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Sample records for spectral functions

  1. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  2. Spectral functions of scalar mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Pagliara, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    In this work we study the spectral functions of scalar mesons in one- and two-channel cases by using nonlocal interaction Lagrangian(s). When the propagators satisfy the Källen-Lehman representation, a normalized spectral function is obtained, allowing one to take into account finite-width effects in the evaluation of decay rates. In the one-channel case, suitable to the light σ and k mesons, the spectral function can deviate consistently from a Breit-Wigner shape. In the two-channel case with one subthreshold channel, the evaluated spectral function is well approximated by a Flatté distribution; when applying the study to the a0(980) and f0(980) mesons, the tree-level forbidden KK decay is analyzed.

  3. Asymptotics of thermal spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron-Huot, S.

    2009-06-01

    We use operator product expansion (OPE) techniques to study the spectral functions of currents and stress tensors at finite temperature, in the high-energy timelike region ω≫T. The leading corrections to these spectral functions are proportional to ˜T4 expectation values in general, and the leading corrections ˜g2T4 are calculated at weak coupling, up to an undetermined coefficient in the shear viscosity channel. Spectral functions are shown to be infrared safe, in the deeply virtual regime, up to order g8T4. The convergence of (vacuum subtracted) sum rules in the shear and bulk viscosity channels is established in QCD to all orders in perturbation theory, though numerically significant tails ˜T4/(log⁡ω)3 are shown to exist in the bulk viscosity channel. We argue that the spectral functions of currents and stress tensors in infinitely coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills theory do not receive any medium-dependent power correction.

  4. Universal fermionic spectral functions from string theory.

    PubMed

    Gauntlett, Jerome P; Sonner, Julian; Waldram, Daniel

    2011-12-09

    We carry out the first holographic calculation of a fermionic response function for a strongly coupled d=3 system with an explicit D=10 or D=11 supergravity dual. By considering the supersymmetry current, we obtain a universal result applicable to all d=3 N=2 SCFTs with such duals. Surprisingly, the spectral function does not exhibit a Fermi surface, despite the fact that the system is at finite charge density. We show that it has a phonino pole and at low frequencies there is a depletion of spectral weight with a power-law scaling which is governed by a locally quantum critical point.

  5. Dissipative effects on quarkonium spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdag, Yusuf; Young, Clint

    2015-04-01

    Quarkonium at finite temperature is described as an open quantum system whose dynamics are determined by a potential VR(x ) and drag coefficient η , using a path integral with a nonlocal term. Path-integral Monte Carlo calculations determine the Euclidean Green function for this system to an accuracy greater than one part in a thousand and the maximum entropy method is used to determine the spectral function; challenges facing any kind of deconvolution are discussed in detail with the aim of developing intuition for when deconvolution is possible. Significant changes to the quarkonium spectral function in the 1 S channel are found, suggesting that any description of quarkonium at finite temperature, using a potential, must also carefully consider the effect of dissipation.

  6. Spectral functions in ultracold Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, William; Randeria, Mohit

    2011-03-01

    We study the fermion spectral function in the superfluid state across the BEC-BCS crossover and in the normal Fermi liquid phase in highly imbalanced Fermi gases. We focus on features that can be measured in momentum-resolved radio frequency spectroscopy experiments. We go beyond mean field theory and include the effects of Gaussian order parameter fluctuations in a manner that gives excellent agreement with asymptotically exact results for the T = 0 equation of state in the BEC and BCS limits, as well as quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) results near unitarity. We show that sharp Bogoliubov quasiparticles, with a substantial coherent spectral weight, exist near unitarity. We argue that this is true generally even beyond the Gaussian approximation. In addition, quasiparticle scattering and interaction with collective modes produces incoherent spectral weight. We show that the dispersion is strongly renormalized at unitarity with its minimum shifted up from its mean field value √{ 2 mμ } and compare our results with existing QMC data. We discuss how the spectral function changes qualitatively compared with its mean field form as 1 / (kF a) increases and the chemical potential changes sign. Supported by NSF-DMR 0706203 and ARO W911NF-08-1-0338.

  7. On the spectral function of carriers in the pseudogap state

    SciTech Connect

    Belemuk, A. M.; Barabanov, A. F.

    2016-09-15

    We consider the evolution of the spectral function of charge carriers for a 2D Kondo lattice depending on the parameters of the model. A self-consistent solution is obtained for the spectral function using the formalism of irreducible Green’s functions. In the low doping level regime, the behavior of the spectral function exhibits suppression of the spectral weight of carriers in the low-frequency range, which is typical of the pseudogap state.

  8. Spectral functionals, nonholonomic Dirac operators, and noncommutative Ricci flows

    SciTech Connect

    Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2009-07-15

    We formulate a noncommutative generalization of the Ricci flow theory in the framework of spectral action approach to noncommutative geometry. Grisha Perelman's functionals are generated as commutative versions of certain spectral functionals defined by nonholonomic Dirac operators and corresponding spectral triples. We derive the formulas for spectral averaged energy and entropy functionals and state the conditions when such values describe (non)holonomic Riemannian configurations.

  9. Functional Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) is a high-speed, high resolution imaging modality capable of structural and functional characterization of tissue microstructure. SDOCT fills a niche between histology and ultrasound imaging, providing non-contact, non-invasive backscattering amplitude and phase from a sample. Due to the translucent nature of the tissue, ophthalmic imaging is an ideal space for SDOCT imaging. Structural imaging of the retina has provided new insights into ophthalmic disease. The phase component of SDOCT images remains largely underexplored, though. While Doppler SDOCT has been explored in a research setting, it has yet to gain traction in the clinic. Other, functional exploitations of the phase are possible and necessary to expand the utility of SDOCT. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy (SDPM) is an extension of SDOCT that is capable of resolving sub-wavelength displacements within a focal volume. Application of sub-wavelength displacement measurement imaging could provide a new method for non-invasive optophysiological measurement. This body of work encompasses both hardware and software design and development for implementation of SDOCT. Structural imaging was proven in both the lab and the clinic. Coarse phase changes associated with Doppler flow frequency shifts were recorded and a study was conducted to validate Doppler measurement. Fine phase changes were explored through SDPM applications. Preliminary optophysiology data was acquired to study the potential of sub-wavelength measurements in the retina. To remove the complexity associated with in-vivo human retinal imaging, a first principles approach using isolated nerve samples was applied using standard SDPM and a depthencoded technique for measuring conduction velocity. Results from amplitude as well as both coarse and fine phase processing are presented. In-vivo optophysiology using SDPM is a promising avenue for exploration, and projects furthering or extending this body

  10. Propagation of spectral functions and dilepton production at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Gy.; Kaempfer, B.; Zetenyi, M.

    2012-06-15

    The time evolution of vector meson spectral functions is studied within a BUU-type transport model. Applications focus on {rho} and {omega} mesons being important pieces for the interpretation of the dielectron invariant mass spectrum. Since the evolution of the spectral functions is driven by the local density, the inmedium modifications turn out to compete, in this approach, with the known vacuum contributions.

  11. Material reconstruction for spectral computed tomography with detector response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiulong; Gao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Different from conventional computed tomography (CT), spectral CT using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is able to provide the unprecedented material compositions. However accurate spectral CT needs to account for the detector response function (DRF), which is often distorted by factors such as pulse pileup and charge-sharing. In this work, we propose material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF. The simulation results suggest that the proposed methods reconstructed more accurate material compositions than the conventional method without DRF. Moreover, the proposed linearized method with linear data fidelity from spectral resampling had improved reconstruction quality from the nonlinear method directly based on nonlinear data fidelity.

  12. Function of snake mobbing in spectral tarsiers.

    PubMed

    Gursky, Sharon

    2006-04-01

    Numerous species are known for their tendency to approach and confront their predators as a group. This behavior is known as mobbing. Snakes seem to be one of the more consistent recipients of this type of predator-directed behavior. This paper explores individual differences (sex and age) in the mobbing behavior of the spectral tarsier toward live and model snakes. This study was conducted at Tangkoko Nature Reserve (Sulawesi, Indonesia) during 2003-2004. During this research, 11 natural mobbing events and 31 artificially induced mobbing events were observed. The mean number of individuals at a mobbing was 5.7. The duration of mobbing events was strongly correlated with the number of assembled mobbers. Adults were more likely than other age classes to participate in mobbings. Males were more likely than females to participate in mobbings. Mobbing groups often contained more than one adult male, despite the fact that no spectral tarsier group contains more than one adult male. No difference in body size between extragroup males and resident males was observed, refuting the "attract the mightier" hypothesis. The number of mobbers did not affect whether the tarsier or the snake retreated first, countering the "move-on" hypothesis. The "perception advertisement" hypothesis was tentatively supported, in that live snakes were rarely seen in the area following mobbing calls, in comparison to when tarsiers either ignored the snake or alarm call. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Comparison of nuclear Hamiltonians using spectral function sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, A.; Carbone, A.; Polls, A.

    2017-07-01

    Background: The energy weighted sum rules of the single-particle spectral functions provide a quantitative understanding of the fragmentation of nuclear states due to short-range and tensor correlations. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to compare on a quantitative basis the single-particle spectral function generated by different nuclear Hamiltonians in symmetric nuclear matter using the first three energy-weighted moments. Method: The spectral functions are calculated in the framework of the self-consistent Green's function approach at finite temperature within a ladder resummation scheme. We analyze the first three moments of the spectral function and connect these to the correlations induced by the interactions between the nucleons in symmetric nuclear matter. In particular, the variance of the spectral function is directly linked to the dispersive contribution of the self-energy. The discussion is centered around two- and three-body chiral nuclear interactions, with and without renormalization, but we also provide results obtained with the traditional phase-shift-equivalent CD-Bonn and Av18 potentials. Results: The variance of the spectral function is particularly sensitive to the short-range structure of the force, with hard-core interactions providing large variances. Chiral forces yield variances which are an order of magnitude smaller and, when tamed using the similarity renormalization group, the variance reduces significantly and in proportion to the renormalization scale. The presence of three-body forces does not substantially affect the results. Conclusions: The first three moments of the spectral function are useful tools in analyzing the importance of correlations in nuclear ground states. In particular, the second-order moment provides a direct insight into dispersive contributions to the self-energy and its value is indicative of the fragmentation of single-particle states.

  14. Spectral function and kinetic equation for a normal Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, M.; Siddique, I.; Kondratyev, A. S.

    2007-08-01

    On the basis of the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) version of the time-dependent Green's function method, an Ansatz for the approximation of a spectral function is offered. The Ansatz possesses all the advantages of quasiparticle and extended quasiparticle approximations and satisfies the KB equation for a spectral function in the case of slightly nonequilibrium system when disturbances in space and time are taken into consideration in the gradient approximation. This feature opens opportunities for the microscopic derivation of the Landau kinetic equation for the quasiparticle distribution function of the normal Fermi liquid and provides the widening of these equations' temperature range of validity.

  15. Quark Spectral Function above T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Sixue; Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin; Roberts, Craig D.

    2011-05-24

    The maximum entropy method is used to calculate the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent solution of the rainbow-truncated gap equation of QCD at temperatures above T{sub c}, the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration. We find that, besides the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode at the temperatures above but near T{sub c}. In the vicinity of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength. So long as this mode persists, the system may reasonably be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  16. Fault Detection of Rotating Machinery using the Spectral Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    1997-01-01

    The spectral distribution function is introduced to characterize the process leading to faults in rotating machinery. It is shown to be a more robust indicator than conventional power spectral density estimates, but requires only slightly more computational effort. The method is illustrated with examples from seeded gearbox transmission faults and an analytical model of a defective bearing. Procedures are suggested for implementation in realistic environments.

  17. Fault Detection of Rotating Machinery using the Spectral Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    1997-01-01

    The spectral distribution function is introduced to characterize the process leading to faults in rotating machinery. It is shown to be a more robust indicator than conventional power spectral density estimates, but requires only slightly more computational effort. The method is illustrated with examples from seeded gearbox transmission faults and an analytical model of a defective bearing. Procedures are suggested for implementation in realistic environments.

  18. Bayesian inference of nonpositive spectral functions in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkopf, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    We present the generalization to nonpositive definite spectral functions of a recently proposed Bayesian deconvolution approach (BR method). The novel prior used here retains many of the beneficial analytic properties of the original method; in particular, it allows us to integrate out the hyperparameter α directly. To preserve the underlying axiom of scale invariance, we introduce a second default-model related function, whose role is discussed. Our reconstruction prescription is contrasted with existing direct methods, as well as with an approach where shift functions are introduced to compensate for negative spectral features. A mock spectrum analysis inspired by the study of gluon spectral functions in QCD illustrates the capabilities of this new approach.

  19. Dynamic critical phenomena from spectral functions on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jürgen; Schlichting, Sören; Sexty, Dénes

    2010-06-01

    We investigate spectral functions in the vicinity of the critical temperature of a second-order phase transition. Since critical phenomena in quantum field theories are governed by classical dynamics, universal properties can be computed using real-time lattice simulations. For the example of a relativistic single-component scalar field theory in 2+1 dimensions, we compute the spectral function described by universal scaling functions and extract the dynamic critical exponent z. Together with exactly known static properties of this theory, we obtain a verification from first principles that the relativistic theory is well described by the dynamic universality class of relaxational models with conserved density (Model C).

  20. Spectrally Shaped Random-Phase Spreading Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-24

    gain reduction due to reference function windowing. 18 3.3 Excision of narrow band interference. 19 4 4.1 Hardware based adaptive system with...frequency-spread CW interference falling within the data-rate bandwidth. Assuming that fref(t) is at base band, i.e. having a spectrum extending from zero...report describes the baseband hardware demonstrator based upon AT&T DSP32C digital signal processing cards in an IBM personal computer host platform, and

  1. Spectral properties of four-time fermionic Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Shvaika, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The spectral relations for the four-time fermionic Green's functions are derived in the most general case. The terms which correspond to the zero-frequency anomalies, known before only for the bosonic Green's functions, are separated and their connection with the second cumulants of the Boltzmann distribution function is elucidated. Furthermore, the high-frequency expansions of the four-time fermionic Green's functions are provided for different directions in the frequency space.

  2. Applications of spectral inversion to understanding vegetation functional trait relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, A. N.; Dietze, M.; Viskari, T.; Townsend, P. A.; Serbin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral data from both field observations and remote sensing platforms are a rich source of information for studying plant traits. Traditional approaches to using spectral data for studying vegetation have proven effective in sensor-, site-, or plant type-specific settings, but differences in model assumptions and failure to account for uncertainties have hindered efforts to synthesize observations from different sources and use spectral data in a predictive capacity. Here we present a novel approach that uses Bayesian inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf radiative transfer model (RTM) to investigate the ability of spectral data to inform our understanding of plant functional traits. First, we validated our method by comparing inversion results to independent measurements of relevant leaf structural and biochemical parameters. Second, we tested the accuracy and precision of RTM parameter retrieval as a function of spectral resolution and quality by performing inversions on simulated observations for a variety of common remote sensing platforms. We observed predictable increases in parameter uncertainty and covariance with declining spectral resolution, but we also found that the measurement characteristics of all sensors are capable of providing information about at least some of the parameters of interest. Finally, we applied our inversion to a large database of field spectra and plant traits spanning tropical, temperate, and boreal forests, agricultural plots, arid shrublands, and tundra to identify dominant sources of variability and characterize trade-offs in plant functional traits. We found substantial intraspecific variability in traits and explored the extent to which this variability falls along the same axes as the interspecific leaf economics spectrum. Ultimately, our results show that Bayesian RTM inversion provides a powerful framework for using spectral data to inform our understanding of plant functional traits and how they are linked with ecosystem

  3. Measurement and Shaping of Biphoton Spectral Wave Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischler, N.; Büse, A.; Helt, L. G.; Juan, M. L.; Piro, N.; Ghosh, J.; Steel, M. J.; Molina-Terriza, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present a simple method to reconstruct the complex spectral wave function of a biphoton, and hence gain complete information about the spectral and temporal properties of a photon pair. The technique, which relies on quantum interference, is applicable to biphoton states produced with a monochromatic pump when a shift of the pump frequency produces a shift in the relative frequencies contributing to the biphoton. We demonstrate an example of such a situation in type-II parametric down conversion allowing arbitrary paraxial spatial pump and detection modes. Moreover, our test cases demonstrate the possibility to shape the spectral wave function. This is achieved by choosing the spatial mode of the pump and of the detection modes, and takes advantage of spatiotemporal correlations.

  4. Photon propagation function: spectral analysis of its asymptotic form.

    PubMed

    Schwinger, J

    1974-08-01

    The physical attitudes of source theory, displacing those of renormalized, perturbative, operator field theory, are used in a simple discussion of the asymptotic behavior of the photon propagation function. A guiding principle is the elementary consistency requirement that, under circumstances where a physical parameter cannot be accurately measured, no sensitivity to its precise value can enter the description of those circumstances. The mathematical tool is the spectral representation of the propagation function, supplemented by an equivalent phase representation. The Gell-Mann-Low equation is recovered, but with their function now interpreted physically as the spectral weight function. A crude inequality is established for the latter, which helps in interpolating between the initial rising behavior and the ultimate zero at infinite mass. There is a brief discussion of the aggressive source theory viewpoint that denies the existence of a "bare charge".

  5. SPECTRAL FUNCTIONS OF A CANONICAL SYSTEM OF ORDER 2n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnovich, A. L.

    1992-02-01

    The author describes a set of pseudospectral functions of the canonical system of differential equations \\displaystyle dW(x,\\,\\lambda)/dx = i\\lambda JH(x)W(x,\\lambda),\\qquad W(0,\\,\\lambda) = E_{2n},where \\displaystyle 0\\leq x\\leq l<\\infty,\\qquad H(x)=H^*(x)\\geq0,\\qquad J=\\begin{bmatrix}0 & E_n\\\\E_n & 0\\end{bmatrix}.In terms of the Hamiltonians H(x), conditions are given under which the pseudospectral functions are spectral functions.

  6. Consistent two-lifetime model for spectral functions of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, František; Hlubina, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Recently it has been found that models with at least two lifetimes have to be considered when analyzing the angle-resolved photoemission data in the nodal region of the cuprates [Kondo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 7699 (2015), 10.1038/ncomms8699]. In this paper we compare two such models. First we show that the phenomenological model used by Kondo et al. violates the sum rule for the occupation number. Next we consider the recently proposed model of the so-called Dynes superconductors, wherein the two lifetimes measure the strengths of pair-conserving and pair-breaking processes. We demonstrate that the model of the Dynes superconductors is fully consistent with known exact results, and we study in detail the resulting spectral functions. Finally, we show that the spectral functions in the nodal region of the cuprates can be fitted well by the model of the Dynes superconductors.

  7. Generalized neural networks for spectral analysis: dynamics and Liapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Vegas, José M; Zufiria, Pedro J

    2004-03-01

    This paper analyzes local and global behavior of several dynamical systems which generalize some artificial neural network (ANN) semilinear models originally designed for principal component analysis (PCA) in the characterization of random vectors. These systems implicitly performed the spectral analysis of correlation (i.e. symmetric positive definite) matrices. Here, the proposed generalizations cover both nonsymmetric matrices as well as fully nonlinear models. Local stability analysis is performed via linearization and global behavior is analyzed by constructing several Liapunov functions.

  8. Charmonium correlators and spectral functions at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ding,H.T.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Satz, H.

    2008-09-01

    We present an operational approach to address the in-medium behavior of charmonium and analyze the reliability of maximum entropy method (MEM). We study the dependences of the ratio of correlators to the reconstructed one and the free one on the resonance's width and the continuum's threshold. Furthermore, we discuss the issue of the default model dependence of the spectral function obtained from MEM.

  9. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  10. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE PAGES

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmore » that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.« less

  11. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  12. A Critical Examination of Wind-Wave Spectral Functional Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, data from random ocean waves are presented in spectral functions. The spectra are the result of Fourier analysis. Fourier spectral analysis has dominated data analysis for, at least, the last hundred years. It has been the standard method for is examining the global amplitude-frequency distributions. Although Fourier transform valid under extremely general conditions, there are some crucial restrictions for the Fourier spectral analysis. The system must be linear, and the data must be stationary- otherwise, the resulting spectrum will make little physical sense. The stationarity requirement is also a common required criterion for most of other available data analysis methods. Nevertheless, few, if any, natural phenomena are linear and stationary. To compound these complications is the imperfection of our probes or numerical schemes the interactions of the imperfect probes even with a perfect linear system can make the final data nonlinear. Furthermore, all the available data are usually of finite duration. Under these conditions, Fourier analysis is of limited use, For lack of alternatives, however, Fourier analysis is still used to process such data. The loose application of Fourier analysis and the insouciant adoption of the stationary and linear assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions. Ocean waves are know to be nonlinear, and the wind system generating the wave field are seldom stationary- As a result, the traditional examination of the spectral form hardly made physical sense. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data, This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous

  13. A Critical Examination of Wind-Wave Spectral Functional Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, data from random ocean waves are presented in spectral functions. The spectra are the result of Fourier analysis. Fourier spectral analysis has dominated data analysis for, at least, the last hundred years. It has been the standard method for is examining the global amplitude-frequency distributions. Although Fourier transform valid under extremely general conditions, there are some crucial restrictions for the Fourier spectral analysis. The system must be linear, and the data must be stationary- otherwise, the resulting spectrum will make little physical sense. The stationarity requirement is also a common required criterion for most of other available data analysis methods. Nevertheless, few, if any, natural phenomena are linear and stationary. To compound these complications is the imperfection of our probes or numerical schemes the interactions of the imperfect probes even with a perfect linear system can make the final data nonlinear. Furthermore, all the available data are usually of finite duration. Under these conditions, Fourier analysis is of limited use, For lack of alternatives, however, Fourier analysis is still used to process such data. The loose application of Fourier analysis and the insouciant adoption of the stationary and linear assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions. Ocean waves are know to be nonlinear, and the wind system generating the wave field are seldom stationary- As a result, the traditional examination of the spectral form hardly made physical sense. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data, This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous

  14. Windowing functions for SAR data with spectral gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Dickey, Fred M.; Romero, Louis A.

    2003-09-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar systems are being driven to provide images with ever-finer resolutions. This, of course, requires ever-wider bandwidths to support these resolutions in a number of frequency bands across the microwave (and lower) spectrum. The problem is that the spectrum is already quite crowded with a multitude of users, and a multitude of uses. For a radar system, this manifests itself as a number of 'stay-out' zones in the spectrum mandated by regulatory agencies; frequencies where the radar is not allowed to transmit. Even frequencies where the radar is allowed to transmit might be corrupted by interference from other legitimate (and/or illegitimate) users, rendering these frequencies useless to the radar system. In a SAR image, these spectral holes (by whatever source) degrade images, most notably by increasing objectionable sidelobe levels, most evident in the neighborhood of bright point-like objects. For contiguous spectrums, sidelobes in SAR images are controlled by employing window functions. However, those windows that work well for contiguous spectrums don't seem to work well for spectrums with significant gaps or holes. In this paper we address the question "Can some sorts of window functions be developed and employed to advantage when the spectrum is not contiguous, but contains significant holes or gaps?" A window function that minimizes sidelobe energy can be constructed based on prolate spheroidal wave functions. This approach is extended to accommodate spectral notches or holes, although the guaranteed minimum sidelobe energy can be quite high in this case.

  15. Determining Ionospheric Irregularity Spectral Density Function from Japan GEONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, E. H.; Light, M. E.; Parker, P. A.; Carrano, C. S.; Haaser, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Japan's GEONET GPS network is the densest GPS monitoring network in the world, with 1200+ receivers over the area of Japan. Measuring and calibrating the integrated total electron content (TEC) from each station has been done in many cases to provide detailed maps of ionospheric disturbances over Japan. We use TEC measurements from Japan's GEONET array to determine an empirically derived description of the 2-dimensional scale sizes of spatial irregularities above Japan. The contributions from various scale sizes will be included in a statistical description for the irregularity spectral density (ISD) function. We will compare the statistics of the spatial irregularities between calm and moderately scintillated conditions.

  16. A rapid retrieval methodology based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function for space observation spectral radiance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, Brendan M.; Abrarov, Sanjar M.; Jagpal, Raj K.

    2014-06-01

    In our recent publication, we proposed the application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to a line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer modelling1. We applied the GENSPECT LBL radiative transfer model that utilizes the HITRAN database to generate synthetic spectral data due to thermal or solar radiation of the Earth or planetary atmosphere2. It has been shown that the SIVF methodology enables the computation of a LBL radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution model without loss in accuracy. In contrast to the traditional method of computation, the SIVF implementation accounts for the area under the Voigt function between adjacent grid points resulting in well-preserved shape of a spectral radiance even at low spectral resolution. This significant advantage of the SIVF methodology can be applied in the rapid retrieval of the space observation data, required for real-time control and decision making in future generation of the Argus3 remote-sensing microspectrometers. The spectrally integrated methodology can be generalized to other linebroadening profiles, such as Galatry, Rautian-Sobelman or speed dependent profiles, to prevent underestimation of the spectral radiance that always occurs at reduced spectral resolution1 in any LBL radiative transfer model using a traditional method of computation.

  17. Spectral loudness summation as a function of duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Kollmeier, Birger

    2002-03-01

    Loudness was measured as a function of signal bandwidth for 10-, 100-, and 1000-ms-long signals. The test and reference signals were bandpass-filtered noise spectrally centered at 2 kHz. The bandwidth of the test signal was varied from 200 to 6400 Hz. The reference signal had a bandwidth of 3200 Hz. The reference levels were 45, 55, and 65 dB SPL. The level to produce equal loudness was measured with an adaptive, two-interval, two-alternative forced-choice procedure. A loudness matching procedure was used, where the tracks for all signal pairs to be compared were interleaved. Mean results for nine normal-hearing subjects showed that the magnitude of spectral loudness summation depends on signal duration. For all reference levels, a 6- to 8-dB larger level difference between equally loud signals with the smallest (Δf=200 Hz) and largest (Δf=6400 Hz) bandwidth is found for 10-ms-long signals than for the 1000-ms-long signals. The duration effect slightly decreases with increasing reference loudness. As a consequence, loudness models should include a duration-dependent compression stage. Alternatively, if a fixed loudness ratio between signals of different duration is assumed, this loudness ratio should depend on the signal spectrum.

  18. Electron Spectral Function for the t-J Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, T.; Gibbs, Zane P.; Bishop, Marilyn F.

    1996-03-01

    Computed electron spectral functions for the t-J model(Z. Wang, Y. Bang, and G. Kotliar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67), 2733, (1991). are presented. Large-\\cal N expansion techniques are used in which all self energies are evaluated to leading order in 1/\\cal N. Slave bosons are employed to enforce the non-double-occupancy constraint. Results are given for several values of the exchange coupling J/t and doping δ, including those appropriate to cuprate superconductors. A sharp dispersive quasiparticle peak is found near the Fermi energy. Additional spectral weight occurs at lower frequencies, which arises from the form of the normal self-energy. This is qualitatively similar to the self-energy obtained by Kampf and Schrieffer(A. Kampf and J. R. Schrieffer, Phys. Rev. B 41), 6399 (1990). from a parameterized model of an electron coupled to antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, which is characterized by shadow bands. The lower shadow band in their calculation is analogous to the lower band in our results.

  19. Spectral functions of non-essentially self-adjoint operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falomir, H. A.; Pisani, P. A. G.

    2012-09-01

    One of the many problems to which Dowker devoted his attention is the effect of a conical singularity in the base manifold on the behavior of the quantum fields. In particular, he studied the small-t asymptotic expansion of the heat-kernel trace on a cone and its effects on physical quantities as the Casimir energy. In this paper, we review some peculiar results found in the last decade, regarding the appearance of non-standard powers of t, and even negative integer powers of log t, in this asymptotic expansion for the self-adjoint extensions of some symmetric operators with singular coefficients. Similarly, we show that the ζ-function associated with these self-adjoint extensions presents an unusual analytic structure. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  20. Specification of optical components using the power spectral density function

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Wolfe, C.R.; Manes, K.R.; Trenholme, J.B.; Aikens, D.M.; English, R.E. Jr.

    1995-06-20

    This paper describes the use of Fourier techniques to characterize the wavefront of optical components, specifically, the use of the power spectral density, (PSD), function. The PSDs of several precision optical components will be shown. Many of the optical components of interest to us have square, rectangular or irregularly shaped apertures with major dimensions up-to 800 mm. The wavefronts of components with non-circular apertures cannot be analyzed with Zernicke polynomials since these functions are an orthogonal set for circular apertures only. Furthermore, Zernicke analysis is limited to treating low frequency wavefront aberrations; mid-spatial scale and high frequency error are expressed only as ``residuals.`` A more complete and powerful representation of the optical wavefront can be obtained by Fourier analysis in 1 or 2 dimensions. The PSD is obtained from the amplitude of frequency components present in the Fourier spectrum. The PSD corresponds to the scattered intensity as a function of scattering angle in the wavefront and can be used to describe the intensity distribution at focus. The shape of a resultant wavefront or the focal spot of a complex multi-component laser system can be calculated and optimized using the PSDs of individual optical components which comprise it.

  1. Alternate Function Bases for Global Scale Spectral General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paldor, N.

    2016-02-01

    Solutions of the Shallow Water Equations (SWE) on a rotating sphere (AKA Laplace Tidal Equations) were recently derived for baroclinic and barotropic oceans. In baroclinic oceans where the speed of gravity waves is of the order of a few meters per second the solutions are very well approximated by Hermite Functions (i.e. Hermite Polynomials multiplied by a Gaussian "envelope") while in barotropic oceans where the speed of gravity waves is of the order of 100 m/s the eigenfunctions are Gegenbauer Functions i.e. Gengenbauer Polynomials multiplieג by an "envelope" which is a high power of cos(latitude). These two sets of functions approximate the solutions of the eigenvalue problem associated with zonally propagating wave solutions of the SWE and therefore they provide alternate bases to the Spherical Harmonics basis in spectral general circulation models. Our results in simulating exact solutions of the SWE demonstrate that in barotropic oceans at high wavenumbers numerical simulations by the Gegenbauer Functions are significantly more accurate than simulations by the Spherical Harmonic. In baroclinic oceans numerical simulations by the Hermite Harmonics are far more accurate than simulations by the Spherical Harmonics and time interval over which the latter simulations can be carried out is much shorter than by the former. Similar advantages of the new bases prevail in simulations of the nonlinear equations even though the base functions are not eigensolutions of the nonlinear SWE. Numerical simulations by the Gegenbauer Harmonics are more stable than those by the Spherical Harmonics even in baroclinic oceans where neither set of eigenfunctions is a solution of the associated eigenvalue problem. The poor performance of the Spherical Harmonics basis in baroclinic oceans is attributed to the fact that higher modes have increased resolution mainly near the poles while regular solutions decay with latitude over a scale proportional to the radius of deformation.

  2. Towards tests of quark-hadron duality with functional analysis and spectral function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boito, Diogo; Caprini, Irinel

    2017-04-01

    The presence of terms that violate quark-hadron duality in the expansion of QCD Green's functions is a generally accepted fact. Recently, a new approach was proposed for the study of duality violations (DVs), which exploits the existence of a rigorous lower bound on the functional distance, measured in a certain norm, between a "true" correlator and its approximant calculated theoretically along a contour in the complex energy plane. In the present paper, we pursue the investigation of functional-analysis-based tests towards their application to real spectral function data. We derive a closed analytic expression for the minimal functional distance based on the general weighted L2 norm and discuss its relation with the distance measured in the L∞ norm. Using fake data sets obtained from a realistic toy model in which we allow for covariances inspired from the publicly available ALEPH spectral functions, we obtain, by Monte Carlo simulations, the statistical distribution of the strength parameter that measures the magnitude of the DV term added to the usual operator product expansion. The results show that, if the region with large errors near the end point of the spectrum in τ decays is excluded, the functional-analysis-based tests using either L2 or L∞ norms are able to detect, in a statistically significant way, the presence of DVs in realistic spectral function pseudodata.

  3. The spectral function and quasiparticle dynamics of graphene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a simple honeycomb lattice, is the building block of graphite, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes and has fascinating electronic properties deriving from the effectively massless, relativistic behavior of its charge carriers. The study of many-body interactions among these carriers is of interest owing to their contribution to superconductivity in these systems. I will report synthesis of graphene thin films (1-4 layers) grown on SiC and the evolution of their band structure using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We determined the spectral function for graphene as a function of doping, which encodes the many-body interactions among the quasiparticles in the system---namely the charge and vibrational excitations. Our measurements show that the bands around the Dirac crossing point are heavily renormalized by electron-electron, electron-plasmon, and electron-phonon coupling, showing that these interactions must be considered on an equal footing in attempts to understand the quasiparticle dynamics in graphene and related systems. At very high doping (comparable to graphite intercalation compounds (GICs)) renormalization of the carrier mass near EF becomes significant for electrons moving in certain directions, supporting the importance of electron-phonon coupling in superconductivity in GICs.

  4. Two-Time Green's Functions and the Spectral Density Method in Nonextensive Classical Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, A.; Cosenza, F.; de Cesare, L.

    2001-12-01

    The two-time retarded and advanced Green's function technique is formulated in nonextensive classical statistical mechanics within the optimal Lagrange multiplier framework. The main spectral properties are presented and a spectral decomposition for the spectral density is obtained. Finally, the nonextensive version of the spectral density method is given and its effectiveness is tested by exploring the equilibrium properties of a classical ferromagnetic spin chain.

  5. Spectral and geometrical variation of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of diffuse reflectance standards.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Rabal, Ana María; Campos, Joaquín; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2012-12-20

    A study on the variation of the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of four diffuse reflectance standards (matte ceramic, BaSO(4), Spectralon, and white Russian opal glass) is accomplished through this work. Spectral BRDF measurements were carried out and, using principal components analysis, its spectral and geometrical variation respect to a reference geometry was assessed from the experimental data. Several descriptors were defined in order to compare the spectral BRDF variation of the four materials.

  6. Single-hole spectral function and spin-charge separation in the t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, A. S.; Prokof'ev, N. V.; Svistunov, B. V.

    2001-07-01

    Worm algorithm Monte Carlo simulations of the hole Green function with subsequent spectral analysis were performed for 0.1<=J/t<=0.4 on lattices with up to L×L=32×32 sites at a temperature as low as T=J/40, and present, apparently, the hole spectral function in the thermodynamic limit. Spectral analysis reveals a δ-function-sharp quasiparticle peak at the lower edge of the spectrum that is incompatible with the power-law singularity and thus rules out the possibility of spin-charge separation in this parameter range. Spectral continuum features two peaks separated by a gap ~4÷5 t.

  7. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature and isospin density with the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziyue; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The pion superfluid and the corresponding Goldstone and soft modes are investigated in a two-flavor quark-meson model with a functional renormalization group. By solving the flow equations for the effective potential and the meson two-point functions at finite temperature and isospin density, the critical temperature for the superfluid increases sizeably in comparison with solving the flow equation for the potential only. The spectral function for the soft mode shows clearly a transition from meson gas to quark gas with increasing temperature and a crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of quarks with increasing isospin density.

  8. Characterizing Cyclostationary Features of Digital Modulated Signals with Empirical Measurements using Spectral Correlation Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    USING SPECTRAL CORRELATION FUNCTION THESIS Mujun Song, Captain, ROKA AFIT/GCE/ENG/11-09 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR... CORRELATION FUNCTION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and...cyclostationarity of a signal to detect its presence. Signals that have cyclostationarity exhibit correlations between widely separated spectral components

  9. On one-sided filters for spectral Fourier approximations of discontinuous functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Cai; Gottlieb, David; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1991-01-01

    The existence of one-sided filters, for spectral Fourier approximations of discontinuous functions, which can recover spectral accuracy up to discontinuity from one side, was proved. A least square procedure was also used to construct such a filter and test it on several discontinuous functions numerically.

  10. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  11. Fermionic spectral functions in backreacting p-wave superconductors at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, G. L.; Grandi, N. E.; Lugo, A. R.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the spectral function of fermions in a p-wave superconducting state, at finite both temperature and gravitational coupling, using the AdS/CF T correspondence and extending previous research. We found that, for any coupling below a critical value, the system behaves as its zero temperature limit. By increasing the coupling, the "peak-dip-hump" structure that characterizes the spectral function at fixed momenta disappears. In the region where the normal/superconductor phase transition is first order, the presence of a non-zero order parameter is reflected in the absence of rotational symmetry in the fermionic spectral function at the critical temperature.

  12. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  13. Using speech sounds to test functional spectral resolution in listeners with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Winn, Matthew B; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2015-03-01

    In this study, spectral properties of speech sounds were used to test functional spectral resolution in people who use cochlear implants (CIs). Specifically, perception of the /ba/-/da/ contrast was tested using two spectral cues: Formant transitions (a fine-resolution cue) and spectral tilt (a coarse-resolution cue). Higher weighting of the formant cues was used as an index of better spectral cue perception. Participants included 19 CI listeners and 10 listeners with normal hearing (NH), for whom spectral resolution was explicitly controlled using a noise vocoder with variable carrier filter widths to simulate electrical current spread. Perceptual weighting of the two cues was modeled with mixed-effects logistic regression, and was found to systematically vary with spectral resolution. The use of formant cues was greatest for NH listeners for unprocessed speech, and declined in the two vocoded conditions. Compared to NH listeners, CI listeners relied less on formant transitions, and more on spectral tilt. Cue-weighting results showed moderately good correspondence with word recognition scores. The current approach to testing functional spectral resolution uses auditory cues that are known to be important for speech categorization, and can thus potentially serve as the basis upon which CI processing strategies and innovations are tested.

  14. Spectral functions of lightly doped antiferromagnets using dressed hole operators

    SciTech Connect

    Riera, J.A.; Dagotto, E.

    1997-06-01

    Literature addressing the existence of hole pockets in experiments for the high-T{sub c} cuprates and in theoretical analysis of electronic models of correlated electrons is reviewed. It is argued that the issue is not conclusively resolved, both in theory and experiments. The apparently large Fermi surface observed in numerical studies of the doped Hubbard and t-J models suggests the presence of 1{minus}x carriers (with x the concentration of holes). However, this is in contradiction with results obtained in similar calculations for the Drude weight which scales with x at low doping. To address such a paradox, {ital dressed} operators are here used. Their spectral decomposition A({bold k},{omega}) is analyzed specially using the t-J model on ladders, but considering also chains and two-dimensional (2D) clusters. The results are contrasted against those obtained with the standard bare operators. It is concluded that substantial changes in the spectral weight can occur by replacing the bare hole creation operator by its dressed version. Apparently large Fermi surfaces can turn into small ones by working with quasiparticle (qp) operators that represent accurately the state of one hole. Thus, large Fermi surfaces in angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), obtained by the sudden removal of an electron, may not be in contradiction with a visualization of the normal state of lightly doped antiferromagnets as composed of a gas of spin polarons with energies approximately obtained from the rigid band doping of the half-filled dispersion. The coexistence of a large Fermi surface in ARPES with, e.g., a holelike Hall coefficient seems possible in systems with strong correlations. In this paper the expression hole pocket is used as representing a large accumulation of spectral weight centered at {bold k}=({plus_minus}{pi}/2,{plus_minus}{pi}/2) generated by antiferromagnetic correlations in 2D clusters, or in analogous positions for ladders and chains. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Spectral functions and in-medium properties of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripolt, R.-A.; von Smekal, L.; Wambach, J.

    The in-medium modifications of hadron properties such as masses and decay widths have been a major focus of the scientific work of Gerry Brown and the insights gained by him and his collaborators made them major drivers of this field for several decades. Their prediction of experimental signals in di-lepton pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions was instrumental in initiating large experimental campaigns which continue till today. In this chapter, we review recent results which elucidate the relation of hadronic spectral properties at finite temperature and density to the restoration of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry.

  16. In-medium spectral functions of vector- and axial-vector mesons from the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christopher; Rennecke, Fabian; Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; von Smekal, Lorenz; Wambach, Jochen

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present the first results on vector- and axial-vector meson spectral functions as obtained by applying the nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach to an effective low-energy theory motivated by the gauged linear sigma model. By using a recently proposed analytic continuation method, we study the in-medium behavior of the spectral functions of the ρ and a1 mesons in different regimes of the phase diagram. In particular, we demonstrate explicitly how these spectral functions degenerate at high temperatures as well as at large chemical potentials, as a consequence of the restoration of chiral symmetry. In addition, we also compute the momentum dependence of the ρ and a1 spectral functions and discuss the various timelike and spacelike processes that can occur.

  17. Tunnel determinants from spectral zeta functions. Instanton effects in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, A. Alonso; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2014-07-23

    In this paper we develop an spectral zeta function regularization procedure on the determinants of instanton fluctuation operators that describe the semi-classical order of tunnel effects between degenerate vacua.

  18. Spectral function of the three-dimensional system of massless Dirac electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lošić, Željana Bonačić

    2017-01-01

    We determine the one-particle spectral function for the three-dimensional system of massless Dirac electrons with the long-range Coulomb interaction. The electron self-energy is calculated within the G0W0 approximation. We find that the spectral function has a low-energy quasi-particle and a characteristic structure due to the optic plasmon mode. The present approach is appropriate for the wide range of energy scales given by Fermi energy and plasmon energy. The obtained spectral properties are brought into correspondence with the spectra of the three-dimensional topological Dirac semimetals obtained from recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements.

  19. Spectral function and responsivity of resonant tunneling and superlattice quantum dot infrared photodetectors using Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naser, M. A.; Deen, M. J.; Thompson, D. A.

    2007-10-01

    Theoretical modeling of resonant tunneling (RT) and superlattice (SL) quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) using Green's function is reported. The RT QDIP gives very low dark current which improves the detectivity of the device and allows for high temperature operation. The SL QDIP gives high responsivity and is suitable for low-level signal detection. The theoretical model is based on Green's function method which is used to calculate the spectral function and the density of states of the two detectors. The kinetic equation that governs Green's functions is solved numerically using the method of finite differences. From the information obtained from the density of states, the possible energy transitions are obtained. The bound states are calculated by solving the eigenvalue problem using the method of finite differences, while the continuum states localized in the quantum dot region are calculated using Green's functions. Using the first order dipole approximation and Fermi golden rule, the eigenstates are used to calculate the responsivity of the detectors which is compared with available experimental results. The theoretical model is then used for studying the effect of changing the quantum dot height-to-diameter ratio on the normal incidence responsivity of the SL structure.

  20. Spectral functions of strongly correlated extended systems via an exact quantum embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, George H.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-04-01

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.186404], introduced an approach to quantum cluster embedding methods whereby the mapping of strongly correlated bulk problems to an impurity with finite set of bath states was rigorously formulated to exactly reproduce the entanglement of the ground state. The formalism provided similar physics to dynamical mean-field theory at a tiny fraction of the cost but was inherently limited by the construction of a bath designed to reproduce ground-state, static properties. Here, we generalize the concept of quantum embedding to dynamic properties and demonstrate accurate bulk spectral functions at similarly small computational cost. The proposed spectral DMET utilizes the Schmidt decomposition of a response vector, mapping the bulk dynamic correlation functions to that of a quantum impurity cluster coupled to a set of frequency-dependent bath states. The resultant spectral functions are obtained on the real-frequency axis, without bath discretization error, and allows for the construction of arbitrary dynamic correlation functions. We demonstrate the method on the one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model, where we obtain zero temperature and thermodynamic limit spectral functions, and show the trivial extension to two-particle Green's functions. This advance therefore extends the scope and applicability of DMET in condensed-matter problems as a computationally tractable route to correlated spectral functions of extended systems and provides a competitive alternative to dynamical mean-field theory for dynamic quantities.

  1. Spectral zeta function and non-perturbative effects in ABJM Fermi-gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki

    2015-11-01

    The exact partition function in ABJM theory on three-sphere can be regarded as a canonical partition function of a non-interacting Fermi-gas with an unconventional Hamiltonian. All the information on the partition function is encoded in the discrete spectrum of this Hamiltonian. We explain how (quantum mechanical) non-perturbative corrections in the Fermi-gas system appear from a spectral consideration. Basic tools in our analysis are a Mellin-Barnes type integral representation and a spectral zeta function. From a consistency with known results, we conjecture that the spectral zeta function in the ABJM Fermi-gas has an infinite number of "non-perturbative" poles, which are invisible in the semi-classical expansion of the Planck constant. We observe that these poles indeed appear after summing up perturbative corrections. As a consequence, the perturbative resummation of the spectral zeta function causes non-perturbative corrections to the grand canonical partition function. We also present another example associated with a spectral problem in topological string theory. A conjectured non-perturbative free energy on the resolved conifold is successfully reproduced in this framework.

  2. DNA and protein change in tissues probed by Kubelka-Munk spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanlong; Celmer, Edward J.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2000-04-01

    Normal, fibroadenoma, malignant, and adipose breast tissues were investigated using Kubelka-Munk Spectral Function (KMSF). The spectral features in KMSF were identified and compared with absorption spectra determined by transmission measurements. A specified spectral feature measured in adipose tissue was assigned to (beta) -carotene, which can be used to separate fat form other molecular components in breast tissues. The peaks of (KMF) at 260nm and 280nm were attributed to DNA and proteins. The signal amplitude over 255nm to 265nm and 275nm to 285nm were found to be different for malignant fibroadenoma, and normal tissues.

  3. Spectral Methods Using Rational Basis Functions on an Infinite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.

    1987-03-01

    By using the map y = L cot( t) where L is a constant, differential equations on the interval yɛ [- ∞, ∞] can be transformed into tɛ [0, π] and solved by an ordinary Fourier series. In this article, earlier work by Grosch and Orszag ( J. Comput. Phys.25, 273 (1977)), Cain, Ferziger, and Reynolds ( J. Comput. Phys.56, 272 (1984)), and Boyd ( J. Comput. Phys.25, 43 (1982); 57, 454 (1985); SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (1987)) is extended in several ways. First, the series of orthogonal rational functions converge on the exterior of bipolar coordinate surfaces in the complex y-plane. Second, Galerkin's method will convert differential equations with polynomial or rational coefficients into banded matrix problems. Third, with orthogonal rational functions it is possible to obtain exponential convergence even for u( y) that asymptote to a constant although this behavior would wreck alternatives such as Hermite or sinc expansions. Fourth, boundary conditions are usually "natural" rather than "essential" in the sense that the singularities of the differential equation will force the numerical solution to have the correct behavior at infinity even if no constraints are imposed on the basis functions. Fifth, mapping a finite interval to an infinite one and then applying the rational Chebyshev functions gives an exponentially convergent method for functions with bounded endpoint singularities. These concepts are illustrated by five numerical examples.

  4. Spectral Data Captures Important Variability Between and Among Species and Functional Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. A.; Serbin, S. P.; Kingdon, C.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Narrowband spectral data in the visible, near and shortwave infrared (400-2500 nm) are being used increasingly in plant ecology to characterize the biochemical, physiological and water status of vegetation, as well as community composition. In particular, spectroscopic data have recently received considerable attention for their capacity to discriminate plants according to functional properties or 'optical types.' Such measurements can be acquired from airborne/satellite remote sensing imagery or field spectrometers and are commonly used to directly estimate or infer properties important to photosynthesis, carbon and water fluxes, nutrient dynamics, phenology, and disturbance. Spectral data therefore represent proxies for measurements that are otherwise time consuming or expensive to make, and - more importantly - provide the opportunity to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of taxonomic or functional groups. We have found that spectral variation within species and functional types can in fact exceed the variation between types. As such, we recommend that the traditional quantification of characteristics defining species and/or functional types must be modified to include the range of variability in those properties. We provide four examples of the importance of spectral data for describing within-species/functional type variation. First, within temperate forests, the spectral properties of foliage vary considerably with canopy position. This variability is strongly related to differences in specific leaf area between shade- and sun-lit leaves, and the resulting differences among leaves in strategies for light harvesting, photosynthesis, and leaf longevity. These results point to the need to better characterize leaf optical properties throughout a canopy, rather than basing the characterization of ecosystem functioning on only the sunlit portion of the canopy crown. Second, we show considerable differences in optical properties of foliage from

  5. Multi-Nucleon Short-Range Correlation Model for Nuclear Spectral Functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiles, Oswaldo; Sargsian, Misak

    2017-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model for nuclear spectral functions at high missing momenta and energies based on the multi-nucleon short-range correlation (SRC) model aimed at probing nuclear structure at short-distances. The model is based on the effective Feynman diagram method which allows us to account for the relativistic effects in the SRC domain. We derive the contribution of two-nucleon SRC with center of mass motion, and three-nucleon SRCs to the nuclear spectral functions. The spectral functions are based on two theoretical approaches in evaluating covariant Feynman diagrams: In the first, referred to as virtual nucleon approximation, we reduce Feynman diagrams to the time ordered non-covariant diagrams by evaluating nucleon spectators on the SRC at their positive energy poles, neglecting the contribution from vacuum diagrams. In the second approach, referred to as light-front approximation, we formulate the boost invariant nuclear spectral function on the light-front reference frame, on which the vacuum diagrams are suppressed. Numerical calculations and parametrization of spectral functions and momentum distributions are presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy grant under contract DE- FG02-01ER41172.

  6. A Spectral Lyapunov Function for Exponentially Stable LTV Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. Jim; Liu, Yong; Hang, Rui

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the formulation of a Lyapunov function for an exponentially stable linear timevarying (LTV) system using a well-defined PD-spectrum and the associated PD-eigenvectors. It provides a bridge between the first and second methods of Lyapunov for stability assessment, and will find significant applications in the analysis and control law design for LTV systems and linearizable nonlinear time-varying systems.

  7. Nonperturbative spectral-density function for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Using a nonperturbative self-energy solution for the nondegenerate Anderson model, the temperature-dependent spectral-density function is calculated in the symmetric limit. The function is found to give reliable results for all values of the parameter u and inverse temperature beta.

  8. Spectral pattern recognition in under-sampled functions

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtz, R.F.

    1988-08-01

    Fourier optics and an optical bench model are used to construct an ensemble of candidate functions representing variational patterns in an undersampled two dimensional function g(x,y). The known sample function s(x,y) is the product of g(x,y) and a set of unit impulses on the sample point pattern p(x,y) which, from the optical point of view, is an aperture imposing strict mathematical limits on what the sample can tell g(x,y). The laws of optics enforce much needed - and often lacking - conceptual discipline in reconstructing candidate variational patterns in g(x,y). The Fourier transform (FT) of s(x,y) is the convolution of the FT's of g(x,y) and p(x,y). If the convolution shows aliasing or confounding of frequencies undersampling is surely present and all reconstructions are indeterminate. Then information from outside s(x,y) is required and it is easily expressed in frequency terms so that the principles of optical filtering and image reconstruction can be applied. In the application described and pictured the FT of s(x,y) was filtered to eliminate unlikely or uninteresting high frequency amplitude maxima. A menu of the 100 strongest remaining terms was taken as indicating the principle variations patterns in g(x,y). Subsets of 10 terms from the menu were chosen using stepwise regression. By so restricting the subset size both the variance and the span of their inverse transforms were made consistent with those of the data. The amplitudes of the patterns being overdetermined, it was possible to estimate the phases also. The inverse transforms of 9 patterns so selected are regarded as ensembles of reconstructions, that is as stochastic process models, from which estimates of the mean and other moments can be calculated.

  9. Time-dependence of the holographic spectral function: diverse routes to thermalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Souvik; Ishii, Takaaki; Joshi, Lata Kh; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Ramadevi, P.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new method for computing the holographic retarded propagator in generic (non-)equilibrium states using the state/geometry map. We check that our method reproduces the thermal spectral function given by the Son-Starinets prescription. The time-dependence of the spectral function of a relevant scalar operator is studied in a class of non-equilibrium states. The latter are represented by AdS-Vaidya geometries with an arbitrary parameter characterising the timescale for the dual state to transit from an initial thermal equilibrium to another due to a homogeneous quench. For long quench duration, the spectral function indeed follows the thermal form at the instantaneous effective temperature adiabatically, although with a slight initial time delay and a bit premature thermalisation. At shorter quench durations, several new non-adiabatic features appear: (i) time-dependence of the spectral function is seen much before than that in the effective temperature (advanced time-dependence), (ii) a big transfer of spectral weight to frequencies greater than the initial temperature occurs at an intermediate time (kink formation) and (iii) new peaks with decreasing amplitudes but in greater numbers appear even after the effective temperature has stabilised (persistent oscillations). We find four broad routes to thermalisation for lower values of spatial momenta. At higher values of spatial momenta, kink formations and persistent oscillations are suppressed, and thermalisation time decreases. The general thermalisation pattern is globally top-down, but a closer look reveals complexities.

  10. Direct measurement of the spectral transfer function of a laser based anemometer.

    PubMed

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob; Sjöholm, Mikael; Courtney, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a continuous-wave (cw) laser based anemometer's probe volume on the measurement of wind turbulence is studied in this paper. Wind speed time series acquired by both a remote sensing cw laser anemometer, whose line-of-sight was aligned with the wind direction, and by a reference sensor (sonic anemometer) located in the same direction, were used. The spectral transfer function, which describes the attenuation of the power spectral density of the wind speed turbulence, was calculated and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical exponential function, which is based on the properties of the probe volume of a focused Gaussian laser beam. Parameters such as fluctuations of the wind direction, as well as the overestimation of the laser Doppler spectrum threshold, were found to affect the calculation of the spectral transfer function by introducing high frequency noise.

  11. Extracting surface phonon properties from the electronic spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Ward

    2005-03-01

    Angle resolved photoemission measurements have revealed an enhancement in the electron-phonon coupling (EPC) for two- dimensional surface states and quantum-well states in thin films. A recent theoretical advancement by J. Shi [1] has developed a method for the direct extraction of the momentum dependent Eliashberg function from the high-resolution photoemission data. The origin of the enhanced EPC at surfaces and interfaces will be explored as well as schemes to tune the EPC by modification of the surface electronic and vibrational properties. The implications of EPC on physical properties will be discussed, including the lifetime of electronic states near the Fermi energy. 1. Junren Shi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 186401 (2004). The work at UT supported by NSF- DMR 0105232. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  12. Multinucleon short-range correlation model for nuclear spectral functions: Theoretical framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiles, Oswaldo; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a theoretical approach for nuclear spectral functions at high missing momenta and removal energies based on the multinucleon short-range correlation (SRC) model. The approach is based on the effective Feynman diagrammatic method which allows us to account for the relativistic effects important in the SRC domain. In addition to two-nucleon (2N) SRC with center of mass motion we also derive the contribution of three-nucleon SRCs to the nuclear spectral functions. The latter is modeled based on the assumption that 3N SRCs are a product of two sequential short-range nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions. This approach allows us to express the 3N SRC part of the nuclear spectral function as a convolution of two NN SRCs. Thus the knowledge of 2N SRCs allows us to model both two- and three-nucleon SRC contributions to the spectral function. The derivations of the spectral functions are based on two theoretical frameworks for evaluating covariant Feynman diagrams: In the first, referred to as virtual nucleon approximation, we reduce Feynman diagrams to the time ordered noncovariant diagrams by evaluating nucleon spectators in the SRC at their positive energy poles, neglecting explicitly the contribution from vacuum diagrams. In the second approach, referred to as light-front approximation, we formulate the boost invariant nuclear spectral function in the light-front reference frame in which case the vacuum diagrams are generally suppressed and the bound nucleon is described by its light-front variables such as momentum fraction, transverse momentum, and invariant mass.

  13. Statistical Study of Turbulence: Spectral Functions and Correlation Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenkiel, Francois N.

    1958-01-01

    In reading the publications on turbulence of different authors, one often runs the risk of confusing the various correlation coefficients and turbulence spectra. We have made a point of defining, by appropriate concepts, the differences which exist between these functions. Besides, we introduce in the symbols a few new characteristics of turbulence. In the first chapter, we study some relations between the correlation coefficients and the different turbulence spectra. Certain relations are given by means of demonstrations which could be called intuitive rather than mathematical. In this way we demonstrate that the correlation coefficients between the simultaneous turbulent velocities at two points are identical, whether studied in Lagrange's or in Euler's systems. We then consider new spectra of turbulence, obtained by study of the simultaneous velocities along a straight line of given direction. We determine some relations between these spectra and the correlation coefficients. Examining the relation between the spectrum of the turbulence measured at a fixed point and the longitudinal-correlation curve given by G. I. Taylor, we find that this equation is exact only when the coefficient is very small.

  14. Massive Yang-Mills for vector and axial-vector spectral functions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The hadronic mechanism which leads to chiral symmetry restoration is explored in the context of the ρπa1 system using Massive Yang-Mills, a hadronic effective theory which governs their microscopic interactions. In this approach, vector and axial-vector mesons are implemented as gauge bosons of a local chiral gauge group. We have previously shown that this model can describe the experimentally measured vector and axial-vector spectral functions in vacuum. Here, we carry the analysis to finite temperatures by evaluating medium effects in a pion gas and calculating thermal spectral functions. We find that the spectral peaks in both channels broaden along with a noticeable downward mass shift in the a1 spectral peak and negligible movement of the ρ peak. The approach toward spectral function degeneracy is accompanied by a reduction of chiral order parameters, i.e., the pion decay constant and scalar condensate. Our findings suggest a mechanism where the chiral mass splitting induced in vacuum is burned off. We explore this mechanism and identify future investigations which can further test it.

  15. Spectral and spatial decomposition of lithospheric magnetic field models using spherical Slepian functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, Ciarán D.; Saarimäki, Jarno; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Simons, Frederik J.

    2013-04-01

    Global magnetic field models are typically expressed as spherical-harmonic expansion coefficients. Slepian functions are linear combinations of spherical harmonics that produce new basis functions, which vanish approximately outside chosen geographical boundaries but also remain orthogonal within the spatial region of interest. Hence, they are suitable for decomposing spherical-harmonic models into portions that have significant magnetic field strength only in selected areas. Slepian functions are spatio-spectrally concentrated, balancing spatial bias and spectral leakage. Here, we employ them as a basis to decompose the global lithospheric magnetic field model MF7 up to degree and order 72, into two distinct regions. One of the resultant fields is concentrated within the ensemble of continental domains, and the other is localized over its complement, the oceans. Our procedure neatly divides the spectral power at each harmonic degree into two parts. The field over the continents dominates the overall crustal magnetic field, and each region has a distinct power-spectral signature. The oceanic power spectrum is approximately flat, while that of the continental region shows increasing power as the spherical-harmonic degree increases. We provide a further breakdown of the field into smaller, non-overlapping continental and oceanic regions, and speculate on the source of the variability in their spectral signatures.

  16. Precision spectral peak frequency measurement using a window leakage ratio function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, David C.

    2015-03-01

    For power spectra of signals consisting of stationary sinusoids mixed with random noise, the frequency and amplitude of a spectral peak can be estimated with greater accuracy than the nearest frequency bin of the Fourier transform by exploiting the spectral leakage characteristics for the particular data window used. Techniques such as linear interpolation or an amplitude weighted average have inadequate precision due to the nonlinear leakage into adjacent bins and the dependence on data window type. This paper offers a new general algorithm presented using the Fourier coefficients ck of the input data window to produce a function which is the ratio of the side-bin amplitudes of the window in the frequency domain. The ratio function allows one to use the amplitudes of the adjacent bins of a spectral peak to precisely estimate the peak frequency and amplitude when the frequency does not lie exactly on a frequency bin (in between the discrete bins of a Fourier transform). Examples are provided for a number of popular data windows. The ratio function can be most easily implemented using a simplified log-ratio function for the window side bin magnitudes. A statistical analysis provides a useful frequency estimation error estimate given the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral peak based on an approximation of the ratio of non-zero mean Gaussian variables. The benefits of this technique are not just improved estimation accuracy for amplitude and frequency, but also allow large spectral data files to be accurately reduced in size for remote monitoring of vibration spectra. An example is given of a methodology for reduction of spectral data file size without the loss of important signals for analysis where the file size is reduced by 88% with only a few percent error, which is mostly confined to the background noise in the reconstructed spectrum.

  17. Empirical relaxation function and spectral density for underdamped vibrations at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2009-03-01

    A new relaxation function which accounts for electronic dephasing (electronic phase loss and excited state lifetime) is presented, whose applicability for underdamped motion at low temperatures is examined in detail. This new empirical relaxation function φ(t ) yields linear and nonlinear spectral/temporal profiles that render accurate dephasing time in the underdamped regime. The relaxation function φ(t ) is normally expressed in terms of the coupling functions Mj' and Mj″ on which the time evolution of the vibrational modes in question depends. The corresponding spectral density, which is a central quantity in probing dynamics, is derived and compared to that of the multimode Brownian oscillator model. Derivation and discussion of the new position and momentum autocorrelation functions in terms of our new spectral density are presented. While the position autocorrelation function plays a key role in representing solvation structure in polar or nonpolar medium, the momentum correlation function projects out the molecular vibrational motion. The Liouville space generating function (LGF) for harmonic and anharmonic systems is expressed in terms of our new empirical φ(t ) and spectral density, leading to more physical observation. Several statistical quantities are derived from the position and momentum correlation function, which in turn contribute to LGF. Model calculations reflecting the infinite population decay in the low temperature limit in linear and nonlinear spectroscopic signals are presented. The herein quantum dipole moment correlation function is compared to that derived in [M. Toutounji, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5319 (2003)] using mixed quantum-classical dynamics framework, yielding reasonable results, in fact identical at higher temperatures. The results herein are found to be informative, useful, and consistent with experiments.

  18. The spectral shift function and Levinson's theorem for quantum star graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Demirel, Semra

    2012-08-15

    We consider the Schroedinger operator on a star shaped graph with n edges joined at a single vertex. We derive an expression for the trace of the difference of the perturbed and unperturbed resolvent in terms of a Wronskian. This leads to representations for the perturbation determinant and the spectral shift function, and to an analog of Levinson's formula.

  19. On the use of the noncentral chi-square density function for the distribution of helicopter spectral estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Donald P.

    1993-01-01

    A probability density function for the variability of ensemble averaged spectral estimates from helicopter acoustic signals in Gaussian background noise was evaluated. Numerical methods for calculating the density function and for determining confidence limits were explored. Density functions were predicted for both synthesized and experimental data and compared with observed spectral estimate variability.

  20. Analytic representations of bath correlation functions for ohmic and superohmic spectral densities using simple poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    We present a scheme to express a bath correlation function (BCF) corresponding to a given spectral density (SD) as a sum of damped harmonic oscillations. Such a representation is needed, for example, in many open quantum system approaches. To this end we introduce a class of fit functions that enables us to model ohmic as well as superohmic behavior. We show that these functions allow for an analytic calculation of the BCF using pole expansions of the temperature dependent hyperbolic cotangent. We demonstrate how to use these functions to fit spectral densities exemplarily for cases encountered in the description of photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. Finally, we compare absorption spectra obtained for different fits with exact spectra and show that it is crucial to take properly into account the behavior at small frequencies when fitting a given SD.

  1. Analytic representations of bath correlation functions for ohmic and superohmic spectral densities using simple poles

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2014-09-07

    We present a scheme to express a bath correlation function (BCF) corresponding to a given spectral density (SD) as a sum of damped harmonic oscillations. Such a representation is needed, for example, in many open quantum system approaches. To this end we introduce a class of fit functions that enables us to model ohmic as well as superohmic behavior. We show that these functions allow for an analytic calculation of the BCF using pole expansions of the temperature dependent hyperbolic cotangent. We demonstrate how to use these functions to fit spectral densities exemplarily for cases encountered in the description of photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. Finally, we compare absorption spectra obtained for different fits with exact spectra and show that it is crucial to take properly into account the behavior at small frequencies when fitting a given SD.

  2. Spectral imaging reveals microvessel physiology and function from anastomoses to thromboses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; Agarwal, Nikita; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A.; Dedeugd, Casey; Raizada, Mohan K.; Oh, S. Paul; Sorg, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal microvascular physiology and function is common in many diseases. Numerous pathologies include hypervascularity, aberrant angiogenesis, or abnormal vascular remodeling among the characteristic features of the disease, and quantitative imaging and measurement of microvessel function can be important to increase understanding of these diseases. Several optical techniques are useful for direct imaging of microvascular function. Spectral imaging is one such technique that can be used to assess microvascular oxygen transport function with high spatial and temporal resolution in microvessel networks through measurements of hemoglobin saturation. We highlight novel observation made with our intravital microscopy spectral imaging system employed with mouse dorsal skin-fold window chambers for imaging hemoglobin saturation in microvessel networks. Specifically, we image acute oxygenation fluctuations in a tumor microvessel network, the development of arteriovenous malformations in a mouse model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and the formation of spontaneous and induced microvascular thromboses and occlusions.

  3. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE PAGES

    Smallwood, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  4. Spectral Discrete Probability Density Function of Measured Wind Turbine Noise in the Far Field

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources. PMID:25905097

  5. Multicolor single-molecule imaging by spectral point-spread-function engineering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechtman, Yoav; Weiss, Lucien E.; Backer, Adam S.; Moerner, William E.

    2016-02-01

    We extend the information content of the microscope's point-spread-function (PSF) by adding a new degree of freedom: spectral information. We demonstrate controllable encoding of a microscopic emitter's spectral information (color) and 3D position in the shape of the microscope's PSF. The design scheme works by exploiting the chromatic dispersion of an optical element placed in the optical path. By using numerical optimization we design a single physical pattern that yields different desired phase delay patterns for different wavelengths. To demonstrate the method's applicability experimentally, we apply it to super-resolution imaging and to multiple particle tracking.

  6. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field.

    PubMed

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources.

  7. Spectral function of the two-dimensional large-N t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Marilyn F.; Gibbs, Zane P.; McMullen, T.

    1999-06-01

    Calculations of the one-electron spectral function of the t-J model on a two-dimensional square lattice are described. A large-N generalization of the t-J model is used to develop 1/N expansions, and the t-J model constraint is enforced by slave bosons. The saddle point about which the 1/N expansion is carried out is chosen to be uniform in both space and time, and self-energies are calculated to next-to-leading order in 1/N as in the work of Z. Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2733 (1991)]. The results of computations of the one-electron electron spectral functions for wave vectors throughout the Brillouin zone are presented for several values of the exchange coupling J/t and doping δ. A sharp dispersive quasiparticle peak is found near the Fermi energy. Additional spectral weight occurs at lower frequencies, and this arises from features in the normal self-energy. These features are qualitatively similar to the self-energy obtained by Kampf and Schrieffer [Phys. Rev. B 41, 6399 (1990)] from a parametrized model of an electron coupled to antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations that leads to shadow band structure in the one-electron spectral function.

  8. Two-time Green's functions and spectral density method in nonextensive quantum statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, A; Cosenza, F; De Cesare, L

    2008-05-01

    We extend the formalism of the thermodynamic two-time Green's functions to nonextensive quantum statistical mechanics. Working in the optimal Lagrangian multiplier representation, the q -spectral properties and the methods for a direct calculation of the two-time q Green's functions and the related q -spectral density ( q measures the nonextensivity degree) for two generic operators are presented in strict analogy with the extensive (q=1) counterpart. Some emphasis is devoted to the nonextensive version of the less known spectral density method whose effectiveness in exploring equilibrium and transport properties of a wide variety of systems has been well established in conventional classical and quantum many-body physics. To check how both the equations of motion and the spectral density methods work to study the q -induced nonextensivity effects in nontrivial many-body problems, we focus on the equilibrium properties of a second-quantized model for a high-density Bose gas with strong attraction between particles for which exact results exist in extensive conditions. Remarkably, the contributions to several thermodynamic quantities of the q -induced nonextensivity close to the extensive regime are explicitly calculated in the low-temperature regime by overcoming the calculation of the q grand-partition function.

  9. Phonon spectral functions of photo-generated hot carrier plasmas: effects of carrier screening and plasmon-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2017-02-15

    We investigate spectral behavior of phonon spectral functions in an interacting multi-component hot carrier plasma. Spectral analysis of various phonon spectral functions is performed considering carrier-phonon channels of polar and nonpolar optical phonons, acoustic deformation-potential, and piezoelectric Coulomb couplings. Effects of phonon self-energy corrections are examined at finite temperature within a random phase approximation extended to include the effects of dynamic screening, plasmon-phonon coupling, and local-field corrections of the plasma species. We provide numerical data for the case of a photo-generated electron-hole plasma formed in a wurtzite GaN. Our result shows the clear significance of the multiplicity of the plasma species in the phonon spectral functions of a multi-component plasma giving rise to a variety of spectral behaviors of carrier-phonon coupled collective modes. A useful sum rule on the plasma-species-resolved dielectric functions is also found.

  10. Phonon spectral functions of photo-generated hot carrier plasmas: effects of carrier screening and plasmon-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectral behavior of phonon spectral functions in an interacting multi-component hot carrier plasma. Spectral analysis of various phonon spectral functions is performed considering carrier-phonon channels of polar and nonpolar optical phonons, acoustic deformation-potential, and piezoelectric Coulomb couplings. Effects of phonon self-energy corrections are examined at finite temperature within a random phase approximation extended to include the effects of dynamic screening, plasmon-phonon coupling, and local-field corrections of the plasma species. We provide numerical data for the case of a photo-generated electron-hole plasma formed in a wurtzite GaN. Our result shows the clear significance of the multiplicity of the plasma species in the phonon spectral functions of a multi-component plasma giving rise to a variety of spectral behaviors of carrier-phonon coupled collective modes. A useful sum rule on the plasma-species-resolved dielectric functions is also found.

  11. Optimization of the autocorrelation weighting function for the time-domain calculation of spectral centroids.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seo; Hur, Don; Kim, Hyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Spectral centroid from the backscattered ultrasound provides important information about the attenuation properties of soft tissues and Doppler effects of blood flows. Because the spectral centroid is originally determined from the power spectrum of backscattered ultrasound signals in the frequency domain, it is natural to calculate it after converting time-domain signals into spectral domain signals, using the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Recent research, however, derived the time-domain equations for calculating the spectral centroid using a Parseval's theorem, to avoid the calculation of the Fourier transform. The work only presented the final result, which showed that the computational time of the proposed time-domain method was 4.4 times faster than that of the original FFT-based method, whereas the average estimation error was negligible. In this paper, we present the optimal design of the autocorrelation weighting function, which is used for the timedomain spectral centroid estimation process, to reduce the computational time significantly. We also carry out a comprehensive analysis of the computational complexities of the FFTbased and time-domain methods with respect to the length of ultrasound signal segments. The simulation results using numerical phantoms show that, with the optimized autocorrelation weighting function, we only need approximately 3% of the full set of data points. In addition to that, because the proposed optimization technique requires a fixed number of data points to calculate the spectral centroid, the execution time is constant as the length of the data segment increases, whereas the execution time of the conventional FFT-based method is increased. Analysis of the computational complexities between the proposed method and the conventional FFT-based method presents O(N) and O(Nlog2N), respectively.

  12. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, A.; Alvarez, G.

    2016-11-01

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. This paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper then studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases studied indicate that the Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.

  13. Spectral collocation methods using sine functions for a rotating Bose-Einstein condensation in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Shuang; Chang, Shing-Lin; Chien, Cheng-Sheng

    2012-02-01

    We study spectral-Galerkin methods (SGM) and spectral collocation methods (SCM) for parameter-dependent problems, where the Fourier sine functions are used as the basis functions. When the SGM and the SCM are incorporated in the context of a Taylor predictor-inexact Newton corrector continuation algorithm for tracing solution curves of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), they can efficiently provide accurate numerical solutions for the GPE. We show how the inexact Newton method outperforms the classical Newton method in the continuation algorithm. In our numerical experiments, the centered difference method (CDM), the SGM and SCM are exploited to compute energy levels and wave functions of a rotating Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and a rotating BEC in optical lattices in 2D. Sample numerical results are reported.

  14. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-11-21

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. Our paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper also studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases we studied indicate that themore » Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.« less

  15. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-11-21

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. Our paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper also studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases we studied indicate that the Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.

  16. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors.

    PubMed

    Nocera, A; Alvarez, G

    2016-11-01

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. This paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper then studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases studied indicate that the Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.

  17. Single-particle spectral function of the Λ hyperon in finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2017-02-01

    The spectral function of the Λ hyperon in finite nuclei is calculated from the corresponding Λ self-energy, which is constructed within a perturbative many-body approach using some of the hyperon-nucleon interactions of the Jülich and Nijmegen groups. Binding energies, wave functions and disoccupation numbers of different single-particle states are obtained for various hypernuclei from He5Λ to Pb209Λ. The agreement between the calculated binding energies and experimental data is qualitatively good. The small spin-orbit splitting of the p- , d- , f- and g-wave states is confirmed. The discrete and the continuum contributions of the single-Λ spectral function are computed. Their appearance is qualitatively similar to that of the nucleons. The Z-factor, that measures the importance of correlations, is also calculated. Our results show that its value is relatively large, indicating that the Λ hyperon is less correlated than nucleons. This is in agreement with the results obtained by other authors for the correlations of the Λ in infinite nuclear matter. The disoccupation numbers are obtained by integrating the spectral function over the energy. Our results show that the discrete contribution to the disoccupation number decreases when increasing the momentum of the Λ. This indicates that, in the production reactions of hypernuclei, the Λ hyperon is mostly formed in a quasi-free state.

  18. Single-particle spectral function for the classical one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortmann, C.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral function for an electron one-component plasma is calculated self-consistently using the GW(0) approximation for the single-particle self-energy. In this way, correlation effects that go beyond the mean-field description of the plasma are contained, i.e., the collisional damping of single-particle states, the dynamical screening of the interaction, and the appearance of collective plasma modes. Second, a nonperturbative analytic solution for the on-shell GW(0) self-energy as a function of momentum is presented. It reproduces the numerical data for the spectral function with a relative error of less than 10% in the regime where the Debye screening parameter is smaller than the inverse Bohr radius, κ<1aB-1 . In the limit of low density, the nonperturbative self-energy behaves as n1/4 , whereas a perturbation expansion leads to the unphysical result of a density-independent self-energy [Fennel and Wilfer, Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 32, 265 (1974)]. The derived expression will greatly facilitate the calculation of observables in correlated plasmas (transport properties, equation of state) that need the spectral function as an input quantity. This is demonstrated for the shift of the chemical potential, which is computed from the analytical formulas and compared to the GW(0) result. At a plasma temperature of 100eV and densities below 1021cm-3 , the two approaches deviate by less than 10% from each other.

  19. Energetic Particle Spectral Shapes in Planetary Magnetospheres; Assessment of the Kappa Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.

    2015-12-01

    In assessing the efficacy of the kappa distribution function in space environments, it is useful to follow two paths. First, to what extent do we consider the kappa function (or any function) to represent some kind of universal spectral shape that indicates common physical processes occurring in a wide diversity of space environments? Second, how useful is the kappa function in quantitatively characterizing observed spectral shapes, particularly for the purpose permitting further quantitative analyses of the environment (e. g. wave growth). In this report I evaluate the efficacy of the kappa distribution in representing energetic particle spectral shapes in planetary magnetospheres from both perspectives. In particular, I expand on the extensive treatment provided by Carbary et al. (2014) by taking a more explicit comparative approach between the different planets (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) and also focusing on the most intense (and therefore from my perspective the most interesting) spectra within each of these different planets. There is no question that the "power law tail" represents as close to a universal characteristic of planetary space environments as one could hope to find. Such a universal shape must represent some universality in the energization and/or equilibrating processes. Also, there is no question that such tails must (to be non-divergent) and do roll over to flatter shapes at lower energies. In a number of applications, this basic characteristic has been usefully characterized by the kappa function to extract such parameters of the system as flow velocities. However, at least for the more intense spectra at Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, the kappa function in fact does a relatively poor job in representing the low energy roll-over of energetic particle spectra. Other functional forms have been found to be much more useful for characterizing these spectral shapes over a broad range of energies. And specifically, a very

  20. Detector level ABI spectral response function: FM4 analysis and comparison for different ABI modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, Boryana; Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Frank; Wu, Xiangqian

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of imaging instruments Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is to be launched aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites - R Series (GOES-R). Four ABI flight modules (FM) are planned to be launched on GOES-R,S,T,U, the first one in the fall of 2016. Pre-launch testing is on-going for FM3 and FM4. ABI has 16 spectral channels, six in the visible/near infrared (VNIR 0.47 - 2.25 μm), and ten in the thermal infrared (TIR 3.9 - 13.3 μm) spectral regions, to be calibrated on-orbit by observing respectively a solar diffuser and a blackbody. Each channel has hundreds of detectors arranged in columns. Operationally one Analytic Generation of Spectral Response (ANGEN) function will be used to represent the spectral response function (SRF) of all detectors in a band. The Vendor conducted prelaunch end-to-end SRF testing to compare to ANGEN; detector specific SRF data was taken for: i) best detector selected (BDS) mode - for FM 2,3, and 4; and ii) all detectors (column mode) - for four spectral bands in FM3 and FM4. The GOES-R calibration working group (CWG) has independently used the SRF test data for FM2 and FM3 to study the potential impact of detector-to-detector SRF differences on the ABI detected Earth view radiances. In this paper we expand the CWG analysis to include the FM4 SRF test data - the results are in agreement with the Vendor analysis, and show excellent instrument performance and compare the detector-to-detector SRF differences and their potential impact on the detected Earth view radiances for all of the tested ABI modules.

  1. Spectral Function and Quasiparticle Damping of Interacting Bosons in Two Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sinner, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter; Hasselmann, Nils

    2009-03-27

    We employ the functional renormalization group to study dynamical properties of the two-dimensional Bose gas. Our approach is free of infrared divergences, which plague the usual diagrammatic approaches, and is consistent with the exact Nepomnyashchy identity, which states that the anomalous self-energy vanishes at zero frequency and momentum. We recover the correct infrared behavior of the propagators and present explicit results for the spectral line shape, from which we extract the quasiparticle dispersion and dampi0008.

  2. Nucleon spectral function at finite temperature and the onset of superfluidity in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, T.; Roepke, G.; Schnell, A.; Kwong, N.H.; Koehler, H.S.

    1996-05-01

    Nucleon self-energies and spectral functions are calculated at the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperatures. In particular, the behavior of these quantities at temperatures above and close to the critical temperature for the superfluid phase transition in nuclear matter is discussed. It is shown how the singularity in the thermodynamic {ital T} matrix at the critical temperature for superfluidity (Thouless criterion) reflects in the self-energy and correspondingly in the spectral function. The real part of the on-shell self-energy (optical potential) shows an anomalous behavior for momenta near the Fermi momentum and temperatures close to the critical temperature related to the pairing singularity in the imaginary part. For comparison the self-energy derived from the {ital K} matrix of Brueckner theory is also calculated. It is found that there is no pairing singularity in the imaginary part of the self-energy in this case, which is due to the neglect of hole-hole scattering in the {ital K} matrix. From the self-energy the spectral function and the occupation numbers for finite temperatures are calculated. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Spectral correlation functions of the sum of two independent complex Wishart matrices with unequal covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Checinski, Tomasz; Kieburg, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We compute the spectral statistics of the sum H of two independent complex Wishart matrices, each of which is correlated with a different covariance matrix. Random matrix theory enjoys many applications including sums and products of random matrices. Typically ensembles with correlations among the matrix elements are much more difficult to solve. Using a combination of supersymmetry, superbosonisation and bi-orthogonal functions we are able to determine all spectral k-point density correlation functions of H for arbitrary matrix size N. In the half-degenerate case, when one of the covariance matrices is proportional to the identity, the recent results by Kumar for the joint eigenvalue distribution of H serve as our starting point. In this case the ensemble has a bi-orthogonal structure and we explicitly determine its kernel, providing its exact solution for finite N. The kernel follows from computing the expectation value of a single characteristic polynomial. In the general non-degenerate case the generating function for the k-point resolvent is determined from a supersymmetric evaluation of the expectation value of k ratios of characteristic polynomials. Numerical simulations illustrate our findings for the spectral density at finite N and we also give indications how to do the asymptotic large-N analysis.

  4. A perturbative approach to the spectral zeta functions of strings, drums, and quantum billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo

    2012-12-15

    We show that the spectral zeta functions of inhomogeneous strings and drums can be calculated using Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory. The inhomogeneities that can be treated with this method are small but otherwise arbitrary and include the previously studied case of a piecewise constant density. In two dimensions the method can be used to derive the spectral zeta function of a domain obtained from the small deformation of a square. We also obtain exact sum rules that are valid for arbitrary densities and that correspond to the values taken by the spectral zeta function at integer positive values; we have tested numerically these sum rules in specific examples. We show that the Dirichlet or Neumann Casimir energies of an inhomogeneous string, evaluated to first order in perturbation theory, contain in some cases an irremovable divergence, but that the combination of the two is always free of divergences. Finally, our calculation of the Casimir energies of a string with piecewise constant density and of two perfectly conducting concentric cylinders, of similar radius, reproduce the results previously published.

  5. A spectral Phase-Amplitude method for propagating a wave function to large distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawitscher, George

    2015-06-01

    The phase and amplitude (Ph-A) of a wave function vary slowly with distance, in contrast to the wave function that can be highly oscillatory. Hence the Ph-A representation of a wave function requires far fewer computational mesh points than the wave function itself. In 1930 Milne presented an equation for the phase and the amplitude functions (which is different from the one developed by Calogero), and in 1962 Seaton and Peach solved these equations iteratively. The objective of the present study is to implement Seaton and Peach's iteration procedure with a spectral Chebyshev expansion method, and at the same time present a non-iterative analytic solution to an approximate version of the iterative equations. The iterations converge rapidly for the case of attractive potentials. Two numerical examples are given: (1) for a potential that decreases with distance as 1 /r3, and (2) a Coulomb potential ∝ 1 / r. In both cases the whole radial range of [0-2000] requires only between 25 and 100 mesh points and the corresponding accuracy is between 10-3 and 10-6. The 0th iteration (which is the WKB approximation) gives an accuracy of 10-2. This spectral method permits one to calculate a wave function out to large distances reliably and economically.

  6. Fractal dimensions of wave functions and local spectral measures on the Fibonacci chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macé, Nicolas; Jagannathan, Anuradha; Piéchon, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical framework for understanding the wave functions and spectrum of an extensively studied paradigm for quasiperiodic systems, namely the Fibonacci chain. Our analytical results, which are obtained in the limit of strong modulation of the hopping amplitudes, are in good agreement with published numerical data. In the perturbative limit, we show a symmetry of wave functions under permutation of site and energy indices. We compute the wave-function renormalization factors and from them deduce analytical expressions for the fractal exponents corresponding to individual wave functions, as well as their global averages. The multifractality of wave functions is seen to appear at next-to-leading order in ρ . Exponents for the local spectral density are given, in extremely good accord with numerical calculations. Interestingly, our analytical results for exponents are observed to describe the system rather well even for values of ρ well outside the domain of applicability of perturbation theory.

  7. In-medium Spectral Functions in a Coarse-Graining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Weil, Janus; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    We use a coarse-graining approach to extract local thermodynamic properties from simulations with a microscopic transport model by averaging over a large ensemble of events. Setting up a grid of small space-time cells and going into each cell's rest frame allows to determine baryon and energy density. With help of an equation of state we get the corresponding temperature T and baryon-chemical potential μB. These results are used for the calculation of the thermal dilepton yield. We apply and compare two different spectral functions for the ρ meson, firstly a calculation from hadronic many-body theory and secondly a calculation from experimental scattering amplitudes. The results obtained with our approach are compared to measurements of the NA60 Collaboration. A relatively good description of the data is achieved with both spectral functions. However, the hadronic many-body calculation is found to be closer to the experimental data with regard to the in-medium broadening of the spectral shape.

  8. Exact solution for the hypergeometric Green's function describing spectral formation in x-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.

    2005-05-01

    An eigenfunction expansion method involving hypergeometric functions is used to solve the partial differential equation governing the transport of radiation in an X-ray pulsar accretion column containing a radiative shock. The procedure yields the exact solution for the Green's function, which describes the scattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from a source located near the surface of the star. Collisions between the injected photons and the infalling electrons cause the radiation to gain energy as it diffuses through the gas and gradually escapes by passing through the walls of the column. The presence of the shock enhances the energization of the radiation and creates a power-law spectrum at high energies, which is typical for a Fermi process. The analytical solution for the Green's function provides important physical insight into the spectral formation process in X-ray pulsars, and it also has direct relevance for the interpretation of spectral data for these sources. Additional interesting mathematical aspects of the problem include the establishment of a closed-form expression for the quadratic normalization integrals of the orthogonal eigenfunctions, and the derivation of a new summation formula involving products of hypergeometric functions. By taking various limits of the general expressions, we also develop new linear and bilinear generating functions for the Jacobi polynomials.

  9. Using singular value decomposition to compute the conditioned cross-spectral density matrix and coherence functions

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.

    1995-08-07

    It is shown that the usual method for computing the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input/multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross spectral density matrix of the inputs and outputs. The modified form of Cholesky decomposition used is G{sub zz} = LCL{prime}, where G is the cross spectral density matrix of inputs and outputs, L is a lower; triangular matrix with ones on the diagonal, and C is a diagonal matrix, and the symbol {prime} denotes the conjugate transpose. If a diagonal element of C is zero, the off diagonal elements in the corresponding column of L are set to zero. It is shown that the results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of G{sub zz}. The formulation as a SVD problem suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  10. Stochastic chaos induced by diffusion processes with identical spectral density but different probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Youming; Zheng, Fan

    2016-12-01

    Stochastic chaos induced by diffusion processes, with identical spectral density but different probability density functions (PDFs), is investigated in selected lightly damped Hamiltonian systems. The threshold amplitude of diffusion processes for the onset of chaos is derived by using the stochastic Melnikov method together with a mean-square criterion. Two quasi-Hamiltonian systems, namely, a damped single pendulum and damped Duffing oscillator perturbed by stochastic excitations, are used as illustrative examples. Four different cases of stochastic processes are taking as the driving excitations. It is shown that in such two systems the spectral density of diffusion processes completely determines the threshold amplitude for chaos, regardless of the shape of their PDFs, Gaussian or otherwise. Furthermore, the mean top Lyapunov exponent is employed to verify analytical results. The results obtained by numerical simulations are in accordance with the analytical results. This demonstrates that the stochastic Melnikov method is effective in predicting the onset of chaos in the quasi-Hamiltonian systems.

  11. Stochastic chaos induced by diffusion processes with identical spectral density but different probability density functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Youming; Zheng, Fan

    2016-12-01

    Stochastic chaos induced by diffusion processes, with identical spectral density but different probability density functions (PDFs), is investigated in selected lightly damped Hamiltonian systems. The threshold amplitude of diffusion processes for the onset of chaos is derived by using the stochastic Melnikov method together with a mean-square criterion. Two quasi-Hamiltonian systems, namely, a damped single pendulum and damped Duffing oscillator perturbed by stochastic excitations, are used as illustrative examples. Four different cases of stochastic processes are taking as the driving excitations. It is shown that in such two systems the spectral density of diffusion processes completely determines the threshold amplitude for chaos, regardless of the shape of their PDFs, Gaussian or otherwise. Furthermore, the mean top Lyapunov exponent is employed to verify analytical results. The results obtained by numerical simulations are in accordance with the analytical results. This demonstrates that the stochastic Melnikov method is effective in predicting the onset of chaos in the quasi-Hamiltonian systems.

  12. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [18F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  13. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions.

    PubMed

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J

    2016-06-21

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [(18)F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  14. Comparative spectral analysis between the functionality of the human eye and of the optical part of a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2015-02-01

    A software that comparatively analysis the spectral functionality of the optical part of the human eye and of the optical image acquisition system of the digital camera, is presented. Comparisons are done using demonstrative images which present the spectral color transformations of an image that is considered the test object. To perform the simulations are presented the spectral models and are computed their effects on the colors of the spectral image, during the propagation of the D48 sun light through the eye and the optics of the digital camera. The simulations are made using a spectral image processing algorithm which converts the spectral image into XYZ color space, CIE CAM02 color appearance model and then into RGB color space.

  15. The busy function: a new analytic function for describing the integrated 21-cm spectral profile of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmeier, T.; Jurek, R.; Obreschkow, D.; Koribalski, B. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2014-02-01

    Accurate parametrization of galaxies detected in the 21-cm H I emission is of fundamental importance to the measurement of commonly used indicators of galaxy evolution, including the Tully-Fisher relation and the H I mass function. Here, we propose a new analytic function, named the `busy function', that can be used to accurately describe the characteristic double-horn H I profile of many galaxies. The busy function is a continuous, differentiable function that consists of only two basic functions, the error function, erf(x), and a polynomial, |x|n, of degree n ≥ 2. We present the basic properties of the busy function and illustrate its great flexibility in fitting a wide range of H I profiles from the Gaussian profiles of dwarf galaxies to the broad, asymmetric double-horn profiles of spiral galaxies. Applications of the busy function include the accurate and efficient parametrization of observed H I spectra of galaxies and the construction of spectral templates for simulations and matched-filtering algorithms. We demonstrate the busy function's power by automatically fitting it to the H I spectra of 1000 galaxies from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) Bright Galaxy Catalog, using our own C/C++ implementation, and comparing the resulting parameters with the catalogued ones. We also present two methods for determining the uncertainties of observational parameters derived from the fit.

  16. Techniques for estimating the unknown functions of incomplete experimental spectral and correlation response matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Borsoi, Laurent; Delaune, Xavier; Piteau, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose analytical and numerical straightforward approximate methods to estimate the unknown terms of incomplete spectral or correlation matrices, when the cross-spectra or cross-correlations available from multiple measurements do not cover all pairs of transducer locations. The proposed techniques may be applied whenever the available data includes the auto-spectra at all measurement locations, as well as selected cross-spectra which implicates all measurement locations. The suggested methods can also be used for checking the consistency between the spectral or correlation functions pertaining to measurement matrices, in cases of suspicious data. After presenting the proposed spectral estimation formulations, we discuss their merits and limitations. Then we illustrate their use on a realistic simulation of a multi-supported tube subjected to turbulence excitation from cross-flow. Finally, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques by extracting the modal responses of the simulated flow-excited tube, using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) method, from an incomplete response matrix 1

  17. [Colon adenoma detection using Kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein bands].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua-Jiang; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Xie, Shu-Sen; He, Bo-Hua; Li, Li-Bo; Chen, Xue-Mei; Wu, Guo-Yong; Lu, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Differential diagnosis of human colon adenoma was studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 590 to 1 064 nm pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 218% (p < 0.05) and 68.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. Pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 208% (p < 0.05) and 59.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. Pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the beta-carotene absorption bands at 480 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 41.7% (p < 0.05) and 32.9% (p < 0.05) respectively. Obviously, pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant changes in the contents of the DNA, protein and beta-carotene of colon epithelial tissues. The conclusion can be applied to rapid, low-cost and noninvasive optical biopsy of colon adenoma, and provides a useful reference.

  18. Assessing dynamic spectral causality by lagged adaptive directed transfer function and instantaneous effect factor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2014-07-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The nonzero covariance of the model's residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the "causal ordering" is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In this study, we first investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in time

  19. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  20. Unified Description of Electron-Nucleus Scattering within the Spectral Function Formalism.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Noemi; Lovato, Alessandro; Benhar, Omar

    2016-05-13

    The formalism based on factorization and nuclear spectral functions has been generalized to treat transition matrix elements involving two-nucleon currents, whose contribution to the nuclear electromagnetic response in the transverse channel is known to be significant. We report the results of calculations of the inclusive electron-carbon cross section, showing that the inclusion of processes involving two-nucleon currents appreciably improves the agreement between theory and data in the dip region, between the quasielastic and Δ-production peaks. The relation to approaches based on the independent particle of the nucleus and the implications for the analysis of flux-integrated neutrino-nucleus cross sections are discussed.

  1. Spectral properties of a double-quantum-dot structure: A causal Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J. Q.; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    1999-09-01

    Spectral properties of a double quantum dot (QD) structure are studied by a causal Green's function (GF) approach. The double QD system is modeled by an Anderson-type Hamiltonian in which both the intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions are taken into account. The GF's are derived by an equation-of-motion method and the real-space renormalization-group technique. The numerical results show that the average occupation number of electrons in the QD exhibits staircase features and the local density of states depends appreciably on the electron occupation of the dot.

  2. Cross spectral measurement of head related speech transfer functions using speaker's own voice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukina, Masumi; Kawahara, Hideki

    2002-11-01

    A cross spectrum method is applied to measure sound pressure variations around the head using the speaker's own speech sounds. The variations are represented as transfer functions from the mouth reference point to a set of measuring points. Preliminary tests indicated that there are systematic frequency response variations depending on vowel colors. This vowel color dependency was not replicated in the classical measurement of speech radiation characteristics by J. L. Flanagan. However, taking into account the large (sometimes exceeding 20 dB) amount of variations, it is not likely to be negligible. A set of calibration and normalization procedures were introduced to reduce artifacts due to background noise, room acoustics, zeros in the speech spectra. A series of M-sequence based transfer function measurements were also conducted using a head and torso simulator to evaluate intrinsic errors in the cross spectral measurements. It was found that the standard errors in the cross spectral measurements using recorded speech sounds are around 1 dB. Based on these reference data and confidence interval calculations based on coherence, it is safe to conclude that the vowel color dependency is significantly modifying the transfer functions. [Work supported by JSPS.

  3. Holographic vector mesons from spectral functions at finite baryon or isospin density

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Kaminski, Matthias; Rust, Felix

    2008-02-15

    We consider gauge/gravity duality with flavor for the finite-temperature field theory dual of the AdS-Schwarzschild black hole background with embedded D7-brane probes. In particular, we investigate spectral functions at finite baryon density in the black hole phase. We determine the resonance frequencies corresponding to meson-mass peaks as function of the quark mass over temperature ratio. We find that these frequencies have a minimum for a finite value of the quark mass. If the quotient of quark mass and temperature is increased further, the peaks move to larger frequencies. At the same time the peaks narrow, in agreement with the formation of nearly stable vector meson states which exactly reproduce the meson-mass spectrum found at zero temperature. We also calculate the diffusion coefficient, which has finite value for all quark mass to temperature ratios, and exhibits a first-order phase transition. Finally we consider an isospin chemical potential and find that the spectral functions display a resonance peak splitting, similar to the isospin meson-mass splitting observed in effective QCD models.

  4. Spectral properties of the gauge invariant quark Green's function in two-dimensional QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sazdjian, H.

    2010-06-01

    The gauge invariant quark Green's function with a path-ordered phase factor along a straight line is studied in two-dimensional QCD in the large-N{sub c} limit by means of an exact integrodifferential equation. Its spectral functions are analytically determined. They are infrared finite and lie on the positive real axis of the complex plane of the momentum squared variable, corresponding to momenta in the forward light cone. Their singularities are represented by an infinite number of threshold type branch points with power-law -3/2, starting at positive mass values, characterized by an integer number n and increasing with n. The analytic expression of the Green's function for all momenta is presented. The appearance of strong threshold singularities is suggestive of the fact that quarks could not be observed as asymptotic states.

  5. Spectral function of InAs /InGaAs quantum dots in a well detector using Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naser, M. A.; Deen, M. J.; Thompson, D. A.

    2006-11-01

    Theoretical modeling of an InAs /InGaAs quantum dot-in-a well (DWELL) detector is reported. The DWELL structure consists of pyramidal-shaped InAs quantum dots with dimensions of 11nm (base) and 6.5nm (height) placed on the top half of an InGaAs quantum well of 11nm width, which is buried in a GaAs matrix. The Green's function method is used to calculate the spectral function and the density of states of the DWELL. The kinetic equation that governs Green's functions is solved numerically using the method of finite differences. From the information obtained from the density of states, the responsivity of the DWELL can be estimated. The calculated energy eigenvalues are compared with the experimentally measured responsivity of a DWELL detector.

  6. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  7. Dilepton production in heavy-ion collisions with in-medium spectral functions of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, E.; Faessler, Amand; Fuchs, C.; Cozma, M. D.; Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Martemyanov, B.

    2008-09-15

    The in-medium spectral functions of {rho} and {omega} mesons and the broadening of nucleon resonances at finite baryon density are calculated self-consistently by combining a resonance dominance model for the vector meson production with an extended vector meson dominance model. The influence of the in-medium modifications of the vector meson properties on the dilepton spectrum in heavy-ion collisions is investigated. The dilepton spectrum is generated for the C+C reaction at 2.0A GeV and compared with recent HADES Collaboration data. The collision dynamics is then described by the Tuebingen relativistic quantum molecular dynamics transport model. We find that an iterative calculation of the vector meson spectral functions that takes into account the broadening of the nucleon resonances due to their increased in-medium decay branchings is convergent and provides a reasonable description of the experimental data in the mass region 0.45{<=}M{<=}0.75 GeV. On the other side, the theoretical calculations slightly underestimate the region m{sub {pi}}{<=}M{<=}0.4 GeV. Popular in-medium scenarios such as a schematic collisional broadening and dropping vector mesons masses are discussed as well.

  8. A spectral scheme for Kohn-Sham density functional theory of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amartya S.; Elliott, Ryan S.; James, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    Starting from the observation that one of the most successful methods for solving the Kohn-Sham equations for periodic systems - the plane-wave method - is a spectral method based on eigenfunction expansion, we formulate a spectral method designed towards solving the Kohn-Sham equations for clusters. This allows for efficient calculation of the electronic structure of clusters (and molecules) with high accuracy and systematic convergence properties without the need for any artificial periodicity. The basis functions in this method form a complete orthonormal set and are expressible in terms of spherical harmonics and spherical Bessel functions. Computation of the occupied eigenstates of the discretized Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian is carried out using a combination of preconditioned block eigensolvers and Chebyshev polynomial filter accelerated subspace iterations. Several algorithmic and computational aspects of the method, including computation of the electrostatics terms and parallelization are discussed. We have implemented these methods and algorithms into an efficient and reliable package called ClusterES (Cluster Electronic Structure). A variety of benchmark calculations employing local and non-local pseudopotentials are carried out using our package and the results are compared to the literature. Convergence properties of the basis set are discussed through numerical examples. Computations involving large systems that contain thousands of electrons are demonstrated to highlight the efficacy of our methodology. The use of our method to study clusters with arbitrary point group symmetries is briefly discussed.

  9. Two-Flux Green's Function Analysis for Transient Spectral Radiation in a Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is developed for obtaining transient temperatures in a two-layer semitransparent composite with spectrally dependent properties. Each external boundary of the composite is subjected to radiation and convection. The two-flux radiative transfer equations are solved by deriving a Green's function. This yields the local radiative heat source needed to numerically solve the transient energy equation. An advantage of the two-flux method is that isotropic scattering is included without added complexity. The layer refractive indices are larger than one. This produces internal reflections at the boundaries and the internal interface; the reflections are assumed diffuse. Spectral results using the Green's function method are verified by comparing with numerical solutions using the exact radiative transfer equations. Transient temperature distributions are given to illustrate the effect of radiative heating on one side of a composite with external convective cooling. The protection of a material from incident radiation is illustrated by adding scattering to the layer adjacent to the radiative source.

  10. The spectral function of 40Ar through the (e ,e' p) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; E12-14-012 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator based neutrino-oscillation measurements, where neutrinos interact predominantly with nucleons bound in nuclei, demand an accurate description of the cross sections. Nuclear effects play a decisive role and are considered one of the main sources of systematic uncertainties. An effort is underway to develop theoretical models capable of a fully quantitative description of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections. An approach based on many body theory has proven successful in explaining electron-nucleus cross sections. The application of this approach to the analysis of neutrino interactions will require accurate models of the spectral functions for the nuclei in neutrino detectors. Of paramount importance is 40Ar, to be used in the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE, formerly LBNE). A 40Ar (e ,e' p) experiment which will prove indispensable for the construction of the argon spectral function has been approved at Jefferson Lab. The (e ,e' p) data, in addition, will advance theoretical developments, including the description of final-state interactions, unavoidable in neutrino experiments. The motivation, goals, experimental details and plans for the execution of this measurement will be discussed.

  11. Characterization of frontal air-sea interaction by spectral transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Niklas; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nonaka, Masami

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric response to fronts of sea surface temperature is typically characterized by regressions between wind speed, wind stress curl and divergence, with frontal scale variations of sea surface temperature and its down- and cross-wind gradients. We extend this approach spectral space to test underlying dynamics. Recently, we introduced a linear model for the response of the atmospheric boundary layer to mesoscale variations the sea surface temperature. The model includes the impact of sea surface temperature fronts on vertical mixing and on pressure gradients, and includes advection by a background Ekman spiral. Model dynamics are governed by transfer function in wave-number space between sea surface temperature, and frontally boundary layer variables. To test the physics of this linear model, we use frontally induced wind speed and direction as simulated by a high resolution atmospheric general circulation model, and evaluate the spectral transfer functions. For the Southern Ocean results show encouraging agreements and suggest that the linear model captures the underlying physics. In contrast, the Kuroshio region is more challenging.

  12. A spectral scheme for Kohn–Sham density functional theory of clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amartya S. Elliott, Ryan S. James, Richard D.

    2015-04-15

    Starting from the observation that one of the most successful methods for solving the Kohn–Sham equations for periodic systems – the plane-wave method – is a spectral method based on eigenfunction expansion, we formulate a spectral method designed towards solving the Kohn–Sham equations for clusters. This allows for efficient calculation of the electronic structure of clusters (and molecules) with high accuracy and systematic convergence properties without the need for any artificial periodicity. The basis functions in this method form a complete orthonormal set and are expressible in terms of spherical harmonics and spherical Bessel functions. Computation of the occupied eigenstates of the discretized Kohn–Sham Hamiltonian is carried out using a combination of preconditioned block eigensolvers and Chebyshev polynomial filter accelerated subspace iterations. Several algorithmic and computational aspects of the method, including computation of the electrostatics terms and parallelization are discussed. We have implemented these methods and algorithms into an efficient and reliable package called ClusterES (Cluster Electronic Structure). A variety of benchmark calculations employing local and non-local pseudopotentials are carried out using our package and the results are compared to the literature. Convergence properties of the basis set are discussed through numerical examples. Computations involving large systems that contain thousands of electrons are demonstrated to highlight the efficacy of our methodology. The use of our method to study clusters with arbitrary point group symmetries is briefly discussed.

  13. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  14. Structure-function relationships using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: comparison with scanning laser polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Aptel, Florent; Sayous, Romain; Fortoul, Vincent; Beccat, Sylvain; Denis, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the regional relationships between visual field sensitivity and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry. Prospective cross-sectional study. One hundred and twenty eyes of 120 patients (40 with healthy eyes, 40 with suspected glaucoma, and 40 with glaucoma) were tested on Cirrus-OCT, GDx VCC, and standard automated perimetry. Raw data on RNFL thickness were extracted for 256 peripapillary sectors of 1.40625 degrees each for the OCT measurement ellipse and 64 peripapillary sectors of 5.625 degrees each for the GDx VCC measurement ellipse. Correlations between peripapillary RNFL thickness in 6 sectors and visual field sensitivity in the 6 corresponding areas were evaluated using linear and logarithmic regression analysis. Receiver operating curve areas were calculated for each instrument. With spectral-domain OCT, the correlations (r(2)) between RNFL thickness and visual field sensitivity ranged from 0.082 (nasal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, linear regression) to 0.726 (supratemporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, logarithmic regression). By comparison, with GDx-VCC, the correlations ranged from 0.062 (temporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, linear regression) to 0.362 (supratemporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, logarithmic regression). In pairwise comparisons, these structure-function correlations were generally stronger with spectral-domain OCT than with GDx VCC and with logarithmic regression than with linear regression. The largest areas under the receiver operating curve were seen for OCT superior thickness (0.963 ± 0.022; P < .001) in eyes with glaucoma and for OCT average thickness (0.888 ± 0.072; P < .001) in eyes with suspected glaucoma. The structure-function relationship was significantly stronger with spectral-domain OCT than with scanning laser polarimetry, and was better expressed

  15. Generation of time histories with a specified auto spectral density and probability density function

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.

    1996-08-01

    It is recognized that some dynamic and noise environments are characterized by time histories which are not Gaussian. An example is high intensity acoustic noise. Another example is some transportation vibration. A better simulation of these environments can be generated if a zero mean non-Gaussian time history can be reproduced with a specified auto (or power) spectral density (ASD or PSD) and a specified probability density function (pdf). After the required time history is synthesized, the waveform can be used for simulation purposes. For example, modem waveform reproduction techniques can be used to reproduce the waveform on electrodynamic or electrohydraulic shakers. Or the waveforms can be used in digital simulations. A method is presented for the generation of realizations of zero mean non-Gaussian random time histories with a specified ASD, and pdf. First a Gaussian time history with the specified auto (or power) spectral density (ASD) is generated. A monotonic nonlinear function relating the Gaussian waveform to the desired realization is then established based on the Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) of the desired waveform and the known CDF of a Gaussian waveform. The established function is used to transform the Gaussian waveform to a realization of the desired waveform. Since the transformation preserves the zero-crossings and peaks of the original Gaussian waveform, and does not introduce any substantial discontinuities, the ASD is not substantially changed. Several methods are available to generate a realization of a Gaussian distributed waveform with a known ASD. The method of Smallwood and Paez (1993) is an example. However, the generation of random noise with a specified ASD but with a non-Gaussian distribution is less well known.

  16. A new psychophysical method for determining the photopic spectral-luminosity function of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Rovamo, J; Koljonen, T; Näsänen, R

    1996-09-01

    Using an 8 mm pupil, 2AFC-method, and 2 x 2 deg2 grating at 2 c/deg we measured contrast sensitivity as a function of integrated radiance for a series of interference filters with peak wavelengths at 400-700 nm. Irrespective of the radiance level, contrast sensitivity was highest when wavelength was at and around 550 nm. It decreased towards longer and shorter wavelengths, reflecting the variation of the probability of quantal catch with light wavelength. When contrast sensitivity functions plotted in double logarithmic coordinates were shifted horizontally by multiplying the integrated radiances of each filter by an appropriate scaling factor, the functions superimposed onto a single curve. Contrast sensitivity at lower levels of relative radiance (R) increased in proportion to square root of R, obeying DeVries-Rose law, but at higher levels contrast sensitivity was constant, obeying Weber's law. Scaling factors plotted as a function of wavelength provided an estimate of V(lambda) quite similar to the standard 2 deg photopic spectral-luminosity function of CIE 1924.

  17. Spectral and structural studies of the anti-cancer drug Flutamide by density functional theoretical method.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, G; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-01-03

    A comprehensive screening of the more recent DFT theoretical approach to structural analysis is presented in this section of theoretical structural analysis. The chemical name of 2-methyl-N-[4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-propanamide is usually called as Flutamide (In the present study it is abbreviated as FLT) and is an important and efficacious drug in the treatment of anti-cancer resistant. The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, electronic and NMR spectral interpretation of Flutamide have been studied with the aid of density functional theory method (DFT). The vibrational assignments of the normal modes were performed on the basis of the PED calculations using the VEDA 4 program. Comparison of computational results with X-ray diffraction results of Flutamide allowed the evaluation of structure predictions and confirmed B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as accurate for structure determination. Application of scaling factors for IR and Raman frequency predictions showed good agreement with experimental values. This is supported the assignment of the major contributors of the vibration modes of the title compound. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The comparison of measured FTIR, FT-Raman, and UV-Visible data to calculated values allowed assignment of major spectral features of the title molecule. Besides, Frontier molecular orbital analyze was also investigated using theoretical calculations.

  18. Spectral and structural studies of the anti-cancer drug Flutamide by density functional theoretical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive screening of the more recent DFT theoretical approach to structural analysis is presented in this section of theoretical structural analysis. The chemical name of 2-methyl-N-[4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-propanamide is usually called as Flutamide (In the present study it is abbreviated as FLT) and is an important and efficacious drug in the treatment of anti-cancer resistant. The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, electronic and NMR spectral interpretation of Flutamide have been studied with the aid of density functional theory method (DFT). The vibrational assignments of the normal modes were performed on the basis of the PED calculations using the VEDA 4 program. Comparison of computational results with X-ray diffraction results of Flutamide allowed the evaluation of structure predictions and confirmed B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as accurate for structure determination. Application of scaling factors for IR and Raman frequency predictions showed good agreement with experimental values. This is supported the assignment of the major contributors of the vibration modes of the title compound. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The comparison of measured FTIR, FT-Raman, and UV-Visible data to calculated values allowed assignment of major spectral features of the title molecule. Besides, Frontier molecular orbital analyze was also investigated using theoretical calculations.

  19. Spectral functions of the one-dimensional Hubbard model in the U{r_arrow}+{infinity} limit: How to use the factorized wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Penc, K.; Hallberg, K.; Mila, F.; Shiba, H.

    1997-06-01

    We give the details of the calculation of the spectral functions of the one-dimensional Hubbard model using the spin-charge factorized wave function for several versions of the U{r_arrow}+{infinity} limit. The spectral functions are expressed as a convolution of charge and spin dynamical correlation functions. A procedure to evaluate these correlation functions very accurately for large systems is developed, and analytical results are presented for the low-energy region. These results are fully consistent with the conformal field theory. We also propose a direct method of extracting the exponents from the matrix elements in more general cases. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Performance evaluation of spectral vegetation indices using a statistical sensitivity function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Peters, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    A great number of spectral vegetation indices (VIs) have been developed to estimate biophysical parameters of vegetation. Traditional techniques for evaluating the performance of VIs are regression-based statistics, such as the coefficient of determination and root mean square error. These statistics, however, are not capable of quantifying the detailed relationship between VIs and biophysical parameters because the sensitivity of a VI is usually a function of the biophysical parameter instead of a constant. To better quantify this relationship, we developed a “sensitivity function” for measuring the sensitivity of a VI to biophysical parameters. The sensitivity function is defined as the first derivative of the regression function, divided by the standard error of the dependent variable prediction. The function elucidates the change in sensitivity over the range of the biophysical parameter. The Student's t- or z-statistic can be used to test the significance of VI sensitivity. Additionally, we developed a “relative sensitivity function” that compares the sensitivities of two VIs when the biophysical parameters are unavailable.

  1. Computation of the spectral density of two-point functions: Complex masses, cut rules, and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Dudal, David; Guimaraes, Marcelo S.

    2011-02-15

    We present a steepest descent calculation of the Kaellen-Lehmann spectral density of two-point functions involving complex conjugate masses in Euclidean space. This problem occurs in studies of (gauge) theories with Gribov-like propagators. As the presence of complex masses and the use of Euclidean space brings the theory outside of the strict validity of the Cutkosky cut rules, we discuss an alternative method based on the Widder inversion operator of the Stieltjes transformation. It turns out that the results coincide with those obtained by naively applying the cut rules. We also point out the potential usefulness of the Stieltjes (inversion) formalism when nonstandard propagators are used, in which case cut rules are not available at all.

  2. Multi-spectral Metasurface for Different Functional Control of Reflection Waves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Metasurface have recently generated much interest due to its strong manipulation of electromagnetic wave and its easy fabrication compared to bulky metamaterial. Here, we propose the design of a multi-spectral metasurface that can achieve beam deflection and broadband diffusion simultaneously at two different frequency bands. The metasurface is composed of two-layered metallic patterns backed by a metallic ground plane. The top-layer metasurface utilizes the cross-line structures with two different dimensions for producing 0 and π reflection phase response, while the bottom-layer metasurface is realized by a topological morphing of the I-shaped patterns for creating the gradient phase distribution. The whole metasurface is demonstrated to independently control the reflected waves to realize different functions at two bands when illuminated by a normal linear-polarized wave. Both simulation and experimental results show that the beam deflection is achieved at K-band with broadband diffusion at X-Ku band. PMID:27001206

  3. First Measurement of the {rho} Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Specht, H.J.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-04-28

    We report on a precision measurement of low-mass muon pairs in 158 AGeV indium-indium collisions at the CERN SPS. A significant excess of pairs is observed above the yield expected from neutral meson decays. The unprecedented sample size of 360 000 dimuons and the good mass resolution of about 2% allow us to isolate the excess by subtraction of the decay sources. The shape of the resulting mass spectrum is consistent with a dominant contribution from {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{yields}{rho}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation. The associated space-time averaged {rho} spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. This may rule out theoretical models linking hadron masses directly to the chiral condensate.

  4. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  5. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-01

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  7. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: spectral types and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Simon; Ronen, Shai; Price, Ian; Lahav, Ofer; Colless, Matthew; Maddox, Steve; Deeley, Kathryn; Glazebrook, Karl; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Driver, Simon P.; Dalton, Gavin; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kaiser, Nick; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Peacock, John; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    1999-09-01

    We describe the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the current status of the observations. In this exploratory paper, we apply a principal component analysis to a preliminary sample of 5869 galaxy spectra and use the two most significant components to split the sample into five spectral classes. These classes are defined by considering visual classifications of a subset of the 2dF spectra, and also by comparison with high-quality spectra of local galaxies. We calculate a luminosity function for each of the different classes and find that later-type galaxies have a fainter characteristic magnitude, and a steeper faint-end slope. For the whole sample we find M*=-19.7 (for Ω=1, H_0=100kms^-1Mpc^-1), α=-1.3, φ*=0.017. For class 1 (`early-type') we find M*=-19.6, α=-0.7, while for class 5 (`late-type') we find M*=-19.0, α=-1.7. The derived 2dF luminosity functions agree well with other recent luminosity function estimates.

  8. Spectral analysis of the Stromlo-APM Survey - II. Galaxy luminosity function and clustering by spectral type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, J.; Tresse, L.; Maddox, S.

    1999-11-01

    We study the luminosity function and clustering properties of subsamples of local galaxies selected from the Stromlo-APM Survey by the rest-frame equivalent widths of their Hα and [Oii] emission lines. The bJ luminosity function of star-forming galaxies has a significantly steeper faint-end slope than that for quiescent galaxies: the majority of sub-L* galaxies are currently undergoing significant star formation. Emission-line galaxies are less strongly clustered, both amongst themselves and with the general galaxy population, than are quiescent galaxies. Thus as well as being less luminous, star-forming galaxies also inhabit lower density regions of the Universe than quiescent galaxies.

  9. Infrared behavior and spectral function of a Bose superfluid at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, N.

    2009-10-15

    In a Bose superfluid, the coupling between transverse (phase) and longitudinal fluctuations leads to a divergence of the longitudinal correlation function, which is responsible for the occurrence of infrared divergences in the perturbation theory and the breakdown of the Bogoliubov approximation. We report a nonperturbative renormalization-group calculation of the one-particle Green's function of an interacting boson system at zero temperature. We find two regimes separated by a characteristic momentum scale k{sub G} ('Ginzburg' scale). While the Bogoliubov approximation is valid at large momenta and energies,|p|,|{omega}|/c>>k{sub G} (with c as the velocity of the Bogoliubov sound mode), in the infrared (hydrodynamic) regime,|p|,|{omega}|/c<function. In particular, we find that the anomalous self-energy agrees with the Bogoliubov result {sigma}{sub an}(p,{omega}){approx_equal}const at high energies and behaves as {sigma}{sub an}(p,{omega}){approx}(c{sup 2}p{sup 2}-{omega}{sup 2}){sup (d-3)/2} in the infrared regime (with d as the space dimension), in agreement with the Nepomnyashchii identity {sigma}{sub an}(0,0)=0 and the predictions of Popov's hydrodynamic theory. We argue that the hydrodynamic limit of the one-particle Green's function is fully determined by the knowledge of the exponent 3-d characterizing the divergence of the longitudinal susceptibility and the Ward identities associated to gauge and Galilean invariances. The infrared singularity of {sigma}{sub an}(p,{omega}) leads to a continuum of excitations (coexisting with the sound mode) which shows up in the one-particle spectral function.

  10. Resonant photoemission study of the 4f spectral function of cerium in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, N.; Bertran, F.; Gourieux, T.; Kierren, B.; Malterre, D.; Panaccione, G. |

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we present a resonant photoemission study of the cerium 4f spectral function in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces. By covering cerium ultrathin films with lanthanum, we completely suppress the surface contribution of the spectra. Then we show that the cerium atoms at the interface are in an intermediate valent state, whereas the f{sup 1} configuration is stabilized in the top layer. This method allows us to obtain the genuine 4f spectral function of the interface, and could be extended to a study of Ce-based compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  12. Assessing a learning process with functional ANOVA estimators of EEG power spectral densities.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, David; Ramírez-Moreno, Mauricio A

    2016-04-01

    We propose to assess the process of learning a task using electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements. In particular, we quantify changes in brain activity associated to the progression of the learning experience through the functional analysis-of-variances (FANOVA) estimators of the EEG power spectral density (PSD). Such functional estimators provide a sense of the effect of training in the EEG dynamics. For that purpose, we implemented an experiment to monitor the process of learning to type using the Colemak keyboard layout during a twelve-lessons training. Hence, our aim is to identify statistically significant changes in PSD of various EEG rhythms at different stages and difficulty levels of the learning process. Those changes are taken into account only when a probabilistic measure of the cognitive state ensures the high engagement of the volunteer to the training. Based on this, a series of statistical tests are performed in order to determine the personalized frequencies and sensors at which changes in PSD occur, then the FANOVA estimates are computed and analyzed. Our experimental results showed a significant decrease in the power of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] rhythms for ten volunteers during the learning process, and such decrease happens regardless of the difficulty of the lesson. These results are in agreement with previous reports of changes in PSD being associated to feature binding and memory encoding.

  13. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p < 0.05), 146.5% (p < 0.05), 282.4% (p < 0.05), 32.4% (p < 0.05), 56.00 (p < 0.05) and 83.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p < 0.05), 262.9% (p < 0.05), 660.1% (p < 0.05) and 34% (p < 0.05), 72. 2% (p < 0.05), 113.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were

  14. Spin, charge, and single-particle spectral functions of the one-dimensional quarter filled Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaad, F. F.

    2008-10-01

    We use a recently developed extension of the weak-coupling diagrammatic determinantal quantum Monte Carlo method to investigate the spin, charge, and single-particle spectral functions of the one-dimensional quarter filled Holstein model with phonon frequency ω0=0.1t . As a function of the dimensionless electron-phonon coupling we observe a transition from a Luttinger to a Luther-Emery liquid with dominant 2kf charge fluctuations. Emphasis is placed on the temperature dependence of the single-particle spectral function. At high temperatures and in both phases it is well accounted for within a self-consistent Born approximation. In the low-temperature Luttinger liquid phase we observe features that compare favorably with a bosonization approach retaining only forward scattering. In the Luther-Emery phase, the spectral function at low temperatures shows a quasiparticle gap that matches half the spin gap, whereas at temperatures above which this quasiparticle gap closes characteristic features of the Luttinger liquid model are apparent. Our results are based on lattice simulations on chains up to L=20 for two-particle properties and on cluster dynamical mean-field theory calculations with clusters up to 12 sites for the single-particle spectral function.

  15. DNA and protein changes caused by disease in human breast tissues probed by the Kubelka-Munk spectral functional.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanlong; Celmer, Edward J; Koutcher, Jason A; Alfano, R R

    2002-06-01

    Malignant, fibroadenoma, normal and adipose breast tissues were studied using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The absorption spectra of the breast tissues were extracted from the diffuse reflectance spectra using the Kubelka-Munk function (K-M function). The spectral features of the K-M function were identified and compared with those of the absorption spectra. The spectral features of the K-M function were assigned to DNA, protein, beta-carotene and hemoglobin (oxygenated and deoxygenated) molecules in the breast tissue. The amplitudes of the K-M function averaged from 275 to 285 nm and from 255 to 265 nm and were found to be different for malignant, fibroadenoma and normal tissues. These differences were attributed to changes in proteins and DNA. A set of critical parameters was determined for separating malignant tissues from fibroadenoma and normal tissues. This approach should hold for other tissue types such as cervix, uterus and colon.

  16. Development of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for in vivo Functional Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin

    Optical coherence tomography is a rapidly developing optical imaging modality capable of noninvasively providing depth resolved information of biological tissue at micrometer scale. In this thesis, we described several OCT technologies that can be used to double the imaging depth, realize functional vasculature imaging of biological tissue and increase the imaging speed of OCT system. Aim 1: Use of a scanner to introduce spatial frequency modulation to OCT spectral interferograms for in vivo full-range Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. A novel method was developed that could easily introduce a modulation frequency onto the X-direction (i.e., B-scan) of the FDOCT scanning system, enabling full-range Fourier-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (frFDOCT). Compared to the conventional FDOCT system, the newly developed frFDOCT system can provide increased system sensitivity and deeper imaging depth. The previous technology that can achieve frFDOCT either needed multiple steps for data capturing, which is time consuming, or required additional components which increased the system's complexity. The newly developed method generates a modulation spatial frequency in the spectral interferogram by simply offsetting the probe beam at the X-scanner. Aim 2: Using optical micro-angiography to achieve in vivo volumetric imaging of vascular perfusion within human retina and choroids. Optical Micro-Angiography (OMAG) is a functional extension of FDOCT technology. It can achieve visualization of vasculature network of biological tissue. In order to apply the OMAG method to image vasculature map of human retina and choroid, a phase compensation algorithm was developed, which could minimize the motion artifacts generated by the movements of human eye and head. Aim 3: Developing ultrahigh sensitive optical micro-angiography to achieve micro vasculature imaging of biological tissue. To improve the vasculature image quality, we developed ultrahigh sensitive OMAG (UHS

  17. Investigation of the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function of sea foam layer by the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Ma, L X; Wang, F Q; Wang, C A; Wang, C C; Tan, J Y

    2015-11-20

    Spectral properties of sea foam greatly affect ocean color remote sensing and aerosol optical thickness retrieval from satellite observation. This paper presents a combined Mie theory and Monte Carlo method to investigate visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of sea foam layers. A three-layer model of the sea foam is developed in which each layer is composed of large air bubbles coated with pure water. A pseudo-continuous model and Mie theory for coated spheres is used to determine the effective radiative properties of sea foam. The one-dimensional Cox-Munk surface roughness model is used to calculate the slope density functions of the wind-blown ocean surface. A Monte Carlo method is used to solve the radiative transfer equation. Effects of foam layer thickness, bubble size, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and wavelength on the spectral reflectance and BRDF are investigated. Comparisons between previous theoretical results and experimental data demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method. Sea foam can significantly increase the spectral reflectance and BRDF of the sea surface. The absorption coefficient of seawater near the surface is not the only parameter that influences the spectral reflectance. Meanwhile, the effects of bubble size, foam layer thickness, and solar zenith angle also cannot be obviously neglected.

  18. Phonon spectral function of the one-dimensional Holstein-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We use the continuous-time interaction expansion (CT-INT) quantum Monte Carlo method to calculate the phonon spectral function of the one-dimensional Holstein-Hubbard model at half-filling. Our results are consistent with a soft-mode Peierls transition in the adiabatic regime, and the existence of a central peak related to long-range order in the Peierls phase. We explain a previously observed feature at small momenta in terms of a hybridization of charge and phonon excitations. Tuning the system from a Peierls to a metallic phase with a nonzero Hubbard interaction suppresses the central peak, but a significant renormalization of the phonon dispersion remains. In contrast, the dispersion is only weakly modified in the Mott phase. We discuss finite-size effects, the relation to the dynamic charge structure factor, as well as additional sum rules and their implications. Finally, we reveal the existence of a discrete symmetry in a continuum field theory of the Holstein model, which is spontaneously broken in the Peierls phase.

  19. Melting of stripe phases and its signature in the single-particle spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowski, Marcin; Assaad, Fakher F.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental data [J. Fink, E. Schierle, E. Weschke, J. Geck, D. Hawthorn, V. Soltwisch, H. Wadati, H.-H. Wu, H. A. Dürr, N. Wizent, B. Büchner, and G. A. Sawatzky, Phys. Rev. B 79, 100502 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevB.79.100502] indicating the existence of a pure stripe charge order over unprecedently wide temperature range in La1.8-xEu0.2SrxCuO4 , we investigate the temperature-induced melting of the metallic stripe phase. In spite of taking into account local dynamic correlations within a real-space dynamical mean-field theory of the Hubbard model, we observe a mean-field-like melting of the stripe order irrespective of the choice of the next-nearest-neighbor hopping. The temperature dependence of the single-particle spectral function shows the stripe induced formation of a flat band around the antinodal points accompanied by the opening a gap in the nodal direction.

  20. Psychomotor performance during ozone exposure: spectral and discriminant function analysis of EEG

    SciTech Connect

    Gliner, J.A.; Horvath, S.M; Sorich, R.A.; Hanley, J.

    1980-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ozone on the electroencephalogram during psychomotor performance. The first experiment consisted of a 2-h visual sustained attention task in room air and 0.75 parts per million (ppM) ozone. The second experiment was a divided attention study which combined a visual choice reaction time situation with an auditory sustained attention task. Ozone levels in this experiment were 0.0 ppM, 0.3 ppM, and 0.75 ppM. Spectral and discriminant function analyses were performed on the EEG collected during these studies. Attempts were made to categorize the EEG between different ozone levels, at rest, during each task performance, and between task and no-task performance within each ambient air condition. Discriminations between conditions for individuals were quite good, but discriminations for the combined subjects were disappointing with the exception of those between task and no-task conditions, which were moderately good.

  1. Beyond histograms: Efficiently estimating radial distribution functions via spectral Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.

    2017-03-01

    Despite more than 40 years of research in condensed-matter physics, state-of-the-art approaches for simulating the radial distribution function (RDF) g(r) still rely on binning pair-separations into a histogram. Such methods suffer from undesirable properties, including subjectivity, high uncertainty, and slow rates of convergence. Moreover, such problems go undetected by the metrics often used to assess RDFs. To address these issues, we propose (I) a spectral Monte Carlo (SMC) quadrature method that yields g(r) as an analytical series expansion and (II) a Sobolev norm that assesses the quality of RDFs by quantifying their fluctuations. Using the latter, we show that, relative to histogram-based approaches, SMC reduces by orders of magnitude both the noise in g(r) and the number of pair separations needed for acceptable convergence. Moreover, SMC reduces subjectivity and yields simple, differentiable formulas for the RDF, which are useful for tasks such as coarse-grained force-field calibration via iterative Boltzmann inversion.

  2. Real-time Functional Analysis of Inertial Microfluidic Devices via Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Biqin; Chen, Siyu; Zhou, Fan; Chan, Christina H. Y.; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technology that enables real-time functional analysis of sorting microparticles and cells in an inertial microfluidic device. We demonstrated high-speed, high-resolution acquisition of cross-sectional images at a frame rate of 350 Hz, with a lateral resolution of 3 μm and an axial resolution of 1 μm within the microfluidic channel filled with water. We analyzed the temporal sequence of cross-sectional SD-OCT images to determine the position and diameter of microspheres in a spiral microfluidic channel under various flow rates. We used microspheres with known diameters to validate the sub-micrometer precision of the particle size analysis based on a scattering model of spherical microparticles. An additional investigation of sorting live HT-29 cells in the spiral microfluidic channel indicated that the distribution of cells within in the microchannel has a close correspondence with the cells’ size distribution. The label-free real-time imaging and analysis of microscale particles in flow offers robustness for practical applications with live cells and allows us to better understand the mechanisms of particle separations in microfluidic sorting systems. PMID:27619202

  3. Gender and speaker identification as a function of the number of channels in spectrally reduced speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Julio; Oliver, Juan C.

    2005-07-01

    Considerable research on speech intelligibility for cochlear-implant users has been conducted using acoustic simulations with normal-hearing subjects. However, some relevant topics about perception through cochlear implants remain scantly explored. The present study examined the perception by normal-hearing subjects of gender and identity of a talker as a function of the number of channels in spectrally reduced speech. Two simulation strategies were compared. They were implemented by two different processors that presented signals as either the sum of sine waves at the center of the channels or as the sum of noise bands. In Experiment 1, 15 subjects determined the gender of 40 talkers (20 males + 20 females) from a natural utterance processed through 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 16 channels with both processors. In Experiment 2, 56 subjects matched a natural sentence uttered by 10 talkers with the corresponding simulation replicas processed through 3, 4, 8, and 16 channels for each processor. In Experiment 3, 72 subjects performed the same task but different sentences were used for natural and processed stimuli. A control Experiment 4 was conducted to equate the processing steps between the two simulation strategies. Results showed that gender and talker identification was better for the sine-wave processor, and that performance through the noise-band processor was more sensitive to the number of channels. Implications and possible explanations for the superiority of sine-wave simulations are discussed.

  4. Effects of Mg(2+)on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of spinach photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chen; Xiao, Wu; Hao, Huang; Xiaoqing, Liu; Chao, Liu; Lei, Zheng; Fashui, Hong

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper we report the results obtained with the photosystem II (PSII) isolated from spinach treated by MgCl(2), and studied the effect of Mg(2+) on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of PSII. The results showed that Mg(2+) treatment at a suitable concentration could significantly increase the absorption intensity of PSII and the intensity ratio of Soret band to Q band of chlorophyll-a. The treatment also elevated the excited peak intensity at 230, 278 and 343 nm, and the emitted peak intensity at 304 and 682 nm, and the ratio of F(278)/F(230), respectively. The results implied that Mg(2+) increased absorbance for visible light, improving energy transfer among amino acids within PSII protein complex and accelerating energy transport from tyrosine residue to chlorophyll-a. The photochemical activity and oxygen evolving rate of PSII were also enhanced by Mg(2+). This is viewed as evidence that Mg(2+) can promote energy transfer and oxygen evolution in PSII of spinach.

  5. Viscosity of strongly interacting quantum fluids: Spectral functions and sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2010-05-15

    The viscosity of strongly interacting systems is a topic of great interest in diverse fields. We focus here on the bulk and shear viscosities of nonrelativistic quantum fluids, with particular emphasis on strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases. We use Kubo formulas for the bulk and shear viscosity spectral functions, {zeta}({omega}) and {eta}({omega}), respectively, to derive exact, nonperturbative results. Our results include a microscopic connection between the shear viscosity {eta} and the normal-fluid density {rho}{sub n}; sum rules for {zeta}({omega}) and {eta}({omega}) and their evolution through the BCS-BEC crossover (where BEC denotes Bose-Einstein condensate); and universal high-frequency tails for {eta}({omega}) and the dynamic structure factor S(q,{omega}). We use our sum rules to show that, at unitarity, {zeta}({omega}) is identically zero and thus relate {eta}({omega}) to density-density correlations. We predict that frequency-dependent shear viscosity {eta}({omega}) of the unitary Fermi gas can be experimentally measured using Bragg spectroscopy.

  6. Effects of Mg 2+on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of spinach photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chen; Xiao, Wu; Hao, Huang; Xiaoqing, Liu; Chao, Liu; Lei, Zheng; Fashui, Hong

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper we report the results obtained with the photosystem II (PSII) isolated from spinach treated by MgCl 2, and studied the effect of Mg 2+ on spectral characteristics and photosynthetic functions of PSII. The results showed that Mg 2+ treatment at a suitable concentration could significantly increase the absorption intensity of PSII and the intensity ratio of Soret band to Q band of chlorophyll-a. The treatment also elevated the excited peak intensity at 230, 278 and 343 nm, and the emitted peak intensity at 304 and 682 nm, and the ratio of F278/ F230, respectively. The results implied that Mg 2+ increased absorbance for visible light, improving energy transfer among amino acids within PSII protein complex and accelerating energy transport from tyrosine residue to chlorophyll-a. The photochemical activity and oxygen evolving rate of PSII were also enhanced by Mg 2+. This is viewed as evidence that Mg 2+ can promote energy transfer and oxygen evolution in PSII of spinach.

  7. Estimation of response-spectral values as functions of magnitude, distance, and site conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical predictive equations for the horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5-percent damping for 12 different periods from 0.1 to 4.0 s. Using a multiple linear-regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity, we analyzed response spectra period by period for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. The resulting predictive equations show amplification of the response values at soil sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.5 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 1.5 s. For periods less than 0.5 s there is no statistically significant difference between rock sites and the soil sites represented in the data set. These results are consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predictive equations is that the response values at different periods are different functions of magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Trifunac and Anderson). The slope of the least-squares straight line relating log response to moment magnitude ranges from 0.21 at a period of 0.1 s to greater than 0.5 at periods of 1 s and longer. This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficients for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 5 km

  8. Branching ratios and spectral functions of τ decays: Final ALEPH measurements and physics implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; Bonis, I. De; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Filippis, N. De; Palma, M. De; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    2005-12-01

    The full LEP-1 data set collected with the ALEPH detector at the Z pole during 1991-1995 is analysed in order to measure the τ decay branching fractions. The analysis follows the global method used in the published study based on 1991-1993 data, but several improvements are introduced, especially concerning the treatment of photons and π0's. Extensive systematic studies are performed, in order to match the large statistics of the data sample corresponding to over 300 000 measured and identified τ decays. Branching fractions are obtained for the two leptonic channels and 11 hadronic channels defined by their respective numbers of charged particles and π0's. Using previously published ALEPH results on final states with charged and neutral kaons, corrections are applied to the hadronic channels to derive branching ratios for exclusive final states without kaons. Thus the analyses of the full LEP-1 ALEPH data are combined to yield a complete description of τ decays, encompassing 22 non-strange and 11 strange hadronic modes. Some physics implications of the results are given, in particular related to universality in the leptonic charged weak current, isospin invariance in a1 decays, and the separation of vector and axial-vector components of the total hadronic rate. Finally, spectral functions are determined for the dominant hadronic modes and updates are given for several analyses. These include: tests of isospin invariance between the weak charged and electromagnetic hadronic currents, fits of the ρ resonance lineshape, and a QCD analysis of the non-strange hadronic decays using spectral moments, yielding the value αs(mτ2)=0.340±0.005exp±0.014th. The evolution to the Z mass scale yields αs(MZ2)=0.1209±0.0018. This value agrees well with the direct determination from the Z width and provides the most accurate test to date of asymptotic freedom in the QCD gauge theory.

  9. Lunar phase function effects on spectral ratios used for resource assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S. M.; Collins, J.; Singer, R. B.; Johnson, J. R.; Melendrez, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Groundbased telescopic CCD images of 36 selected locations on the moon were obtained in five 'standard' bandpasses at 12 phase angles ranging from -78 deg to +75 deg to measure phase function effects on the ratio values used to quantify the abundance of TiO2 and qualitatively indicate soil maturity. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moon is 'bluer' at small phase angles, but that the effect on the ratio values for TiO2 abundance for the phase angles of our data is on the order of the measurement uncertainties throughout the range of abundances found in the mare. The effect is more significant as seen from orbiting spacecraft over a range of selenographic latitude. Spectral ratio images (400/560 and 400/730 nm) were used to map the abundance of TiO2 using the empirical relation found by Charlette et al from analysis of returned lunar soils. Additionally, the 950/560 and 950/730 nm image ratios were used to define the regions of mature mare soil in which the relation is valid. Although the phase function dependence on wavelength was investigated and quantified for small areas and the integrated disc, the effect specifically on TiO2 mapping was not rigorously determined. For consistency and convenience in observing the whole lunar front side, our mapping utilized images taken -15 deg less than alpha less than 15 deg when the moon was fully illuminated from earth; however, this includes the strong opposition peak.

  10. Validation of Spectral Analysis as a Noninvasive Tool to Assess Autonomic Regulation of Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, Charles F.; Evans, Joyce M.

    1996-01-01

    A major focus of our program has been to develop a sensitive noninvasive procedure to quantify early weightlessness-induced changes in cardiovascular function or potential dysfunction. Forty studies of healthy young volunteers (10 men and 10 women, each studied twice) were conducted to determine changes in the sympatho-vagal balance of autonomic control of cardiovascular regulation during graded headward and footward blood volume shifts. Changes in sympatho-vagal balance were classified by changes in the mean levels and spectral content of cardiovascular variables and verified by changes in circulating levels of catecholamines and pancreatic polypeptide. Possible shifts in intra/extravascular fluid were assessed from changes in hematocrit and plasma mass density while changes in the stimulus to regulate plasma volume were determined from Plasma Renin Activity (PRA). Autonomic blockade was used to unmask the relative contribution of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent influences in response to 10 min each of 0, 20 and 40 mmHg Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) and 15 and 30 mmHg Positive Pressure (LBPP). The combination of muscarinic blockade with graded LBNP and LBPP was used to evoke graded increases and decreases in sympathetic activity without parasympathetic contributions. The combination of beta blockade with graded LBNP and LBPP was used to produce graded increases and decreases in parasympathetic activity without beta sympathetic contributions. Finally, a combination of both beta and muscarinic blockades with LBNP and LBPP was used to determine the contribution from other, primarily alpha adrenergic, sources. Mean values, spectral analyses and time frequency analysis of R-R interval (HR), Arterial Pressure (AP), peripheral blood flow (RF), Stroke Volume (SV) and peripheral resistance (TPR) were performed for all phases of the study. Skin blood Flow (SF) was also measured in other studies and similarly analyzed. Spectra were examined for changes in

  11. ESTIMATION OF RESPONSE-SPECTRAL VALUES AS FUNCTIONS OF MAGNITUDE, DISTANCE, AND SITE CONDITIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, D.M.; ,

    1983-01-01

    Horizontal pseudo-velocity response was analyzed for twelve shallow earthquakes in western North America. Estimation of response-spectral values was related to magnitude, distance and site conditions. Errors in the methods are analyzed.

  12. Variation of surface water spectral response as a function of in situ sampling technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Hodgson, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were carried out to determine the spectral variation contributed by a particular sampling technique. A portable radiometer was used to measure the surface water spectral response. Variation due to the reflectance of objects near the radiometer (i.e., the boat side) during data acquisition was studied. Consideration was also given to the variation due to the temporal nature of the phenomena (i.e., wave activity).

  13. Vowel discrimination by hearing infants as a function of number of spectral channelsa)

    PubMed Central

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Houston, Derek M.; Hynan, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced spectral resolution negatively impacts speech perception, particularly perception of vowels and consonant place. This study assessed impact of number of spectral channels on vowel discrimination by 6-month-old infants with normal hearing by comparing three listening conditions: Unprocessed speech, 32 channels, and 16 channels. Auditory stimuli (/ti/ and /ta/) were spectrally reduced using a noiseband vocoder and presented to infants with normal hearing via visual habituation. Results supported a significant effect of number of channels on vowel discrimination by 6-month-old infants. No differences emerged between unprocessed and 32-channel conditions in which infants looked longer during novel stimulus trials (i.e., discrimination). The 16-channel condition yielded a significantly different pattern: Infants demonstrated no significant difference in looking time to familiar vs novel stimulus trials, suggesting infants cannot discriminate /ti/ and /ta/ with only 16 channels. Results support effects of spectral resolution on vowel discrimination. Relative to published reports, young infants need more spectral detail than older children and adults to perceive spectrally degraded speech. Results have implications for development of perception by infants with hearing loss who receive auditory prostheses. PMID:24815281

  14. Vowel discrimination by hearing infants as a function of number of spectral channels.

    PubMed

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Houston, Derek M; Hynan, Linda S

    2014-05-01

    Reduced spectral resolution negatively impacts speech perception, particularly perception of vowels and consonant place. This study assessed impact of number of spectral channels on vowel discrimination by 6-month-old infants with normal hearing by comparing three listening conditions: Unprocessed speech, 32 channels, and 16 channels. Auditory stimuli (/ti/ and /ta/) were spectrally reduced using a noiseband vocoder and presented to infants with normal hearing via visual habituation. Results supported a significant effect of number of channels on vowel discrimination by 6-month-old infants. No differences emerged between unprocessed and 32-channel conditions in which infants looked longer during novel stimulus trials (i.e., discrimination). The 16-channel condition yielded a significantly different pattern: Infants demonstrated no significant difference in looking time to familiar vs novel stimulus trials, suggesting infants cannot discriminate /ti/ and /ta/ with only 16 channels. Results support effects of spectral resolution on vowel discrimination. Relative to published reports, young infants need more spectral detail than older children and adults to perceive spectrally degraded speech. Results have implications for development of perception by infants with hearing loss who receive auditory prostheses.

  15. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Epitropakis, A.; Pecháček, T.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of a detailed study of the X-ray power spectral density (PSD) functions of 12 X-ray bright AGN, using almost all the archival XMM-Newton data. The total net exposure of the EPIC-pn light curves is larger than 350 ks in all cases (and exceeds 1 Ms in the case of 1H 0707-497). In a physical scenario in which X-ray reflection occurs in the inner part of the accretion disc of AGN, the X-ray reflection component should be a filtered echo of the X-ray continuum signal and should be equal to the convolution of the primary emission with the response function of the disc. Our primary objective is to search for these reflection features in the 5-7 keV (iron line) and 0.5-1 keV (soft) bands, where the X-ray reflection fraction is expected to be dominant. We fit to the observed periodograms two models: a simple bending power-law model (BPL) and a BPL model convolved with the transfer function of the accretion disc assuming the lamp-post geometry and X-ray reflection from a homogeneous disc. We do not find any significant features in the best-fitting BPL model residuals either in individual PSDs in the iron band, soft and full band (0.3-10 keV) or in the average PSD residuals of the brightest and more variable sources (with similar black hole mass estimates). The typical amplitude of the soft and full-band residuals is around 3-5 per cent. It is possible that the expected general relativistic effects are not detected because they are intrinsically lower than the uncertainty of the current PSDs, even in the strong relativistic case in which X-ray reflection occurs on a disc around a fast rotating black hole having an X-ray source very close above it. However, we could place strong constrains to the X-ray reflection geometry with the current data sets if we knew in advance the intrinsic shape of the X-ray PSDs, particularly its high-frequency slope.

  16. Light-front spin-dependent spectral function and nucleon momentum distributions for a three-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Pace, Emanuele; Salmè, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Poincaré covariant definitions for the spin-dependent spectral function and for the momentum distributions within the light-front Hamiltonian dynamics are proposed for a three-fermion bound system, starting from the light-front wave function of the system. The adopted approach is based on the Bakamjian-Thomas construction of the Poincaré generators, which allows one to easily import the familiar and wide knowledge on the nuclear interaction into a light-front framework. The proposed formalism can find useful applications in refined nuclear calculations, such as those needed for evaluating the European Muon Collaboration effect or the semi-inclusive deep inelastic cross sections with polarized nuclear targets, since remarkably the light-front unpolarized momentum distribution by definition fulfills both normalization and momentum sum rules. Also shown is a straightforward generalization of the definition of the light-front spectral function to an A -nucleon system.

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    SciTech Connect

    Mocsy,A.; Petreczky, P.

    2008-06-27

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  18. Chiral dynamics in form factors, spectral-function sum rules, meson-meson scattering and semilocal duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Hui; Oller, J. A.; de Elvira, J. Ruiz

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we perform the one-loop calculation of the scalar and pseudoscalar form factors in the framework of U(3) chiral perturbation theory with explicit tree level exchanges of resonances. The meson-meson scattering calculation from Guo and Oller [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 84, 034005 (2011)10.1103/PhysRevD.84.034005] is extended as well. The spectral functions of the nonet scalar-scalar (SS) and pseudoscalar-pseudoscalar (PP) correlators are constructed by using the corresponding form factors. After fitting the unknown parameters to the scattering data, we discuss the resonance content of the resulting scattering amplitudes. We also study spectral-function sum rules in the SS-SS, PP-PP, and SS-PP sectors as well as semilocal duality from scattering. The former relate the scalar and pseudoscalar spectra between themselves while the latter mainly connects the scalar spectrum with the vector one. Finally we investigate these items as a function of NC for NC>3. All these results pose strong constraints on the scalar dynamics and spectroscopy that are discussed. They are successfully fulfilled by our meson-meson scattering amplitudes and spectral functions.

  19. Spectral emissivities and optical constants of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals as functions of temperature and wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a noncontact temperature measurement device utilizing rotating analyzer ellipsometry is described. The technique circumvents the necessity of spectral emissivity estimation by direct measurement concomittant with radiance brightness. Using this approach, the optical properties of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Zr were measured in situ at four wavelengths and up to 600 K superheat in the liquid. The data suggest an increase in the emissivity of the liquid compared with the incandescent solid. The data also show moderate temperature dependence of the spectral emissivity. A few measurements of the optical properties of undercooled liquid metals were also conducted. The data for both solids and liquids show excellent agreement with available values in the literature for the spectral emissivities as well as the optical constants.

  20. Asymptotic formula for the Riesz means of the spectral functions of Laplace-Beltrami operator on unit sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadly Nurullah Rasedee, Ahmad; Ahmedov, Anvarjon; Sathar, Mohammad Hasan Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The mathematical models of the heat and mass transfer processes on the ball type solids can be solved using the theory of convergence of Fourier-Laplace series on unit sphere. Many interesting models have divergent Fourier-Laplace series, which can be made convergent by introducing Riesz and Cesaro means of the series. Partial sums of the Fourier-Laplace series summed by Riesz method are integral operators with the kernel known as Riesz means of the spectral function. In order to obtain the convergence results for the partial sums by Riesz means we need to know an asymptotic behavior of the latter kernel. In this work the estimations for Riesz means of spectral function of Laplace-Beltrami operator which guarantees the convergence of the Fourier-Laplace series by Riesz method are obtained.

  1. Speech recognition in noise as a function of the number of spectral channels: comparison of acoustic hearing and cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Friesen, L M; Shannon, R V; Baskent, D; Wang, X

    2001-08-01

    Speech recognition was measured as a function of spectral resolution (number of spectral channels) and speech-to-noise ratio in normal-hearing (NH) and cochlear-implant (CI) listeners. Vowel, consonant, word, and sentence recognition were measured in five normal-hearing listeners, ten listeners with the Nucleus-22 cochlear implant, and nine listeners with the Advanced Bionics Clarion cochlear implant. Recognition was measured as a function of the number of spectral channels (noise bands or electrodes) at signal-to-noise ratios of + 15, + 10, +5, 0 dB, and in quiet. Performance with three different speech processing strategies (SPEAK, CIS, and SAS) was similar across all conditions, and improved as the number of electrodes increased (up to seven or eight) for all conditions. For all noise levels, vowel and consonant recognition with the SPEAK speech processor did not improve with more than seven electrodes, while for normal-hearing listeners, performance continued to increase up to at least 20 channels. Speech recognition on more difficult speech materials (word and sentence recognition) showed a marginally significant increase in Nucleus-22 listeners from seven to ten electrodes. The average implant score on all processing strategies was poorer than scores of NH listeners with similar processing. However, the best CI scores were similar to the normal-hearing scores for that condition (up to seven channels). CI listeners with the highest performance level increased in performance as the number of electrodes increased up to seven, while CI listeners with low levels of speech recognition did not increase in performance as the number of electrodes was increased beyond four. These results quantify the effect of number of spectral channels on speech recognition in noise and demonstrate that most CI subjects are not able to fully utilize the spectral information provided by the number of electrodes used in their implant.

  2. Liquid crystal retarder spectral retardance characterization based on a Cauchy dispersion relation and a voltage transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Asticio; Donoso, Ramiro; Ramírez, Manuel; Carrión, José; del Mar Sánchez-López, María; Moreno, Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    We present a methodology for the spectral characterization of the optical modulation properties of a liquid crystal retarder (LCR). The method includes its complete description with a single Cauchy dispersion relation and a single voltage transfer function. As a result, an accurate description of the LCR retardance is achieved, both versus applied voltage and versus wavelength, with very few parameters. Finally, an imaging polarimetric system has also been developed to characterize the spatial variations in the device.

  3. Agile dual-channel spectral imaging with spectral zooming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Wang, Michael R; Yang, Jame J

    2008-08-10

    A dual-channel spectral imaging system with agile spectral band access and spectral bandwidth tuning capability is presented. A diffractive grating and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) are respectively used as spectral dispersion and spectral filtering elements for the two channels. A 4f spectral filtering channel using an adjustable slit is set up at the first diffraction order of the grating to realize coarse spectral band selection. The AOTF selectively filters the spectrum of the nondispersed zero order to realize fine spectral imaging. The spectral zooming function is achieved without increasing spectral frame number facilitating real-time spectral imaging operation. Feasibility of the spectral imaging has been demonstrated through preliminary experiments. Minimum 6 nm spectral resolution and 1.2 degrees field of view have been achieved. The real-time spectral imaging capable of wide spectral band operation without loosing desired fine spectral capability is particularly useful for a variety of defense, medical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  4. A comparative study of rhodopsin function in the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis): Spectral tuning and light-activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, Ilke; Dungan, Sarah Z; Hauser, Frances E; Morrow, James M; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-07-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating the phototransduction cascade in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Although well-characterized in a few model systems, comparative studies of rhodopsin function, particularly for nonmammalian vertebrates are comparatively lacking. Bowerbirds are rare among passerines in possessing a key substitution, D83N, at a site that is otherwise highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors. While this substitution is present in some dim-light adapted vertebrates, often accompanying another unusual substitution, A292S, its functional relevance in birds is uncertain. To investigate functional effects associated with these two substitutions, we use the rhodopsin gene from the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis) as a background for site-directed mutagenesis, in vitro expression and functional characterization. We also mutated these sites in two additional rhodopsins that do not naturally possess N83, chicken and bovine, for comparison. Both sites were found to contribute to spectral blue-shifts, but had opposing effects on kinetic rates. Substitutions at site 83 were found to primarily affect the kinetics of light-activated rhodopsin, while substitutions at site 292 had a larger impact on spectral tuning. The contribution of substitutions at site 83 to spectral tuning in particular depended on genetic background, but overall, the effects of substitutions were otherwise surprisingly additive, and the magnitudes of functional shifts were roughly similar across all three genetic backgrounds. By employing a comparative approach with multiple species, our study provides new insight into the joint impact of sites 83 and 292 on rhodopsin structure-function as well as their evolutionary significance for dim-light vision across vertebrates. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  5. Exponents of the spectral functions and dynamical structure factor of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the (k , ω) -plane finite-energy line shape of the zero-temperature one-boson removal spectral function (ω < 0) , one-boson addition spectral function (ω > 0) , and charge dynamical structure factor (ω > 0) of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas with repulsive boson interaction c > 0. Our analysis of the problem focuses on the line shape at finite excitation energies in the vicinity of these functions spectrum upper (ω < 0) or lower (ω > 0) threshold. Specifically, we derive the exact momentum, interaction, and density dependences of the exponents controlling such a line shape in each of the N = 1 , 2 , 3 , … momentum subdomains k ∈ [(N - 1) 2 πn , N 2 πn ] . Here n = N / L is the boson density, N the boson number, and L the system length. In the thermodynamic limit considered in our study nearly all spectral weight of the dynamical correlation functions is for large values of n / c contained in the N = 1 momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] . As n / c decreases a small fraction of that weight is transferred to the remaining set of N = 2 , 3 , 4 , … momentum subdomains, particularly to the N = 2 subdomain. In the case of the momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] , our exact results agree with those of previous studies. For that subdomain the above exponents are plotted as a function of the momentum for several n / c values. Our derivation of the line shapes of the three dynamical correlation functions relies on the use of a simplified form of the pseudofermion dynamical theory of the fermionic 1D Hubbard model suitably modified in this paper for the 1D Bose gas.

  6. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  7. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland.

    PubMed

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa E Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M N

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus (Cistus salviifolius) and ulex (Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence (ΔF/Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types.

  8. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M. N.

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus ( Cistus salviifolius) and ulex ( Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence ( ΔF/ Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types.

  9. A numerical spectral approach for the derivation of piezometric head covariance functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lent, Thomas; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    1989-11-01

    Relating the variability of permeability to the variability of head is a central part of linear estimation techniques such as cokriging. Only a few analytic relationships between log permeability covariances and head covariances presently exist. This paper describes a general numerical procedure which computes head covariances (ordinary or generalized) and cross covariances for any proper log permeability covariance. The numerical spectral method, a discrete analog of Fourier-Stieltjes analysis, employs the pertinent linearized (small-perturbation approximation) equations describing the physics of flow. The domain is taken as finite, with boundary effects considered negligible. The numerical spectral method can reproduce all pertinent analytic results with excellent agreement. Furthermore, we demonstrate the method's generality by finding the covariance relations for a case where no analytical results presently exist.

  10. Comparison of the single-wavelength and spectral-reconstruction methods for determining the solvation-response function

    SciTech Connect

    Gardecki, J.A.; Maroncelli, M.

    1999-03-04

    A comparison of the solvation/spectral-response functions obtained by two independent techniques, the single-wavelength and spectral-reconstruction methods, is reported. Determination of the best wavelengths for application of the linear-single-wavelength approximation for the solute coumarin 153 (C153) is achieved using radiative rate data and steady-state emission spectra in a series of 36 different solvents at room temperature. The optimal linear wavelength is found to be 555 nm. (This wavelength, which is on the red side of the spectrum, yields superior results when compared to the more traditional choice of 470--480 nm, on the blue side.) Response functions determined using both 560- and 470-nm observation wavelengths are compared to previously reported spectral-reconstruction results in 24 solvents. A comparison of the characteristic times indicates that the linear-single-wavelength method can be used to predict solvation times with an accuracy of roughly {+-}30--40% (1 standard deviation) using suitably scaled data collected at {approximately}560 nm. Application of a nonlinear version of the single-wavelength method does not provide increased accuracy.

  11. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  12. Spectral contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography for improved detection of tumor microvasculature and functional imaging of lymphatic drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; Sen, Debasish; de la Zerda, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well-suited to study in vivo dynamics of blood circulation and lymphatic flow because of the technique's combination of rapid image acquisition, micron spatial resolution, and penetration depth in turbid tissues. However, OCT has been historically constrained by a dearth of contrast agents that are readily distinguished from the strong scattering intrinsic to biological tissues. In this study, we demonstrate large gold nanorods (LGNRs) as optimized contrast agents for OCT. LGNRs produce 32-fold greater backscattering than GNRs previously tested for contrast-enhanced OCT. Furthermore, LGNRs exhibit 110-fold stronger spectral signal than conventional GNRs when coupled with custom spectral detection algorithms. This signal enhancement enables picomolar OCT detection sensitivity in vivo and single-particle detection against optically-clear backgrounds. Moreover, the ability to synthesize LGNRs with tunable spectral peaks provides a viable platform for multiplexed imaging studies. To explore the advantages of LGNRs as OCT contrast agents, we implemented them for noninvasive 3D imaging of tumor blood supply and active lymphatic drainage in mice. Spectral detection of LGNRs enabled 100% improvement in imaging depth for detecting microvasculature (vessels 20 μm in diameter) in U87MG glioblastoma xenografts in mice pinnae. We also demonstrated our approach's ability to map the spatial dependence of lymph drainage and flow directionality within lymphatic capillaries. Using LGNRs with distinct spectra, we further identified the functional states of individual lymphatic valves in vivo. Thus, this approach provides a powerful new platform for functional imaging that may be extended for future molecular imaging studies with OCT.

  13. The Solar Spectral Irradiance as a Function of the Mg II Index for Atmosphere and Climate Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuillier, Gerard; DeLand, Matthew; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Bolsee, David; Melo, Stella

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method to reconstruct the solar spectrum irradiance in the Ly alpha-400 nm region, and its variability, based on the Mg II index and neutron monitor. Measurements of the solar spectral irradiance available in the literature have been made with different instruments at different times and different spectral ranges. However, climate studies require harmonized data sets. This new approach has the advantage of being independent of the absolute calibration and aging of the instruments. First, the Mg II index is derived using solar spectra from Ly alpha (121 nm) to 410 nm measured from 1978 to 2010 by several space missions. The variability of the spectra with respect to a chosen reference spectrum as a function of time and wavelength is scaled to the derived Mg II index. The set of coefficients expressing the spectral variability can be applied to the chosen reference spectrum to reconstruct the solar spectra within a given time frame or Mg II index values. The accuracy of this method is estimated using two approaches: by direct comparison with particular cases where solar spectra are available from independent measurements, and by calculating the standard deviation between the measured spectra and their reconstruction. From direct comparisons with measurements we obtain an accuracy of about 1 to 2 %, which degrades towards Ly alpha. In a further step, we extend our solar spectral irradiance reconstruction back to the Maunder Minimum introducing the relationship between the Mg II index and the neutron monitor data. Consistent measurements of the Mg II index are not available prior to 1978. However, we observe that over the last three solar cycles, the Mg II index shows strong correlation with the modulation potential determined from the neutron monitor data. Assuming that this correlation can be applied to the past, we reconstruct the Mg II index from the modulation potential back to the Maunder Minimum, and obtain the corresponding solar

  14. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Numerical renormalization group calculation of near-gap peaks in spectral functions of the Anderson model with superconducting leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, T.; Weichselbaum, A.; von Delft, J.; Bulla, R.

    2008-07-01

    We use the numerical renormalization group method (NRG) to investigate a single-impurity Anderson model with a coupling of the impurity to a superconducting host. Analysis of the energy flow shows that, contrary to previous belief, NRG iterations can be performed up to a large number of sites, corresponding to energy differences far below the superconducting gap Δ. This allows us to calculate the impurity spectral function A(ω) very accurately for frequencies |ω|~Δ, and to resolve, in a certain parameter regime, sharp peaks in A(ω) close to the gap edge.

  16. Spectral zeta function of a sub-Laplacian on product sub-Riemannian manifolds and zeta-regularized determinant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Wolfram; Furutani, Kenro

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the spectral zeta function for sub-Laplace operators on product manifolds M×N. Starting from suitable conditions on the zeta functions on each factor, the existence of a meromorphic extension to the complex plane and real analyticity in a zero neighbourhood is proved. In the special case of N=S1 and using the Poisson summation formula, we obtain expressions for the zeta-regularized determinant. Moreover, we can calculate limit cases of such determinants by inserting a parameter into our formulas. This is a generalization of results in Furutani and de Gosson (2003) [1] and in particular it applies to an intrinsic sub-Laplacian on U(2)≅S3×S1 induced by a sum of squares of canonical vector fields on S3; cf. Bauer and Furutani (2008) [2]. Finally, the spectral zeta function of a sub-Laplace operator on Heisenberg manifolds is calculated by using an explicit expression of the heat kernel for the corresponding sub-Laplace operator on the Heisenberg group; cf. Beals et al. (2000) [18] and Hulanicki (1976) [19].

  17. Light-front spin-dependent spectral function and nucleon momentum distributions for a three-body system

    DOE PAGES

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Pace, Emanuele; Salme, Giovanni; ...

    2017-01-10

    Poincare covariant definitions for the spin-dependent spectral function and for the momentum distributions within the light-front Hamiltonian dynamics are proposed for a three-fermion bound system, starting from the light-front wave function of the system. The adopted approach is based on the Bakamjian–Thomas construction of the Poincaré generators, which allows one to easily import the familiar and wide knowledge on the nuclear interaction into a light-front framework. The proposed formalism can find useful applications in refined nuclear calculations, such as those needed for evaluating the European Muon Collaboration effect or the semi-inclusive deep inelastic cross sections with polarized nuclear targets, sincemore » remarkably the light-front unpolarized momentum distribution by definition fulfills both normalization and momentum sum rules. As a result, also shown is a straightforward generalization of the definition of the light-front spectral function to an A-nucleon system.« less

  18. GX 3+1: The Stability of Spectral Index as a Function of Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifana, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram, We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites, We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and Gaussian component We argue that the electron temperature kTe of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keY to 4.5 keY, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index Gamma is almost constant (Gamma = 2.00 +/- 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by factor four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component We interpret this quasi-stability of the index Gamma and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+ I was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries. This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low state to the high state and then finally saturates at

  19. GX 3+1: THE STABILITY OF SPECTRAL INDEX AS A FUNCTION OF MASS ACCRETION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev E-mail: titarchuk@fe.infn.it

    2012-03-10

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram. We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Beppo SAX satellites. We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian component. We argue that the electron temperature kT{sub e} of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keV to 4.5 keV, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index {Gamma} is almost constant ({Gamma} = 2.00 {+-} 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by a factor of four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component. We interpret this quasi-stability of the index {Gamma} and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+1 was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries (see Farinelli and Titarchuk). This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low

  20. GX 3+1: The Stability of Spectral Index as a Function of Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2012-03-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram. We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Beppo SAX satellites. We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian component. We argue that the electron temperature kTe of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keV to 4.5 keV, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index Γ is almost constant (Γ = 2.00 ± 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by a factor of four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component. We interpret this quasi-stability of the index Γ and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+1 was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries (see Farinelli & Titarchuk). This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low state to the high state

  1. Diversification of non-visual photopigment parapinopsin in spectral sensitivity for diverse pineal functions.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Wada, Seiji; Kawano-Yamashita, Emi; Hara, Yuichiro; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Kosaka, Shigeaki; Kawakami, Koichi; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Shichida, Yoshinori; Terakita, Akihisa

    2015-09-15

    Recent genome projects of various animals have uncovered an unexpectedly large number of opsin genes, which encode protein moieties of photoreceptor molecules, in most animals. In visual systems, the biological meanings of this diversification are clear; multiple types of visual opsins with different spectral sensitivities are responsible for color vision. However, the significance of the diversification of non-visual opsins remains uncertain, in spite of the importance of understanding the molecular mechanism and evolution of varied non-visual photoreceptions. Here, we investigated the diversification of the pineal photopigment parapinopsin, which serves as the UV-sensitive photopigment for the pineal wavelength discrimination in the lamprey, linking it with other pineal photoreception. Spectroscopic analyses of the recombinant pigments of the two teleost parapinopsins PP1 and PP2 revealed that PP1 is a UV-sensitive pigment, similar to lamprey parapinopsin, but PP2 is a blue-sensitive pigment, with an absorption maximum at 460-480 nm, showing the diversification of non-visual pigment with respect to spectral sensitivity. We also found that PP1 and PP2 exhibit mutually exclusive expressions in the pineal organs of three teleost species. By using transgenic zebrafish in which these parapinopsin-expressing cells are labeled, we found that PP1-expressing cells basically possess neuronal processes, which is consistent with their involvement in wavelength discrimination. Interestingly, however, PP2-expressing cells rarely possess neuronal processes, raising the possibility that PP2 could be involved in non-neural responses rather than neural responses. Furthermore, we found that PP2-expressing cells contain serotonin and aanat2, the key enzyme involved in melatonin synthesis from serotonin, whereas PP1-expressing cells do not contain either, suggesting that blue-sensitive PP2 is instead involved in light-regulation of melatonin secretion. In this paper, we have clearly

  2. Downwelling spectral irradiance during evening twilight as a function of the lunar phase.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Glenn; Johnsen, Sönke

    2015-02-01

    We measured downwelling spectral vector irradiance (from 350 to 800 nm) during evening civil and nautical twilight (solar elevation down to -12°). Nine sets of measurements were taken to cover the first half of the lunar cycle (from the new to full moon) and were also used to calculate chromaticity (CIE 1976 u'v'). The lunar phase had no consistent effect on downwelling irradiance until solar elevation was less than -8°. For lower solar elevations, the effect of the moon increased with the fraction of the illuminated lunar disk until the fraction was approximately 50%. For fractions greater than 50%, the brightness and chromaticity of the downwelling irradiance were approximately independent of the fraction illuminated, likely because the greater brightness of a fuller moon was offset by its lower elevation during twilight. Given the importance of crepuscular periods to animal activity, including predation, reproductive cycles, and color vision in dim light, these results may have significant implications for animal ecology.

  3. Speech recognition in normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss as a function of the number of spectral channels.

    PubMed

    Başkent, Deniz

    2006-11-01

    Speech recognition by normal-hearing listeners improves as a function of the number of spectral channels when tested with a noiseband vocoder simulating cochlear implant signal processing. Speech recognition by the best cochlear implant users, however, saturates around eight channels and does not improve when more electrodes are activated, presumably due to reduced frequency selectivity caused by channel interactions. Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss may also have reduced frequency selectivity due to cochlear damage and the resulting reduction in the nonlinear cochlear mechanisms. The present study investigates whether such a limitation in spectral information transmission would be observed with hearing-impaired listeners, similar to implant users. To test the hypothesis, hearing-impaired subjects were selected from a population of patients with moderate hearing loss of cochlear origin, where the frequency selectivity would be expected to be poorer compared to normal hearing. Hearing-impaired subjects were tested for vowel and consonant recognition in steady-state background noise of varying levels using a noiseband vocoder and as a function of the number of spectral channels. For comparison, normal-hearing subjects were tested with the same stimuli at different presentation levels. In quiet and low background noise, performance by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects was similar. In higher background noise, performance by hearing-impaired subjects saturated around eight channels, while performance by normal-hearing subjects continued to increase up to 12-16 channels with vowels, and 10-12 channels with consonants. A similar trend was observed for most of the presentation levels at which the normal-hearing subjects were tested. Therefore, it is unlikely that the effects observed with hearing-impaired subjects were due to insufficient audibility or high presentation levels. Consequently, the results with hearing-impaired subjects were similar to

  4. Spectral functions for D ¯ and D¯0* mesons in nuclear matter with partial restoration of chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, Daiki; Yasui, Shigehiro; Harada, Masayasu

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the in-medium masses of a D ¯(0-) meson and a D¯0*(0+) meson, and spectral functions for D ¯ and D¯0* meson channels in nuclear matter. These mesons are introduced as chiral partners in the chiral-symmetry-broken vacuum, hence they are useful to explore the partial restoration of the broken chiral symmetry in nuclear matter. We consider the linear sigma model to describe the chiral symmetry breaking and to investigate a qualitative tendency of changes of D ¯ mesons at low density. Our study shows that the loop corrections to D ¯ and D¯0* meson masses provide a smaller mass splitting at finite density than that in vacuum, a result that indicates a tendency of the restoration of the chiral symmetry. We investigate also the spectral function for D¯0* meson channel, and find three peaks. The first peak, which corresponds to the resonance of the D¯0* meson, is broadened by collisions with nucleons in medium, and the peak position shifts to lower mass due to the partial restoration of chiral symmetry as the density increases. The second peak is identified as a threshold enhancement which shows a remarkable enhancement as the density increases. The third peak is Landau damping. The obtained properties of D ¯ and D¯0* mesons in nuclear matter will provide useful information for experiments.

  5. Spectral determination of concentrations of functionally diverse pigments in increasingly complex arctic tundra canopies.

    PubMed

    Boelman, Natalie T; Magney, Troy S; Logan, Barry A; Griffin, Kevin L; Eitel, Jan U H; Greaves, Heather; Prager, Case M; Vierling, Lee A

    2016-09-01

    As the Arctic warms, tundra vegetation is becoming taller and more structurally complex, as tall deciduous shrubs become increasingly dominant. Emerging studies reveal that shrubs exhibit photosynthetic resource partitioning, akin to forests, that may need accounting for in the "big leaf" net ecosystem exchange models. We conducted a lab experiment on sun and shade leaves from S. pulchra shrubs to determine the influence of both constitutive (slowly changing bulk carotenoid and chlorophyll pools) and facultative (rapidly changing xanthophyll cycle) pigment pools on a suite of spectral vegetation indices, to devise a rapid means of estimating within canopy resource partitioning. We found that: (1) the PRI of dark-adapted shade leaves (PRIo) was double that of sun leaves, and that PRIo was sensitive to variation among sun and shade leaves in both xanthophyll cycle pool size (V + A + Z) (r (2) = 0.59) and Chla/b (r (2) = 0.64); (2) A corrected PRI (difference between dark and illuminated leaves, ΔPRI) was more sensitive to variation among sun and shade leaves in changes to the epoxidation state of their xanthophyll cycle pigments (dEPS) (r (2) = 0.78, RMSE = 0.007) compared to the uncorrected PRI of illuminated leaves (PRI) (r (2) = 0.34, RMSE = 0.02); and (3) the SR680 index was correlated with each of (V + A + Z), lutein, bulk carotenoids, (V + A + Z)/(Chla + b), and Chla/b (r (2) range = 0.52-0.69). We suggest that ΔPRI be employed as a proxy for facultative pigment dynamics, and the SR680 for the estimation of constitutive pigment pools. We contribute the first Arctic-specific information on disentangling PRI-pigment relationships, and offer insight into how spectral indices can assess resource partitioning within shrub tundra canopies.

  6. THE FIRST HARD X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-06-10

    We present results of our power spectral density (PSD) analysis of 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 58 month light curves from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the 14-150 keV band. PSDs were fit using a Monte Carlo based algorithm to take into account windowing effects and measurement error. All but one source were found to be fit very well using an unbroken power law with a slope of {approx} - 1, consistent at low frequencies with previous studies in the 2-10 keV band, with no evidence of a break in the PSD. For five of the highest signal-to-noise ratio sources, we tested the energy dependence of the PSD and found no significant difference in the PSD at different energies. Unlike previous studies of X-ray variability in AGNs, we do not find any significant correlations between the hard X-ray variability and different properties of the AGN including luminosity and black hole mass. The lack of break frequencies and correlations seem to indicate that AGNs are similar to the high state of Galactic black holes.

  7. Compton profiles of NiO and TiO2 obtained from first principles GWA spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, M. Khidzir; M, F. M. Halid; W, A. T. Wan Abdullah

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we first use momentum density studies to understand strongly correlated electron behavior, which is typically seen in transition metal oxides. We observe that correlated electron behavior as seen in bulk NiO is due to the Fermi break located in the middle of overlapping spectral functions obtained from a GW (G is Green’s function and W is the screened Coulomb interaction) approximation (GWA) calculation while in the case of TiO2 we can see that the origin of the constant momentum distribution in lower momenta is due to a pile up of spectra before the Fermi energy. These observations are then used to compare our calculated Compton profiles with previous experimental studies of Fukamachi and Limandri. Our calculations for NiO are observed to follow the same trend as the experimental profile but it is seen to have a wide difference in the case of TiO2before the Fermi break. The ground state momentum densities differ significantly from the quasiparticle momentum density, thus stressing the importance of the quasiparticle wave function as the input for the study of charge density and the electron localization function. Finally we perform a calculation of the quasiparticle renormalization function, giving a quantitative description of the discontinuity of the GWA momentum density.

  8. Proposal for a new parameterisation of the instrumental spectral response function in DOAS retrievals and application to satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Lampel, Johannes; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The instrumental spectral response function (ISRF) is a key quantity in spectroscopy. Within DOAS retrievals, the ISRF is needed for an accurate wavelength calibration and for the convolution of trace gas cross-sections to instrumental resolution. DOAS analysis software like QDOAS or DOASIS allow the fitting of a high resolution solar spectrum to a measured spectrum based on a parameterized ISRF with predefined shape (e.g. Gauss, Lorentz, Voigt). For OMI, a more advanced ISRF ("broadened Gauss") was determined which allows for flat-top and asymmetric ISRF; however, this ISRF model is computationally expensive due to the high number of parameters. Here we propose a "Super Gaussian" as further model function for the ISRF, which is similar to a Gaussian, but with the exponent ξ as additional free parameter: F(x) = A ∗ exp(-(|x|/w)ξ) The parameter w determines the width of F , while ξ basically determines the shape. Optionally, different values for ξ and w can be allowed for the left vs. right branch of F to construct asymmetric ISRFs. This model function was found to be a good compromise between good fit results (i.e., F represents the actual ISRF much better than a Gaussian) for a wide range of tested ISRF shapes on the one hand, and robustness of the fit and low computation time on the other hand due to the low number of free parameters. A further advantage of this description of the ISRF is that the two partial derivatives, representing changes of shape and width, respectively, allow to mimic potential spectral structures caused by temporal changes of the ISRF (e.g. due to changes of the detector temperature) by adding pseudo-absorbers in the DOAS analysis. We investigate how far this affects different trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements.

  9. Median-plane sound localization as a function of the number of spectral channels using a channel vocoder.

    PubMed

    Goupell, Matthew J; Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Using a vocoder, median-plane sound localization performance was measured in eight normal-hearing listeners as a function of the number of spectral channels. The channels were contiguous and logarithmically spaced in the range from 0.3 to 16 kHz. Acutely testing vocoded stimuli showed significantly worse localization compared to noises and 100 pulses click trains, both of which were tested after feedback training. However, localization for the vocoded stimuli was better than chance. A second experiment was performed using two different 12-channel spacings for the vocoded stimuli, now including feedback training. One spacing was from experiment 1. The second spacing (called the speech-localization spacing) assigned more channels to the frequency range associated with speech. There was no significant difference in localization between the two spacings. However, even with training, localizing 12-channel vocoded stimuli remained worse than localizing virtual wideband noises by 4.8 degrees in local root-mean-square error and 5.2% in quadrant error rate. Speech understanding for the speech-localization spacing was not significantly different from that for a typical spacing used by cochlear-implant users. These experiments suggest that current cochlear implants have a sufficient number of spectral channels for some vertical-plane sound localization capabilities, albeit worse than normal-hearing listeners, without loss of speech understanding.

  10. Median-plane sound localization as a function of the number of spectral channels using a channel vocoder

    PubMed Central

    Goupell, Matthew J.; Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a vocoder, median-plane sound localization performance was measured in eight normal-hearing listeners as a function of the number of spectral channels. The channels were contiguous and logarithmically spaced in the range from 0.3 to 16 kHz. Acutely testing vocoded stimuli showed significantly worse localization compared to noises and 100 pulse∕s click trains, both of which were tested after feedback training. However, localization for the vocoded stimuli was better than chance. A second experiment was performed using two different 12-channel spacings for the vocoded stimuli, now including feedback training. One spacing was from experiment 1. The second spacing (called the speech-localization spacing) assigned more channels to the frequency range associated with speech. There was no significant difference in localization between the two spacings. However, even with training, localizing 12-channel vocoded stimuli remained worse than localizing virtual wideband noises by 4.8° in local root-mean-square error and 5.2% in quadrant error rate. Speech understanding for the speech-localization spacing was not significantly different from that for a typical spacing used by cochlear-implant users. These experiments suggest that current cochlear implants have a sufficient number of spectral channels for some vertical-plane sound localization capabilities, albeit worse than normal-hearing listeners, without loss of speech understanding. PMID:20136221

  11. A spectral approach integrating functional genomic annotations for coding and noncoding variants.

    PubMed

    Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; McCallum, Kenneth; Xu, Bin; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2016-02-01

    Over the past few years, substantial effort has been put into the functional annotation of variation in human genome sequences. Such annotations can have a critical role in identifying putatively causal variants for a disease or trait among the abundant natural variation that occurs at a locus of interest. The main challenges in using these various annotations include their large numbers and their diversity. Here we develop an unsupervised approach to integrate these different annotations into one measure of functional importance (Eigen) that, unlike most existing methods, is not based on any labeled training data. We show that the resulting meta-score has better discriminatory ability using disease-associated and putatively benign variants from published studies (in both coding and noncoding regions) than the recently proposed CADD score. Across varied scenarios, the Eigen score performs generally better than any single individual annotation, representing a powerful single functional score that can be incorporated in fine-mapping studies.

  12. Gluon-propagator functional form in the Landau gauge in SU(3) lattice QCD: Yukawa-type gluon propagator and anomalous gluon spectral function

    SciTech Connect

    Iritani, Takumi; Suganuma, Hideo; Iida, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    We study the gluon propagator D{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}{sup ab}(x) in the Landau gauge in SU(3) lattice QCD at {beta}=5.7, 5.8, and 6.0 at the quenched level. The effective gluon mass is estimated as 400-600 MeV for r{identical_to}(x{sub {alpha}}x{sub {alpha}}){sup 1/2}=0.5-1.0 fm. Through the functional-form analysis of D{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}{sup ab}(x) obtained in lattice QCD, we find that the Landau-gauge gluon propagator D{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}}{sup aa}(r) is well described by the Yukawa-type function e{sup -mr}/r with m{approx_equal}600 MeV for r=0.1-1.0 fm in the four-dimensional Euclidean space-time. In the momentum space, the gluon propagator D-tilde{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}}{sup aa}(p{sup 2}) with (p{sup 2}){sup 1/2}=0.5-3 GeV is found to be well approximated with a new-type propagator of (p{sup 2}+m{sup 2}){sup -3/2}, which corresponds to the four-dimensional Yukawa-type propagator. Associated with the Yukawa-type gluon propagator, we derive analytical expressions for the zero-spatial-momentum propagator D{sub 0}(t), the effective mass M{sub eff}(t), and the spectral function {rho}({omega}) of the gluon field. The mass parameter m turns out to be the effective gluon mass in the infrared region of {approx}1 fm. As a remarkable fact, the obtained gluon spectral function {rho}({omega}) is almost negative definite for {omega}>m, except for a positive {delta}-functional peak at {omega}=m.

  13. Electron spectral function and algebraic spin liquid for the normal state of underdoped high T(c) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Rantner, W; Wen, X G

    2001-04-23

    We propose to describe the spin fluctuations in the normal state (spin-pseudogap phase) of underdoped high T(c) cuprates as a manifestation of an algebraic spin liquid. Within the slave boson implementation of spin-charge separation, the normal state is described by massless Dirac fermions, charged bosons, and a gauge field. The gauge interaction, as an exact marginal perturbation, drives the mean-field free-spinon fixed point to a new spin-quantum fixed point-the algebraic spin liquid. Luttinger-liquid-like line shapes for the electron spectral function are obtained in the normal state, and we show how a coherent quasiparticle peak appears as spin and charge recombine.

  14. Full-zone spectral envelope function formalism for the optimization of line and point tunnel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Verreck, Devin Groeseneken, Guido; Verhulst, Anne S.; Mocuta, Anda; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Van de Put, Maarten; Magnus, Wim; Sorée, Bart

    2015-10-07

    Efficient quantum mechanical simulation of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) is indispensable to allow for an optimal configuration identification. We therefore present a full-zone 15-band quantum mechanical solver based on the envelope function formalism and employing a spectral method to reduce computational complexity and handle spurious solutions. We demonstrate the versatility of the solver by simulating a 40 nm wide In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As lineTFET and comparing it to p-n-i-n configurations with various pocket and body thicknesses. We find that the lineTFET performance is not degraded compared to semi-classical simulations. Furthermore, we show that a suitably optimized p-n-i-n TFET can obtain similar performance to the lineTFET.

  15. Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptari, Leonya P.; Del Dotto, Alessio; Pace, Emanuele; Salme, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  16. Parametrized optical functions of strontium barium niobate crystals in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorywalski, Krzysztof; Andriyevsky, Bohdan; Piasecki, Michał; Kityk, Iwan

    2017-09-01

    Complex optical function ɛ(E) = ɛ1(E) + iɛ2(E) components parallel ɛ∥(E ) and perpendicular ɛ⊥(E) to the optic axis are determined in the photon energy range E = 2-10 eV for SrxBa1-xNb2O6 single crystals with the composition parameters x = 0.40, 0.50, 0.61, 0.65, and 0.75. The spectra are obtained from the evaluation of the ellipsometric data using a relevant optical model which takes into account the optical anisotropy of the crystal and surface imperfection of the measured specimens. We report the parameters necessary to construct the optical function for each studied composition. Additionally, the energies of electronic inter-band transitions are obtained from the analysis in terms of standard analytical line shapes.

  17. On the Beam Functions Spectral Expansions for Fourth-Order Boundary Value Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N. C.; Christov, C. I.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we develop further the Galerkin technique based on the so-called beam functions with application to nonlinear problems. We make use of the formulas expressing a product of two beam functions into a series with respect to the system. First we prove that the overall convergence rate for a fourth-order linear b.v.p is algebraic fifth order, provided that the derivatives of the sought function up to fifth order exist. It is then shown that the inclusion of a quadratic nonlinear term in the equation does not degrade the fifth-order convergence. We validate our findings on a model problem which possesses analytical solution in the linear case. The agreement between the beam-Galerkin solution and the analytical solution for the linear problem is better than 10-12 for 200 terms. We also show that the error introduced by the expansion of the nonlinear term is lesser than 10-9. The beam-Galerkin method outperforms finite differences due to its superior accuracy whilst its advantage over the Chebyshev-tau method is attributed to the smaller condition number of the matrices involved in the former.

  18. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics.

  19. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmediev, N.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.; Devine, N.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics.

  20. [Retinal function under conditions of artificial illumination with varying spectral makeup in patients with sclerotic macular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Soldatova, A M

    1990-01-01

    In conditions of a laboratory experiment using illumination of various light sources (by incandescent, luminescent, arc-mercury, natrium lamps), determination of visual acuity, visual field, color perception, restoration time of visual acuity after macular flash lighting (photostress test), Heidinger's phenomenon as well as visocontrastometry after V. V. Volkov, Weston's correction test were conducted in 46 patients (92 eyes) with macular dystrophy and 50 healthy persons in the dynamics of a working day. It was found that the spectral composition of the visible light has a remarkable influence on the function of color perception, contrast sensitivity, reaction of visual analyser on light load, visual ability to work. In patients with macular dystrophy, the dependence on the light medium was expressed much greater than in healthy persons. The highest functional state of the retina and visual ability to work in patients with macular dystrophy were provided by natrium lamps having a maximum radiation in the yellow part of the spectrum. The short-wave visible light of arc-mercury and luminescent lamps somewhat suppressed the functional state of the retina and reduced visual ability to work. The results obtained are important for selection of optimal conditions of work for patients with macular dystrophy.

  1. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi, M=Ir,Os

    DOE PAGES

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, Iyad I.; May, Andrew F.; ...

    2015-03-31

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M=Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.1) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. In this paper, our INS measurements on single-crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(Q;E), for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers and increases electron-phonon coupling, leads tomore » softened interatomic force-constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S(Q,E) from INS through a Green's function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Finally, our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.« less

  2. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi (M =Ir , Os )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, I. I.; May, A. F.; Li, C. W.; Sales, B. C.; Niedziela, J. L.; Ma, J.; Matsuda, M.; Abernathy, D. L.; Berlijn, T.

    2015-03-01

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M = Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x =0 ,0.02 ,0.04 ,0.1 ) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. Our INS measurements on single crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S (Q ,E ) , for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers, leads to softened interatomic force constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S (Q ,E ) from INS through a Green's-function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory simulations, and we study the disorder-induced lifetimes on large supercells. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.

  3. Higher order moments, structure functions and spectral ratios in near- and far-wakes of a wind turbine array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Naseem; Aseyev, A.; McCraney, J.; Vuppuluri, V.; Abbass, O.; Al Jubaree, T.; Melius, M.; Cal, R. B.

    2014-11-01

    Hot-wire measurements obtained in a 3 × 3 wind turbine array boundary layer are utilized to analyze higher order statistics which include skewness, kurtosis as well as the ratios of structure functions and spectra. The ratios consist of wall-normal to streamwise components for both quantities. The aim is to understand the degree of anisotropy in the flow for the near- and far-wakes of the flow field where profiles at one diameter and five diameters are considered, respectively. The skewness at top tip for both wakes show a negative skewness while below the turbine canopy, this terms are positive. The kurtosis shows a Gaussian behavior in the near-wake immediately at hub-height. In addition, the effect due to the passage of the rotor in tandem with the shear layer at the top tip renders relatively high differences in the fourth order moment. The second order structure function and spectral ratios are found to exhibit anisotropic behavior at the top and bottom-tips for the large scales. Mixed structure functions and co-spectra are also considered in the context of isotropy.

  4. An Efficient Spectral Method for Ordinary Differential Equations with Rational Function Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Torres, David; Hagstrom, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    We present some relations that allow the efficient approximate inversion of linear differential operators with rational function coefficients. We employ expansions in terms of a large class of orthogonal polynomial families, including all the classical orthogonal polynomials. These families obey a simple three-term recurrence relation for differentiation, which implies that on an appropriately restricted domain the differentiation operator has a unique banded inverse. The inverse is an integration operator for the family, and it is simply the tridiagonal coefficient matrix for the recurrence. Since in these families convolution operators (i.e. matrix representations of multiplication by a function) are banded for polynomials, we are able to obtain a banded representation for linear differential operators with rational coefficients. This leads to a method of solution of initial or boundary value problems that, besides having an operation count that scales linearly with the order of truncation N, is computationally well conditioned. Among the applications considered is the use of rational maps for the resolution of sharp interior layers.

  5. A comprehensive account of spectral, Hartree Fock, and Density Functional Theory studies of 2-chlorobenzothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daswani, Ujla; Sharma, Pratibha; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Benzothiazole moiety is found to play an important role in medicinal chemistry with a wide range of pharmacological activities. Herein, a simple, benzothiazole derivative viz., 2-chlorobenzothiazole (2CBT) has been analyzed. The spectroscopic properties of the target compound were examined by FT-IR (4400-450 cm-1), FT-Raman (4000-50 cm-1), and NMR techniques. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO. Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio Hartree Fock and Density Functional Theory (DFT)/B3LYP method using varied basis sets combination. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results precisely complements with the experimental findings. Electronic absorption spectra along with energy and oscillator strength were obtained by TDDFT method. Atomic charges have also been reported. Total density isosurface and total density mapped with electrostatic potential surface (MESP) has been shown.

  6. Structure and spectral characteristics of diquat-cucurbituril complexes from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Peerannawar, Swarada R; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2013-11-01

    Electronic structure, (1)H NMR and infrared spectra of diquat (6,7-dihydrodipyrido[1,2-b:1',2'-e] pyrazine-5,8-diium or DQ(2+)) encapsulated by cucurbit[n]uril (n = 7,8) hosts are obtained using the density functional theory. Theoretical calculations have shown that both CB[7] or CB[8] host possesses strong affinity toward DQ(2+) compared to its reduced cation or neutral species. Calculated (1)H NMR spectra reveal that Hα protons on bi-pyridinium rings of DQ(2+)@CB[8] complex are de-shielded owing to C=O⋯H interactions. On the other hand aromatic (Hβ and Hδ) of DQ(2+) within the CB[8] cavity exhibit significant shielding. The complexation of CB[8] with DQ(2+) splits the carbonyl stretching vibration (1788 cm(-1)) into two distinct vibrations which correspond to 1765 cm(-1) arising from hydrogen bonded carbonyls and the 1792 cm(-1) band from non-interacting ones. Further, the CN stretching vibration in DQ(2+) exhibits a frequency blue-shift of 6 cm(-1) on its encapsulation within the CB[8] cavity. The direction of frequency shift has been explained on the basis of natural bond orbital analyses.

  7. Synthesis, growth and spectral studies of S-benzyl isothiouronium nitrate by density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemalatha, P.; Kumaresan, S.; Veeravazhuthi, V.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2013-05-01

    S-benzyl isothiouronium nitrate (SBTN), was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Vis and NMR spectra. The Centro-symmetric single crystal of S-benzyl isothiouronium nitrate (SBTN), which crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/C, exhibits second order non-linear optical (NLO) susceptibility, due to intermolecular charge transfer. S-benzyl isothiouronium ion forms well defined charge transfer (CT) salt with anion nitrate through N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. It is to identify the direction of specific N-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the -NH2 group and O- in the anion and also sacking in the solid state responsible for NLO activity in this crystal. The SHG technique confirms the non-linear optical property of the grown crystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been carried out to study the nature of hydrogen involved in the SBTN crystal. The bond lengths and bond angles of the structure of SBTN crystal calculated using B3LYP method with 6-311+(2d,2p) basis set. These calculations are compared with experimental values to provide deep insight into its electronic structure and property of grown crystal.

  8. FURTHER DEFINING SPECTRAL TYPE 'Y' AND EXPLORING THE LOW-MASS END OF THE FIELD BROWN DWARF MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Davy Kirkpatrick, J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian S.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Tinney, C. G.; Parker, Stephen; Salter, Graeme

    2012-07-10

    We present the discovery of another seven Y dwarfs from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using these objects, as well as the first six WISE Y dwarf discoveries from Cushing et al., we further explore the transition between spectral types T and Y. We find that the T/Y boundary roughly coincides with the spot where the J - H colors of brown dwarfs, as predicted by models, turn back to the red. Moreover, we use preliminary trigonometric parallax measurements to show that the T/Y boundary may also correspond to the point at which the absolute H (1.6 {mu}m) and W2 (4.6 {mu}m) magnitudes plummet. We use these discoveries and their preliminary distances to place them in the larger context of the solar neighborhood. We present a table that updates the entire stellar and substellar constituency within 8 pc of the Sun, and we show that the current census has hydrogen-burning stars outnumbering brown dwarfs by roughly a factor of six. This factor will decrease with time as more brown dwarfs are identified within this volume, but unless there is a vast reservoir of cold brown dwarfs invisible to WISE, the final space density of brown dwarfs is still expected to fall well below that of stars. We also use these new Y dwarf discoveries, along with newly discovered T dwarfs from WISE, to investigate the field substellar mass function. We find that the overall space density of late-T and early-Y dwarfs matches that from simulations describing the mass function as a power law with slope -0.5 < {alpha} < 0.0; however, a power law may provide a poor fit to the observed object counts as a function of spectral type because there are tantalizing hints that the number of brown dwarfs continues to rise from late-T to early-Y. More detailed monitoring and characterization of these Y dwarfs, along with dedicated searches aimed at identifying more examples, are certainly required.

  9. Surface spectral function of momentum-dependent pairing potentials in a topological insulator: application to CuxBi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Wan, Shaolong

    2013-05-29

    We propose three possible momentum-dependent pairing potentials as candidates for topological superconductors (for example CuxBi2Se3), and calculate the surface spectral function and surface density of states with these pairing potentials. We find that the first two can give the same spectral functions as the fully gapped and node-contacted pairing potentials given by Fu and Berg (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 097001), and that the third one can obtain a topological non-trivial case in which there exists a flat Andreev bound state and which preserves the threefold rotation symmetry. We hope our proposals and results will be assessed by future experiment.

  10. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS).

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Spahn, Olga Blum; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Functional brain imaging is of great interest for understanding correlations between specific cognitive processes and underlying neural activity. This understanding can provide the foundation for developing enhanced human-machine interfaces, decision aides, and enhanced cognition at the physiological level. The functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based event-related optical signal (EROS) technique can provide direct, high-fidelity measures of temporal and spatial characteristics of neural networks underlying cognitive behavior. However, current EROS systems are hampered by poor signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and depth of measure, limiting areas of the brain and associated cognitive processes that can be investigated. We propose to investigate a flexible, tunable, multi-spectral fNIRS EROS system which will provide up to 10x greater SNR as well as improved spatial and temporal resolution through significant improvements in electronics, optoelectronics and optics, as well as contribute to the physiological foundation of higher-order cognitive processes and provide the technical foundation for miniaturized portable neuroimaging systems.

  11. Spectral Changes in the Hyperluminous Pulsar in NGC 5907 as a Function of Super-orbital Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, F.; Walton, D. J.; Stern, D.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Brightman, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Rana, V.

    2017-01-01

    We present broadband, multi-epoch X-ray spectroscopy of the pulsating ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in NGC 5907. Simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR data from 2014 are best described by a multicolor blackbody model with a temperature gradient as a function of accretion disk radius significantly flatter than expected for a standard thin accretion disk (T(r)\\propto {r}-p, with p={0.608}-0.012+0.014). Additionally, we detect a hard power-law tail at energies above 10 keV, which we interpret as being due to Comptonization. We compare this observation to archival XMM-Newton, Chandra, and NuSTAR data from 2003, 2012, and 2013, and investigate possible spectral changes as a function of phase over the 78-day super-orbital period of this source. We find that observations taken around phases 0.3–0.4 show very similar temperature profiles, even though the observed flux varies significantly, while one observation taken around phase 0 has a significantly steeper profile. We discuss these findings in light of the recent discovery that the compact object is a neutron star and show that precession of the accretion disk or the neutron star can self-consistently explain most observed phenomena.

  12. Field testing of biological spectral weighting functions for induction of UV-absorbing compounds in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Flint, Stephan D; Searles, Peter S; Caldwell, Martyn M

    2004-05-01

    Action spectra are typically used as biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF) in biological research on the stratospheric ozone depletion issue. Despite their critical role in determining the amount of UV supplied in experiments, there has been only limited testing of different functions under realistic field conditions. Here, we calculate effective radiation according to five published BSWF and evaluate the appropriateness of these BSWF in representing the induction of UV-absorbing compounds. Experiments were carried out in the field using both ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) supplementation and selective filtering of solar UV radiation. For the four species tested, BSWF that extend into the ultraviolet-A radiation (320-400 nm) (UV-A) with moderate effectiveness best represented the observed results. When compared with the commonly used generalized plant response, these BSWF suggest that simulations of ozone depletion will require more radiation than in the past experiments. However, they imply lower radiation supplements than a new plant growth BSWF that has a greater emphasis on UV-A wavelengths.

  13. An algebraic formulation and implementation of the tetrahedron linear method for the Brillouin zone integration of spectral functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaprzyk, S.

    2012-02-01

    A package of FORTRAN subroutines is provided for the Brillouin zone (BZ) integration of the Green's functions (GF) and spectral functions. The relevant weighting factors at sampling points in the BZ are evaluated to high precision with the help of the formulas for both the real and imaginary parts. The analytical properties of implemented expressions are discussed, and their range of validity is determined. The limiting cases when values at the tetrahedron corners coincide are worked out in terms of the finite difference quotients and replaced by the derivatives. The present numerical algorithms are developed for one-, two- and three-dimensional simplexes, with the potential ability of handling simplexes with higher dimensions as well. As an example, the results of computation the simple cubic lattice GF's are presented. Program summaryProgram title: SimTet Catalogue identifier: AEKF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3176 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19 416 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran Computer: Any computer with a Fortran compiler Operating system: Unix, Linux, Windows RAM: 512 Mbytes Classification: 4.11, 7.3 Nature of problem: The integration of the Green's function over the Brillouin zone appears in the computations of many physical quantities in solid-state physics. Solution method: The integral over the Brillouin zone is computed with the tetrahedron linear method. The complex weights are generated with the novel algebraic formulas free of apparent singularities and well suited for automatic computations. Running time: A few μsec per integral.

  14. Microscopic nucleon spectral function for finite nuclei featuring two- and three-nucleon short-range correlations: The model versus ab initio calculations for three-nucleon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofi degli Atti, Claudio; Mezzetti, Chiara Benedetta; Morita, Hiko

    2017-04-01

    Background: Two-nucleon (2 N ) short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei have been recently thoroughly investigated, both theoretically and experimentally and the study of three-nucleon (3 N ) SRC, which could provide important information on short-range hadronic structure, is underway. Novel theoretical ideas concerning 2 N and 3 N SRC are put forward in the present paper. Purpose: The general features of a microscopic one-nucleon spectral function which includes the effects of both 2 N and 3 N SRC and its comparison with ab initio spectral functions of the three-nucleon systems are illustrated. Methods: A microscopic and parameter-free one-nucleon spectral function expressed in terms of a convolution integral involving ab initio relative and center-of-mass (c.m.) momentum distributions of a 2 N pair and aimed at describing two- and three-nucleon short-range correlations, is obtained by using: (i) the two-nucleon momentum distributions obtained within ab initio approaches based upon nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Argonne family; (ii) the exact relation between one- and two-nucleon momentum distributions; (iii) the fundamental property of factorization of the nuclear wave function at short internucleon ranges. Results: The comparison between the ab initio spectral function of 3He and the one based upon the convolution integral shows that when the latter contains only two-nucleon short-range correlations the removal energy location of the peaks and the region around them exhibited by the ab initio spectral function are correctly predicted, unlike the case of the high and low removal energy tails; the inclusion of the effects of three-nucleon correlations brings the convolution model spectral function in much better agreement with the ab initio one; it is also found that whereas the three-nucleon short-range correlations dominate the high energy removal energy tail of the spectral function, their effects on the one-nucleon momentum distribution are almost one

  15. Assessment of UV biological spectral weighting functions for phenolic metabolites and growth responses in silver birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, Titta; Venäläinen, Tuulia; Tegelberg, Riitta; Lindfors, Anders; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Sutinen, Sirkka; O'Hara, Robert B; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2009-01-01

    In research concerning stratospheric ozone depletion, action spectra are used as biological spectral weighting functions (BSWFs) for describing the effects of UV radiation on plant responses. Our aim was to evaluate the appropriateness of six frequently used BSWFs that differ in effectiveness with increasing wavelength. The evaluation of action spectra was based on calculating the effective UV radiation doses according to 1-2) two formulations of the generalized plant action spectrum, 3) a spectrum for ultraviolet induced erythema in human skin, 4) a spectrum for the accumulation of a flavonol in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, 5) a spectrum for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings and 6) the plant growth action spectrum. We monitored effects of UV radiation on the concentration of individual UV absorbing metabolites and chlorophyll concentrations in leaves and growth responses of silver birch (Betula pendula) seedlings. Experiments were conducted outdoors using plastic films attenuating different parts of the UV spectrum. Chlorophyll concentrations and growth were not affected by the UV treatments. The response to UV radiation varied between and within groups of phenolics. In general, the observed responses of phenolic groups and individual flavonoids were best predicted by action spectra extending into the UV-A region with moderate effectiveness.

  16. Shift-and-invert parallel spectral transformation eigensolver: Massively parallel performance for density-functional based tight-binding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong; Zapol, Peter; Dixon, David A.; Wagner, Albert F.; Keceli, Murat

    2015-11-17

    The Shift-and-invert parallel spectral transformations (SIPs), a computational approach to solve sparse eigenvalue problems, is developed for massively parallel architectures with exceptional parallel scalability and robustness. The capabilities of SIPs are demonstrated by diagonalization of density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) Hamiltonian and overlap matrices for single-wall metallic carbon nanotubes, diamond nanowires, and bulk diamond crystals. The largest (smallest) example studied is a 128,000 (2000) atom nanotube for which ~330,000 (~5600) eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained in ~190 (~5) seconds when parallelized over 266,144 (16,384) Blue Gene/Q cores. Weak scaling and strong scaling of SIPs are analyzed and the performance of SIPs is compared with other novel methods. Different matrix ordering methods are investigated to reduce the cost of the factorization step, which dominates the time-to-solution at the strong scaling limit. As a result, a parallel implementation of assembling the density matrix from the distributed eigenvectors is demonstrated.

  17. Shift-and-invert parallel spectral transformation eigensolver: Massively parallel performance for density-functional based tight-binding

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Hong; Zapol, Peter; Dixon, David A.; ...

    2015-11-17

    The Shift-and-invert parallel spectral transformations (SIPs), a computational approach to solve sparse eigenvalue problems, is developed for massively parallel architectures with exceptional parallel scalability and robustness. The capabilities of SIPs are demonstrated by diagonalization of density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) Hamiltonian and overlap matrices for single-wall metallic carbon nanotubes, diamond nanowires, and bulk diamond crystals. The largest (smallest) example studied is a 128,000 (2000) atom nanotube for which ~330,000 (~5600) eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained in ~190 (~5) seconds when parallelized over 266,144 (16,384) Blue Gene/Q cores. Weak scaling and strong scaling of SIPs are analyzed and the performance of SIPsmore » is compared with other novel methods. Different matrix ordering methods are investigated to reduce the cost of the factorization step, which dominates the time-to-solution at the strong scaling limit. As a result, a parallel implementation of assembling the density matrix from the distributed eigenvectors is demonstrated.« less

  18. Assessing forest structure and function from spectral transmittance measurements: a case study in a Mediterranean holm oak forest.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Lydia; Peñuelas, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Annual changes in structural attributes and seasonal dynamics in water content, photosynthetic rate and light-use efficiency (LUE) were assessed by spectral transmittance for 4 years (1999-2003) in six stands of a Mediterranean holm oak forest. Green biomass, total biomass and leaf area index (LAI) were determined. In 1999, seasonal dynamics of net carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange and water content were measured. We recorded photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) transmittance and hyperspectral transmittance in the 400-1100 nm region and derived reflectance-based vegetation indices. Transmittance over the PAR region derived from either ceptometer or spectroradiometer measurements (PART and TPAR, respectively) was related to green and total biomass. Both PART and TPAR were also related to LAI (r=0.79 and r=0.70, respectively, P <0.001) and were appropriate for comparison among stands, whereas subtle changes in LAI within a stand were better assessed by the transmittance amplitude in the red edge region (TRE) (within a stand, r=0.77-0.99, P <0.001). Spectral transmittance-based indices successfully captured physiological processes that occurred on temporal (seasonal) and spatial scales. The transmittance-based water index (TWI) was related to both foliage and canopy water content (r=0.69, P <0.001). Estimates of foliage and canopy water content improved in dense (closed) stands (r=0.84 and r=0.87, respectively, P <0.001) compared with low-density stands. Under non-drought conditions, transmittance-based photochemical reflectance index (TPRI) was related to LUE (r=0.58, P <0.05) and net CO2 exchange (r=0.72, P <0.01), and the combined TPAR x TPRI index greatly improved these relationships (r=0.93 and r=0.84, respectively, P <0.01), indicating that both structural and physiological adjustments modified CO2 fixation capacity in these forest stands. Our novel approach to the study of transmitted radiation provides a tool for estimating structural and functional variables

  19. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  20. Seasonal discrimination of C3 and C4 grasses functional types: An evaluation of the prospects of varying spectral configurations of new generation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoko, Cletah; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2017-10-01

    The present study assessed the potential of varying spectral configuration of Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Sentinel 2 MultiSpectal Instrument (MSI) and Worldview 2 sensors in the seasonal discrimination of Festuca costata (C3) and Themeda Triandra (C4) grass species in the Drakensberg, South Africa. This was achieved by resampling hyperspectral measurements to the spectral windows corresponding to the three sensors at two distinct seasonal periods (summer peak and end of winter), using the Discriminant Analysis (DA) classification ensemble. In summer, standard bands of the Worldview 2 produced the highest overall classification accuracy (98.61%), followed by Sentinel 2 (97.52%), whereas the Landsat 8 spectral configuration was the least performer, using vegetation indices (95.83%). In winter, Sentinel 2 spectral bands produced the highest accuracy (96.18%) for the two species, followed by Worldview 2 (94.44%) and Landsat 8 yielded the least (91.67%) accuracy. Results also showed that maximum separability between C3 and C4 grasses was in summer, while at the end of winter considerable overlaps were noted, especially when using the spectral settings of the Landsat 8 OLI and Sentinel 2 shortwave infrared bands. Test of significance in species reflectance further confirmed that in summer, there were significant differences (P < 0.05), whereas in winter, most of the spectral windows of all sensors yielded insignificant differences (P > 0.05) between the two species. In this regard, the peak summer period presents a promising opportunity for the spectral discrimination of C3 and C4 grass species functional types, than the end of winter, when using multispectral sensors. Results from this study highlight the influence of seasonality on discrimination and therefore provide the basis for the successful discrimination and mapping of C3 and C4 grass species.

  1. Study of hole pair condensation based on the SU(2) Slave-Boson approach to the t-J Hamiltonian: Temperature, momentum and doping dependences of spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Salk, S.H.S.; Lee, S.S.

    1999-11-01

    Based on the U(1) and SU(2) slave-boson approaches to the t-J Hamiltonian, the authors evaluate the one electron spectral functions for the hole doped high {Tc} cuprates for comparison with the angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data. They find that the observed quasiparticle peak in the superconducting state is correlated with the hump which exists in the normal state. They find that the spectral weight of the quasiparticle peak increases as doping rate increases, which is consistent with observation. As a consequence of the phase fluctuation effects of the spinon and holon pairing order parameters the spectral weight of the predicted peak obtained from the SU(2) theory is found to be smaller than the one predicted from U(1) mean field theory.

  2. Temperature dependent dielectric function in the near-infrared to vacuum-ultraviolet ultraviolet spectral range of alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Lühmann, T.; Böntgen, T.; Franke, H.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Opper, D.

    2013-12-14

    The dielectric function of nano-/polycrystalline alumina and yttria stabilised zirconia thin films has been investigated in a wide spectral range from 1.0 eV to 7.5 eV and temperatures between 10 K and room temperature. In the near band-edge spectral range, we found a broad distribution of optical transitions within the band gap, the so-called Urbach absorption tail which is typical for amorphous or polycrystalline materials due to the lack of long range order in the crystal structure. The coupling properties of the electronic system to the optical phonon bath and thermal lattice vibrations strongly depend on the ratio of the spectral extent of these disorder states to the main phonon energy, which we correlate with the different crystalline structure of our samples. The films have been grown at room temperature and 650 °C by pulsed laser deposition.

  3. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  4. Mean-field approximation for thermodynamic and spectral functions of correlated electrons: Strong coupling and arbitrary band filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav; Kauch, Anna

    2017-04-01

    We present a construction of a mean-field theory for thermodynamic and spectral properties of correlated electrons reliable in the strong-coupling limit. We introduce an effective interaction determined self-consistently from the reduced parquet equations. It is a static local approximation of the two-particle irreducible vertex, the kernel of a potentially singular Bethe-Salpeter equation. The effective interaction enters the Ward identity from which a thermodynamic self-energy, renormalizing the one-electron propagators, is determined. The dynamical Schwinger-Dyson equation with the thermodynamic propagators is then used to calculate the spectral properties. The thermodynamic and spectral properties of correlated electrons are in this way determined on the same footing and in a consistent manner. Such a mean-field approximation is analytically controllable and free of unphysical behavior and spurious phase transitions. We apply the construction to the asymmetric Anderson impurity and the Hubbard models in the strong-coupling regime.

  5. Spectral function of the U →∞ one-dimensional Hubbard model at finite temperature and the crossover to the spin-incoherent regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanieh-ha, Mohammad; Feiguin, Adrian E.

    2014-10-01

    The physics of the strongly interacting Hubbard chain (with t /U ≪1 ) at finite temperatures undergoes a crossover to a spin-incoherent regime when the temperature is very small relative to the Fermi energy, but larger than the characteristic spin energy scale. This crossover can be understood by means of Ogata and Shiba's factorized wave function, where charge and spin are totally decoupled, and assuming that the charge remains in the ground state, while the spin is thermally excited and at an effective "spin temperature." We use the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method to calculate the dynamical contributions of the spin, to reconstruct the single-particle spectral function of the electrons. The crossover is characterized by a redistribution of spectral weight both in frequency and momentum, with an apparent shift by kF of the minimum of the dispersion.

  6. [The spectral analysis as an instrument for the investigation of the functional-dynamic complexes of oral speech skills for the medical criminalistic identification of the speaker].

    PubMed

    Kir'yanov, P A; Kaganov, A Sh

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the search for the theoretical foundations and the approaches to the assessment of the methodological basis for the application of the spectral analysis to the investigation of the functional-dynamic complexes (FDC) of oral speech skills for the medical criminalistic identification of the speaker. The study included the analysis of the relevant literature publications, methodological proposals of the authors of the present article, and the results of their medical criminalistics investigations and laboratory experiments. The results of the study give evidence that the spectral analysis provides an acceptable tool for distinguishing the stable identification signs of a given acoustic group that characterize the functional-dynamic complexes of oral speech skills skills for the medical criminalistic identification of the speaker.

  7. Spectral analysis and catalytic activities of the microsomal mixed-function oxidase system of the sea anemone (phylum: Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Heffernan, L M; Winston, G W

    1998-11-01

    Cnidarians are primarily marine organisms with a wide and diverse habitat worldwide. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated the presence of proteins in the molecular mass range of 50-60 KDa that were recognized by several antibodies raised against fish cytochromes P450 of the CYP 1, 2, and 3 families in microsomes prepared from the columnar regions of 5 species of sea anemones (Heffernan et al. Mar Environ Res 1996;42:353-357). Pursuant to those studies we report herein results of spectral analyses, NAD(P)H-oxidoreductase and ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) of sea anemone microsomal fractions. The predominant feature in the difference spectrum of dithionite (DTN)-reduced, CO-liganded anemone microsomes was a peak with lambda max of approximately 418 nm, which slowly increased for about 20 min and decreased after about 40 min. A relatively lower amplitude 450 nm peak was attained within 5 min of CO addition and was stable for up to 90 min. The 450 nm peak did not increase concomitant to the decrease in the 418 nm peak suggesting that the latter is not denatured P450. A significantly larger 450 nm peak was attained in CO-difference spectra when DTN was added prior to CO. NADPH-dependent cytochrome c (P450) reductase of the sea anemones was 1.8-3.9 nmol/min/mg protein, which is at the lower end of the range observed in invertebrates. NADH-cytochrome c reductase was 9-25 nmol/min/mg protein, while the NADH-ferricyanide (b5) reductase ranged from 73-232 nmol/min/mg protein. When microsomal EROD activity was measured under conditions in which the reaction was linear with respect to protein concentration, a decrease in fluorescence was typically observed for the initial 15 min of the time course and then increased linearly for up to 90 min; initial velocities were determined from the increasing linear region. NADPH was the preferred cofactor for EROD activity and the NAD(P)H-EROD activity was higher in Anthopleura elegantissima than Anthopleura

  8. On the Gibbs phenomenon 3: Recovering exponential accuracy in a sub-interval from a spectral partial sum of a piecewise analytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, David; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of overcoming Gibbs phenomenon was continued, i.e., obtaining exponential accuracy at all points including at the discontinuities themselves, from the knowledge of a spectral partial sum of a discontinuous but piecewise analytic function. It was shown that if we are given the first N expansion coefficients of an L(sub 2) function f(x) in terms of either the trigonometrical polynomials or the Chebyshev or Legendre polynomials, an exponentially convergent approximation to the point values of f(x) in any sub-interval in which it is analytic can be constructed.

  9. Airborne in-situ spectral characterization and concentration estimates of fluorescent organics as a function of depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittle, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purpose of many in-situ airborne light scattering experiments in natural waters is to spectrally characterize the subsurface fluorescent organics and estimate their relative concentrations. This is often done by shining a laser beam into the water and monitoring its subsurface return signal. To do this with the proper interpretation, depth must be taken into account. If one disregards depth dependence when taking such estimates, both their spectral characteristics and their concentrations estimates can be rather ambiguous. A simple airborne lidar configuration is used to detect the subsurface return signal from a particular depth and wavelength. Underwater scatterometer were employed to show that in-situ subsurface organics are very sensitive to depth, but they also require the use of slow moving boats to cover large sample areas. Also, their very entry into the water disturbs the sample it is measuring. The method described is superior and simplest to any employed thus far.

  10. Spectral functions of a time-periodically driven Falicov-Kimball model: Real-space Floquet dynamical mean-field theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Tao; Hofstetter, Walter

    2017-08-01

    We present a systematic study of the spectral functions of a time-periodically driven Falicov-Kimball Hamiltonian. In the high-frequency limit, this system can be effectively described as a Harper-Hofstadter-Falicov-Kimball model. Using real-space Floquet dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), we take into account the interaction effects and contributions from higher Floquet bands in a nonperturbative way. Our calculations show a high degree of similarity between the interacting driven system and its effective static counterpart with respect to spectral properties. However, as also illustrated by our results, one should bear in mind that Floquet DMFT describes a nonequilibrium steady state, while an effective static Hamiltonian describes an equilibrium state. We further demonstrate the possibility of using real-space Floquet DMFT to study edge states on a cylinder geometry.

  11. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  12. Integrated airborne lidar and multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) for plant species mapping across multiple functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, K.; Asner, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to map plant species distributions has long been one of the key goals of terrestrial remote sensing. Achieving this goal has been challenging, however, due to technical constraints and the difficulty in relating remote observations to ground measurements. Advances in both the types of data that can be collected remotely and in available analytical tools like multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) are allowing for rapid improvements in this field. In 2007 the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) acquired high resolution lidar and hyperspectral imagery of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (Woodside, California). The site contains a mosaic of vegetation types, from grassland to chaparral to evergreen forest. To build a spectral library, 415 GPS points were collected in the field, made up of 44 plant species, six plant categories (for nonphotosynthetic vegetation), and four substrate types. Using the lidar data to select the most illuminated pixels as seen from the aircraft (based on canopy shape and viewing angle), we then reduced the spectral library to only the most fully lit pixels. To identify individual plant species in the imagery, first the hyperspectral data was used to calculate the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and then pixels with an NDVI less than 0.15 were removed from further analysis. The remaining image was stratified into five classes based on vegetation height derived from the lidar data. For each class, a suite of possible endmembers was identified and then three endmember selection procedures (endmember average RMS, minimum average spectral angle, and count based endmember selection) were employed to select the most representative endmembers from each species in each class. Two and three endmember models were then applied and each pixel was assigned a species or plant category based on the highest endmember fraction. To validate the approach, an independent set of 200 points was collected throughout the

  13. The use of wavelength-selective plastic cladding materials in horticulture: understanding of crop and fungal responses through the assessment of biological spectral weighting functions.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nigel D; Jacobson, Rob J; Taylor, Anna; Wargent, Jason J; Moore, Jason P

    2005-01-01

    Plant responses to light spectral quality can be exploited to deliver a range of agronomically desirable end points in protected crops. This can be achieved using plastics with specific spectral properties as crop covers. We have studied the responses of a range of crops to plastics that have either (a) increased transmission of UV compared with standard horticultural covers, (b) decreased transmission of UV or (c) increased the ratio of red (R) : far-red (FR) radiation. Both the UV-transparent and R : FR increasing films reduced leaf area and biomass, offering potential alternatives to chemical growth regulators. The UV-opaque film increased growth, but while this may be useful in some crops, there were trade-offs with elements of quality, such as pigmentation and taste. UV manipulation may also influence disease control. Increasing UV inhibited not only the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea but also the disease biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum. Unlike B. cinerea, T. harzianum was highly sensitive to UV-A radiation. These fungal responses and those for plant growth in the growth room and the field under different plastics are analyzed in terms of alternative biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF). The role of BSWF in assessing general patterns of response to UV modification in horticulture is also discussed.

  14. Canopy-level spectral reflectance varies as a function of community composition, biomass and ecosystem productivity in a boreal rich fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPartland, M.; Falkowski, M. J.; Kane, E. S.; Montgomery, R.

    2016-12-01

    Peatland ecosystems play an important role in the northern boreal landscape by storing up to thirty percent of all terrestrial organic carbon in soil and living biomass. Peatland productivity varies as a function of soil moisture content, nutrient availability and plant community composition. In an effort to develop large-scale assessments of peatland productivity in a changing boreal climate, this research integrates measurements of vegetation composition, structure and productivity with in situ hyperspectral canopy reflectance measurements. This study was conducted at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) at the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research Station. APEX is a decade-long experiment looking at the effects of altered water tables on peatland ecology and biogeochemistry. Over the course of the experiment, plant communities and aboveground productivity within the APEX treatment plots have shifted in response to prolonged drought or flooding. Species abundance and standing biomass were estimated in each of three large water table treatments (raised, lowered and control). Photosynthesis was measured for each of four dominant species present across all treatments. Number of leaves per plant were recorded, and tissues were harvested for calculation of specific leaf area and C:N stoichiometry. Spectral reflectance was measured using an Analytical Spectral Devices Fieldspec Pro, which recorded reflected solar radiation from 300 to 2500 nm at one-nanometer spectral resolution. This study investigates the effects of community composition, standing biomass, and plant productivity on canopy reflectance. These results will broaden our understanding how biophysical properties drive canopy spectral reflectance, and will help inform remote sensing assessments of peatland ecosystem response to climate change over large areas.

  15. Infrared, vibrational circular dichroism, and Raman spectral simulations for β-sheet structures with various isotopic labels, interstrand, and stacking arrangements using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Welch, William R W; Kubelka, Jan; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2013-09-12

    Infrared (IR), Raman, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectral variations for different β-sheet structures were studied using simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) force field and intensity computations. The DFT vibrational parameters were obtained for β-sheet fragments containing nine-amides and constrained to a variety of conformations and strand arrangements. These were subsequently transferred onto corresponding larger β-sheet models, normally consisting of five strands with ten amides each, for spectral simulations. Further extension to fibril models composed of multiple stacked β-sheets was achieved by combining the transfer of DFT parameters for each sheet with dipole coupling methods for interactions between sheets. IR spectra of the amide I show different splitting patterns for parallel and antiparallel β-sheets, and their VCD, in the absence of intersheet stacking, have distinct sign variations. Isotopic labeling by (13)C of selected residues yields spectral shifts and intensity changes uniquely sensitive to relative alignment of strands (registry) for antiparallel sheets. Stacking of multiple planar sheets maintains the qualitative spectral character of the single sheet but evidences some reduction in the exciton splitting of the amide I mode. Rotating sheets with respect to each other leads to a significant VCD enhancement, whose sign pattern and intensity is dependent on the handedness and degree of rotation. For twisted β-sheets, a significant VCD enhancement is computed even for sheets stacked with either the same or opposite alignments and the inter-sheet rotation, depending on the sense, can either further increase or weaken the enhanced VCD intensity. In twisted, stacked structures (without rotation), similar VCD amide I patterns (positive couplets) are predicted for both parallel and antiparallel sheets, but different IR intensity distributions still enable their differentiation. Our simulation results prove useful

  16. Neural representation of spectral and temporal features of song in the auditory forebrain of zebra finches as revealed by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Boumans, Tiny; Theunissen, Frédéric E; Poirier, Colline; Van Der Linden, Annemie

    2007-11-01

    Song perception in songbirds, just as music and speech perception in humans, requires processing the spectral and temporal structure found in the succession of song-syllables. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and synthetic songs that preserved exclusively either the temporal or the spectral structure of natural song, we investigated how vocalizations are processed in the avian forebrain. We found bilateral and equal activation of the primary auditory region, field L. The more ventral regions of field L showed depressed responses to the synthetic songs that lacked spectral structure. These ventral regions included subarea L3, medial-ventral subarea L and potentially the secondary auditory region caudal medial nidopallium. In addition, field L as a whole showed unexpected increased responses to the temporally filtered songs and this increase was the largest in the dorsal regions. These dorsal regions included L1 and the dorsal subareas L and L2b. Therefore, the ventral region of field L appears to be more sensitive to the preservation of both spectral and temporal information in the context of song processing. We did not find any differences in responses to playback of the bird's own song vs other familiar conspecific songs. We also investigated the effect of three commonly used anaesthetics on the blood oxygen level-dependent response: medetomidine, urethane and isoflurane. The extent of the area activated and the stimulus selectivity depended on the type of anaesthetic. We discuss these results in the context of what is known about the locus of action of the anaesthetics, and reports of neural activity measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  17. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of 18FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–CT (18FDG PET–CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Methods: Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and 18FDG micro-PET–CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. Results: 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Conclusion: Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of 18FDG PET–CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of 125I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Advances in knowledge: Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of 125I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models

  18. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of (18)FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT ((18)FDG PET-CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and (18)FDG micro-PET-CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models because the nIC correlates with the SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT.

  19. Electron-boson spectral density function of correlated multiband systems obtained from optical data: Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-31

    We introduce an approximate method which can be used to simulate the optical conductivity data of correlated multiband systems for normal and superconducting cases by taking advantage of a reversed process in comparison to a usual optical data analysis, which has been used to extract the electron-boson spectral density function from measured optical spectra of single-band systems, like cuprates. We applied this method to optical conductivity data of two multiband pnictide systems (Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs) and obtained the electron-boson spectral density functions. The obtained electron-boson spectral density consists of a sharp mode and a broad background. The obtained spectral density functions of the multiband systems show similar properties as those of cuprates in several aspects. We expect that our method helps to reveal the nature of strong correlations in the multiband pnictide superconductors.

  20. dPotFit: A computer program to fit diatomic molecule spectral data to potential energy functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes program dPotFit, which performs least-squares fits of diatomic molecule spectroscopic data consisting of any combination of microwave, infrared or electronic vibrational bands, fluorescence series, and tunneling predissociation level widths, involving one or more electronic states and one or more isotopologs, and for appropriate systems, second virial coefficient data, to determine analytic potential energy functions defining the observed levels and other properties of each state. Four families of analytical potential functions are available for fitting in the current version of dPotFit: the Expanded Morse Oscillator (EMO) function, the Morse/Long-Range (MLR) function, the Double-Exponential/Long-Range (DELR) function, and the 'Generalized Potential Energy Function' (GPEF) of Šurkus, which incorporates a variety of polynomial functional forms. In addition, dPotFit allows sets of experimental data to be tested against predictions generated from three other families of analytic functions, namely, the 'Hannover Polynomial' (or "X-expansion") function, and the 'Tang-Toennies' and Scoles-Aziz 'HFD', exponential-plus-van der Waals functions, and from interpolation-smoothed pointwise potential energies, such as those obtained from ab initio or RKR calculations. dPotFit also allows the fits to determine atomic-mass-dependent Born-Oppenheimer breakdown functions, and singlet-state Λ-doubling, or 2Σ splitting radial strength functions for one or more electronic states. dPotFit always reports both the 95% confidence limit uncertainty and the "sensitivity" of each fitted parameter; the latter indicates the number of significant digits that must be retained when rounding fitted parameters, in order to ensure that predictions remain in full agreement with experiment. It will also, if requested, apply a "sequential rounding and refitting" procedure to yield a final parameter set defined by a minimum number of significant digits, while ensuring no

  1. Estimation of slip distribution using an inverse method based on spectral decomposition of Green's function utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Honglin; Kato, Teruyuki; Hori, Muneo

    2007-07-01

    An inverse method based on the spectral decomposition of the Green's function was employed for estimating a slip distribution. We conducted numerical simulations along the Philippine Sea plate (PH) boundary in southwest Japan using this method to examine how to determine the essential parameters which are the number of deformation function modes and their coefficients. Japanese GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) Global Positioning System (GPS) data were used for three years covering 1997-1999 to estimate interseismic back slip distribution in this region. The estimated maximum back slip rate is about 7 cm/yr, which is consistent with the Philippine Sea plate convergence rate. Areas of strong coupling are confined between depths of 10 and 30 km and three areas of strong coupling were delineated. These results are consistent with other studies that have estimated locations of coupling distribution.

  2. Synthesis, spectral characterization and density functional theory exploration of 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M.; Syed Ali Padusha, M.; Bharanidharan, S.; Saleem, H.; Dhandapani, A.; Manivarman, S.

    2015-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized compound, namely 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol (QPPO) are analyzed. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm-1) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational assignments of QPPO have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Gaussian03W software package. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) is calculated to find its character in non-linear optics. Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method is used to calculate 1H NMR chemical shift calculations were carried out and compared with experimental data. The electronic properties like UV-Visible spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO energies were reported. The energy gap shows that the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Thermodynamic parameters of the title compound were calculated at various temperatures.

  3. Synthesis, spectral characterization and density functional theory exploration of 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M; Padusha, M Syed Ali; Bharanidharan, S; Saleem, H; Dhandapani, A; Manivarman, S

    2015-06-05

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized compound, namely 1-(quinolin-3-yl)piperidin-2-ol (QPPO) are analyzed. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational assignments of QPPO have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Gaussian03W software package. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) is calculated to find its character in non-linear optics. Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method is used to calculate (1)H NMR chemical shift calculations were carried out and compared with experimental data. The electronic properties like UV-Visible spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO energies were reported. The energy gap shows that the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Thermodynamic parameters of the title compound were calculated at various temperatures.

  4. Miniature spectral imaging device for wide-field quantitative functional imaging of the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Brandon S.; Llopis, Antonio; Palmer, Gregory M.; McCachren, Samuel S., III; Senlik, Ozlem; Miller, David; Brooke, Martin A.; Jokerst, Nan M.; Geradts, Joseph; Greenup, Rachel; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a portable, breast margin assessment probe leveraging diffuse optical spectroscopy to quantify the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins during breast conserving surgery. The approach presented here leverages a custom-made 16-channel annular photodiode imaging array (arranged in a 4×4 grid), a raster-scanning imaging platform with precision pressure control, and compressive sensing with an optimized set of eight wavelengths in the visible spectral range. A scalable Monte-Carlo-based inverse model is used to generate optical property [μs‧(λ) and μa(λ)] measures for each of the 16 simultaneously captured diffuse reflectance spectra. Subpixel sampling (0.75 mm) is achieved through incremental x, y raster scanning of the imaging probe, providing detailed optical parameter maps of breast margins over a 2×2 cm2 area in ˜9 min. The morphological landscape of a tumor margin is characterized using optical surrogates for the fat to fibroglandular content ratio, which has demonstrated diagnostic utility in delineating tissue subtypes in the breast.

  5. Noncomputable Spectral Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teutsch, Jason

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to enumerate all computer programs. In particular, for every partial computable function, there is a shortest program which computes that function. f-MIN is the set of indices for shortest programs. In 1972, Meyer showed that f-MIN is Turing equivalent to 0'', the halting set with halting set oracle. This paper generalizes the notion of shortest programs, and we use various measures from computability theory to describe the complexity of the resulting "spectral sets." We show that under certain Godel numberings, the spectral sets are exactly the canonical sets 0', 0'', 0''', ... up to Turing equivalence. This is probably not true in general, however we show that spectral sets always contain some useful information. We show that immunity, or "thinness" is a useful characteristic for distinguishing between spectral sets. In the final chapter, we construct a set which neither contains nor is disjoint from any infinite arithmetic set, yet it is 0-majorized and contains a natural spectral set. Thus a pathological set becomes a bit more friendly. Finally, a number of interesting open problems are left for the inspired reader.

  6. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  7. Spectral classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, C.

    Taxonomic classification of astronomically observed stellar objects is described in terms of spectral properties. Stars receive a classification containing a letter, number, and a Roman numeral, which relates the star to other stars of higher or lower Roman numerals. The citation indicates the stellar chromatic emission in relation to the wavelengths of other stars. Standards are chosen from the available objects detected. Various classification schemes such as the MK, HD, and the Barbier-Chalonge-Divan systems are defined, including examples of indexing differences. Details delineating the separations between classifications are discussed with reference to the information content in spectral and in photometric classification schemes. The parameters usually used for classification include the temperature, luminosity, reddening, binarity, rotation, magnetic field, and elemental abundance or composition. The inclusion of recently discovered extended wavelength characteristics in nominal classifications is outlined, together with techniques involved in automated classification.

  8. Effects of irradiance and spectral quality on leaf structure and function in seedlings of two Southeast Asian Hopea (Dipterocarpaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W; Oberbauer, S F; Johnson, P; Krishnapilay, B; Mansor, M; Mohamad, H; Yap, S K

    2000-04-01

    We studied the development of leaf characters in two Southeast Asian dipterocarp forest trees under different photosynthetic photon flux densities (PFD) and spectral qualities (red to far-red, R:FR). The two species, Hopea helferi and H. odorata, are taxonomically closely related but differ in their ecological requirements; H. helferi is more drought tolerant and H. odorata more shade tolerant. Seedlings were grown in replicated shadehouse treatments of differing PFD and R:FR. We measured or calculated (1) leaf and tissue thicknesses; (2) mesophyll parenchyma, air space, and lignified tissue volumes; (3) mesophyll air volumes (V(mes)/A(surf)) and surfaces (A(mes)/A(surf)); (4) palisade cell length and width; (5) chlorophyll/cm and a/b; (6) leaf absorption; and (7) attenuance/absorbance at 652 and 550 nm. These characters varied in response to light conditions in both taxa. Characters were predominantly affected by PFD, and R:FR slightly influenced many characters. Leaf characters of H. odorata were more plastic in response to treatment conditions. Characters were correlated with each other in a complex fashion. Variation in leaf anatomy is most likely a consequence of increasing leaf thickness in both taxa, which may increase mechanical strength and defense against herbivory in more exposed environments. Variation in leaf optical properties was most likely affected by pigment photo-bleaching in treatments of more intense PFD and was not correlated with A(max). The greater plasticity of leaf responses in H. odorata helps explain the acclimation over the range of light conditions encountered by this shade-tolerant taxon. The dense layer of scales on the leaf undersurface and other anatomical characters in H. helferi reduced gas exchange and growth in this drought-tolerant tree.

  9. Spectral Searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouse, James F.

    1985-12-01

    Infrared Spectral Searching has progressed rapidly over the past two years since the last FT-IR Conference in Durham, England. In addition, if we compare the searching capabilities available to the Infrared Spectroscopist today with those that were available a short four years ago at the last North American Conference held in Columbia, South Carolina, then the advancements are even more impressive. In retrospect, I would describe the state-of-the-art in Spectral Searching at the 1981 FT-IR Conference as "Level 1 Searching", where the spectroscopist was limited to measuring a spectrum for his unknown material, and automatically searching it against very limited libraries at that time to obtain a search report. The report generally provided an ordered ranking of the best matches, chemical name, and a spectrum number so the reference spectrum could be located and reviewed in books. In 1981, there existed a total of three commercially available infrared search packages at the instrument level. Two of the packages were available for FT-IR instruments and the third was available on a dispersive instrument. Only the FT-IR packages allowed viewing the reference spectra on the CRT along with the unknown spectrum by automated spectral retrieval from the reference libraries stored on disk. However, the primary source of reference spectra was still predominantly hard copy.

  10. Silver nanoparticles deposited on amine-functionalized silica spheres and their amalgamation-based spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameshkumar, Perumal; Manivannan, Shanmugam; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2013-05-01

    A facile synthetic method to decorate amine-functionalized silica spheres (SiO2) by silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is reported. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images showed that spherical Ag NPs with an average particle size of 14 nm were deposited on 250 nm-sized SiO2 spheres (SiO2/Ag NPs). The spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions were carried out using the synthesized SiO2/Ag NPs with an experimental detection limit of 5 μM. It was found that the addition of Hg(II) ions (150 μM) into the solution of SiO2/Ag NPs completely quenched the SPR band of the Ag NPs due to the formation of anisotropic Ag amalgam crystals (AgHg). The selective detection of Hg(II) ions by SiO2/Ag NPs in the presence of other environmentally relevant metal ions was also demonstrated using spectral and colorimetric methods.

  11. On-board calibration of the spectral response functions of the Advanced Baseline Imager's thermal IR channels by observation of the planet Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, James C.

    2010-09-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will image Earth in 16 spectral channels, including 10 thermal IR (TIR) channels. The instantaneous field of view (IFOV) of each TIR detector element is (56 μrad)2. The ABI has an onboard fullaperture blackbody, the Internal Calibration Target (ICT), used in conjunction with deep space looks to calibrate the ABI's TIR channels. The ICT is only observed over a small range of temperatures and at one specific pair of reflection angles from the ABI's two scan mirrors. The sunlit area on Mercury's surface underfills the IFOV's of the ABI's TIR channels, but has a much higher range of characteristic temperatures than the ICT, so its radiation is weighted more strongly toward shorter wavelengths. Comparison of a TIR channel's responses to the ICT and to Mercury provides a sensitive means to evaluate variations in spectral response functions among detector elements, across the ABI's field of regard, and among instruments on different satellites. Observations of Mercury can also verify co-registration among the ABI's atmospheric absorption channels that do not observe features on Earth's surface. The optimal conditions for viewing Mercury typically occur during one or two intervals of a few weeks each year when it traverses the ABI's FOR (-10.5o < declination < +10.5o) with an elongation angle from the Sun of at least 20.5o.

  12. Comparability of Red/Near-Infrared Reflectance and NDVI Based on the Spectral Response Function between MODIS and 30 Other Satellite Sensors Using Rice Canopy Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from −12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, −8.52% to −0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and −9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7

  13. Comparability of red/near-infrared reflectance and NDVI based on the spectral response function between MODIS and 30 other satellite sensors using rice canopy spectra.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-11-26

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from -12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, -8.52% to -0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and -9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7-17 showed

  14. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  15. Short-range ordering effects on the electronic Bloch spectral function of real materials in the nonlocal coherent-potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmodoro, Alberto; Ernst, Arthur; Ostanin, Sergei; Sandratskii, Leonid; Trevisanutto, Paolo E.; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Staunton, Julie B.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlocal coherent-potential approximation provides a systematic technique for the study of short-range ordering effects in a variety of disordered systems. In its original formulation the technique, however, shows an unwanted dependence on details in the coarse-grained effective medium construction. This is particularly evident in the study of k ⃗-resolved quantities, such as the Bloch spectral function and other non-site-diagonal observables. We remove the issue and recover fully physical results in first principles studies of real materials, by means of a resampling procedure first proposed for model tight-binding Hamiltonians. The prescription is further generalized to the case of complex unit cell compounds, with more than a single sublattice, and illustrated through examples from metallic alloys and disordered local moment simulations of paramagnetism in the prototype iron-based superconductor FeSe.

  16. Estimation of the propagation direction and spectral properties of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia using Directed Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Kaminski, Maciej; Marciniak, Radoslaw; Byrczek, Tomasz; Stasiowski, Michal; Jalowiecki, Przemyslaw; Sobieszek, Aleksander; Zmyslowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate spectral properties and propagation of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia between individual EEG recording channels. The intensities of activity flows were calculated for delta, theta, alpha and beta waves using the Directed Transfer Function integration procedure. It was found that delta waves played the dominant role in the EEG signal propagation during anesthesia and it was suggested that theta and alpha waves propagation could be related to the processes participating in the wakefulness control. Data obtained with DTF method were compared with data received from the analysis of cerebral blood flow with the use of PET in other laboratory. This study showed that analysis of the EEG signal propagation is useful for better understanding and thus safer induction of anaesthesia procedure.

  17. The spectral green's function nodal method for multigroup slab-geometry fixed-source S{sub N} problems with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, W. A.; Filho, H. A.; Barros, R. C.

    2013-07-01

    A generalization of the spectral Green's function (SGF) method is developed for multigroup, fixed-source, slab-geometry discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) problems with anisotropic scattering. The offered SGF method with the one-node block inversion (NBI) iterative scheme converges numerical solutions that are completely free from spatial truncation errors for multigroup slab-geometry S{sub N} problems with scattering anisotropy of order L, provided L < N. As a coarse-mesh numerical method, the SGF method generates numerical solutions that generally do not give detailed information on the problem solution profile, as the grid points can be located considerably away from each other. Therefore, presented here is a technique for the spatial reconstruction of the coarse-mesh solution generated by the multigroup SGF method. Numerical results are given to illustrate the method's accuracy. (authors)

  18. Multipurpose Spectral Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, Fred; Lorentzen, Dag Arne; Heia, Karsten; Svenøe, Trond

    2000-06-01

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 . One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system s front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m).

  19. Anterior cingulate cortex-related connectivity in first-episode schizophrenia: a spectral dynamic causal modeling study with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Long-Biao; Liu, Jian; Wang, Liu-Xian; Li, Chen; Xi, Yi-Bin; Guo, Fan; Wang, Hua-Ning; Zhang, Lin-Chuan; Liu, Wen-Ming; He, Hong; Tian, Ping; Yin, Hong; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of schizophrenia (SZ) is important for shedding light on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this mental disorder. Structural and functional alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) have been implicated in the neurobiology of SZ. However, the effective connectivity among them in SZ remains unclear. The current study investigated how neuronal pathways involving these regions were affected in first-episode SZ using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Forty-nine patients with a first-episode of psychosis and diagnosis of SZ—according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision—were studied. Fifty healthy controls (HCs) were included for comparison. All subjects underwent resting state fMRI. We used spectral dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to estimate directed connections among the bilateral ACC, DLPFC, hippocampus, and MPFC. We characterized the differences using Bayesian parameter averaging (BPA) in addition to classical inference (t-test). In addition to common effective connectivity in these two groups, HCs displayed widespread significant connections predominantly involved in ACC not detected in SZ patients, but SZ showed few connections. Based on BPA results, SZ patients exhibited anterior cingulate cortico-prefrontal-hippocampal hyperconnectivity, as well as ACC-related and hippocampal-dorsolateral prefrontal-medial prefrontal hypoconnectivity. In summary, spectral DCM revealed the pattern of effective connectivity involving ACC in patients with first-episode SZ. This study provides a potential link between SZ and dysfunction of ACC, creating an ideal situation to associate mechanisms behind SZ with aberrant connectivity among these cognition and emotion-related regions. PMID:26578933

  20. Electroencephalogram Theta/Beta Ratio and Spectral Power Correlates of Executive Functions in Children and Adolescents With AD/HD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Wei; Li, Hui; Wu, Zhanliang; Zhao, Qihua; Song, Yan; Liu, Lu; Qian, Qiujin; Wang, Yufeng; Roodenrys, Steven; Johnstone, Stuart J; De Blasio, Frances M; Sun, Li

    2017-07-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) has been widely used in AD/HD research. The current study firstly aimed to replicate a recent trend related to EEG theta/beta ratio (TBR) in children and adolescents. Also, the study aimed to examine the value of resting EEG activity as biomarkers for executive function (EF) in participants with AD/HD. Fifty-three participants with AD/HD and 37 healthy controls were recruited. Resting EEG was recorded with eyes closed. Participants with AD/HD additionally completed EF tasks via the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. TBR did not differ between groups; however, TBR was positively correlated with inattentive symptoms in AD/HD. Other correlations were found between EEG activity and neuropsychological functions including spatial planning and decision making in the AD/HD group. The results do not support the diagnostic value of TBR. Instead, given the heterogeneous features, the results support the prognostic value of EEG in AD/HD.

  1. Genomic Bayesian functional regression models with interactions for predicting wheat grain yield using hyper-spectral image data.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Montesinos-López, Osval A; Cuevas, Jaime; Mata-López, Walter A; Burgueño, Juan; Mondal, Sushismita; Huerta, Julio; Singh, Ravi; Autrique, Enrique; González-Pérez, Lorena; Crossa, José

    2017-01-01

    Modern agriculture uses hyperspectral cameras that provide hundreds of reflectance data at discrete narrow bands in many environments. These bands often cover the whole visible light spectrum and part of the infrared and ultraviolet light spectra. With the bands, vegetation indices are constructed for predicting agronomically important traits such as grain yield and biomass. However, since vegetation indices only use some wavelengths (referred to as bands), we propose using all bands simultaneously as predictor variables for the primary trait grain yield; results of several multi-environment maize (Aguate et al. in Crop Sci 57(5):1-8, 2017) and wheat (Montesinos-López et al. in Plant Methods 13(4):1-23, 2017) breeding trials indicated that using all bands produced better prediction accuracy than vegetation indices. However, until now, these prediction models have not accounted for the effects of genotype × environment (G × E) and band × environment (B × E) interactions incorporating genomic or pedigree information. In this study, we propose Bayesian functional regression models that take into account all available bands, genomic or pedigree information, the main effects of lines and environments, as well as G × E and B × E interaction effects. The data set used is comprised of 976 wheat lines evaluated for grain yield in three environments (Drought, Irrigated and Reduced Irrigation). The reflectance data were measured in 250 discrete narrow bands ranging from 392 to 851 nm (nm). The proposed Bayesian functional regression models were implemented using two types of basis: B-splines and Fourier. Results of the proposed Bayesian functional regression models, including all the wavelengths for predicting grain yield, were compared with results from conventional models with and without bands. We observed that the models with B × E interaction terms were the most accurate models, whereas the functional regression models (with B-splines and Fourier

  2. Modeling and spectral simulation of matrix-isolated molecules by density functional calculations: A case study on formic acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2010-12-01

    The supermolecule approach has been used to model molecules embedded in solid argon matrix, wherein interaction between the guest and the host atoms in the first solvation shell is evaluated with the use of density functional calculations. Structural stability and simulated spectra have been obtained for formic acid dimer (FAD)-Arn (n = 21-26) clusters. The calculations at the B971/6-31++G(3df,3pd) level have shown that the tetrasubstitutional site on Ar(111) plane is likely to incorporate FAD most stably, in view of consistency with the matrix shifts available experimentally.

  3. Functional double-shelled silicon nanocrystals for two-photon fluorescence cell imaging: spectral evolution and tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sourov; Ghosh, Batu; Beaune, Grégory; Nagarajan, Usharani; Yasui, Takao; Nakamura, Jin; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Baba, Yoshinobu; Shirahata, Naoto; Winnik, Françoise M.

    2016-04-01

    Functional near-IR (NIR) emitting nanoparticles (NPs) adapted for two-photon excitation fluorescence cell imaging were obtained starting from octadecyl-terminated silicon nanocrystals (ncSi-OD) of narrow photoluminescence (PL) spectra having no long emission tails, continuously tunable over the 700-1000 nm window, PL quantum yields exceeding 30%, and PL lifetimes of 300 μs or longer. These NPs, consisting of a Pluronic F127 shell and a core made up of assembled ncSi-OD kept apart by an octadecyl (OD) layer, were readily internalized into the cytosol, but not the nucleus, of NIH3T3 cells and were non-toxic. Asymmetrical field-flow fractionation (AF4) analysis was carried out to determine the size of the NPs in water. HiLyte Fluor 750 amine was linked via an amide link to NPs prepared with Pluronic-F127-COOH, as a first demonstration of functional NIR-emitting water dispersible ncSi-based nanoparticles.Functional near-IR (NIR) emitting nanoparticles (NPs) adapted for two-photon excitation fluorescence cell imaging were obtained starting from octadecyl-terminated silicon nanocrystals (ncSi-OD) of narrow photoluminescence (PL) spectra having no long emission tails, continuously tunable over the 700-1000 nm window, PL quantum yields exceeding 30%, and PL lifetimes of 300 μs or longer. These NPs, consisting of a Pluronic F127 shell and a core made up of assembled ncSi-OD kept apart by an octadecyl (OD) layer, were readily internalized into the cytosol, but not the nucleus, of NIH3T3 cells and were non-toxic. Asymmetrical field-flow fractionation (AF4) analysis was carried out to determine the size of the NPs in water. HiLyte Fluor 750 amine was linked via an amide link to NPs prepared with Pluronic-F127-COOH, as a first demonstration of functional NIR-emitting water dispersible ncSi-based nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01437b

  4. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi, M=Ir,Os

    SciTech Connect

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, Iyad I.; May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Ma, Jie; Matsuda, Masaaki; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Berlijn, Tom

    2015-03-31

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M=Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.1) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. In this paper, our INS measurements on single-crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(Q;E), for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers and increases electron-phonon coupling, leads to softened interatomic force-constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S(Q,E) from INS through a Green's function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Finally, our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.

  5. Integration of spectral domain optical coherence tomography with microperimetry generates unique datasets for the simultaneous identification of visual function and retinal structure in ophthalmological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulen, Peter; Gallimore, Gary; Vincent, Ryan D.; Sabates, Nelson R.; Sabates, Felix N.

    2011-06-01

    Conventional perimeters are used routinely in various eye disease states to evaluate the central visual field and to quantitatively map sensitivity. However, standard automated perimetry proves difficult for retina and specifically macular disease due to the need for central and steady fixation. Advances in instrumentation have led to microperimetry, which incorporates eye tracking for placement of macular sensitivity values onto an image of the macular fundus thus enabling a precise functional and anatomical mapping of the central visual field. Functional sensitivity of the retina can be compared with the observed structural parameters that are acquired with high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography and by integration of scanning laser ophthalmoscope-driven imaging. Findings of the present study generate a basis for age-matched comparison of sensitivity values in patients with macular pathology. Microperimetry registered with detailed structural data performed before and after intervention treatments provides valuable information about macular function, disease progression and treatment success. This approach also allows for the detection of disease or treatment related changes in retinal sensitivity when visual acuity is not affected and can drive the decision making process in choosing different treatment regimens and guiding visual rehabilitation. This has immediate relevance for applications in central retinal vein occlusion, central serous choroidopathy, age-related macular degeneration, familial macular dystrophy and several other forms of retina related visual disability.

  6. Synthesis, structural and spectral analysis of 1-(pyrazin-2-yl) piperidin-2-ol by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M; Syed Ali Padusha, M; Govindarasu, K; Kavitha, E

    2015-03-05

    The organic compound 1-(pyrazin-2-yl) piperidin-2-ol (abbreviated as PPOL) has been synthesized and characterized by IR, Raman, (1)H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The Fourier-transform Raman (3500-50cm(-1)) and infrared spectra (4000-400cm(-1)) were recorded in the solid state and interpreted by comparison with theoretical spectra derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of the compound was obtained by the density functional theory using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. In the optimized geometry results shows that geometry parameters are good agreement with XRD values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. In calculation of electronic absorption spectra, TD-DFT calculations were carried out in the both gas and solution phases. (1)H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. (1)H NMR analysis is evident for O-H⋯O intermolecular interaction of the title molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound have been calculated at different temperatures and the results reveal that the standard heat capacities (Cp,m), standard entropies (Sm) and standard enthalpy changes (Hm) increase with rise in temperature. In addition, HOMO and LUMO energies and the first-order hyperpolarizability have been computed.

  7. Synthesis, structural and spectral analysis of 1-(pyrazin-2-yl) piperidin-2-ol by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M.; Syed Ali Padusha, M.; Govindarasu, K.; Kavitha, E.

    2015-03-01

    The organic compound 1-(pyrazin-2-yl) piperidin-2-ol (abbreviated as PPOL) has been synthesized and characterized by IR, Raman, 1H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The Fourier-transform Raman (3500-50 cm-1) and infrared spectra (4000-400 cm-1) were recorded in the solid state and interpreted by comparison with theoretical spectra derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of the compound was obtained by the density functional theory using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. In the optimized geometry results shows that geometry parameters are good agreement with XRD values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. In calculation of electronic absorption spectra, TD-DFT calculations were carried out in the both gas and solution phases. 1H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H NMR analysis is evident for O-H⋯O intermolecular interaction of the title molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound have been calculated at different temperatures and the results reveal that the standard heat capacities (Cp,m), standard entropies (Sm) and standard enthalpy changes (Hm) increase with rise in temperature. In addition, HOMO and LUMO energies and the first-order hyperpolarizability have been computed.

  8. Spectral ratios of ambient noise based on the diffuse field theory: Improved inversion of H/V in layered media using analytical properties of Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Perton, M.; Piña, J.; Luzón, F.; Garcia-Jerez, A.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.

    2013-12-01

    It is well know the popularity of H/V spectral ratio to extract the dominant frequency of soil sites for microzonation studies (Nakamura, 1989). It is relatively easy to make measurements as only one station is needed. Despite its success, this approach had not solid theoretical basis until a proposal to link ambient noise vibrations with diffuse field theory was made (Sánchez-Sesma et al, 2011a). Based on this theory the average spectral density of a given motion of a point, also called directional energy density (Perton et al, 2009), is proportional to the imaginary part of Green function precisely at the observation point. The proportionality implies that vector components are all multiplied by the current spectral level of the diffuse illumination. Appropriate normalization is crucial to make the experimental spectral ratios closer to the theoretical counterpart. According to this theory the square of H/V is twice the ratio of ImG11 and ImG33, where ImG11 and ImG33 are the imaginary part of Green functions at the load point for horizontal and vertical components, respectively. From ImG11 it could be possible through Fourier analysis to extract pseudo reflections and thus constrain the inversion of soil profile. We propose to assess ImG11 removing the influence of illumination spectrum using the H/V spectral ratio and an estimate of ImG33 (obtained from a priori model) by means of ImG11=0.5(H/V)2*ImG33. It has been found that ImG33 is less sensitive to details of stratigraphy. In fact, the most relevant property is the Poisson ratio of the uppermost layer which controls the slope in high frequency (Sánchez-Sesma et al, 2011b). Pseudo-reflection seismograms are thus obtained from Fourier transform, back to time domain, of i{ImG11-ImG11HSS}, where ImG11HSS is the imaginary part of Green functions at the load point for horizontal load at the surface of a half-space with the properties of the uppermost layer. With the obtained model ImG33 can be updated and the

  9. Optimal renormalization and the extraction of the strange quark mass from moments of the τ -decay spectral function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Das, Diganta

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an optimal renormalization group analysis pertinent to the analysis of polarization functions associated with the s -quark mass relevant in τ -decay. The technique is based on the renormalization group invariance constraints which lead to closed form summation of all the leading and next-to-leading logarithms at each order in perturbation theory. The new perturbation series exhibits reduced sensitivity to the renormalization scale and improved behavior in the complex plane along the integration contour. Using improved experimental and theory inputs, we have extracted the value of the strange quark mass ms(2 GeV )=106.70 ±9.36 MeV and ms(2 GeV )=74.47 ±7.77 MeV from presently available ALEPH and OPAL data respectively. These determinations are in agreement with the determinations in other phenomenological methods and from the lattice.

  10. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization and Crystals Structure of some Arsane Derivatives of Gold (I) Complexes: A Comparative Density Functional Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Shawkataly, Omar bin; Goh, Chin-Ping; Tariq, Abu; Khan, Imthyaz Ahmad; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Rosli, Mohd Mustaqim

    2015-01-01

    A series of complexes of the type LAuCl where L = tris(p-tolylarsane), tris(m-tolylarsane), bis(diphenylarsano)ethane, and tris(naphthyl)arsane have been synthesized. All of the new complexes, 1-4, have been fully characterized by means of 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The structures of complexes 1-4 have been determined from X-ray diffraction data. The linear molecules have an average bond distance between gold-arsenic and gold-chlorine of 2.3390Å and 2.2846Å, respectively. Aurophilic interaction was prominent in complex 1 and 3, whereas complex 2 and 4 do not show any such interaction. The intermolecular gold interaction bond length was affected by the electronegativity of the molecule. The computed values calculated at DFT level using B3LYP function are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:25798915

  11. Molecular structure, vibrational spectral studies of pyrazole and 3,5-dimethyl pyrazole based on density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, V; Jayamani, N; Mathammal, R

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of pyrazole (PZ) and 3,5-dimethyl pyrazole (DMP) have been studied. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the title compounds in the solid phase are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1), respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecules in the ground state are calculated using density functional methods (B3LYP) with 6-311+G** basis set. The vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The complete vibrational assignments are performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SM) method. 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts results are compared with the experimental values.

  12. Spectral distribution and wave function of electrons emitted from a single-particle source in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.; Samuelsson, P.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate theoretically a scheme for spectroscopy of electrons emitted by an on-demand single-particle source. The total system, with an electron turnstile source and a single-level quantum dot spectrometer, is implemented with edge states in a conductor in the quantum Hall regime. Employing a Floquet scattering approach, the source and the spectrometer are analyzed within a single theoretical framework. The nonequilibrium distribution of the emitted electrons is analyzed via the direct current at the dot spectrometer. In the adiabatic and intermediate source frequency regimes, the distribution is found to be strongly peaked around the active resonant level of the turnstile. At high frequencies the distribution is split up into a set of fringes, resulting from the interplay of resonant transport through the turnstile and absorption or emission of individual Floquet quanta. For ideal source operation, with exactly one electron emitted per cycle, an expression for the single-electron wave function is derived.

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): ugrizYJHK Sérsic luminosity functions and the cosmic spectral energy distribution by Hubble type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelvin, Lee S.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Graham, Alister W.; Phillipps, Steven; Agius, Nicola K.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Baldry, Ivan; Bamford, Steven P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Colless, Matthew; Conselice, Christopher J.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Norberg, Peder; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Popescu, Cristina C.; Prescott, Matthew; Taylor, Edward N.; Tuffs, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    We report the morphological classification of 3727 galaxies from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey with Mr < -17.4 mag and in the redshift range 0.025 < z < 0.06 (2.1 × 105 Mpc3) into E, S0-Sa, SB0-SBa, Sab-Scd, SBab-SBcd, Sd-Irr and little blue spheroid classes. Approximately 70 per cent of galaxies in our sample are disc-dominated systems, with the remaining ˜30 per cent spheroid dominated. We establish the robustness of our classifications, and use them to derive morphological-type luminosity functions and luminosity densities in the ugrizYJHK passbands, improving on prior studies that split by global colour or light profile shape alone. We find that the total galaxy luminosity function is best described by a double-Schechter function while the constituent morphological-type luminosity functions are well described by a single-Schechter function. These data are also used to derive the star formation rate densities for each Hubble class, and the attenuated and unattenuated (corrected for dust) cosmic spectral energy distributions, i.e. the instantaneous energy production budget. While the observed optical/near-IR energy budget is dominated 58:42 by galaxies with a significant spheroidal component, the actual energy production rate is reversed, i.e. the combined disc-dominated populations generate ˜1.3 times as much energy as the spheroid-dominated populations. On the grandest scale, this implies that chemical evolution in the local Universe is currently largely confined to mid-type spiral classes like our Milky Way.

  14. The G-Spectral Estimator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    correlation function and is equivalent to an en-transformation [11] of the same function. Gray, Houston and Morgan ( GHM ) noted the estimator to have some...satis- factory way of selecting the proper value n in the en-transform. GHM went on to conclude that an ARMA spectral estimator would probably have...which will be seen to avoid the difficulties noted by GHM , and will in fact, be shown to be equivalent to a method of moments ARMA spectral estimator

  15. Infrared transform spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Lee, Jamine; Gregor, Brian; Goldstein, Neil; Panfili, Raphael; Fox, Marsha

    2012-10-01

    A dispersive transform spectral imager named FAROS (FAst Reconfigurable Optical Sensor) has been developed for high frame rate, moderate-to-high resolution hyperspectral imaging. A programmable digital micromirror array (DMA) modulator makes it possible to adjust spectral, temporal and spatial resolution in real time to achieve optimum tradeoff for dynamic monitoring requirements. The system's F/2.8 collection optics produces diffraction-limited images in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectral region. The optical system is based on a proprietary dual-pass Offner configuration with a single spherical mirror and a confocal spherical diffraction grating. FAROS fulfills two functions simultaneously: one output produces two-dimensional polychromatic imagery at the full focal plane array (FPA) frame rate for fast object acquisition and tracking, while the other output operates in parallel and produces variable-resolution spectral images via Hadamard transform encoding to assist in object discrimination and classification. The current version of the FAROS spectral imager is a multispectral technology demonstrator that operates in the MWIR with a 320 x 256 pixel InSb FPA running at 478 frames per second resulting in time resolution of several tens of milliseconds per hypercube. The instrument has been tested by monitoring small-scale rocket engine firings in outdoor environments. The instrument has no macro-scale moving parts, and conforms to a robust, small-volume and lightweight package, suitable for integration with small surveillance vehicles. The technology is also applicable to multispectral/hyperspectral imaging applications in diverse areas such as atmospheric contamination monitoring, agriculture, process control, and biomedical imaging, and can be adapted for use in any spectral domain from the ultraviolet (UV) to the LWIR region.

  16. Subquadratic-scaling subspace projection method for large-scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations using spectral finite-element discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamarri, Phani; Gavini, Vikram

    2014-09-01

    We present a subspace projection technique to conduct large-scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations using higher-order spectral finite-element discretization. The proposed method treats both metallic and insulating materials in a single framework and is applicable to both pseudopotential as well as all-electron calculations. The key ideas involved in the development of this method include: (i) employing a higher-order spectral finite-element basis that is amenable to mesh adaption; (ii) using a Chebyshev filter to construct a subspace, which is an approximation to the occupied eigenspace in a given self-consistent field iteration; (iii) using a localization procedure to construct a nonorthogonal localized basis spanning the Chebyshev filtered subspace; and (iv) using a Fermi-operator expansion in terms of the subspace-projected Hamiltonian represented in the nonorthogonal localized basis to compute relevant quantities like the density matrix, electron density, and band energy. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach on benchmark systems involving pseudopotential calculations on aluminum nanoclusters up to 3430 atoms and on alkane chains up to 7052 atoms, as well as all-electron calculations on silicon nanoclusters up to 3920 electrons. The benchmark studies revealed that accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy can be obtained with the proposed method, and a subquadratic-scaling with system size was observed for the range of materials systems studied. In particular, for the alkane chains—representing an insulating material—close to linear scaling is observed, whereas, for aluminum nanoclusters—representing a metallic material—the scaling is observed to be O (N1.46). For all-electron calculations on silicon nanoclusters, the scaling with the number of electrons is computed to be O (N1.75). In all the benchmark systems, significant computational savings have been realized with the proposed approach, with

  17. Theoretical investigations into spectral and non-linear optical properties of brucine and strychnine using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nasarul; Niaz, Saba; Manzoor, Taniya; Pandith, Altaf Hussain

    2014-10-01

    The density functional theoretical (DFT) computations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d, p) level to calculate the equilibrium geometry, vibrational wave numbers, intensities, and various other molecular properties of brucine and strychnine, which were found in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The out-of-phase stretching modes of aromatic rings and carbonyl stretching modes in combination with CH stretching modes at stereogenic centers generate VCD signals, which are remarkably efficient configuration markers for these chiral molecular systems. NBOs analysis reveals that the large values of second order perturbation energy (47.24 kcal/mol for brucine and 46.93 kcal/mol for strychnine) confirms strong hyperconjugative interaction between the orbital containing the lone pair of electron of nitrogen and the neighboring Cdbnd O antibonding orbital. The molecular electrostatic potential map of strychnine molecule, with no polar groups other than the lone keto group, shows less polarization, which accounts for its lower susceptibility towards electrophilic attack as compared to brucine.

  18. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: A density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator’s strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  19. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: a density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindasamy, P; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2014-09-15

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  20. Theoretical investigations into spectral and non-linear optical properties of brucine and strychnine using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nasarul; Niaz, Saba; Manzoor, Taniya; Pandith, Altaf Hussain

    2014-10-15

    The density functional theoretical (DFT) computations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d, p) level to calculate the equilibrium geometry, vibrational wave numbers, intensities, and various other molecular properties of brucine and strychnine, which were found in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The out-of-phase stretching modes of aromatic rings and carbonyl stretching modes in combination with CH stretching modes at stereogenic centers generate VCD signals, which are remarkably efficient configuration markers for these chiral molecular systems. NBOs analysis reveals that the large values of second order perturbation energy (47.24kcal/mol for brucine and 46.93kcal/mol for strychnine) confirms strong hyperconjugative interaction between the orbital containing the lone pair of electron of nitrogen and the neighboring CO antibonding orbital. The molecular electrostatic potential map of strychnine molecule, with no polar groups other than the lone keto group, shows less polarization, which accounts for its lower susceptibility towards electrophilic attack as compared to brucine.

  1. Spectral analysis, vibrational assignments, NBO analysis, NMR, UV-Vis, hyperpolarizability analysis of 2-aminofluorene by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jone Pradeepa, S; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-05-05

    In this present investigation, the collective experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational analysis and NBO analysis has been reported for 2-aminofluorene. FT-IR spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-400 cm(-1). FT-Raman spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-50 cm(-1). The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) were calculated for 2-aminofluorene using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model chemistry. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of 2-aminofluorene were calculated using GIAO method. The computed vibrational and NMR spectra were compared with the experimental results. The total energy distribution (TED) was derived to deepen the understanding of different modes of vibrations contributed by respective wavenumber. The experimental UV-Vis spectra was recorded in the region of 400-200 nm and correlated with simulated spectra by suitably solvated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model. The HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with time dependent DFT approach. The nonlinearity of the title compound was confirmed by hyperpolarizabilty examination. Using theoretical calculation Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) was investigated.

  2. Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

  3. The surface-enhanced Raman spectra of aflatoxins: spectral analysis, density functional theory calculation, detection and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Gao, Simin; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Yao-Wen; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-09-21

    High-quality surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of aflatoxin (AF) B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2) have been acquired using silver nanorod (AgNR) array substrates fabricated by oblique angle deposition method. Significant vibrational peaks are identified on the argon plasma-cleaned substrates, and those peaks agree very well with the Raman spectra calculated by density function theory (DFT). The concentration-dependent SERS detection is also explored. The relationship between the concentration (C) of different AFs and the SERS intensity (I) of the Raman peak at Δν = 1592 cm(-1) is found to follow the general relationship I = AC(α), with α ranging from 0.32 to 0.46 for the four AFs. The limits of detection (LODs) reach 5 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) for AFB(1), 1 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) for AFB(2), and 5 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) for both AFG(1) and AFG(2) in bulk solution, or 6.17 × 10(-16) mol/1.93 × 10(-4) ng of AFB(1), 1.23 × 10(-15) mol/3.88 × 10(-4) ng for AFB(2), 6.17 × 10(-17) mol/2.03 × 10(-5) ng for AFG(1), and 6.17 × 10(-17) mol/2.04 × 10(-5) ng for AFG(2) per laser spot. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to successfully differentiate these four different kinds of AFs at different concentrations up to their detection limits. The LODs obtained from PCA agree with the LODs obtained by using peak fitting method. With such a low detection limit and outstanding differentiation ability, we prove the possibility of utilizing the SERS detection system as a platform for highly sensitive mycotoxin detection.

  4. Establishing a Nonequilibrium Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem Through Simultaneous Measurement of the Power Spectral Density and Transfer Function of Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevelyan, Alexander; Corwin, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We explore the response of a model statistical system to strong, non-linear perturbations to its state variables. Specifically, we work with a tunable model of Johnson-Nyquist noise, designed to permit a driving of both the drift and diffusion terms in the associated White Noise Langevin Equation. We achieve a simultaneous measurement of both sides of the Fluctuation Dissipation Theorem (FDT) by driving the circuit with digitally generated white noise and measuring the output. This allows us to calculate a frequency-dependent effective temperature for the driven system, which for an equilibrium system should be set by the energy scale of the input white noise. Comparison of the two sides of FDT-the circuit's transfer function and the power spectral density of the voltage fluctuations-across frequency-space proves non-trivial, and methods are discussed for achieving the most reliable estimate. After comparing the response for a series of functional signals, we find that FDT, measured in this simultaneous fashion, remains intact even while the system is being actively driven out of equilibrium.

  5. Spectral phasor analysis reveals altered membrane order and function of root hair cells in Arabidopsis dry2/sqe1-5 drought hypersensitive mutant.

    PubMed

    Sena, Florencia; Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Astrada, Soledad; Botella, Miguel A; Malacrida, Leonel; Borsani, Omar

    2017-10-01

    Biological membranes allow the regulation of numerous cellular processes, which are affected when unfavorable environmental factors are perceived. Lipids and proteins are the principal components of biological membranes. Each lipid has unique biophysical properties, and, therefore the lipid composition of the membrane is critical to maintaining the bilayer structure and functionality. Membrane composition and integrity are becoming the focus of studies aiming to understand how plants adapt to its environment. In this study, using a combination of di-4-ANEPPDHQ fluorescence and spectral phasor analysis, we report that the drought hypersensitive/squalene epoxidase (dry2/sqe1-5) mutant with reduced major sterols such as sitosterol and stigmasterol in roots presented higher membrane fluidity than the wild type. Moreover, analysis of endomembrane dynamics showed that vesicle formation was affected in dry2/sqe1-5. Further analysis of proteins associated with sterol rich micro domains showed that dry2/sqe1-5 presented micro domains function altered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Early morphological changes and functional abnormalities in group 2A idiopathic juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry.

    PubMed

    Maruko, I; Iida, T; Sekiryu, T; Fujiwara, T

    2008-11-01

    To report early morphological changes and functional abnormalities in group 2A idiopathic juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis (IJRT) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and microperimetry. Six eyes (three patients; average age, 64 years) with group 2A IJRT were examined using SD-OCT and microperimetry. On SD-OCT, breaks in the highly reflective line, considered the boundary between the photoreceptor inner and outer segments, at the temporal to the fovea and corresponding to the telangiectasis lesions were observed in all eyes. Highly reflective tissue was observed in the outer retinal layer in five eyes. In three eyes with a right-angle venule, the outer retinal layer was replaced by the highly reflective tissue and was contiguous to the inner retinal layer. Microperimetry showed the reduction in the retinal sensitivity thresholds at the temporal to the fovea in five eyes. Early morphological alterations in group 2A IJRT in SD-OCT were observed. These finding might be visualisation of Müller cell abnormality on SD-OCT. At the same time, the disorder of photoreceptors occurs at the telangiectasis lesions from MP-1. Detailed observation of these abnormalities provides an understanding of the morphological and functional features of group 2A IJRT.

  7. Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    reasons for spectral fitting being a supplement to the standard energy spectrum ROI method. Fermi- Kurie plot Given the difficulty in fitting a beta...continuum, it is important to find an alternative method. A Fermi- Kurie plot (Krane 1988) is one method, which allows a beta spectrum to be plotted ...corrective function takes into account the initial and final spin and polarity states. A rb itr ar y un its Figure 6. Fermi- Kurie plot . T (MeV

  8. Surface Roughness and Critical Exponent Analyses of Boron-Doped Diamond Films Using Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging: Application of Autocorrelation and Power Spectral Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Vierkant, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    The evolution of the surface roughness of growing metal or semiconductor thin films provides much needed information about their growth kinetics and corresponding mechanism. While some systems show stages of nucleation, coalescence, and growth, others exhibit varying microstructures for different process conditions. In view of these classifications, we report herein detailed analyses based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization to extract the surface roughness and growth kinetics exponents of relatively low boron-doped diamond (BDD) films by utilizing the analytical power spectral density (PSD) and autocorrelation function (ACF) as mathematical tools. The machining industry has applied PSD for a number of years for tool design and analysis of wear and machined surface quality. Herein, we present similar analyses at the mesoscale to study the surface morphology as well as quality of BDD films grown using the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. PSD spectra as a function of boron concentration (in gaseous phase) are compared with those for samples grown without boron. We find that relatively higher boron concentration yields higher amplitudes of the longer-wavelength power spectral lines, with amplitudes decreasing in an exponential or power-law fashion towards shorter wavelengths, determining the roughness exponent ( α ≈ 0.16 ± 0.03) and growth exponent ( β ≈ 0.54), albeit indirectly. A unique application of the ACF, which is widely used in signal processing, was also applied to one-dimensional or line analyses (i.e., along the x- and y-axes) of AFM images, revealing surface topology datasets with varying boron concentration. Here, the ACF was used to cancel random surface "noise" and identify any spatial periodicity via repetitive ACF peaks or spatially correlated noise. Periodicity at shorter spatial wavelengths was observed for no doping and low doping levels, while smaller correlations were observed for relatively

  9. Spectral power and functional connectivity changes during mindfulness meditation with eyes open: A magnetoencephalography (MEG) study in long-term meditators.

    PubMed

    Wong, W P; Camfield, D A; Woods, W; Sarris, J; Pipingas, A

    2015-10-01

    Whilst a number of previous studies have been conducted in order to investigate functional brain changes associated with eyes-closed meditation techniques, there is a relative scarcity in the literature with regards to changes occurring during eyes-open meditation. The current project used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate differences in spectral power and functional connectivity between 11 long-term mindfulness meditators (LTMMs) with >5 years of experience and 12 meditation-naïve control participants both during baseline eyes-open rest and eyes-open open-monitoring (OM) mindfulness meditation. During resting with eyes-open, prior to meditating, greater mean alpha power was observed for LTMMs in comparison to controls. However, during the course of OM meditation, a significantly greater increase in theta power was observed over a broad fronto-centro-parietal region for control participants in comparison to LTMMs. In contrast, whole-head mean connectivity was found to be significantly greater for long-term meditators in comparison to controls in the theta band both during rest as well as during meditation. Additionally, mean connectivity was significantly lower for long-term meditators in the low gamma band during rest and significantly lower in both low and high gamma bands during meditation; and the variance of low-gamma connectivity scores for long-term meditators was significantly decreased compared to the control group. The current study provides important new information as to the trait functional changes in brain activity associated with long-term mindfulness meditation, as well as the state changes specifically associated with eyes-open open monitoring meditation techniques.

  10. Inverse Spectral Problems for Tridiagonal N by N Complex Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, Gusein Sh.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, the concept of generalized spectral function is introduced for finite-order tridiagonal symmetric matrices (Jacobi matrices) with complex entries. The structure of the generalized spectral function is described in terms of spectral data consisting of the eigenvalues and normalizing numbers of the matrix. The inverse problems from generalized spectral function as well as from spectral data are investigated. In this way, a procedure for construction of complex tridiagonal matrices having real eigenvalues is obtained.

  11. Optimization and extraction of functional information from in vitro flow models using dual-beam spectral-domain optical coherence tomography cross-correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Daly, Susan M; Silien, Christophe; Leahy, Martin J

    2013-10-01

    As in vivo flow behavior can be pulsatile, intermittent, and/or otherwise changeable with time, the ability to provide clinicians with a means of real-time visualization and functional assessment of structures is of particular importance. The discernment of pulsatile flow behavior using a dual-beam spectral domain optical coherence tomography system (db-SdOCT) by quasi-simultaneous measurement by two planes of illumination is demonstrated. By cross-correlation analysis, it is possible to compute velocity metrics pertaining to flowing particle motion, without a priori angular knowledge. This is the first application of cross-correlation-based dynamic assessment for the extraction of pulsatile behavior in an in vitro environment using an optimized db-SdOCT system. The experimental results outlined have shown the db-SdOCT system and its associated algorithms to be successful in the discernment of intermittent pulsatile flow behavior in in vitro models, concurrent to yielding velocity values in good agreement with that of the applied flow rate.

  12. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution.

  13. Extracting the spectral function of the cuprates by a full two-dimensional analysis: Angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Bi2Sr2CuO6

    SciTech Connect

    Meevasana, W.

    2010-04-30

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has revealed a dispersion anomaly at high binding energy near 0.3-0.5 eV in various families of the high-temperature superconductors. For further studies of this anomaly we present a new two-dimensional fitting-scheme and apply it to high-statistics ARPES data of the strongly-overdoped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 6} cuprate superconductor. The procedure allows us to extract the self-energy in an extended energy and momentum range. It is found that the spectral function of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 6} can be parameterized using a small set of tight-binding parameters and a weakly-momentum-dependent self-energy up to 0.7 eV in binding energy and over the entire first Brillouin zone. Moreover the analysis gives an estimate of the momentum dependence of the matrix element, a quantity, which is often neglected in ARPES analyses.

  14. Site effects in the city of Port au Prince (Haiti) : A combined use of spectral ratio methods and empirical Greens functions simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Fleur, S.; Courboulex, F.; Bertrand, E.; Deschamps, A.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.; Prepetit, C.; Hough, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Haiti was struck in January 2010 by a strong Mw=7 earthquake that caused extensive damages in the city of Port au Prince. At this time, very few seismological stations were working in Haiti and the only one that recorded the mainshock in Port au Prince was saturated. Thus, there were no direct measurements of the ground motion produced by this large event. Quickly after the 2010 event, several permanent accelerometric stations were installed by the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) and the BME (Bureau des Mines et de l'Energie d'Haiti) as well as broad-band stations by the GSC (Geological Survey of Canada). Since their installation, these stations recorded several tens of aftershocks. The aim of our work is to take advantage of this new dataset to better understand the ground motions generated by earthquakes in the city of Port au Prince. We have used first spectral ratio methods to obtain the transfer function of each station, and then an empirical Green's Function simulation approach to combine source and site effects. In order to estimate site effects under each station, we have used classical spectral ratio methods. In a first step, the H/V (Horizontal/Vertical) method was used to select a reference station (in Port au Prince) that should be ideally a station without any site effects. We selected two stations, HCEA and PAPH, as reference stations, as even if the shape of their H/V curves is not always equal to 1 in the entire frequency band. In a second step, we computed the transfer function at each station by a ratio between the spectra of each earthquake at each station and the spectra obtained at the reference station (we use successively HCEA, PAPH and a combination of both). The results were kept only for the frequencies where the signal to noise was larger than 3. In the frequency range 1 to 20 Hz, we found site/reference ratios that reach values from 3 to 8 and a large variability from one station to another one. In the low frequency band 0.5 to 1 Hz a peak

  15. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2016-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral-line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It converges rapidly and is very flexible in that it can be used with any fitting function. We present examples of cubic-spline and Gaussian fits and give special attention to measurements of blue-red asymmetries of coronal emission lines.

  16. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  17. Assessment of liver function in chronic liver diseases and regional function of irradiated liver by means of 99mTc-galactosyl-human serum albumin liver scintigraphy and quantitative spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, A; Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Fujii, T; Ikezoe, J

    2000-12-01

    Scintigraphy with 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid galactosyl human serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) was performed on 102 patients, then the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF), the rate constant for liver uptake of the tracer from the blood (K1) and the hepatic blood flow index (HBFI) were determined by spectral analysis. The HEF, K1 and HBFI values correlated moderately or closely with various indices of hepatic function, and the HEF and K1 values decreased according to the stage of liver dysfunction. The HEF and K1 values linearly and nonlinearly correlated with HH15 and LHL15, respectively. The HEF, K1 and HBFI values for the irradiated portion of 20 patients before and alter irradiation were compared. The HEF value in patients with a cirrhotic liver significantly (p < 0.002) decreased compared with that in patients with a normal liver at a dose of less than 40 Gy, whereas the HBFI value in patients with a normal liver significantly (p < 0.05) decreased compared with that in patients with a cirrhotic liver at a dose of 40 Gy or greater. This method appears to be a simple, non-invasive and useful tool with which to quantitatively evaluate liver function and it also helps clarify changes in regional function of the irradiated liver.

  18. Spectral assignments and NMR parameter-structure relationships in borates using high-resolution 11B NMR and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Oliver L G; Iuga, Dinu; Howes, Andrew P; Pike, Kevin J; Holland, Diane; Dupree, Ray

    2013-06-07

    High-resolution, solid-state (11)B NMR spectra have been obtained at high magnetic fields for a range of polycrystalline borates using double-rotation (DOR), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning and isotopic dilution. DOR linewidths can be less than 0.2 ppm in isotopically diluted samples, allowing highly accurate values for the isotropic chemical shift, δiso, and electric field gradient to be obtained. The experimental values are used as a test of density functional calculations using both projector augmented wave based CASTEP and WIEN2k. The CASTEP calculations of δiso are generally in very good agreement with experiment, having r.m.s. deviation 0.40 ppm. WIEN2k calculations of electric field gradient magnitude, CQ, and asymmetry, η, are also in excellent agreement with experiment, with r.m.s. deviations 0.038 MHz and 0.042 respectively. However, whilst CASTEP gives a similar deviation for η (0.043) it overestimates CQ by ∼15%. After scaling of the calculated electric field gradient by 0.842 the deviation in CQ is practically identical to that of the WIEN2k calculations. The spectral assignments that follow from the experimental and computational results allow identification of correlations between δiso and (a) the average B-O-B bond angle, θ[combining overline], for both three and four coordinated boron, giving δiso(B(III)) = (185.1 -θ[combining overline])/3.42 ppm and δiso(B(IV)) = (130.2 -θ[combining overline])/5.31 ppm; and (b) the ring-site T(3) unit trigonal planar angular deviation, Stri, giving δiso(T(3)(ring)) = (1.642 × 10(-2)-Stri)/(8.339 × 10(-4)) ppm.

  19. Planar-waveguide integrated spectral comparator.

    PubMed

    Mossberg, T W; Iazikov, D; Greiner, C

    2004-06-01

    A cost-effective yet robust and versatile dual-channel spectral comparator is presented. The silica-on-silicon planar-waveguide integrated device includes two holographic Bragg-grating reflectors (HBRs) with complementary spectral transfer functions. Output comprises projections of input signal spectra onto the complementary spectral channels. Spectral comparators may be useful in optical code-division multiplexing, optical packet decoding, spectral target recognition, and the identification of molecular spectra. HBRs may be considered to be mode-specific photonic crystals.

  20. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  1. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  2. Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, Fay; Elizalde, Emilio; Kirsten, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    extension that impacts particles never entering that region. What is the gravitational analogue for that situation? The analogue concerns the impact a localized curvature has, and the cone is an excellent example to shed light on that question. Related to the method of images, Stuart has done an enormous amount of work on the influence of topology and curvature on quantum field theory. An example is [17], where the vacuum stress-energy tensor for Clifford-Klein forms of the flat or spherical type were computed. Another strand we would like to mention is Stuart's interest in higher spin equations. In [18], Steven Weinberg wrote down a set of higher spin equations that took his fancy. They involved angular momentum theory, which has always pleased Stuart, and the description was an alternative to Roger Penrose's use of two-spinors. Investigating the inconsistencies that arose on coupling to gauge theories, Stuart extended the classic results in [19], from electromagnetism to gravity in accordance with his general philosophy; see, e.g., [20, 21, 22]. Lately, Stuart is best known for his many applications in the context of zeta function regularization and its applications to quantum field theory under external conditions and spectral theory. He can be considered the world expert on particular case calculations with a knowledge of the literature, old and recent, that is not seen very often and which originated in the many hours spent at different (mostly British) libraries. His attitude towards explicit computations is nicely summarized by himself: 'I have always been interested in exact solutions, even if unphysical, so long as they are pretty. They seem to be working mechanisms that fit together, complete in themselves, like a watch.' The following issue in honour of Stuart's 75th birthday contains contributions that touch upon the various topics he has worked on. References [1] de Broglie L 1928 La mécanique ondulatoire (Paris: Gauthier-Villars) [2] Castillejo L, Dalitz R H

  3. Optimized infra-red spectral response of surfaces for sub-ambient sky cooling as a function of humidity and operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, A. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2010-05-01

    The preferred surface spectral response for sub-ambient sky cooling varies according to the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere and the operating difference (Ta-Ts) between ambient and emitter surface temperatures. While all good candidates average high emittance from 7.9 μm to 13 μm, where the atmosphere is most transparent (the IR "sky window"), the preferred spectral response in the remainder of the Planck spectrum depends on a number of factors. Emittances E in studies to date have been near the two extremes of a high E ~ 0.85 to 0.95, and an E value between 0.3 to 0.4 for surfaces which emit strongly only in the sky window. Cooling rates and ideal spectral properties vary with operating conditions. The reasons behind this will be explained for select different coatings, using spectral densities for emitted outgoing radiation, which is Ts dependent, and the incoming radiation that is absorbed, which is fixed unless the atmosphere changes. Higher E surfaces always work best above and just below ambient but external factors that reduce incoming radiation from the atmosphere, including very low humidity or heat mirror apertures, extend this preference down to lower surface temperatures. Sky window spectrally selective coatings do not benefit as much because they already absorb little incoming radiation, but always have the potential to achieve very much colder temperatures if non-radiative heat gains are kept low.

  4. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  5. Nuclear Transparency and Single Particle Spectral Functions from Quasielastic A(e,e'p) Reactions up to Q2=8.1 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, David Wayne

    2003-05-01

    High statistics elastic and quasielastic scattering measurements were performed on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and iron at squared momentum transfers up to 8.1 GeV2. Both the nuclear transparency and the single particle spectral functions were extracted by means of comparison with a Plane- Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. Our data provide no evidence of the onset of color transparency within our kinematic range.

  6. Vibrational spectral investigation, NBO, first hyperpolarizability and UV-Vis spectral analysis of 3,5-dichlorobenzonitrile and m-bromobenzonitrile by ab initio and density functional theory methods.

    PubMed

    Senthil kumar, J; Jeyavijayan, S; Arivazhagan, M

    2015-02-05

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,5-dichlorobenzonitrile and m-bromobenzonitrile have been recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1), respectively. The optimized geometry, wave numbers and intensity of vibrational bonds of title molecules are obtained by ab initio and DFT level of theory with complete relaxation in the potential energy surface using 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignments aided by the theoretical harmonic frequency, analysis have been proposed. The harmonic vibrational frequencies calculated have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The UV-Vis spectral analysis of the molecules has also been done which confirms the charge transfer of the molecules. Furthermore, the first hyperpolarizability and total dipole moment of the molecules have been calculated.

  7. Temporal and spectral resolution of hearing in patients with precipitous hearing loss: Gap release of masking (GRM) and the role of cognitive function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, Martin D.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure temporal acuity and spectral resolution of hearing in new hearing-aid users over a period of time post-fitting, and to demonstrate the extent to which performance might change over time. For one-octave wide maskers with and without spectral and temporal gaps, masking was measured repeatedly over 3 months post-fitting. GRM was characterized as the release from masking under the gap conditions. The cognitive skills of the participants were assessed with two tests for measuring working memory capacity and lexical vigilance. The results showed that while the masking by one-octave wide noise maskers without any gaps was constant over time, GRM increased over time for maskers involving a temporal gap. Moreover, at low frequencies where the subjects had normal hearing-threshold levels, they performed as hearing-impaired for the spectral-gap condition. For the temporal-gap condition, they performed as normally hearing at both low and high frequencies. These results suggest that patients with precipitous hearing loss do not maintain normal spectral resolution through the low-frequency region, in which the hearing threshold levels are otherwise normal. Surprisingly, the results also showed moderate though highly significant correlation between lexical vigilance and GRM. [Work supported by the William Demant Foundation.] a)Currently at CNBH, Dept. Physiol., University of Cambridge, CB2 3EG Cambridge, UK.

  8. VIIRS S-NPP Nighttime DNB Spectral Response Function (SRF): The At-launch Characteristics and How the SRF Changes with Time Due to Tungsten Oxides Chromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, B.; Lei, N.; Moeller, C.

    2015-12-01

    The VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) is designed with 3 gain stages: Low (LGS), Mid (MGS) and High (HGS) to span bright daytime to moonlit night earth scene signal levels. The published at-launch DNB relative spectral response (RSR) is based upon the LGS spectral measurements, since it was well measured in the pre-launch test program and the LGS can be calibrated by the on-board solar diffuser (MGS and HGS saturate on the SD). The LGS RSR however does not fully represent the spectral characteristics of nighttime DNB data from the MGS and HGS. Nighttime data users who apply the detailed DNB spectral characteristics in their analyses should use modulated RSR appropriate to the MGS and HGS observations. The RSR modulation is due to spectral darkening of the 4 mirrors of the S-NPP VIIRS telescope, which were contaminated with tungsten oxides in fabrication. These tungsten oxides are 'in family' with transition lenses on eyeglasses that darken when exposed to sunlight but do not recover when VIIRS goes into darkness because VIIRS in space is in a vacuum (transition lenses require atmospheric oxygen to recover). The on-going mirror darkening has caused a time-dependent shift in DNB RSR towards blue wavelengths. This presentation will provide access to the correct RSR to use for S-NPP DNB nighttime data over the mission time on-orbit. The changes in characteristics will be described in engineering terms to facilitate clear user understanding of how to handle RSR for nighttime observations over the mission lifetime.

  9. Efficiency enhancement calculations of state-of-the-art solar cells by luminescent layers with spectral shifting, quantum cutting, and quantum tripling function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Kate, O. M.; de Jong, M.; Hintzen, H. T.; van der Kolk, E.

    2013-08-01

    Solar cells of which the efficiency is not limited by the Shockley-Queisser limit can be obtained by integrating a luminescent spectral conversion layer into the cell structure. We have calculated the maximum efficiency of state-of-the-art c-Si, pc-Si, a-Si, CdTe, GaAs, CIS, CIGS, CGS, GaSb, and Ge solar cells with and without an integrated spectral shifting, quantum cutting, or quantum tripling layer using their measured internal quantum efficiency (IQE) curves. Our detailed balance limit calculations not only take into account light in-coupling efficiency of the direct AM1.5 spectral irradiance but also wavelength dependence of the refractive index and the IQEs of the cells and the angular dependent light in-coupling of the indirect spectral irradiance. An ideal quantum cutting layer enhances all cell efficiencies ranging from a modest 2.9% for c-Si to much larger values of 4.0%, 7.7%, and 11.2% for CIGS, Ge, and GaSb, respectively. A quantum tripling layer also enhances cell efficiencies, but to a lesser extent. These efficiency enhancements are largest for small band gap cells like GaSb (7.5%) and Ge (3.8%). Combining a quantum tripling and a quantum cutting layer would enhance efficiency of these cells by a factor of two. Efficiency enhancement by a simple spectral shifting layer is limited to less than 1% in case the IQE is high for blue and UV lights. However, for CdTe and GaSb solar cells, efficiency enhancements are as high as 4.6% and 3.5%, respectively. A shifting layer based on available red LED phosphors like Sr2Si5N8:Eu will raise CdTe efficiency by 3.0%.

  10. Temperature dependence of the dielectric function in the spectral range (0.5–8.5) eV of an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Krauß, H.; Kranert, C.; Bonholzer, M.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-09-15

    We present the dielectric function of a bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film in the wide spectral range from near-infrared to vacuum-ultraviolet and for temperatures 10 K–300 K, determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. From the temperature dependence of electronic transition energies, we derive electron-phonon coupling properties and found hints that the direct parabolic band-band transitions involve In-d states. Further we discuss possible excitonic contributions to the dielectric function.

  11. Dynamics of modulated beams in spectral domain

    DOE PAGES

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.

    2017-07-16

    General formalism for describing dynamics of modulated beams along linear beamlines is developed. We describe modulated beams with spectral distribution function which represents Fourier transform of the conventional beam distribution function in the 6-dimensional phase space. The introduced spectral distribution function is localized in some region of the spectral domain for nearly monochromatic modulations. It can be characterized with a small number of typical parameters such as the lowest order moments of the spectral distribution. We study evolution of the modulated beams in linear beamlines and find that characteristic spectral parameters transform linearly. The developed approach significantly simplifies analysis ofmore » various schemes proposed for seeding X-ray free electron lasers. We use this approach to study several recently proposed schemes and find the bandwidth of the output bunching in each case.« less

  12. Spectral effects in quantum teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2007-02-15

    We use a multimode description of polarization-encoded qubits to analyze the quantum teleportation protocol. Specifically, we investigate how the teleportation fidelity depends on the spectral correlations inherent to polarization-entangled photons generated by type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion. We find that the maximal obtainable fidelity depends on the spectral entanglement carried by the joint probability amplitude, a result which we quantify for the case of a joint spectrum approximated by a correlated Gaussian function. We contrast these results with a similar analysis of the visibility obtained in a polarization-correlation experiment.

  13. Spectral Effects in Quantum Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Grice, Warren P

    2007-01-01

    We use a multimode description of polarization-encoded qubits to analyze the quantum teleportation protocol. Specifically, we investigate how the teleportation fidelity depends on the spectral correlations inherent to polarization-entangled photons generated by type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion. We find that the maximal obtainable fidelity depends on the spectral entanglement carried by the joint probability amplitude, a result which we quantify for the case of a joint spectrum approximated by a correlated Gaussian function. We contrast these results with a similar analysis of the visibility obtained in a polarization-correlation experiment.

  14. General spectral utility metric for spectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Rulon E.; Elder, Timothy D.; Stewart, David J.; Cincotta, Eric J.; Kennedy, Carolyn S.; Van Nostrand, R. Craig

    2005-06-01

    Published approaches to assessing and predicting spectral image utility are generally based on regression methods which fit coefficients to an equation with terms representing spatial scale, spectral fidelity, and signal-to-noise. Such approaches are patterned after the National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale General Image Quality Equation (NIIRS GIQE) designed for use with remotely-sensed panchromatic imagery. Preliminary testing of these approaches suggests that they will work for some subsets of spectral imagery applications but are not generally applicable to all spectral imaging problems. We present here an approach that gets at the heart of the general problem-assessing the confidence of an image analyst in performing a specified task with a specific spectral image. While applicable in other areas such as health imaging, our approach to spectral utility assessment is presented in this paper from a remote sensing point of view. Our approach allows trade-offs in tasking and system design across the "spectrum" of imagers including panchromatic, multispectral, hyperspectral, and even ultraspectral. Our approach is based on a fusion concept called "semantic transformation." We assume that spectral and spatial information are largely separable with both contributing to the overall utility of the image. The "semantic transformation" combines the spatial and spectral information in a common term (in our case confidence) to give an overall confidence in performing the specified task. Addressing the spatial and spectral information separately allows us the freedom to assess the information contained in each in ways that the information is actually assimilated (i.e., usually spatial information in exploited visually while spectral information consisting of more than three or four bands is usually exploited by computer algorithms). For the spectral information, we can use either generic exploitation algorithms or the specific algorithms that the image analyst

  15. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  16. Spectral and spatial tuning of onset and offset response functions in auditory cortical fields A1 and CL of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Deepa L; Recanzone, Gregg H

    2016-12-07

    The mammalian auditory cortex is necessary for spectral and spatial processing of acoustic stimuli. Most physiological studies of single neurons in the auditory cortex have focused on the onset and sustained portions of evoked responses, but there have been far fewer studies on the relationship between onset and offset responses. In the current study, we compared spectral and spatial tuning of onset and offset responses of neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1) and the caudolateral (CL) belt area of awake macaque monkeys. Several different metrics were used to determine the relationship between onset and offset response profiles in both frequency and space domains. In the frequency domain, a substantial proportion of neurons in A1 and CL displayed highly dissimilar best stimuli for onset- and offset-evoked responses, though even for these neurons, there was usually a large overlap in the range of frequencies that elicited onset and offset responses and distributions of tuning overlap metrics were mostly unimodal. In the spatial domain, the vast majority of neurons displayed very similar best locations for onset- and offset-evoked responses, along with unimodal distributions of all tuning overlap metrics considered. Finally, for both spectral and spatial tuning, a slightly larger fraction of neurons in A1 displayed non-overlapping onset and offset response profiles, relative to CL, which supports hierarchical differences in the processing of sounds in the two areas. However, these differences are small compared to differences in proportions of simple cells (low overlap) and complex cells (high overlap) in primary and secondary visual areas.

  17. Spectral imaging of the human ocular fundus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truitt, Paul Wiley

    Introduction. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a high spectral and spatial resolution fundus imager and to assess its utility in visualizing and characterizing normal anatomical and pathological tissue classes in the human ocular fundus. The ocular fundus (posterior portion of the eye) affords a unique opportunity to directly observe neural and vascular tissue in vivo. Many ocular and systemic diseases manifest changes in the normal fundus anatomy. Current examination techniques are not optimized to detect changes prior to the formation of damaging lesions. Spectral imaging may allow visualization of disease states before the onset of traditional clinical signs. Normal tissue in the eye has distinct spectral characteristics determined by specific structural organization and the presence of specific chemical substances and ocular pigments. Pathological states result in physical and chemical changes to the tissue. Spectral imaging exploits the differences in the spectral characteristics to separate different classes of material. When these spectral properties are combined with the spatial context of the image, improved visualization and detection is possible. Methods. Two independent spectral imaging devices were developed and integrated to a commercially available Zeiss fundus camera. Spectral data were collected in order to characterize the normal anatomical tissue classes and to assess the usefulness of spectral features for improved class discernment. Spectral images were collected for 14 subjects Diabetic Retinopathy were imaged. Mean spectral curves were produced for each class and for each subject. These spectral curves were normalized to remove the contribution from the pigment melanin (the major pigment associated with variation in fundus pigmentation) and modeled with a piece-wise linear function consisting of a DC offset and four slopes. Results. Differences in the shape of the spectral curve exist between macular edema and normal macular and

  18. Spectral Methods for Numerical Relativity.

    PubMed

    Grandclément, Philippe; Novak, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Equations arising in general relativity are usually too complicated to be solved analytically and one must rely on numerical methods to solve sets of coupled partial differential equations. Among the possible choices, this paper focuses on a class called spectral methods in which, typically, the various functions are expanded in sets of orthogonal polynomials or functions. First, a theoretical introduction of spectral expansion is given with a particular emphasis on the fast convergence of the spectral approximation. We then present different approaches to solving partial differential equations, first limiting ourselves to the one-dimensional case, with one or more domains. Generalization to more dimensions is then discussed. In particular, the case of time evolutions is carefully studied and the stability of such evolutions investigated. We then present results obtained by various groups in the field of general relativity by means of spectral methods. Work, which does not involve explicit time-evolutions, is discussed, going from rapidly-rotating strange stars to the computation of black-hole-binary initial data. Finally, the evolution of various systems of astrophysical interest are presented, from supernovae core collapse to black-hole-binary mergers.

  19. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets.

  20. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  1. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  2. Weighted compression of spectral color information.

    PubMed

    Laamanen, Hannu; Jetsu, Tuija; Jaaskelainen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2008-06-01

    Spectral color information is used nowadays in many different applications. Accurate spectral images are usually very large files, but a proper compression method can reduce needed storage space remarkably with a minimum loss of information. In this paper we introduce a principal component analysis (PCA) -based compression method of spectral color information. In this approach spectral data is weighted with a proper weight function before forming the correlation matrix and calculating the eigenvector basis. First we give a general framework for how to use weight functions in compression of relevant color information. Then we compare the weighted compression method with the traditional PCA compression method by compressing and reconstructing the Munsell data set consisting of 1,269 reflectance spectra and the Pantone data set consisting of 922 reflectance spectra. Two different weight functions are proposed and tested. We show that weighting clearly improves retention of color information in the PCA-based compression process.

  3. An upper-bound metric for characterizing spectral and spatial coregistration errors in spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Skauli, Torbjørn

    2012-01-16

    Coregistration errors in multi- and hyperspectral imaging sensors arise when the spatial sensitivity pattern differs between bands or when the spectral response varies across the field of view, potentially leading to large errors in the recorded image data. In imaging spectrometers, spectral and spatial offset errors are customarily specified as "smile" and "keystone" distortions. However these characteristics do not account for errors resulting from variations in point spread function shape or spectral bandwidth. This paper proposes improved metrics for coregistration error both in the spatial and spectral dimensions. The metrics are essentially the integrated difference between point spread functions. It is shown that these metrics correspond to an upper bound on the error in image data. The metrics enable estimation of actual data errors for a given image, and can be used as part of the merit function in optical design optimization, as well as for benchmarking of spectral image sensors.

  4. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  5. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  6. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  7. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  8. Analysis of spectral identifier of fatty acid functional group of packaging frying oil and bulk frying oil with the effect of repeated heating using FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Vinda Dwi Dini; Nasution, Aulia M. T.

    2016-11-01

    Frying oil is a cooking medium that is commonly used in Indonesia. Frying process can lead changes in the properties of frying oil. Heating oil with high temperature and many repetition will cause degradation in oil and may cause health problems, such as cholesterol, induces heart disease, and cancer. Degradation of the frying oil can be determined based on changes in the cluster function of fatty acids due to the heating influence. Therefore, it is necessary to test the frying oil under treatments with variety of time heating using a spectrometer Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Spectra from FTIR was processed using derivative spectroscopy method to clearly see the difference in the measured spectra. Range spectra of interest is at wavelength of 13,500 to 14,200 nm i.e. indicating the double bond of carbon in molecule HC = CH. The analysis was performed by calculating the area of the spectral curve from the respected 2nd order derivative. Result show that the absorbance of packaging frying oil is higher than the bulk frying oil. In addition, heating of frying oil can decrease the area of respected 2nd order derivative. Packaging frying oil heating on 30 minutes which has the area of spectral curve of 0.904217 decrease become 0.881394 after 3 times heating. While the bulk frying oil heating 30 minutes, in the first heating which has area of spectral curve of 0.916089 decrease become 0.865379 after 3 times heating. The decline in the area of the curve occurs due to breakdown of the double bond of carbon in the molecule HC = CH that caused by heating at high temperatures and repeated heating.

  9. Spectral multidimensional scaling

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Kimmel, Ron

    2013-01-01

    An important tool in information analysis is dimensionality reduction. There are various approaches for large data simplification by scaling its dimensions down that play a significant role in recognition and classification tasks. The efficiency of dimension reduction tools is measured in terms of memory and computational complexity, which are usually a function of the number of the given data points. Sparse local operators that involve substantially less than quadratic complexity at one end, and faithful multiscale models with quadratic cost at the other end, make the design of dimension reduction procedure a delicate balance between modeling accuracy and efficiency. Here, we combine the benefits of both and propose a low-dimensional multiscale modeling of the data, at a modest computational cost. The idea is to project the classical multidimensional scaling problem into the data spectral domain extracted from its Laplace–Beltrami operator. There, embedding into a small dimensional Euclidean space is accomplished while optimizing for a small number of coefficients. We provide a theoretical support and demonstrate that working in the natural eigenspace of the data, one could reduce the process complexity while maintaining the model fidelity. As examples, we efficiently canonize nonrigid shapes by embedding their intrinsic metric into , a method often used for matching and classifying almost isometric articulated objects. Finally, we demonstrate the method by exposing the style in which handwritten digits appear in a large collection of images. We also visualize clustering of digits by treating images as feature points that we map to a plane. PMID:24108352

  10. Spectral analysis of time functions of plasma glucose and immunoreactive insulin during intravenous glucose tolerance testing on atherosclerosis and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinov, Igor A.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Malinova, Lidia I.; Brook, Sergey B.

    2000-04-01

    The time functions of plasma glucose and insulin obtained during intravenous glucose tolerance test were approximated by sections of Fourier series. The convincing quantitative and quality distinctions of amplitudes both phases of the first and second harmonics of decomposition of the indicated time functions are obtained. These distinctions were used as a basis of diagnostic algorithm of metabolic violations appropriate for atherosclerosis and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in clinically obvious and preclinical stages.

  11. Robust material decomposition for spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Johnson, G. A.; Badea, C. T.

    2014-03-01

    There is ongoing interest in extending CT from anatomical to functional imaging. Recent successes with dual energy CT, the introduction of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents enable functional imaging capabilities via spectral CT. However, many challenges related to radiation dose, photon flux, and sensitivity still must be overcome. Here, we introduce a post-reconstruction algorithm called spectral diffusion that performs a robust material decomposition of spectral CT data in the presence of photon noise to address these challenges. Specifically, we use spectrally joint, piece-wise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased relative to the source data. Spectral diffusion integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms. Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg/mL), gold (0.9 mg/mL), and gadolinium (2.9 mg/mL) concentrations.

  12. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  13. MS-ONLINE Mass Spectral Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokizane, Soichi; Nagaoka, Nobuaki

    A mass spectral database, MS-ONLINE, is described which is produced by FIZ Chemie, in Federal Republic of Germany and offered online through the INKADATA system. The data source of this database is WILEY/NBS MASS SPECTRAL DATA BASE and it includes 80,680 spectra. Spectral data can be retrieved from a substance search (by assigning molecular weight, molecular formula or name), a specific peak search, or a similarity search of peak patterns called SISCOM search. Further more, the system has functions supporting the component identification of mixtures and the identification from an isotopic abundance. The algorism of the SISCOM search is explained in detail.

  14. Learning theory of distributed spectral algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zheng-Chu; Lin, Shao-Bo; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2017-07-01

    Spectral algorithms have been widely used and studied in learning theory and inverse problems. This paper is concerned with distributed spectral algorithms, for handling big data, based on a divide-and-conquer approach. We present a learning theory for these distributed kernel-based learning algorithms in a regression framework including nice error bounds and optimal minimax learning rates achieved by means of a novel integral operator approach and a second order decomposition of inverse operators. Our quantitative estimates are given in terms of regularity of the regression function, effective dimension of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and qualification of the filter function of the spectral algorithm. They do not need any eigenfunction or noise conditions and are better than the existing results even for the classical family of spectral algorithms.

  15. Estimation of spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2017-03-01

    Rolling bearings are the most important elements in rotating machinery. Bearing frequently fall out of service for various reasons: heavy loads, unsuitable lubrications, ineffective sealing. Bearing faults may cause a decrease in performance. Analysis of bearing vibration signals has attracted attention in the field of monitoring and fault diagnosis. Bearing vibration signals give rich information for early detection of bearing failures. Spectral kurtosis, SK, is a parameter in frequency domain indicating how the impulsiveness of a signal varies with frequency. Faults in rolling bearings give rise to a series of short impulse responses as the rolling elements strike faults, SK potentially useful for determining frequency bands dominated by bearing fault signals. SK can provide a measure of the distance of the analyzed bearings from a healthy one. SK provides additional information given by the power spectral density (psd). This paper aims to explore the estimation of spectral kurtosis using short time Fourier transform known as spectrogram. The estimation of SK is similar to the estimation of psd. The estimation falls in model-free estimation and plug-in estimator. Some numerical studies using simulations are discussed to support the methodology. Spectral kurtosis of some stationary signals are analytically obtained and used in simulation study. Kurtosis of time domain has been a popular tool for detecting non-normality. Spectral kurtosis is an extension of kurtosis in frequency domain. The relationship between time domain and frequency domain analysis is establish through power spectrum-autocovariance Fourier transform. Fourier transform is the main tool for estimation in frequency domain. The power spectral density is estimated through periodogram. In this paper, the short time Fourier transform of the spectral kurtosis is reviewed, a bearing fault (inner ring and outer ring) is simulated. The bearing response, power spectrum, and spectral kurtosis are plotted to

  16. Spectral correlations of individual quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Altland, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of chaotic quantum graphs. We demonstrate that the energy-average over the spectrum of individual graphs can be traded for the functional average over a supersymmetric nonlinear {sigma}-model action. This proves that spectral correlations of individual quantum graphs behave according to the predictions of Wigner-Dyson random matrix theory. We explore the stability of the universal random matrix behavior with regard to perturbations, and discuss the crossover between different types of symmetries.

  17. Power Spectral Density and Hilbert Transform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    there is 1.3 W of power. How much bandwidth does a pure sine wave require? The bandwidth of an ideal sine wave is 0 Hz. How do you represent a 1-W... sine wave source (power concentrated in a single frequency) on a power spectral density graph (power per frequency, watts per hertz)? The Dirac delta...represent the power contained in a sine wave (zero bandwidth) on a power spectral density graph. Fig. 1 Dirac delta function () =

  18. Spectral Dimensionality and Scale of Urban Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Characterization of urban radiance and reflectance is important for understanding the effects of solar energy flux on the urban environment as well as for satellite mapping of urban settlement patterns. Spectral mixture analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery suggest that the urban radiance field can very often be described with combinations of three or four spectral endmembers. Dimensionality estimates of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) radiance measurements of urban areas reveal the existence of 30 to 60 spectral dimensions. The extent to which broadband imagery collected by operational satellites can represent the higher dimensional mixing space is a function of both the spatial and spectral resolution of the sensor. AVIRIS imagery offers the spatial and spectral resolution necessary to investigate the scale dependence of the spectral dimensionality. Dimensionality estimates derived from Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) eigenvalue distributions show a distinct scale dependence for AVIRIS radiance measurements of Milpitas, California. Apparent dimensionality diminishes from almost 40 to less than 10 spectral dimensions between scales of 8000 m and 300 m. The 10 to 30 m scale of most features in urban mosaics results in substantial spectral mixing at the 20 m scale of high altitude AVIRIS pixels. Much of the variance at pixel scales is therefore likely to result from actual differences in surface reflectance at pixel scales. Spatial smoothing and spectral subsampling of AVIRIS spectra both result in substantial loss of information and reduction of apparent dimensionality, but the primary spectral endmembers in all cases are analogous to those found in global analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery of other urban areas.

  19. Spectral Dimensionality and Scale of Urban Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Characterization of urban radiance and reflectance is important for understanding the effects of solar energy flux on the urban environment as well as for satellite mapping of urban settlement patterns. Spectral mixture analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery suggest that the urban radiance field can very often be described with combinations of three or four spectral endmembers. Dimensionality estimates of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) radiance measurements of urban areas reveal the existence of 30 to 60 spectral dimensions. The extent to which broadband imagery collected by operational satellites can represent the higher dimensional mixing space is a function of both the spatial and spectral resolution of the sensor. AVIRIS imagery offers the spatial and spectral resolution necessary to investigate the scale dependence of the spectral dimensionality. Dimensionality estimates derived from Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) eigenvalue distributions show a distinct scale dependence for AVIRIS radiance measurements of Milpitas, California. Apparent dimensionality diminishes from almost 40 to less than 10 spectral dimensions between scales of 8000 m and 300 m. The 10 to 30 m scale of most features in urban mosaics results in substantial spectral mixing at the 20 m scale of high altitude AVIRIS pixels. Much of the variance at pixel scales is therefore likely to result from actual differences in surface reflectance at pixel scales. Spatial smoothing and spectral subsampling of AVIRIS spectra both result in substantial loss of information and reduction of apparent dimensionality, but the primary spectral endmembers in all cases are analogous to those found in global analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery of other urban areas.

  20. Dielectric function in the NIR-VUV spectral range of (In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Kranert, C.; Böntgen, T.; Wenckstern, H. von; Krauß, H.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-08-07

    We determined the dielectric function of the alloy system (In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the wide spectral range from 0.5 eV to 8.5 eV and for In contents ranging from x = 0.02 to x = 0.61. The predicted optical transitions for binary, monoclinic β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and cubic bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well reflected by the change of the dielectric functions' lineshape as a function of the In content. In an intermediate composition range with phase-separated material (x ≈ 0.3…0.4), the lineshape differs considerably, which we assign to the presence of the high-pressure rhombohedral InGaO{sub 3}-II phase, which we also observe in Raman experiments in this range. By model analysis of the dielectric function, we derived spectra of the refractive index and the absorption coefficient and energy parameters of electronic band-band transitions. We discuss the sub-band gap absorption tail in relation to the influence of the In 4d orbitals on the valence bands. The data presented here provide a basis for a deeper understanding of the electronic properties of this technologically important material system and may be useful for device engineering.

  1. Molecular modeling and spectral comparison for the change in methyl position of nitrophenol compounds 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol and 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol: a density functional theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Siva Priya, M; Usha Rani, N; James, C

    2013-04-15

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol (PNOC) and 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (PNMC) were recorded and analyzed in the solid phase in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1) respectively. Molecular modeling of the compounds PNOC and PNMC were done by the density functional theoretical (DFT) method using Becke's three parameter exchange functional combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional with 6-31G(d) as basis set. Vibrational assignments of the two compounds have been carried out with the help of Normal coordinate analyses (NCA) followed by the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field calculations (SQMFF). Intra-molecular charge transfer and delocalization within the molecule is confirmed with the aid of natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). PNOC and PNMC are similar compounds with same functional groups, only the position of the methyl group is different. The effect of the position change of the methyl group was interpreted with the vibrational spectra.

  2. Multi-spectral pyrometry—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António

    2017-08-01

    In pyrometry measurements, the unknown target emissivity is a critical source of uncertainty, especially when the emissivity is low. Aiming to overcome this problem, various multi-spectral pyrometry systems and processing techniques have been proposed in the literature. Basically, all multi-spectral systems are based on the same principle: the radiation emitted by the target is measured at different channels having different spectral characteristics, and the emissivity is modelled as a function of wavelength with adjustable parameters to be obtained empirically, resulting in a system of equations whose solution is the target temperature and the parameters of the emissivity function. The present work reviews the most important multi-spectral developments. Concerning the spectral width of the measurement channels, multi-spectral systems are divided into multi-wavelength (monochromatic channels) and multi-band (wide-band channels) systems. Regarding the number of unknowns and equations (one equation per channel), pyrometry systems can either be determined (same number of unknowns and equations, having a unique solution) or overdetermined (more equations than unknowns, to be solved by least-squares). Generally, higher-order multi-spectral systems are overdetermined, since the uncertainty of the solutions obtained from determined systems increases as the number of channels increases, so that determined systems normally have less than four channels. In terms of the spectral characteristics of the measurement channels, narrow bands, far apart from each other and shifted towards lower wavelengths, seem to provide more accurate solutions. Many processing techniques have been proposed, but they strongly rely on the relationship between emissivity and wavelength, which is, in turn, strongly dependent on the characteristics of a particular target. Several accurate temperature and/or emissivity results have been reported, but no universally accepted multi-spectral technique has

  3. Temporal Lorentzian spectral triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We present the notion of temporal Lorentzian spectral triple which is an extension of the notion of pseudo-Riemannian spectral triple with a way to ensure that the signature of the metric is Lorentzian. A temporal Lorentzian spectral triple corresponds to a specific 3 + 1 decomposition of a possibly noncommutative Lorentzian space. This structure introduces a notion of global time in noncommutative geometry. As an example, we construct a temporal Lorentzian spectral triple over a Moyal-Minkowski spacetime. We show that, when time is commutative, the algebra can be extended to unbounded elements. Using such an extension, it is possible to define a Lorentzian distance formula between pure states with a well-defined noncommutative formulation.

  4. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  5. Spectrophotometer spectral bandwidth calibration with absorption bands crystal standard.

    PubMed

    Soares, O D; Costa, J L

    1999-04-01

    A procedure for calibration of a spectral bandwidth standard for high-resolution spectrophotometers is described. Symmetrical absorption bands for a crystal standard are adopted. The method relies on spectral band shape fitting followed by a convolution with the slit function of the spectrophotometer. A reference spectrophotometer is used to calibrate the spectral bandwidth standard. Bandwidth calibration curves for a minimum spectral transmission factor relative to the spectral bandwidth of the reference spectrophotometer are derived for the absorption bands at the wavelength of the band absorption maximum. The family of these calibration curves characterizes the spectral bandwidth standard. We calibrate the spectral bandwidth of a spectrophotometer with respect to the reference spectrophotometer by determining the spectral transmission factor minimum at every calibrated absorption band of the bandwidth standard for the nominal instrument values of the spectral bandwidth. With reference to the standard spectral bandwidth calibration curves, the relation of the spectral bandwidth to the reference spectrophotometer is determined. We determine the discrepancy in the spectrophotometers' spectral bandwidths by averaging the spectral bandwidth discrepancies relative to the standard calibrated values found at the absorption bands considered. A weighted average of the uncertainties is taken.

  6. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  7. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  8. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  9. Determination of optical properties of human blood in the spectral range 250 to 1100 nm using Monte Carlo simulations with hematocrit-dependent effective scattering phase functions.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Roggan, André; Müller, Gerhard; Meinke, Martina

    2006-01-01

    The absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), and anisotropy factor g of diluted and undiluted human blood (hematocrit 0.84 and 42.1%) are determined under flow conditions in the wavelength range 250 to 1100 nm, covering the absorption bands of hemoglobin. These values are obtained by high precision integrating sphere measurements in combination with an optimized inverse Monte Carlo simulation (IMCS). With a new algorithm, appropriate effective phase functions could be evaluated for both blood concentrations using the IMCS. The best results are obtained using the Reynolds-McCormick phase function with the variation factor alpha = 1.2 for hematocrit 0.84%, and alpha = 1.7 for hematocrit 42.1%. The obtained data are compared with the parameters given by the Mie theory. The use of IMCS in combination with selected appropriate effective phase functions make it possible to take into account the nonspherical shape of erythrocytes, the phenomenon of coupled absorption and scattering, and multiple scattering and interference phenomena. It is therefore possible for the first time to obtain reasonable results for the optical behavior of human blood, even at high hematocrit and in high hemoglobin absorption areas. Moreover, the limitations of the Mie theory describing the optical properties of blood can be shown.

  10. On the spectral formulation of Granger causality.

    PubMed

    Chicharro, D

    2011-12-01

    Spectral measures of causality are used to explore the role of different rhythms in the causal connectivity between brain regions. We study several spectral measures related to Granger causality, comprising the bivariate and conditional Geweke measures, the directed transfer function, and the partial directed coherence. We derive the formulation of dependence and causality in the spectral domain from the more general formulation in the information-theory framework. We argue that the transfer entropy, the most general measure derived from the concept of Granger causality, lacks a spectral representation in terms of only the processes associated with the recorded signals. For all the spectral measures we show how they are related to mutual information rates when explicitly considering the parametric autoregressive representation of the processes. In this way we express the conditional Geweke spectral measure in terms of a multiple coherence involving innovation variables inherent to the autoregressive representation. We also link partial directed coherence with Sims' criterion of causality. Given our results, we discuss the causal interpretation of the spectral measures related to Granger causality and stress the necessity to explicitly consider their specific formulation based on modeling the signals as linear Gaussian stationary autoregressive processes.

  11. [Modeling and Simulation of Spectral Polarimetric BRDF].

    PubMed

    Ling, Jin-jiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Ren-bin; Tang, Qian; Ye, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Under the conditions of the polarized light, The reflective surface of the object is affected by many factors, refractive index, surface roughness, and so the angle of incidence. For the rough surface in the different wavelengths of light exhibit different reflection characteristics of polarization, a spectral polarimetric BRDF based on Kirchhof theory is proposee. The spectral model of complex refraction index is combined with refraction index and extinction coefficient spectral model which were got by using the known complex refraction index at different value. Then get the spectral model of surface roughness derived from the classical surface roughness measuring method combined with the Fresnel reflection function. Take the spectral model of refraction index and roughness into the BRDF model, then the spectral polarimetirc BRDF model is proposed. Compare the simulation results of the refractive index varies with wavelength, roughness is constant, the refraction index and roughness both vary with wavelength and origin model with other papers, it shows that, the spectral polarimetric BRDF model can show the polarization characteristics of the surface accurately, and can provide a reliable basis for the application of polarization remote sensing, and other aspects of the classification of substances.

  12. Prelaunch spectral calibration of a carbon dioxide spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhigang; Lin, Chao; Li, Chengliang; Wang, Long; Ji, Zhenhua; Xue, Hao; Wei, Yuefeng; Gong, Chenghu; Gao, Minghui; Liu, Lei; Gao, Zhiliang; Zheng, Yuquan

    2017-06-01

    The carbon dioxide spectrometer (CDS) on board the Chinese Carbon Dioxide Observation Satellite (TanSat) is a high spectral and spatial resolution grating spectrometer with three specific spectral bands dedicated to atmospheric CO2 detection. The CDS’s design and on-ground spectral calibration are presented in this paper. The instrument line shape functions and spectral dispersion were characterized using a tunable diode laser-based testing system for all spectral pixels of the CDS placed in a thermal vacuum chamber.

  13. In situ nondestructive imaging of functional pigments in Micro-Tom tomato fruits by multi spectral imaging based on Wiener estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Ooe, Shintaro; Todoroki, Shinsuke; Asamizu, Erika

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the functional pigments in the tomato fruits nondestructively, we propose a method based on the multispectral diffuse reflectance images estimated by the Wiener estimation for a digital RGB image. Each pixel of the multispectral image is converted to the absorbance spectrum and then analyzed by the multiple regression analysis to visualize the contents of chlorophyll a, lycopene and β-carotene. The result confirms the feasibility of the method for in situ imaging of chlorophyll a, β-carotene and lycopene in the tomato fruits.

  14. Current clinical applications of spectral tissue Doppler echocardiography (E/E' ratio) as a noninvasive surrogate for left ventricular diastolic pressures in the diagnosis of heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function

    PubMed Central

    Arques, Stephane; Roux, Emmanuel; Luccioni, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Congestive heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function has emerged as a growing epidemic medical syndrome in developed countries, which is characterized by high morbidity and mortality rates. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of this condition is essential for optimizing the therapeutic management. The diagnosis of congestive heart failure is challenging in patients presenting without obvious left ventricular systolic dysfunction and additional diagnostic information is most commonly required in this setting. Comprehensive Doppler echocardiography is the single most useful diagnostic test recommended by the ESC and ACC/AHA guidelines for assessing left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac abnormalities in patients with suspected congestive heart failure, and non-invasively determined basal or exercise-induced pulmonary capillary hypertension is likely to become a hallmark of congestive heart failure in symptomatic patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function. The present review will focus on the current clinical applications of spectral tissue Doppler echocardiography used as a reliable noninvasive surrogate for left ventricular diastolic pressures at rest as well as during exercise in the diagnosis of heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function. Chronic congestive heart failure, a disease of exercise, and acute heart failure syndromes are characterized by specific pathophysiologic and diagnostic issues, and these two clinical presentations will be discussed separately. PMID:17386087

  15. A geometric approach to spectral subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional power spectral subtraction algorithm is computationally simple to implement but suffers from musical noise distortion. In addition, the subtractive rules are based on incorrect assumptions about the cross terms being zero. A new geometric approach to spectral subtraction is proposed in the present paper that addresses these shortcomings of the spectral subtraction algorithm. A method for estimating the cross terms involving the phase differences between the noisy (and clean) signals and noise is proposed. Analysis of the gain function of the proposed algorithm indicated that it possesses similar properties as the traditional MMSE algorithm. Objective evaluation of the proposed algorithm showed that it performed significantly better than the traditional spectral subtractive algorithm. Informal listening tests revealed that the proposed algorithm had no audible musical noise. PMID:19122867

  16. Spectral Synthesis with Empirical Priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodre, L., Jr.

    2017-07-01

    We have been developing a Bayesian parameter estimator which is very competitive compared with other machine learning methods, as evidenced by several experiments performed by our group (e.g., on photometric redshifts and galaxy spectral synthesis). Our approach relies on a training set, i.e., a (empirical, theoretical or mixed) data set with known parameters, and outputs the probability distribution function of a certain parameter, as well as other statistical summaries of this distribution, for all galaxies in the survey. We propose to build a large training set using theoretical libraries and use them to derive galaxy parameters from S-PLUS, J-PLUS and J-PAS observations.

  17. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE PAGES

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  18. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  19. Interactive Spectral Analysis and Computation (ISAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Isaac is a task in the NSO external package for IRAF. A descendant of a FORTRAN program written to analyze data from a Fourier transform spectrometer, the current implementation has been generalized sufficiently to make it useful for general spectral analysis and other one dimensional data analysis tasks. The user interface for Isaac is implemented as an interpreted mini-language containing a powerful, programmable vector calculator. Built-in commands provide much of the functionality needed to produce accurate line lists from input spectra. These built-in functions include automated spectral line finding, least squares fitting of Voigt profiles to spectral lines including equality constraints, various filters including an optimal filter construction tool, continuum fitting, and various I/O functions.

  20. Rapid Chemometric Filtering of Spectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaman, Gregory; Pelletier, Michael; Seshadri, Suresh

    2004-01-01

    A method of rapid, programmable filtering of spectral transmittance, reflectance, or fluorescence data to measure the concentrations of chemical species has been proposed. By programmable is meant that a variety of spectral analyses can readily be performed and modified in software, firmware, and/or electronic hardware, without need to change optical filters or other optical hardware of the associated spectrometers. The method is intended to enable real-time identification of single or multiple target chemical species in applications that involve high-throughput screening of multiple samples. Examples of such applications include (but are not limited to) combinatorial chemistry, flow cytometry, bead assays, testing drugs, remote sensing, and identification of targets. The basic concept of the proposed method is to perform real-time crosscorrelations of a measured spectrum with one or more analytical function(s) of wavelength that could be, for example, the known spectra of target species. Assuming that measured spectral intensities are proportional to concentrations of target species plus background spectral intensities, then after subtraction of background levels, it should be possible to determine target species concentrations from cross-correlation values. Of course, the problem of determining the concentrations is more complex when spectra of different species overlap, but the problem can be solved by use of multiple analytical functions in combination with computational techniques that have been developed previously for analyses of this type. The method is applicable to the design and operation of a spectrometer in which spectrally dispersed light is measured by means of an active-pixel sensor (APS) array. The row or column dimension of such an array is generally chosen to be aligned along the spectral-dispersion dimension, so that each pixel intercepts light in a narrow spectral band centered on a wavelength that is a known function of the pixel position. The

  1. Many-body Green’s function theory for electron-phonon interactions: The Kadanoff-Baym approach to spectral properties of the Holstein dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Säkkinen, Niko; Peng, Yang; Appel, Heiko; Leeuwen, Robert van

    2015-12-21

    We present a Kadanoff-Baym formalism to study time-dependent phenomena for systems of interacting electrons and phonons in the framework of many-body perturbation theory. The formalism takes correctly into account effects of the initial preparation of an equilibrium state and allows for an explicit time-dependence of both the electronic and phononic degrees of freedom. The method is applied to investigate the charge neutral and non-neutral excitation spectra of a homogeneous, two-site, two-electron Holstein model. This is an extension of a previous study of the ground state properties in the Hartree (H), partially self-consistent Born (Gd) and fully self-consistent Born (GD) approximations published in Säkkinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 234101 (2015)]. Here, the homogeneous ground state solution is shown to become unstable for a sufficiently strong interaction while a symmetry-broken ground state solution is shown to be stable in the Hartree approximation. Signatures of this instability are observed for the partially self-consistent Born approximation but are not found for the fully self-consistent Born approximation. By understanding the stability properties, we are able to study the linear response regime by calculating the density-density response function by time-propagation. This amounts to a solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a sophisticated kernel. The results indicate that none of the approximations is able to describe the response function during or beyond the bipolaronic crossover for the parameters investigated. Overall, we provide an extensive discussion on when the approximations are valid and how they fail to describe the studied exact properties of the chosen model system.

  2. The nuisance of nuisance regression: spectral misspecification in a common approach to resting-state fMRI preprocessing reintroduces noise and obscures functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hallquist, Michael N; Hwang, Kai; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-11-15

    Recent resting-state functional connectivity fMRI (RS-fcMRI) research has demonstrated that head motion during fMRI acquisition systematically influences connectivity estimates despite bandpass filtering and nuisance regression, which are intended to reduce such nuisance variability. We provide evidence that the effects of head motion and other nuisance signals are poorly controlled when the fMRI time series are bandpass-filtered but the regressors are unfiltered, resulting in the inadvertent reintroduction of nuisance-related variation into frequencies previously suppressed by the bandpass filter, as well as suboptimal correction for noise signals in the frequencies of interest. This is important because many RS-fcMRI studies, including some focusing on motion-related artifacts, have applied this approach. In two cohorts of individuals (n=117 and 22) who completed resting-state fMRI scans, we found that the bandpass-regress approach consistently overestimated functional connectivity across the brain, typically on the order of r=.10-.35, relative to a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression approach. Inflated correlations under the bandpass-regress approach were associated with head motion and cardiac artifacts. Furthermore, distance-related differences in the association of head motion and connectivity estimates were much weaker for the simultaneous filtering approach. We recommend that future RS-fcMRI studies ensure that the frequencies of nuisance regressors and fMRI data match prior to nuisance regression, and we advocate a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression strategy that better controls nuisance-related variability.

  3. The Nuisance of Nuisance Regression: Spectral Misspecification in a Common Approach to Resting-State fMRI Preprocessing Reintroduces Noise and Obscures Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hallquist, Michael N.; Hwang, Kai; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Recent resting-state functional connectivity fMRI (RS-fcMRI) research has demonstrated that head motion during fMRI acquisition systematically influences connectivity estimates despite bandpass filtering and nuisance regression, which are intended to reduce such nuisance variability. We provide evidence that the effects of head motion and other nuisance signals are poorly controlled when the fMRI time series are bandpass-filtered but the regressors are unfiltered, resulting in the inadvertent reintroduction of nuisance-related variation into frequencies previously suppressed by the bandpass filter, as well as suboptimal correction for noise signals in the frequencies of interest. This is important because many RS-fcMRI studies, including some focusing on motion-related artifacts, have applied this approach. In two cohorts of individuals (n = 117 and 22) who completed resting-state fMRI scans, we found that the bandpass-regress approach consistently overestimated functional connectivity across the brain, typically on the order of r = .10 – .35, relative to a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression approach. Inflated correlations under the bandpass-regress approach were associated with head motion and cardiac artifacts. Furthermore, distance-related differences in the association of head motion and connectivity estimates were much weaker for the simultaneous filtering approach. We recommend that future RS-fcMRI studies ensure that the frequencies of nuisance regressors and fMRI data match prior to nuisance regression, and we advocate a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression strategy that better controls nuisance-related variability. PMID:23747457

  4. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  5. Vibrational spectral investigation of four second order nonlinear optical azobenzene-containing materials: a combination of experimental and density functional theoretical (DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchang; Li, Wei; Li, Zhong'an; Zhou, Xiaodong; Li, Zhen; Qin, Jingui; Hu, Jiming

    2011-09-01

    In this work, four-second order nonlinear optical (NLO) azobenzene-containing materials are studied in-depth by using vibrational spectra and density functional theory (DFT). The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and FT-Raman spectra are recorded in the range of 50-4000 and 100-3600cm(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, the DFT computations are performed at B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level to derive equilibrium geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and intensities, and first hyperpolarizability, and the scaled theoretical wavenumbers are also shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The calculated results show that these four azobenzene-containing compounds are good materials and the compound with nitro substituent groups possesses a larger first molecular hyperpolarizability (β) value. Moreover, the simultaneous infrared and Raman activation of R1 group and CC stretching suggest that the charge transfer interaction might occur between the R1 group and phenyl ring, and the HOMO-LUMO gap analysis also supports this viewpoint. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    DOE PAGES

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    Tmore » his review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions.he addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway.o ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [ H + ] concentration with that of the cell compartments.his review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature ( 37 ° C ) versus room temperature ( 25 ° C ) , (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H + ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na + / H + exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH.he versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design.« less

  7. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    This review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions. The addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway. To ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [H+] concentration with that of the cell compartments. This review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature (37°C) versus room temperature (25°C), (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H+ ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH. The versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design. PMID:22778738

  8. Altered resting state brain dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy can be observed in spectral power, functional connectivity and graph theory metrics.

    PubMed

    Quraan, Maher A; McCormick, Cornelia; Cohn, Melanie; Valiante, Taufik A; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of EEG epilepsy data that accumulated for over half a century, our ability to understand brain dynamics associated with epilepsy remains limited. Using EEG data from 15 controls and 9 left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) patients, in this study we characterize how the dynamics of the healthy brain differ from the "dynamically balanced" state of the brain of epilepsy patients treated with anti-epileptic drugs in the context of resting state. We show that such differences can be observed in band power, synchronization and network measures, as well as deviations from the small world network (SWN) architecture of the healthy brain. The θ (4-7 Hz) and high α (10-13 Hz) bands showed the biggest deviations from healthy controls across various measures. In particular, patients demonstrated significantly higher power and synchronization than controls in the θ band, but lower synchronization and power in the high α band. Furthermore, differences between controls and patients in graph theory metrics revealed deviations from a SWN architecture. In the θ band epilepsy patients showed deviations toward an orderly network, while in the high α band they deviated toward a random network. These findings show that, despite the focal nature of LTLE, the epileptic brain differs in its global network characteristics from the healthy brain. To our knowledge, this is the only study to encompass power, connectivity and graph theory metrics to investigate the reorganization of resting state functional networks in LTLE patients.

  9. Altered Resting State Brain Dynamics in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Can Be Observed in Spectral Power, Functional Connectivity and Graph Theory Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Quraan, Maher A.; McCormick, Cornelia; Cohn, Melanie; Valiante, Taufik A.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of EEG epilepsy data that accumulated for over half a century, our ability to understand brain dynamics associated with epilepsy remains limited. Using EEG data from 15 controls and 9 left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) patients, in this study we characterize how the dynamics of the healthy brain differ from the “dynamically balanced” state of the brain of epilepsy patients treated with anti-epileptic drugs in the context of resting state. We show that such differences can be observed in band power, synchronization and network measures, as well as deviations from the small world network (SWN) architecture of the healthy brain. The θ (4–7 Hz) and high α (10–13 Hz) bands showed the biggest deviations from healthy controls across various measures. In particular, patients demonstrated significantly higher power and synchronization than controls in the θ band, but lower synchronization and power in the high α band. Furthermore, differences between controls and patients in graph theory metrics revealed deviations from a SWN architecture. In the θ band epilepsy patients showed deviations toward an orderly network, while in the high α band they deviated toward a random network. These findings show that, despite the focal nature of LTLE, the epileptic brain differs in its global network characteristics from the healthy brain. To our knowledge, this is the only study to encompass power, connectivity and graph theory metrics to investigate the reorganization of resting state functional networks in LTLE patients. PMID:23922658

  10. ADE spectral networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro; Park, Chan Y.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new perspective and a generalization of spectral networks for 4d {N} = 2 theories of class S associated to Lie algebras {g} = A n , D n , E6, and E7. Spectral networks directly compute the BPS spectra of 2d theories on surface defects coupled to the 4d theories. A Lie algebraic interpretation of these spectra emerges naturally from our construction, leading to a new description of 2d-4d wall-crossing phenomena. Our construction also provides an efficient framework for the study of BPS spectra of the 4d theories. In addition, we consider novel types of surface defects associated with minuscule ccrepresentations of {g}.

  11. Chromatic confocal spectral interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Papastathopoulos, Evangelos; Koerner, Klaus; Osten, Wolfgang

    2006-11-10

    Chromatic confocal spectral interferomertry (CCSI) is a novel scheme for topography measurements that combines the techniques of spectral interferometry and chromatic confocal microscopy. This hybrid method allows for white-light interferometric detection with a high NA in a single-shot manner. To the best of our knowledge, CCSI is the first interferometric method that utilizes a confocally filtered and chromatically dispersed focus for detection and simultaneously allows for retrieval of the depth position of reflecting or scattering objects utilizing the phase (modulation frequency) of the interferometric signals acquired. With the chromatically dispersed focus, the depth range of the sensor is decoupled from the NA of the microscope objective.

  12. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF z {approx}> 1 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HOSTS IN GOODS: CONSTRAINTS ON EVOLUTIONARY DELAY AND THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M. G.; Chary, R. R.

    2011-04-10

    We identify a sample of 22 host galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.95 < z < 1.8 discovered in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. We measure the photometry of the hosts in Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based imaging of the GOODS fields to provide flux densities from the U band to 24 {mu}m. We fit the broadband photometry of each host with simple stellar population models to estimate the age of the stellar population giving rise to the SN Ia explosions. We break the well-known age-extinction degeneracy in such analyses using the Spitzer 24 {mu}m data to place upper limits on the thermally reprocessed, far-infrared emission from dust. The ages of these stellar populations give us an estimate of the delay times between the first epoch of star formation in the galaxies and the explosion of the SNe Ia. We find a bi-modal distribution of delay times ranging from 0.06 to 4.75 Gyr although at the 95% confidence interval, the delay time distribution is consistent with a single power law as well. We also constrain the first epoch of low-mass star formation using these results, showing that stars of mass {approx}<8 M{sub sun} were formed within 3 Gyr after the big bang and possibly by z {approx} 6. This argues against a truncated stellar initial mass function in high-redshift galaxies.

  13. Exposure time calculation for spectral cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaib, Ahmed; Robles-Kelly, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic exposure time adjustment for multispectral and hyperspectral cameras. The method presented here is based upon a spectral power image. Here, we use the photopic response function due to its widespread usage in photography and psychophysics. Note that, however, the method presented here is quite general in nature and can employ a number of spectral sensitivity functions for the computation of the spectral power image. Making use of this spectral power image, the exposure time is then computed via iterative updates so as to minimize the squared error between a target image and the current spectral power yielded by the imager. This target image is recovered in a straightforward manner using histogram equalization and the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) photopic function. This, in turn, yields an automatic method devoid of calibration targets or additional inputs. We perform a stability and controllability analysis of our method using a state-space representation. We also show the applicability of the method for exposure time calculation on staring array and multicharge coupled device architecture cameras on real-world scenes.

  14. On Summability of Distributions and Spectral Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, R.; Gracia-Bondía, J. M.; Várilly, J. C.

    Modulo the moment asymptotic expansion, the Cesáro and parametric behaviours of distributions at infinity are equivalent. On the strength of this result, we construct the asymptotic analysis for spectral densities arising from elliptic pseudodifferential operators. We show how Cesáro developments lead to efficient calculations of the expansion coefficients of counting number functionals and Green functions. The bosonic action functional proposed by Chamseddine and Connes can more generally be validated as a Cesáro asymptotic development.

  15. Lunar spectral types.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, T. B.; Charette, M. P.; Johnson, T. V.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Adams, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Results of observations of the spectral reflectance properties (0.3 to 1.1 micron) of a number of lunar mare, upland, and bright crater areas with the use of ground-based telescopes. These new data are discussed in view of earlier studies in an attempt to provide a basis for more detailed interpretation. The spectral reflectivity curves (0.3 to 1.1 micron) for all lunar areas studied consist of a positive sloping continuum with a superimposed symmetric absorption band centered at 0.95 micron. Upland, mare, and bright crater materials can be identified by their spectral curves. The curves for upland and mare regions show a range of shapes from fresh, bright craters to progressively darker background material that correlates with the apparent age of the surface features. The observed upland material has uniform spectral properties, but the mare material shows some variety, probably due to Ti(3+) dispersed in lunar-soil glass. Copernicus and Aristarchus appear to have exposed upland material from beneath the mare but Kepler has not. This observation suggests that the mare is no deeper than about 15 km in the Copernicus area and about 6 km deep in the Aristarchus area, but in the Kepler area the mare must be at least about 5 km deep.

  16. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  17. Microwave spectral line listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency, intensity, and identification of 9615 spectral lines belonging to 75 molecules are tabulated in order of increasing frequency. Measurements for all 75 molecules were made in the frequency range from 26500 to 40000 MHz by a computer controlled spectrometer. Measurements were also made in the 18000 to 26500 MHz range for some of the molecules.

  18. Lunar spectral types.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, T. B.; Charette, M. P.; Johnson, T. V.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Adams, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Results of observations of the spectral reflectance properties (0.3 to 1.1 micron) of a number of lunar mare, upland, and bright crater areas with the use of ground-based telescopes. These new data are discussed in view of earlier studies in an attempt to provide a basis for more detailed interpretation. The spectral reflectivity curves (0.3 to 1.1 micron) for all lunar areas studied consist of a positive sloping continuum with a superimposed symmetric absorption band centered at 0.95 micron. Upland, mare, and bright crater materials can be identified by their spectral curves. The curves for upland and mare regions show a range of shapes from fresh, bright craters to progressively darker background material that correlates with the apparent age of the surface features. The observed upland material has uniform spectral properties, but the mare material shows some variety, probably due to Ti(3+) dispersed in lunar-soil glass. Copernicus and Aristarchus appear to have exposed upland material from beneath the mare but Kepler has not. This observation suggests that the mare is no deeper than about 15 km in the Copernicus area and about 6 km deep in the Aristarchus area, but in the Kepler area the mare must be at least about 5 km deep.

  19. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Ondřej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-01

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph Γ is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter α. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of Γ as α → ∞. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph Γ. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where Γ is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  20. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, Ondrej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-15

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph {Gamma} is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter {alpha}. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of {Gamma} as {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph {Gamma}. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where {Gamma} is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  1. Spectral-collocation variational integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiqun; Wu, Boying; Leok, Melvin

    2017-03-01

    Spectral methods are a popular choice for constructing numerical approximations for smooth problems, as they can achieve geometric rates of convergence and have a relatively small memory footprint. In this paper, we introduce a general framework to convert a spectral-collocation method into a shooting-based variational integrator for Hamiltonian systems. We also compare the proposed spectral-collocation variational integrators to spectral-collocation methods and Galerkin spectral variational integrators in terms of their ability to reproduce accurate trajectories in configuration and phase space, their ability to conserve momentum and energy, as well as the relative computational efficiency of these methods when applied to some classical Hamiltonian systems. In particular, we note that spectrally-accurate variational integrators, such as the Galerkin spectral variational integrators and the spectral-collocation variational integrators, combine the computational efficiency of spectral methods together with the geometric structure-preserving and long-time structural stability properties of symplectic integrators.

  2. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  3. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  4. A property of subspaces admitting spectral synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abuzyarova, N F

    1999-04-30

    Let H be the space of holomorphic functions in a convex domain G subset of C. The following result is established: each closed subspace W subset of H that is invariant with respect to the operator of differentiation and admits spectral synthesis can be represented as the solution set of two (possibly coinciding) homogeneous convolution equations.

  5. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    SciTech Connect

    Egger, A. E.

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  6. Ultraviolet Spectral Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally; Lindler, Don

    2009-01-01

    At redshifts, z>l, the rest-frame mid-UV is brought into view of large, ground-based telescopes. Here, we report on a study of the potential of the rest-frame UV spectrum for deriving the age since the last major episode of star formation in a galaxy. We base this investigation on wide-band (0.2-1.0 microns), low-resolution (R-1000) spectra of single stars in Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). We find that a combination of mid-UV spectral indices and colors can indeed yield the age of a stellar population, but only if light from the stellar population is unreddened.

  7. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  8. Comprehensive view of high-spectral-resolution lidar technique from the perspective of spectral discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Yupeng; Zhou, Yudi; Bai, Jian; Liu, Chong; Shen, Yibing

    2016-05-01

    As already known commonly, high-spectral-resolution lidar technique (HSRL) employs a narrowband spectroscopic filter to separate the elastic backscattered aerosol signal from the thermal Doppler broadened molecular backscattered contribution. This paper presents a new and comprehensive view of HSRL technique from the perspective of spectral discrimination, without concretizing the analysis into a specific spectral discrimination filter. Based on a general HSRL layout with three-channel configuration, a theoretical model of retrieval error evaluation is introduced. In this model, we only take the error sources related to the spectral discrimination parameters into account, and ignore other error sources not associated with these focused parameters. This theoretical model is subsequently verified by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Both the model and MC simulations demonstrate that a large molecular transmittance and a large spectral discrimination ratio (SDR, i.e., ratio of the molecular transmittance to the aerosol transmittance) are beneficial to reduce the retrieval error. Moreover, we find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SDR of the lidar system are often tradeoffs, and we suggest considering a suitable SDR for higher molecular transmittance (thus higher SNR) instead of using unnecessarily high SDR when designing the spectral discrimination filter. This view interprets the function of the narrowband spectroscopic filter in HSRL system essentially, and will provide some general guidelines for the reasonable design of the spectral discrimination filter for HSRL community.

  9. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  10. Spectral tailoring device

    DOEpatents

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  11. Spectral methods for discontinuous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, S.; Gottlieb, D.; Tadmor, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral methods yield high-order accuracy even when applied to problems with discontinuities, though not in the sense of pointwise accuracy. Two different procedures are presented which recover pointwise accurate approximations from the spectral calculations.

  12. A review of spectral methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lustman, L.

    1984-01-01

    An outline for spectral methods for partial differential equations is presented. The basic spectral algorithm is defined, collocation are emphasized and the main advantage of the method, the infinite order of accuracy in problems with smooth solutions are discussed. Examples of theoretical numerical analysis of spectral calculations are presented. An application of spectral methods to transonic flow is presented. The full potential transonic equation is among the best understood among nonlinear equations.

  13. (LMRG): Microscope Resolution, Objective Quality, Spectral Accuracy and Spectral Un-mixing

    PubMed Central

    Bayles, Carol J.; Cole, Richard W.; Eason, Brady; Girard, Anne-Marie; Jinadasa, Tushare; Martin, Karen; McNamara, George; Opansky, Cynthia; Schulz, Katherine; Thibault, Marc; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    The second study by the LMRG focuses on measuring confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) resolution, objective lens quality, spectral imaging accuracy and spectral un-mixing. Affordable test samples for each aspect of the study were designed, prepared and sent to 116 labs from 23 countries across the globe. Detailed protocols were designed for the three tests and customized for most of the major confocal instruments being used by the study participants. One protocol developed for measuring resolution and objective quality was recently published in Nature Protocols (Cole, R. W., T. Jinadasa, et al. (2011). Nature Protocols 6(12): 1929–1941). The first study involved 3D imaging of sub-resolution fluorescent microspheres to determine the microscope point spread function. Results of the resolution studies as well as point spread function quality (i.e. objective lens quality) from 140 different objective lenses will be presented. The second study of spectral accuracy looked at the reflection of the laser excitation lines into the spectral detection in order to determine the accuracy of these systems to report back the accurate laser emission wavelengths. Results will be presented from 42 different spectral confocal systems. Finally, samples with double orange beads (orange core and orange coating) were imaged spectrally and the imaging software was used to un-mix fluorescence signals from the two orange dyes. Results from 26 different confocal systems will be summarized. Time will be left to discuss possibilities for the next LMRG study.

  14. Chiral solitons in the spectral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, Enrique Ruiz; Broniowski, Wojciech; Golli, Bojan

    2007-07-01

    Chiral solitons with baryon number one are investigated in the spectral quark model. In this model the quark propagator is a superposition of complex-mass propagators weighted with a suitable spectral function. This technique is a method of regularizing the effective quark theory in a way preserving many desired features crucial in analysis of solitons. We review the model in the vacuum sector, stressing the feature of the absence of poles in the quark propagator. We also investigate in detail the analytic structure of meson two-point functions. We provide an appropriate prescription for constructing valence states in the spectral approach. The valence state in the baryonic soliton is identified with a saddle point of the Dirac eigenvalue treated as a function of the spectral mass. Because of this feature the valence quarks never become unbound nor dive into the negative spectrum, hence providing stable solitons as absolute minima of the action. This is a manifestation of the absence of poles in the quark propagator. Self-consistent mean-field hedgehog solutions are found numerically and some of their properties are determined and compared to previous chiral soliton models. Our analysis constitutes an involved example of a treatment of a relativistic complex-mass system.

  15. Spectral representation theory of graded composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Kwok, C. M.; Yu, K. W.

    2008-03-01

    In graded composite materials, the physical properties can vary continuously in space and it may give different physical phenomena when compared with homogeneous materials. The Bergman-Milton spectral representation is a rigorous mathematical formalism to express the effective dielectric constant of nongraded composite materials [1]. In this study, we consider a material (rather than microsture [2]) graded composites, and generalize the Bergman-Milton spectral representation to extract the spectral density function for the effective dielectric constant of this graded composite material in the frequency domain [3]. Analytic and numerical solution will be presented for graded films and graded spheres. [1] D. J. Bergman, Phys. Rev. B 14, 4304 (1976). [2] J. P. Huang, K. W. Yu, G. Q. Gu, M. Karttunen, Phys. Rev. E 67, 051405 (2003). [3] L. Gao, J. P. Huang, K.W. Yu, Eur. Phys. J. B 36, 475 (2003).

  16. Spectrally multiplexed chromatic confocal multipoint sensing.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Lorenz, Lucia; Kleindienst, Roman; Grewe, Adrian; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2013-11-15

    We present a concept for chromatic confocal distance sensing that employs two levels of spectral multiplexing for the parallelized evaluation of multiple lateral measurement points; at the first level, the chromatic confocal principle is used to encode distance information within the spectral distribution of the sensor signal. For lateral multiplexing, the total spectral bandwidth of the sensor is split into bands. Each band is assigned to a different lateral measurement point by a segmented diffractive element. Based on this concept, we experimentally demonstrate a chromatic confocal three-point sensor that is suitable for harsh production environments, since it works with a single-point spectrometer and does not require scanning functionality. The experimental system has a working distance of more than 50 mm, a measurement range of 9 mm, and an axial resolution of 50 μm.

  17. [A Terahertz Spectral Database Based on Browser/Server Technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong; Song, Yue

    2015-09-01

    With the solution of key scientific and technical problems and development of instrumentation, the application of terahertz technology in various fields has been paid more and more attention. Owing to the unique characteristic advantages, terahertz technology has been showing a broad future in the fields of fast, non-damaging detections, as well as many other fields. Terahertz technology combined with other complementary methods can be used to cope with many difficult practical problems which could not be solved before. One of the critical points for further development of practical terahertz detection methods depends on a good and reliable terahertz spectral database. We developed a BS (browser/server) -based terahertz spectral database recently. We designed the main structure and main functions to fulfill practical requirements. The terahertz spectral database now includes more than 240 items, and the spectral information was collected based on three sources: (1) collection and citation from some other abroad terahertz spectral databases; (2) collected from published literatures; and (3) spectral data measured in our laboratory. The present paper introduced the basic structure and fundament functions of the terahertz spectral database developed in our laboratory. One of the key functions of this THz database is calculation of optical parameters. Some optical parameters including absorption coefficient, refractive index, etc. can be calculated based on the input THz time domain spectra. The other main functions and searching methods of the browser/server-based terahertz spectral database have been discussed. The database search system can provide users convenient functions including user registration, inquiry, displaying spectral figures and molecular structures, spectral matching, etc. The THz database system provides an on-line searching function for registered users. Registered users can compare the input THz spectrum with the spectra of database, according to

  18. Spectral zone selection methodology for pebble bed reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ramatsemela Mphahlele; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kostadin N. Ivanov; Hans D. Gougar

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is developed for determining boundaries of spectral zones for pebble bed reactors. A spectral zone is defined as a region made up of a number of nodes whose characteristics are collectively similar and that are assigned the same few-group diffusion constants. The spectral zones are selected in such a manner that the difference (error) between the reference transport solution and the diffusion code solution takes a minimum value. This is achieved by choosing spectral zones through optimally minimizing this error. The objective function for the optimization algorithm is the total reaction rate error, which is defined as the sum of the leakage, absorption and fission reaction rates errors in each zone. The selection of these spectral zones is such that the core calculation results based on diffusion theory are within an acceptable tolerance as compared to a proper transport reference solution. Through this work, a consistent approach for identifying spectral zones that yield more accurate diffusion results is introduced.

  19. Signature evaluation of natural targets using high spectral resolution techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chiu, H.-Y.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of 'spectral signature' identification has been applied to LANDSAT and other broad-band multi-spectral scanner data to classify various materials on the earth's surface. A large amount of the spectral information available is invisible, however, to the broad-band sensors. Although the natural targets of interest in remote sensing do not exhibit fine line features such as those associated with gaseous media, there is significant information to be extracted from smoothly varying spectral reflection functions of most natural targets. Subtle variations observed recently in the high resolution 'spectral signatures' of vegetation targets, in particular, promise to open new avenues of application using higher spectral and radiometric resolution techniques. This research was accomplished using a 500-band spectroradiometer system specially adapted to rapid airborne operations

  20. Nonlinear spectral correlation for fatigue crack detection under noisy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon; Jeon, Ikgeun

    2017-07-01

    When ultrasonic waves at two distinct frequencies are applied to a structure with a fatigue crack, crack-induced nonlinearity creates nonlinear ultrasonic modulations at the sum and difference of the two input frequencies. The amplitude of the nonlinear modulation components is typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the primary linear components. Therefore, the modulation components can be easily buried under noise levels and it becomes difficult to extract the nonlinear modulation components under noisy environments using a conventional spectral density function. In this study, nonlinear spectral correlation, which calculates the spectral correlation between nonlinear modulation components, is proposed to isolate the nonlinear modulation components from noisy environments and used for fatigue crack detection. The proposed nonlinear spectral correlation offers the following benefits: (1) Stationary noises have little effect on nonlinear spectral correlation; (2) By using a wideband high-frequency input and a single low-frequency input, the contrast of nonlinear spectral correlation between damage and intact conditions can be enhanced; and (3) The test efficiency can be also improved via reducing the data collection time. Validation tests are performed on aluminum plates and scaled steel shafts with real fatigue cracks. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed nonlinear spectral correlation owns a higher sensitivity to fatigue crack than the classical nonlinear coefficient estimated from the spectral density function, and the usage of nonlinear spectral correlation allows the detection of fatigue crack even using noncontact air-coupled transducers with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Silverman, John; McDowell, Jonathan; Callanan, Paul; Snowden, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is 'wobbled', possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC (an x ray spectral fitting package) response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how, the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  2. Spectral Filter Array for Multispectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chuan

    Conventional multispectral imaging (MSI) is achieved by utilizing a spectral filter array -- a set of predetermined narrowband spectral filters spatially multiplexed over an array of pixel sensors, which necessitates different filters to be designed for each application. In this dissertation, we propose a fundamentally different approach to multispectral imaging known as the Fourier Multispectral Imaging (Fourier MSI). The proposed method utilizes broadband multichroic filters with sinusoidally varying transmittance as a function of wavenumber. Unlike narrowband measurements, these sinusoidal filter measurements largely avoid aliasing that contaminates the spectra while undersampling with narrowband filters. Because of this, Fourier MSI provides a better recovery from discrete filter measurements and preserves the spectra features over the entire detecting wavelength range. We designed and fabricated these sinusoidal filters in both bulk and pixel formats, built up multispectral imaging system with the manufactured filters and made spectral imaging measurements with numerous targets like multispectral LED array, color checker, etc. The measurements show that spectral features such as reflection and absorption peaks are well preserved with this technique. Compared to multispectral systems based on narrowband filters, the Fourier MSI system generalizes well to applications where we lack a priori knowledge of the expected spectral content, which makes it a versatile technique for a wide range of multispectral imaging applications.

  3. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

    2015-01-01

    The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

  4. Effect of input spectrum on the spectral switch characteristics in a white-light Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Brundavanam, Maruthi M; Viswanathan, Nirmal K; Rao, D Narayana

    2009-12-01

    We report here a detailed experimental study to demonstrate the effect of source spectral characteristics such as spectral bandwidth (Deltalambda), peak wavelength (lambda(0)), and shape of the spectrum on the spectral shifts and spectral switches measured due to temporal correlation in a white-light Michelson interferometer operated in the spectral domain. Behavior of the spectral switch characteristics such as the switch position, switch amplitude, and switch symmetry are discussed in detail as a function of optical path difference between the interfering beams. The experimental results are compared with numerical calculations carried out using interference law in the spectral domain with modified source spectral characteristics. On the basis of our results we feel that our study is of critical importance in the selection of source spectral characteristics to further improve the longitudinal resolution or the measurement sensitivity in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and microscopy.

  5. Spectral variability on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Older ground-based observations are reprocessed in order to assess the spectral variability of Ceres surface before the beginning of observations by the Dawn spacecraft. Ceres was observed with NACO on the VLT in 2004 and 2005, producing resolved spectra of the disk under different attitudes. The data cover the range from 0.91-3.80 µm (J, H, K, and L bands), except in the telluric regions. They consist in spectral scans of the dayside, typically with 15 lines of 20 samples, an actual resolution of ~ 100 km, and a spectral resolution R~500 to 1500. A specific calibration scheme has been applied to preprocess the data and to evidence small compositional variations at the surface of Ceres. The major signatures observed are two bands centered at 3.06 and 3.30 µm, which exhibit significant spatial variations at this scale (5 to 10%). These features are best fit by ammoniated minerals (phyllosilicates or feldspars), although the lack of secondary hydration bands seems to rule out phyllosilicates. No significant absorption or variation is observed in J, H and K bands, consistently with [1]. No presence of ices (H2O, C02…) is detected, even at the poles. If Ceres was once rich in ices (e.g., [2]), this suggests a global resurfacing with melting of ices in the subsurface, and alteration under the influence of H2O and perhaps NH3, with reduced production of phyllosilicates. References [1] Carry et al (2012) Icarus 217, 20 [2] McCord, T. B. and C. Sotin (2005) JGR 110, 05009.

  6. Femtosecond spectral holography

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, A.M.; Leaird, D.E.; Reitze, D.H.; Paek, E.G. )

    1992-10-01

    Storage, recall, and processing of shaped femtosecond waveforms are achieved by performing spectral holography within a femtosecond pulse shaping apparatus. Time reversal, as well as correlation and convolution, of femtosecond temporal signals is demonstrated. Applications of this technique to matched filtering, dispersion compensation, encryption and decoding, and femtosecond waveform synthesis are also discussed. The work extends the powerful principles of holographic signal processing, which have been used extensively for pattern recognition and filtering of two-dimensional spatial signals, to the femtosecond time domain. 44 refs.

  7. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  8. Topics in spectral methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    After detailing the construction of spectral approximations to time-dependent mixed initial boundary value problems, a study is conducted of differential equations of the form 'partial derivative of u/partial derivative of t = Lu + f', where for each t, u(t) belongs to a Hilbert space such that u satisfies homogeneous boundary conditions. For the sake of simplicity, it is assumed that L is an unbounded, time-independent linear operator. Attention is given to Fourier methods of both Galerkin and pseudospectral method types, the Galerkin method, the pseudospectral Chebyshev and Legendre methods, the error equation, hyperbolic partial differentiation equations, and time discretization and iterative methods.

  9. Femtosecond spectral holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Andrew M.; Leaird, Daniel E.; Reitze, David H.; Paek, Eung G.

    1992-10-01

    Storage, recall, and processing of shaped femtosecond waveforms are achieved by performing spectral holography within a femtosecond pulse shaping apparatus. Time reversal, as well as correlation and convolution, of femtosecond temporal signals is demonstrated. Applications of this technique to matched filtering, dispersion compensation, encryption and decoding, and femtosecond waveform synthesis are also discussed. The work extends the powerful principles of holographic signal processing, which have been used extensively for pattern recognition and filtering of two-dimensional spatial signals, to the femtosecond time domain.

  10. OSSE spectral analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Brown, K. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Matz, S. M.; Strickman, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the spectra from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) is complicated because of the typically low signal to noise (approx. 0.1 percent) and the large background variability. The OSSE instrument was designed to address these difficulties by periodically offset-pointing the detectors from the source to perform background measurements. These background measurements are used to estimate the background during each of the source observations. The resulting background-subtracted spectra can then be accumulated and fitted for spectral lines and/or continua. Data selection based on various environmental parameters can be performed at various stages during the analysis procedure. In order to achieve the instrument's statistical sensitivity, however, it will be necessary for investigators to develop a detailed understanding of the instrument operation, data collection, and the background spectrum and its variability. A brief description of the major steps in the OSSE spectral analysis process is described, including a discussion of the OSSE background spectrum and examples of several observational strategies.

  11. Spectral diffusion: an algorithm for robust material decomposition of spectral CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2014-10-01

    Clinical successes with dual energy CT, aggressive development of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents promise to establish spectral CT as a powerful functional imaging modality. Common to all of these applications is the need for a material decomposition algorithm which is robust in the presence of noise. Here, we develop such an algorithm which uses spectrally joint, piecewise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased. We call this algorithm spectral diffusion because it integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms (e.g. anisotropic diffusion, total variation, bilateral filtration). Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg mL-1), gold (0.9 mg mL-1), and gadolinium (2.9 mg mL-1) concentrations. We then apply spectral diffusion to the in vivo separation of these three materials in the mouse kidneys, liver, and spleen.

  12. Spectral absorption coefficients of argon and silicon and spectral reflectivity of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to estimate the spectral properties of argon as a function of pressure, temperature, and wave number. The spectral characteristics of the argon buffer gas exert a strong influence on radiative energy transfer in the in-reactor test configuration of the nuclear light bulb engine. An existing computer program was modified and used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficients of argon at total pressures of 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 atm in the temperature interval between 1000 and 30,000 K. At each pressure and temperature, spectral properties were calculated for forty-seven wave numbers in the interval between 1000 and 1,000,000 cm/1. Estimates of the spectral absorption coefficients of silicon were made as part of an evaluation of silicon vapor as a possible buffer-gas seeding agent for the reference nuclear light bulb engine. Existing cross-section data were used to calculate the spectral characteristics of silicon at twenty-four temperatures in the interval between 2000 and 10,000 K.

  13. Spectral diffusion: an algorithm for robust material decomposition of spectral CT data.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2014-11-07

    Clinical successes with dual energy CT, aggressive development of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents promise to establish spectral CT as a powerful functional imaging modality. Common to all of these applications is the need for a material decomposition algorithm which is robust in the presence of noise. Here, we develop such an algorithm which uses spectrally joint, piecewise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased. We call this algorithm spectral diffusion because it integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms (e.g. anisotropic diffusion, total variation, bilateral filtration). Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg mL(-1)), gold (0.9 mg mL(-1)), and gadolinium (2.9 mg mL(-1)) concentrations. We then apply spectral diffusion to the in vivo separation of these three materials in the mouse kidneys, liver, and spleen.

  14. Spectral Diffusion: An Algorithm for Robust Material Decomposition of Spectral CT Data

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical successes with dual energy CT, aggressive development of energy discriminating x-ray detectors, and novel, target-specific, nanoparticle contrast agents promise to establish spectral CT as a powerful functional imaging modality. Common to all of these applications is the need for a material decomposition algorithm which is robust in the presence of noise. Here, we develop such an algorithm which uses spectrally joint, piece-wise constant kernel regression and the split Bregman method to iteratively solve for a material decomposition which is gradient sparse, quantitatively accurate, and minimally biased. We call this algorithm spectral diffusion because it integrates structural information from multiple spectral channels and their corresponding material decompositions within the framework of diffusion-like denoising algorithms (e.g. anisotropic diffusion, total variation, bilateral filtration). Using a 3D, digital bar phantom and a material sensitivity matrix calibrated for use with a polychromatic x-ray source, we quantify the limits of detectability (CNR = 5) afforded by spectral diffusion in the triple-energy material decomposition of iodine (3.1 mg/mL), gold (0.9 mg/mL), and gadolinium (2.9 mg/mL) concentrations. We then apply spectral diffusion to the in vivo separation of these three materials in the mouse kidneys, liver, and spleen. PMID:25296173

  15. Spectral Analysis in High Radiation Space Backgrounds with Robust Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasche, G. P.; Coldwell, R. L.; Nobel, L. A.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral analysis software is tested for its ability to fit spectra from space. The approach, which emphasizes the background shape function, is uniquely suited to the identification of weak-strength nuclides in high-radiation background environments.

  16. Spectral Characteristics of Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Turner, Jake D.; Penteado, Paulo; Khamsi, Tymon B.; Soderblom, Jason M.

    2014-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens and ground-based measurements of Titan reveal an eroded surface, with lakes, dunes, and sinuous washes. These features, coupled with measurements of clouds and rain, indicate the transfer of methane between Titan’s surface and atmosphere. The presence of methane-damp lowlands suggests further that the atmospheric methane (which is continually depleted through photolysis) may be supplied by sub-surface reservoirs. The byproducts of methane photolysis condense onto the surface, leaving layers of organic sediments that record Titan’s past atmospheres.Thus knowledge of the source and history of Titan's atmosphere requires measurements of the large scale compositional makeup of Titan's surface, which is shrouded by a thick and hazy atmosphere. Towards this goal, we analyzed roughly 100,000 spectra recorded by Cassini’s Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Our study is confined to the latitude region (20S—20N) surrounding the landing site of the Huygens probe (at 10S, 192W), which supplied only measurement of the vertical profiles of the methane abundance and haze scattering characteristics. VIMS near-IR spectral images indicate subtle latitudinal and temporal variations in the haze characteristics in the tropics. We constrain these small changes with full radiative transfer analyses of each of the thousands of VIMS spectra, which were recorded of different terrains and at different lighting conditions. The resulting models of Titan’s atmosphere as a function of latitude and year indicate the seasonal migration of Titan’s tropical haze and enable the derivation of Titan’s surface albedo at 8 near-IR wavelength regions where Titan’s atmosphere is transparent enough to allow visibility to the surface. The resultant maps of Titan’s surface indicate a number of terrain types with distinct spectral characteristics that are suggestive of atmospheric and surficial processes, including the deposition of organic material, erosion of

  17. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  18. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  19. Spectral disentangling with Spectangular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablowski, Daniel P.; Weber, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The paper introduces the software Spectangular for spectral disentangling via singular value decomposition with global optimisation of the orbital parameters of the stellar system or radial velocities of the individual observations. We will describe the procedure and the different options implemented in our program. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance and the applicability using tests on artificial data. Additionally, we use high-resolution spectra of Capella to demonstrate the performance of our code on real-world data. The novelty of this package is the implemented global optimisation algorithm and the graphical user interface (GUI) for ease of use. We have implemented the code to tackle SB1 and SB2 systems with the option of also dealing with telluric (static) lines. Based in part on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.

  20. Multi Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical imaging system provides automatic co-registration of a plurality of multi spectral images of an object which are generated by a plurality of video cameras or other optical detectors. The imaging system includes a modular assembly of beam splitters, lens tubes, camera lenses and wavelength selective filters which facilitate easy reconfiguration and adjustment of the system for various applications. A primary lens assembly generates a real image of an object to be imaged on a reticle which is positioned at a fixed length from a beam splitter assembly. The beam splitter assembly separates a collimated image beam received from the reticle into multiple image beams, each of which is projected onto a corresponding one of a plurality of video cameras. The lens tubes which connect the beam splitter assembly to the cameras are adjustable in length to provide automatic co-registration of the images generated by each camera.

  1. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  2. Spectral filtering for plant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy E.; Mcmahon, Margaret J.; Rajapakse, Nihal C.; Decoteau, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Both plants and animals have one general commonality in their perception of light. They both are sensitive primarily to the 400 to 700 nm wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This is referred to as the visible spectrum for animals and as the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectrum for plants. Within this portion of the spectrum, animals perceive colors. Relatively recently it has been learned that within this same spectral range plants also demonstrate varying responses at different wavelengths, somewhat analogous to the definition of various colors at specific wavelengths. Although invisible to the human eye, portions of the electromagnetic spectrum on either side of the visible range are relatively inactive photosynthetically but have been found to influence important biological functions. These portions include the ultraviolet (UV approximately equal to 280-400 nm) and the far-red (FR approximately equal to 700-800 nm). The basic photoreceptor of plants for photosynthesis is chlorophyll. It serves to capture radiant energy which combined with carbon dioxide and water produces oxygen and assimulated carbon, used for the synthesis of cell wall polysaccarides, proteins, membrane lipids and other cellular constituents. The energy and carbon building blocks of photosynthesis sustain growth of plants. On the other hand, however, there are other photoreceptors, or pigments, that function as signal transducers to provide information that controls many physiological and morphological responses of how a plant grows. Known photomorphogenic receptors include phytochrome (the red/far-red sensor in the narrow bands of 655-665 nm and 725-735 nm ranges, respectively) and 'cryptochrome' (the hypothetical UV-B sensor in the 280-320 nm range). Since the USDA team of W. L. Butler, S. B. Hendricks, H. A. Borthwick, H. A. Siegleman and K. Norris in Beltsville, MD detected by spectroscopy, extracted and identified phytochrome as a protein in the 1950's, many

  3. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  4. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  5. Spectral distribution of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.; Richmond, J.

    1980-01-01

    Available quantitative data on solar total and spectral irradiance are examined in the context of utilization of solar irradiance for terrestrial applications of solar energy. The extraterrestrial solar total and spectral irradiance values are also reviewed. Computed values of solar spectral irradiance at ground level for different air mass values and various levels of atmospheric pollution or turbidity are presented. Wavelengths are given for computation of solar, absorptance, transmittance and reflectance by the 100 selected-ordinate method and by the 50 selected-ordinate method for air mass 1.5 and 2 solar spectral irradiance for the four levels of atmospheric pollution.

  6. [Soil taxonomy on the basis of reflectance spectral characteristics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan-Jun; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Yuan-Zhi; Song, Kai-Shan; Wang, Zong-Ming; Li, Fang; Hu, Mao-Gui

    2008-03-01

    Soil spectral reflectance is the comprehensive representation of soil physical and chemical parameters, and its study is the physical basis for soil remote sensing and provides a new way and standard for soil properties themselves' research. Soil room spectra significantly correlate with that derived from hyperspectral images. So the room spectra are very important for soil taxonomy and investigation. To seek for the feasibility of soil taxonomy on the basis of topsoil reflectance spectral characteristics, and provide the theory foundation for quick soil taxonomy based on remote sensing methods, the spectral reflectance in the visible and near infrared region (400-2 500 nm) of 248 soil samples (black soil, chernozem, meadow soil, blown soil, alluvial soil) collected from Nongan county, Jilin province was measured with a hyperspectral device in room, and the soil spectral characteristics were determined with continuum removal method, and soil spectral indices (spectral absorption area, depth and asymmetry) were computed, which were introduced into BP network models as external input variables. The models consist of three layers (input, output and hidden layer), the training function is "TRAINLM", learning function "LEARNGDM", and transferring function "TAN SIG". The results showed that: (1) There are some differences among different soils in their spectral characteristics, but with similar parental matrix and climate, the spectral differences of soils in Nongan county are not significant. So it's difficult to analyze soil spectral characteristics based on soil reflectance. (2) The curves after continuum removal strengthened soil spectral absorption characteristics, and simplified soil spectral analysis. The soil spectral curves in Nongan county mainly have five spectral absorption vales at 494, 658, 1 415, 1 913 and 2 206 nm, and the former two vales are caused by soil organic matter, Fe and mechanical composition, the latter three are due to soil moisture; the

  7. Spectral Properties of Unimodular Lattice Triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Benedikt; Schmidt, Ella M.; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Random unimodular lattice triangulations have been recently used as an embedded random graph model, which exhibit a crossover behavior between an ordered, large-world and a disordered, small-world behavior. Using the ergodic Pachner flips that transform such triangulations into another and an energy functional that corresponds to the degree distribution variance, Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations can be applied to study these graphs. Here, we consider the spectra of the adjacency and the Laplacian matrix as well as the algebraic connectivity and the spectral radius. Power law dependencies on the system size can clearly be identified and compared to analytical solutions for periodic ground states. For random triangulations we find a qualitative agreement of the spectral properties with well-known random graph models. In the microcanonical ensemble analytical approximations agree with numerical simulations. In the canonical ensemble a crossover behavior can be found for the algebraic connectivity and the spectral radius, thus combining large-world and small-world behavior in one model. The considered spectral properties can be applied to transport problems on triangulation graphs and the crossover behavior allows a tuning of important transport quantities.

  8. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases-with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is "wobbled", possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT HRI from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  9. Terahertz Josephson spectral analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, A. V.; Gundareva, I. I.; Lyatti, M. V.; Volkov, O. Y.; Pavlovskiy, V. V.; Poppe, U.; Divin, Y. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Principles of Hilbert-transform spectral analysis (HTSA) are presented and advantages of the technique in the terahertz (THz) frequency range are discussed. THz HTSA requires Josephson junctions with high values of characteristic voltages I c R n and dynamics described by a simple resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. To meet these requirements, [001]- and [100]-tilt YBa2Cu3O7‑x bicrystal junctions with deviations from the RSJ model less than 1% have been developed. Demonstrators of Hilbert-transform spectrum analyzers with various cryogenic environments, including integration into Stirling coolers, are described. Spectrum analyzers have been characterized in the spectral range from 50 GHz to 3 THz. Inside a power dynamic range of five orders, an instrumental function of the analyzers has been found to have a Lorentz form around a single frequency of 1.48 THz with a spectral resolution as low as 0.9 GHz. Spectra of THz radiation from optically pumped gas lasers and semiconductor frequency multipliers have been studied with these spectrum analyzers and the regimes of these radiation sources were optimized for a single-frequency operation. Future applications of HTSA will be related with quick and precise spectral characterization of new radiation sources and identification of substances in the THz frequency range.

  10. Multiway spectral community detection in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Newman, M. E. J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most widely used methods for community detection in networks is the maximization of the quality function known as modularity. Of the many maximization techniques that have been used in this context, some of the most conceptually attractive are the spectral methods, which are based on the eigenvectors of the modularity matrix. Spectral algorithms have, however, been limited, by and large, to the division of networks into only two or three communities, with divisions into more than three being achieved by repeated two-way division. Here we present a spectral algorithm that can directly divide a network into any number of communities. The algorithm makes use of a mapping from modularity maximization to a vector partitioning problem, combined with a fast heuristic for vector partitioning. We compare the performance of this spectral algorithm with previous approaches and find it to give superior results, particularly in cases where community sizes are unbalanced. We also give demonstrative applications of the algorithm to two real-world networks and find that it produces results in good agreement with expectations for the networks studied.

  11. Estimation of the Spectral Sensitivity Functions of Un-Modified and Modified Commercial Off-The Digital Cameras to Enable Their Use as a Multispectral Imaging System for Uavs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, E.; Gibson-Poole, S.; MacArthur, A.; Gaulton, R.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-08-01

    Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) digital cameras on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have the potential to be used as multispectral imaging systems; however, their spectral sensitivity is usually unknown and needs to be either measured or estimated. This paper details a step by step methodology for identifying the spectral sensitivity of modified (to be response to near infra-red wavelengths) and un-modified COTS digital cameras, showing the results of its application for three different models of camera. Six digital still cameras, which are being used as imaging systems on-board different UAVs, were selected to have their spectral sensitivities measured by a monochromator. Each camera was exposed to monochromatic light ranging from 370 nm to 1100 nm in 10 nm steps, with images of each step recorded in RAW format. The RAW images were converted linearly into TIFF images using DCRaw, an open-source program, before being batch processed through ImageJ (also open-source), which calculated the mean and standard deviation values from each of the red-green-blue (RGB) channels over a fixed central region within each image. These mean values were then related to the relative spectral radiance from the monochromator and its integrating sphere, in order to obtain the relative spectral response (RSR) for each of the cameras colour channels. It was found that different un-modified camera models present very different RSR in some channels, and one of the modified cameras showed a response that was unexpected. This highlights the need to determine the RSR of a camera before using it for any quantitative studies.

  12. Spectral methods on arbitrary grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David

    1995-01-01

    Stable and spectrally accurate numerical methods are constructed on arbitrary grids for partial differential equations. These new methods are equivalent to conventional spectral methods but do not rely on specific grid distributions. Specifically, we show how to implement Legendre Galerkin, Legendre collocation, and Laguerre Galerkin methodology on arbitrary grids.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF SPECTRAL IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of remote sensing using spectral imaging is just being realized through the investigation to a wide variety of environmental issues. Improved spectral and spatial resolution is very important to the detection of effects once regarded as unobservable. A current researc...

  14. Dependence of the spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio on aerosol spectral distribution and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Dumka, U. C.; Psiloglou, B. E.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the modification of the clear-sky spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio (DDR) as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The solar spectrum under various atmospheric conditions is derived with Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine (SMARTS) radiative transfer code, using the urban and continental aerosol models as inputs. The spectral DDR can be simulated with great accuracy by an exponentially decreasing curve, while the aerosol optical properties strongly affect the scattering processes in the atmosphere, thus modifying the DDR especially in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Furthermore, the correlation between spectral DDR and spectral AOD can be represented precisely by an exponential function and can give valuable information about the dominance of specific aerosol types. The influence of aerosols on spectral DDR increases with increasing SZA, while the simulations using the urban aerosol model as input in SMARTS are closer to the measurements taken in the Athens urban environment. The SMARTS simulations are interrelated with spectral measurements and can be used for indirect estimations of SSA. Overall, the current work provides some theoretical approximations and functions that help in understanding the dependence of DDR on astronomical and atmospheric parameters.

  15. Spectral imagery collection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Joao M.; Rosario, Dalton; Farley, Vincent; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL for the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of adverse weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives at 549 and 1280m from the sensor location. The collected database will allow for: 1) Understand of signature variability under the different weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of hyperspectral and polarimetric technologies; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  16. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  17. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE PAGES

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  18. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  19. A Subspace Approach to Spectral Quantification for MR Spectroscopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yudu; Lam, Fan; Clifford, Bryan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2017-08-18

    To provide a new approach for incorporating both spatial and spectral priors into the solution of the spectral quantification problem for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). A novel signal model is proposed, which represents the spectral distributions of each molecule as a subspace and the entire spectrum as a union-of-subspaces. Based on this model, the spectral quantification can be solved in two steps: a) subspace estimation based on the empirical distributions of the spectral parameters estimated using spectral priors, and b) parameter estimation for the union-of-subspaces model incorporating spatial priors. The proposed method has been evaluated using both simulated and experimental data, producing impressive results. The proposed union-of-subspaces representation of spatiospectral functions provides an effective computational framework for solving the MRSI spectral quantification problem with spatiospectral constraints. The proposed approach transforms how the MRSI spectral quantification problem is solved and enables efficient and effective use of spatiospectral priors to improve parameter estimation. The resulting algorithm is expected to be useful for a wide range of quantitative metabolic imaging studies using MRSI.

  20. Spectral Apparatus with a Cryogenic, High-Throughput, Multipass Gas Cell for Studies of Absorption of Radiation by Gaseous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, N. I.; Mirumyants, S. O.; Parzhin, S. N.; Dodov, I. R.

    2016-11-01

    Spectral systems with an MKhK-6 cryogenic, high-throughput, multipass gas cell for studying the absorption spectra of gaseous media with high spectral resolution in the 0.1-6 μm range at pressures of 100 to 5·106 Pa and temperatures of 180-300 K are discussed. Their use in measurements of spectral absorption coefficients, temperature dependences of the spectral transmission function, and parameters of spectral absorption lines is examined.

  1. Constructing Polynomial Spectral Models for Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Hogg, David W.

    2016-08-01

    Stellar spectra depend on the stellar parameters and on dozens of photospheric elemental abundances. Simultaneous fitting of these { N } ˜ 10-40 model labels to observed spectra has been deemed unfeasible because the number of ab initio spectral model grid calculations scales exponentially with { N }. We suggest instead the construction of a polynomial spectral model (PSM) of order { O } for the model flux at each wavelength. Building this approximation requires a minimum of only ≤ft(≥nfrac{}{}{0em}{}{{ N }+{ O }}{{ O }}\\right) calculations: e.g., a quadratic spectral model ({ O }=2) to fit { N }=20 labels simultaneously can be constructed from as few as 231 ab initio spectral model calculations; in practice, a somewhat larger number (˜300-1000) of randomly chosen models lead to a better performing PSM. Such a PSM can be a good approximation only over a portion of label space, which will vary case-by-case. Yet, taking the APOGEE survey as an example, a single quadratic PSM provides a remarkably good approximation to the exact ab initio spectral models across much of this survey: for random labels within that survey the PSM approximates the flux to within 10-3 and recovers the abundances to within ˜0.02 dex rms of the exact models. This enormous speed-up enables the simultaneous many-label fitting of spectra with computationally expensive ab initio models for stellar spectra, such as non-LTE models. A PSM also enables the simultaneous fitting of observational parameters, such as the spectrum’s continuum or line-spread function.

  2. Spectral sea surface reflectance of skylight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; He, Shuangyan; Shabani, Afshin; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Du, Keping

    2017-02-20

    In examining the dependence of the sea surface reflectance of skylight ρs on sky conditions, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and viewing geometry, Mobley [Appl. Opt.38, 7442 (1999).10.1364/AO.38.007442] assumed ρs is independent of wavelength. Lee et al. [Opt. Express18, 26313 (2010).10.1364/OE.18.026313] showed experimentally that ρs does vary spectrally due to the spectral difference of sky radiance coming from different directions, which was ignored in Mobley's study. We simulated ρs from 350 nm to 1000 nm by explicitly accounting for spectral variations of skylight distribution and Fresnel reflectance. Furthermore, we separated sun glint from sky glint because of significant differences in magnitude, spectrum and polarization state between direct sun light and skylight light. The results confirm that spectral variation of ρs(λ) mainly arises from the spectral distribution of skylight and would vary from slightly blueish due to normal dispersion of the refractive index of water, to neutral and then to reddish with increasing wind speeds and decreasing solar zenith angles. Polarization moderately increases sky glint by 8 - 20% at 400 nm but only by 0 - 10% at 1000 nm. Sun glint is inherently reddish and becomes significant (>10% of sky glint) when the sun is at the zenith with moderate winds or when the sea is roughened (wind speeds > 10 m s-1) with solar zenith angles < 20°. We recommend a two-step procedure by first correcting the glint due to direct sun light, which is unpolarized, followed by removing the glint due to diffused and polarized skylight. The simulated ρs(λ) as a function of wind speeds, sun angles and aerosol concentrations for currently recommended sensor-sun geometry, i.e., zenith angle = 40° and azimuthal angle relative to the sun = 45°, is available upon request.

  3. Atomic Data for Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene

    Collisional excitation and ionization cross sections suitable to highly excited states of the target atom at low and intermediate kinetic energy of the scattering particle have been derived following the semiclassical Impact Parameter approximation. An analytical expression for cross section involving transitions with Δ l > 1 has been obtained when the semiclassical requirement and the Ehrhardt conditions are valid. The analytical cross sections are explicit functions of the initial quantum number of the target atom, the incident velocity of the colliding particle and Δ n (for bound-bound transitions), allowing a generalization to any transition needed in a spectral modeling code. The cross sections obtained with the Impact Parameter approximation present a close agreement with previous theoretical results for dipole and quadrupole (Δ l = 2) cross sections of bound-bound transitions. Results of octupolar (Δ l = 3) cross sections are also given for Δ n = 1 and Δ n = 2 and a wide range of incident energies. The results indicate that the cross sections corresponding to transitions with Δ l > 1 are significant up to incident energies about 100 times the transition energy. The Impact Parameter cross sections for bound-free transitions present a very good agreement with experimental values, in particular at low incident energies.

  4. Spectral Multipliers for Schrodinger Operators: 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-18

    harmonic analysis and PDEs. It is closely related to the study of the associated function spaces and Littlewood -Paley theory. Let H = −∆ + V be a...Secondary: 35J10, 35P25, 35Q40. Key words and phrases. spectral multiplier, Schrödinger operator, Littlewood - Paley theory. The author is supported...to the identity, so that ρ ∈ L1(Rn) is positive and decreasing, then sup t>0 |ρt ∗ f(x)| ≤Mf(x) where M denotes the Hardy- Littlewood maximal function

  5. Incompressible Spectral-Element Method-Derivation of Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    expansion functions. Not all orthogonal expansion functions provide high accuracy; however, the eigenfunctions of a singlar Sturm - Liouville operator allow...orthogonal functions p(x), q(x), w(x) = functions in Sturm - Liouville equation P = p/p + IV-V, dynamic pressure Pn = a system of orthogonal polynomials of...truncated series in approximating functions. 1.2 Sturm - Liouville Problems The importance of Sturm - Liouville problems for spectral methods lies in the fact

  6. Spectral quantification of Southern Baltic seabed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefler, K.; Tegowski, J.; Nowak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The work presents the fast and efficient tool for seafloor classification, where scales and shapes of geomorphological forms were taken into account. The precise bathymetry and seafloor texture was developed with multibeam echosounder at six different areas of size up to 10 by 20 km. This areas demonstrate typical geomorphological seafloor features of bottom relief at the southern Baltic Sea coastal waters. The acoustical measurements were accompanied by geological sampling and video inspection. High resolution mosaic maps were obtained as a result of multi-survey measurements with maximal spatial resolution of 0.05m. Such accuracy of the measurements allows to observe small geomorphologic forms as ripplemarks or pebbles. The most investigated polygons have bottom relief of polygenetic origin with relicts of periglacial forms together with contemporary forms of marine origin. In the studied areas different forms of sand accumulation were found, beginning with small ripplemarks ending at big sandy waves. In the seabed erosion zones the bottom surface is rough and varied with clearly formed embankments, abrasive platforms, inselbergs and stony gravely abrasive pavements on the bottom surface. Such geomorphic diversity of the bottom surface has allowed for development of consistent geomorphological classification system based mainly on spectral properties of seafloor roughness. Each analysed area was divided into squares (200 by 200 m) with an overlap between adjacent subareas of 75% a square size. Next, subdivided areas were spectrally transformed using a two dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT). The spectral parameters as maximal value of spectral density function, spectral exponent and strength, spectral moments, mean frequency, spectral width and skewness for each characteristic type of bottom surface were determined relaying on the calculated 2D spectra. Moreover, other features characterised the corrugated surface as fractal dimension, radius of

  7. CCN Spectral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  8. Applicability of spectral indices on thickness identification of oil slick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yanfei; Shen, Yonglin; Chen, Qihao; Liu, Xiuguo

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing technology has played a vital role in the identification and monitoring of oil spill events, and amount of spectral indices have been developed. In this paper, the applicability of six frequently-used indices is analyzed, and a combination of spectral indices in aids of support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is used to identify the oil slicks and corresponding thickness. The six spectral indices are spectral rotation (SR), spectral absorption depth (HI), band ratio of blue and green (BG), band ratio of BG and shortwave infrared index (BGN), 555nm and 645nm normalized by the blue band index (NB) and spectral slope (ND). The experimental study is conducted in the Gulf of Mexico oil spill zone, with Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) hyperspectral imagery captured in May 17, 2010. The results show that SR index is the best in all six indices, which can effectively distinguish the thickness of the oil slick and identify it from seawater; HI index and ND index can obviously distinguish oil slick thickness; BG, BGN and NB are more suitable to identify oil slick from seawater. With the comparison among different kernel functions of SVM, the classify accuracy show that the polynomial and RBF kernel functions have the best effect on the separation of oil slick thickness and the relatively pure seawater. The applicability of spectral indices of oil slick and the method of oil film thickness identification will in aids of oil/gas exploration and oil spill monitoring.

  9. Status of MODIS spatial and spectral characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Dan; Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-05-01

    Since launch, both Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments have continued to operate and make measurements of the earth's top of atmospheric (TOA) radiances and reflectance. MODIS collects data in 36 spectral bands covering wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.4 μm. These spectral bands and detectors are located on four focal plane assemblies (FPAs). MODIS on-board calibrators (OBC) include a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA), which was designed to characterize and monitor sensor spatial and spectral performance, such as on-orbit changes in the band-to-band registration (BBR), modulation transfer function (MTF), spectral band center wavelengths (CW) and bandwidths (BW). In this paper, we provide a status update of MODIS spatial and spectral characterization and performance, following a brief description of SRCA functions and on-orbit calibration activities. Sensor spatial and spectral performance parameters derived from SRCA measurements are introduced and discussed. Results show that on-orbit spatial performance has been very stable for both Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments. The large BBR shifts in Aqua MODIS, an issue identified pre-launch, have remained the same over its entire mission. On-orbit changes in CW and BW are less than 0.5 nm and 1 nm, respectively, for most VIS/NIR spectral bands of both instruments.

  10. Theory of spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Vahimaa, Pasi; Tervo, Jani

    2005-08-01

    A coherent-mode representation for spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses is derived both in the space-frequency domain and in the space-time domain. It is shown that both the cross-spectral density and the mutual coherence function of partially coherent pulses can be expressed as a sum of spatially and spectrally and temporally completely coherent modes. The concept of the effective degree of coherence for nonstationary fields is introduced. As an application of the theory, the propagation of Gaussian Schell-model pulsed beams in the space-frequency domain is considered and their coherent-mode representation is presented.

  11. Recovering pointwise values of discontinuous data within spectral accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D.; Tadmor, E.

    1985-01-01

    The pointwise values of a function, f(x), can be accurately recovered either from its spectral or pseudospectral approximations, so that the accuracy solely depends on the local smoothness of f in the neighborhood of the point x. Most notably, given the equidistant function grid values, its intermediate point values are recovered within spectral accuracy, despite the possible presence of discontinuities scattered in the domain. (Recall that the usual spectral convergence rate decelerates otherwise to first order, throughout). To this end, a highly oscillatory smoothing kernel is employed in contrast to the more standard positive unit-mass mollifiers. In particular, post-processing of a stable Fourier method applied to hyperbolic equations with discontinuous data, recovers the exact solution modulo a spectrally small error. Numerical examples are presented.

  12. Spectrally-encoded color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a technique for ultraminiature endoscopy that encodes each spatial location on the sample with a different wavelength. One limitation of previous incarnations of SEE is that it inherently creates monochromatic images, since the spectral bandwidth is expended in the spatial encoding process. Here we present a spectrally-encoded imaging system that has color imaging capability. The new imaging system utilizes three distinct red, green, and blue spectral bands that are configured to illuminate the grating at different incident angles. By careful selection of the incident angles, the three spectral bands can be made to overlap on the sample. To demonstrate the method, a bench-top system was built, comprising a 2400-lpmm grating illuminated by three 525-μm-diameter beams with three different spectral bands. Each spectral band had a bandwidth of 75 nm, producing 189 resolvable points. A resolution target, color phantoms, and excised swine small intestine were imaged to validate the system's performance. The color SEE system showed qualitatively and quantitatively similar color imaging performance to that of a conventional digital camera. PMID:19688002

  13. spectral-cube: Read and analyze astrophysical spectral data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Thomas; Ginsburg, Adam; Beaumont, Chris; Leroy, Adam; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Spectral-cube provides an easy way to read, manipulate, analyze, and write data cubes with two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension, optionally with Stokes parameters. It is a versatile data container for building custom analysis routines. It provides a uniform interface to spectral cubes, robust to the wide range of conventions of axis order, spatial projections, and spectral units that exist in the wild, and allows easy extraction of cube sub-regions using physical coordinates. It has the ability to create, combine, and apply masks to datasets and is designed to work with datasets too large to load into memory, and provide basic summary statistic methods like moments and array aggregates.

  14. A nonlinear generalization of spectral Granger causality.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Wei, Hua-Liang; Billings, Stephen A; Sarrigiannis, Ptolemaios G

    2014-06-01

    Spectral measures of linear Granger causality have been widely applied to study the causal connectivity between time series data in neuroscience, biology, and economics. Traditional Granger causality measures are based on linear autoregressive with exogenous (ARX) inputs models of time series data, which cannot truly reveal nonlinear effects in the data especially in the frequency domain. In this study, it is shown that the classical Geweke's spectral causality measure can be explicitly linked with the output spectra of corresponding restricted and unrestricted time-domain models. The latter representation is then generalized to nonlinear bivariate signals and for the first time nonlinear causality analysis in the frequency domain. This is achieved by using the nonlinear ARX (NARX) modeling of signals, and decomposition of the recently defined output frequency response function which is related to the NARX model.

  15. Aviation spectral camera infinity target simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyue; Ming, Xing; Liu, Jiu; Guo, Wenji; Lv, Gunbo

    2014-11-01

    With the development of science and technology, the applications of aviation spectral camera becoming more widely. Developing a test system of dynamic target is more important. Aviation spectral camera infinity target simulation system can be used to test the resolution and the modulation transfer function of camera. The construction and work principle of infinity target simulation system were introduced in detail. Dynamic target generator based digital micromirror device (DMD) and required performance of collimation System were analyzed and reported. The dynamic target generator based on DMD had the advantages of replacing image convenient, size small and flexible. According to the requirement of tested camera, by rotating and moving mirror, has completed a full field infinity dynamic target test plan.

  16. Spectral Classification Using Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuqiang, Chen; Yan, Wu; Yude, Bu; Guodong, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel machine learning algorithm, restricted Boltzmann machine, is introduced. The algorithm is applied for the spectral classification in astronomy. Restricted Boltzmann machine is a bipartite generative graphical model with two separate layers (one visible layer and one hidden layer), which can extract higher level features to represent the original data. Despite generative, restricted Boltzmann machine can be used for classification when modified with a free energy and a soft-max function. Before spectral classification, the original data are binarised according to some rule. Then, we resort to the binary restricted Boltzmann machine to classify cataclysmic variables and non-cataclysmic variables (one half of all the given data for training and the other half for testing). The experiment result shows state-of-the-art accuracy of 100%, which indicates the efficiency of the binary restricted Boltzmann machine algorithm.

  17. Compact Airborne Spectral Sensor (COMPASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simi, Christopher G.; Winter, Edwin M.; Williams, Mary M.; Driscoll, David C.

    2001-08-01

    The COMPACT Airborne Spectral Sensor (COMPASS) design is intended to demonstrate a new design concept for solar reflective hyper spectral systems for the Government. Capitalizing from recent focal plane developments, the COMPASS system utilizes a single FPA to cover the 0.4-2.35micrometers spectral region. This system also utilizes an Offner spectrometer design as well as an electron etched lithography curved grating technology pioneered by NASA/JPL. This paper also discusses the technical trades, which drove the design selection of COMPASS. When completed, the core COMPASS spectrometer design could be used in a large variety of configurations on a variety of aircraft.

  18. Forest Species Identification with High Spectral Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. E., Jr.; Zhu, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Data collected over the Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes Test Site and the Saginaw Forest Test Site (Michigan) with the JPL Airborne Imaging Spectrometer and the Collins' Airborne Spectroradiometer are being used for forest species identification. The linear discriminant function has provided higher identification accuracies than have principal components analyses. Highest identification accuracies are obtained in the 450 to 520 nm spectral region. Spectral bands near 1,300, 1,685 and 2,220 nm appear to be important, also.

  19. Inversion of Spectral Lineshapes to Yield Collision Rate Constants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-15

    Rates for Highly Vibrationally Excited Molecules", J. Chem. Phys. 74, 5031 (1981). 4. E. Wilczek, J. BelBruno and J. Gelfand, " Voigt Profiles of Spectral ... Lines : Accuracy of Line Parameters as a Function of Peak Transmittance", Applied Spectroscopy , in press (1981). 5. J. BelBruno, M. Zughul, J. Gelfand...and H.Rabitz, "Analysis of Collision- Broadened and Overlapping Spectral Lines to Obtain Individual Line Param- eters", J. Mol. Spec., in press (1981

  20. Evolutionary Computing Methods for Spectral Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard; Fink, Wolfgang; Huntsberger, Terrance; Lee, Seugwon; Tisdale, Edwin; VonAllmen, Paul; Tinetti, Geivanna

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for processing spectral images to retrieve information on underlying physical, chemical, and/or biological phenomena is based on evolutionary and related computational methods implemented in software. In a typical case, the solution (the information that one seeks to retrieve) consists of parameters of a mathematical model that represents one or more of the phenomena of interest. The methodology was developed for the initial purpose of retrieving the desired information from spectral image data acquired by remote-sensing instruments aimed at planets (including the Earth). Examples of information desired in such applications include trace gas concentrations, temperature profiles, surface types, day/night fractions, cloud/aerosol fractions, seasons, and viewing angles. The methodology is also potentially useful for retrieving information on chemical and/or biological hazards in terrestrial settings. In this methodology, one utilizes an iterative process that minimizes a fitness function indicative of the degree of dissimilarity between observed and synthetic spectral and angular data. The evolutionary computing methods that lie at the heart of this process yield a population of solutions (sets of the desired parameters) within an accuracy represented by a fitness-function value specified by the user. The evolutionary computing methods (ECM) used in this methodology are Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing, both of which are well-established optimization techniques and have also been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. These are embedded in a conceptual framework, represented in the architecture of the implementing software, that enables automatic retrieval of spectral and angular data and analysis of the retrieved solutions for uniqueness.

  1. Compressive spectroscopy by spectral modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    We review two compressive spectroscopy techniques based on modulation in the spectral domain that we have recently proposed. Both techniques achieve a compression ratio of approximately 10:1, however each with a different sensing mechanism. The first technique uses a liquid crystal cell as a tunable filter to modulate the spectral signal, and the second technique uses a Fabry-Perot etalon as a resonator. We overview the specific properties of each of the techniques.

  2. Radiometric and Spectral Measurement Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-18

    NSWCCR/RDTN-92/0003 AD-A250 771LI~ llliii11l li l l iillt111 RADIOMETRIC AND SPECTRAL MEASUREMENT INSTRUMENTS CRANE DIVISION NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE... INSTRUMENTS 6. AUTHOR(S) B. E. DOUDA H. A. WEBSTER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) a. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NIJMBER...Maxiry-um 200 w ords) THIS IS A DESCRIPTION OF AN ASSORTMENT OF RADIOMETRIC AND SPECTRAL INSTRUMENTATION USED FOR MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIATIVE OUTPUT OF

  3. Impact of computational methods and spectral models on the retrieval of optical properties via spectral optimization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaohui; Li, Yonghong; Shang, Shaoping; Shang, Shaoling

    2013-03-11

    Spectral optimization algorithm (SOA) is a well-accepted scheme for the retrieval of water constituents from the measurement of ocean color radiometry. It defines an error function between the input and output remote sensing reflectance spectrum, with the latter modeled with a few variables that represent the optically active properties, while the variables are solved numerically by minimizing the error function. In this paper, with data from numerical simulations and field measurements as input, we evaluate four computational methods for minimization (optimization) for their efficiency and accuracy on solutions, and illustrate impact of bio-optical models on the retrievals. The four optimization routines are the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM), the Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG), the Downhill Simplex Method (Amoeba), and the Simulated Annealing-Downhill Simplex (i.e. SA + Amoeba, hereafter abbreviated as SAA). The Garver-Siegel-Maritorena SOA model is used as a base to test these computational methods. It is observed that 1) LM is the fastest method, but SAA has the largest number of valid retrievals; 2) the quality of final solutions are strongly influenced by the forms of spectral models (or eigen functions); and 3) dynamically-varying eigen functions are necessary to obtain smaller errors for both reflectance spectrum and retrievals. Results of this study provide helpful guidance for the selection of a computational method and spectral models if an SOA scheme is to be used to process ocean color images.

  4. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  5. Spectral imaging: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Garini, Yuval; Young, Ian T; McNamara, George

    2006-08-01

    Spectral imaging extends the capabilities of biological and clinical studies to simultaneously study multiple features such as organelles and proteins qualitatively and quantitatively. Spectral imaging combines two well-known scientific methodologies, namely spectroscopy and imaging, to provide a new advantageous tool. The need to measure the spectrum at each point of the image requires combining dispersive optics with the more common imaging equipment, and introduces constrains as well. The principles of spectral imaging and a few representative applications are described. Spectral imaging analysis is necessary because the complex data structure cannot be analyzed visually. A few of the algorithms are discussed with emphasis on the usage for different experimental modes (fluorescence and bright field). Finally, spectral imaging, like any method, should be evaluated in light of its advantages to specific applications, a selection of which is described. Spectral imaging is a relatively new technique and its full potential is yet to be exploited. Nevertheless, several applications have already shown its potential. (c) 2006 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  6. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  7. Spectral densities and nuclear spin relaxation in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.

    1988-12-01

    We investigate the properties of ten spectral densities relevant for nuclear spin relaxation studies in solids. This is preceded by a brief review of nuclear spin relaxation in solids which includes a discussion of the appropriate spin-dependent interactions and the various relaxation rates which can be measured. Also, the link between nuclear spin relaxation and dielectric relaxation is discussed. Where possible and/or appropriate each of the spectral densities is expressed as a continuous distribution of Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound (or Debye) spectral densities 2ξ /(1 + ξ 2 ω 2) for nuclear Larmor angular frequency ω and correlation time ξ. The spectral densities are named after their originators or the shape of the distributions of correlation times or both and are (1) Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound or δ-function, (2) Havriliak-Negami, (3) Cole-Cole, (4) Davidson-Cole, (5) Fang, (6) Fuoss-Kirkwood, (7) Bryn Mawr, (8) Wagner or log-Gaussian, (9) log-Lorentzian, and (10) Fröhlich or energy box. The Havriliak-Negami spectral density is related to the Dissado-Hill theory for dielectric relaxation. The spectral densities are expressed in a way which makes them easy to compare with each other and with experimental data. Many plots of the distributions of correlation times and of the spectral densities vs. various correlation times characterizing the distributions are given.

  8. Spectral properties of light in quantum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöll, L.; Vogel, W.; Welsch, D.-G.

    1990-07-01

    The problem of spectral filtering of quantized light fields is studied, based on the recently developed quantum-optical theory of the action of passive, lossless optical systems [L. Knöll, W. Vogel, and D.-G. Welsch, Phys. Rev. A 36, 3803 (1987)]. Expressions for the operator of the electric field strength of the light and the normally and time-ordered field-correlation functions are derived for the case of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer being present. Various kinds of field decomposition that are usually considered in classical optics are studied. The results are compared with the Fourier approach to spectral properties of light. It is shown that, dependent on the experimental scheme used, new quantum effects appear, which may prevent the observation of the Fourier structure of the light as predicted from classical optics. Quantitatively this is demonstrated for the example of spectral squeezing in resonance fluorescence, where significant discrepancies between the measured and the full Fourier spectrum are found.

  9. Power spectral density of 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.

    2017-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. This correspondence describes the decomposition of the full 3D PSD into the familiar components from the 3D Noise model. The standard 3D noise method assumes spectrally (spatio-temporal) white random processes, which is demonstrated to be atypically in the case with complex modern imaging sensors. Using the spectral shape allows for more appropriate analysis of the impact of the noise of the sensor. The processing routines developed for this work consider finite memory constraints and utilize Welch's method for unbiased PSD estimation. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  10. Spectral Lags Obtained by CCF of Smoothed Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaosheng; Chen, Li; Wang, Dehua

    2012-04-01

    We present a new technique to calculate the spectral lags of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Unlike previous processing methods, we first smooth the light curves of gamma-ray bursts in high- and low-energy bands using the "Loess" filter, then we directly define the spectral lags as such to maximize the cross-correlation function (CCF) between two smoothed light curves. This method is suitable for various shapes of CCF; it effectively avoids the errors caused by manual selections for the fitting function and fitting interval. Using the method, we have carefully measured the spectral lags of individual pulses contained in Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts with known redshifts and confirmed the anticorrelation between the spectral lag and the isotropic luminosity. The distribution of spectral lags can be well fitted by four Gaussian components, with the centroids at 0.03 s, 0.09 s, 0.15 s, and 0.21 s, respectively. We find that some spectral lags of the multipeak GRBs seem to evolve with time.

  11. Spectral Lags Obtained by CCF of Smoothed Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaosheng; Chen, Li; Wang, Dehua

    2012-04-01

    We present a new technique to calculate the spectral lags of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Unlike previous processing methods, we first smooth the light curves of gamma-ray bursts in high- and low-energy bands using the “Loess” filter, then we directly define the spectral lags as such to maximize the cross-correlation function (CCF) between two smoothed light curves. This method is suitable for various shapes of CCF; it effectively avoids the errors caused by manual selections for the fitting function and fitting interval. Using the method, we have carefully measured the spectral lags of individual pulses contained in Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts with known redshifts and confirmed the anticorrelation between the spectral lag and the isotropic luminosity. The distribution of spectral lags can be well fitted by four Gaussian components, with the centroids at 0.03 s, 0.09 s, 0.15 s, and 0.21 s, respectively. We find that some spectral lags of the multipeak GRBs seem to evolve with time.

  12. Spectral action models of gravity on packed swiss cheese cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Adam; Marcolli, Matilde

    2016-06-01

    We present a model of (modified) gravity on spacetimes with fractal structure based on packing of spheres, which are (Euclidean) variants of the packed swiss cheese cosmology models. As the action functional for gravity we consider the spectral action of noncommutative geometry, and we compute its expansion on a space obtained as an Apollonian packing of three-dimensional spheres inside a four-dimensional ball. Using information from the zeta function of the Dirac operator of the spectral triple, we compute the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the spectral action. They consist of a zeta regularization of the divergent sum of the leading terms of the spectral actions of the individual spheres in the packing. This accounts for the contribution of points 1 and 3 in the dimension spectrum (as in the case of a 3-sphere). There is an additional term coming from the residue at the additional point in the real dimension spectrum that corresponds to the packing constant, as well as a series of fluctuations coming from log-periodic oscillations, created by the points of the dimension spectrum that are off the real line. These terms detect the fractality of the residue set of the sphere packing. We show that the presence of fractality influences the shape of the slow-roll potential for inflation, obtained from the spectral action. We also discuss the effect of truncating the fractal structure at a certain scale related to the energy scale in the spectral action.

  13. [The study on spectral reflectance reconstruction based on wideband multi-spectral acquisition system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Wan, Xiao-Xia; Huang, Xin-Guo; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chan

    2013-04-01

    The multispectral image acquisition oriented to reproduction requests that the data is device independent and scenes independent, and can realize the characterization of the original color information. Aiming at disturbance, noise error of system, and the requirement for training samples' typical representative and correlation, the authors proposed orthogonal regression spectral algorithm and training samples selection algorithm based on subspace tracking, through the mapping function between the spectral space and color space, by selecting the best samples in typical representative and correlation samples between target samples and selected samples. The modified Sinar 75H trichromatic digital camera combined with bandpass filter glasses were used for experiment, the data show that our method has higher spectral and chromaticity accuracy, the training samples selected by subspace tracking method are uniformly distributed in the sample space, and have good orthogonality. The statistics experimental results indicate that the performance of the proposed method is obviously better than that of previous method, in both color difference error and spectral reflectance error.

  14. Fractional spectral and pseudo-spectral methods in unbounded domains: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian-Arab, Hassan; Dehghan, Mehdi; Eslahchi, M. R.

    2017-06-01

    This paper is intended to provide exponentially accurate Galerkin, Petrov-Galerkin and pseudo-spectral methods for fractional differential equations on a semi-infinite interval. We start our discussion by introducing two new non-classical Lagrange basis functions: NLBFs-1 and NLBFs-2 which are based on the two new families of the associated Laguerre polynomials: GALFs-1 and GALFs-2 obtained recently by the authors in [28]. With respect to the NLBFs-1 and NLBFs-2, two new non-classical interpolants based on the associated- Laguerre-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss-Radau points are introduced and then fractional (pseudo-spectral) differentiation (and integration) matrices are derived. Convergence and stability of the new interpolants are proved in detail. Several numerical examples are considered to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the basis functions to approximate fractional derivatives (and integrals) of some functions. Moreover, the pseudo-spectral, Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin methods are successfully applied to solve some physical ordinary differential equations of either fractional orders or integer ones. Some useful comments from the numerical point of view on Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin methods are listed at the end.

  15. Spectral Information System for Australian Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, L. A.; Ong, C.; Hueni, A.; Suarez, L.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.

    2013-12-01

    Inherently field spectroscopy involves the study of the interrelationships between the spectral characteristics of objects and their biophysical attributes in the field environment (Bauer et al., 1986; Milton, 1987). Spectroscopy measurements taken of vegetated surfaces provide spectral characteristics indicative of the status, composition and structure of the components measured. However, additional elements are present that add undesired effects to the overall signal such as the soil background or the viewing and illumination geometry (Suarez etal 2013). Further, the leaf spectrum is affected by several factors including leaf age, phenology, a highly variable range of stressors, any of which may be the actual focus of study, and additionally influenced by a range of environmental conditions. There is a critical need to use acquired spectra to infer vegetation function, understand phenological cycles, characterise biodiversity or as part of the process to assess biogeochemical processes. However the collection of leaf spectra during field campaigns is undertaken on a project basis, where a large number of spectra tend to be collected, yet the value and ability to share and confidently re-use such collections is often restricted. Often this is because the data are stored in disparate silos with little, if any, consistency in formatting and content, and most importantly, lack metadata to aid their discovery and re-use. These datasets have significant potential for vegetation scientists but also benefit the wider earth observation remote sensing and other earth science communities. In Australia this problem has been addressed by the adoption and enhancement of the existing SPECCHIO system (Hueni et al. 2009) as a suitable standard for spectral data exchange. As a spectral database, the system provides storage of spectra and associated metadata, retrieval of spectral data using metadata space queries, information on provenance, all of which facilitate repeatability of

  16. The chain collocation method: A spectrally accurate calculus of forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufat, Dzhelil; Mason, Gemma; Mullen, Patrick; Desbrun, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Preserving in the discrete realm the underlying geometric, topological, and algebraic structures at stake in partial differential equations has proven to be a fruitful guiding principle for numerical methods in a variety of fields such as elasticity, electromagnetism, or fluid mechanics. However, structure-preserving methods have traditionally used spaces of piecewise polynomial basis functions for differential forms. Yet, in many problems where solutions are smoothly varying in space, a spectral numerical treatment is called for. In an effort to provide structure-preserving numerical tools with spectral accuracy on logically rectangular grids over periodic or bounded domains, we present a spectral extension of the discrete exterior calculus (DEC), with resulting computational tools extending well-known collocation-based spectral methods. Its efficient implementation using fast Fourier transforms is provided as well.

  17. Spectral mixing models of S-Type asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Beth E.; Lucey, Paul G.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Fanale, Fraser P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to determine S-Type asteroid mineralogies with the use of Hapke theory spectral mixing modelling. Previous attempts to understand the spectral variations present in this single class of asteroids have concentrated on spectral parameters such as absorption band center wavelengths, band area ratios, and geometric albedos. The procedure taken here is to utilize the Hapke spectral reflectance model to calculate single scatter albedo as a function of wavelength for a suite of candidate end-member materials. These materials are then mixed linearly in single scatter albedo space, and the mixture is converted, assuming intimate particle mixing, back to reflectance for the spectrum matching routine. A total of 39 S-Type asteroids selected from the Bell et al. survey have been matched with mixture model spectra.

  18. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  19. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  20. Effects of photometric geometry on spectral reflectance measurements. [celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Gradie, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in obtaining valuable results needed for the full interpretation of the spectral reflectance curves of solar system objects. The degree to which photometric geometry affects spectral reflectance curves was demonstrated. Various forms of photometric functions were compared and a function adequate for describing the scattering properties of low and moderately reflecting materials was developed and applied in a study of the phase coefficients of various materials, as well as in a study of how the shape of a body affects the spectral reflectance properties. The adequacy of the photometric function for Mars-like analogs was studied. The goniometer system is being converted to a computer driven mode. As soon as computer controls are integrated in the goniometer, the phase dependence 0.95 micron feature in meteorite spectra is scheduled to begin.