edges and on the side surfaces. This is an essential step towards a thorough understanding of plasmon modes and the effect of edge and corner evolution in polygonous nanoplatelets.

  9. Optimal spectral windows for microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.; Bai, Baocheng

    1991-01-01

    Tomographic microwave diversity imaging is analyzed using linear system theory concepts, and optimal spectral windows for data acquisition are obtained either by considering window position in the spectral domain or by using simulated annealing to find an optimal phase weighting of the object frequency response samples collected over the specified spectral window. This study provides a means of microwave image formation that is applicable under general assumptions. Results of numerical simulations and representative images reconstructed from realistic experimental microwave scattering data are given, demonstrating that the proposed approach is superior to previous image reconstruction methods.

  10. Time-Spectral Rotorcraft Simulations on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffell, Joshua I.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The Time-Spectral method is derived as a Fourier collocation scheme and applied to NASA's overset Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver OVERFLOW. The paper outlines the Time-Spectral OVERFLOWimplementation. Successful low-speed laminar plunging NACA 0012 airfoil simulations demonstrate the capability of the Time-Spectral method to resolve the highly-vortical wakes typical of more expensive three-dimensional rotorcraft configurations. Dealiasing, in the form of spectral vanishing viscosity (SVV), facilitates the convergence of Time-Spectral calculations of high-frequency flows. Finally, simulations of the isolated V-22 Osprey tiltrotor for both hover and forward (edgewise) flight validate the three-dimensional Time-Spectral OVERFLOW implementation. The Time-Spectral hover simulation matches the time-accurate calculation using a single harmonic. Significantly more temporal modes and SVV are required to accurately compute the forward flight case because of its more active, high-frequency wake.

  11. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is affected by a common artifact in "push-broom" sensors, the so-called "spectral smile". As a consequence, both central wavelength and spectral width of the spectral response vary along the across-track dimension, thus giving rise to a shifting and smoothing of spectra (see Fig. 1 (left)). In fact, both effects are greater for spectra on the edges, while they are minimum for data acquired by central detectors, the so-called "sweet spot". The prior artifacts become particularly critical for Martian observations which contain steep spectra such as CO2 ice-rich polar images. Fig. 1 (right) shows the horizontal brightness gradient which appears in every band corresponding to a steep portion of spectra. The correction of CRISM spectral smile is addressed using a two-step method which aims at modifying data sensibly in order to mimic the optimal CRISM response. First, all spectra, which are previously interpolated by cubic splines, are resampled to the "sweet spot" wavelengths in order to overcome the spectra shift. Secondly, the non-uniform spectral width is overcome by mimicking an increase of spectral resolution thanks to a spectral sharpening. In order to minimize noise, only bands particularly suffering from smile are selected. First, bands corresponding to the outliers of the Minimum Noise Transformation (MNF) eigenvector, which corresponds to the MNF band related to smile (MNF-smile), are selected. Then, a spectral neighborhood Θi, which takes into account the local spectral convexity or concavity, is defined for every selected band in order to maximize spectral shape preservation. The proposed sharpening technique takes into account both the instrument parameters and the observed spectra. First, every reflectance value belonging to a Θi is reevaluated by a sharpening which depends on a ratio of the spectral width of the current detector and the "sweet spot" one. Then, the optimal degree of

  12. Experimental observation of anomalous topological edge modes in a slowly driven photonic lattice.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Spracklen, Alexander; Valiente, Manuel; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Goldman, Nathan; Thomson, Robert R

    2017-01-04

    Topological quantum matter can be realized by subjecting engineered systems to time-periodic modulations. In analogy with static systems, periodically driven quantum matter can be topologically classified by topological invariants, whose non-zero value guarantees the presence of robust edge modes. In the high-frequency limit of the drive, topology is described by standard topological invariants, such as Chern numbers. Away from this limit, these topological numbers become irrelevant, and novel topological invariants must be introduced to capture topological edge transport. The corresponding edge modes were coined anomalous topological edge modes, to highlight their intriguing origin. Here we demonstrate the experimental observation of these topological edge modes in a 2D photonic lattice, where these propagating edge states are shown to coexist with a quasi-localized bulk. Our work opens an exciting route for the exploration of topological physics in time-modulated systems operating away from the high-frequency regime.

  13. Experimental observation of anomalous topological edge modes in a slowly driven photonic lattice

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Spracklen, Alexander; Valiente, Manuel; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Goldman, Nathan; Thomson, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Topological quantum matter can be realized by subjecting engineered systems to time-periodic modulations. In analogy with static systems, periodically driven quantum matter can be topologically classified by topological invariants, whose non-zero value guarantees the presence of robust edge modes. In the high-frequency limit of the drive, topology is described by standard topological invariants, such as Chern numbers. Away from this limit, these topological numbers become irrelevant, and novel topological invariants must be introduced to capture topological edge transport. The corresponding edge modes were coined anomalous topological edge modes, to highlight their intriguing origin. Here we demonstrate the experimental observation of these topological edge modes in a 2D photonic lattice, where these propagating edge states are shown to coexist with a quasi-localized bulk. Our work opens an exciting route for the exploration of topological physics in time-modulated systems operating away from the high-frequency regime. PMID:28051060

  14. Experimental observation of anomalous topological edge modes in a slowly driven photonic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Spracklen, Alexander; Valiente, Manuel; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Goldman, Nathan; Thomson, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Topological quantum matter can be realized by subjecting engineered systems to time-periodic modulations. In analogy with static systems, periodically driven quantum matter can be topologically classified by topological invariants, whose non-zero value guarantees the presence of robust edge modes. In the high-frequency limit of the drive, topology is described by standard topological invariants, such as Chern numbers. Away from this limit, these topological numbers become irrelevant, and novel topological invariants must be introduced to capture topological edge transport. The corresponding edge modes were coined anomalous topological edge modes, to highlight their intriguing origin. Here we demonstrate the experimental observation of these topological edge modes in a 2D photonic lattice, where these propagating edge states are shown to coexist with a quasi-localized bulk. Our work opens an exciting route for the exploration of topological physics in time-modulated systems operating away from the high-frequency regime.

  15. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  16. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    SciTech Connect

    Assadi, Saeed

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  17. Red edge shift and biochemical content in grass canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanga, Onisimo; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    The concentration of foliar nitrogen in tropical grass is one of the factors that explain the distribution of wildlife. Therefore, the remote sensing of foliar nitrogen contributes to a better understanding of wildlife feeding patterns. This study evaluated changes in the red edge position of the 680 nm continuum removed chlorophyll feature in the reflectance spectra of samples of Cenchus ciliaris grass grown in a greenhouse under three levels of nitrogen supply. Canopy spectral measurements from each treatment were recorded under controlled laboratory conditions over a four-week period using a GER 3700 spectroradiometer. Results indicate that the mean wavelength positions of the three fertilization treatments were statistically different. An increase in nitrogen supply yielded a shift in the red edge position to longer wavelengths. The red edge position, amplitude, slope at 713 nm and slope at 725 nm were significantly correlated to measured nitrogen concentration (bootstrapped r = 0.89, - 0.28, 0.63 and 0.75, respectively) even at canopy level. Based on these results, the red edge position is strongly correlated with biochemical concentration in plants compared to the other methods tested. The study provides conclusive evidence that confirms the strength of a red edge-nitrogen relationship that remains underused in remote sensing. This method is promising for estimating nutrient content in grasslands.

  18. Objective evaluation of slanted edge charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Harvey (.

    2015-01-01

    Camera objective characterization methodologies are widely used in the digital camera industry. Most objective characterization systems rely on a chart with specific patterns, a software algorithm measures a degradation or difference between the captured image and the chart itself. The Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) method, which is part of the ISO 122331 standard, is now very commonly used in the imaging industry, it is a very convenient way to measure a camera Modulation transfer function (MTF). The SFR algorithm can measure frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency thanks to super-resolution, so it does provide useful information on aliasing and can provide modulation for frequencies between half Nyquist and Nyquist on all color channels of a color sensor with a Bayer pattern. The measurement process relies on a chart that is simple to manufacture: a straight transition from a bright reflectance to a dark one (black and white for instance), while a sine chart requires handling precisely shades of gray which can also create all sort of issues with printers that rely on half-toning. However, no technology can create a perfect edge, so it is important to assess the quality of the chart and understand how it affects the accuracy of the measurement. In this article, I describe a protocol to characterize the MTF of a slanted edge chart, using a high-resolution flatbed scanner. The main idea is to use the RAW output of the scanner as a high-resolution micro-densitometer, since the signal is linear it is suitable to measure the chart MTF using the SFR algorithm. The scanner needs to be calibrated in sharpness: the scanner MTF is measured with a calibrated sine chart and inverted to compensate for the modulation loss from the scanner. Then the true chart MTF is computed. This article compares measured MTF from commercial charts and charts printed on printers, and also compares how of the contrast of the edge (using different shades of gray) can affect the chart MTF

  19. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  20. Radiative ablation with two ionizing fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge.

    PubMed

    Poujade, Olivier; Bonnefille, Max; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge front is presented in this article. It allows us to understand extra shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur.

  1. Ultrasonic testing of plates containing edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Karagulle, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal is utilized for the nondestructive evaluation of plates containing perpendicular edge cracks. The effects of the existence lateral location and depth of the crack on the magnitude spectra of individual reflections in the SWF signal are studied. If the reflections in the SWF signal are not overlapped the short time Fourier analysis is applied. If the reflections are overlapped the short time homomorphic analysis (cepstrum analysis) is applied. Several reflections which have average resonant frequencies approximately at 0.9, 1.3, and 1.7 MHz are analyzed. It is observed that the magnitude ratios evaluated at average resonant frequencies decrease more with increasing d/h if the crack is located between the transducers, where h is plate thickness and d is crack depth. Moreover, for the plates, crack geometries, reflections, and frequencies considered, the average decibel drop depends mainly on the dimensionless parameter d/h and it is approximately -1 dB per 0.07 d/h. Changes in the average resonant frequencies of the magnitude spectra are also observed due to changes in the location of the crack.

  2. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  3. Terahertz Josephson spectral analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, A. V.; Gundareva, I. I.; Lyatti, M. V.; Volkov, O. Y.; Pavlovskiy, V. V.; Poppe, U.; Divin, Y. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Principles of Hilbert-transform spectral analysis (HTSA) are presented and advantages of the technique in the terahertz (THz) frequency range are discussed. THz HTSA requires Josephson junctions with high values of characteristic voltages I c R n and dynamics described by a simple resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. To meet these requirements, [001]- and [100]-tilt YBa2Cu3O7‑x bicrystal junctions with deviations from the RSJ model less than 1% have been developed. Demonstrators of Hilbert-transform spectrum analyzers with various cryogenic environments, including integration into Stirling coolers, are described. Spectrum analyzers have been characterized in the spectral range from 50 GHz to 3 THz. Inside a power dynamic range of five orders, an instrumental function of the analyzers has been found to have a Lorentz form around a single frequency of 1.48 THz with a spectral resolution as low as 0.9 GHz. Spectra of THz radiation from optically pumped gas lasers and semiconductor frequency multipliers have been studied with these spectrum analyzers and the regimes of these radiation sources were optimized for a single-frequency operation. Future applications of HTSA will be related with quick and precise spectral characterization of new radiation sources and identification of substances in the THz frequency range.

  4. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  5. Band-pass filters for THz spectral range fabricated by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisiat, B.; Bičiūnas, A.; Kašalynas, I.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2011-09-01

    The terahertz resonant metal-mesh filters were fabricated using the laser direct writing technique. UV picosecond laser was employed to cut matrixes of cross-shaped holes in stainless steel foil and molybdenum layer deposited on polyimide substrate. Different laser processing strategies were developed: holes were cut through in the metal foil and the molybdenum film was removed from the polyimide by laser ablation. Band-pass filters with a different center frequency were designed and fabricated. The regular shape, smoothness of edges and sharpness of corners of the cross-shaped holes in the metal were the main attributes for quality assessment for the laser ablation process. Spectral characteristics of the filters, determined by the mesh period, cross-arm length, and its width, were investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and conventional space-domain Fourier transform spectroscopy. Experimental data were supported by three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  6. Ca L2,3-edge XANES and Sr K-edge EXAFS study of hydroxyapatite and fossil bone apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zougrou, I. M.; Katsikini, M.; Brzhezinskaya, M.; Pinakidou, F.; Papadopoulou, L.; Tsoukala, E.; Paloura, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Upon burial, the organic and inorganic components of hard tissues such as bone, teeth, and tusks are subjected to various alterations as a result of interactions with the chemical milieu of soil, groundwater, and presence of microorganisms. In this study, simulation of the Ca L 2,3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum of hydroxyapatite, using the CTM4XAS code, reveals that the different symmetry of the two nonequivalent Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites in the unit cell gives rise to specific spectral features. Moreover, Ca L 2,3-edge XANES spectroscopy is applied in order to assess variations in fossil bone apatite crystallinity due to heavy bacterial alteration and catastrophic mineral dissolution, compared to well-preserved fossil apatite, fresh bone, and geologic apatite reference samples. Fossilization-induced chemical alterations are investigated by means of Ca L 2,3-edge XANES and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are related to histological evaluation using optical microscopy images. Finally, the variations in the bonding environment of Sr and its preference for substitution in the Ca(1) or Ca(2) sites upon increasing the Sr/Ca ratio is assessed by Sr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  7. Ca L2,3-edge XANES and Sr K-edge EXAFS study of hydroxyapatite and fossil bone apatite.

    PubMed

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Brzhezinskaya, M; Pinakidou, F; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E; Paloura, E C

    2016-08-01

    Upon burial, the organic and inorganic components of hard tissues such as bone, teeth, and tusks are subjected to various alterations as a result of interactions with the chemical milieu of soil, groundwater, and presence of microorganisms. In this study, simulation of the Ca L 2,3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum of hydroxyapatite, using the CTM4XAS code, reveals that the different symmetry of the two nonequivalent Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites in the unit cell gives rise to specific spectral features. Moreover, Ca L 2,3-edge XANES spectroscopy is applied in order to assess variations in fossil bone apatite crystallinity due to heavy bacterial alteration and catastrophic mineral dissolution, compared to well-preserved fossil apatite, fresh bone, and geologic apatite reference samples. Fossilization-induced chemical alterations are investigated by means of Ca L 2,3-edge XANES and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and are related to histological evaluation using optical microscopy images. Finally, the variations in the bonding environment of Sr and its preference for substitution in the Ca(1) or Ca(2) sites upon increasing the Sr/Ca ratio is assessed by Sr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  8. Bounds on probability of state transfer with respect to readout time and edge weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Whitney; Kirkland, Steve; Li, Chi-Kwong; Plosker, Sarah; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of a spin chain modeled by an undirected weighted connected graph exhibiting perfect state transfer to small perturbations in readout time and edge weight in order to obtain physically relevant bounds on the probability of state transfer. At the heart of our analysis is the concept of the numerical range of a matrix; our analysis of edge weight errors additionally makes use of the spectral and Frobenius norms.

  9. Plasma turbulence measured with fast frequency swept reflectometry in JET H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clairet, F.; Sirinelli, A.; Meneses, L.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    In this work we present recent achievements to provide precise measurements of turbulence on JET H-mode plasmas using frequency sweeping reflectometry diagnostic. The plasma density fluctuations retrieved from swept reflected signals, first initiated with the Tore Supra reflectometry (Heuraux et al 2003 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74 1501, Vermare et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 S743, Gerbaud et al 2006 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77 10E928), provides a radial profile of the density fluctuation level and its spectral structure. Using the complete set of the JET X-mode fast sweeping heterodyne reflectometers we have determined the temporal dynamic of the density fluctuation profile from the edge to the center during an H-mode discharge. At the L-H transition, the turbulence reduction seems to occur, at first, simultaneously from the edge to the center then deepens at the edge at ρ ~ 0.95 and this deepening propagates toward the center with a steepening of the wavenumber spectra. During an edge localized mode (ELM) event, a substantial density fluctuations increase has been observed with a localized turbulent wave front propagating toward the center accompanying a particle transport. We also show that type-III ELMs sustain a steady and high level of plasma turbulence compare to type-I.

  10. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a nonlinear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite terms

  11. Interaction between leading and trailing edge vortex shedding: effects of bluff body geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Zachary; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2011-11-01

    Elongated bluff bodies are distinguished from shorter bluff bodies (e.g., circular cylinders) by the fact that they have separating-reattaching flow at the leading edge as well as having vortex shedding at the trailing edge. Engineering examples of these bodies include heat exchanger fins and long-span suspension bridges. We have performed experiments on elongated bluff bodies of varying geometry. These experiments have been performed at Reynolds numbers O(104) based on the thickness of the model. Both surface pressure measurements (using 512 simultaneously sampled pressure taps) and PIV are used to quantify the flow fields of these bodies. The leading edge separation angle is controlled by changing the leading edge geometry. It is observed that the size of the leading edge separation bubble increases with increasing leading edge separation angle. As the size of the leading edge separation bubble increases, it is shown to continually decrease the shedding frequency for a given elongation ratio. It is suggested that the shedding frequency is diminished because the trailing edge vortex shedding is affected by the structures being shed from the leading edge separation bubble. The implications of this competition between leading and trailing edge flows will be explored.

  12. Spectral studies of the sources of ionospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, G.D.; Kelley, M.C. )

    1987-01-01

    Spectral analyses have been performed upon a number of incoherent scatter radar data sets obtained at Jicamarca, Peru; Chatanika, Alaska; and Arecibo, Puerto Rico, with the goal of understanding the sources of electric fields with periods in the range of 1-10 hours. Two distinct sources are identified and studied in some detail. In quiet times, atmospheric gravity waves seem the most likely source of the ionospheric electric field. In fact, both in an average sense and in the single case study available the mesospheric winds measured at Poker Flat, Alaska, in this frequency range are remarkably similar in magnitude to the quiet time thermospheric plasma drifts measured overhead by the nearby Chatanika radar. Such drifts are driven by electric fields which, the authors argue, could easily be generated by the observed wind fields. Comparison with the spectra of electric field measurements at other latitudes suggests that such a source is worldwide and determines the geophysical noise level of low- and mid-latitude electric field measurements. Turning to active times, the authors present a measure of the transfer function for electric field measurements. Turning to active times, they present a measure of the transfer function for electric field penetration between high- and low-altitude L shells. At the very lowest frequencies (periods of {ge} 10 hours) the low-altitude sites are well shielded, presumably by an Alfven layer at the inner edge of the ring current. Higher frequency fluctuations penetrate very easily to low latitudes. A response peak seems to occur in the 3- to 5-hour range of periods, with a lower response occurring at 1 cycle/hour, although this result must be viewed as preliminary for now. Between L = 5.5 and L = 1.4 the zonal electric field component as projected to the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere penetrates with little or no attenuation.

  13. A study of slanted-edge MTF stability and repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Jackson K. M.

    2015-01-01

    The slanted-edge method of measuring the spatial frequency response (SFR) as an approximation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) has become a well known and widely used image quality testing method over the last 10 years. This method has been adopted by multiple international standards including ISO and IEEE. Nearly every commercially available image quality testing software includes the slanted-edge method and there are numerous open-source algorithms available. This method is one of the most important image quality algorithms in use today. This paper explores test conditions and the impacts they have on the stability and precision of the slanted-edge method as well as details of the algorithm itself. Real world and simulated data are used to validate the characteristics of the algorithm. Details of the target such as edge angle and contrast ratio are tested to determine the impact on measurement under various conditions. The original algorithm defines a near vertical edge so that errors introduced are minor but the theory behind the algorithm requires a perfectly vertical edge. A correction factor is introduced as a way to compensate for this problem. Contrast ratio is shown to have no impact on results in an absence of noise.

  14. Integrated filter and detector array for spectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A spectral imaging system having an integrated filter and photodetector array is disclosed. The filter has narrow transmission bands which vary in frequency along the photodetector array. The frequency variation of the transmission bands is matched to, and aligned with, the frequency variation of a received spectral image. The filter is deposited directly on the photodetector array by a low temperature deposition process. By depositing the filter directly on the photodetector array, permanent alignment is achieved for all temperatures, spectral crosstalk is substantially eliminated, and a high signal to noise ratio is achieved.

  15. On the Edge: Haptic Discrimination of Edge Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andy L.; Kent, Christopher; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Benton, Christopher P.; Groen, Martin G. M.; Noyes, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets) necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven) and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber’s Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration) suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness. PMID:24023852

  16. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  17. Quantum pump in quantum spin Hall edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for quantum pump in a quantum spin Hall bar with two quantum point contacts (QPCs). The pump currents can be generated by applying harmonically modulating gate voltages at QPCs. The phase difference between the gate voltages introduces an effective gauge field, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and generates pump currents. The pump currents display very different pump frequency dependence for weak and strong e-e interaction. These unique properties are induced by the helical feature of the edge states, and therefore can be used to detect and control edge state transport.

  18. Anomalous Magnetotransport in Disordered Structures: Classical Edge-State Percolation.

    PubMed

    Schirmacher, Walter; Fuchs, Benedikt; Höfling, Felix; Franosch, Thomas

    2015-12-11

    By event-driven molecular dynamics simulations we investigate magnetotransport in a two-dimensional model with randomly distributed scatterers close to the field-induced localization transition. This transition is generated by percolating skipping orbits along the edges of obstacle clusters. The dynamic exponents differ significantly from those of the conventional transport problem on percolating systems, thus establishing a new dynamic universality class. This difference is tentatively attributed to a weak-link scenario, which emerges naturally due to barely overlapping edge trajectories. We make predictions for the frequency-dependent conductivity and discuss implications for active colloidal circle swimmers in a hetegogeneous environment.

  19. Simultaneous Teleportation of the Spectral and Polarization States of a Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Bennink, Ryan S; Grice, Warren P

    2008-01-01

    We describe how spectrally multimode, polarization-entangled photons simultaneously teleport quantum information encoded into the spectral and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon using sum frequency generation to implement a Bell-state measurement.

  20. Polarization and spectral action of narrow slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksyuk, M. V.; Felde, Ch. V.; Polyanskii, P. V.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study of diffraction of coherent (laser, completely polarized) and incoherent (temporal, polychromatic, unpolarized) light radiation at slits whose width is restricted by a few wavelengths is made. It is shown that for diffraction at the edge of metallic half-plane screen, the angular dependences of diffraction field intensity are considerably different for orientation of the electric field vector parallel and perpendicular to the screen edge, so that metallic screen causes polarization action on the probing beam. It is shown that as the width of a slit formed by two metallic half-planes becomes less than ten wavelengths (being left larger than a wavelength), as the polarization effect is considerable even for the forward direction, i.e. for the zero diffraction angle. It causes also spectral effect, if polychromatic radiation diffracts at narrow slit at metallic screen. Namely, one observes pronounced blue shift of the maximum of the spectral distribution of the forward diffracted polychromatic ('white-light') beam. We apply for the first time the Berry's chromascopic technique for experimental data processing to elucidate such diffraction induced spectral changes.

  1. Polarization and spectral action of narrow slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksyuk, M. V.; Felde, Ch. V.; Polyanskii, P. V.

    2011-09-01

    Experimental study of diffraction of coherent (laser, completely polarized) and incoherent (temporal, polychromatic, unpolarized) light radiation at slits whose width is restricted by a few wavelengths is made. It is shown that for diffraction at the edge of metallic half-plane screen, the angular dependences of diffraction field intensity are considerably different for orientation of the electric field vector parallel and perpendicular to the screen edge, so that metallic screen causes polarization action on the probing beam. It is shown that as the width of a slit formed by two metallic half-planes becomes less than ten wavelengths (being left larger than a wavelength), as the polarization effect is considerable even for the forward direction, i.e. for the zero diffraction angle. It causes also spectral effect, if polychromatic radiation diffracts at narrow slit at metallic screen. Namely, one observes pronounced blue shift of the maximum of the spectral distribution of the forward diffracted polychromatic ('white-light') beam. We apply for the first time the Berry's chromascopic technique for experimental data processing to elucidate such diffraction induced spectral changes.

  2. Image recovery from edge primitives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Huck, Friedrich O.; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar

    1990-01-01

    A method for extracting edge primitives from Mach-band patterns is presented together with a method for recovering image representations of features outlined by the edge boundaries. The accuracy, stability, and resolution of these representations are assessed. Since these representations are most commonly used in characterizing targets, this method of low-level processing offers new opportunities for computer vision and high data-compressing coding. Two bandpass filters are considered, the spatially invariant Laplacian of Gaussian filter and spatially variant intensity-dependent spatial (IDS) summation. It is shown that the recovery from the IDS bandpass data is particularly advantageous in applications for which robustness to local and temporal variations in illumination is important. It is concluded that the edge primitives extracted from bandpassed images can be an efficient way to store, transmit, and represent images.

  3. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  4. Watson-Crick and sugar-edge base pairing of cytosine in the gas phase: UV and infrared spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-23

    While keto-amino cytosine is the dominant species in aqueous solution, spectroscopic studies in molecular beams and in noble gas matrices show that other cytosine tautomers prevail in apolar environments. Each of these offers two or three H-bonding sites (Watson-Crick, wobble, sugar-edge). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 ← S0 vibronic spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone (Cyt·2PY) and 1-methylcytosine·2PY are measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV depletion, and IR depletion spectroscopy. The UV spectra of the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge isomers of Cyt·2PY are separated using UV/UV spectral hole-burning. Five different isomers of Cyt·2PY are observed in a supersonic beam. We show that the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge dimers of keto-amino cytosine with 2PY are the most abundant in the beam, although keto-amino-cytosine is only the third most abundant tautomer in the gas phase. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) methylation of the cytosine N1-H group prevents formation of both the sugar-edge and wobble isomers and gives the Watson-Crick isomer exclusively. (2) The calculated ground state binding and dissociation energies, relative gas-phase abundances, excitation and the ionization energies are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant Cyt·2PY isomers to the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge complexes of keto-amino cytosine. (3) The comparison of calculated ground state vibrational frequencies to the experimental IR spectra in the carbonyl stretch and NH/OH/CH stretch ranges strengthen this identification.

  5. Edge waves and resonances in two-dimensional phononic crystal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jin-Chen; Hsu, Chih-Hsun

    2015-05-01

    We present a numerical study on phononic band gaps and resonances occurring at the edge of a semi-infinite two-dimensional (2D) phononic crystal plate. The edge supports localized edge waves coupling to evanescent phononic plate modes that decay exponentially into the semi-infinite phononic crystal plate. The band-gap range and the number of edge-wave eigenmodes can be tailored by tuning the distance between the edge and the semi-infinite 2D phononic lattice. As a result, a phononic band gap for simultaneous edge waves and plate waves is created, and phononic cavities beside the edge can be built to support high-frequency edge resonances. We design an L3 edge cavity and analyze its resonance characteristics. Based on the band gap, high quality factor and strong confinement of resonant edge modes are achieved. The results enable enhanced control over acoustic energy flow in phononic crystal plates, which can be used in designing micro and nanoscale resonant devices and coupling of edge resonances to other types of phononic or photonic crystal cavities.

  6. A Psychophysical Evaluation of Spectral Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiovanni, Jeffrey J.; Nelson, Peggy B.; Schlauch, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss have well-documented elevated hearing thresholds; reduced auditory dynamic ranges; and reduced spectral (or frequency) resolution that may reduce speech intelligibility, especially in the presence of competing sounds. Amplification and amplitude compression partially compensate for elevated thresholds and…

  7. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  8. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  9. Edge Coloring, Polyhedra and Probability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    also \\dBi{v)-\\dB*{v)\\ < i<Jand|m Al(5J)- idef (SJ)| < | . t f ll t t \\8\\ {\\ | X ^ n(J follows from (a) and ±A < |B?| < 3A. D Preparing the marking...chromatic index of G and is denoted by x ’{G). We consider the edge coloring problem in the framework of the relationship between an integer program and its...linear programming relaxation. To do this we first formulate edge coloring as an integer program and let x *(G) be the optimum of the linear

  10. Edge detection and texture classification by cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Zylinski, Sarah; Osorio, Daniel; Shohet, Adam J

    2009-12-14

    Cephalopod mollusks including octopus and cuttlefish are adept at adaptive camouflage, varying their appearance to suit the surroundings. This behavior allows unique access into the vision of a non-human species because one can ask how these animals use spatial information to control their coloration pattern. There is particular interest in factors that affect the relative levels of expression of the Mottle and the Disruptive body patterns. Broadly speaking, the Mottle is displayed on continuous patterned surfaces whereas the Disruptive is used on discrete objects such as pebbles. Recent evidence from common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, suggests that multiple cues are relevant, including spatial scale, contrast, and depth. We analyze the body pattern responses of juvenile cuttlefish to a range of checkerboard stimuli. Our results suggest that the choice of camouflage pattern is consistent with a simple model of how cuttlefish classify visual textures, according to whether they are Uniform or patterned, and whether the pattern includes visual edges. In particular, cuttlefish appear to detect edges by sensing the relative spatial phases of two spatial frequency components (e.g., fundamental and the third harmonic Fourier component in a square wave). We discuss the relevance of these findings to vision and camouflage in aquatic environments.

  11. Role of Edges in Complex Network Epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Fei; Chen, Chao

    2012-09-01

    In complex network epidemiology, diseases spread along contacting edges between individuals and different edges may play different roles in epidemic outbreaks. Quantifying the efficiency of edges is an important step towards arresting epidemics. In this paper, we study the efficiency of edges in general susceptible-infected-recovered models, and introduce the transmission capability to measure the efficiency of edges. Results show that deleting edges with the highest transmission capability will greatly decrease epidemics on scale-free networks. Basing on the message passing approach, we get exact mathematical solution on configuration model networks with edge deletion in the large size limit.

  12. Supporting interactive graph exploration using edge plucking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Nelson; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2007-01-01

    Excessive edge density in graphs can cause serious readability issues, which in turn can make the graphs difficult to understand or even misleading. Recently, we introduced the idea of providing tools that offer interactive edge bending as a method by which edge congestion can be disambiguated. We extend this direction, presenting a new tool, Edge Plucking, which offers new interactive methods to clarify node-edge relationships. Edge Plucking expands the number of situations in which interactive graph exploration tools can be used to address edge congestion.

  13. The development of a tunable, single-frequency ultraviolet laser source for UV filtered Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, N.; Gambogi, J.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.; Rines, G. A.; Finch, A.; Schwarz, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    We present the development of a flexible, high power, narrow line width, tunable ultraviolet source for diagnostic application. By frequency tripling the output of a pulsed titanium-sapphire laser, we achieve broadly tunable (227-360 nm) ultraviolet light with high quality spatial and spectral resolution. We also present the characterization of a mercury vapor cell which provides a narrow band, sharp edge absorption filter at 253.7 nm. These two components form the basis for the extension of the Filtered Rayleigh Scattering technique into the ultraviolet. The UV-FRS system is comprised of four pieces: a single frequency, cw tunable Ti:Sapphire seeding source; a high-powered pulsed Ti:Sapphire oscillator; a third harmonic generator system; and an atomic mercury vapor filter. In this paper we discuss the development and characterization of each of these elements.

  14. Edge enhanced morphology for infrared image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Liu, Haonan

    2017-01-01

    Edge information is one of the critical information for infrared images. Morphological operators have been widely used for infrared image analysis. However, the edge information in infrared image is weak and the morphological operators could not well utilize the edge information of infrared images. To strengthen the edge information in morphological operators, the edge enhanced morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are given and analyzed. Secondly, the pseudo operators which are derived from the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are defined. Finally, the applications for infrared image analysis are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposed edge enhanced morphological operators. The proposed edge enhanced morphological operators are useful for the applications related to edge features, which could be extended to wide area of applications.

  15. Quickbird Satellite in-orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurement Using Edge, Pulse and Impulse Methods for Summer 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helder, Dennis; Choi, Taeyoung; Rangaswamy, Manjunath

    2005-01-01

    the zero-crossing points in the frequency domain from a pulse, the pulse width should be less than the width of two pixels (or 2 GSD's), but the short extent of the pulse results in a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Similarly, for a high-resolution satellite imaging system such as Quickbird, the input pulse width was critical because of the zero crossing points and noise present in the background area. It is important, therefore, that the width of the input pulse be appropriately sized. Finally, the MTF was calculated by taking ratio between Fourier transform of output and Fourier transform of input. Regardless of whether the edge, pulse and impulse target method is used, the orientation of the targets is critical in order to obtain uniformly spaced sub-pixel data points. When the orientation is incorrect, sample data points tend to be located in clusters that result in poor reconstruction of the edge or pulse profiles. Thus, a compromise orientation must be selected so that all spectral bands can be accommodated. This report continues by outlining the objectives in Section 2, procedures followed in Section 3, descriptions of the field campaigns in Section 4, results in Section 5, and a brief summary in Section 6.

  16. A fast leading-edge pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.

    1986-01-01

    The pulse generator consists of ECL semiconductor integrated circuits, high speed transistors and step restorer diodes, among others; its circuitry is simple. The leading edge of the output pulse is less than 100 ps, and the output impedance is 50 ohms. An ECL four-wire receiver connected as a closed loop circut is used in the oscillator section of the set. The pulse frequency varies as low as 10 Hz and as high as 100 MHz. The control of pulse with is based on the subtraction of two pulse widths. The output pulse width may be less than 10 ns and the maximum width may be as wide as an oscillator half cycle. The pulse amplitude is continuously adjustable from + or - 35 mV to + or - 5 V. The operating principle of the oscillator stage, a simplified logic diagram, waveforms at various points, a rectifier circuit in the first stage, positive pulse channel circuit, and an adjustable power source are shown.

  17. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics of edge localized mode precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z. B.; Wang, Lu; Wang, X. G.

    2015-02-15

    A possible origin of edge-localized-mode (ELM) precursors based on nonlinear ideal peeling-ballooning mode is reported. Via nonlinear variational principle, a nonlinear evolution equation of the radial displacement is derived and solved, analytically. Besides an explosive growth in the initial nonlinear phase, it is found that the local displacement evolves into an oscillating state in the developed nonlinear phase. The nonlinear frequency of the ELM precursors scales as ω{sub pre}∼x{sup 1/3}ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in}{sup 2/3}n, with x position in radial direction, ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in} strength of initial perturbation, and n toroidal mode number.

  18. Edge convection driven by externally applied potentials

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2000-08-01

    A theoretical model of convection in collisional tokamak edge and scrape-off-layer plasmas is described. In the linear theory, any mechanism for poloidal and toroidal symmetry breaking of the equilibrium will drive ExB flows; this result stems from the parallel thermal and pressure forces in Ohm's law. In the nonlinear theory, the quadratic coupling of the perturbations leads to quasilinear-type fluxes in the vorticity, density, and temperature equations. If the convection is strong enough, these fluxes lead to an ambipolarity constraint on the equilibrium electric field and to increased transport of particles and energy. The theory shows qualitative agreement with some tokamak experiments in which potential perturbations are externally driven by radio frequency antennas. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Observation of beat oscillation generation by coupled waves associated with parametric decay during radio frequency wave heating of a spherical tokamak plasma.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Oosako, Takuya; Takase, Yuichi; Ejiri, Akira; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Adachi, Yuuki; Tojo, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kurashina, Hiroki; Yamada, Kotaro; An, Byung Il; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Shimpo, Fujio; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Haduki; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanashima, Kentaro; Kakuda, Hidetoshi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Wakatsuki, Takuma

    2010-06-18

    We present an observation of beat oscillation generation by coupled modes associated with parametric decay instability (PDI) during radio frequency (rf) wave heating experiments on the Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2. Nearly identical PDI spectra, which are characterized by the coexistence of the rf pump wave, the lower-sideband wave, and the low-frequency oscillation in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency, are observed at various locations in the edge plasma. A bispectral power analysis was used to experimentally discriminate beat oscillation from the resonant mode for the first time. The pump and lower-sideband waves have resonant mode components, while the low-frequency oscillation is exclusively excited by nonlinear coupling of the pump and lower-sideband waves. Newly discovered nonlocal transport channels in spectral space and in real space via PDI are described.

  20. Critical review of the trailing edge condition in steady and unsteady flow. Blade flutter in compressors and fans: Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radwan, S. F.; Rockwell, D. O.; Johnson, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Existing interpretations of the trailing edge condition, addressing both theoretical and experimental works in steady, as well as unsteady flows are critically reviewed. The work of Kutta and Joukowski on the trailing edge condition in steady flow is reviewed. It is shown that for most practical airfoils and blades (as in the case of most turbomachine blades), this condition is violated due to rounded trailing edges and high frequency effects, the flow dynamics in the trailing edge region being dominated by viscous forces; therefore, any meaningful modelling must include viscous effects. The question of to what extent the trailing edge condition affects acoustic radiation from the edge is raised; it is found that violation of the trailing edge condition leads to significant sound diffraction at the tailing edge, which is related to the problem of noise generation. Finally, various trailing edge conditions in unsteady flow are discussed, with emphasis on high reduced frequencies.

  1. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  2. Laplacian operator-based edge detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin

    2007-05-01

    Laplacian operator is a second derivative operator often used in edge detection. Compared with the first derivative-based edge detectors such as Sobel operator, the Laplacian operator may yield better results in edge localization. Unfortunately, the Laplacian operator is very sensitive to noise. In this paper, based on the Laplacian operator, a model is introduced for making some edge detectors. Also, the optimal threshold is introduced for obtaining a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimate of edges.

  3. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  4. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  5. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  6. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  7. Spectral tunneling of lattice nonlocal solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Torner, Lluis; Vysloukh, Victor A.

    2010-07-15

    We address spectral tunneling of walking spatial solitons in photorefractive media with nonlocal diffusion component of the nonlinear response and an imprinted shallow optical lattice. In contrast to materials with local nonlinearities, where solitons traveling across the lattice close to the Bragg angle suffer large radiative losses, in photorefractive media with diffusion nonlinearity resulting in self-bending, solitons survive when their propagation angle approaches and even exceeds the Bragg angle. In the spatial frequency domain this effect can be considered as tunneling through the band of spatial frequencies centered around the Bragg frequency where the spatial group velocity dispersion is positive.

  8. Spectral measures of bipartivity in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A

    2005-10-01

    We introduce a quantitative measure of network bipartivity as a proportion of even to total number of closed walks in the network. Spectral graph theory is used to quantify how close to bipartite a network is and the extent to which individual nodes and edges contribute to the global network bipartivity. It is shown that the bipartivity characterizes the network structure and can be related to the efficiency of semantic or communication networks, trophic interactions in food webs, construction principles in metabolic networks, or communities in social networks.

  9. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  10. Frequency comb swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a ~−1.2dB sensitivity roll off over ~3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have −10dB and −5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0–3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed. PMID:19997365

  11. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  12. Nonlinear series resonance and standing waves in dual-frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, De-Qi; Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Wang, You-Nian

    2017-01-01

    It is well-known that the nonlinear series resonance in a high frequency capacitive discharge enhances the electron power deposition and also creates standing waves which produce radially center-high rf voltage profiles. In this work, the dynamics of series resonance and wave effects are examined in a dual-frequency driven discharge, using an asymmetric radial transmission line model incorporating a Child law sheath. We consider a cylindrical argon discharge with a conducting electrode radius of 15 cm, gap length of 3 cm, with a base case having a 60 MHz high frequency voltage of 250 V and a 10 MHz low frequency voltage of 1000 V, with a high frequency phase shift {φ\\text{H}}=π between the two frequencies. For this phase shift there is only one sheath collapse, and the time-averaged spectral peaks of the normalized current density at the center are mainly centered on harmonic numbers 30 and 50 of the low frequency, corresponding to the first standing wave resonance frequency and the series resonance frequency, respectively. The effects of the waves on the series resonance dynamics near the discharge center give rise to significant enhancements in the electron power deposition, compared to that near the discharge edge. Adjusting the phase shift from π to 0, or decreasing the low frequency from 10 to 2 MHz, results in two or more sheath collapses, respectively, making the dynamics more complex. The sudden excitation of the perturbed series resonance current after the sheath collapse results in a current oscillation amplitude that is estimated from analytical and numerical calculations. Self-consistently determining the dc bias and including the conduction current is found to be important. The subsequent slow time variation of the high frequency oscillation is analyzed using an adiabatic theory.

  13. SCINTILLATION ARCS IN LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF THE TIMING-ARRAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0437–4715

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2016-02-10

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ{sup 2}) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437–4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  14. A nonlinear generalization of spectral Granger causality.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Wei, Hua-Liang; Billings, Stephen A; Sarrigiannis, Ptolemaios G

    2014-06-01

    Spectral measures of linear Granger causality have been widely applied to study the causal connectivity between time series data in neuroscience, biology, and economics. Traditional Granger causality measures are based on linear autoregressive with exogenous (ARX) inputs models of time series data, which cannot truly reveal nonlinear effects in the data especially in the frequency domain. In this study, it is shown that the classical Geweke's spectral causality measure can be explicitly linked with the output spectra of corresponding restricted and unrestricted time-domain models. The latter representation is then generalized to nonlinear bivariate signals and for the first time nonlinear causality analysis in the frequency domain. This is achieved by using the nonlinear ARX (NARX) modeling of signals, and decomposition of the recently defined output frequency response function which is related to the NARX model.

  15. Testing a Missing Spectral Link in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellay, Hamid; Tran, Tuan; Goldburg, Walter; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2012-12-01

    Although the cardinal attribute of turbulence is the velocity fluctuations, these fluctuations have been ignored in theories of the frictional drag of turbulent flows. Our goal is to test a new theory that links the frictional drag to the spectral exponent α, a property of the velocity fluctuations in a flow. We use a soap-film channel wherein for the first time the value of α can be switched between 3 and 5/3, the two theoretically possible values in soap-film flows. To induce turbulence with α=5/3, we make one of the edges of the soap-film channel serrated. Remarkably, the new theory of the frictional drag holds in both soap-film flows (for either value of the spectral exponent α) and ordinary pipe flows (where α=5/3), even though these types of flow are governed by different equations.

  16. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (includingthe level of out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors to a known source of electromagnetic radiation individually. This was determined by measuring the interferometric output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. Knowledge of the relative variations in the spectral response between HFI detectors allows for a more thorough analysis of the HFI data. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. While previous papers describe the pre-flight experiments conducted on the Planck HFI, this paper focusses on the analysis of the pre-flight spectral response measurements and the derivation of data products, e.g. band-average spectra, unit conversion coefficients, and colour correction coefficients, all with related uncertainties. Verifications of the HFI spectral response data are provided through comparisons with photometric HFI flight data. This validation includes use of HFI zodiacal emission observations to demonstrate out-of-band spectral signal rejection better than 108. The accuracy of the HFI relative spectral response data is verified through comparison with complementary flight-data based unit conversion coefficients and colour correction

  17. Nature of Graphene Edges: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acik, Muge; Chabal, Yves J.

    2011-07-01

    Graphene edges determine the optical, magnetic, electrical, and electronic properties of graphene. In particular, termination, chemical functionalization and reconstruction of graphene edges leads to crucial changes in the properties of graphene, so control of the edges is critical to the development of applications in electronics, spintronics and optoelectronics. Up to date, significant advances in studying graphene edges have directed various smart ways of controlling the edge morphology. Though, it still remains as a major challenge since even minor deviations from the ideal shape of the edges significantly deteriorate the material properties. In this review, we discuss the fundamental edge configurations together with the role of various types of edge defects and their effects on graphene properties. Indeed, we highlight major demanding challenges to find the most suitable technique to characterize graphene edges for numerous device applications such as transistors, sensors, actuators, solar cells, light-emitting displays, and batteries in graphene technology.

  18. Fast computation of the spectral correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Jérôme; Xin, Ge; Hamzaoui, Nacer

    2017-08-01

    Although the Spectral Correlation is one of the most versatile spectral tools to analyze cyclostationary signals (i.e. signals comprising hidden periodicities or repetitive patterns), its use in condition monitoring has so far been hindered by its high computational cost. The Cyclic Modulation Spectrum (the Fourier transform of the spectrogram) stands as a much faster alternative, yet it suffers from the uncertainty principle and is thus limited to detect relatively slow periodic modulations. This paper fixes the situation by proposing a new fast estimator of the spectral correlation, the Fast Spectral Correlation, based on the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). It proceeds from the property that, for a cyclostationary signal, the STFT evidences periodic flows of energy in and across its frequency bins. The Fourier transform of the interactions of the STFT coefficients then returns a quantity which scans the Spectral Correlation along its cyclic frequency axis. The gain in computational cost as compared to the conventional estimator is like the ratio of the signal length to the STFT window length and can therefore be considerable. The validity of the proposed estimator is demonstrated on non trivial vibration signals (very weak bearing signatures and speed varying cases) and its computational advantage is used to compute a new quantity, the Enhanced Envelope Spectrum.

  19. Improved time-frequency analysis of ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data using the reassigned spectrogram technique

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, P.; Silva, A.; Silva, F. da; Graca, S. da; Manso, M. E. [Associacao EURATOM Conway, G. D. [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-15

    The spectrogram is one of the best-known time-frequency distributions suitable to analyze signals whose energy varies both in time and frequency. In reflectometry, it has been used to obtain the frequency content of FM-CW signals for density profile inversion and also to study plasma density fluctuations from swept and fixed frequency data. Being implemented via the short-time Fourier transform, the spectrogram is limited in resolution, and for that reason several methods have been developed to overcome this problem. Among those, we focus on the reassigned spectrogram technique that is both easily automated and computationally efficient requiring only the calculation of two additional spectrograms. In each time-frequency window, the technique reallocates the spectrogram coordinates to the region that most contributes to the signal energy. The application to ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data results in better energy concentration and improved localization of the spectral content of the reflected signals. When combined with the automatic (data driven) window length spectrogram, this technique provides improved profile accuracy, in particular, in regions where frequency content varies most rapidly such as the edge pedestal shoulder.

  20. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel

  1. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images.

    PubMed

    Haq, Izhar; Anwar, Shahzad; Shah, Kamran; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Shah, Shaukat Ali

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images) employs a 3 × 3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270 × 290 pixels having 24 dB 'salt and pepper' noise, it detected very few (22) false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931), Prewitt (2741), LOG (3102), Roberts (1451) and Canny (1045) false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images.

  2. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images) employs a 3×3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270×290 pixels having 24 dB ‘salt and pepper’ noise, it detected very few (22) false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931), Prewitt (2741), LOG (3102), Roberts (1451) and Canny (1045) false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images. PMID:26407133

  3. Reprint of : Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-08-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  4. A physical interpretation of the variability power spectral components in accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Done, Chris

    2010-07-01

    We propose a physical framework for interpreting the characteristic frequencies seen in the broad-band power spectra from black hole and neutron star binaries. We use the truncated disc/hot inner flow geometry, and assume that the hot flow is generically turbulent. Each radius in the hot flow produces fluctuations, and we further assume that these are damped on the viscous frequency. Integrating over radii gives broad-band continuum noise power between low- and high-frequency breaks which are set by the viscous time-scale at the outer and inner edge of the hot flow, respectively. Lense-Thirring (vertical) precession of the entire hot flow superimposes the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) on this continuum power. We test this model on the power spectra seen in the neutron star systems (atolls) as these have the key advantage that the (upper) kHz QPO most likely independently tracks the truncation radius. These show that this model can give a consistent solution, with the truncation radius decreasing from 20 to 8Rg while the inner radius of the flow remains approximately constant at ~4.5Rg i.e. 9.2 km. We use this very constrained geometry to predict the low-frequency QPO from Lense-Thirring precession of the entire hot flow from ro to ri. The simplest assumption of a constant surface density in the hot flow matches the observed QPO frequency to within 25 per cent. This match can be made even better by considering that the surface density should become increasingly centrally concentrated as the flow collapses into an optically thick boundary layer during the spectral transition. The success of the model opens up the way to use the broad-band power spectra as a diagnostic of accretion flows in strong gravity.

  5. Quantifying edge significance on maintaining global connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yuhua; Li, Yebin; Zhang, Min; Ma, Guoshuai; Lu, Furong

    2017-01-01

    Global connectivity is a quite important issue for networks. The failures of some key edges may lead to breakdown of the whole system. How to find them will provide a better understanding on system robustness. Based on topological information, we propose an approach named LE (link entropy) to quantify the edge significance on maintaining global connectivity. Then we compare the LE with the other six acknowledged indices on the edge significance: the edge betweenness centrality, degree product, bridgeness, diffusion importance, topological overlap and k-path edge centrality. Experimental results show that the LE approach outperforms in quantifying edge significance on maintaining global connectivity. PMID:28349923

  6. Saddle-node dynamics for edge detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Y.F.

    1994-09-01

    The author demonstrates how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, this scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  7. Universal fermionic spectral functions from string theory.

    PubMed

    Gauntlett, Jerome P; Sonner, Julian; Waldram, Daniel

    2011-12-09

    We carry out the first holographic calculation of a fermionic response function for a strongly coupled d=3 system with an explicit D=10 or D=11 supergravity dual. By considering the supersymmetry current, we obtain a universal result applicable to all d=3 N=2 SCFTs with such duals. Surprisingly, the spectral function does not exhibit a Fermi surface, despite the fact that the system is at finite charge density. We show that it has a phonino pole and at low frequencies there is a depletion of spectral weight with a power-law scaling which is governed by a locally quantum critical point.

  8. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  9. Feature Extraction Without Edge Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    feature? A.I. Memo 1356, MIT Artificial Intellegence Lab, April 1992. [65] W. A. Richards, B. Dawson, and D. Whittington. Encoding contour shape by...AD-A279 842 . " Technical Report 1434 --Feature Extraction Without Edge Detection Ronald D. Chane MIT Artificial .Intelligencc Laboratory ",, 𔃾•d...Chaney 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Massachusetts Institute of Technology Artificial

  10. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  11. Retention and the competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Lemery, L D

    2000-01-01

    I believe that retaining effective, seasoned employees enhances an organization's ability to compete in the marketplace. Though these seasoned employees seem to be more explicitly expensive, a detailed analysis of the costs involved in hiring and orienting replacement personnel may prove this assumption false. In addition, seasoned employees' intimate job knowledge actually constitutes the organization's competitive edge. Therefore, retaining seasoned personnel seems to become an important, mission- and vision-imperative institutional objective.

  12. Topological edge states in pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Cody; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Kargarian, Mehdi

    In some members of the ferro-pnictides, non-trivial topology in the bulk band-structure is related to potentially observable gapless edge states. We study these states numerically and analytically for a range of parameters, with and without superconductivity and antiferromagnetic SDW ordering, and their relation to the symmetries and topologically non-trivial aspects of our model Hamiltonian. Support was provided by the Doctoral Student Research Grant program at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

  13. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  14. Theory of spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Vahimaa, Pasi; Tervo, Jani

    2005-08-01

    A coherent-mode representation for spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses is derived both in the space-frequency domain and in the space-time domain. It is shown that both the cross-spectral density and the mutual coherence function of partially coherent pulses can be expressed as a sum of spatially and spectrally and temporally completely coherent modes. The concept of the effective degree of coherence for nonstationary fields is introduced. As an application of the theory, the propagation of Gaussian Schell-model pulsed beams in the space-frequency domain is considered and their coherent-mode representation is presented.

  15. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  16. Evaluating the impact of red-edge band from Rapideye image for classifying insect defoliation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelabu, Samuel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi

    2014-09-01

    The prospect of regular assessments of insect defoliation using remote sensing technologies has increased in recent years through advances in the understanding of the spectral reflectance properties of vegetation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the red edge channel of Rapideye imagery to discriminate different levels of insect defoliation in an African savanna by comparing the results of obtained from two classifiers. Random Forest and Support vector machine classification algorithms were applied using different sets of spectral analysis involving the red edge band. Results show that the integration of information from red edge increases classification accuracy of insect defoliation levels in all analysis performed in the study. For instance, when all the 5 bands of Rapideye imagery were used for classification, the overall accuracies increases about 19% and 21% for SVM and RF, respectively, as opposed to when the red edge channel was excluded. We also found out that the normalized difference red-edge index yielded a better accuracy result than normalized difference vegetation index. We conclude that the red-edge channel of relatively affordable and readily available high-resolution multispectral satellite data such as Rapideye has the potential to considerably improve insect defoliation classification especially in sub-Saharan Africa where data availability is limited.

  17. Josephson effects in an alternating current biased transition edge sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, L.; Kozorezov, A.; Akamatsu, H.; van der Kuur, J.; Bruijn, M. P.; den Hartog, R. H.; Hijmering, R.; Khosropanah, P.; Lambert, C.; van der Linden, A. J.; Ridder, M. L.; Suzuki, T.; Gao, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    We report the experimental evidence of the ac Josephson effect in a transition edge sensor (TES) operating in a frequency domain multiplexer and biased by ac voltage at MHz frequencies. The effect is observed by measuring the non-linear impedance of the sensor. The TES is treated as a weakly linked superconducting system and within the resistively shunted junction model framework. We provide a full theoretical explanation of the results by finding the analytic solution of the non-inertial Langevian equation of the system and calculating the non-linear response of the detector to a large ac bias current in the presence of noise.

  18. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  19. Temporal Lorentzian spectral triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We present the notion of temporal Lorentzian spectral triple which is an extension of the notion of pseudo-Riemannian spectral triple with a way to ensure that the signature of the metric is Lorentzian. A temporal Lorentzian spectral triple corresponds to a specific 3 + 1 decomposition of a possibly noncommutative Lorentzian space. This structure introduces a notion of global time in noncommutative geometry. As an example, we construct a temporal Lorentzian spectral triple over a Moyal-Minkowski spacetime. We show that, when time is commutative, the algebra can be extended to unbounded elements. Using such an extension, it is possible to define a Lorentzian distance formula between pure states with a well-defined noncommutative formulation.

  20. Quantum frequency bridge: high-accuracy characterization of a nearly-noiseless parametric frequency converter.

    PubMed

    Burenkov, Ivan A; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana; Nam, Sae Woo; Krister Shalm, L; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2017-01-23

    We demonstrate an efficient and inherently ultra-low noise frequency conversion via a parametric sum frequency generation. Due to the wide separation between the input and pump frequencies and the low pump frequency relative to the input photons, the upconversion results in only ≈100 background photons per hour. To measure such a low rate, we introduced a dark count reduction algorithm for an optical transition edge sensor.

  1. Monitoring plant response to phenanthrene using the red edge of canopy hyperspectral reflectance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linhai; Chen, Zhongxin; Wang, Jianjian; Ding, Jinzhi; Yu, Yunjiang; Li, Junsheng; Xiao, Nengwen; Jiang, Lianhe; Zheng, Yuanrun; Rimmington, Glyn M

    2014-09-15

    To investigate the mechanisms and potential for the remote sensing of phenanthrene-induced vegetation stress, we measured field canopy spectra, and associated plant and soil parameters in the field controlled experiment in the Yellow River Delta of China. Two widely distributed plant communities, separately dominated by reed (Phragmites australis) and glaucous seepweed (Suaeda salsa), were treated with different doses of phenanthrene. The canopy spectral changes of plant community resulted from the decreases of biomass and foliar projective coverage, while leaf photosynthetic pigment concentrations showed no significance difference among treatments. The spectral response to phenanthrene included a flattened red edge, with decreased first derivative of reflectance. The red edge slope and area consistently responded to phenanthrene, showing a strong relationship with aboveground biomass, coverage and canopy pigments density. These results suggest the potential of remote sensing and the importance of field validation to correctly interpret the causes of the spectral changes.

  2. Knife-edge seal for vacuum bagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Cam actuated clamps pinch bagging material between long knife edge (mounted to clamps) and high temperature rubber cushion bonded to baseplate. No adhesive, tape, or sealing groove is needed to seal edge of bagging sheet against base plate.

  3. Edge and coupled core/edge transport modeling in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Cohen, R H; LoDestro, L L; Mattor, N; Porter, G D; Rensink, M E; Rognlien, T D; Ryutov, D D; Scott, H A; Wan, A

    1998-10-14

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal ExB drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations; above a critical v ExB, the model predicts transitions to supersonic SOL flow at the inboard midplane. Two-dimensional simulations show the importance of ExB flow in the private-flux region and B-drift effects. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, and interesting effects, some traveling back up the magnetic field-lines to the SOL plasma, are predicted. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts at the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative rnodelling. Long-lived oscillatory UEDGE solutions in both ITER and DIII-D are reported. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are shown to be well modelled with UEDGE, and the roles of impurity and neutral transport in the edge and SOL are discussed.

  4. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  5. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  6. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  7. HTS step-edge Josephson junction terahertz harmonic mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia; Weily, Andrew R.; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Ting; Foley, Cathy P.; Guo, Yingjie Jay

    2017-02-01

    A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) terahertz (THz) frequency down-converter or mixer based on a thin-film ring-slot antenna coupled YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO)/MgO step-edge Josephson junction is reported. The frequency down-conversion was achieved using higher order harmonics of an applied lower frequency (19-40 GHz) local oscillator signal in the Josephson junction mixing with a THz signal of over 600 GHz, producing a 1-3 GHz intermediate frequency signal. Up to 31st order of harmonic mixing was obtained and the mixer operated stably at temperatures up to 77 K. The design details of the antenna, HTS Josephson junction mixer, the matching and isolation circuits, and the DC and RF performance evaluation are described in this paper.

  8. ARE SPECTRAL AND TIMING CORRELATIONS SIMILAR IN DIFFERENT SPECTRAL STATES IN BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.

    2015-03-20

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The bandpass of the XRT has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a correlated spectral and variability study, with variability from both components of the accretion flow. We present for the first time a combined study of the evolution of spectral parameters (disk temperature and radius) and timing parameters (frequency and strength) of all power spectral components in different spectral states. Comparison of the correlations in different spectral states shows that the frequency and strength of the power spectral components exhibit dependencies on the disk temperature that are different in the (low-)hard and the hard-intermediate states (HIMSs); most of these correlations that are clearly observed in the HIMS (in MAXI J1659-152 and GX 339-4) are not seen in the (low-)hard state (in GX 339-4 and SWIFT J1753.5-0127). Also, the responses of the individual frequency components to changes in the disk temperature are markedly different from one component to the next. Hence, the spectral-timing evolution cannot be explained by a single correlation that spans both these spectral states. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  9. Wavy Edges and Other Disturbances in Saturn's Encke and Keeler Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, M. S.; Burns, J. A.; Hedman, M. M.; Spitale, J. N.; Porco, C. C.; Murray, C. D.; Cassini Imaging Team

    2005-08-01

    Cassini has observed an unexpectedly complex array of radial variations in the edges of the Encke Gap and the Keeler Gap. Each of these gaps in Saturn's rings (both located near the outer edge of the A Ring) is inhabited and maintained by a known moon (Pan, and the newly-discovered S/2005 S1, respectively). In the Encke Gap edges, the wavelength in some regions does not remain constant but varies smoothly in a repeating pattern. Additionally, the shape of the waveform deviates significantly from sinusoidal, with amplitudes that sometimes grow and sometimes decay. Wavy edges are ubiquitous in the Encke Gap, covering 360o of longitude on both sides. This confirms Voyager indications that particle collisions and streamline crossing are not efficient at damping them (timescales ≳ 10 months), and negates the simplistic assumption that ring particles enter a new encounter with no memory of the previous one. The situation is quite different in the Keeler Gap edges, where only ˜ 3 wavecycles appear before undergoing a transition, in which the edge recedes from the gap's center by ˜ 5 km, and the waveform takes on a turbulent appearance, lacking any sharp edge. The waveforms from the Keeler moon then die out completely, only several degrees of longitude away from the moon. Yet the Keeler Gap edges are hardly quiescent away from the moon. Sharp-edged asymmetric features dubbed ``wisps'', ˜ 1 km in amplitude, are seen in abundance on the outer edge. Most spectacularly, the radial location of the inner edge varies quasi-periodically over a range of ˜ 15 km. The dominant frequency of this variation is consistent with the influence of the nearby 32:31 resonance (ILR) with Prometheus, though other frequencies also exist. Thus, the total width of the Keeler Gap varies by a factor of nearly 50%, from 32 to 47 km.

  10. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  11. SciDAC - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation - Project Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Scott

    2014-11-03

    Final Technical Report: Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) Principal Investigator: Scott Parker, University of Colorado, Boulder Description/Abstract First-principle simulations of edge pedestal micro-turbulence are performed with the global gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM for both low and high confinement tokamak plasmas. The high confinement plasmas show a larger growth rate, but nonlinearly a lower particle and heat flux. Numerical profiles are obtained from the XGC0 neoclassical code. XGC0/GEM code coupling is implemented under the EFFIS (“End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation”) framework. Investigations are underway to clearly identify the micro-instabilities in the edge pedestal using global and flux-tube gyrokinetic simulation with realistic experimental high confinement profiles. We use both experimental profiles and those obtained using the EFFIS XGC0/GEM coupled code framework. We find there are three types of instabilities at the edge: a low-n, high frequency electron mode, a high-n, low frequency ion mode, and possibly an ion mode like kinetic ballooning mode (KBM). Investigations are under way for the effects of the radial electric field. Finally, we have been investigating how plasmas dominated by ion-temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, how cold Deuterium and Tritium ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. We call this mechanism “natural fueling.” It is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of the turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. To understand this mechanism, examine the situation where the electrons are adiabatic, and there is an ion heat flux. In such a case, lower energy particles move inward and higher energy particles move outward. If a trace amount of cold particles are added, they will move inward.

  12. Reduction of Free-Edge Stress Concentration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    oscillatory type of behavior near the free edge of the capped laminate before converging to zero further inside the laminate. The length of the edge effect is...Condition," J. Comp. Materials. Vol. 14 (1980), p. 2. 13. Altus, E., Rotem, A. and Shmueli, M., "Free Edge Effect in Angle- Ply Laminates - A New

  13. Understanding and preventing the edge effect.

    PubMed

    Cheneau, Edouard; Wolfram, Roswitha; Leborgne, Laurent; Waksman, Ron

    2003-02-01

    Edge stenosis, combining neointimal proliferation and negative remodeling, remains a serious limitation of vascular brachytherapy. This review comprehensively presents terminology, definitions, mechanisms, and treatment strategies to better understand the complexities of edge narrowing. The major contributors to this phenomenon are known; understanding the practical solutions will enable us to further minimize the problem of the edge effect.

  14. Densified edge seals for fuel cell components

    DOEpatents

    DeCasperis, Anthony J.; Roethlein, Richard J.; Breault, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A porous fuel cell component, such as an electrode substrate, has a densified edge which forms an improved gas seal during operation when soaked with electrolyte. The edges are made from the same composition as the rest of the component and are made by compressing an increased thickness of this material along the edges during the fabrication process.

  15. Assessing the role of spectral and intensity cues in spectral ripple detection and discrimination in cochlear-implant users.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elizabeth S; Oxenham, Andrew J; Nelson, Peggy B; Nelson, David A

    2012-12-01

    Measures of spectral ripple resolution have become widely used psychophysical tools for assessing spectral resolution in cochlear-implant (CI) listeners. The objective of this study was to compare spectral ripple discrimination and detection in the same group of CI listeners. Ripple detection thresholds were measured over a range of ripple frequencies and were compared to spectral ripple discrimination thresholds previously obtained from the same CI listeners. The data showed that performance on the two measures was correlated, but that individual subjects' thresholds (at a constant spectral modulation depth) for the two tasks were not equivalent. In addition, spectral ripple detection was often found to be possible at higher rates than expected based on the available spectral cues, making it likely that temporal-envelope cues played a role at higher ripple rates. Finally, spectral ripple detection thresholds were compared to previously obtained speech-perception measures. Results confirmed earlier reports of a robust relationship between detection of widely spaced ripples and measures of speech recognition. In contrast, intensity difference limens for broadband noise did not correlate with spectral ripple detection measures, suggesting a dissociation between the ability to detect small changes in intensity across frequency and across time.

  16. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  17. Image enhancement by non-linear extrapolation in frequency space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H. (Inventor); Greenspan, Hayit K. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An input image is enhanced to include spatial frequency components having frequencies higher than those in an input image. To this end, an edge map is generated from the input image using a high band pass filtering technique. An enhancing map is subsequently generated from the edge map, with the enhanced map having spatial frequencies exceeding an initial maximum spatial frequency of the input image. The enhanced map is generated by applying a non-linear operator to the edge map in a manner which preserves the phase transitions of the edges of the input image. The enhanced map is added to the input image to achieve a resulting image having spatial frequencies greater than those in the input image. Simplicity of computations and ease of implementation allow for image sharpening after enlargement and for real-time applications such as videophones, advanced definition television, zooming, and restoration of old motion pictures.

  18. Demodulation circuit for AC motor current spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hendrix, Donald E.; Smith, Stephen F.

    1990-12-18

    A motor current analysis method for the remote, noninvasive inspection of electric motor-operated systems. Synchronous amplitude demodulation and phase demodulation circuits are used singly and in combination along with a frequency analyzer to produce improved spectral analysis of load-induced frequencies present in the electric current flowing in a motor-driven system.

  19. Results from the EDGES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Liese; EDGES Team

    2017-03-01

    Results are presented from a deep imaging survey with the Spitzer Space Telescope which was designed to identify and measure the faint stellar populations around nearby galaxies. The Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science (EDGES) Survey includes a sample of 92 nearby galaxies with a range of morphological types and environments. The observations include a field-of-view of at least 5 times the optical size and are deep enough to detect stellar mass surface densities of several hundredths of a solar mass per square parsec. The observations reveal extended stellar features, such as stellar disks and stellar streams, around many of the target galaxies, as expected from hierarchical galaxy formation scenarios.

  20. K-edge densitometer (KED)

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K.; Hansen, W.J.

    1993-02-11

    In 1979, a K-edge densitometer (KED) was installed by the Safeguards Assay group from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai-mura, Japan. It uses an active nondestructive assay technique, KED, to measure the plutonium concentration of the product solution. The measurement uncertainty of an assay depends on the count time chosen, but can be 0.5% or better. The computer hardware and software were upgraded in 1992. This manual describes the operation of the instrument, with an emphasis on the user interface to the software.