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Sample records for spectroscopic methods examples

  1. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  2. Mass spectroscopic apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.; Stanton, Alan C.

    1991-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a method and apparatus for ionization modulated mass spectrometric analysis. Analog or digital data acquisition and processing can be used. Ions from a time variant source are detected and quantified. The quantified ion output is analyzed using a computer to provide a two-dimensional representation of at least one component present within an analyte.

  3. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  4. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  5. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  6. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  7. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F.; Reid, Ray D.

    2012-01-01

    This invention relates to non-contact spectroscopic methods and apparatus for performing chemical analysis and the ideal wavelengths and sources needed for this analysis. It employs deep ultraviolet (200- to 300-nm spectral range) electron-beam-pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor lightemitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers. Three achieved goals for this innovation are to reduce the size (under 20 L), reduce the weight [under 100 lb (.45 kg)], and reduce the power consumption (under 100 W). This method can be used in microscope or macroscope to provide measurement of Raman and/or native fluorescence emission spectra either by point-by-point measurement, or by global imaging of emissions within specific ultraviolet spectral bands. In other embodiments, the method can be used in analytical instruments such as capillary electrophoresis, capillary electro-chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, and related instruments for detection and identification of unknown analytes using a combination of native fluorescence and/or Raman spectroscopic methods. This design provides an electron-beampumped semiconductor radiation-producing method, or source, that can emit at a wavelength (or wavelengths) below 300 nm, e.g. in the deep ultraviolet between about 200 and 300 nm, and more preferably less than 260 nm. In some variations, the method is to produce incoherent radiation, while in other implementations it produces laser radiation. In some variations, this object is achieved by using an AlGaN emission medium, while in other implementations a diamond emission medium may be used. This instrument irradiates a sample with deep UV radiation, and then uses an improved filter for separating wavelengths to be detected. This provides a multi-stage analysis of the sample. To avoid the difficulties related to producing deep UV semiconductor sources, a pumping approach has been developed that uses

  8. Selective spectroscopic methods for water analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bikas

    1997-06-24

    This dissertation explores in large part the development of a few types of spectroscopic methods in the analysis of water. Methods for the determination of some of the most important properties of water like pH, metal ion content, and chemical oxygen demand are investigated in detail. This report contains a general introduction to the subject and the conclusions. Four chapters and an appendix have been processed separately. They are: chromogenic and fluorogenic crown ether compounds for the selective extraction and determination of Hg(II); selective determination of cadmium in water using a chromogenic crown ether in a mixed micellar solution; reduction of chloride interference in chemical oxygen demand determination without using mercury salts; structural orientation patterns for a series of anthraquinone sulfonates adsorbed at an aminophenol thiolate monolayer chemisorbed at gold; and the role of chemically modified surfaces in the construction of miniaturized analytical instrumentation.

  9. Outstanding Examples of Innovative Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, David R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The author describes a conference on exploring some educational methods that have proved effective in other fields and at other levels of medical education to see if they have application to continuing medical education. (SSH)

  10. Multivariate analysis methods for spectroscopic blood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael F. G.; Rohani, Arash; Ghazalah, Rashid; Vitkin, I. Alex; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Blood tests are an essential tool in clinical medicine with the ability diagnosis or monitor various diseases and conditions; however, the complexities of these measurements currently restrict them to a laboratory setting. P&P Optica has developed and currently produces patented high performance spectrometers and is developing a spectrometer-based system for rapid reagent-free blood analysis. An important aspect of this analysis is the need to extract the analyte specific information from the measured signal such that the analyte concentrations can be determined. To this end, advanced chemometric methods are currently being investigated and have been tested using simulated spectra. A blood plasma model was used to generate Raman, near infrared, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra with glucose as the target analyte. The potential of combined chemometric techniques, where multiple spectroscopy modalities are used in a single regression model to improve the prediction ability was investigated using unfold partial least squares and multiblock partial least squares. Results show improvement in the predictions of glucose levels using the combined methods and demonstrate potential for multiblock chemometrics in spectroscopic blood analysis.

  11. Advances in spectroscopic methods for quantifying soil carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, James B.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Calderon, Francisco; Hively, W. Dean

    2012-01-01

    The current gold standard for soil carbon (C) determination is elemental C analysis using dry combustion. However, this method requires expensive consumables, is limited by the number of samples that can be processed (~100/d), and is restricted to the determination of total carbon. With increased interest in soil C sequestration, faster methods of analysis are needed, and there is growing interest in methods based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible, near-infrared or mid-infrared spectral ranges. These spectral methods can decrease analytical requirements and speed sample processing, be applied to large landscape areas using remote sensing imagery, and be used to predict multiple analytes simultaneously. However, the methods require localized calibrations to establish the relationship between spectral data and reference analytical data, and also have additional, specific problems. For example, remote sensing is capable of scanning entire watersheds for soil carbon content but is limited to the surface layer of tilled soils and may require difficult and extensive field sampling to obtain proper localized calibration reference values. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the present state of spectroscopic methods for determination of soil carbon.

  12. Apparatus and method for spectroscopic analysis of scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Strobl, Karlheinz; Bigio, Irving J.; Loree, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for spectroscopic analysis of scattering media. Subtle differences in materials have been found to be detectable from plots of intensity as a function of wavelength of collected emitted and scattered light versus wavelength of excitation light.

  13. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    SciTech Connect

    De Bord, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  14. Whispering Gallery Optical Resonator Spectroscopic Probe and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a spectroscopic probe comprising at least one whispering gallery mode optical resonator disposed on a support, the whispering gallery mode optical resonator comprising a continuous outer surface having a cross section comprising a first diameter and a second diameter, wherein the first diameter is greater than the second diameter. A method of measuring a Raman spectrum and an Infra-red spectrum of an analyte using the spectroscopic probe is also disclosed.

  15. Spectroscopic Methods for Label-Free Optical Nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John E.

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the nanoscale organization and structure of macromolecules play a significant role in determining the function and properties of biological systems. To understand the relationships between biological structure and function at nanometer length scales, there is a need for methods which enable imaging of intact nanoscale biological structure. An ideal technique for these applications is sensitive to nanoscale structure below the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopy ( 200 nm), achieves label-free contrast, is non-perturbing to biological samples, is quantitative, is capable of molecular specificity, is high-throughput, and finally is simple, enabling widespread utilization. Existing techniques meet some of these criteria, but all have limitations. For example, super-resolution optical microscopy methods achieve molecular-specific nanoscale resolution well below the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopes, however, they rely on fluorescent labels often at high densities that can be toxic and can often require potentially damaging illumination intensities for imaging. As a result, there remains a need for label-free optical techniques to study the nanoscale structural properties of cells. To address this need, the development of instrumentation and algorithms for Partial Wave Spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy will be described. PWS is a spectroscopic, label-free, nanoscale sensitive microscope which, senses rather than resolves structure below the resolution limit of conventional microscopes ( 200nm). First, PWS has shown utility as a diagnostic screening tool for cancer due to nanoscale structural alterations that occur in cells as part of the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Instrumentation and algorithms developed to enable high-throughput cancer screening applications will be described. Further enhancement of data acquisition and analysis speed will then be described through the development of new

  16. Role of Optical Spectroscopic Methods in Neuro-Oncological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Bahreini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In the surgical treatment of malignant tumors, it is crucial to characterize the tumor as precisely as possible. The determination of the exact tumor location as well as the analysis of its properties is very important in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis as early as possible. In neurosurgical applications, the optical, non-invasive and in situ techniques allow for the label-free analysis of tissue, which is helpful in neuropathology. In the past decades, optical spectroscopic methods have been investigated drastically in the management of cancer. In the optical spectroscopic techniques, tissue interrogate with sources of light which are ranged from the ultraviolet to the infrared wavelength in the spectrum. The information accumulation of light can be in a reflection which is named reflectance spectroscopy; or interactions with tissue at different wavelengths which are called fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. This review paper introduces the optical spectroscopic methods which are used to characterize brain tumors (neuro-oncology). Based on biochemical information obtained from these spectroscopic methods, it is possible to identify tumor from normal brain tissues, to indicate tumor margins, the borders towards normal brain tissue and infiltrating gliomas, to distinguish radiation damage of tissues, to detect particular central nervous system (CNS) structures to identify cell types using particular neurotransmitters, to detect cells or drugs which are optically labeled within therapeutic intermediations and to estimate the viability of tissue and the prediction of apoptosis beginning in vitro and in vivo. The label-free, optical biochemical spectroscopic methods can provide clinically relevant information and need to be further exploited to develop a safe and easy-to-use technology for in situ diagnosis of malignant tumors. PMID:25987969

  17. Plant roots and spectroscopic methods - analyzing species, biomass and vitality.

    PubMed

    Rewald, Boris; Meinen, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand plant functioning, plant community composition, and terrestrial biogeochemistry, it is decisive to study standing root biomass, (fine) root dynamics, and interactions belowground. While most plant taxa can be identified by visual criteria aboveground, roots show less distinctive features. Furthermore, root systems of neighboring plants are rarely spatially segregated; thus, most soil horizons and samples hold roots of more than one species necessitating root sorting according to taxa. In the last decades, various approaches, ranging from anatomical and morphological analyses to differences in chemical composition and DNA sequencing were applied to discern species' identity and biomass belowground. Among those methods, a variety of spectroscopic methods was used to detect differences in the chemical composition of roots. In this review, spectroscopic methods used to study root systems of herbaceous and woody species in excised samples or in situ will be discussed. In detail, techniques will be reviewed according to their usability to discern root taxa, to determine root vitality, and to quantify root biomass non-destructively or in soil cores holding mixtures of plant roots. In addition, spectroscopic methods which may be able to play an increasing role in future studies on root biomass and related traits are highlighted.

  18. Spectroscopic methods for detection of impurities in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strashnikova, Natalia V.; Papiashvili, Nona; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Mark, Shlomo; Shilon, Guy; Khankin, Daniel; Kalisky, Yehoshua; Kalisky, Ofra; Parola, Abraham H.

    2011-11-01

    Optical photoluminescence spectroscopic method for detection of impurities, hazardous materials, pesticides, and pollutants in water resources, both qualitatively and quantitatively, is presented. The method is based on synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of organic aromatic compounds, or poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and is carried out by following simultaneously their excitation and emission spectra. The full excitation emission matrix (EEM) generated in this way provides a 2-D and 3-D fluorescence map of the tested sample and the diagonals through the axes origin provide the synchronous fluorescence spectra at a constant wavelengths differences between the emission and excitation wavelengths, thus enabling multitude components identification. This map contains all the relevant spectroscopic information of the tested sample, and serves as a unique "fingerprint" with a very specific and accurate identification. When compared with pre-determined spectra and calibration curves from a "databank", there is a one-toone correspondence between the image and the specific compound, and it can be identified accurately both qualitatively and quantitatively. This method offers several significant advantages, and it provides a sensitive (ppm detection level), accurate and simple spectroscopic tool to monitor impurities and pollutants in water. The design and performance of the spectrofluorimeter prototype, as well as the software development and analysis of chemical organic compounds and mixtures in water will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy methods for spectroscopic imaging of subsurface interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method for spatially-resolved, spectroscopic investigation of subsurface interface structure has been developed. The method, Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM), is based on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) techniques. BEEM combines STM vacuum tunneling with unique ballistic electron spectroscopy capabilities. BEEM enables, for the first time, direct imaging of subsurface interface electronic properties with nanometer spatial resolution. STM topographic images of surface structure and BEEM images of subsurface properties are obtained simultaneously. BEEM capabilities are demonstrated by investigation of important metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  20. Spectroscopic Methods of Remote Sensing for Vegetation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy (IS), often referred to as hyperspectral remote sensing, is one of the latest innovations in a very long history of spectroscopy. Spectroscopic methods have been used for understanding the composition of the world around us, as well as, the solar system and distant parts of the universe. Continuous sampling of the electromagnetic spectrum in narrow bands is what separates IS from previous forms of remote sensing. Terrestrial imaging spectrometers often have hundreds of channels that cover the wavelength range of reflected solar radiation, including the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) regions. In part due to the large number of channels, a wide variety of methods have been applied to extract information from IS data sets. These can be grouped into several broad classes, including: multi-channel indices, statistical procedures, full spectrum mixing models, and spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic methods carry on the more than 150 year history of laboratory-based spectroscopy applied to material identification and characterization. Spectroscopic methods of IS relate the positions and shapes of spectral features resolved by airborne and spaceborne sensors to the biochemical and physical composition of vegetation in a pixel. The chlorophyll 680nm, water 980nm, water 1200nm, SWIR 1700nm, SWIR 2100nm, and SWIR 2300nm features have been the subject of study. Spectral feature analysis (SFA) involves isolating such an absorption feature using continuum removal (CR) and calculating descriptors of the feature, such as center position, depth, width, area, and asymmetry. SFA has been applied to quantify pigment and non-pigment biochemical concentrations in leaves, plants, and canopies. Spectral feature comparison (SFC) utilizes CR of features in each pixel's spectrum and linear regression with continuum-removed features in reference spectra in a library of known vegetation types to map vegetation species and communities. SFC has

  1. Advances in spectroscopic methods for quantifying soil carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebig, Mark; Franzluebbers, Alan J.; Follett, Ronald F.; Hively, W. Dean; Reeves, James B.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Calderon, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard for soil C determination is combustion. However, this method requires expensive consumables, is limited to the determination of the total carbon and in the number of samples which can be processed (~100/d). With increased interest in soil C sequestration, faster methods are needed. Thus, interest in methods based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible, near-infrared or mid-infrared ranges using either proximal or remote sensing. These methods have the ability to analyze more samples (2 to 3X/d) or huge areas (imagery) and do multiple analytes simultaneously, but require calibrations relating spectral and reference data and have specific problems, i.e., remote sensing is capable of scanning entire watersheds, thus reducing the sampling needed, but is limiting to the surface layer of tilled soils and by difficulty in obtaining proper calibration reference values. The objective of this discussion is the present state of spectroscopic methods for soil C determination.

  2. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  3. Experimental Mathemataics: Examples, Methods andImplications

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-01-31

    Recent years have seen the flowering of ''experimental'' mathematics, namely the utilization of modern computer technology as an active tool in mathematical research. This development is not limited to a handful of researchers, nor to a handful of universities, nor is it limited to one particular field of mathematics. Instead, it involves hundreds of individuals, at many different institutions, who have turned to the remarkable new computational tools now available to assist in their research, whether it be in number theory, algebra, analysis, geometry or even topology. These tools are being used to work out specific examples, generate plots, perform various algebraic and calculus manipulations, test conjectures, and explore routes to formal proof. Using computer tools to test conjectures is by itself a major time saver for mathematicians, as it permits them to quickly rule out false notions.

  4. Mixed Methods Sampling: A Typology with Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teddlie, Charles; Yu, Fen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a discussion of mixed methods (MM) sampling techniques. MM sampling involves combining well-established qualitative and quantitative techniques in creative ways to answer research questions posed by MM research designs. Several issues germane to MM sampling are presented including the differences between probability and…

  5. Structural and biochemical characterization of engineered tissue using FTIR spectroscopic imaging: melanoma progression as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Kong, Rong

    2008-02-01

    Engineered tissue represents a convenient path to providing models for imaging and disease progression. The use of these models or phantoms is becoming increasingly prevalent. While structural characterization of these systems is well-documented, a combination of biochemical and structural knowledge is often helpful. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging is a rapidly emerging technique that combines the molecular selectivity of spectroscopy with the spatial specificity of optical microscopy. Here, we report on the application of FTIR spectroscopic for analysis of a melanoma model in engineered skin. We first characterize the biochemical properties, consistency and spectral changes in different layers of growing skin. Results provide simple indices for monitoring tissue consistency and reproducibility as a function of time. Second, we introduce malignant melanocytes to simulate tumor formation and growth. Both cellular changes associated with tumor formation and growth can be observed. FTIR images indicate holistic chemical changes during the tumor growth, allowing for the development of automated pathology protocols. FTIR imaging being non-destructive, further, samples remain entirely compatible with downstream tissue processing or staining. We specifically examined the correlation of structural changes, molecular content and reproducibility of the model systems. The development of analysis, integrating spectroscopy, imaging and computation will allow for quality control and standardization of both the structural and biochemical properties of tissue phantoms.

  6. Does DFT-SAPT method provide spectroscopic accuracy?

    SciTech Connect

    Shirkov, Leonid; Makarewicz, Jan

    2015-02-14

    Ground state potential energy curves for homonuclear and heteronuclear dimers consisting of noble gas atoms from He to Kr were calculated within the symmetry adapted perturbation theory based on the density functional theory (DFT-SAPT). These potentials together with spectroscopic data derived from them were compared to previous high-precision coupled cluster with singles and doubles including the connected triples theory calculations (or better if available) as well as to experimental data used as the benchmark. The impact of midbond functions on DFT-SAPT results was tested to study the convergence of the interaction energies. It was shown that, for most of the complexes, DFT-SAPT potential calculated at the complete basis set (CBS) limit is lower than the corresponding benchmark potential in the region near its minimum and hence, spectroscopic accuracy cannot be achieved. The influence of the residual term δ(HF) on the interaction energy was also studied. As a result, we have found that this term improves the agreement with the benchmark in the repulsive region for the dimers considered, but leads to even larger overestimation of potential depth D{sub e}. Although the standard hybrid exchange-correlation (xc) functionals with asymptotic correction within the second order DFT-SAPT do not provide the spectroscopic accuracy at the CBS limit, it is possible to adjust empirically basis sets yielding highly accurate results.

  7. Some examples related to the method of Lagrangian descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Herrera, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    We provide families of counter-examples, including Hamiltonian systems, to the method of Lagrangian descriptors developed by Mancho, Wiggins, and their co-workers. A detailed mathematical discussion on why that methodology fails together with some pathological phenomena are given as well.

  8. Denoising spectroscopic data by means of the improved least-squares deconvolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, A.; Van Reeth, T.; Tsymbal, V.; Aerts, C.; Kochukhov, O.; Debosscher, J.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler space missions have led to the discovery of a large number of intriguing, and in some cases unique, objects among which are pulsating stars, stars hosting exoplanets, binaries, etc. Although the space missions have delivered photometric data of unprecedented quality, these data are lacking any spectral information and we are still in need of ground-based spectroscopic and/or multicolour photometric follow-up observations for a solid interpretation. Aims: The faintness of most of the observed stars and the required high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of spectroscopic data both imply the need to use large telescopes, access to which is limited. In this paper, we look for an alternative, and aim for the development of a technique that allows the denoising of the originally low S/N (typically, below 80) spectroscopic data, making observations of faint targets with small telescopes possible and effective. Methods: We present a generalization of the original least-squares deconvolution (LSD) method by implementing a multicomponent average profile and a line strengths correction algorithm. We tested the method on simulated and real spectra of single and binary stars, among which are two intrinsically variable objects. Results: The method was successfully tested on the high-resolution spectra of Vega and a Kepler star, KIC 04749989. Application to the two pulsating stars, 20 Cvn and HD 189631, showed that the technique is also applicable to intrinsically variable stars: the results of frequency analysis and mode identification from the LSD model spectra for both objects are in good agreement with the findings from literature. Depending on the S/N of the original data and spectral characteristics of a star, the gain in S/N in the LSD model spectrum typically ranges from 5 to 15 times. Conclusions: The technique introduced in this paper allows an effective denoising of the originally low S/N spectroscopic data. The high S/N spectra obtained

  9. Methods and apparatus for distributed resource discovery using examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Lawrence David (Inventor); Castelli, Vittorio (Inventor); Chang, Yuan-Chi (Inventor); Hill, Matthew L. (Inventor); Li, Chung-Sheng (Inventor); Smith, John Richard (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Distributed resource discovery is an essential step for information retrieval and/or providing information services. This step is usually used for determining the location of an information or data repository which has relevant information. The most fundamental challenge is the usual lack of semantic interoperability of the requested resource. In accordance with the invention, a method is disclosed where distributed repositories achieve semantic interoperability through the exchange of examples and, optionally, classifiers. The outcome of the inventive method can be used to determine whether common labels are referring to the same semantic meaning.

  10. Spectroscopic Analysis of Wall Conditioning Methods in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Eleanor; Soukhanovskii, Vlad

    2015-11-01

    Plasma confinement and performance in NSTX are reliant upon well-conditioned plasma facing components (PFCs). Past conditioning techniques used in NSTX include hot and cold boronization, lithium pellet injection (LPI), and lithium evaporation. The influx of hydrogen-containing molecules and radicals can be studied through spectroscopic observation of the hydrogen to deuterium (H/D) intensity ratio in the edge plasma. A code to determine H/D ratios has been developed and tested on known light sources before being applied to data from prior NSTX experiments. In general, boronization was found to reduce the H/D ratio, with further H reduction seen from cold boronization when compared to hot boronization. No correlation between LPI and H/D ratio was observed. Lithium evaporation produced a significant H decrease. In the future this analysis will be applied immediately following NSTX-U pulses to provide data on plasma-surface interactions. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOGS PROJECT. I. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC METHODS AND MULTI-YEAR TIMESCALE SPECTROSCOPIC RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R. O.; Briley, M. M.; Lambert, R. A.; Fuller, V. A.; Newsome, I. M.; Seeds, M. F.; Saken, J. M.; Kahvaz, Y.; Corbally, C. J.

    2015-12-15

    This is the first in a series of papers presenting methods and results from the Young Solar Analogs Project, which began in 2007. This project monitors both spectroscopically and photometrically a set of 31 young (300–1500 Myr) solar-type stars with the goal of gaining insight into the space environment of the Earth during the period when life first appeared. From our spectroscopic observations we derive the Mount Wilson S chromospheric activity index (S{sub MW}), and describe the method we use to transform our instrumental indices to S{sub MW} without the need for a color term. We introduce three photospheric indices based on strong absorption features in the blue-violet spectrum—the G-band, the Ca i resonance line, and the Hydrogen-γ line—with the expectation that these indices might prove to be useful in detecting variations in the surface temperatures of active solar-type stars. We also describe our photometric program, and in particular our “Superstar technique” for differential photometry which, instead of relying on a handful of comparison stars, uses the photon flux in the entire star field in the CCD image to derive the program star magnitude. This enables photometric errors on the order of 0.005–0.007 magnitude. We present time series plots of our spectroscopic data for all four indices, and carry out extensive statistical tests on those time series demonstrating the reality of variations on timescales of years in all four indices. We also statistically test for and discover correlations and anti-correlations between the four indices. We discuss the physical basis of those correlations. As it turns out, the “photospheric” indices appear to be most strongly affected by emission in the Paschen continuum. We thus anticipate that these indices may prove to be useful proxies for monitoring emission in the ultraviolet Balmer continuum. Future papers in this series will discuss variability of the program stars on medium (days–months) and short

  12. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods: an introductory example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauenberg, Katy; Elster, Clemens

    2016-02-01

    When the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and methods from its supplements are not applicable, the Bayesian approach may be a valid and welcome alternative. Evaluating the posterior distribution, estimates or uncertainties involved in Bayesian inferences often requires numerical methods to avoid high-dimensional integrations. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is such a method—powerful, flexible and widely applied. Here, a concise introduction is given, illustrated by a simple, typical example from metrology. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is the most basic and yet flexible MCMC method. Its underlying concepts are explained and the algorithm is given step by step. The few lines of software code required for its implementation invite interested readers to get started. Diagnostics to evaluate the performance and common algorithmic choices are illustrated to calibrate the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for efficiency. Routine application of MCMC algorithms may be hindered currently by the difficulty to assess the convergence of MCMC output and thus to assure the validity of results. An example points to the importance of convergence and initiates discussion about advantages as well as areas of research. Available software tools are mentioned throughout.

  13. New background correction method for liquid chromatography with diode array detection, infrared spectroscopic detection and Raman spectroscopic detection.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Hans F M; Dijkstra, Reyer J; Eilers, Paul H C; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Westerhuis, Johan A

    2004-11-19

    A new method to eliminate the background spectrum (EBS) during analyte elution in column liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to spectroscopic techniques is proposed. This method takes into account the shape and also intensity differences of the background eluent spectrum. This allows the EBS method to make a better estimation of the background eluent spectrum during analyte elution. This is an advantage for quantification as well as for identification of analytes. The EBS method uses a two-step procedure. First, the baseline spectra are modeled using a limited number of principal components (PCs). Subsequently, an asymmetric least squares (asLS) regression method is applied using these principal components to correct the measured spectra during elution for the background contribution. The asymmetric least squares regression needs one parameter, the asymmetry factor p. This asymmetry factor determines relative weight of positive and negative residuals. Simulations are performed to test the EBS method in well-defined situations. The effect of spectral noise on the performance and the sensitivity of the EBS method for the value of the asymmetry factorp is tested. Two applications of the EBS method are discussed. In the first application, the goal is to extract the analyte spectrum from an LC-Raman analysis. In this case, the EBS method facilitates easy identification of unknown analytes using spectral libraries. In a second application, the EBS method is used for baseline correction in LC-diode array detection (DAD) analysis of polymeric standards during a gradient elution separation. It is shown that the EBS method yields a good baseline correction, without the need to perform a blank chromatographic run.

  14. 26 CFR 1.482-8 - Examples of the best method rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... method. (b) Examples. Example 1. Preference for comparable uncontrolled price method. Company A is the U... other method. See §§ 1.482-1(c)(2)(i) and -3(b)(2)(ii)(A). Example 2. Resale price method preferred to comparable uncontrolled price method. The facts are the same as in Example 1, except that the toaster...

  15. Diagnostic of the surface micro-discharge using spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang-Fang; Morfill, Gregor

    2012-10-01

    A handheld and battery-driven CAP device is designed for clinical studies. The accomplished medical phase I study has shown high bactericidal efficacy in vitro, ex vivo as well as in vivo. Although tests have been done concerning the biological safety and toxic gas emissions accordingly to the electrical safety, the chemical production of this device is not well addressed. In particular, the ozone production remains to be a big issue for safety reasons and reactive Nitrogen and Oxygen species (RNOS) are regarded to the key players for the biological and medical effects of CAPs. Given the application time for the clinical trial would be in the range of 30 seconds, we will present the temporal evolution of several RNOS within running time of a few minutes. The measurement is done mainly by the optical emission and absorption spectroscopies. Depending on the characteristic parameters of the applied voltage signal for discharge, the production of the RNOS may evolve in different profiles. Especially for high power operation, the discharge takes around 30 seconds to reach a steady state. Although the discharge power is found to be the most important factor, the characteristic frequency and even the gas temperature in ambient air, which in our case is the working gas, may alter the yields of several species, for example ozone and atomic Oxygen. The result will help for developing CAP devices for different applications and to design the protocol for the clinical test concerning the efficacy and safety.

  16. Review of UV spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrophoretic methods for the cholinesterase reactivating antidote pralidoxime (2-PAM).

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pralidoxime (2-PAM) belongs to the class of monopyridinium oximes with reactivating potency on cholinesterases inhibited by phosphylating organophosphorus compounds (OPC), for example, pesticides and nerve agents. 2-PAM represents an established antidote for the therapy of anticholinesterase poisoning since the late 1950s. Quite high therapeutic concentrations in human plasma (about 13 µg/ml) lead to concentrations in urine being about 100 times higher allowing the use of less sensitive analytical techniques that were used especially in the early years after 2-PAM was introduced. In this time (mid-1950s until the end of the 1970s) 2-PAM was most often analyzed by either paper chromatography or simple UV spectroscopic techniques omitting any sample separation step. These methods were displaced completely after the establishment of column liquid chromatography in the early 1980s. Since then, diverse techniques including cation exchange, size-exclusion, reversed-phase, and ligand-exchange chromatography have been introduced. Today, the most popular method for 2-PAM quantification is ion pair chromatography often combined with UV detection representing more than 50% of all column chromatographic procedures published. Furthermore, electrophoretic approaches by paper and capillary zone electrophoresis have been successfully used but are seldom applied. This review provides a commentary and exhaustive summary of analytical techniques applied to detect 2-PAM in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples to characterize stability and pharmacokinetics as well as decomposition and biotransformation products. Separation techniques as well as diverse detectors are discussed in appropriate detail allowing comparison of individual preferences and limitations. In addition, novel data on mass spectrometric fragmentation of 2-PAM are provided.

  17. Stepwise method based on Wiener estimation for spectral reconstruction in spectroscopic Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Wang, Gang; Cui, Xiaoyu; Liu, Quan

    2017-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated great potential in biomedical applications. However, spectroscopic Raman imaging is limited in the investigation of fast changing phenomena because of slow data acquisition. Our previous studies have indicated that spectroscopic Raman imaging can be significantly sped up using the approach of narrow-band imaging followed by spectral reconstruction. A multi-channel system was built to demonstrate the feasibility of fast wide-field spectroscopic Raman imaging using the approach of simultaneous narrow-band image acquisition followed by spectral reconstruction based on Wiener estimation in phantoms. To further improve the accuracy of reconstructed Raman spectra, we propose a stepwise spectral reconstruction method in this study, which can be combined with the earlier developed sequential weighted Wiener estimation to improve spectral reconstruction accuracy. The stepwise spectral reconstruction method first reconstructs the fluorescence background spectrum from narrow-band measurements and then the pure Raman narrow-band measurements can be estimated by subtracting the estimated fluorescence background from the overall narrow-band measurements. Thereafter, the pure Raman spectrum can be reconstructed from the estimated pure Raman narrow-band measurements. The result indicates that the stepwise spectral reconstruction method can improve spectral reconstruction accuracy significantly when combined with sequential weighted Wiener estimation, compared with the traditional Wiener estimation. In addition, qualitatively accurate cell Raman spectra were successfully reconstructed using the stepwise spectral reconstruction method from the narrow-band measurements acquired by a four-channel wide-field Raman spectroscopic imaging system. This method can potentially facilitate the adoption of spectroscopic Raman imaging to the investigation of fast changing phenomena.

  18. 1H-spectroscopic imaging using a modified Dixon method

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, G.; Schad, L.R.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1988-11-01

    Inhomogeneities of the static magnetic field and the different susceptibilities of the various types of tissue are a serious problem for all imaging methods of spectral separation of fat and water. In the Dixon method this problem is solved by using the absolute values of the image signals for the separation. In image regions where the fat signal is greater than the water signal, however, this results in an incorrect assignment of the computed solutions. A modified Dixon method was developed to easily carry out the spectral separation completely over the entire image by interactively building up a phase correction matrix after the data acquisition. The spectral delineation of the fat tissue finds an interesting application in the treatment planning with fast neutrons in accounting for the increase in dose.

  19. Determination of nitrous oxide concentrations by spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoeva, Larissa A.; Kiseleva, Margarete S.; Sinelnikova, Galina E.

    1990-08-01

    In the proposed paper an empirical method has been developed for determination of nitrous oxide concentration using the absorption band 2'), in proximity of), 3.87J4m, free from overlapping with absorption bands from other atmospheric gases. The transmission spectra of the atmospheric air are recorded with unresolved rotation-vibration structure. The method is inexpensive, simple and efficient It may be used for determination of enviromental pollution in homogeneous media (laboratory or production plant conditions, ground layer of atmosphere) and of unhomogeneous composistion mixtures when studying the contents of nitrous oxide along slope paths in troposphere and stratosphere.

  20. Probing and mapping plasmonic systems by spectroscopic methods (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noginova, Natalia; Hussain, Rabia; Mashhadi, Soheila

    2016-09-01

    Rare earth ions having both electric and magnetic dipole transitions in emission spectra can be used as local probe to provide information on degree of modification and local distribution of optical electric and magnetic fields in plasmonic systems. In our research, we use highly luminescent organic systems with Eu3+ to study and analyze modification of magnetic and electric dipoles emission in different environment, including systems having plasmonic electric resonance or magnetic resonance in the range of Eu3+ emission, and flat metal. Experimental setup based on selective detection of the particular transition was built and used for probing and mapping of electric and magnetic fields in plasmonic systems and metasurfaces. The method developed can find applications in characterization of plasmonic systems and metamaterials, and engineering of emission properties of rare earth ions and other emitters.

  1. Raman spectroscopic instrumentation and plasmonic methods for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuki

    The advent of nanotechnology has led to incredible growth in how we consume, make and approach advanced materials. By exploiting nanoscale material properties, unique control of optical, thermal, mechanical, and electrical characteristics becomes possible. This thesis describes the development of a novel localized surface plasmon resonant (LSPR) color sensitive photosensor, based on functionalization of gold nanoparticles onto tianium dioxide nanowires and sensing by a metal-semiconducting nanowire-metal photodiode structure. This LSPR photosensor has been integrated into a system that incorporates Raman spectroscopy, microfluidics, optical trapping, and sorting flow cytometry into a unique material characterization system called the microfluidic optical fiber trapping Raman sorting flow cytometer (MOFTRSFC). Raman spectroscopy is utilized as a powerful molecular characterization technique used to analyze biological, mineralogical and nanomaterial samples. To combat the inherently weak Raman signal, plasmonic methods have been applied to exploit surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), increasing Raman intensity by up to 5 orders of magnitude. The resultant MOFTRSFC system is a prototype instrument that can effectively trap, analyze, and sort micron-sized dielectric particles and biological cells. Raman spectroscopy has been presented in several modalities, including the development of a portable near-infrared Raman spectrometer and other emerging technologies.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic studies to acquire a quality control method of Eucalyptus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Baranska, M; Schulz, H; Reitzenstein, S; Uhlemann, U; Strehle, M A; Krüger, H; Quilitzsch, R; Foley, W; Popp, J

    2005-08-05

    This article presents a novel and original approach to analyze in situ the main components of Eucalyptus oil by means of Raman spectroscopy. The obtained two-dimensional Raman maps demonstrate a unique possibility to study the essential oil distribution in the intact plant tissue. Additionally, Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman and attenuated total reflection (ATR)-IR spectra of essential oils isolated from several Eucalyptus species by hydrodistillation are presented. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed in order to interpret the spectra of the essential oils of the Eucalyptus species. It is shown that the main components of the essential oils can be recognized by both vibrational spectroscopic techniques using the spectral information of the pure terpenoids. Spectroscopic analysis is based on the key bands of the individual volatile substances and therefore allows one to discriminate different essential oil profiles of several Eucalyptus species. It has been found that the presented spectroscopic data correlate very well with those obtained by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. All these investigations are helpful tools to generate a fast and easy method to control the quality of the essential oils with vibrational spectroscopic techniques in combination with DFT calculations.

  3. Application of Spectroscopic Methods for Structural Analysis of Chitin and Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Kumirska, Jolanta; Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Kaczyński, Zbigniew; Bychowska, Anna; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Thöming, Jorg; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Chitin, the second most important natural polymer in the world, and its N-deacetylated derivative chitosan, have been identified as versatile biopolymers for a broad range of applications in medicine, agriculture and the food industry. Two of the main reasons for this are firstly the unique chemical, physicochemical and biological properties of chitin and chitosan, and secondly the unlimited supply of raw materials for their production. These polymers exhibit widely differing physicochemical properties depending on the chitin source and the conditions of chitosan production. The presence of reactive functional groups as well as the polysaccharide nature of these biopolymers enables them to undergo diverse chemical modifications. A complete chemical and physicochemical characterization of chitin, chitosan and their derivatives is not possible without using spectroscopic techniques. This review focuses on the application of spectroscopic methods for the structural analysis of these compounds. PMID:20559489

  4. Investigation on the interaction of pyrene with bovine serum albumin using spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengbin; Gu, Jiali; Ma, Xiping; Dong, Tian; Meng, Xuelian

    2014-05-05

    This paper was designed to investigate the interaction of pyrene with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under physiological condition by spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic analysis of the emission quenching revealed that the quenching mechanism of BSA by pyrene was static. The binding sites and constants of pyrene-BSA complex were observed to be 1.20 and 2.63×10(6) L mol(-1) at 298 K, respectively. The enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) revealed that van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds stabilized the pyrene-BSA complex. Energy transfer from tryptophan to pyrene occurred by a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) mechanism, and the distance (r=2.72 nm) had been determined. The results of synchronous, three-dimensional fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectra showed that the pyrene induced conformational changes of BSA.

  5. Structures and Encapsulation Motifs of Functional Molecules Probed by Laser Spectroscopic and Theoretical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kusaka, Ryoji; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Ebata, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    We report laser spectroscopic and computational studies of host/guest hydration interactions between functional molecules (hosts) and water (guest) in supersonic jets. The examined hosts include dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) and calix[4]arene (C4A). The gaseous complexes between the functional molecular hosts and water are generated under jet-cooled conditions. Various laser spectroscopic methods are applied for these species: the electronic spectra are observed by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), mass-selected resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and ultraviolet-ultraviolet hole-burning (UV-UV HB) spectroscopy, whereas the vibrational spectra for each individual species are observed by infrared-ultraviolet double resonance (IR-UV DR) spectroscopy. The obained results are analyzed by first principles electronic structure calculations. We discuss the conformations of the host molecules, the structures of the complexes, and key interactions forming the specific complexes. PMID:22319310

  6. Study on Biological Effects of La(3+) on Rat Liver Mitochondria by Microcalorimetric and Spectroscopic Methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man; Gao, Jia-Ling; Feng, Zhi-Jiang; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-09-01

    The effects of lanthanum on heat production of mitochondria isolated from Wistar rat liver were investigated with microcalorimetry; simultaneously, the effects on mitochondrial swelling and membrane potential (Δψ) were determined by spectroscopic methods. La(3+) showed only inhibitory action on mitochondrial energy turnover with IC50 being 55.8 μmol L(-1). In the spectroscopic experiments, La(3+), like Ca(2+), induced rat liver mitochondrial swelling and decreased membrane potential (Δψ), which was inhibited by the specific permeability transition inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). The induction ability of La(3+) was stronger than that of Ca(2+). These results demonstrated that La(3+) had some biotoxicity effect on mitochondria; the effects of La(3+) and Ca(2+) on rat liver mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) are different, and La represents toxic action rather than Ca analogy.

  7. Ghanaian cocoa bean fermentation characterized by spectroscopic and chromatographic methods and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Aculey, Patrick C; Snitkjaer, Pia; Owusu, Margaret; Bassompiere, Marc; Takrama, Jemmy; Nørgaard, Lars; Petersen, Mikael A; Nielsen, Dennis S

    2010-08-01

    Export of cocoa beans is of great economic importance in Ghana and several other tropical countries. Raw cocoa has an astringent, unpleasant taste, and flavor, and has to be fermented, dried, and roasted to obtain the characteristic cocoa flavor and taste. In an attempt to obtain a deeper understanding of the changes in the cocoa beans during fermentation and investigate the possibility of future development of objective methods for assessing the degree of fermentation, a novel combination of methods including cut test, colorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, NIR spectroscopy, and GC-MS evaluated by chemometric methods was used to examine cocoa beans sampled at different durations of fermentation and samples representing fully fermented and dried beans from all cocoa growing regions of Ghana. Using colorimetry it was found that samples moved towards higher a* and b* values as fermentation progressed. Furthermore, the degree of fermentation could, in general, be well described by the spectroscopic methods used. In addition, it was possible to link analysis of volatile compounds with predictions of fermentation time. Fermented and dried cocoa beans from the Volta and the Western regions clustered separately in the score plots based on colorimetric, fluorescence, NIR, and GC-MS indicating regional differences in the composition of Ghanaian cocoa beans. The study demonstrates the potential of colorimetry and spectroscopic methods as valuable tools for determining the fermentation degree of cocoa beans. Using GC-MS it was possible to demonstrate the formation of several important aroma compounds such 2-phenylethyl acetate, propionic acid, and acetoin and the breakdown of others like diacetyl during fermentation. Practical Application: The present study demonstrates the potential of using colorimetry and spectroscopic methods as objective methods for determining cocoa bean quality along the processing chain. Development of objective methods for determining cocoa bean

  8. Optical caries diagnostics: comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with method of laser integral fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research we present the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyses parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries-involved bacterias. He-Ne-laser ((lambda) =632,8 nm, 1-2mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) =655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630nm, 1mW) and He-Ne laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries.

  9. Green-synthesis, characterization, photostability and polarity studies of novel Schiff base dyes using spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M; Asiri, Abdullah M; Khan, Salman A

    2012-01-01

    Preparation, characterization, photostability and polarity studies of novel Schiff base dyes using spectroscopic methods were achieved. The Schiff base dyes were prepared by the reaction of salicylaldehyde/2-Hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde with aminophenazone under microwave irradiation. The spectroscopic (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C-NMR, Mass) studies and elemental analyses were in good agreement with chemical structure of synthesized compounds. In addition, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments showed that these dyes are good absorbent and fluorescent. Based on the photostability study of these dyes, minimal to no loss in fluorescence intensities of 4-[(2-Hydroxy-benzylidene)-amino] 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-pyrazol-3-one (D1) (6.14%) and 4-[(2-Hydroxy-naphthalen-1-ylmethylene)-amino]-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-pyrazol-3-one (D2) (2.95%) was observed with an increase in the exposure time using time-based fluorescence steady-state experiments. These studies also inferred that these Schiffbase dyes have a high photostability against photobleaching. In addition, Dye 2 is found to be more sensitive than Dye 1 to the polarity of the microenvironment provided by different solvents based on the results of fluorescence polarity studies.

  10. Optical fiber termination method for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppett, Claire; Edelstein, Jerry; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Meghrouni-Brown, Zakios; Fagrelius, Parker

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe the method we use to optically terminate the fibers which offers many advantages over methods that have been used in the past.

  11. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  12. Synoptic typing: interdisciplinary application methods with three practical hydroclimatological examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, C. M.; Leathers, D. J.; Levia, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic classification is a methodology that represents diverse atmospheric variables and allows researchers to relate large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns to regional- and small-scale terrestrial processes. Synoptic classification has often been applied to questions concerning the surface environment. However, full applicability has been under-utilized to date, especially in disciplines such as hydroclimatology, which are intimately linked to atmospheric inputs. This paper aims to (1) outline the development of a daily synoptic calendar for the Mid-Atlantic (USA), (2) define seasonal synoptic patterns occurring in the region, and (3) provide hydroclimatological examples whereby the cascading response of precipitation characteristics, soil moisture, and streamflow are explained by synoptic classification. Together, achievement of these objectives serves as a guide for development and use of a synoptic calendar for hydroclimatological studies. In total 22 unique synoptic types were identified, derived from a combination of 12 types occurring in the winter (DJF), 13 in spring (MAM), 9 in summer (JJA), and 11 in autumn (SON). This includes six low pressure systems, four high pressure systems, one cold front, three north/northwest flow regimes, three south/southwest flow regimes, and five weakly defined regimes. Pairwise comparisons indicated that 84.3 % had significantly different rainfall magnitudes, 86.4 % had different rainfall durations, and 84.7 % had different rainfall intensities. The largest precipitation-producing classifications were not restricted to low pressure systems, but rather to patterns with access to moisture sources from the Atlantic Ocean and easterly (on-shore) winds, which transport moisture inland. These same classifications resulted in comparable rates of soil moisture recharge and streamflow discharge, illustrating the applicability of synoptic classification for a range of hydroclimatological research objectives.

  13. Conceptual evaluation of population health surveillance programs: method and example.

    PubMed

    El Allaki, Farouk; Bigras-Poulin, Michel; Ravel, André

    2013-03-01

    Veterinary and public health surveillance programs can be evaluated to assess and improve the planning, implementation and effectiveness of these programs. Guidelines, protocols and methods have been developed for such evaluation. In general, they focus on a limited set of attributes (e.g., sensitivity and simplicity), that are assessed quantitatively whenever possible, otherwise qualitatively. Despite efforts at standardization, replication by different evaluators is difficult, making evaluation outcomes open to interpretation. This ultimately limits the usefulness of surveillance evaluations. At the same time, the growing demand to prove freedom from disease or pathogen, and the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and the International Health Regulations require stronger surveillance programs. We developed a method for evaluating veterinary and public health surveillance programs that is detailed, structured, transparent and based on surveillance concepts that are part of all types of surveillance programs. The proposed conceptual evaluation method comprises four steps: (1) text analysis, (2) extraction of the surveillance conceptual model, (3) comparison of the extracted surveillance conceptual model to a theoretical standard, and (4) validation interview with a surveillance program designer. This conceptual evaluation method was applied in 2005 to C-EnterNet, a new Canadian zoonotic disease surveillance program that encompasses laboratory based surveillance of enteric diseases in humans and active surveillance of the pathogens in food, water, and livestock. The theoretical standard used for evaluating C-EnterNet was a relevant existing structure called the "Population Health Surveillance Theory". Five out of 152 surveillance concepts were absent in the design of C-EnterNet. However, all of the surveillance concept relationships found in C-EnterNet were valid. The proposed method can be used to improve the design and documentation of surveillance programs. It

  14. Possibility of determination of the level of antioxidants in human body using spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, E.; Gorbunova, E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the processes of antioxidant defence against aggressive free radicals in human body were investigated theoretically; and the existing methods of diagnosis of oxidative stress and disturbance of antioxidant activity were reviewed. Also, the kinetics of free radical reactions in the oxidation of luminol and interaction antioxidants (such as chlorophyll in the multicomponent system of plant's leaves and ubiquinone) with the UV radiation were investigated experimentally by spectroscopic method. The results showed that this method is effective for recording the luminescence of antioxidants, free radicals, chemiluminescent reactions and fluorescence. In addition these results reveal new opportunities for the study of the antioxidant activity and antioxidant balance in a multicomponent system by allocating features of the individual components in spectral composition. A creation of quality control method for drugs, that are required for oxidative stress diagnosis, is a promising direction in the development of given work.

  15. The Erosion of a Method: Examples from Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greckhamer, Thomas; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2005-01-01

    Since its original inception in the 1960s grounded theory has been widely used by many qualitative researchers. However, recently epistemologically different versions of grounded theory have been presented and this epistemological diversity among grounded theorists and the erosion of the method will be the major focus of this paper. The first…

  16. 26 CFR 1.482-8 - Examples of the best method rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulations, these examples are based on simplified facts, are provided solely for purposes of illustrating... assumed facts of the examples, and are not general conclusions concerning the relative reliability of any... comparable uncontrolled price method. The facts are the same as in Example 1, except that the toaster...

  17. A comparison of microscopic and spectroscopic identification methods for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Lee, Jongmyoung; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-04-15

    The analysis of microplastics in various environmental samples requires the identification of microplastics from natural materials. The identification technique lacks a standardized protocol. Herein, stereomicroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FT-IR) identification methods for microplastics (<1mm) were compared using the same samples from the sea surface microlayer (SML) and beach sand. Fragmented microplastics were significantly (p<0.05) underestimated and fiber was significantly overestimated using the stereomicroscope both in the SML and beach samples. The total abundance by FT-IR was higher than by microscope both in the SML and beach samples, but they were not significantly (p>0.05) different. Depending on the number of samples and the microplastic size range of interest, the appropriate identification method should be determined; selecting a suitable identification method for microplastics is crucial for evaluating microplastic pollution.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization and quantitative determination of atorvastatin calcium impurities by novel HPLC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Seven process related impurities were identified by LC-MS in the atorvastatin calcium drug substance. These impurities were identified by LC-MS. The structure of impurities was confirmed by modern spectroscopic techniques like 1H NMR and IR and physicochemical studies conducted by using synthesized authentic reference compounds. The synthesized reference samples of the impurity compounds were used for the quantitative HPLC determination. These impurities were detected by newly developed gradient, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. The system suitability of HPLC analysis established the validity of the separation. The analytical method was validated according to International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) with respect to specificity, precision, accuracy, linearity, robustness and stability of analytical solutions to demonstrate the power of newly developed HPLC method.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization and quantitative determination of atorvastatin calcium impurities by novel HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Seven process related impurities were identified by LC-MS in the atorvastatin calcium drug substance. These impurities were identified by LC-MS. The structure of impurities was confirmed by modern spectroscopic techniques like (1)H NMR and IR and physicochemical studies conducted by using synthesized authentic reference compounds. The synthesized reference samples of the impurity compounds were used for the quantitative HPLC determination. These impurities were detected by newly developed gradient, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. The system suitability of HPLC analysis established the validity of the separation. The analytical method was validated according to International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) with respect to specificity, precision, accuracy, linearity, robustness and stability of analytical solutions to demonstrate the power of newly developed HPLC method.

  20. Novel spectroscopic methods for determination of Cromolyn sodium and Oxymetazoline hydrochloride in binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; El-Kosasy, A. M.; Magdy, N.; El Zahar, N. M.

    2014-10-01

    New accurate, sensitive and selective spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods were developed and subsequently validated for determination of Cromolyn sodium (CS) and Oxymetazoline HCl (OXY) in binary mixture. These methods include ‘H-point standard addition method (HPSAM) and area under the curve (AUC)' spectrophotometric method and first derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic (FDSFS) method. For spectrophotometric methods, absorbances were recorded at 241.5 nm and 274.9 nm for HPSAM and the wavelength was selected in ranges 232.0-254.0 nm and 216.0-229.0 nm for AUC method, where the concentration was obtained by applying Cramer's rule. For FDSFS method, the first-derivative synchronous fluorescence signal was measured at 290.0 nm, using Δλ = 145.0 nm. The suggested methods were validated according to International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines and the results revealed that they were precise and reproducible. All the obtained results were statistically compared with those of the reported method and there was no significant difference.

  1. Novel spectroscopic methods for determination of Cromolyn sodium and Oxymetazoline hydrochloride in binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; El-Kosasy, A M; Magdy, N; El Zahar, N M

    2014-10-15

    New accurate, sensitive and selective spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods were developed and subsequently validated for determination of Cromolyn sodium (CS) and Oxymetazoline HCl (OXY) in binary mixture. These methods include 'H-point standard addition method (HPSAM) and area under the curve (AUC)' spectrophotometric method and first derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic (FDSFS) method. For spectrophotometric methods, absorbances were recorded at 241.5nm and 274.9nm for HPSAM and the wavelength was selected in ranges 232.0-254.0nm and 216.0-229.0nm for AUC method, where the concentration was obtained by applying Cramer's rule. For FDSFS method, the first-derivative synchronous fluorescence signal was measured at 290.0nm, using Δλ=145.0nm. The suggested methods were validated according to International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines and the results revealed that they were precise and reproducible. All the obtained results were statistically compared with those of the reported method and there was no significant difference.

  2. Speciation of Iron in Silicic Glasses: Inferences From Spectroscopic Methods and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Menguy, N.

    2007-05-01

    Iron environment in silicic glasses has been investigated using optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and TEM. The samples are calco-alkaline silicic glasses from different localities and containing 0.5 to 2 wt% Fe. The redox state of iron in silicate glasses and the local environment around Fe2+ and Fe3+ is known to influence properties such as color or viscosity and crystal-liquid element partitioning, for glasses and melts, respectively. Considering eruption conditions, this information can give a better understanding of the cooling conditions and setting of lava flows. The spectra of silicic glasses are strongly different from that of synthetic glasses and tektites. All spectroscopic methods show the presence of Fe3+ and Fe2+ cations belonging to the glassy network associated with clustered superparamagnetic Fe-oxides. TEM data indicate that nanometric Fe-oxide clusters are poorly crystallized. The spectroscopic data on obsidians have been compared to those recorded on magnetite and synthetic glasses to assess the importance of Fe oxide clusters. These clusters are responsible for the variety of coloration of these obsidians. The speciation of iron in these glasses and associated clusters will be discussed in terms of formation conditions.

  3. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  4. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    1997-03-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis. 20 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1990-01-01

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  6. Apparatus for and method of performing spectroscopic analysis on an article

    DOEpatents

    Powell, G.L.; Hallman, R.L. Jr.

    1999-04-20

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing an article having an entrance and an exit in communication with the entrance. The apparatus comprises: a spectrometer having an emission source with a focal point; a plurality of mirrors; and a detector connected to the spectroscope. The emission source is positioned so that its focal point is substantially coextensive with the entrance of the article. The mirrors comprise: a first mirror positionable adjacent the exit of the article and a second mirror positioned relative to the other of said plurality of mirrors. The first mirror receives scattered emissions exiting the article and substantially collimates the scattered emissions. The second mirror substantially focuses the collimated emissions into a focused emission. The detector receives the focused emission from the mirrors. 6 figs.

  7. Apparatus for and method of performing spectroscopic analysis on an article

    DOEpatents

    Powell, George Louis; Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for and method of analyzing an article having an entrance and an exit in communication with the entrance. The apparatus comprises: a spectrometer having an emission source with a focal point; a plurality of mirrors; and a detector connected to the spectroscope. The emission source is positioned so that its focal point is substantially coextensive with the entrance of the article. The mirrors comprise: a first mirror positionable adjacent the exit of the article and a second mirror positioned relative to the other of said plurality of mirrors. The first mirror receives scattered emissions exiting the article and substantially collimates the scattered emissions. The second mirror substantially focuses the collimated emissions into a focused emission. The detector receives the focused emission from the mirrors.

  8. Development and Validation of Stability Indicating Spectroscopic Method for Content Analysis of Ceftriaxone Sodium in Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Ethiraj, Revathi; Thiruvengadam, Ethiraj; Sampath, Venkattapuram Saravanan; Vahid, Abdul; Raj, Jithin

    2014-01-01

    A simple, selective, and stability indicating spectroscopic method has been selected and validated for the assay of ceftriaxone sodium in the powder for injection dosage forms. Proposed method is based on the measurement of absorbance of ceftriaxone sodium in aqueous medium at 241 nm. The method obeys Beer's law in the range of 5–50 μg/mL with correlation coefficient of 0.9983. Apparent molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 2.046 × 103 L mol−1 cm−1 and 0.02732 μg/cm2/0.001 absorbance units. This study indicated that ceftriaxone sodium was degraded in acid medium and also underwent oxidative degradation. Percent relative standard deviation associated with all the validation parameters was less than 2, showing compliance with acceptance criteria of Q2 (R1), International Conference on Harmonization (2005) guidelines. Then the proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of ceftriaxone sodium in sterile preparation and results were comparable with reported methods. PMID:27355020

  9. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-04-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist Dill parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulated directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  10. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist DIll parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulate directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  11. Development of vibrational spectroscopic methods to rapidly and non-destructively assess quality of chicken breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of Vibrational Spectroscopic Methods to Rapidly and Non-Destructively Assess Quality of Chicken Breast Meat H. Zhuang1, M. Sohn2, S. Trabelsi1 and K. Lawrence1 1Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, 950 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 2University of Georgia, De...

  12. Technical and technological investigation of cultural heritage: experience in applications of spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, I. A.; Chugunova, K. S.; Kadikova, I. F.; Khavrin, S. V.; Pisareva, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Physical and chemical methods of analysis are indispensable for restoration, study of painting techniques, examination and attribution of works of art. Development of new directions of investigations as well as improvements in sample preparation allow applying non-destructive analysis methods, minimizing amount of matter used to obtain informative spectra, preventing alteration and destruction of samples in the course of investigation. This paper observes the examples of applying optical and spectral methods, including molecular spectral analysis and electron microscopy, for study of binding media and pigments of painting and archaeological artifacts.

  13. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between tetrandrine and two serum albumins by chemometrics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Liu, Rong; jiang, Xiaohui

    2013-11-01

    The binding interactions of tetrandrine (TETD) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by spectroscopic methods. These experimental data were further analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, and the concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA/HSA, TETD and TETD-BSA/HSA) existed in the interaction procedure, as well as, the apparent equilibrium constants Kapp were evaluated. The binding sites number n and the binding constants K were obtained at various temperatures. The binding distance between TETD and BSA/HSA was 1.455/1.451 nm. The site markers competitive experiments indicated that TETD primarily bound to the tryptophan residue of BSA/HSA within site I. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) calculated on the basis of different temperatures revealed that the binding of TETD-BSA was mainly depended on the hydrophobic interaction strongly and electrostatic interaction, and yet the binding of TETD-HSA was strongly relied on the hydrophobic interaction. The results of synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FT-IR spectra show that the conformation of proteins has altered in the presence of TETD. In addition, the effect of some common ions on the binding constants between TETD and proteins were also discussed.

  14. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between tetrandrine and two serum albumins by chemometrics methods.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Liu, Rong; Jiang, Xiaohui

    2013-11-01

    The binding interactions of tetrandrine (TETD) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by spectroscopic methods. These experimental data were further analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, and the concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA/HSA, TETD and TETD-BSA/HSA) existed in the interaction procedure, as well as, the apparent equilibrium constants Kapp were evaluated. The binding sites number n and the binding constants K were obtained at various temperatures. The binding distance between TETD and BSA/HSA was 1.455/1.451nm. The site markers competitive experiments indicated that TETD primarily bound to the tryptophan residue of BSA/HSA within site I. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) calculated on the basis of different temperatures revealed that the binding of TETD-BSA was mainly depended on the hydrophobic interaction strongly and electrostatic interaction, and yet the binding of TETD-HSA was strongly relied on the hydrophobic interaction. The results of synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FT-IR spectra show that the conformation of proteins has altered in the presence of TETD. In addition, the effect of some common ions on the binding constants between TETD and proteins were also discussed.

  15. Comparability of a Three-Dimensional Structure in Biopharmaceuticals Using Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Javier, Mario E.; Romero-Díaz, Alexis J.; Villaseñor-Ortega, Francisco; Pérez, Néstor O.; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure depends on weak interactions and covalent bonds, like disulfide bridges, established according to the environmental conditions. Here, we present the validation of two spectroscopic methodologies for the measurement of free and unoxidized thiols, as an attribute of structural integrity, using 5,5′-dithionitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) and DyLight Maleimide (DLM) as derivatizing agents. These methods were used to compare Rituximab and Etanercept products from different manufacturers. Physicochemical comparability was demonstrated for Rituximab products as DTNB showed no statistical differences under native, denaturing, and denaturing-reducing conditions, with Student's t-test P values of 0.6233, 0.4022, and 0.1475, respectively. While for Etanercept products no statistical differences were observed under native (P = 0.0758) and denaturing conditions (P = 0.2450), denaturing-reducing conditions revealed cysteine contents of 98% and 101%, towards the theoretical value of 58, for the evaluated products from different Etanercept manufacturers. DLM supported equality between Rituximab products under native (P = 0.7499) and denaturing conditions (P = 0.8027), but showed statistical differences among Etanercept products under native conditions (P < 0.001). DLM suggested that Infinitam has fewer exposed thiols than Enbrel, although DTNB method, circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence (TCSPC), and activity (TNFα neutralization) showed no differences. Overall, this data revealed the capabilities and drawbacks of each thiol quantification technique and their correlation with protein structure. PMID:24963443

  16. Comparability of a three-dimensional structure in biopharmaceuticals using spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Pérez Medina Martínez, Víctor; Abad-Javier, Mario E; Romero-Díaz, Alexis J; Villaseñor-Ortega, Francisco; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure depends on weak interactions and covalent bonds, like disulfide bridges, established according to the environmental conditions. Here, we present the validation of two spectroscopic methodologies for the measurement of free and unoxidized thiols, as an attribute of structural integrity, using 5,5'-dithionitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) and DyLight Maleimide (DLM) as derivatizing agents. These methods were used to compare Rituximab and Etanercept products from different manufacturers. Physicochemical comparability was demonstrated for Rituximab products as DTNB showed no statistical differences under native, denaturing, and denaturing-reducing conditions, with Student's t-test P values of 0.6233, 0.4022, and 0.1475, respectively. While for Etanercept products no statistical differences were observed under native (P = 0.0758) and denaturing conditions (P = 0.2450), denaturing-reducing conditions revealed cysteine contents of 98% and 101%, towards the theoretical value of 58, for the evaluated products from different Etanercept manufacturers. DLM supported equality between Rituximab products under native (P = 0.7499) and denaturing conditions (P = 0.8027), but showed statistical differences among Etanercept products under native conditions (P < 0.001). DLM suggested that Infinitam has fewer exposed thiols than Enbrel, although DTNB method, circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence (TCSPC), and activity (TNF α neutralization) showed no differences. Overall, this data revealed the capabilities and drawbacks of each thiol quantification technique and their correlation with protein structure.

  17. Determination of Cephalexin Monohydrate in Pharmaceutical Dosage Form by Stability-Indicating RP-UFLC and UV Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Sagar Suman; Ravi Kumar, Bera V. V.; Dash, Rabisankar; Mohanta, Ganeswar

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-fast liquid chromatographic method and two UV spectroscopic methods were developed for the determination of cephalexin monohydrate in pharmaceutical dosage forms. Isocratic separation was performed on an Enable C18G column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) using methanol:0.01 M TBAHS (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The PDA detection wavelength was set at 254 nm. The UV spectroscopic method was performed at 261 nm and at 256–266 nm for the AUC method using a phosphate buffer (pH=5.5). The linearity was observed over a concentration range of 1.0–120 μg/ml for UFLC and both of the UV spectroscopic methods (correlation coefficient=0.999). The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines. The relative standard deviation values for the intraday and interday precision studies were < 2%, and the accuracy was > 99% for all of the three methods. The developed methods were used successfully for the determination of cephalexin in dry syrup formulation. PMID:24482771

  18. Mechanism and conformational studies of farrerol binding to bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guowen; Wang, Lin; Fu, Peng; Hu, Mingming

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism and conformational changes of farrerol binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by spectroscopic methods including fluorescence quenching technique, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy under simulative physiological conditions. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that farrerol could strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change and entropy change for the binding were calculated to be -29.92 kJ mol -1 and 5.06 J mol -1 K -1 according to the van't Hoff equation, which suggested that the both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds play major role in the binding of farrerol to BSA. The binding distance r deduced from the efficiency of energy transfer was 3.11 nm for farrerol-BSA system. The displacement experiments of site markers and the results of fluorescence anisotropy showed that warfarin and farrerol shared a common binding site I corresponding to the subdomain IIA of BSA. Furthermore, the studies of synchronous fluorescence, CD and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the binding of farrerol to BSA induced conformational changes in BSA.

  19. Analysis of interaction between tamoxifen and ctDNA in vitro by multi-spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Ge, Fei

    2010-07-01

    Multi-spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), ultraviolet spectra (UV), fluorescence spectra, 1H NMR spectroscopy, coupled with thermo-denaturation experiments were firstly used to study the interaction of antitumor drug tamoxifen (TMX) with calf thymus (ctDNA) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 4.55). The interaction of TMX with ctDNA could cause a significant enhancement of RLS intensity, the hyperchromic effect, red shift of absorption spectra and the fluorescence quenching of TMX, indicating that there is an inserting interaction between TMX and ctDNA. This inference was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The chemical shift of the benzene proton changes significantly which indicates that TMX could insert into the base pairs of ctDNA. These studies are valuable for a better understanding the mode of TMX-ctDNA interaction further, which are important and useful for designing of new ctDNA targeted drug. And the antitumor drug TMX inserted directly into ctDNA in vitro, which can provide a lot of useful information to explore the development of new and highly effective anti-cancer drugs.

  20. Toxic interaction between acid yellow 23 and trypsin: spectroscopic methods coupled with molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Rutao; Qin, Pengfei

    2012-09-01

    Acid yellow 23 (AY23) is a pervasive azo dye used in many fields which is potentially harmful to the environment and human health. This paper studied the toxic effects of AY23 on trypsin by spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The addition of AY23 effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin via static quenching with association constants of K(290 K) = 3.67 × 10(5) L mol(-1) and K(310 K) = 1.83 × 10(5) L mol(-1). The calculated thermodynamic parameters conformed that AY23 binds to trypsin predominantly via electrostatic forces with one binding site. Conformational investigations indicated the skeletal structure of trypsin unfolded and the microenvironment of tryptophan changed with the addition of AY23. Molecular docking study showed that AY23 interacted with the His 57 and Lys 224 residue of trypsin and led to the inhibition of enzyme activity. This study offers a more comprehensive picture of AY23-trypsin interaction and indicates their interaction may perform toxic effects within the organism.

  1. Binding interaction of atorvastatin with bovine serum albumin: Spectroscopic methods and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Huang, Chuan-ren; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Ying-yao; Wang, Jing; Chen, Jun; Shi, Jie-hua

    2016-03-05

    The interaction of atorvastatin with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular docking technique for providing important insight into further elucidating the store and transport process of atorvastatin in the body and the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics. The experimental results revealed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA induced atorvastatin was a combined dynamic and static quenching. The binding constant and number of binding site of atorvastatin with BSA under simulated physiological conditions (pH=7.4) were 1.41 × 10(5) M(-1) and about 1 at 310K, respectively. The values of the enthalpic change (ΔH(0)), entropic change (ΔS(0)) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG(0)) in the binding process of atorvastatin with BSA at 310K were negative, suggesting that the binding process of atorvastatin and BSA was spontaneous and the main interaction forces were van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction. Moreover, atorvastatin was bound into the subdomain IIA (site I) of BSA, resulting in a slight change of the conformation of BSA.

  2. Binding interaction of atorvastatin with bovine serum albumin: Spectroscopic methods and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Huang, Chuan-ren; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Ying-yao; Wang, Jing; Chen, Jun; Shi, Jie-hua

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of atorvastatin with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular docking technique for providing important insight into further elucidating the store and transport process of atorvastatin in the body and the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics. The experimental results revealed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA induced atorvastatin was a combined dynamic and static quenching. The binding constant and number of binding site of atorvastatin with BSA under simulated physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) were 1.41 × 105 M- 1 and about 1 at 310 K, respectively. The values of the enthalpic change (ΔH0), entropic change (ΔS0) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG0) in the binding process of atorvastatin with BSA at 310 K were negative, suggesting that the binding process of atorvastatin and BSA was spontaneous and the main interaction forces were van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction. Moreover, atorvastatin was bound into the subdomain IIA (site I) of BSA, resulting in a slight change of the conformation of BSA.

  3. Fluorescent-spectroscopic and imaging methods of investigations for diagnostics of head and neck tumors and control of PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinak, N. J.; Shental, Victor V.; Komov, D. V.; Vacoulovskaia, E. G.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Abdullin, N. A.; Pustynsky, I.; Chatikchine, V. H.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Vladimir I.; Zuravleva, V.; Lukjanets, Eugeny A.

    1996-01-01

    Methodics of PDT control and fluorescent-spectroscopic diagnostic of head and neck tumors and mammary gland cancer (nodular) with the use of Kr, He-Ne and semiconductor lasers and photosensitizer (PS) -- Al phtalocyanin (Photosense) are discussed. The results show that applied diagnostic methods permit us not only to identify the topology and malignancy of a tumor but also to correct PDT process directly during irradiation.

  4. A constrained Gauss-Seidel method for correction of point spread function effect in MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Angelie, E; Sappey-Marinier, D; Mallet, J; Bonmartin, A; Sau, J

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio, so a compromise between spatial resolution and examination time is needed in clinical application. The reconstruction of truncated signal introduces a Point Spread Function that considerably affects the spatial resolution. In order to reduce spatial contamination, three methods, applied after Fourier transform image reconstruction, based on deconvolution or iterative techniques are tested to decrease Point Spread Function contamination. A Gauss-Seidel (GS) algorithm is used for iterative techniques with and without a non-negative constraint (GS+). Convergence and noise dependence studies of the GS algorithm have been done. The linear property of contamination was validated on a point sample phantom. A significant decrease of contamination without broadening the spatial resolution was obtained with GS+ method compared to a conventional apodization. This post-processing method can provide a contrast enhancement of clinical spectroscopic images without changes in acquisition time.

  5. Using Mixed Methods to Analyze Video Data: A Mathematics Teacher Professional Development Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Marshall, Patricia L.; McCulloch, Allison W.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses data from 65 teachers participating in a K-2 mathematics professional development research project as an example of how to analyze video recordings of teachers' classroom lessons using mixed methods. Through their discussion, the authors demonstrate how using a mixed methods approach to classroom video analysis allows researchers…

  6. Optical spectroscopic methods for probing the conformational stability of immobilised enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ashok; Moore, Barry D; Kelly, Sharon M; Price, Nicholas C; Rolinski, Olaf J; Birch, David J S; Dunkin, Ian R; Halling, Peter J

    2009-07-13

    We report the development of biophysical techniques based on circular dichroism (CD), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence to investigate in situ the structure of enzymes immobilised on solid particles. Their applicability is demonstrated using subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) immobilised on silica gel and Candida antartica lipase B immobilised on Lewatit VP.OC 1600 (Novozyme 435). SC shows nearly identical secondary structure in solution and in the immobilised state as evident from far UV CD spectra and amide I vibration bands. Increased near UV CD intensity and reduced Trp fluorescence suggest a more rigid tertiary structure on the silica surface. After immobilised SC is inactivated, these techniques reveal: a) almost complete loss of near UV CD signal, suggesting loss of tertiary structure; b) a shift in the amide I vibrational band from 1658 cm(-1) to 1632 cm(-1), indicating a shift from alpha-helical structure to beta-sheet; c) a substantial blue shift and reduced dichroism in the far UV CD, supporting a shift to beta-sheet structure; d) strong increase in Trp fluorescence intensity, which reflects reduced intramolecular quenching with loss of tertiary structure; and e) major change in fluorescence lifetime distribution, confirming a substantial change in Trp environment. DRIFT measurements suggest that pressing KBr discs may perturb protein structure. With the enzyme on organic polymer it was possible to obtain near UV CD spectra free of interference by the carrier material. However, far UV CD, DRIFT and fluorescence measurements showed strong signals from the organic support. In conclusion, the spectroscopic methods described here provide structural information hitherto inaccessible, with their applicability limited by interference from, rather than the particulate nature of, the support material.

  7. Examples of geomorphic reclamation on mined lands in Spain by using the GeoFluv method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Duque, José F.; Bugosh, Nicholas; de Francisco, Cristina; Hernando, Néstor; Martín, Cristina; Nicolau, José M.; Nyssen, Sara; Tejedor, María; Zapico, Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes seven examples of geomorphic reclamation on mined lands of Spain, as solutions for complex environmental problems, by using the GeoFluv method through the Natural Regrade software (Carlson). Of these seven examples, four of them have been partially or totally constructed. Each of them has its own particularities and contributions, becoming innovative geomorphic solutions to existing environmental (ecological, social and economic) problems. The Quebraderos de la Serrana example (Toledo province) allowed a local company to get permission for slate quarrying in a highly ecologically vulnerable area; before that, the permission for extracting rocks had been rejected with a conventional reclamation approach. The Somolinos case is, to this date, the most complete geomorphic reclamation in Spain, and the first one in Europe to have been built by using the GeoFluv method. This restoration has healed a degraded area of about six hectares at the outskirts of the Somolinos hamlet, in a valuable rural landscape of the Guadalajara province. The Arlanza example (Leon province) shows a design which proposes to restore the hydrological connectivity of a coal mine dump which blocked a valley. The Machorro and María Jose examples (Guadalajara province) are allowing kaolin mining to be compatible with the preservation of protected areas at the edge of the Upper Tagus Natural Park (UTNP), in highly vulnerable conditions for water erosion. The Campredó case (Tarragona province) shows an agreement between a mining company, the academia, and the Catalonian Agency of Water, to combine a high standard of geomorphic reclamation with solving problems caused by flooding downstream of a clay mining area. Finally, the Nuria example is also located at the UTNP area; the goals here are to stabilize a large landslide in a waste dump and to minimize the risk of occurrence of flash floods from mining ponds. Additional information on these examples and about the state of art of

  8. Remote determination of exposure degree and iron concentration of lunar soils using VIS-NIR spectroscopic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Erich M.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1994-01-01

    On the Moon, space weathering processes such as micrometeorite bombardment alter the optical properties of lunar soils. As a consequence, lunar soil optical properties are a function not only of composition, but of degree of exposure on the lunar surface as well. In order to accurately assess the compositional properties of the lunar surface using remotely acquired visible and near-infrared spectroscopic data, it is thus necessary either (1) to compare optical properties only of soils characterized by similar degrees of exposure or (2) to otherwise normalize or remove the optical effects due to exposure. Laboratory spectroscopic data for lunar soils are used to develop and test remote spectrocopic methods for determining degree of exposure and for distinguishing between the optical effects due to exposure and those due to composition. A method employing a ratio between reflectances within and outside of the 1 micrometer Fe(2+) crystal field absorption band was developed for remotely identifying highland soils that have reached a steady-state maturity. The relative optical properties of these soils are a function solely of composition and as such can be directly compared. Spectroscopic techniques for accurate quantitative determination of iron content for lunar highland soils are investigated as well. It is shown that approximations of the 1 micrometer Fe(2+) absorption band depth using few to several channel multispectral data or spectroscopic data of inadequate spectral range cannot be used with confidence for compositional analysis. However, band depth measurements derived from continuum-removed high spectral resolution data can be used to calculate the weight percent FeO and relative proportion of iron-bearing silicates in mature lunar highland and mare/highland mixture soils. A preliminary effort to calibrate telescopic band depth to laboratory soil measurements is described.

  9. LiF - a spectroscopic method for rare earth elements identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Beyer, Jan; Jacob, Sandra; Heitmann, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LiF) has a great potential for the exploration and identification of rare earth elements (REE) in natural environments. This spectroscopic technique can provide an efficient way to secure resource availability, while the economic and ecological costs are reduced. No time-consuming sample preparation and analysis is needed prior to decisions along the raw material processing chain. Such non-destructive approaches allow for a fast access to analytical results and hence, are the basis for an immediate adjustment of processing steps. The method uses the material-specific luminescence emissions that are induced by laser-stimulation of a certain wavelength. The distinct emission lines of REE make them well suited for the development of a LiF-based exploration technique. However, typical REE emission peaks known from the free elements may shift or be masked in natural materials due to their position in the crystal lattice, varying compositions of minerals or other natural conditions such as water content. The natural variability therefore, demands for comprehensive investigations of REE and their spectral characteristics in minerals. To identify those spectral information that are robust and unequivocal, we analyse spectra of REE standards measured in different matrix minerals including phosphates and fluorides. We use variable laser wavelengths from UV (325 nm) to green (532 nm) and a detection range from 340 nm to 1080 nm. Results show spectral characteristics that sort REE in three groups due to: no distinct emission lines, absorption features, distinct luminescence emission lines. Measured in different matrix minerals, we determine shifts for some of the spectral features and some disappear or decline in intensity. Changing the wavelength of the laser allows for a more selective stimulation of REE emissions, especially wavelengths longer than UV can reduce the unspecific emission of all luminescent components of a sample and thus enhance

  10. Applying Process Improvement Methods to Clinical and Translational Research: Conceptual Framework and Case Examples.

    PubMed

    Daudelin, Denise H; Selker, Harry P; Leslie, Laurel K

    2015-12-01

    There is growing appreciation that process improvement holds promise for improving quality and efficiency across the translational research continuum but frameworks for such programs are not often described. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework and case examples of a Research Process Improvement Program implemented at Tufts CTSI. To promote research process improvement, we developed online training seminars, workshops, and in-person consultation models to describe core process improvement principles and methods, demonstrate the use of improvement tools, and illustrate the application of these methods in case examples. We implemented these methods, as well as relational coordination theory, with junior researchers, pilot funding awardees, our CTRC, and CTSI resource and service providers. The program focuses on capacity building to address common process problems and quality gaps that threaten the efficient, timely and successful completion of clinical and translational studies.

  11. Applying Process Improvement Methods to Clinical and Translational Research: Conceptual Framework and Case Examples

    PubMed Central

    Daudelin, Denise H.; Selker, Harry P.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation that process improvement holds promise for improving the quality and efficiency across the translational research continuum but frameworks for such programs are not often described. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework and case examples of a Research Process Improvement Program implemented at Tufts CTSI. To promote research process improvement, we developed online training seminars, workshops, and in-person consultation models to describe core process improvement principles and methods, demonstrate the use of improvement tools, and illustrate the application of these methods in case examples. We implemented these methods, as well as relational coordination theory, with junior researchers, pilot funding awardees, our CTRC, and CTSI resource and service providers. The program focuses on capacity building to address common process problems and quality gaps that threaten the efficient, timely and successful completion of clinical and translational studies. PMID:26332869

  12. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  13. Determining spectroscopic redshifts by using k nearest neighbor regression. I. Description of method and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügler, S. D.; Polsterer, K.; Hoecker, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. In astronomy, new approaches to process and analyze the exponentially increasing amount of data are inevitable. For spectra, such as in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral database, usually templates of well-known classes are used for classification. In case the fitting of a template fails, wrong spectral properties (e.g. redshift) are derived. Validation of the derived properties is the key to understand the caveats of the template-based method. Aims: In this paper we present a method for statistically computing the redshift z based on a similarity approach. This allows us to determine redshifts in spectra for emission and absorption features without using any predefined model. Additionally, we show how to determine the redshift based on single features. As a consequence we are, for example, able to filter objects that show multiple redshift components. Methods: The redshift calculation is performed by comparing predefined regions in the spectra and individually applying a nearest neighbor regression model to each predefined emission and absorption region. Results: The choice of the model parameters controls the quality and the completeness of the redshifts. For ≈90% of the analyzed 16 000 spectra of our reference and test sample, a certain redshift can be computed that is comparable to the completeness of SDSS (96%). The redshift calculation yields a precision for every individually tested feature that is comparable to the overall precision of the redshifts of SDSS. Using the new method to compute redshifts, we could also identify 14 spectra with a significant shift between emission and absorption or between emission and emission lines. The results already show the immense power of this simple machine-learning approach for investigating huge databases such as the SDSS.

  14. Method for selection of optimal road safety composite index with examples from DEA and TOPSIS method.

    PubMed

    Rosić, Miroslav; Pešić, Dalibor; Kukić, Dragoslav; Antić, Boris; Božović, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Concept of composite road safety index is a popular and relatively new concept among road safety experts around the world. As there is a constant need for comparison among different units (countries, municipalities, roads, etc.) there is need to choose an adequate method which will make comparison fair to all compared units. Usually comparisons using one specific indicator (parameter which describes safety or unsafety) can end up with totally different ranking of compared units which is quite complicated for decision maker to determine "real best performers". Need for composite road safety index is becoming dominant since road safety presents a complex system where more and more indicators are constantly being developed to describe it. Among wide variety of models and developed composite indexes, a decision maker can come to even bigger dilemma than choosing one adequate risk measure. As DEA and TOPSIS are well-known mathematical models and have recently been increasingly used for risk evaluation in road safety, we used efficiencies (composite indexes) obtained by different models, based on DEA and TOPSIS, to present PROMETHEE-RS model for selection of optimal method for composite index. Method for selection of optimal composite index is based on three parameters (average correlation, average rank variation and average cluster variation) inserted into a PROMETHEE MCDM method in order to choose the optimal one. The model is tested by comparing 27 police departments in Serbia.

  15. Growing string method with interpolation and optimization in internal coordinates: method and examples.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Paul M

    2013-05-14

    The growing string method (GSM) has proven especially useful for locating chemical reaction paths at low computational cost. While many string methods use Cartesian coordinates, these methods can be substantially improved by changes in the coordinate system used for interpolation and optimization steps. The quality of the interpolation scheme is especially important because it determines how close the initial path is to the optimized reaction path, and this strongly affects the rate of convergence. In this article, a detailed description of the generation of internal coordinates (ICs) suitable for use in GSM as reactive tangents and in string optimization is given. Convergence of reaction paths is smooth because the IC tangent and orthogonal directions are better representations of chemical bonding compared to Cartesian coordinates. This is not only important quantitatively for reducing computational cost but also allows reaction paths to be described with smoothly varying chemically relevant coordinates. Benchmark computations with challenging reactions are compared to previous versions of GSM and show significant speedups. Finally, a climbing image scheme is included to improve the quality of the transition state approximation, ensuring high reliability of the method.

  16. Spectroscopic methods for the determination of surface-active substances in water (a review)

    SciTech Connect

    Subbotina, E.I.; Dedkov, Yu.M.

    1987-12-01

    Synthetic surfactants, for their ability to mingle with and transform chemicals more toxic in nature such as petroleum products, oils, pesticides, and chlorinated hydrocarbons into substances that easily permeate and move through the hydrosphere into water reservoirs and other exposure pathways, pose a grave danger to water quality control. This paper reviews predominantly the spectrophotometric procedures available for monitoring these surfactants but also discusses fluorimetric, infrared spectroscopic, and atomic absorption procedures, and compares a wide range of solvents and reagents for the extraction and preparatory activation of the surfactants.

  17. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Zelepouga, Serguei A; Rue, David M; Saveliev, Alexei V

    2011-03-15

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  18. A rapid Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method for direct quantification of paracetamol content in solid pharmaceutical formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallah, Muhammad Ali; Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal; Mahesar, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Bajeer, Muhammad Ashraf

    2015-04-01

    A transmission FTIR spectroscopic method was developed for direct, inexpensive and fast quantification of paracetamol content in solid pharmaceutical formulations. In this method paracetamol content is directly analyzed without solvent extraction. KBr pellets were formulated for the acquisition of FTIR spectra in transmission mode. Two chemometric models: simple Beer's law and partial least squares employed over the spectral region of 1800-1000 cm-1 for quantification of paracetamol content had a regression coefficient of (R2) of 0.999. The limits of detection and quantification using FTIR spectroscopy were 0.005 mg g-1 and 0.018 mg g-1, respectively. Study for interference was also done to check effect of the excipients. There was no significant interference from the sample matrix. The results obviously showed the sensitivity of transmission FTIR spectroscopic method for pharmaceutical analysis. This method is green in the sense that it does not require large volumes of hazardous solvents or long run times and avoids prior sample preparation.

  19. Pedagogies in Action: A Community Resource Linking Teaching Methods to Examples of their Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; Fox, S. P.; Iverson, E. A.; Kirk, K.; Ormand, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Pedagogies in Action portal (http://serc.carleton.edu/sp) provides access to information on more than 40 teaching methods with examples of their use in geoscience and beyond. Each method is described with pages addressing what the method is, why or when it is useful, and how it can be implemented. New methods added this year include Teaching with Google Earth, Jigsaw, Teaching the Process of Science, Guided Discovery Problems, Teaching Urban Students, and Using ConceptTests. Examples then show specifically how the method has been used to teach concepts in a variety of disciplines. The example collection now includes 775 teaching activities of which more than 550 are drawn from the geosciences. Geoscience faculty are invited to add their own examples to this collection or to test examples in the collection and provide a review. Evaluation results show that the combination of modules and activities inspires teachers at all levels to use a new pedagogy and increases their confidence that they can use it successfully. In addition, submitting activities to the collection, including writing summary information for other instructors, helps them think more carefully about the design of their activity. The activity collections are used both for ready to use activities and to find ideas for new activities. The portal provides overarching access to materials developed by a wide variety of collaborating partners each of which uses the service to create a customized pedagogic portal addressing a more specific audience. Of interest to AGU members are pedagogic portals on Starting Point: Teaching Introductory Geoscience (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo); On the Cutting Edge (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops); Enduring Resources for Earth System Education (http://earthref.org/ERESE) Microbial Life Educational Resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/microbe_life); the National Numeracy Network (http://serc.carleton.edu/nnn/index.html); CAUSE: The Consortium for

  20. A Review of Computational Methods in Materials Science: Examples from Shock-Wave and Polymer Physics

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Martin O.; Hiermaier, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses several computational methods used on different length and time scales for the simulation of material behavior. First, the importance of physical modeling and its relation to computer simulation on multiscales is discussed. Then, computational methods used on different scales are shortly reviewed, before we focus on the molecular dynamics (MD) method. Here we survey in a tutorial-like fashion some key issues including several MD optimization techniques. Thereafter, computational examples for the capabilities of numerical simulations in materials research are discussed. We focus on recent results of shock wave simulations of a solid which are based on two different modeling approaches and we discuss their respective assets and drawbacks with a view to their application on multiscales. Then, the prospects of computer simulations on the molecular length scale using coarse-grained MD methods are covered by means of examples pertaining to complex topological polymer structures including star-polymers, biomacromolecules such as polyelectrolytes and polymers with intrinsic stiffness. This review ends by highlighting new emerging interdisciplinary applications of computational methods in the field of medical engineering where the application of concepts of polymer physics and of shock waves to biological systems holds a lot of promise for improving medical applications such as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or tumor treatment. PMID:20054467

  1. Mining unusual and rare stellar spectra from large spectroscopic survey data sets using the outlier-detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Luo, Ali; Li, Yinbi; Pan, Jingchang; Tu, Liangping; Jiang, Bin; Kong, Xiao; Shi, Zhixin; Yi, Zhenping; Wang, Fengfei; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Yongheng

    2013-05-01

    The large number of spectra obtained from sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the survey executed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called GuoShouJing Telescope) provide us with opportunities to search for peculiar or even unknown types of spectra. In response to the limitations of existing methods, a novel outlier-mining method, the Monte Carlo Local Outlier Factor (MCLOF), is proposed in this paper, which can be used to highlight unusual and rare spectra from large spectroscopic survey data sets. The MCLOF method exposes outliers automatically and efficiently by marking each spectrum with a number, i.e. using outlier index as a flag for an unusual and rare spectrum. The Local Outlier Factor (LOF) represents how unusual and rare a spectrum is compared with other spectra and the Monte Carlo method is used to compute the global LOF for each spectrum by randomly selecting samples in each independent iteration. Our MCLOF method is applied to over half a million stellar spectra (classified as STAR by the SDSS Pipeline) from the SDSS data release 8 (DR8) and a total of 37 033 spectra are selected as outliers with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ≥ 3 and outlier index ≥0.85. Some of these outliers are shown to be binary stars, emission-line stars, carbon stars and stars with unusual continuum. The results show that our proposed method can efficiently highlight these unusual spectra from the survey data sets. In addition, some relatively rare and interesting spectra are selected, indicating that the proposed method can also be used to mine rare, even unknown, spectra. The proposed method can be applicable not only to spectral survey data sets but also to other types of survey data sets. The spectra of all peculiar objects selected by our MCLOF method are available from a user-friendly website: http://sciwiki.lamost.org/Miningdr8/.

  2. Comparison of correction methods for inhomogeneities in daily time series on example of Central European datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.,

    2010-09-01

    Prior any data analysis, data quality control and homogenization have to be undertaken to get rid of erroneous values in time series. In this work we focused especially on comparison of methods for daily data inhomogeneities correction. Two basic approaches for inhomogeneity adjustments were adopted and compared: (i) "delta" method - adjustment of monthly series and projection of estimated smoothed monthly adjustments into annual variation of daily adjustments and (ii) "variable" correction of daily values according to the corresponding percentiles. "Variable" correction methods emerged only in recent years. Their results were investigated in this work more deeply and they were mutually compared. Among the analyzed methods belong HOM of Paul Della-Marta, SPLIDHOM method of Olivier Mestre and own methods (DAP). We applied multi-element approach (using e.g. weather types) as well and investigated if it can improve the models. Comparison of the available correction methods is also current task of the ongoing COST action ESO601 (www. homogenisation.org). Performance of the available correction methods (on daily scale) is shown on example of Central European series of various meteorological elements (air temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, sunshine duration). Comparisons among the methods as well as its various modifications (parameters settings) were investigated. For the task, ProClimDB software has been used (read more at www.climahom.eu).

  3. Determining uranium speciation in Fernald soils by molecular spectroscopic methods. FY 1993 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Crisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-07-01

    This progress report describes new experimental results and interpretations for data collected from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993, as part of the Characterization Task of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration of the Office of Technology Development, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. X-ray absorption, optical luminescence, and Raman vibrational spectroscopies were used to determine uranium speciation in contaminated soils from the US DOE`s former uranium production facility at Fernald, Ohio. These analyses were carried out both before and after application of one of the various decontamination technologies being developed within the Integrated Demonstration. This year the program focused on characterization of the uranium speciation remaining in the soils after decontamination treatment. X-ray absorption and optical luminescence spectroscopic data were collected for approximately 40 Fernald soil samples, which were treated by one or more of the decontamination technologies.

  4. Optimization Of Technology For The Systems Of Hard-Oxide Layers By Spectroscopic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, K.; Szalai, G.; Kojnok, J.; Szász, A.

    1986-10-01

    The well-known evaporating process of hard-oxid coatings for laser mirrors has many uncontrolled parameters. This paper deals with the Ti0,-SiO2 hard-oxides systems. The optimization of technology is based on optical [transmission; reflection parameters etc), spectroscopical [soft x-ray emission spectroscopy /SXES/, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy /XFS/], structural (x-ray diffraction /XRD/) and damage threshold /DT/ examinations. The Ti02 was found in the evaporated layers in two equilibrium phases - rutil and anatase - depending on the evapora-tion conditions. The rutil phase was better than the anatase considering the DT for mirrors at λ=]1064 µm. The explanation is based on the difference of the near-infrared absorbtion between rutil and anatase phase of Ti02.

  5. [Clinical examples of professor LI Zhi-dao's "tonifying three qi" acupuncture method].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Chao; Li, Yan; Fu, Yuan-Xin; Zhao, Xiang-Fei; Sun, Jing; Li, Lan-Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Professor LI Zhi-dao, according to acupoint selection of syndrome differentiation in TCM basic theory, concluded a new therapy, namely "tonifying three qi" that is mainly based on three acupoints in the Conception Vessel. This method is consisted of Danzhong (CV 17), Zhongwan (CV 12) and Qihai (CV 6) in the Conception Vessel, which could successively nourish clear qi, stomach qi and original qi. In clinic, according to the severity of symptoms of three qi, the acupoints are selected flexibly, which could respectively treat deficiency of heart-lung qi, deficiency of stomach-spleen qi and deficiency of original qi. Some examples are also given in the article.

  6. A Systematic Method For Tracer Test Analysis: An Example Using Beowawe Tracer Data

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of tracer data using moment analysis requires a strict adherence to a set of rules which include data normalization, correction for thermal decay, deconvolution, extrapolation, and integration. If done correctly, the method yields specific information on swept pore volume, flow geometry and fluid velocity, and an understanding of the nature of reservoir boundaries. All calculations required for the interpretation can be done in a spreadsheet. The steps required for moment analysis are reviewed in this paper. Data taken from the literature is used in an example calculation.

  7. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined.

  8. Rapid and sensitive determination of proteins with Eriochrome Red in the presence of anionic surfactant by multi-spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yongru; Cai, Changqun; Gong, Hang; Chen, Xiaoming

    2010-10-01

    A new high-sensitivity detection of protein assay at the nanogram level is proposed based on multi-spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultraviolet spectra (UV) and fluorescence spectra etc. Under the optimum conditions, the amplified RLS signals of anionic azo dyes Eriochrome Red B (ERB) in the presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphonate (SDS) was in proportion to the concentration of proteins in the range of 0.0-3.5 mg L -1 and 3.5-12.5 mg L -1 for bovine serum albumin (BSA), 0.0-2.0 mg L -1 and 2.0-8.0 mg L -1 for human serum albumin (HSA). The detection limits were 4.2 ng mL -1 and 2.7 ng mL -1, respectively. The method was satisfactorily applied to the measurement of total protein in human serum samples and a high-sensitivity was achieved.

  9. Gel electrophoretic methods for the analysis of biosimilar pharmaceuticals using the example of recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Christian; Thevis, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Due to their versatility and cost-effectiveness, gel electrophoretic methods provide an important set of tools for the analysis of therapeutic proteins. As an increasing number of biosimilar pharmaceuticals are entering the market, techniques are required that allow reliable demonstration of comparability of these products with the reference products. Isoelectric focusing, SDS-PAGE, native PAGE and 2D electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) have been frequently applied for this purpose. Supplementary techniques are fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis and sarcosyl-PAGE. Of additional importance is the comparison of recombinant with endogenously synthesized glycoproteins. Reagent array analysis combined with SDS-PAGE and western blotting proved especially useful for this purpose. As an example for the application of these methods, the analysis of recombinant originator erythropoietins and some of their biosimilar counterparts is described.

  10. Bayesian Methods for the Physical Sciences. Learning from Examples in Astronomy and Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, Stefano; Weaver, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Chapter 1: This chapter presents some basic steps for performing a good statistical analysis, all summarized in about one page. Chapter 2: This short chapter introduces the basics of probability theory inan intuitive fashion using simple examples. It also illustrates, again with examples, how to propagate errors and the difference between marginal and profile likelihoods. Chapter 3: This chapter introduces the computational tools and methods that we use for sampling from the posterior distribution. Since all numerical computations, and Bayesian ones are no exception, may end in errors, we also provide a few tips to check that the numerical computation is sampling from the posterior distribution. Chapter 4: Many of the concepts of building, running, and summarizing the resultsof a Bayesian analysis are described with this step-by-step guide using a basic (Gaussian) model. The chapter also introduces examples using Poisson and Binomial likelihoods, and how to combine repeated independent measurements. Chapter 5: All statistical analyses make assumptions, and Bayesian analyses are no exception. This chapter emphasizes that results depend on data and priors (assumptions). We illustrate this concept with examples where the prior plays greatly different roles, from major to negligible. We also provide some advice on how to look for information useful for sculpting the prior. Chapter 6: In this chapter we consider examples for which we want to estimate more than a single parameter. These common problems include estimating location and spread. We also consider examples that require the modeling of two populations (one we are interested in and a nuisance population) or averaging incompatible measurements. We also introduce quite complex examples dealing with upper limits and with a larger-than-expected scatter. Chapter 7: Rarely is a sample randomly selected from the population we wish to study. Often, samples are affected by selection effects, e.g., easier

  11. Interaction of tetramethylpyrazine with two serum albumins by a hybrid spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun

    The interactions of tetramethylpyrazine (TMPZ) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by various spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence tests showed that TMPZ could bind to BSA/HSA to form complexes. The binding constants of TMPZ-BSA and TMPZ-HSA complexes were observed to be 1.442 × 104 and 3.302 × 104 M-1 at 298 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) calculated on the basis of different temperatures revealed that the binding of TMPZ-HSA was mainly depended on hydrophobic interaction, and yet the binding of TMPZ-BSA might involve hydrophobic interaction strongly and electrostatic interaction. The results of synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, FT-IR and CD spectra showed that the conformations of both BSA and HSA altered with the addition of TMPZ. The binding average distance between TMPZ and BSA/HSA was evaluated according to Föster non-radioactive energy transfer theory. In addition, with the aid of site markers (such as, phenylbutazone, ibuprofen and digitoxin), TMPZ primarily bound to tryptophan residues of BSA/HSA within site I (sub-domain II A).

  12. Direct visualization of both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells via an uncommon spectroscopic method

    PubMed Central

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M. Y.; Monchaud, David

    2016-01-01

    Guanine-rich DNA or RNA sequences can fold into higher-order, four-stranded structures termed quadruplexes that are suspected to play pivotal roles in cellular mechanisms including the control of the genome integrity and gene expression. However, the biological relevance of quadruplexes is still a matter of debate owing to the paucity of unbiased evidences of their existence in cells. Recent reports on quadruplex-specific antibodies and small-molecule fluorescent probes help dispel reservations and accumulating evidences now pointing towards the cellular relevance of quadruplexes. To better assess and comprehend their biology, developing new versatile tools to detect both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in cells is essential. We report here a smart fluorescent probe that allows for the simple detection of quadruplexes thanks to an uncommon spectroscopic mechanism known as the red-edge effect (REE). We demonstrate that this effect could open avenues to greatly enhance the ability to visualize both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells, using simple protocols and fluorescence detection facilities. PMID:27535322

  13. Studies on the interaction of apigenin with calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufang; Sun, Xuejun; Kong, Rongmei; Xu, Mingming

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between apigenin and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) in a pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques, and viscosity measurements. It was found that apigenin molecules could intercalate into the base pairs of DNA, forming a apigenin-DNA complex with a binding constant of K310K = 6.4 × 104 L mol-1. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) were calculated to be 7.36 × 104 J mol-1, 329 J K-1 mol-1 and -2.84 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the apigenin-DNA complex. Thermal denaturation study suggested that the stabilization of the ctDNA helix was increased when the apigenin binding to ctDNA as indicated by the increase in thermal denaturation temperature of ctDNA at around 5.0 °C in the presence of apigenin. Spectroscopic techniques together with melting techniques and viscosity determination provided evidences of intercalation mode of binding for the interaction between apigenin and ctDNA.

  14. Studies of interaction of emodin and DNA in the presence of ethidium bromide by spectroscopic method.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shuyun; Zhang, Hanqi; Qiao, Chunyu; Sun, Ying; Liu, Chunming

    2008-01-01

    Emodin interacting with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been studied by different spectroscopic techniques, such as fluorescence, ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis), and fourier transform infared (FT-IR) spectroscopies, using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe of DNA. The decrease in the fluorescence of DNA-EB system on addition of emodin shows that the fluorescence quenching of DNA-EB complex by emodin occurs. The binding constants of emodin with DNA in the presence of EB are 6.02x10(4), 9.20x10(4) and 1.17x10(5)Lmol(-1) at 20, 35 and 50 degrees C, respectively. FT-IR spectrum further suggests that both the phosphate groups and the bases of DNA react with emodin. The reaction of DNA with emodin in the presence of EB is affected by ionic strength and temperature. The values of melting temperature (T(m)) of DNA-EB complex and emodin-DNA-EB complexes were determined, respectively. From the experiment evidences, the major binding mode of emodin with DNA should be the groove binding.

  15. Teaching Research Methods and Statistics in eLearning Environments: Pedagogy, Practical Examples, and Possible Futures

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Adam J.; Coventry, William L.; Morgan, Methuen I.; Loi, Natasha M.

    2016-01-01

    Generally, academic psychologists are mindful of the fact that, for many students, the study of research methods and statistics is anxiety provoking (Gal et al., 1997). Given the ubiquitous and distributed nature of eLearning systems (Nof et al., 2015), teachers of research methods and statistics need to cultivate an understanding of how to effectively use eLearning tools to inspire psychology students to learn. Consequently, the aim of the present paper is to discuss critically how using eLearning systems might engage psychology students in research methods and statistics. First, we critically appraise definitions of eLearning. Second, we examine numerous important pedagogical principles associated with effectively teaching research methods and statistics using eLearning systems. Subsequently, we provide practical examples of our own eLearning-based class activities designed to engage psychology students to learn statistical concepts such as Factor Analysis and Discriminant Function Analysis. Finally, we discuss general trends in eLearning and possible futures that are pertinent to teachers of research methods and statistics in psychology. PMID:27014147

  16. Teaching Research Methods and Statistics in eLearning Environments: Pedagogy, Practical Examples, and Possible Futures.

    PubMed

    Rock, Adam J; Coventry, William L; Morgan, Methuen I; Loi, Natasha M

    2016-01-01

    Generally, academic psychologists are mindful of the fact that, for many students, the study of research methods and statistics is anxiety provoking (Gal et al., 1997). Given the ubiquitous and distributed nature of eLearning systems (Nof et al., 2015), teachers of research methods and statistics need to cultivate an understanding of how to effectively use eLearning tools to inspire psychology students to learn. Consequently, the aim of the present paper is to discuss critically how using eLearning systems might engage psychology students in research methods and statistics. First, we critically appraise definitions of eLearning. Second, we examine numerous important pedagogical principles associated with effectively teaching research methods and statistics using eLearning systems. Subsequently, we provide practical examples of our own eLearning-based class activities designed to engage psychology students to learn statistical concepts such as Factor Analysis and Discriminant Function Analysis. Finally, we discuss general trends in eLearning and possible futures that are pertinent to teachers of research methods and statistics in psychology.

  17. Spectroscopic methods of process monitoring for safeguards of used nuclear fuel separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Jamie Lee

    To support the demonstration of a more proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel processing plant, techniques and instrumentation to allow the real-time, online determination of special nuclear material concentrations in-process must be developed. An ideal materials accountability technique for proliferation resistance should provide nondestructive, realtime, on-line information of metal and ligand concentrations in separations streams without perturbing the process. UV-Visible spectroscopy can be adapted for this precise purpose in solvent extraction-based separations. The primary goal of this project is to understand fundamental URanium EXtraction (UREX) and Plutonium-URanium EXtraction (PUREX) reprocessing chemistry and corresponding UV-Visible spectroscopy for application in process monitoring for safeguards. By evaluating the impact of process conditions, such as acid concentration, metal concentration and flow rate, on the sensitivity of the UV-Visible detection system, the process-monitoring concept is developed from an advanced application of fundamental spectroscopy. Systematic benchtop-scale studies investigated the system relevant to UREX or PUREX type reprocessing systems, encompassing 0.01-1.26 M U and 0.01-8 M HNO3. A laboratory-scale TRansUranic Extraction (TRUEX) demonstration was performed and used both to analyze for potential online monitoring opportunities in the TRUEX process, and to provide the foundation for building and demonstrating a laboratory-scale UREX demonstration. The secondary goal of the project is to simulate a diversion scenario in UREX and successfully detect changes in metal concentration and solution chemistry in a counter current contactor system with a UV-Visible spectroscopic process monitor. UREX uses the same basic solvent extraction flowsheet as PUREX, but has a lower acid concentration throughout and adds acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) as a complexant/reductant to the feed solution to prevent the extraction of Pu. By examining

  18. The first examples of multiply bonded dirhenium(iii,ii) paramagnetic complexes containing nitrobenzoate ligands: spectroscopic, structural, cytotoxicity and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Suman; Ghosh, Mrinal Kanti; Mandal, Suman; Rane, Vinayak; Kadam, Ramakant; Chatterjee, Annesha; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Chattopadhyay, Swarup

    2017-02-09

    4-Nitrobenzoic acid, 3-nitrobenzoic acid and 4'-nitro[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid react with the multiply bonded paramagnetic dirhenium(iii,ii) complex Re2(μ-O2CCH3)Cl4(μ-Ph2PCH2PPh2)2 (1) in refluxing ethanol to afford the paramagnetic substitution products of the type Re2(μ-L)Cl4(μ-Ph2PCH2PPh2)2, where L represents the nitrobenzoate ligands [L = 4-nitrobenzoate, 2; 3-nitrobenzoate, 3; 4'-nitro[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylate, 4]. These are the first examples of paramagnetic dirhenium complexes containing nitrobenzoate ligands. The spectral (UV-vis, IR, and EPR) and electrochemical properties of the complexes are described. The identity of 4 has been established by single-crystal X-ray structure determination (Re-Re distance of 2.2967(4) Å). The electronic structures of the complexes were scrutinized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. X-band EPR spectral measurements along with the DFT analysis show that the unpaired electron resides in the metal-metal δ* antibonding orbital. The complexes were also screened in vitro for their antiproliferative properties against the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 by the MTT assay. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the complexes arrested the sub-G0/G1 phase.

  19. Mesh Deformation Based on Fully Stressed Design: The Method and Two-Dimensional Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Mesh deformation in response to redefined boundary geometry is a frequently encountered task in shape optimization and analysis of fluid-structure interaction. We propose a simple and concise method for deforming meshes defined with three-node triangular or four-node tetrahedral elements. The mesh deformation method is suitable for large boundary movement. The approach requires two consecutive linear elastic finite-element analyses of an isotropic continuum using a prescribed displacement at the mesh boundaries. The first analysis is performed with homogeneous elastic property and the second with inhomogeneous elastic property. The fully stressed design is employed with a vanishing Poisson s ratio and a proposed form of equivalent strain (modified Tresca equivalent strain) to calculate, from the strain result of the first analysis, the element-specific Young s modulus for the second analysis. The theoretical aspect of the proposed method, its convenient numerical implementation using a typical linear elastic finite-element code in conjunction with very minor extra coding for data processing, and results for examples of large deformation of two-dimensional meshes are presented in this paper. KEY WORDS: Mesh deformation, shape optimization, fluid-structure interaction, fully stressed design, finite-element analysis, linear elasticity, strain failure, equivalent strain, Tresca failure criterion

  20. Inverse scattering spectroscopic method for the fast measurement of the number and mass concentrations of metal nanoparticle colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoce; Bai, Benfeng; Liu, Wenqi; Wu, Xiaochun

    2016-04-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) have wide applications in various fields due to their unique properties. The accurate and fast characterization of metal NP concentration is highly demanded in the synthesis, metrology, and applications of NPs. The commonly used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a standard method for measuring the mass concentration (MC) of NPs, even though it is time-consuming, expensive, and destructive. While for the number concentration (NC) characterization of NPs, the method is less explored. Here, we present an improved optical extinction-scattering spectroscopic method for the fast, non-destructive characterization of the MC and NC of poly-disperse metal NP colloid simultaneously. By measuring the extinction spectrum and the 90° scattering spectrum of the nanorod (NR) colloid, we can solve an inverse scattering problem to retrieve the two dimensional joint probability density function (2D-JPDF) with respect to the width and the aspect ratio of NR sample accurately, based on which the NC and MC of the colloidal NPs can be calculated. This method is powerful to characterize both the geometric parameters and the concentrations, including the MC and NC, of poly-disperse metal NPs simultaneously. It is very useful for the non-destructive, non-contact, and in-situ comprehensive measurement of colloidal NPs. This method also has the potential to characterize NPs of other shapes or made of other materials.

  1. Characterization of vanadium, manganese and iron model clusters by vibrational and optical spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin

    1999-12-01

    The active ferryl intermediates in the catalytic cycles of heme proteins are subject to interactions from the proximal and distal amino acid residues which control their activities and affect the ν(FeIVO) frequency. The effects of sixth axial ligation, hydrogen bonding, and solvent induced polarization on the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferryl porphyrin analogs, vanadyl (VIVO) porphyrins and their π-cation radicals, are characterized. ν(VIVO) stretching bands for (VO)TMPyP and (VO)PPIX are observed to be sensitive to the pH value of the aqueous solutions, and reveal a number of coexisting 5-coordinate (c) and 6- c vanadyl porphyrins in solution. Moreover, the ν(VIVO) bands for (VO)TMP and (VO)TPP porphyrins upshift to higher frequencies with the formation of their π-cation radicals, in agreement with that of the (VO)OEP radical. For both a1u (OEP) and a2u (TPP, TMP) type radicals, an increased positive charge on the porphyrin reduces the porphyrin --> vanadium electron donation, but enhances the oxo --> V donation. The UV-Vis absorption and RR spectroscopic studies on a series of oxo-bridged vanadium(III) and manganese (III, IV) complexes established spectrostructural correlations that are useful as monitors of the structure of vanadium(III) and manganese(III, IV) centers in biological systems. The linear and bent V-O-V dimers display distinctive RR and absorption spectra. The linear V-O-V bridge displays an intense μ-O --> V charge transfer (CT) absorption band and a strongly enhanced symmetric (νs) or antisymmetric (νas) V-O-V stretching band in RR spectra, depending upon terminal ligands. In contrast, the bent bridge shows two μ-O --> V CT bands and both νs and νas V- O-V stretches are observed in RR spectra. These νs and νas vibrations are used to indicate that the vanadium(III) oxo-bridged dimer intercalates with DNA. The Mn-O-Mn vibrational frequencies in the 400-700 cm -1 region of the oxo-bridged manganese(III, IV) dimers, trimers, and

  2. Differential-Integral method in polymer processing: Taking melt electrospinning technique for example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoyi, Li; Weimin, Yang; Hongbo, Chen; Jing, Tan; Pengcheng, Xie

    2016-03-01

    A concept of Differential-Integral (DI) method applied in polymer processing and molding was proposed, which included melt DI injection molding, DI nano-composites extrusion molding and melt differential electrospinning principle and equipment. Taking the melt differential electrospinning for example to introduce the innovation research progress, two methods preparing polymer ultrafine fiber have been developed: solution electro-spinning and melt electro-spinning, between which solution electro-spinning is much simpler to realize in lab. More than 100 institutions have endeavored to conduct research on it and more than 30 thousand papers have been published. However, its industrialization was restricted to some extend because of the existence of toxic solvent during spinning process and poor mechanical strength of resultant fibers caused by small pores on fiber surface. Solvent-free melt electrospinning is environmentally friendly and highly productive. However, problems such as the high melt viscosity, thick fiber diameter and complex equipment makes it relatively under researched compared with solution electrospinning. With the purpose of solving the shortage of traditional electro-spinning equipment with needles or capillaries, a melt differential electro-spinning method without needles or capillaries was firstly proposed. Nearly 50 related patents have been applied since 2005, and systematic method innovations and experimental studies have also been conducted. The prepared fiber by this method had exhibited small diameter and smooth surface. The average fiber diameter can reach 200-800 nm, and the single nozzle can yield two orders of magnitude more than the capillaries. Based on the above principle, complete commercial techniques and equipment have been developed to produce ultra-fine non-woven fabrics for the applications in air filtration, oil spill recovery and water treatment, etc.

  3. Development of new UV-vis spectroscopic microwave-assisted method for determination of glucose in pharmaceutical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazal; Hussain, Z.; Haq, H.; Arian, M. B.; Boqué, R.; Khan, K. M.; Hussain, K.; Jabeen, F.; Hussain, J.; Ahmed, M.; Alharasi, A.; Naureen, Z.; Hussain, H.; Khan, A.; Perveen, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new UV-Visible spectroscopic method assisted with microwave for the determination of glucose in pharmaceutical formulations was developed. In this study glucose solutions were oxidized by ammonium molybdate in the presence of microwave energy and reacted with aniline to produce a colored solution. Optimum conditions of the reaction including wavelength, temperature, and pH of the medium and relative concentration ratio of the reactants were investigated. It was found that the optimal wavelength for the reaction is 610 nm, the optimal reaction time is 80 s, the optimal reaction temperature is 160 °C, the optimal reaction pH is 4, and the optimal concentration ratio aniline/ammonium molybdate solution was found to be 1:1. The limits of detection and quantification of the method are 0.82 and 2.75 ppm for glucose solution, respectively. The use of microwaves improved the speed of the method while the use of aniline improved the sensitivity of the method by shifting the wavelength.

  4. Development of new UV-vis spectroscopic microwave-assisted method for determination of glucose in pharmaceutical samples.

    PubMed

    Mabood, Fazal; Hussain, Z; Haq, H; Arian, M B; Boqué, R; Khan, K M; Hussain, K; Jabeen, F; Hussain, J; Ahmed, M; Alharasi, A; Naureen, Z; Hussain, H; Khan, A; Perveen, S

    2016-01-15

    A new UV-Visible spectroscopic method assisted with microwave for the determination of glucose in pharmaceutical formulations was developed. In this study glucose solutions were oxidized by ammonium molybdate in the presence of microwave energy and reacted with aniline to produce a colored solution. Optimum conditions of the reaction including wavelength, temperature, and pH of the medium and relative concentration ratio of the reactants were investigated. It was found that the optimal wavelength for the reaction is 610 nm, the optimal reaction time is 80s, the optimal reaction temperature is 160°C, the optimal reaction pH is 4, and the optimal concentration ratio aniline/ammonium molybdate solution was found to be 1:1. The limits of detection and quantification of the method are 0.82 and 2.75 ppm for glucose solution, respectively. The use of microwaves improved the speed of the method while the use of aniline improved the sensitivity of the method by shifting the wavelength.

  5. Qualitative research: a review of methods with use of examples from the total knee replacement literature.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Dorcas E; Clark, Jocalyn P

    2009-05-01

    Qualitative research is a useful approach to explore perplexing or complicated clinical situations. Since 1996, at least fifteen qualitative studies in the area of total knee replacement alone were found. Qualitative studies overcome the limits of quantitative work because they can explicate deeper meaning and complexity associated with questions such as why patients decline joint replacement surgery, why they do not adhere to pain medication and exercise regimens, how they manage in the postoperative period, and why providers do not always provide evidence-based care. In this paper, we review the role of qualitative methods in orthopaedic research, using knee osteoarthritis as an illustrative example. Qualitative research questions tend to be inductive, and the stance of the investigator is relevant and explicitly acknowledged. Qualitative methodologies include grounded theory, phenomenology, and ethnography and involve gathering opinions and text from individuals or focus groups. The methods are rigorous and take training and time to apply. Analysis of the textual data typically proceeds with the identification, coding, and categorization of patterns in the data for the purpose of generating concepts from within the data. With use of analytic techniques, researchers strive to explain the findings; questions are asked to tease out different levels of meaning, identify new concepts and themes, and permit a deeper interpretation and understanding. Orthopaedic practitioners should consider the use of qualitative research as a tool for exploring the meaning and complexities behind some of the perplexing phenomena that they observe in research findings and clinical practice.

  6. The utilisation of health research in policy-making: concepts, examples and methods of assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hanney, Stephen R; Gonzalez-Block, Miguel A; Buxton, Martin J; Kogan, Maurice

    2003-01-01

    The importance of health research utilisation in policy-making, and of understanding the mechanisms involved, is increasingly recognised. Recent reports calling for more resources to improve health in developing countries, and global pressures for accountability, draw greater attention to research-informed policy-making. Key utilisation issues have been described for at least twenty years, but the growing focus on health research systems creates additional dimensions. The utilisation of health research in policy-making should contribute to policies that may eventually lead to desired outcomes, including health gains. In this article, exploration of these issues is combined with a review of various forms of policy-making. When this is linked to analysis of different types of health research, it assists in building a comprehensive account of the diverse meanings of research utilisation. Previous studies report methods and conceptual frameworks that have been applied, if with varying degrees of success, to record utilisation in policy-making. These studies reveal various examples of research impact within a general picture of underutilisation. Factors potentially enhancing utilisation can be identified by exploration of: priority setting; activities of the health research system at the interface between research and policy-making; and the role of the recipients, or 'receptors', of health research. An interfaces and receptors model provides a framework for analysis. Recommendations about possible methods for assessing health research utilisation follow identification of the purposes of such assessments. Our conclusion is that research utilisation can be better understood, and enhanced, by developing assessment methods informed by conceptual analysis and review of previous studies. PMID:12646071

  7. [Methods in health services research. The example of the evaluation of the German disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Morfeld, M; Wirtz, M

    2006-02-01

    According to the established definition of Pfaff, health services research analyses patients' path through the institutions of the health care system. The focus is on development, evaluation and implementation of innovative measures of health care. By increasing its quality health services research strives for an improvement of efficacy and efficiency of the health care system. In order to allow for an appropriate evaluation it is essential to differentiate between structure, process and outcome quality referring to (1) the health care system in its entirety, (2) specific health care units as well as (3) processes of communication in different settings. Health services research comprises a large array of scientific disciplines like public health, medicine, social sciences and social care. For the purpose of managing its tasks adequately a special combination of instruments and methodological procedures is needed. Thus, diverse techniques of evaluation research as well as special requirements for study designs and assessment procedures are of vital importance. The example of the German disease management programmes illustrates the methodical requirements for a scientific evaluation.

  8. Coherent spectroscopic methods for monitoring pathogens, genetically modified products and nanostructured materials in colloidal solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moguilnaya, T.; Suminov, Y.; Botikov, A.; Ignatov, S.; Kononenko, A.; Agibalov, A.

    2016-12-01

    We developed the new automatic method that combines the method of forced luminescence and stimulated Brillouin scattering. This method is used for monitoring pathogens, genetically modified products and nanostructured materials in colloidal solution. We carried out the statistical spectral analysis of pathogens, genetically modified soy and nano-particles of silver in water from different regions in order to determine the statistical errors of the method. We studied spectral characteristics of these objects in water to perform the initial identification with 95% probability. These results were used for creation of the model of the device for monitor of pathogenic organisms and working model of the device to determine the genetically modified soy in meat.

  9. A validated near-infrared spectroscopic method for methanol detection in biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Andrea; Bräuer, Bastian; Nieuwenkamp, Gerard; Ent, Hugo; Bremser, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel quality control is a relevant issue as biodiesel properties influence diesel engine performance and integrity. Within the European metrology research program (EMRP) ENG09 project ‘Metrology for Biofuels’, an on-line/at-site suitable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method has been developed in parallel with an improved EN14110 headspace gas chromatography (GC) analysis method for methanol in biodiesel. Both methods have been optimized for a methanol content of 0.2 mass% as this represents the maximum limit of methanol content in FAME according to EN 14214:2009. The NIRS method is based on a mobile NIR spectrometer equipped with a fiber-optic coupled probe. Due to the high volatility of methanol, a tailored air-tight adaptor was constructed to prevent methanol evaporation during measurement. The methanol content of biodiesel was determined from evaluation of NIRS spectra by partial least squares regression (PLS). Both GC analysis and NIRS exhibited a significant dependence on biodiesel feedstock. The NIRS method is applicable to a content range of 0.1% (m/m) to 0.4% (m/m) of methanol with uncertainties at around 6% relative for the different feedstocks. A direct comparison of headspace GC and NIRS for samples of FAMEs yielded that the results of both methods are fully compatible within their stated uncertainties.

  10. Analysis of human blood plasma and hen egg white by chiroptical spectroscopic methods (ECD, VCD, ROA).

    PubMed

    Synytsya, Alla; Judexová, Miluše; Hrubý, Tomáš; Tatarkovič, Michal; Miškovičová, Michaela; Petruželka, Luboš; Setnička, Vladimír

    2013-06-01

    Chiroptical methods are widely used in structural and conformational analyses of biopolymers. The application of these methods to investigations of biofluids would provide new avenues for the molecular diagnosis of protein-misfolding diseases. In this work, samples of human blood plasma and hen egg white were analyzed using a combination of conventional and chiroptical methods: ultraviolet absorption/electronic circular dichroism (UV/ECD), Fourier transform infrared absorption/vibrational circular dichroism (FTIR/VCD), and Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (Raman/ROA). For comparison, the main components of these substances--human serum albumin (HSA) and ovalbumin (Ova)--were also analyzed by these methods. The ultraviolet region of the ECD spectrum was analyzed using the CDNN CD software package to evaluate the secondary structures of the proteins. The UV/ECD, FTIR/VCD, and Raman/ROA spectra of the substances were quite similar to those of the corresponding major proteins, while some differences were also detected and explained. The conclusions drawn from the FTIR/VCD and Raman/ROA data were in good agreement with the secondary structures calculated from ECD. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that the chiroptical methods used here can be applied to analyze not only pure protein solutions but also more complex systems, such as biological fluids.

  11. Critical review of near-infrared spectroscopic methods validations in pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    De Bleye, C; Chavez, P-F; Mantanus, J; Marini, R; Hubert, Ph; Rozet, E; Ziemons, E

    2012-10-01

    Based on the large number of publications reported over the past five years, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is more and more considered an attractive and promising analytical tool regarding Process Analytical Technology and Green Chemistry. From the reviewed literature, few of these publications present a thoroughly validated NIRS method even if some guidelines have been published by different groups and regulatory authorities. However, as any analytical method, the validation of NIRS method is a mandatory step at the end of the development in order to give enough guarantees that each of the future results during routine use will be close enough to the true value. Besides the introduction of PAT concepts in the revised document of the European Pharmacopoeia (2.2.40) dealing with near-infrared spectroscopy recently published in Pharmeuropa, it agrees very well with this mandatory step. Indeed, the latter suggests to use similar analytical performance characteristics than those required for any analytical procedure based on acceptance criteria consistent with the intended use of the method. In this context, this review gives a comprehensive and critical overview of the methodologies applied to assess the validity of quantitative NIRS methods used in pharmaceutical applications.

  12. Effect of hybrid oxidation on the titanium oxide layer's properties investigated by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. J.; Kurpaska, L.; Lubas, M.; Lesniak, M.; Jasinski, J.; Sitarz, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the study of hybrid Ti Grade 2 during oxidation using FADT - fluidized bed atmospheric diffusive treatment and PVD - magnetron sputtering have been investigated. Additionally, the influence of the oxidation method on the change in the mechanism of oxygen transport to the substrate have been discussed (phenomenon responsible for the improvement of bioactivity). Presented method consists in forming the titanium surface layer saturated with oxygen due to the diffusion and deposition of a thin homogeneous oxide coating on the Ti surface. Discussed processes diminish the surface roughness and increase bio-compatibility of the surface, which results in easier hydroxyapatite cluster deposition. The diffusion process was conducted on Al2O3 fluidized bed, with air as the fluidizing factor at 913 K for 8 h. The deposition of the oxide coatings were carried out with magnetron sputtering, with the use of a TiO2 target at a pressure of 3 × 10-2 mbars and power of 350 W. To evaluate the effects of hybrid oxidation and to determine the mechanism of oxygen transport, the following research methods have been applied: spectroscopy (GDOS, SIMS, RS), microscopic methods (SEM-EDS, SEM-EBSD, TEM-EFTEM), X-ray tests (μ-XRD, GID). Obtained test results were used to identify the type of oxide coatings, to assess the thickness of the layers and to study the influence of crystallographic orientation on oxygen transport and concentration in the surface layer and in the oxide coating. It has been found that the formation of oxide coatings created by using the hybrid method (FADT + PVD leads to a change in oxygen concentration in the substrate due to introduced defects. This phenomenon is in opposition to the conventional methods such as: electrochemical or laser oxidation. In contrast, forming a tight homogeneous oxide coating on Ti surface improves the biocompatibility, which is particularly important in the context of biomedical applications.

  13. EVALUATION OF EXTRACTION AND SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS FOR PB SPECIATION IN AN AMENDED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immobilization of pyromorphite (Pbs(PO4hCI) via P amendments to Pb contaminated soils is proving to be a viable method of remediation. However, the issue of ascertaining the amount of soil Pb converted to pyromorphite is difficult in heterogeneous soil systems. Previous attempts ...

  14. Quantitative analysis of uranium in aqueous solutions using a semiconductor laser-based spectroscopic method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye-Ryun; Jung, Euo Chang; Cha, Wansik; Song, Kyuseok

    2013-05-07

    A simple analytical method based on the simultaneous measurement of the luminescence of hexavalent uranium ions (U(VI)) and the Raman scattering of water, was investigated for determining the concentration of U(VI) in aqueous solutions. Both spectra were measured using a cw semiconductor laser beam at a center wavelength of 405 nm. The empirical calibration curve for the quantitative analysis of U(VI) was obtained by measuring the ratio of the luminescence intensity of U(VI) at 519 nm to the Raman scattering intensity of water at 469 nm. The limit of detection (LOD) in the parts per billion range and a dynamic range from the LOD up to several hundred parts per million were achieved. The concentration of uranium in groundwater determined by this method is in good agreement with the results determined by kinetic phosphorescence analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  15. Spectroscopic studies of biologically active coumarin laser dye: Evaluation of dipole moments by solvatochromic shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppal, V. V.; Muddapur, G. V.; Patil, N. R.; Melavanki, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we attempted to record absorption and emission spectra of 2-acetyl-3H-benzo[f]chromen-3-one [2AHBC] laser dye in different solvents of varying polarities to investigate its solvatochromic behavior. The two electronic states dipole moments of 2AHBC are calculated using solvatochromic spectral shifts which are correlated with dielectric constant (ɛ) refractive index (n) of various solvents. A systematic approach is made to estimate ground and excited state dipole moments on the basis of different solvent correlation methods like Bilot-Kawski equations, Lippert-Mataga, Bakhsheiv, Kawaski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt methods. Dipole moments in the excited state was found to be higher than the ground state by confirming π→π* transition.

  16. An infrared spectroscopic based method for mercury(II) detection in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Chandrasoma, Asela; Hamid, Amer Al Abdel; Bruce, Alice E; Bruce, Mitchell R M; Tripp, Carl P

    2012-05-30

    A new method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with FTIR spectroscopy to detect Hg(II) in aqueous samples is described. The technique is envisioned for on-site, field evaluation rather than lab-based techniques. This paper presents the "proof of principle" of this new approach toward measurements of Hg(II) in water and identifies mass transport issues that would need to be overcome in order to migrate from a lab based method to field operation. The SPE material supported on a Si wafer is derivatized with an acylthiosemicarbazide, which undergoes a reaction in the presence of aqueous Hg(II) to form an oxadiazole ring. The progress of the reaction is monitored by IR spectroscopy. Following EPA guidelines, the method of detection limit (MDL) for the SPE/IR was 5 μg of Hg(II)cm(-2). In a 1L sample and a 1cm(2) Si wafer, this translates to a detection limit of 5 ppb. This system shows a high selectivity toward aqueous Hg(II) over other thiophilic heavy metal ions such as Pb(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II) and other metal ions such as Ni(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), In(III), Ru(III), Na(I), and Ag(I) in aqueous solutions.

  17. Methods of defining best practice for population health approaches with obesity prevention as an example.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Deborah A; Flynn, Mary A T

    2006-11-01

    Childhood obesity has reached a crisis stage and has become a population health issue. The few traditional systematic reviews that have been done to identify best practice provide little direction for action. The concept of evidence-based practice has been adopted in health care, and in medicine in particular, to determine best practice. Evidence-based medicine has its origins in the scientific method and for many researchers this concept means strict adherence to standards determining internal validity in order to justify a practice as evidence based. Practitioners addressing population health face challenges in identifying criteria for determining evidence, in part because of the nature of population health with its goal of shifting the health of whole populations. As well, the type of evidence provided by more traditional critical appraisal schema is limiting. Expanded approaches in finding and defining evidence have been proposed that use: expert panels; broad and inclusive search and selection strategies; appraisal criteria that incorporate context and generalizability. A recent synthesis of 147 programmes addressing childhood overweight and obesity provides a concrete example of using a broader approach to identify evidence for best practice (Flynn et al. 2006). Incorporating evaluation and population health frameworks as criterion components in addition to traditional methodological rigour criteria, this synthesis has identified programmes that provide contextual information that can be used to populate what Swinburn et al. (2005) have described as the 'promise table'. Using this approach a range in 'certainty of effectiveness' and a range in 'potential for population impact' are integrated to identify promising strategies. The exercise can provide direction for agencies and practitioners in taking action to address obesity.

  18. Chemical, Thermal and Spectroscopic Methods to Assess Biodegradation of Winery-Distillery Wastes during Composting.

    PubMed

    Torres-Climent, A; Gomis, P; Martín-Mata, J; Bustamante, M A; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Pérez-Espinosa, A; Paredes, C; Moral, R

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the co-composting process of wastes from the winery and distillery industry with animal manures, using the classical chemical methods traditionally used in composting studies together with advanced instrumental methods (thermal analysis, FT-IR and CPMAS 13C NMR techniques), to evaluate the development of the process and the quality of the end-products obtained. For this, three piles were elaborated by the turning composting system, using as raw materials winery-distillery wastes (grape marc and exhausted grape marc) and animal manures (cattle manure and poultry manure). The classical analytical methods showed a suitable development of the process in all the piles, but these techniques were ineffective to study the humification process during the composting of this type of materials. However, their combination with the advanced instrumental techniques clearly provided more information regarding the turnover of the organic matter pools during the composting process of these materials. Thermal analysis allowed to estimate the degradability of the remaining material and to assess qualitatively the rate of OM stabilization and recalcitrant C in the compost samples, based on the energy required to achieve the same mass losses. FT-IR spectra mainly showed variations between piles and time of sampling in the bands associated to complex organic compounds (mainly at 1420 and 1540 cm-1) and to nitrate and inorganic components (at 875 and 1384 cm-1, respectively), indicating composted material stability and maturity; while CPMAS 13C NMR provided semi-quantitatively partition of C compounds and structures during the process, being especially interesting their variation to evaluate the biotransformation of each C pool, especially in the comparison of recalcitrant C vs labile C pools, such as Alkyl /O-Alkyl ratio.

  19. Chemical, Thermal and Spectroscopic Methods to Assess Biodegradation of Winery-Distillery Wastes during Composting

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Climent, A.; Gomis, P.; Martín-Mata, J.; Bustamante, M. A.; Marhuenda-Egea, F. C.; Pérez-Murcia, M. D.; Pérez-Espinosa, A.; Paredes, C.; Moral, R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the co-composting process of wastes from the winery and distillery industry with animal manures, using the classical chemical methods traditionally used in composting studies together with advanced instrumental methods (thermal analysis, FT-IR and CPMAS 13C NMR techniques), to evaluate the development of the process and the quality of the end-products obtained. For this, three piles were elaborated by the turning composting system, using as raw materials winery-distillery wastes (grape marc and exhausted grape marc) and animal manures (cattle manure and poultry manure). The classical analytical methods showed a suitable development of the process in all the piles, but these techniques were ineffective to study the humification process during the composting of this type of materials. However, their combination with the advanced instrumental techniques clearly provided more information regarding the turnover of the organic matter pools during the composting process of these materials. Thermal analysis allowed to estimate the degradability of the remaining material and to assess qualitatively the rate of OM stabilization and recalcitrant C in the compost samples, based on the energy required to achieve the same mass losses. FT-IR spectra mainly showed variations between piles and time of sampling in the bands associated to complex organic compounds (mainly at 1420 and 1540 cm-1) and to nitrate and inorganic components (at 875 and 1384 cm-1, respectively), indicating composted material stability and maturity; while CPMAS 13C NMR provided semi-quantitatively partition of C compounds and structures during the process, being especially interesting their variation to evaluate the biotransformation of each C pool, especially in the comparison of recalcitrant C vs labile C pools, such as Alkyl /O-Alkyl ratio. PMID:26418458

  20. A spectroscopic method for identifying terrestrial biocarbonates and application to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Orofino, V.; D'Elia, M.; Fonti, S.; Mastandrea, A.; Guido, A.; Russo, F.

    2011-06-01

    Searching for traces of extinct and/or extant life on Mars is one of the major objectives for remote-sensing and in situ exploration of the planet. In previous laboratory works we have investigated the infrared spectral modifications induced by thermal processing on different carbonate samples, in the form of fresh shells and fossils of different ages, whose biotic origin is easily recognizable. The goal was to discriminate them from their abiotic counterparts. In general, it is difficult to identify biotic signatures, especially when the organisms inducing the carbonate precipitation have low fossilization potential (i.e. microbes, bacteria, archaea). A wide variety of microorganisms are implicated in carbonate genesis, and their direct characterization is very difficult to evaluate by traditional methods, both in ancient sedimentary systems and even in recent environments. In the present work we apply our analysis to problematic carbonate samples, in which there is no clear evidence of controlled or induced biomineralization. This analysis indicates a very likely biotic origin of the aragonite samples under study, in agreement with the conclusion previously reported by Guido et al. (2007) who followed a completely different approach based on a complex set of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical and biochemical analyses. We show that our method is reliable for discriminating between biotic and abiotic carbonates, and therefore it is a powerful tool in the search for life on Mars in the next generation of space missions to the planet.

  1. Investigation on the protein-binding properties of icotinib by spectroscopic and molecular modeling method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-xin; Xiong, Hang-xing; Li, Li-wei

    2016-05-15

    Icotinib is a highly-selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer, which has been developed as a new targeted anti-tumor drug in China. In this work, the interaction of icotinib and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular probe and molecular modeling methods. The results showed that icotinib binds to Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule, resulting in icotinib-HSA complexes formed at ground state. The number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and thermodynamic parameters of the reaction were calculated at different temperatures. The negative enthalpy change (ΔH(θ)) and entropy change (ΔS(θ)) indicated that the structure of new complexes was stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The distance between donor and acceptor was calculated according to Förster's non-radiation resonance energy transfer theory. The structural changes of HSA caused by icotinib binding were detected by synchronous spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Molecular modeling method was employed to unfold full details of the interaction at molecular level, most of which could be supported by experimental results. The study analyzed the probability that serum albumins act as carriers for this new anticarcinogen and provided fundamental information on the process of delivering icotinib to its target tissues, which might be helpful in understanding the mechanism of icotinib in cancer therapy.

  2. Investigation on the protein-binding properties of icotinib by spectroscopic and molecular modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-xin; Xiong, Hang-xing; Li, Li-wei

    2016-05-01

    Icotinib is a highly-selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer, which has been developed as a new targeted anti-tumor drug in China. In this work, the interaction of icotinib and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular probe and molecular modeling methods. The results showed that icotinib binds to Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule, resulting in icotinib-HSA complexes formed at ground state. The number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and thermodynamic parameters of the reaction were calculated at different temperatures. The negative enthalpy change (ΔHθ) and entropy change (ΔSθ) indicated that the structure of new complexes was stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The distance between donor and acceptor was calculated according to Förster's non-radiation resonance energy transfer theory. The structural changes of HSA caused by icotinib binding were detected by synchronous spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Molecular modeling method was employed to unfold full details of the interaction at molecular level, most of which could be supported by experimental results. The study analyzed the probability that serum albumins act as carriers for this new anticarcinogen and provided fundamental information on the process of delivering icotinib to its target tissues, which might be helpful in understanding the mechanism of icotinib in cancer therapy.

  3. Investigation of interaction of antibacterial drug sulfamethoxazole with human serum albumin by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Sheng-Rui; Ji, Xiaohui

    2014-04-24

    Interaction of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods under physiological conditions. The interaction mechanism was firstly predicted through molecular modeling that confirmed the interaction between SMX and HSA. The binding parameters and the thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures for the reaction had been calculated according to the Stern-Volmer, Hill, Scatchard and the Van't Hoff equations, respectively. One independent class of binding site existed during the interaction between HSA and SMX. The binding constants decreased with the increasing temperatures, which meant that the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction, namely standard enthalpy ΔH(0) and entropy ΔS(0), had been calculated to be -16.40 kJ mol(-1) and 32.33 J mol(-1) K(-1), respectively, which suggested that the binding process was exothermic, enthalpy driven and spontaneous. SMX bound to HSA was mainly based on electrostatic interaction, but hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds could not be excluded from the binding. The conformational changes of HSA in the presence of SMX were confirmed by the three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. CD data suggested that the protein conformation was altered with the reduction of α-helices from 55.37% to 41.97% at molar ratio of SMX/HSA of 4:1.

  4. Hardware and Methods of the Optical End-to-End Test of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conard, Steven J.; Redman, Kevin W.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; McGuffey, Doug B.; Smee, Stephen; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kushner, Gary

    1999-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), currently being tested and scheduled for a 1999 launch, is an astrophysics satellite designed to provide high spectral resolving power (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda = 24,000-30,000) over the interval 90.5-118.7 nm. The FUSE optical path consists of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic, primary mirrors which illuminate separate Rowland circle spectrograph channels equipped with holographic gratings and delay line microchannel plate detectors. We describe the hardware and methods used for the optical end-to-end test of the FUSE instrument during satellite integration and test. Cost and schedule constraints forced us to devise a simplified version of the planned optical test which occurred in parallel with satellite thermal-vacuum testing. The optical test employed a collimator assembly which consisted of four co-aligned, 15" Cassegrain telescopes which were positioned above the FUSE instrument, providing a collimated beam for each optical channel. A windowed UV light source, remotely adjustable in three axes, was mounted at the focal plane of each collimator. Problems with the UV light sources, including high F-number and window failures, were the only major difficulties encountered during the test. The test succeeded in uncovering a significant problem with the secondary structure used for the instrument closeout cavity and, furthermore, showed that the mechanical solution was successful. The hardware was also used extensively for simulations of science observations, providing both UV light for spectra and visible light for the fine error sensor camera.

  5. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  6. Characterization of organic and inorganic optoelectronic semiconductor devices using advanced spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Raoul

    In this thesis, advanced spectroscopy methods are discussed and applied to gain understanding of the physical properties of organic conjugated molecules, II-VI thin film semiconductors, and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL). Experiments include single photon and two-photon excitation with lasers, with subsequent measurements of the absorption and photoluminescence, as well as photocurrent measurements using tungsten and xenon lamps, measuring the direct current and the alternating current of the devices. The materials are investigated in dissolved form (conjugated polymers), thin films (polymers, II-VI semiconductors), and complex layer structures (hybrid device, VCSEL). The experiments are analyzed and interpreted by newly developed or applied theories for two-photon saturation processes in semiconductors, bandgap shrinkage due to optically induced electron hole pairs, and the principle of detailed balance to describe the photoluminescence in thin film cadmium sulfide.

  7. Characterization of the Interaction between Eupatorin and Bovine Serum Albumin by Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongliang; Yao, Nannan; Xu, Haoran; Wang, Tianshi; Li, Guiying; Li, Zhengqiang

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction between eupatorin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, and molecular modeling at pH 7.4. Results of UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies illustrated that BSA fluorescence was quenched by eupatorin via a static quenching mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions played major roles in the interaction. Moreover, the efficiency of energy transfer, and the distance between BSA and acceptor eupatorin, were calculated. The effects of eupatorin on the BSA conformation were analyzed using UV-vis, CD, and synchronous fluorescence. Finally, the binding of eupatorin to BSA was modeled using the molecular docking method. PMID:23839090

  8. Interaction Behavior Between Niclosamide and Pepsin Determined by Spectroscopic and Docking Methods.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liuqi; Ma, Xiaoli; Yan, Jin; Xu, Kailin; Wang, Qing; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between niclosamide (NIC) and pepsin was investigated using multispectroscopic and molecular docking methods. Binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures were measured. Results of fluorescence quenching and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy showed that changes occurred in the microenvironment of tryptophan residues and the molecular conformation of pepsin. Molecular interaction distance and energy-transfer efficiency between pepsin and NIC were determined based on Förster nonradiative energy-transfer mechanism. Furthermore, the binding of NIC inhibited pepsin activity in vitro. All these results indicated that NIC bound to pepsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds at a single binding site. In conclusion, this study provided substantial molecular-level evidence that NIC could induce changes in pepsin structure and conformation.

  9. In search of blood--detection of minute particles using spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L; Gason, F; Gilbert, B

    2008-08-25

    An examination protocol for rapid detection of remnants of blood particles on garments of suspects in bloody murder cases is described. Microparticles of blood are sampled along with fibres and hairs using the tape lifting method. The tapings are searched with a low power microscope for red particles with morphology similar to blood. Presumed blood traces are further examined using microspectrophotometry on the cut out piece of taping. The typical visible spectrum of haemoglobin is characteristic for blood. Alternatively Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the characteristic vibrational spectrum of haemoglobin. At a later stage, these particles may be removed from the piece of taping in order to extract the blood and attempt to obtain a genetic profile.

  10. Analysis of binding interaction between (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC) and β-lactoglobulin by multi-spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuli; Wu, Hui; Liu, Meixia; Liu, Zhigang; Xu, Hong; Lai, Furao

    2011-11-01

    The binding interaction between (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC) with bovine β-lactoglobulin (βLG) was investigated by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. The binding parameters were determined by Stern-Volmer equation and the thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to the van't Hoff equation. The results suggested that βLG was bound by EGC, which resulted in change of native conformation of βLG. van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding probably played major roles in the binding process. Our study is helpful for further elucidation of binding interactions between catechins with milk proteins, which would contribute to the development of novel milk products.

  11. An Internet compendium of analytical methods and spectroscopic information for monomers and additives used in food packaging plastics.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J; Simoneau, C; Cote, D; Boenke, A

    2000-10-01

    An internet website (http:¿cpf.jrc.it/smt/) has been produced as a means of dissemination of methods of analysis and supporting spectroscopic information on monomers and additives used for food contact materials (principally packaging). The site which is aimed primarily at assisting food control laboratories in the European Union contains analytical information on monomers, starting substances and additives used in the manufacture of plastics materials. A searchable index is provided giving PM and CAS numbers for each of 255 substances. For each substance a data sheet gives regulatory information, chemical structures, physico-chemical information and background information on the use of the substance in particular plastics, and the food packaging applications. For monomers and starting substances (155 compounds) the infra-red and mass spectra are provided, and for additives (100 compounds); additionally proton NMR are available for about 50% of the entries. Where analytical methods have been developed for determining these substances as residual amounts in plastics or as trace amounts in food simulants these methods are also on the website. All information is provided in portable document file (PDF) format which means that high quality copies can be readily printed, using freely available Adobe Acrobat Reader software. The website will in future be maintained and up-dated by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) as new substances are authorized for use by the European Commission (DG-ENTR formerly DGIII). Where analytical laboratories (food control or other) require reference substances these can be obtained free-of-charge from a reference collection housed at the JRC and maintained in conjunction with this website compendium.

  12. PDT in the thoracic cavity: Spectroscopic methods and fluence modeling for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia Lauren

    PDT for the thoracic cavity provides a promising cancer treatment modality, but improvements in treatment planning, particularly in PDT dosimetry, can be made to improve uniformity of light delivery. When a cavity of arbitrary geometry is illuminated, the fluence increases due to multiple-scattered photons, referred to as the Integrating Sphere Effect (ISE). Current pleural PDT treatment protocol at the University of Pennsylvania monitors light fluence (hereafter simply fluence, measured in W/cm2) via seven isotropic detectors sutured at different locations in thoracic cavity of a patient. This protocol monitors light at discrete locations, but does not provide a measurement of fluence for the thoracic cavity as a whole. Current calculation of light fluence includes direct light only and thus does not account for the unique optical properties of each tissue type present, which in turn affects the accuracy of the calculated light distribution in the surrounding tissue and, in turn, the overall cell death and treatment efficacy. Treatment planning for pleural PDT can be improved, in part, by considering the contribution of scattered light, which is affected by the two factors of geometry and in vivo optical properties. We expanded the work by Willem Star in regards to the ISE in a spherical cavity. A series of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were run for semi-infinite planar, spherical, and ellipsoidal geometries for a range of optical properties. The results of these simulations are compared to theory and numerical solutions for fluence in the cavity and at the cavity-medium boundary. The development via MC simulations offers a general method of calculating the required light fluence specialized to each patient, based on the treatment surface area. The scattered fluence calculation is dependent on in vivo optical properties (μa and μs') of the tissues treated. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy methods are used to determine the optical properties and

  13. Localized and Spectroscopic Orbitals: Squirrel Ears on Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, R. Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Reexamines the electronic structure of water considering divergent views. Discusses several aspects of molecular orbital theory using spectroscopic molecular orbitals and localized molecular orbitals. Gives examples for determining lowest energy spectroscopic orbitals. (ML)

  14. Characterization of U(VI)-phases in corroded cement products by micro(μ)-spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, J.; Brendebach, B.; Bube, C.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Metz, V.; Prüßmann, T.; Rickers-Appel, K.; Schild, D.; Soballa, E.; Vitova, T.

    2013-04-01

    Cementation is an industrial scale conditioning method applied to fix and solidify liquid low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LLW/ILW) prior to underground disposal in geological formations.To assist prognosis of the long-term safety of cemented waste, alteration of uranium doped cement productswas studied in chloride-rich solutions relevant for final LLW/ILW disposal in rock salt. After long-time exposure of the full-scale LLW/ILW simulates to concentrated NaCl and MgCl2 brines, solid samples were retrieved for chemical and mineralogical analysis with an emphasis on uranium speciation in the corroded cement matrix.Bulk and recent spatially resolved micro(μ) U L3-XAFS measurements point to the occurrence of a diuranate type U(VI) phase forming throughout the corroded cement monoliths. U-enriched hot spots with dimensions up to several tens of μm turn out to be generally X-ray amorphous.

  15. Chemometric optimization of the robustness of the near infrared spectroscopic method in wheat quality control.

    PubMed

    Pojić, Milica; Rakić, Dušan; Lazić, Zivorad

    2015-01-01

    A chemometric approach was applied for the optimization of the robustness of the NIRS method for wheat quality control. Due to the high number of experimental (n=6) and response variables to be studied (n=7) the optimization experiment was divided into two stages: screening stage in order to evaluate which of the considered variables were significant, and optimization stage to optimize the identified factors in the previously selected experimental domain. The significant variables were identified by using fractional factorial experimental design, whilst Box-Wilson rotatable central composite design (CCRD) was run to obtain the optimal values for the significant variables. The measured responses included: moisture, protein and wet gluten content, Zeleny sedimentation value and deformation energy. In order to achieve the minimal variation in responses, the optimal factor settings were found by minimizing the propagation of error (POE). The simultaneous optimization of factors was conducted by desirability function. The highest desirability of 87.63% was accomplished by setting up experimental conditions as follows: 19.9°C for sample temperature, 19.3°C for ambient temperature and 240V for instrument voltage.

  16. A method for the quantitative gamma spectroscopic analysis of an unusually shaped unknown source.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Dewey, Steven C

    2009-02-01

    An unmarked cylindrical device, identified as a ceramic high voltage capacitor, needed its radioactivity assessed so that proper disposal and shipping requirements could be met. Using a high purity germanium detector, naturally occurring 232Th was identified as the source of radioactivity. A series of point source measurements was made along the length of the item's axis using 60Co, having a gamma ray of nearly the same energy as one of the primary 232Th progeny photopeaks. These measurements were then numerically integrated to determine the response of the detector to a line source. A correction for the self shielding of the item was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The item was found to contain approximately 1.85 x 10(5) Bq of uniformly distributed 232Th. The overall method has application to any unusually shaped source, with point source measurements performed using an appropriate radionuclide used to establish an overall sensitivity of the detector, including its dead layer, to the radioactivity in a simple geometric representation of the object. An estimation of self shielding from Monte Carlo is then applied to that result.

  17. Investigation on interaction between Ligupurpuroside A and pepsin by spectroscopic and docking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Liangliang; Xu, Hong; Huang, Fengwen; Li, Yi; Xiao, Huafeng; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Zhangli; He, Zhendan; Zeng, Zheling; Li, Yinong

    2015-01-01

    Ligupurpuroside A is one of the major glycoside in Ku-Din-Cha, a type of Chinese functional tea. In order to better understand its digestion and metabolism in humans, the interaction between Ligupurpuroside A and pepsin has been investigated by fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectra along with molecular docking method. The fluorescence experiments indicate that Ligupurpuroside A can effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin through a combined quenching way at the low concentration of Ligupurpuroside A, and a static quenching procedure at the high concentration. The binding constant, binding sites of Ligupurpuroside A with pepsin have been calculated. The thermodynamic analysis suggests that non-covalent reactions, including electrostatic force, hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main forces stabilizing the complex. According to the Förster's non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between pepsin and Ligupurpuroside A was calculated to be 3.15 nm, which implies that energy transfer occurs between pepsin and Ligupurpuroside A. Conformation change of pepsin was observed from UV-vis absorption spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectra under experimental conditions. In addition, all these experimental results have been validated by the protein-ligand docking studies which show that Ligupurpuroside A is located in the cleft between the domains of pepsin.

  18. Investigation on interaction between Ligupurpuroside A and pepsin by spectroscopic and docking methods.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liangliang; Xu, Hong; Huang, Fengwen; Li, Yi; Xiao, Huafeng; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Zhangli; He, Zhendan; Zeng, Zheling; Li, Yinong

    2015-01-25

    Ligupurpuroside A is one of the major glycoside in Ku-Din-Cha, a type of Chinese functional tea. In order to better understand its digestion and metabolism in humans, the interaction between Ligupurpuroside A and pepsin has been investigated by fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectra along with molecular docking method. The fluorescence experiments indicate that Ligupurpuroside A can effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin through a combined quenching way at the low concentration of Ligupurpuroside A, and a static quenching procedure at the high concentration. The binding constant, binding sites of Ligupurpuroside A with pepsin have been calculated. The thermodynamic analysis suggests that non-covalent reactions, including electrostatic force, hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main forces stabilizing the complex. According to the Förster's non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between pepsin and Ligupurpuroside A was calculated to be 3.15 nm, which implies that energy transfer occurs between pepsin and Ligupurpuroside A. Conformation change of pepsin was observed from UV-vis absorption spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectra under experimental conditions. In addition, all these experimental results have been validated by the protein-ligand docking studies which show that Ligupurpuroside A is located in the cleft between the domains of pepsin.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopic study and NBO analysis on tranexamic acid using DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu, S.; Prabhakaran, A.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we reported the vibrational spectra of tranexamic acid (TA) by experimental and quantum chemical calculation. The solid phase FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of the title compound were recorded in the region 4000 cm-1 to 100 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1 to 400 cm-1 respectively. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of TA in the ground state have been calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with standard 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The scaled theoretical wavenumber showed very good agreement with the experimental values. The vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. Stability of the molecule, arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization, has been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that ED in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies E(2) confirm the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The electrostatic potential mapped onto an isodensity surface has been obtained. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase.

  20. Structure activity studies of an analgesic drug tapentadol hydrochloride by spectroscopic and quantum chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Tapentadol is a novel opioid pain reliever drug with a dual mechanism of action, having potency between morphine and tramadol. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for tapentadol hydrochloride (TAP.Cl) to determine the properties. The geometry is optimised and the structural properties of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded in the solid phase in the region of 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Frontier molecular orbital energies, LUMO-HOMO energy gap, ionisation potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness and chemical potential are also calculated. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalisation has been analysed using NBO analysis. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule are analysed.

  1. Characterization of interaction of calf thymus DNA with gefitinib: spectroscopic methods and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min; Chen, Jun; Wang, Qi

    2015-06-01

    The binding interaction of gefitinib with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) under the simulated physiological pH condition was studied employing UV absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), viscosity measurement and molecular docking methods. The experimental results revealed that gefitinib preferred to bind to the minor groove of ct-DNA with the binding constant (Kb) of 1.29 × 10(4)Lmol(-1) at 298K. Base on the signs and magnitudes of the enthalpy change (ΔH(0)=-60.4 kJ mol(-1)) and entropy change (ΔS(0)=-124.7 J mol(-1)K(-1)) in the binding process and the results of molecular docking, it can be concluded that the main interaction forces between gefitinib and ct-DNA in the binding process were van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction. The results of CD experiments revealed that gefitinib did not disturb native B-conformation of ct-DNA. And, the significant change in the conformation of gefitinib in gefitinib-ct-DNA complex was observed from the molecular docking results and the change was close relation with the structure of B-DNA fragments, indicating that the flexibility of gefitinib molecule also plays an important role in the formation of the stable gefitinib-ct-DNA complex.

  2. Synergic application of spectroscopic and theoretical methods to the chlorogenic acid structure elucidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Svetlana; Tošović, Jelena; Dimitrić Marković, Jasmina M.

    2016-07-01

    Although chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 5CQA) is a dietary polyphenol known for its pharmacological and nutritional properties, its structural features have not been completely elucidated. This is the first study whose aim is to contribute to clarification of the 5CQA structure by comparing the experimental and simulated IR, Raman, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and UV spectra. For this purpose, a comprehensive conformational analysis of 5CQA was performed to reveal its most stable conformations in the gas-state and solution (DMSO and methanol). The lowest-energy conformers were used to predict the spectra at two levels of theory: B3LYP-D3/and M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) in combination with the CPCM solvation model. Both methods provide very good agreement between all experimental and simulated spectra, thus indicating correct arrangement of the atoms in the 5CQA molecule. The quinic moiety is characterized with directed hydrogen bonds, where the carboxylic hydrogen is not oriented towards the carbonyl oxygen of the carboxylic group, but towards the oxygen of the proximate hydroxyl group. In the gas-state the lowest-energy conformers are characterized with the O4sbnd H4 ⋯ O9‧ hydrogen bond, whereas in the solvated state the structures with the O4sbnd H4 ⋯ O10‧ hydrogen bond prevail. Knowing the fine structural details, i.e. the proper conformation of 5CQA, provides a solid base for all further investigations related to this compound.

  3. Recognizing impact glass on Mars using surface texture, mechanical properties, and mid-infrared spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, James Thomson

    A primary goal of future Mars sample return missions is to obtain samples whose isotopic ages can be used to place absolute time constraints on the relative Martian crater chronology. Thus, identifying the origin of surface material as impact or volcanic prior to its return to Earth will be critical. This dissertation focuses on four strategies for identifying and characterizing impact melt breccias from both landed and orbital perspectives. In Part 1, the geology of Viking 2 Landing (VL2) site is re-evaluated using recently acquired orbital data. Measurements of relict landform topography indicate that a layer of sedimentary material at least 120 m thick has been eroded from the site. Crater counts indicate an extreme deficiency of small-diameter craters (<500 m), indicating that resurfacing has continued up to the present. Thermal inertia data over the site is consistent with some rocks being impact-emplaced and possibly impact-derived. In Part 2, three textural characteristics were identified as potential discriminants between vesicular impact and volcanic glasses: vesicle shape (elongation), orientation, and spatial density. Additionally, a theoretical model was developed to constrain the conditions necessary for the preservation of deformed bubble textures. The results suggest that deformed bubbles are unlikely to be preserved in typical Martian basalts or basaltic andesites. Part 3 is an endeavor to extract science from mission support operations. First, a method for determining the bulk density of rocks via a pushing (i.e., by a robotic spacecraft arm) was developed and applied to VL2 rock-pushing data. Although the large measurement uncertainties preclude drawing firm conclusions, the results demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Second, results from the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on the Spirit rover were analyzed to infer the mechanical strength of ground surfaces. Rocks in the Columbia Hills were found to be mechanically consistent with impact melt

  4. Are your spectroscopic data being used?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Potterbusch, Megan R.; Bouquin, Daina; Erdmann, Christopher C.; Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-09-01

    The issue of availability of data and their presentation in spectroscopic publications is discussed. Different current practices are critically reviewed from the point of view of potential users, government policies, and merit of success of the authors. Indeed, properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. Examples based on the statistical analyses of the articles published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy will be shown. We will discuss different methods including supplementary materials to the Journals, public-curated databases and also new tools that can be utilized by spectroscopists.

  5. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  6. Study on the interaction of Co (III) DiAmsar with serum albumins: Spectroscopic and molecular docking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Bahman Vasheghani; Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Rajabi, Farzaneh Hosseinpour; Hooshyar, Zari

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of cobalt-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane-1,8-diamine (Co(III) DiAmsar) as a hexadentate ligand with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under physiological conditions in Tris-HCl buffer solution at pH 7.4. To this aim, at first, Co (III) DiAmsar was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectroscopy and then its interaction with HSA and BSA was investigated by means of various spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-visible (UV-vis), fluorescence, and cyclic voltammetry (CV)) and molecular docking technique. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that the Co (III) DiAmsar strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and BSA through a static quenching procedure. Binding constants (Ka) and the number of binding sites (n ∼ 1) were calculated using Stern-Volmer equations. The ΔG parameters at different temperatures were calculated. Subsequently, the values of ΔH and ΔS were also calculated, which revealed that the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interaction splay a major role in Co (III) DiAmsar-HSA and Co (III) DiAmsar-BSA associations. The distance r between donor (HSA and BSA) and acceptor (Co (III) DiAmsar) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The data obtained by the molecular modeling study revealed the surrounding residues of HSA and BSA around Co (III) DiAmsar.

  7. Study on the interaction of Co (III) DiAmsar with serum albumins: spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Bahman Vasheghani; Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Rajabi, Farzaneh Hosseinpour; Hooshyar, Zari

    2015-01-25

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of cobalt-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane-1,8-diamine (Co(III) DiAmsar) as a hexadentate ligand with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under physiological conditions in Tris-HCl buffer solution at pH 7.4. To this aim, at first, Co (III) DiAmsar was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectroscopy and then its interaction with HSA and BSA was investigated by means of various spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-visible (UV-vis), fluorescence, and cyclic voltammetry (CV)) and molecular docking technique. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that the Co (III) DiAmsar strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and BSA through a static quenching procedure. Binding constants (Ka) and the number of binding sites (n∼1) were calculated using Stern-Volmer equations. The ΔG parameters at different temperatures were calculated. Subsequently, the values of ΔH and ΔS were also calculated, which revealed that the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interaction splay a major role in Co (III) DiAmsar-HSA and Co (III) DiAmsar-BSA associations. The distance r between donor (HSA and BSA) and acceptor (Co (III) DiAmsar) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The data obtained by the molecular modeling study revealed the surrounding residues of HSA and BSA around Co (III) DiAmsar.

  8. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  9. [Incident reporting systems in anesthesiology--methods and benefits using the example of PaSOS].

    PubMed

    Rall, Marcus; Reddersen, Silke; Zieger, Jörg; Schädle, Bertram; Hirsch, Patricia; Stricker, Eric; Martin, Jörg; Geldner, Götz; Schleppers, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Preventing patient harm is one of the main tasks for the field of anesthesiology from early on. With the introduction of the national German incident reporting system PaSOS, which is hosted by the German anesthesia society, anesthesiology is again leading the field of patient safety. Important elements, success factors and background information for the introduction of successful incident reporting systems in an organization are given. Examples by and from PaSOS are given.

  10. Modern geodetic methods for high-accuracy survey coordination on the example of magnetic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoperov, R. I.; Sidorov, R. V.; Soloviev, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The purposes and problems of the international network of geomagnetic observatories INTERMAGNET are briefly described in the work. The importance of the development of the Russian segment of the network as a part of a system for monitoring and estimating geomagnetic conditions on the Russian territory is emphasized. An example of the use of modern high-precision geodetic equipment for coor-dinate referencing of field geophysical observation is described. Factors that distort the referencing of field observations in problems of survey, engineering, and technical geophysics are listed, as well as those related to detail and high-resolution geophysical surveying and those that require a corresponding accuracy of observation point coordination. The magnetic exploration at the site of the Yamal INTERMAGNET-standard observatory serves an example to describe a technique for geodetic provision of a detailed geophysical survey by means of joint use of differential GNSS measurements and electronic tacheometry. The main advantages and disadvantages of the technique suggested are listed.

  11. Using a Three-Step Method in a Calculus Class: Extending the Worked Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses a three-step method that was used in a college calculus course. The three-step method was developed to help students understand the course material and transition to be more independent learners. In addition, the method helped students to transfer concepts from short-term to long-term memory while lowering cognitive load.…

  12. A method to derive vegetation distribution maps for pollen dispersion models using birch as an example.

    PubMed

    Pauling, A; Rotach, M W; Gehrig, R; Clot, B

    2012-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution of sources is a crucial prerequisite for the application of pollen dispersion models such as, for example, COSMO-ART (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases). However, this input is not available for the allergy-relevant species such as hazel, alder, birch, grass or ragweed. Hence, plant distribution datasets need to be derived from suitable sources. We present an approach to produce such a dataset from existing sources using birch as an example. The basic idea is to construct a birch dataset using a region with good data coverage for calibration and then to extrapolate this relationship to a larger area by using land use classes. We use the Swiss forest inventory (1 km resolution) in combination with a 74-category land use dataset that covers the non-forested areas of Switzerland as well (resolution 100 m). Then we assign birch density categories of 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 2.5% to each of the 74 land use categories. The combination of this derived dataset with the birch distribution from the forest inventory yields a fairly accurate birch distribution encompassing entire Switzerland. The land use categories of the Global Land Cover 2000 (GLC2000; Global Land Cover 2000 database, 2003, European Commission, Joint Research Centre; resolution 1 km) are then calibrated with the Swiss dataset in order to derive a Europe-wide birch distribution dataset and aggregated onto the 7 km COSMO-ART grid. This procedure thus assumes that a certain GLC2000 land use category has the same birch density wherever it may occur in Europe. In order to reduce the strict application of this crucial assumption, the birch density distribution as obtained from the previous steps is weighted using the mean Seasonal Pollen Index (SPI; yearly sums of daily pollen concentrations). For future improvement, region-specific birch densities for the GLC2000 categories could be integrated into the mapping procedure.

  13. A method to derive vegetation distribution maps for pollen dispersion models using birch as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauling, A.; Rotach, M. W.; Gehrig, R.; Clot, B.

    2012-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution of sources is a crucial prerequisite for the application of pollen dispersion models such as, for example, COSMO-ART (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling - Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases). However, this input is not available for the allergy-relevant species such as hazel, alder, birch, grass or ragweed. Hence, plant distribution datasets need to be derived from suitable sources. We present an approach to produce such a dataset from existing sources using birch as an example. The basic idea is to construct a birch dataset using a region with good data coverage for calibration and then to extrapolate this relationship to a larger area by using land use classes. We use the Swiss forest inventory (1 km resolution) in combination with a 74-category land use dataset that covers the non-forested areas of Switzerland as well (resolution 100 m). Then we assign birch density categories of 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 2.5% to each of the 74 land use categories. The combination of this derived dataset with the birch distribution from the forest inventory yields a fairly accurate birch distribution encompassing entire Switzerland. The land use categories of the Global Land Cover 2000 (GLC2000; Global Land Cover 2000 database, 2003, European Commission, Joint Research Centre; resolution 1 km) are then calibrated with the Swiss dataset in order to derive a Europe-wide birch distribution dataset and aggregated onto the 7 km COSMO-ART grid. This procedure thus assumes that a certain GLC2000 land use category has the same birch density wherever it may occur in Europe. In order to reduce the strict application of this crucial assumption, the birch density distribution as obtained from the previous steps is weighted using the mean Seasonal Pollen Index (SPI; yearly sums of daily pollen concentrations). For future improvement, region-specific birch densities for the GLC2000 categories could be integrated into the mapping procedure.

  14. Using mixed methods effectively in prevention science: designs, procedures, and examples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanqing; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2014-10-01

    There is growing interest in using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods to generate evidence about the effectiveness of health prevention, services, and intervention programs. With the emerging importance of mixed methods research across the social and health sciences, there has been an increased recognition of the value of using mixed methods for addressing research questions in different disciplines. We illustrate the mixed methods approach in prevention research, showing design procedures used in several published research articles. In this paper, we focused on two commonly used mixed methods designs: concurrent and sequential mixed methods designs. We discuss the types of mixed methods designs, the reasons for, and advantages of using a particular type of design, and the procedures of qualitative and quantitative data collection and integration. The studies reviewed in this paper show that the essence of qualitative research is to explore complex dynamic phenomena in prevention science, and the advantage of using mixed methods is that quantitative data can yield generalizable results and qualitative data can provide extensive insights. However, the emphasis of methodological rigor in a mixed methods application also requires considerable expertise in both qualitative and quantitative methods. Besides the necessary skills and effective interdisciplinary collaboration, this combined approach also requires an open-mindedness and reflection from the involved researchers.

  15. Comparison of methods used to estimate conventional undiscovered petroleum resources: World examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Klett, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Various methods for assessing undiscovered oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquid resources were compared in support of the USGS World Petroleum Assessment 2000. Discovery process, linear fractal, parabolic fractal, engineering estimates, PETRIMES, Delphi, and the USGS 2000 methods were compared. Three comparisons of these methods were made in: (1) the Neuquen Basin province, Argentina (different assessors, same input data); (2) provinces in North Africa, Oman, and Yemen (same assessors, different methods); and (3) the Arabian Peninsula, Arabian (Persian) Gulf, and North Sea (different assessors, different methods). A fourth comparison (same assessors, same assessment methods but different geologic models), between results from structural and stratigraphic assessment units in the North Sea used only the USGS 2000 method, and hence compared the type of assessment unit rather than the method. In comparing methods, differences arise from inherent differences in assumptions regarding: (1) the underlying distribution of the parent field population (all fields, discovered and undiscovered), (2) the population of fields being estimated; that is, the entire parent distribution or the undiscovered resource distribution, (3) inclusion or exclusion of large outlier fields; (4) inclusion or exclusion of field (reserve) growth, (5) deterministic or probabilistic models, (6) data requirements, and (7) scale and time frame of the assessment. Discovery process, Delphi subjective consensus, and the USGS 2000 method yield comparable results because similar procedures are employed. In mature areas such as the Neuquen Basin province in Argentina, the linear and parabolic fractal and engineering methods were conservative compared to the other five methods and relative to new reserve additions there since 1995. The PETRIMES method gave the most optimistic estimates in the Neuquen Basin. In less mature areas, the linear fractal method yielded larger estimates relative to other methods

  16. Changing Perspectives: Validation Framework Review of Examples of Mixed Methods Research into Culturally Relevant Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Patrick Dean

    2016-01-01

    Mixed methods research becomes more utilized in education research every year. As this pluralist paradigm begins to take hold, it becomes more and more necessary to take a critical eye to studies making use of different mixed methods approaches. An area of education research that has yet struggled to find a foothold with mixed methodology is…

  17. Qualitative Methods Can Enrich Quantitative Research on Occupational Stress: An Example from One Occupational Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Farrell, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The chapter examines the ways in which qualitative and quantitative methods support each other in research on occupational stress. Qualitative methods include eliciting from workers unconstrained descriptions of work experiences, careful first-hand observations of the workplace, and participant-observers describing "from the inside" a…

  18. Detecting Causality by Combined Use of Multiple Methods: Climate and Brain Examples

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yoshito; Amigó, José M.; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Yokota, Ryo; Mushiake, Hajime; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Identifying causal relations from time series is the first step to understanding the behavior of complex systems. Although many methods have been proposed, few papers have applied multiple methods together to detect causal relations based on time series generated from coupled nonlinear systems with some unobserved parts. Here we propose the combined use of three methods and a majority vote to infer causality under such circumstances. Two of these methods are proposed here for the first time, and all of the three methods can be applied even if the underlying dynamics is nonlinear and there are hidden common causes. We test our methods with coupled logistic maps, coupled Rössler models, and coupled Lorenz models. In addition, we show from ice core data how the causal relations among the temperature, the CH4 level, and the CO2 level in the atmosphere changed in the last 800,000 years, a conclusion also supported by irregularly sampled data analysis. Moreover, these methods show how three regions of the brain interact with each other during the visually cued, two-choice arm reaching task. Especially, we demonstrate that this is due to bottom up influences at the beginning of the task, while there exist mutual influences between the posterior medial prefrontal cortex and the presupplementary motor area. Based on our results, we conclude that identifying causality with an appropriate ensemble of multiple methods ensures the validity of the obtained results more firmly. PMID:27380515

  19. Raman spectroscopic analysis of human tissue engineered oral mucosa constructs (EVPOME) perturbed by physical and biochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Ganguly, Arindam; Raghavan, Mekhala; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Izumi, Kenji; Morris, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We show the application of near-infrared Raman Spectroscopy to in-vitro monitoring of the viability of tissue constructs (EVPOMEs). During their two week production period EVPOME may encounter thermal, chemical or biochemical stresses that could cause development to cease, rendering the affected constructs useless. We discuss the development of a Raman spectroscopic technique to study EVPOMEs noninvasively, with the ultimate goal of applying it in-vivo. We identify Raman spectroscopic failure indicators for EVPOMEs, which are stressed by temperature, and discuss the implications of varying calcium concentration and pre-treatment of the human keratinocytes with Rapamycin. In particular, Raman spectra show correlation of the peak height ratios of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing, providing a Raman metric to distinguish between viable and nonviable constructs. We also show the results of singular value decomposition analysis, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopic technique to both distinguish between stressed and non-stressed EVPOME constructs, as well as between EVPOMEs and bare AlloDerm® substrates, on which the oral keratinocytes have been cultured. We also discuss complications arising from non-uniform thickness of the AlloDerm® substrate and the cultured constructs, as well as sampling protocols used to detect local stress and other problems that may be encountered in the constructs.

  20. Examining Class Differences in Method Effects Related to Negative Wording: An Example using Rasch Mixture Modeling.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Grant B; DiStefano, Christine; Motl, Robert W

    This study presents a mixture Rasch-based approach to investigating method effects associated with negatively worded items to illustrate how responses to this method effect vary depending on group characteristics. Using college students' responses on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (Rosenberg, M., 1989), four latent classes were identified using six personality measures associated with the presence of this method effect. In addition, Rasch-based parameter estimates suggested latent classes differed in their use of the scale, showing that the method effect associated with negatively worded items may be more prominent for subjects possessing selected personality traits than for others. The mixture model approach to investigating method effects provides a way to address systematic methodological variation that is left unaccounted when a heterogeneous population is analyzed as one group.

  1. Infrared spectroscopic method for analysis of Mg 2Ca(SO 4) 3 in mixtures with MgSO 4 and/or CaSO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Duane H.; Seshadri, Kal S.

    1999-04-01

    Mg 2Ca(SO 4) 3 is prepared from, and may be found in, mixtures with MgSO 4 and CaSO 4. Such mixtures frequently occur in the ash produced by various types of coal combustion, especially in filter cakes from pressurized fluidized bed combustion with dolomite as a SO x sorbent. Previously, qualitative analyses could be performed for Mg 2Ca(SO 4) 3 in these mixtures, but no quantitative analytical method was available. An infrared spectroscopic method has been developed that provides reasonably quantitative results for Mg 2Ca(SO 4) 3, MgSO 4,and CaSO 4 in their mixtures.

  2. Using Google Analytics as a process evaluation method for Internet-delivered interventions: an example on sexual health.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Rik; Roosjen, Johanna L; Poelman, Jos

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to demonstrate the potential of Google Analytics as a process evaluation method for Internet-delivered interventions, using a website about sexual health as an example. This study reports visitors' behavior until 21 months after the release of the website (March 2009-December 2010). In total, there were 850 895 visitors with an average total visiting time (i.e. dose) of 5:07 min. Google Analytics provided data to answer three key questions in terms of process evaluation of an Internet-delivered intervention: (i) How do visitors behave?; (ii) Where do visitors come from? and (iii) What content are visitors exposed to? This real-life example demonstrated the potential of Google Analytics as a method to be used in a process evaluation of Internet-delivered interventions. This is highly relevant given the current expansion of these interventions within the field of health promotion.

  3. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Eva, Megan M.; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Malo, Danielle; Gros, Philippe; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses. PMID:25268389

  4. A comparison of methods to estimate seismic phase delays--Numerical examples for coda wave interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, T. Dylan; Malcolm, Alison E.; Yang, Di; Haney, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Time-shift estimation between arrivals in two seismic traces before and after a velocity perturbation is a crucial step in many seismic methods. The accuracy of the estimated velocity perturbation location and amplitude depend on this time shift. Windowed cross correlation and trace stretching are two techniques commonly used to estimate local time shifts in seismic signals. In the work presented here, we implement Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) to estimate the warping function – a vector of local time shifts that globally minimizes the misfit between two seismic traces. We illustrate the differences of all three methods compared to one another using acoustic numerical experiments. We show that DTW is comparable to or better than the other two methods when the velocity perturbation is homogeneous and the signal-to-noise ratio is high. When the signal-to-noise ratio is low, we find that DTW and windowed cross correlation are more accurate than the stretching method. Finally, we show that the DTW algorithm has better time resolution when identifying small differences in the seismic traces for a model with an isolated velocity perturbation. These results impact current methods that utilize not only time shifts between (multiply) scattered waves, but also amplitude and decoherence measurements. DTW is a new tool that may find new applications in seismology and other geophysical methods (e.g., as a waveform inversion misfit function).

  5. Fuzzy-logic based strategy for validation of multiplex methods: example with qualitative GMO assays.

    PubMed

    Bellocchi, Gianni; Bertholet, Vincent; Hamels, Sandrine; Moens, W; Remacle, José; Van den Eede, Guy

    2010-02-01

    This paper illustrates the advantages that a fuzzy-based aggregation method could bring into the validation of a multiplex method for GMO detection (DualChip GMO kit, Eppendorf). Guidelines for validation of chemical, bio-chemical, pharmaceutical and genetic methods have been developed and ad hoc validation statistics are available and routinely used, for in-house and inter-laboratory testing, and decision-making. Fuzzy logic allows summarising the information obtained by independent validation statistics into one synthetic indicator of overall method performance. The microarray technology, introduced for simultaneous identification of multiple GMOs, poses specific validation issues (patterns of performance for a variety of GMOs at different concentrations). A fuzzy-based indicator for overall evaluation is illustrated in this paper, and applied to validation data for different genetically modified elements. Remarks were drawn on the analytical results. The fuzzy-logic based rules were shown to be applicable to improve interpretation of results and facilitate overall evaluation of the multiplex method.

  6. Can health professionals learn qualitative evaluation methods on the World Wide Web? A case example.

    PubMed

    Steckler, A; Farel, A; Bontempi, J B; Umble, K; Polhamus, B; Trester, A

    2001-12-01

    The Enhancing Data Utilization Skills through Information Technology (EDUSIT) project trained Maternal and Child Health professionals to collect, analyze and interpret data via a year-long web-based course. The overall goal of the project was to strengthen the technology and analytic skills of the public health workforce. This article describes and analyzes a web-based module for training public health professionals to use qualitative research and evaluation methods that was one of six offered within the EDUSIT project. The qualitative module consisted of six units: overview of qualitative methods, planning qualitative studies, conducting field observations, qualitative interviewing, analyzing qualitative data and presenting qualitative findings. Evaluation results found no statistically significant changes in specific knowledge or beliefs about qualitative methods. However, the change in participants' self-efficacy was statistically significant. Participants' self-reports also showed significant changes in perceived skill levels in 'collecting qualitative data through an interview' and 'analyzing and interpreting qualitative data'. Most participants rated each lesson within the qualitative methods module as valuable, and most found the teaching methods used satisfactory, emphasizing the value of both the didactic teaching and the practical exercises and team project. The most common difficulty reported was finding the time to complete the module requirements while also working full-time. Implications of these findings for web-based teaching of public health professionals are discussed.

  7. Theoretical assessment of 3-D magnetotelluric method for oil and gas exploration: Synthetic examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wei, Wenbo; Lu, Qingtian; Dong, Hao; Li, Yanqing

    2014-07-01

    In petroleum explorations, seismic reflection technique has been almost always the preferred method for its high exploration depth and resolution. However, with the development of three dimensional (3D) inversion and interpretation schemes, much potential has been shown in MT method dealing with complex geological structures as in oil and gas exploration. In this study, synthetic geophysical models of petroleum reservoir structures are modeled and utilized to demonstrate that feasibility of 3-D MT technique for hydrocarbon exploration. A series of typical reservoir structure models are constructed and used to generate synthetic MT and seismic data to test the capabilities of 2-D/3-D MT and 2-D seismic inversion techniques. According to the inversion comparison, in addition to correctly retrieve the original forward model, the 3-D MT method also has some advantages over the reflective seismology method, which suffered from the lack of reflection wave and multiple wave problems. With the presented 3-D high resolution MT inversion method, MT techniques should be employed as one of the first choices for petroleum explorations.

  8. STRUCTURE IN THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. I. METHODS AND EXAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2011-01-20

    Three methods for detecting and characterizing structure in point data, such as that generated by redshift surveys, are described: classification using self-organizing maps, segmentation using Bayesian blocks, and density estimation using adaptive kernels. The first two methods are new, and allow detection and characterization of structures of arbitrary shape and at a wide range of spatial scales. These methods should elucidate not only clusters, but also the more distributed, wide-ranging filaments and sheets, and further allow the possibility of detecting and characterizing an even broader class of shapes. The methods are demonstrated and compared in application to three data sets: a carefully selected volume-limited sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey redshift data, a similarly selected sample from the Millennium Simulation, and a set of points independently drawn from a uniform probability distribution-a so-called Poisson distribution. We demonstrate a few of the many ways in which these methods elucidate large-scale structure in the distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe.

  9. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  10. 26 CFR 1.482-8 - Examples of the best method rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... permit adjustments to be made for differences in accounting methods or in reporting of costs between cost... between cost of goods sold and operating expenses of material items such as discounts, insurance, warranty costs, and supervisory, general and administrative expenses. These expenses are significant in...

  11. Effects of Instruction-Supported Learning with Worked Examples in Quantitative Method Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Kai; Klein, Martin; Klopp, Eric; Puhl, Thomas; Stark, Robin

    2013-01-01

    An experimental field study at a German university was conducted in order to test the effectiveness of an integrated learning environment to improve the acquisition of knowledge about empirical research methods. The integrated learning environment was based on the combination of instruction-oriented and problem-oriented design principles and…

  12. Monte Carlo Method for Determining Earthquake Recurrence Parameters from Short Paleoseismic Catalogs: Example Calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques [e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999]. In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means [e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006]. For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDF?s, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  13. Monte Carlo method for determining earthquake recurrence parameters from short paleoseismic catalogs: Example calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques (e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999). In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means (e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006). For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDFs, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  14. 26 CFR 1.482-8 - Examples of the best method rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... circumstances, the gross profit markups derived under the cost plus method are less likely to be susceptible to... receives a markup of 25% on all expenses of promoting Product X, with the exception of media buys, which..., based on a cost of services plus markup of A%. Third-party media buys by USSub in connection...

  15. Results of Bayesian methods depend on details of implementation: An example of estimating salmon escapement goals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkison, Milo D.; Peterman, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Bayesian methods have been proposed to estimate optimal escapement goals, using both knowledge about physical determinants of salmon productivity and stock-recruitment data. The Bayesian approach has several advantages over many traditional methods for estimating stock productivity: it allows integration of information from diverse sources and provides a framework for decision-making that takes into account uncertainty reflected in the data. However, results can be critically dependent on details of implementation of this approach. For instance, unintended and unwarranted confidence about stock-recruitment relationships can arise if the range of relationships examined is too narrow, if too few discrete alternatives are considered, or if data are contradictory. This unfounded confidence can result in a suboptimal choice of a spawning escapement goal.

  16. Paleohydrological methods and some examples from Swedish fluvial environments I. Cobble and boulder deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Establishes approximate empirical relations for determining the minimum unit stream power, bed shear stress and mean flow velocity capable of moving cobbles and boulders on streambeds. The derived equations then are used to estimate the minimum paleoflows that could have transported the boulders of two ancient fluvial deposits in Sweden. The flow estimates are compared with those made by more conventional hydraulic methods. Bankfull flows also are estimated for one of the two deposits, using various hydraulic equations.-Author

  17. Traditional and modern plant breeding methods with examples in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Breseghello, Flavio; Coelho, Alexandre Siqueira Guedes

    2013-09-04

    Plant breeding can be broadly defined as alterations caused in plants as a result of their use by humans, ranging from unintentional changes resulting from the advent of agriculture to the application of molecular tools for precision breeding. The vast diversity of breeding methods can be simplified into three categories: (i) plant breeding based on observed variation by selection of plants based on natural variants appearing in nature or within traditional varieties; (ii) plant breeding based on controlled mating by selection of plants presenting recombination of desirable genes from different parents; and (iii) plant breeding based on monitored recombination by selection of specific genes or marker profiles, using molecular tools for tracking within-genome variation. The continuous application of traditional breeding methods in a given species could lead to the narrowing of the gene pool from which cultivars are drawn, rendering crops vulnerable to biotic and abiotic stresses and hampering future progress. Several methods have been devised for introducing exotic variation into elite germplasm without undesirable effects. Cases in rice are given to illustrate the potential and limitations of different breeding approaches.

  18. Multiwavelength modelling the SED of supersoft X-ray sources I. The method and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopal, A.

    2015-04-01

    Radiation of supersoft X-ray sources (SSS) dominates both the supersof X-ray and the far-UV domain. A fraction of their radiation can be reprocessed into the thermal nebular emission, seen in the spectrum from the near-UV to longer wavelengths. In the case of symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) a strong contribution from their cool giants is indicated in the optical/near-IR. In this paper I introduce a method of multiwavelength modelling the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SSSs from the supersoft X-rays to the near-IR with the aim to determine the physical parameters of their composite spectra. The method is demonstrated on two extragalactic SSSs, the SyXB RX J0059.1-7505 (LIN 358) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), RX J0439.8-6809 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and two Galactic SSSs, the classical nova RX J2030.5+5237 (V1974 Cyg) during its supersoft phase and the classical symbiotic star RX J1601.6+6648 (AG Dra) during its quiescent phase. The multiwavelength approach overcomes the problem of the mutual dependence between the temperature, luminosity and amount of absorption, which appears when only the X-ray data are fitted. Thus, the method provides an unambiguous solution. It was found that selection of the model (a blackbody or an atmospheric model) is not of crucial importance in fitting the global X-ray/IR SED. The multiwavelength modelling of the SED of SSSs is essential in determining their physical parameters.

  19. Core requirements for successful data linkage: an example of a triangulation method

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Y M; Francis, J; Helms, P J; Haughney, J; Bond, C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to explore the views of professional stakeholders and healthcare professionals (HCPs) on the linkage of UK National Health Service (NHS) data for paediatric pharmacovigilance purposes and to make recommendations for such a system. Methods A mixed methods approach including a literature review, interviews, focus groups and a three-round Delphi survey with HCPs in Scotland was followed by a triangulation process using a systematic protocol. The survey was structured using the Theoretical Domains Framework of behaviour change. Items retained after applying the matrix-based triangulation process were thematically coded. Ethical approval was granted by the North of Scotland Research Ethics Service. Results Results from 18 papers, 23 interviewees, 23 participants of focus groups and 61 completed questionnaires in the Delphi survey contributed to the triangulation process. A total of 25 key findings from all four studies were identified during triangulation. There was good convergence; 21 key findings were agreed and remained to inform recommendations. The items were coded as practical/technical (eg, decision about the unique patient identifier to use), mandatory (eg, governed by statute), essential (consistently mentioned in all studies and therefore needed to ensure professional support) or preferable. Conclusions The development of a paediatric linked database has support from professional stakeholders and HCPs in Scotland. The triangulation identified three sets of core requirements for a new system of data linkage. An additional fourth set of ‘preferable’ requirements might increase engagement of HCPs and their support for the new system. PMID:27797999

  20. Methods for Broadband Spectral Analysis: Intrinsic Fluorescence Temperature Sensing as an Example.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Guoyao; Baxter, Greg W; Collins, Stephen F

    2016-11-22

    A systematic study was performed on the temperature-dependent fluorescence of (Ba,Sr)2SiO4:Eu(2+) The barycenter and extended intensity ratio techniques were proposed to characterize the broadband fluorescence spectra. These techniques and other known methods (listed below) were employed and compared in the fluorescent temperature sensing experiment. Multiple sensing functions were obtained using the behaviors of: (1) the barycenter location of the emission band; (2) the emission bandwidth; and (3) the ratio of intensities at different wavelengths in the emission band, respectively. The barycenter technique was not limited by the spectrometer resolution and worked well while the peak location method failed. All the sensing functions were based on the intrinsic characteristics of the fluorescence of the phosphor and demonstrated nearly linear relationships with temperature in the measuring range. The multifunctional temperature-sensing abilities of the phosphor can be applied in a point thermometer or thermal mapping. The new techniques were validated successfully for characterizing various spectra.

  1. Use of recursively generated intermediates in state selective multireference coupled-cluster method: A numerical example

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, K.B.; Adamowicz, L.

    1995-12-01

    The present work represents the first attempt to utilize the idea of recursively generated intermediates (RGI) in the framework of the state-selective multi-reference coupled-cluster method truncated at triple excitations [SS CCSD(T)]. The expressions for stepwise generation of intermediates are so structured that the spin and point symmetry simplifications can be easily applied during computation. Suitable modifications in SS CCSD(T) equations are introduced to allow for optional quasilinearization of nonlinear terms in difficult convergence situations. The computational code is, as expected, much faster than the SS CCSD(T) code without RGI adaptation. This has been numerically demonstrated by potential energy surface (PES) calculation of the HF molecule using a double zeta basis. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Finite-frequency tomography using adjoint methods-Methodology and examples using membrane surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2007-03-01

    We employ adjoint methods in a series of synthetic seismic tomography experiments to recover surface wave phase-speed models of southern California. Our approach involves computing the Fréchet derivative for tomographic inversions via the interaction between a forward wavefield, propagating from the source to the receivers, and an `adjoint' wavefield, propagating from the receivers back to the source. The forward wavefield is computed using a 2-D spectral-element method (SEM) and a phase-speed model for southern California. A `target' phase-speed model is used to generate the `data' at the receivers. We specify an objective or misfit function that defines a measure of misfit between data and synthetics. For a given receiver, the remaining differences between data and synthetics are time-reversed and used as the source of the adjoint wavefield. For each earthquake, the interaction between the regular and adjoint wavefields is used to construct finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, which we call event kernels. An event kernel may be thought of as a weighted sum of phase-specific (e.g. P) banana-doughnut kernels, with weights determined by the measurements. The overall sensitivity is simply the sum of event kernels, which defines the misfit kernel. The misfit kernel is multiplied by convenient orthonormal basis functions that are embedded in the SEM code, resulting in the gradient of the misfit function, that is, the Fréchet derivative. A non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm is used to iteratively improve the model while reducing the misfit function. We illustrate the construction of the gradient and the minimization algorithm, and consider various tomographic experiments, including source inversions, structural inversions and joint source-structure inversions. Finally, we draw connections between classical Hessian-based tomography and gradient-based adjoint tomography.

  3. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fault Zones: Methods and Examples From The San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Prentice, C. S.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths is challenging. Conventional seismic reflection methods do not work well in fault zones that consist of non-planar strata or that have large variations in velocity structure, two properties that occur in most fault zones. Understanding the structure and geometry of fault zones is important to elucidate the earthquake hazard associated with fault zones and the barrier effect that faults impose on subsurface fluid flow. In collaboration with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) at San Andreas Lake on the San Francisco peninsula, we acquired combined seismic P-wave and S-wave reflection, refraction, and guided-wave data to image the principal strand of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that ruptured the surface during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and additional fault strands east of the rupture. The locations and geometries of these fault strands are important because the SFPUC is seismically retrofitting the Hetch Hetchy water delivery system, which provides much of the water for the San Francisco Bay area, and the delivery system is close to the SAF at San Andreas Lake. Seismic reflection images did not image the SAF zone well due to the brecciated bedrock, a lack of layered stratigraphy, and widely varying velocities. Tomographic P-wave velocity images clearly delineate the fault zone as a low-velocity zone at about 10 m depth in more competent rock, but due to soil saturation above the rock, the P-waves do not clearly image the fault strands at shallower depths. S-wave velocity images, however, clearly show a diagnostic low-velocity zone at the mapped 1906 surface break. To image the fault zone at greater depths, we utilized guided waves, which exhibit high amplitude seismic energy within fault zones. The guided waves appear to image the fault zone at varying depths depending on the frequency of the seismic waves. At higher frequencies (~30 to 40 Hz), the guided waves show strong amplification at the

  4. Squeezing observational data for better causal inference: Methods and examples for prevention research.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Michael Oakes, J

    2017-04-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are typically viewed as the gold standard for causal inference. This is because effects of interest can be identified with the fewest assumptions, especially imbalance in background characteristics. Yet because conducting RCTs are expensive, time consuming and sometimes unethical, observational studies are frequently used to study causal associations. In these studies, imbalance, or confounding, is usually controlled with multiple regression, which entails strong assumptions. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe strengths and weaknesses of several methods to control for confounding in observational studies, and to demonstrate their use in cross-sectional dataset that use patient registration data from the Juan Pablo II Primary Care Clinic in La Pintana-Chile. The dataset contains responses from 5855 families who provided complete information on family socio-demographics, family functioning and health problems among their family members. We employ regression adjustment, stratification, restriction, matching, propensity score matching, standardisation and inverse probability weighting to illustrate the approaches to better causal inference in non-experimental data and compare results. By applying study design and data analysis techniques that control for confounding in different ways than regression adjustment, researchers may strengthen the scientific relevance of observational studies.

  5. Problems in estimating self-supplied industrial water use by indirect methods, the California example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burt, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Consumptive fresh-water use by industry in California is estimated at about 230 million gallons per day, or about one-half of one percent of agricultural withdrawals in the State , and only about 1 percent of agricultural consumptive use. Therefore, a significant State-wide realignment of the total water resources could not be made by industrial conservation measures. Nevertheless, considerable latitude for water conservation exists in industry -- fresh water consumed by self-supplied industry amounts to about 40 percent of its withdrawals in California, and only about 10 to 15 percent nationally (not including power-plant use). Furthermore, where firms withdraw and consume less water there is more for others nearby to use. The main question in attempting to estimate self-supplied industrial water use in California by indirect methods was whether accurate estimates of industrial water use could be made from data on surrogates such as production and employment. The answer is apparently not. A fundamental problem was that different data bases produced variable coefficients of water use for similar industries. Much of the potential for error appeared to lie in the water data bases rather than the production or employment data. The apparent reasons are that water-use data are based on responses to questionnaires, which are prone to errors in reporting, and because the data may be aggregated inappropriately for this kind of correlation. Industries within an apparently similar category commonly use different amounts of water, both because of differences in the product and because of differences in production processes even where the end-product is similar. (USGS)

  6. Using new luminescence methods to date the Palaeolithic: the example of Kalambo Falls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duller, Geoff; Tooth, Stephen; Barham, Larry

    2013-04-01

    The Palaeolithic site of Kalambo Falls in the north of Zambia was the subject of detailed study by J.D. Clark in the 1950s with 4 excavations being located within 1 km of each other in a basin upstream of the falls. A rich palaeolithic tool record was recovered, but the value of this record was limited by the lack of chronological information available. In 2006, one of the excavation sites was re-investigated (Barham et al., 2009), including examination of the stratigraphic context and collection of samples for luminescence dating. Many of the sediments in the Kalambo basin were deposited by fluvial activity. Dose distributions in the single grain quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements of the youngest sediments are consistent with incomplete bleaching. However, the residual doses obtained are typically less than 10 Gy, and so for older sediments the impact of incomplete bleaching becomes insignificant. The oldest samples are affected by a different problem, namely saturation of the OSL signal, and many grains are saturated. However in all cases some grains give finite equivalent dose values, making it feasible to calculate single grain quartz OSL ages, but it is difficult to assess whether these ages are reliable or not. Thermally transferred OSL (TT-OSL) from quartz is able to date much older samples due to the high saturation dose of this signal (Duller and Wintle, 2012). Comparison of the TT-OSL and OSL demonstrates that the OSL signal yields age underestimates as samples near saturation. Only by using the two luminescence methods is it possible to create an absolute chronology for this key site stretching back over half a million years. This study demonstrates the potential of using these two luminescence signals together for dating Palaeolithic sites throughout Africa and beyond. Barham, L., Duller, G. A. T., Plater, A. J., Tooth, S. and Turner, S. (2009). Recent excavations at Kalambo Falls, Zambia. Antiquity 83(322). Duller, G. A. T. and

  7. Fast and Simultaneous Determination of the Number and Mass Concentrations of Gold Nanorod Colloid Using an Improved Optical Extinction-Scattering Spectroscopic Method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guoce; Bai, Benfeng; Liu, Wenqi; Wu, Xiaochun

    2016-04-01

    Accurate determination of the concentrations, including the mass concentration (MC) and number concentration (NC), of metal nanoparticle (NP) colloid is highly demanded in the synthesis, metrology, and application of NPs. The commonly used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can only measure the MC of NPs, which is destructive to the NPs and requires advanced operation skills. Here, we present a simple approach based on an improved optical extinction-scattering spectroscopic (OESS) method to fast determining the MC and NC of metal nanorod colloids simultaneously. Unlike most existing spectroscopic methods that can only deal with low-concentration NP colloids, the improved OESS method can accurately solve the inverse scattering problem of NP colloids with higher concentrations, so that a two-dimensional joint probability density function of both the width and aspect ratio of nanorods can be retrieved, which makes the basis for the accurate determination of the MC and NC of the colloids in a large range of concentration. The reliability and accuracy of the method are validated by measuring several typical nanorod colloids with different concentrations and comparing the results with those obtained by the standard ICP-MS method. It is shown that the improved OESS method can cover a broad MC measurement range of at least 10-50 µg/mL and a NC measurement range of 10(9)-10(11)/mL. The uncertainty and sources of error in the measurement are also analyzed. Since the improved OESS method is fast, cost-effective, non-destructive, and easy to implement, it provides a simple way to determine the concentrations of metal NPs and has the potential to be extended to other metal NPs.

  8. Spectroscopic studies on 9H-carbazole-9-(4-phenyl) boronic acid pinacol ester by DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sas, E. B.; Kurt, M.; Can, M.; Horzum, N.; Atac, A.

    2016-08-01

    9H-Carbazole-9-(4-phenyl) boronic acid pinacol ester (9-CPBAPE) molecule was investigated by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectra. FT-IR, FT-Raman and dispersive Raman spectra were recorded in the solid phase. 1H, 13C NMR and UV-vis spectra were recorded in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution. The results of theoretical calculations for the spectra of the title molecule were compared with the experimental spectra. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analyses were performed. The theoretical calculations for the molecular structure and spectroscopic studies were performed with DFT (B3LYP) and 6-311G (d,p) basis set calculations using the Gaussian 09 program. The total (TDOS), partial (PDOS) density of state and overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analyses were performed using GaussSum 2.2 program.

  9. Applying indicators of hydrologic alteration to Texas streams: overview of methods with examples from the Trinity River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiesling, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    Streamflow is a component of aquatic ecosystem health, and long-term alteration of streamflow characteristics can produce large changes in aquatic ecosystem structure and function. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of aquatic ecosystems are all affected by the magnitude and frequency of streamflow. For example, the physical structure (hydrogeomorphology) of aquatic habitats is a property of the interaction between streamflow magnitude and frequency and the physical landscape (Leopold and others, 1992). Chemical processes are affected by changes in water residence time, which is a function of streamflow. Similarly, the structure and function of biological communities associated with stream ecosystems depend in large part on the hydrologic regime (Poff and Ward, 1989, 1990; Sparks, 1992). Within-year variation in streamflow is essential to the survival, growth, and reproduction of aquatic species. Altering streamflow magnitude and frequency and within-year variability has the potential to modify critical aspects of the physical habitat (Bain and others, 1988). Documenting the degree to which streamflow has been modified by the cumulative effects of water development is critical to assessing aquatic ecosystem health. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, conducted a study of the application of the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) methods developed by Richter and others (1996, 1997) to identify streams at risk for biological impairment from the loss of streamflow-dependent habitat. This report provides a brief overview of selected IHA methods for assessing hydrologic alteration; presents examples that illustrate the application of the methods using streamflow data from a subset of USGS stations in the Trinity River Basin, Texas, analyzed in the study; and addresses applicability of the methods statewide.

  10. Studies on the interactions of SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S) with its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-01-01

    SAP-1 is a 113 amino acid long single-chain protein which belongs to the type 2 cystatin gene family. In our previous study, we have purified SAP-1 from human seminal plasma and observed its cross-class inhibitory property. At this time, we report the interaction of SAP-1 with diverse proteases and its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the conformation of SAP-1 is changed after its complexation with proteases, and the alterations in protein secondary structure are quantitatively calculated with increase of α-helices and reduction of β-strand content. To get insight into the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases, we make an effort to model the three-dimensional structure of SAP-1 by molecular modeling and verify its stability and viability through molecular dynamics simulations and finally complexed with different proteases using ClusPro 2.0 Server. A high degree of shape complementarity is examined within the complexes, stabilized by a number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions. Using HB analyses in different protein complexes, we have identified a series of key residues that may be involved in the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases. These findings will assist to understand the mechanism of inhibition of SAP-1 for different proteases and provide intimation for further research.

  11. A single chiroptical spectroscopic method may not be able to establish the absolute configurations of diastereomers: dimethylesters of hibiscus and garcinia acids.

    PubMed

    Polavarapu, Prasad L; Donahue, Emily A; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Scalmani, Giovanni; Hawkins, Edward K; Rizzo, Carmelo; Ibnusaud, Ibrahim; Thomas, Grace; Habel, Deenamma; Sebastian, Dellamol

    2011-06-09

    Electronic circular dichroism (ECD), optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of hibiscus acid dimethyl ester have been measured and analyzed in combination with quantum chemical calculations of corresponding spectra. These results, along with those reported previously for garcinia acid dimethyl ester, reveal that none of these three (ECD, ORD, or VCD) spectroscopic methods, in isolation, can unequivocally establish the absolute configurations of diastereomers. This deficiency is eliminated when a combined spectral analysis of either ECD and VCD or ORD and VCD methods is used. It is also found that the ambiguities in the assignment of absolute configurations of diastereomers may also be overcome when unpolarized vibrational absorption is included in the spectral analysis.

  12. A Single Chiroptical Spectroscopic Method May Not Be Able To Establish the Absolute Configurations of Diastereomers: Dimethylesters of Hibiscus and Garcinia Acids

    PubMed Central

    Polavarapu, Prasad L.; Donahue, Emily A.; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Scalmani, Giovanni; Hawkins, Edward K.; Rizzo, Carmelo; Ibnusaud, Ibrahim; Thomas, Grace; Habel, Deenamma; Sebastian, Dellamol

    2013-01-01

    Electronic circular dichroism (ECD), optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of hibiscus acid dimethyl ester have been measured and analyzed in combination with quantum chemical calculations of corresponding spectra. These results, along with those reported previously for garcinia acid dimethyl ester, reveal that none of these three (ECD, ORD, or VCD) spectroscopic methods, in isolation, can unequivocally establish the absolute configurations of diastereomers. This deficiency is eliminated when a combined spectral analysis of either ECD and VCD or ORD and VCD methods is used. It is also found that the ambiguities in the assignment of absolute configurations of diastereomers may also be overcome when unpolarized vibrational absorption is included in the spectral analysis. PMID:21568330

  13. Characterization of the binding of shikonin to human immunoglobulin using scanning electron microscope, molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    He, Wenying; Ye, Xinyu; Yao, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiuli; Lin, Qiang; Huang, Guolei; Hua, Yingjie; Hui, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Shikonin, one of the active components isolated from the root of Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnst, have anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used clinically in phlebitis and vascular purpura. In the present work, the interaction of human immunoglobulin (HIg) with shikonin has been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling techniques under physiological conditions with drug concentrations of 3.33-36.67 μM. The results of SEM exhibited visually the special effect on aggregation behavior of the complex formed between HIg and shikonin. The fluorescence polarization values indicated that shikonin molecules were found in a motionally unrestricted environment introduced by HIg. Molecular docking showed the shikonin moiety bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HIg, and there are four hydrogen-bonding interactions between shikonin and the residues of protein. The synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectra confirmed that shikonin could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HIg and has an effect on the microenvironment around HIg in aqueous solution. The changes in the secondary structure of HIg were estimated by qualitative and quantitative FT-IR spectroscopic analysis. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters for shikonin-HIg systems were obtained under different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K). The above results revealed the binding mechanism of shikonin and HIg at the ultrastructure and molecular level.

  14. Determination of the acid dissociation constant of the biosurfactant monorhamnolipid in aqueous solution by potentiometric and spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Lebrón-Paler, Ariel; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Becker, Bridget A; Otto, William H; Larive, Cynthia K; Maier, Raina M

    2006-11-15

    The acid dissociation constant in water for a monorhamnolipid mixture extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 has been determined using potentiometry and two spectroscopic approaches at concentrations below and above the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Potentiometric titrations resulted in pKa values ranging from 4.28 +/- 0.16 to 5.50 +/- 0.06 depending on concentration. 1H NMR spectrochemical titrations at concentrations below the cmc revealed a pKa value of 4.39 +/- 0.06. ATR-FT-IR spectrochemical titrations on solutions well above the cmc gave a pKa value of 4.84 +/- 0.05. The value of 4.28 for the free rhamnolipid molecule for concentrations below the cmc differs markedly from that reported previously. However, the pKa of 5.50 for surface-adsorbed and solution aggregates correlates closely to that previously reported. Differences in these pKa values are rationalized in terms of the pH- and concentration-dependent aggregation behavior of rhamnolipids in aqueous solution.

  15. X-ray spectroscopic methods in the studies of nonstoichiometric TiO2-x thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollbek, K.; Sikora, M.; Kapusta, Cz.; Szlachetko, J.; Zakrzewska, K.; Kowalski, K.; Radecka, M.

    2013-09-01

    X-ray spectroscopic techniques have been used in the studies of electronic and structural properties of nonstoichiometric TiO2-x thin films obtained by reactive sputtering from Ti target. Films characterisation has been completed by means of X-ray diffraction in grazing incidence, GID, UV Raman and impedance spectroscopy, optical spectrophotometry, 1s3p Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy, RXES, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS. Stoichiometric thin films of TiO2 are composed of a well-crystallised anatase-rutile mixture with the predominance of anatase while the films with higher oxygen deficit are amorphous to larger extent. Oxidation state changes from Ti4+ in stoichiometric films towards Ti3+ upon increasing departure from stoichiometric composition. This change is accompanied by the significant decrease in the electrical resistivity. The comparison of band gap energies, determined independently from optical and valence band X-ray absorption/emission spectra is good assuming direct allowed transitions.

  16. Rapidly evolving genes in pathogens: methods for detecting positive selection and examples among fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists.

    PubMed

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Refrégier, Guislaine; Yockteng, Roxana; Fournier, Elisabeth; Giraud, Tatiana

    2009-07-01

    The ongoing coevolutionary struggle between hosts and pathogens, with hosts evolving to escape pathogen infection and pathogens evolving to escape host defences, can generate an 'arms race', i.e., the occurrence of recurrent selective sweeps that each favours a novel resistance or virulence allele that goes to fixation. Host-pathogen coevolution can alternatively lead to a 'trench warfare', i.e., balancing selection, maintaining certain alleles at loci involved in host-pathogen recognition over long time scales. Recently, technological and methodological progress has enabled detection of footprints of selection directly on genes, which can provide useful insights into the processes of coevolution. This knowledge can also have practical applications, for instance development of vaccines or drugs. Here we review the methods for detecting genes under positive selection using divergence data (i.e., the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, d(N)/d(S)). We also review methods for detecting selection using polymorphisms, such as methods based on F(ST) measures, frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype structure. In the second part, we review examples where targets of selection have been identified in pathogens using these tests. Genes under positive selection in pathogens have mostly been sought among viruses, bacteria and protists, because of their paramount importance for human health. Another focus is on fungal pathogens owing to their agronomic importance. We finally discuss promising directions in pathogen studies, such as detecting selection in non-coding regions.

  17. Spectroscopic evaluation of thymol dissolved by different methods and influence on acaricidal activity against larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Daemon, Erik; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira; Maturano, Ralph; Senra, Tatiane Oliveira Souza; Calmon, Fernanda; Faza, Aline; de Azevedo Prata, Márcia Cristina; Georgopoulos, Stéfanos Leite; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa

    2012-11-01

    The acaricidal activity of three thymol formulations was investigated at five concentrations (1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg/ml) on Rhipicephalus microplus larvae, and the behavior of its solubility in these formulations was analyzed. The thymol was dissolved in distilled water plus 1 % dimethylsulfoxide as adjuvant under two heating regimes (water bath in formulation 1 and hot plate in formulation 2) as well as without heating in 50 % ethanol and 50 % water (v/v). The acaricidal activity was assessed by the modified larval packet test, and the solubilization behavior was investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, based on the Beer-Lambert law. With formulations 1 and 2, the mortality was greater than 95 % starting at the thymol concentrations of 5.0 and 7.5 mg/ml, respectively, while with formulation 3, this mortality level was reached starting at a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml, showing that the addition of ethanol in the solution enhanced the acaricidal action of thymol. This result was supported by the LC 90 values, which were 3.3, 2.4, and 1.6 mg/ml of thymol for formulations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. This result is related to the better solubility of thymol in the hydroethanolic formulation, since the spectroscopic analysis revealed that the thymol dissolved more completely in this formulation. This fact was evident once the R (2) obtained from the linear regression analysis of the relation absorbance × concentration of the formulations 1, 2, and 3 approached the optimal value (R (2) = 1) in the following sequence: 1, 2, and 3 (0.717, 0.901, and 0.968, respectively).

  18. Insight into the roles of earthworm in vermicomposting of sewage sludge by determining the water-extracts through chemical and spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Lv, Baoyi; Zhang, Jie; Xing, Meiyan

    2014-02-01

    This work illustrated the effects of earthworm in vermicomposting (Eisenia fetida) by determining the water-extracts through chemical and spectroscopic methods. A field experiment with sludge as the only feed was subjected to vermicomposting and the control (without worms) for three weeks. Compared to the control, vermicomposting resulted in lower pH and water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) along with higher electrical conductivity (EC). Moreover, vermicomposting caused nearly two times higher content of water-extractable nitrate (WEN-NO3(-)) than the control. Furthermore, fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) revealed that vermicomposting promoted the hydrolysis/transformation of macromolecular organic matters and accelerated the degradation of polysaccharide-like and protein-like materials. Fluorescence spectroscopy also reflected vermicomposting led to higher humification degree than the control. In all, this study supplies a new view to assess the roles of earthworm in vermicomposting of sewage sludge by evaluating the water extracts.

  19. Management and dissemination of MS proteomic data with PROTICdb: example of a quantitative comparison between methods of protein extraction.

    PubMed

    Langella, Olivier; Valot, Benoît; Jacob, Daniel; Balliau, Thierry; Flores, Raphaël; Hoogland, Christine; Joets, Johann; Zivy, Michel

    2013-05-01

    High throughput MS-based proteomic experiments generate large volumes of complex data and necessitate bioinformatics tools to facilitate their handling. Needs include means to archive data, to disseminate them to the scientific communities, and to organize and annotate them to facilitate their interpretation. We present here an evolution of PROTICdb, a database software that now handles MS data, including quantification. PROTICdb has been developed to be as independent as possible from tools used to produce the data. Biological samples and proteomics data are described using ontology terms. A Taverna workflow is embedded, thus permitting to automatically retrieve information related to identified proteins by querying external databases. Stored data can be displayed graphically and a "Query Builder" allows users to make sophisticated queries without knowledge on the underlying database structure. All resources can be accessed programmatically using a Java client API or RESTful web services, allowing the integration of PROTICdb in any portal. An example of application is presented, where proteins extracted from a maize leaf sample by four different methods were compared using a label-free shotgun method. Data are available at http://moulon.inra.fr/protic/public. PROTICdb thus provides means for data storage, enrichment, and dissemination of proteomics data.

  20. Comparison between deterministic and statistical wavelet estimation methods through predictive deconvolution: Seismic to well tie example from the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Macedo, Isadora A. S.; da Silva, Carolina B.; de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Omoboya, Bode

    2017-01-01

    Wavelet estimation as well as seismic-to-well tie procedures are at the core of every seismic interpretation workflow. In this paper we perform a comparative study of wavelet estimation methods for seismic-to-well tie. Two approaches to wavelet estimation are discussed: a deterministic estimation, based on both seismic and well log data, and a statistical estimation, based on predictive deconvolution and the classical assumptions of the convolutional model, which provides a minimum-phase wavelet. Our algorithms, for both wavelet estimation methods introduce a semi-automatic approach to determine the optimum parameters of deterministic wavelet estimation and statistical wavelet estimation and, further, to estimate the optimum seismic wavelets by searching for the highest correlation coefficient between the recorded trace and the synthetic trace, when the time-depth relationship is accurate. Tests with numerical data show some qualitative conclusions, which are probably useful for seismic inversion and interpretation of field data, by comparing deterministic wavelet estimation and statistical wavelet estimation in detail, especially for field data example. The feasibility of this approach is verified on real seismic and well data from Viking Graben field, North Sea, Norway. Our results also show the influence of the washout zones on well log data on the quality of the well to seismic tie.

  1. Exploration of Porphyrin-based Semiconductors for Negative Charge Transport Applications Using Synthetic, Spectroscopic, Potentiometric, Magnetic Resonance, and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Jeffrey Scott

    Organic pi-conjugated materials are emerging as commercially relevant components in electronic applications that include transistors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. One requirement common to all of these functions is an aptitude for accepting and transmitting charges. It is generally agreed that the development of organic semiconductors that favor electrons as the majority carriers (n-type) lags behind the advances in hole transporting (p-type) materials. This shortcoming suggests that the design space for n-type materials is not yet well explored, presenting researchers with the opportunity to develop unconventional architectures. In this regard, it is worth noting that discrete molecular materials are demonstrating the potential to usurp the preeminent positions that pi-conjugated polymers have held in these areas of organic electronics research. This dissertation describes how an extraordinary class of molecules, meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged porphyrin arrays, has been bent to these new uses. Chapter one describes vis-NIR spectroscopic and magnetic resonance measurements revealing that these porphyrin arrays possess a remarkable aptitude for the delocalization of negative charge. In fact, the miniscule electron-lattice interactions exhibited in these rigid molecules allow them to host the most vast electron-polarons ever observed in a pi-conjugated material. Chapter two describes the development of an ethyne-bridged porphyrin-isoindigo hybrid chromophore that can take the place of fullerene derivatives in the conventional thin film solar cell architecture. Particularly noteworthy is the key role played by the 5,15-bis(heptafluoropropyl)porphyrin building block in the engineering of a chromophore that, gram for gram, is twice as absorptive as poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, exhibits a lower energy absorption onset than this polymer, and yet possesses a photoexcited singlet state sufficiently energetic to transfer a hole to this polymer. Chapter three describes

  2. Selection method of quasi-continuous wavelength combination with applications to the near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Li, Minmiao; Chen, Jiemei

    2014-01-01

    Equidistant combination multiple linear regression (EC-MLR) for the quasi-continuous wavelength selection of spectroscopic analysis was proposed and successfully applied to the reagent-free determination of soil organic matter with near-infrared spectroscopy. For comparison, the continuous-mode moving window partial least squares (MWPLS) and the discrete-mode successive projections algorithm (SPA) were improved by considering the stability and applied to the same analysis object as well. All methods exhibited good effect, but the modeling accuracy, stability, and validation effect of EC-MLR were better than that of the other two methods. Compared with MWPLS, the optimal EC-MLR model contained only 16 wavelengths, and method complexity was substantially reduced. Compared with SPA-MLR, the optimal EC-MLR model could easily undergo spectral preprocessing to improve predictive capability. Moreover, appropriate equidistant discrete wavelength combination with EC-MLR corresponded to the spectral absorption band with proper resolution and can effectively overcome co-linearity interruption for the MLR model. Thus, the EC-MLR method has great potential in practical application and instrument design.

  3. Alternative QSAR models for selected estradiol and cytochrome P450 ligands: comparison between classical, spectroscopic, CoMFA and GRID/GOLPE methods.

    PubMed

    Asikainen, A H; Ruuskanen, J; Tuppurainen, K A

    2005-12-01

    The performance of the spectroscopic EVA (eigenvalue) and EEVA (electronic eigenvalue) methods was tested with data sets applying coumarin 7-hydroxylation inhibitors (28 compounds) for cytochrome P450 mouse CYP2A5 and human CYP2A6 enzymes and 11ss-, 16a-, and 17a-substituted estradiol derivatives (30 compounds) for the lamb uterine estrogen receptor, and compared with the performance of the classical Hansch-type, CoMFA and GRID/GOLPE methods. Besides the internal predictability, the external predictability of the models was tested with several randomized training and test sets to ensure the validity and reliability of the models. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was employed as a general statistical tool with the EVA and EEVA methods. Some supplementary models were also built using only one PLS component with McGowan's volumes (MgVol and MgVol(2)) as additional descriptors and employing multiple linear regression (MLR) as the modelling tool. In general, both the internal and external performance of the EVA model, and more especially the EEVA model, with one PLS component and MgVol parameters was satisfactory, being either as good as or clearly better than that of the Hansch-type, CoMFA and GRID/GOLPE models.

  4. NMR, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV spectroscopic, HOMO-LUMO and NBO analysis of cumene by quantum computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaranjani, T.; Xavier, S.; Periandy, S.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the investigation of cumene using the FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectra obtained through various spectroscopic techniques. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters have been calculated by using HF and density functional theory with the hybrid methods B3LYP, B3PW91 and 6-311+G(d,p)/6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The theoretical vibrational frequencies have been scaled and compared with the corresponding experimental data. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and chemical shifts of the molecule were compared to TMS by using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. A study on the electronic and optical properties, absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, and potential energy surface (PES) is performed using HF and DFT methods. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) at different temperatures are also calculated. NBO analysis is carried out to picture the charge transfer between the localized bonds and lone pairs. NLO properties related to polarizability and hyperpolarizability are also discussed.

  5. Melt Structure and Properties: a Spectroscopic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J.

    2006-12-01

    Entropy, volume, and their P/T derivatives are at the heart of models of the thermodynamics of silicate melts and magmas. Quantitative characterization of glass structure is leading to important new insights into the links from "Microscopic to Macroscopic" that can at least guide interpretations of data and in some cases even have predictive power. A few recent examples will be discussed here. The often-large configurational components to heat capacities, thermal expansivities, and compressibilities of melts strongly indicate that structural changes with temperature and pressure are of key importance. At least some aspects of thermal increases in configurational (as opposed to vibrational) disorder are amenable to spectroscopic detection, either with in situ methods or on glasses with varying quench rates and thus varying fictive temperatures. In some systems, such changes are now clear, and can be shown to make significant contributions to properties. These include network cation coordination in systems such as borate liquids (BO4 to BO3 at higher T), and Al-Si disordering in aluminosilicates. In general, however, progress in this rich problem has only begun. It has long been suspected from thermodynamic analyses (and theoretical simulations) that configurational changes in melts play a key role in volume compression at high pressure, over and above that which can be expressed in "normal" equations of state or from those expected from bond compression and bending. Scattering and spectroscopic studies have revealed some of the important aspects of pressure-induced structural changes, but again we are just at the beginning of full understanding. For example, binary silicate glasses quenched from high-P melts clearly record some systematic increases in Si coordination, while aluminosilicates record systematic pressure and compositional (modifier cation field strength) effects on Al coordination in recovered samples with large, quenched-in density increases

  6. Multi-spectroscopic method study the interaction of anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen and calf thymus DNA and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongqin; Cai, Changqun; Gong, Hang; Chen, Xiaoming

    2011-06-01

    Interactions of the anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in aqueous solution have been studied by multi-spectroscopic method including resonance light scattering (RLS) technique, ultraviolet spectra (UV), 1H NMR, etc. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors and optimum conditions of the reaction have been unequivocally investigated. Mechanism investigations have shown that ketoprofen can bind to ctDNA by groove binding and form large particles, which resulted in the enhancement of RLS intensity. In Critic acid-Na 2HPO 4 buffer (pH = 6.5), ketoprofen has a maximum peak 451.5 nm and the RLS intensity is remarkably enhanced by trace amount of ctDNA due to the interaction between ketoprofen and ctDNA. The enhancement of RLS signal is directly proportional to the concentration of ctDNA in the range of 1.20 × 10 -6-1.0 × 10 -5 mol/L, and its detection limit (3 σ) is 1.33 × 10 -9 mol/L. The method is simple, rapid, practical and relatively free from interference generated by coexisting substance, and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of nucleic acid in synthetic samples with satisfactory results.

  7. Determination of the weight percentage gain and of the acetyl group content of acetylated wood by means of different infrared spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Stefke, Barbara; Windeisen, Elisabeth; Schwanninger, Manfred; Hinterstoisser, Barbara

    2008-02-15

    The weight percentage gain (WPG) and the acetyl group content of wood due to acetylation with acetic anhydride have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). Band height ratios (BHR) (1240/1030 (1230/1030) and 1745/1030 (1740/1030)) of the bands at 1745 (1740), 1240 (1230), and 1030 cm-1 were calculated from FTIR-KBr and FTIR-ATR (attenuated total reflection) spectra. The good linear correlation with a coefficient of determination of about 0.94 over a range from 0 to 27% WPG existing between BHRs and WPG and acetyl group content, respectively, requires only a few samples to calibrate FTIR. Partial least-squares regression models based on second derivatives of the NIR spectra in the wavenumber range from 6080 to 5760 cm-1 resulted in a R2 value of 0.99, number of PLS components (rank) between 3 and 5, root-mean-square error of cross-validation between 0.6 and 0.79%, and a residual prediction deviation up to 10. Although a wide range of input parameters (i.e., various wood species and different procedures of acetylation) was used, highly satisfactory results were obtained. Both FTIR and NIR spectroscopic means fulfill the need for determining the WPG and the acetyl content of acetylated wood. By reason of its additional potential for on-line process control, the NIR method may even outperform the FTIR method.

  8. Biodegradability of Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate/Bacterial Cellulose Composites under Aerobic Conditions, Measured via Evolution of Carbon Dioxide and Spectroscopic and Diffraction Methods.

    PubMed

    Ruka, Dianne R; Sangwan, Parveen; Garvey, Christopher J; Simon, George P; Dean, Katherine M

    2015-08-18

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and bacterial cellulose (BC) are both natural polymeric materials that have the potential to replace traditional, nonrenewable polymers. In particular, the nanofibrillar form of bacterial cellulose makes it an effective reinforcement for PHB. Neat PHB, bacterial cellulose, and a composite of PHB/BC produced with 10 wt % cellulose were composted under accelerated aerobic test conditions, with biodegradability measured by the carbon dioxide evolution method, in conjunction with spectroscopic and diffraction methods to assess crystallinity changes during the biodegradation process. The PHB/BC composite biodegraded at a greater rate and extent than that of PHB alone, reaching 80% degradation after 30 days, whereas PHB did not reach this level of degradation until close to 50 days of composting. The relative crystallinity of PHB and PHB in the PHB/BC composite was found to increase in the initial weeks of degradation, with degradation occurring primarily in the amorphous region of the material and some recrystallization of the amorphous PHB. Small angle X-ray scattering indicates that the change in PHB crystallinity is accompanied by a change in morphology of semicrystalline lamellae. The increased rate of biodegradability suggests that these materials could be applicable to single-use applications and could rapidly biodegrade in compost on disposal.

  9. Multi-spectroscopic method study the interaction of anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen and calf thymus DNA and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongqin; Cai, Changqun; Gong, Hang; Chen, Xiaoming

    2011-06-01

    Interactions of the anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in aqueous solution have been studied by multi-spectroscopic method including resonance light scattering (RLS) technique, ultraviolet spectra (UV), (1)H NMR, etc. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors and optimum conditions of the reaction have been unequivocally investigated. Mechanism investigations have shown that ketoprofen can bind to ctDNA by groove binding and form large particles, which resulted in the enhancement of RLS intensity. In Critic acid-Na(2)HPO(4) buffer (pH=6.5), ketoprofen has a maximum peak 451.5 nm and the RLS intensity is remarkably enhanced by trace amount of ctDNA due to the interaction between ketoprofen and ctDNA. The enhancement of RLS signal is directly proportional to the concentration of ctDNA in the range of 1.20×10(-6)-1.0×10(-5) mol/L, and its detection limit (3σ) is 1.33×10(-9) mol/L. The method is simple, rapid, practical and relatively free from interference generated by coexisting substance, and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of nucleic acid in synthetic samples with satisfactory results.

  10. A simple spectroscopic method to determine the degree of dissociation in hydrogen plasmas with wide-range spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    A new and simple method for determining the degree of dissociation in hydrogen plasmas is presented. In this method, wide-range spectrum covering from an atomic H-γ line (434.05 nm) to molecular Fulcher-α band (600-640 nm) is measured simultaneously by a wide-range miniature spectrometer. Since the wide-range spectrum measured by the miniature spectrometer is too broadened to resolve respective lines in the Fulcher-α band, a synthetic spectrum method is applied to improve the accuracy in the Q-branch of Fulcher-α band intensity measurement. In order to reduce the influence from other transitions or anomalous P- and R-branch of Fulcher-α spectrum, the Fulcher-α spectra of which vibrational states are higher than 1 (υ ≥ 1) are synthesized using the rotational temperature obtained by the 0-0 Fulcher-α spectrum. The degree of dissociation is determined from the intensity ratio between H-γ line and the synthesized Fulcher-α band spectrum. A comparative study carried out in a volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source shows that the degree of dissociation determined by this method agrees well with the measured values using a spectrometer with high spectral resolution. The present method is expected to be useful to characterize the plasma sources with molecular species since it provides important parameters for understanding neutral particle behaviors.

  11. Empirical evaluation of decision support systems: Needs, definitions, potential methods, and an example pertaining to waterfowl management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sojda, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Decision support systems are often not empirically evaluated, especially the underlying modelling components. This can be attributed to such systems necessarily being designed to handle complex and poorly structured problems and decision making. Nonetheless, evaluation is critical and should be focused on empirical testing whenever possible. Verification and validation, in combination, comprise such evaluation. Verification is ensuring that the system is internally complete, coherent, and logical from a modelling and programming perspective. Validation is examining whether the system is realistic and useful to the user or decision maker, and should answer the question: “Was the system successful at addressing its intended purpose?” A rich literature exists on verification and validation of expert systems and other artificial intelligence methods; however, no single evaluation methodology has emerged as preeminent. At least five approaches to validation are feasible. First, under some conditions, decision support system performance can be tested against a preselected gold standard. Second, real-time and historic data sets can be used for comparison with simulated output. Third, panels of experts can be judiciously used, but often are not an option in some ecological domains. Fourth, sensitivity analysis of system outputs in relation to inputs can be informative. Fifth, when validation of a complete system is impossible, examining major components can be substituted, recognizing the potential pitfalls. I provide an example of evaluation of a decision support system for trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) management that I developed using interacting intelligent agents, expert systems, and a queuing system. Predicted swan distributions over a 13-year period were assessed against observed numbers. Population survey numbers and banding (ringing) studies may provide long term data useful in empirical evaluation of decision support.

  12. Reflectance near-infrared spectroscopic method with Chemometric techniques for simultaneous determination of Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methyl sulfonyl methane.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Alaa; Attia, Khalid Abdel-Salam; Nassar, Mohammad Wafaa; Seda, Hamed Hamed Abu; Shoeib, Maisra Al-Shabrawi

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance near-IR (RNIR) spectroscopy was used for the simultaneous determination of chondroitin (CH), glucosamine (GO), and methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM) in tablets. Simple sample preparation was done by grinding, sieving, and compression of the tablets for improving RNIR spectra. Principal component regression and partial least squares (PLS-1 and PLS-2) were successfully applied to quantify the three components in the studied mixture using information included in RNIR spectra in the range of 4350-9100 cm(-1). The calibration model was developed with drug concentration ranges of 14.5-44.2% (w/w) for CH, 18.4-55.3% (w/w) for GO, and 6-18.6% (w/w) for MSM with addition of tablet excipients to the calibration set in the same ratio as in the tested tablets. The calibration models were evaluated by internal validation, cross-validation, and external validation using synthetic and pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was applied for analysis of six batches of the pharmaceutical product. The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of the pharmacopoeial method for the same batch of the pharmaceutical product. No significant differences between the results were found. The RNIR method is accurate and precise, and can be used for QC of pharmaceutical products.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance, vibrational spectroscopic studies, physico-chemical properties and computational calculations on (nitrophenyl) octahydroquinolindiones by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Pasha, M A; Siddekha, Aisha; Mishra, Soni; Azzam, Sadeq Hamood Saleh; Umapathy, S

    2015-02-05

    In the present study, 2'-nitrophenyloctahydroquinolinedione and its 3'-nitrophenyl isomer were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values of the synthesized compounds in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) method with the 6-311++G (d,p) basis set and compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments of wave numbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution using GAR2PED programme. Isotropic chemical shifts for (1)H and (13)C NMR were calculated using gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The experimental vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. On the basis of vibrational analysis, molecular electrostatic potential and the standard thermodynamic functions have been investigated.

  14. Study on photophysical and aggregation induced emission recognition of 1,8-naphthalimide probe for casein by spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Xuhua; Fan, Jun; Han, Quan

    2013-05-01

    A novel water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide derivative 1, bearing two acetic carboxylic groups, exhibited fluorescent turn-on recognition for casein based on the aggregation induced emission (AIE) character. The photophysical properties of 1 consisting of donor and acceptor units were investigated in different solutions. The fluorescence intensity decreased through taking advantage of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) and self-association emission with increasing solvent polarity. Moreover, the spectral red-shift and intensity quench in protic solvents were caused by the excited-state hydrogen bond strengthening effect. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations revealed that 1 exhibited a strong TICT character. The AIE mechanism of 1 with casein was due to 1 docked in the hydrophobic cavity between sub-micelles and bound with Tyr and Trp residues, resulting in the aggregation of 1 on the casein surface and emission enhancement. Based on this, a novel casein assay method was developed. The proposed exhibited a good linear range from 0.1 to 22 μg mL-1, with the detection limit of 2.8 ng mL-1. Satisfactory reproducibility, reversibility and a short response time were realized. This method was applied to the determination of casein in milk powder samples and the results were in good agreement with the result of Biuret method.

  15. Structural, spectroscopic aspects, and electronic properties of (TiO2)n clusters: a study based on the use of natural algorithms in association with quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Ganguly Neogi, Soumya; Chaudhury, Pinaki

    2014-01-05

    In this article, we propose a stochastic search-based method, namely genetic algorithm (GA) and simulated annealing (SA) in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate global and local minimum structures of (TiO2)n clusters with n = 1-12. Once the structures are established, we evaluate the infrared spectroscopic modes, cluster formation energy, vertical excitation energy, vertical ionization potential, vertical electron affinity, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps, and so forth. We show that an initial determination of structure using stochastic techniques (GA/SA), also popularly known as natural algorithms as their working principle mimics certain natural processes, and following it up with density functional calculations lead to high-quality structures for these systems. We have shown that the clusters tend to form three-dimensional networks. We compare our results with the available experimental and theoretical results. The results obtained from SA/GA-DFT technique agree well with available theoretical and experimental data of literature.

  16. The investigation of the binding behavior between ethyl maltol and human serum albumin by multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jianming; Yao, Meihuan; Yao, Xiaojun; Fan, Jing; Ji, Hanxuan

    2012-10-01

    This paper was designed to investigate the interaction of ethyl maltol with human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological condition by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, Fourier transformation infrared spectra, and molecular docking method. Spectroscopic analysis of the emission quenching at different temperatures revealed that the quenching mechanism of HSA by ethyl maltol was static quenching mechanism. The binding constants of ethyl maltol-HSA complexes were observed to be 2.59, 1.88, 1.54, 1.13 × 104 M-1 at 289, 296, 303 and 310 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔH0 and ΔS0 were calculated to be -28.61 kJ mol-1 and -14.59 J mol-1 K-1. Energy transfer from tryptophan to ethyl maltol occurred by a FRET mechanism, and the donor-acceptor distance (3.04 nm) had been determined according to Förster's theory. Molecular docking studies revealed that ethyl maltol situated within subdomain IIA (site I) of HSA. Fluorescence displacement experiments also proved the binding sites between ethyl maltol and HSA.

  17. The investigation of the binding behavior between ethyl maltol and human serum albumin by multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jianming; Yao, Meihuan; Yao, Xiaojun; Fan, Jing; Ji, Hanxuan

    2012-10-01

    This paper was designed to investigate the interaction of ethyl maltol with human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological condition by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, Fourier transformation infrared spectra, and molecular docking method. Spectroscopic analysis of the emission quenching at different temperatures revealed that the quenching mechanism of HSA by ethyl maltol was static quenching mechanism. The binding constants of ethyl maltol-HSA complexes were observed to be 2.59, 1.88, 1.54, 1.13×10(4) M(-1) at 289, 296, 303 and 310 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) were calculated to be -28.61 kJ mol(-1) and -14.59 J mol(-1) K(-1). Energy transfer from tryptophan to ethyl maltol occurred by a FRET mechanism, and the donor-acceptor distance (3.04 nm) had been determined according to Förster's theory. Molecular docking studies revealed that ethyl maltol situated within subdomain IIA (site I) of HSA. Fluorescence displacement experiments also proved the binding sites between ethyl maltol and HSA.

  18. Influence of Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ on (+)-catechin binding to bovine serum albumin studied by fluorescence spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Mijun; Shi, Shuyun; Zhang, Yuping

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heavy metal ions, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ on (+)-catechin binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic methods. The results indicated that the presence of heavy metal ions significantly affected the binding modes and binding affinities of (+)-catechin to BSA, and the effects depend on the types of heavy metal ion. One binding mode was found for (+)-catechin with and without Cd 2+, while two binding modes - a weaker one at low concentration and a stronger one at high concentration were found for (+)-catechin in the presence of Hg 2+ and Pb 2+. The presence of Cd 2+ decreased the binding affinities of (+)-catechin for BSA by 20.5%. The presence of Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ decreased the binding affinity of (+)-catechin for BSA by 8.9% and 26.7% in lower concentration, respectively, and increased the binding affinity of (+)-catechin for BSA by 5.2% and 9.2% in higher concentration, respectively. The changed binding affinity and binding distance of (+)-catechin for BSA in the presence of Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ were mainly because of the conformational change of BSA induced by heavy metal ions. However, the quenching mechanism for (+)-catechin to BSA was based on static quenching combined with non-radiative energy transfer irrespective of the absence or presence of heavy metal ions.

  19. Anodic stripping voltammetry with gold electrodes as an alternative method for the routine determination of mercury in fish. Comparison with spectroscopic approaches.

    PubMed

    Giacomino, Agnese; Ruo Redda, Andrea; Squadrone, Stefania; Rizzi, Marco; Abete, Maria Cesarina; La Gioia, Carmela; Toniolo, Rosanna; Abollino, Ornella; Malandrino, Mery

    2017-04-15

    The applicability to the determination of mercury in tuna of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SW-ASV) conducted at both solid gold electrode (SGE) and a gold nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs-GCE) was demonstrated. Mercury content in two certified materials and in ten samples of canned tuna was measured. The performances of the electrodes were compared with one another as well as with two spectroscopic techniques, namely cold vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) and a direct mercury analyser (DMA). The results found pointed out that both SW-ASV approaches were suitable and easy-to-use method to monitor mercury concentration in tunas, since they allowed accurate quantification at concentration values lower than the maximum admissible level in this matrix ([Hg]=1mg/kgwet weight,ww). In particular, mercury detection at the AuNPs-GCE showed a LOQ in fish-matrix of 0.1μg/l, corresponding to 0.06mg/kgww, with performance comparable to that of DMA.

  20. A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty high-energy solar spectroscopic imager.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Iain G; Hurford, Gordon J; Hudson, Hugh S; Lin, Robert P

    2007-02-01

    We present a new method, fan-beam modulation, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This space-based solar x-ray and gamma-ray telescope has much greater sensitivity than previous experiments in the 3-25 keV range, but is normally not well suited to detecting extended sources since their signal is not modulated by RHESSI's rotating grids. When the spacecraft is offpointed from the target source, however, the fan-beam modulation time-modulates the transmission by shadowing resulting from exploiting the finite thickness of the grids. In this article we detail how the technique is implemented and verify its consistency with sources with clear known signals that have occurred during RHESSI offpointing: microflares and the Crab Nebula. In both cases the results are consistent with previous and complementary measurements. Preliminary work indicates that this new technique allows RHESSI to observe the integrated hard x-ray spectrum of weak extended sources on the quiet Sun.

  1. Chemometrics-assisted simple UV-spectroscopic determination of carbamazepine in human serum and comparison with reference methods.

    PubMed

    Cámara, María S; Mastandrea, Carlos; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2005-09-30

    In the present report, carbamazepine is determined on serum samples of real patients by a procedure completely assisted by chemometric tools. First, a response surface methodology based on a mixture design was applied in order to select the best conditions for the extraction step. Finally, partial least squares multivariate calibration (PLS-1) was applied to second-derivative UV spectra, eliminating a shift baseline effect that originated in the extraction procedure. The performance assessment included: (a) a three-level precision study, (b) a recovery study analyzing spiked samples, and (c) a method comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) applied on real patient samples. The obtained results show the potentiality of the presently studied methodology for the monitoring of patients treated with this anticonvulsant.

  2. A mass spectroscopic method for analysis of AHH-inducing and other polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and selected pesticides in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Larry J.; Hesselberg, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The 209 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners exhibit a wide range in toxicity to fish, birds, and mammals. This paper discusses the use of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry negative chemical ionization (GC/MS-NCI) to quantify congeners of highly suspected toxicity such as IUPAC #77 (3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl) and #126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl). GC/MS analysis time needed to produce the necessary resolution was reduced to 1 h per sample or standard, allowing an autosampler to inject 12 samples in 24 hours, plus 12 standards/QC samples. Identification and quantification of some 60+ congeners and several selected pesticides and estimation of total PCBs are also possible within the 1 h analysis. For congeners of high chlorination (penta through octa), the method exhibited excellent sensitivity, such that we could not locate a fish which exhibited PCB levels below our calibrated quantitation range. NCI was not as sensitive for mono through tri and for some tetrachlorinated PCB congeners, an exception being PCB #77, for which sensitivity was of the same order as for the more highly chlorinated biphenyls. Long term stability was excellent. Over a 6-mo period, results of replicate analyses for PCB congeners and pesticides in a composited sample of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Michigan had a relative standard deviation of 12% of the mean. Over the same time period, mean recoveries for samples spiked at concentrations similar to those in Lake Michigan lake trout were 90-102%. Response was linear over a wide range of concentrations for each of the analyzed compounds. This method is now being used for routine analysis of PCB congeners and selected pesticides in our laboratory.

  3. Investigation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot interactions via spectroscopic methods and effects on enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvir; Tripathi, S K

    2015-01-05

    The paper presents the interactions between trypsin and water soluble cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots investigated by spectrophotometric methods. CdSe quantum dots have strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin by a static quenching mechanism. The quenching has been studied at three different temperatures where the results revealed that electrostatic interactions exist between CdSe quantum dots and trypsin and are responsible to stabilize the complex. The Scatchard plot from quenching revealed 1 binding site for quantum dots by trypsin, the same has been confirmed by making isothermal titrations of quantum dots against trypsin. The distance between donor and acceptor for trypsin-CdSe quantum dot complexes is calculated to be 2.8 nm by energy transfer mechanisms. The intrinsic fluorescence of CdSe quantum dots has also been enhanced by the trypsin, and is linear for concentration of trypsin ranging 1-80 μl. All the observations evidence the formation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot conjugates, where trypsin retains the enzymatic activity which in turn is temperature and pH dependent.

  4. Probing into the binding interaction between medroxyprogesterone acetate and bovine serum albumin (BSA): spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Dong-Qi; Qiu, Min-Jie; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min; Wang, Qi; Shi, Jie-Hua

    2016-09-01

    To further understand the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the binding interaction of MPA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) was studied using fluorescence emission spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular docking methods. The experimental results reveal that the fluorescence of BSA quenches due to the formation of MPA-BSA complex. The number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant for MPA-BSA complex are ~1 and 4.6 × 10(3)  M(-1) at 310 K, respectively. However, it can be concluded that the binding process of MPA with BSA is spontaneous and the main interaction forces between MPA and BSA are van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction due to the negative values of ΔG(0) , ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) in the binding process of MPA with BSA. MPA prefers binding on the hydrophobic cavity in subdomain IIIA (site II'') of BSA resulting in a slight change in the conformation of BSA, but BSA retaining the α-helix structure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Characterization of intermolecular interaction between cyanidin-3-glucoside and bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-hua; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Ying-yao; Chen, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The intermolecular interaction between cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3-G) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism and molecular docking methods. The experimental results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA at 338 nm by Cy-3-G resulted from the formation of Cy-3-G-BSA complex. The number of binding sites (n) for Cy-3-G binding on BSA was approximately equal to 1. The experimental and molecular docking results revealed that after binding Cy-3-G to BSA, Cy-3-G is closer to the Tyr residue than the Trp residue, the secondary structure of BSA almost not change, the binding process of Cy-3-G with BSA is spontaneous, and Cy-3-G can be inserted into the hydrophobic cavity of BSA (site II') in the binding process of Cy-3-G with BSA. Moreover, based on the sign and magnitude of the enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH(0)  = - 29.64 kcal/mol and ΔS(0)  = - 69.51 cal/mol K) and the molecular docking results, it can be suggested that the main interaction forces of Cy-3-G with BSA are Van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions.

  6. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic analysis of anticancer drug mitotane using DFT method; a comparative study of its parent structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2015-04-01

    A comprehensive screening of the density functional theoretical approach to structural analysis is presented in this section. DFT calculations using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory were found to yield results that are very comparable to experimental IR and Raman spectra. Computed geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of the fundamentals were found in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and also its parent structure. The vibrational assignments of the normal modes were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) calculations. It can be proven from the comparative results of mitotane and its parent structure Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), the intramolecular nonbonding interaction between (C1sbnd H19⋯Cl18) in the ortho position which is calculated 2.583 Å and the position of the substitution takeover the vibrational wavenumber to redshift of 47 cm-1. In addition, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been performed for analyzing charge delocalization throughout the molecule. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity and charge delocalization has been analyzed. 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with published results.

  7. Spectroscopic investigations on the photodegradation of toluidine blue dye using cadmium sulphide nanoparticles prepared by a novel method.

    PubMed

    Neelakandeswari, N; Sangami, G; Dharmaraj, N; Taek, Nam Ki; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-05-01

    A novel method to prepare cadmium sulphide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) possessing nearly uniform size was adopted using eggshell membrane (ESM), under different pH conditions. Significant yield of CdS NPs with smallest possible size was obtained by increasing the pH of the reaction medium from acidic to alkaline. The above prepared CdS NPs have been characterized by UV-vis absorption as well as emission spectra, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The efficiency of the above prepared CdS NPs as a catalyst for the photodegradation of toluidine blue (TB) dye, as a function of pH as well as the ratio between the catalyst and the substrate was studied after irradiation with UV light. The results showed that an efficient interaction took place between the catalyst and the substrate to cause degradation of the selected dye. A maximum degradation of toluidine blue dye (90%) was observed at pH 8 which is higher than that of the efficiencies at pH 4 and pH 6.

  8. Exploration of binding of C.I. Food Red 9 with pepsin by optical spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of C.I. Food Red 9 on the conformation and activity of pepsin was performed using multi-spectral methods and molecular docking technique. Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectral analyzes showed that C.I. Food Red 9 binding induced the changes of secondary and tertiary structure of pepsin. The activity experimental results indicated that the activity of pepsin decreased remarkably with the increasing concentration of C.I. Food Red 9. Multi non-covalent interactions including hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces played important roles in the complex formation between C.I. Food Red 9 and pepsin. The binding constants of pepsin with C.I. Food Red 9 were (1.21±0.036)×10(4) L mol(-1) (298 K) and (1.05±0.043)×10(4) L mol(-1) (310 K). Moreover, the putative binding site of C.I. Food Red 9 on pepsin was near to activity pocket. This study demonstrates that C.I. Food Red 9 could cause some negative effects on pepsin.

  9. Investigation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot interactions via spectroscopic methods and effects on enzymatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurvir; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the interactions between trypsin and water soluble cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots investigated by spectrophotometric methods. CdSe quantum dots have strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin by a static quenching mechanism. The quenching has been studied at three different temperatures where the results revealed that electrostatic interactions exist between CdSe quantum dots and trypsin and are responsible to stabilize the complex. The Scatchard plot from quenching revealed 1 binding site for quantum dots by trypsin, the same has been confirmed by making isothermal titrations of quantum dots against trypsin. The distance between donor and acceptor for trypsin-CdSe quantum dot complexes is calculated to be 2.8 nm by energy transfer mechanisms. The intrinsic fluorescence of CdSe quantum dots has also been enhanced by the trypsin, and is linear for concentration of trypsin ranging 1-80 μl. All the observations evidence the formation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot conjugates, where trypsin retains the enzymatic activity which in turn is temperature and pH dependent.

  10. Characterizing the binding interaction between antimalarial artemether (AMT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA): Spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Pan, Dong-Qi; Wang, Xiou-Xiou; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min; Wang, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Artemether (AMT), a peroxide sesquiterpenoides, has been widely used as an antimalarial for the treatment of multiple drug-resistant strains of plasmodium falciparum malaria. In this work, the binding interaction of AMT with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the imitated physiological conditions (pH7.4) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking methods. The experimental results indicated that there was a change in UV absorption of BSA along with a slight red shift of absorption wavelength, indicating that the interaction of AMT with BSA occurred. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by AMT due to the formation of AMT-BSA complex. The number of binding sites (n) and binding constant of AMT-BSA complex were about 1 and 2.63×10(3)M(-1) at 298K, respectively, suggesting that there was stronger binding interaction of AMT with BSA. Based on the analysis of the signs and magnitudes of the free energy change (ΔG(0)), enthalpic change (ΔH(0)) and entropic change (ΔS(0)) in the binding process, it can be concluded that the binding of AMT with BSA was enthalpy-driven process due to |ΔH°|>|TΔS°|. The results of experiment and molecular docking confirmed the main interaction forces between AMT and BSA were van der Waals force. And, there was a slight change in the BSA conformation after binding AMT but BSA still retains its secondary structure α-helicity. However, it had been confirmed that AMT binds on the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB of BSA.

  11. Enhancement of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation Spectroscopic Methods to Investigate the Secondary Structure of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lishan; Sahu, Indra D.; Mayo, Daniel J.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Troxel, Kaylee; Zhou, Andy; Shockley, Erin; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant improvement of a new structural biology approach designed to probe the secondary structure of membrane proteins using the pulsed EPR technique of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. Previously, we showed that we could characterize an α-helical secondary structure with ESEEM spectroscopy using a 2H-labeled Val side chain coupled with site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL). In order to further develop this new approach, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were conducted on several different hydrophobic residues that are commonly found in membrane proteins. 2H-SL distance distributions from the MD results indicated that 2H-labeled Leu was a very strong candidate to significantly improve this ESEEM approach. In order to test this hypothesis, the secondary structure of the α-helical M2δ peptide of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) incorporated into a bicelle was investigated with 2H-labeled Leu d10 at position 10 (i) and nitroxide spin labels positioned 1, 2, 3 and 4 residues away (denoted i+1 to i+4) with ESEEM spectroscopy. The ESEEM data reveal a unique pattern that is characteristic of an α-helix (3.6 residues per turn). Strong 2H modulation was detected for the i+3 and i+4 samples, but not for the i+2 sample. The 2H modulation depth observed for 2H-labeled d10 Leu was significantly enhanced (x4) when compared to previous ESEEM measurements that used 2H-labeled d8 Val. Computational studies indicate that deuterium nuclei on the Leu sidechain are closer to the spin label when compared to Val. The enhancement of 2H modulation and the corresponding Fourier Transform (FT) peak intensity for 2H-labeled Leu significantly reduces the ESEEM data acquisition time for Leu when compared to Val. This research demonstrates that a different 2H-labeled amino acid residue can be used as an efficient ESEEM probe further substantiating this important biophysical technique. Finally, this new method can provide pertinent

  12. Electron Spectroscopic Methods in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Discusses electron-loss spectroscopy and the experimentally observed excitation energies in terms of qualitative MO theory. Reviews information on photoelectron spectroscopy and electron transmission spectroscopy and their relation to the occupied and unoccupied orbital levels. Focuses on teaching applications. (ML)

  13. In vitro study on binding interaction of quinapril with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Pan, Dong-Qi; Jiang, Min; Liu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qi

    2016-08-07

    The binding interaction between quinapril (QNPL) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in vitro has been investigated using UV absorption spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopic, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, 3D fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and molecular docking methods for obtaining the binding information of QNPL with BSA. The experimental results confirm that the quenching mechanism of the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA induced by QNPL is static quenching based on the decrease in the quenching constants of BSA in the presence of QNPL with the increase in temperature and the quenching rates of BSA larger than 10(10) L mol(-1) s(-1), indicating forming QNPL-BSA complex through the intermolecular binding interaction. The binding constant for the QNPL-BSA complex is in the order of 10(5) M(-1), indicating there is stronger binding interaction of QNPL with BSA. The analysis of thermodynamic parameters together with molecular docking study reveal that the main binding forces in the binding process of QNPL with BSA are van der Waal's forces and hydrogen bonding interaction. And, the binding interaction of BSA with QNPL is an enthalpy-driven process. Based on Förster resonance energy transfer, the binding distance between QNPL and BSA is calculated to be 2.76 nm. The results of the competitive binding experiments and molecular docking confirm that QNPL binds to sub-domain IIA (site I) of BSA. It is confirmed there is a slight change in the conformation of BSA after binding QNPL, but BSA still retains its secondary structure α-helicity.

  14. PNS and statistical experiments simulation in subcritical systems using Monte-Carlo method on example of Yalina-Thermal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovich, Sergey; Talamo, A.; Burnos, V.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Fokov, Yu.

    2014-06-01

    In subcritical systems driven by an external neutron source, the experimental methods based on pulsed neutron source and statistical techniques play an important role for reactivity measurement. Simulation of these methods is very time-consumed procedure. For simulations in Monte-Carlo programs several improvements for neutronic calculations have been made. This paper introduces a new method for simulation PNS and statistical measurements. In this method all events occurred in the detector during simulation are stored in a file using PTRAC feature in the MCNP. After that with a special code (or post-processing) PNS and statistical methods can be simulated. Additionally different shapes of neutron pulses and its lengths as well as dead time of detectors can be included into simulation. The methods described above were tested on subcritical assembly Yalina-Thermal, located in Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research SOSNY, Minsk, Belarus. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results was shown.

  15. The comparative analysis of different computations methods of strength of materials by the example of calculations of the axle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, S. I.; Petrov, I. A.; Shutova, M. N.; Alekseeva, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents data of calculation the main characteristics of resilience by different ways. The basic data for the article were the calculation of the guiding axle beam of the vehicle. The calculation was performed by the analytic method and it was necessary to re-check strength of materials by any other method for reliability of the carried-out work. The finite element method was chosen as the competing option.

  16. Example of Occupational Surveillance in a Telemedicine Setting: Application of Epidemiologic Methods at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana; Ruffaner, Lanie M.; Wear, Mary L.; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Lee, Lesley R.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, NASA implemented Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, a formal occupational surveillance program for the U.S. astronaut corps. Because of the nature of the space environment, space medicine presents unique challenges and opportunities for epidemiologists. One such example is the use of telemedicine while crewmembers are in flight, where the primary source of information about crew health is verbal communication between physicians and their crewmembers. Due to restricted medical capabilities, the available health information is primarily crewmember report of signs and symptoms, rather than diagnoses. As epidemiologists at NASA, Johnson Space Center, we have shifted our paradigm from tracking diagnoses based on traditional terrestrial clinical practice to one in which we also incorporate reported symptomology as potential antecedents of disease. In this presentation we describe how characterization of reported signs and symptoms can be used to establish incidence rates for inflight immunologic events. We describe interdisciplinary data sources of information that are used in combination with medical information to analyze the data. We also delineate criteria for symptom classification inclusion. Finally, we present incidence tables and graphs to illustrate the final outcomes. Using signs and symptoms reported via telemedicine, the epidemiologists provide summary evidence regarding incidence of potential inflight medical conditions. These results inform our NASA physicians and scientists, and support evaluation of the occupational health risks associated with spaceflight.

  17. Method for estimating materials fluxes from coastal wetlands into the Great Lakes, with an example from lake Erie. Technical bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented in detail for the quantitative estimation of the flux of water and dissolved or suspended materials through coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes where the juncture of the wetland and lake is constricted by a narrow opening. Application of the method requires frequent (e.g., hourly or daily) data on atmospheric deposition, precipitation, evaporation, upstream discharges from tributaries, wetland water level changes, and water chemistry data at upstream and downstream locations, as well as a detailed knowledge of wetland depth-area and depth-volume relationships. Data collected during October 1989 are used to demonstrate the method.

  18. Reexamination of Statistical Methods for Comparative Anatomy: Examples of Its Application and Comparisons with Other Parametric and Nonparametric Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A. G. M. F.; Nishijo, Hisao; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Various statistical methods have been published for comparative anatomy. However, few studies compared parametric and nonparametric statistical methods. Moreover, some previous studies using statistical method for comparative anatomy (SMCA) proposed the formula for comparison of groups of anatomical structures (multiple structures) among different species. The present paper described the usage of SMCA and compared the results by SMCA with those by parametric test (t-test) and nonparametric analyses (cladistics) of anatomical data. In conclusion, the SMCA can offer a more exact and precise way to compare single and multiple anatomical structures across different species, which requires analyses of nominal features in comparative anatomy. PMID:26413553

  19. Maximum-likelihood estimation of familial correlations from multivariate quantitative data on pedigrees: a general method and examples.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, D C; Vogler, G P; McGue, M; Russell, J M

    1987-01-01

    A general method for maximum-likelihood estimation of familial correlations from pedigree data is presented. The method is applicable to any type of data structure, including pedigrees in which variable numbers of individuals are present within classes of relatives, data in which multiple phenotypic measures are obtained on each individual, and multiple group analyses in which some correlations are equated across groups. The method is applied to data on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol levels obtained from participants in the Swedish Twin Family Study. Results indicate that there is strong familial resemblance for both traits but little cross-trait resemblance. PMID:3687943

  20. Reexamination of Statistical Methods for Comparative Anatomy: Examples of Its Application and Comparisons with Other Parametric and Nonparametric Statistics.

    PubMed

    Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A G M F; Nishijo, Hisao; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Various statistical methods have been published for comparative anatomy. However, few studies compared parametric and nonparametric statistical methods. Moreover, some previous studies using statistical method for comparative anatomy (SMCA) proposed the formula for comparison of groups of anatomical structures (multiple structures) among different species. The present paper described the usage of SMCA and compared the results by SMCA with those by parametric test (t-test) and nonparametric analyses (cladistics) of anatomical data. In conclusion, the SMCA can offer a more exact and precise way to compare single and multiple anatomical structures across different species, which requires analyses of nominal features in comparative anatomy.

  1. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  2. Probing the interaction of a new synthesized CdTe quantum dots with human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Hooshyar, Zari

    2016-05-01

    A novel CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in aqueous phase via a facile method. At first, poly (acrylic amide) grafted onto sodium alginate (PAAm-g-SA) were successfully synthesized and then TGA capped CdTe QDs (CdTe-TGA QDs) were embed into it. The prepared CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs were optimized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated that CdTe-TGA QDs, with particles size of 2.90 nm, were uniformly dispersed on the chains of PAAm-g-SA biopolymer. CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs also exhibited excellent UV-vis absorption and high fluorescence intensity. To explore biological behavior of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs, the interactions between CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs and human serum albumin (HSA) (or bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, FT-IR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopic. The results confirmed the formation of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs-HSA (or BSA) complex with high binding affinities. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG<0, ΔH<0 and ΔS<0) were indicated that binding reaction was spontaneous and van der Waals interactions and hydrogen-bond interactions played a major role in stabilizing the CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs-HSA (or BSA) complexes. The binding distance between CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs and HSA (or BSA)) was calculated about 1.37 nm and 1.27 nm, respectively, according to Forster non-radiative energy transfer theory (FRET). Analyzing FT-IR spectra showed that the formation of QDs-HSA and QDs-BSA complexes led to conformational changes of the HSA and BSA proteins. All these experimental results clarified the effective transportation and elimination of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs in the body by binding to HSA and BSA, which could be a useful guideline for the estimation of QDs as a drug carrier.

  3. [Methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of so-called polyetiological diseases using the example of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Lifshits, A M

    1979-01-01

    General characteristics of the multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) is given. Methodical premises and criteria for the selection of an adequate MSA method applicable to pathoanatomic investigations of the epidemiology of multicausal diseases are presented. The experience of using MSA with computors and standard computing programs in studies of coronary arteries aterosclerosis on the materials of 2060 autopsies is described. The combined use of 4 MSA methods: sequential, correlational, regressional, and discriminant permitted to quantitate the contribution of each of the 8 examined risk factors in the development of aterosclerosis. The most important factors were found to be the age, arterial hypertension, and heredity. Occupational hypodynamia and increased fatness were more important in men, whereas diabetes melitus--in women. The registration of this combination of risk factors by MSA methods provides for more reliable prognosis of the likelihood of coronary heart disease with a fatal outcome than prognosis of the degree of coronary aterosclerosis.

  4. Comparison of correction methods of inhomogeneities in daily data on example of Central European temperature and precipitation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanek, P.; Gruber, Ch.; Zahradnicek, P.

    2009-04-01

    Prior any data analysis, data quality control and homogenization have to be undertaken to get rid of erroneous values in time series. In this work we focused especially on comparison of methods for daily data inhomogeneities correction. Two basic approaches for inhomogeneity adjustments were adopted and compared: (i) "delta" method - adjustment of monthly series and projection of estimated smoothed monthly adjustments into annual variation of daily adjustments and (ii) "variable" correction of daily values according to the corresponding percentiles. "Variable" correction methods were investigated more deeply and their results were mutually compared. The methods used were HOM of Paul Della-Marta, SPLIDHOM of Olivier Mestre and a new method of Petr Stepanek. For the calculation, the software ProClimDB has been combined with R software scripts containing HOM and SPLIDHOM and the different methodological approaches were applied to daily data of various meteorological elements measured in the area of the Czech Republic. The tool is open and freely available. Series were processed by means of the developed ProClimDB and AnClim software (www.climahom.eu).

  5. Assessment of current atomic scale modelling methods for the investigation of nuclear fuels under irradiation: Example of uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolus, Marjorie; Krack, Matthias; Freyss, Michel; Devanathan, Ram

    2015-10-13

    Multiscale approaches are developed to build more physically based kinetic and mechanical mesoscale models to enhance the predictive capability of fuel performance codes and increase the efficiency of the development of the safer and more innovative nuclear materials needed in the future. Atomic scale methods, and in particular electronic structure and empirical potential methods, form the basis of this multiscale approach. It is therefore essential to know the accuracy of the results computed at this scale if we want to feed them into higher scale models. We focus here on the assessment of the description of interatomic interactions in uranium dioxide using on the one hand electronic structure methods, in particular in the density functional theory (DFT) framework and on the other hand empirical potential methods. These two types of methods are complementary, the former enabling to get results from a minimal amount of input data and further insight into the electronic and magnetic properties, while the latter are irreplaceable for studies where a large number of atoms needs to be considered. We consider basic properties as well as specific ones, which are important for the description of nuclear fuel under irradiation. These are especially energies, which are the main data passed to higher scale models. We limit ourselves to uranium dioxide.

  6. A generalized method for high throughput in-situ experiment data analysis: An example of battery materials exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoun, Bachir; Yu, Cun; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Ren, Yang

    2015-04-01

    A generalized method is introduced to extract critical information from series of ranked correlated data. The method is generally applicable to all types of spectra evolving as a function of any arbitrary parameter. This approach is based on correlation functions and statistical scedasticity formalism. Numerous challenges in analyzing high throughput experimental data can be tackled using the herein proposed method. We applied this method to understand the reactivity pathway and formation mechanism of a Li-ion battery cathode material during high temperature synthesis using in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. We demonstrate that Pearson's correlation function can easily unravel all major phase transition and, more importantly, the minor structural changes which cannot be revealed by conventionally inspecting the series of diffraction patterns. Furthermore, a two-dimensional (2D) reactivity pattern calculated as the scedasticity along all measured reciprocal space of all successive diffraction pattern pairs unveils clearly the structural evolution path and the active areas of interest during the synthesis. The methods described here can be readily used for on-the-fly data analysis during various in-situ operando experiments in order to quickly evaluate and optimize experimental conditions, as well as for post data analysis and large data mining where considerable amount of data hinders the feasibility of the investigation through point-by-point inspection.

  7. Lipid monolayer and sparse matrix screening for growing two-dimensional crystals for electron crystallography: methods and examples.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Mark; Dryden, Kelly A; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K

    2013-01-01

    Electron microscopy provides an efficient method for rapidly assessing whether a solution of macromolecules is homogeneous and monodisperse. If the macromolecules can be induced to form two-dimensional crystals that are a single layer in thickness, then electron crystallography of frozen-hydrated crystals has the potential of achieving three-dimensional density maps at sub-nanometer or even atomic resolution. Here we describe the lipid monolayer and sparse matrix screening methods for growing two-dimensional crystals and present successful applications to soluble macromolecular complexes: carboxysome shell proteins and HIV CA, respectively. Since it is common to express recombinant proteins with poly-His tags for purification by metal affinity chromatography, the monolayer technique using bulk lipids doped with Ni(2+) lipids has the potential for broad application. Likewise, the sparse matrix method uses screening conditions for three-dimensional crystallization and is therefore of broad applicability.

  8. Catalase in fluvial biofilms: a comparison between different extraction methods and example of application in a metal-polluted river.

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Bonet, Berta; Corcoll, Natàlia; Guasch, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes are involved in important processes of cell detoxification during oxidative stress and have, therefore, been used as biomarkers in algae. Nevertheless, their limited use in fluvial biofilms may be due to the complexity of such communities. Here, a comparison between different extraction methods was performed to obtain a reliable method for catalase extraction from fluvial biofilms. Homogenization followed by glass bead disruption appeared to be the best compromise for catalase extraction. This method was then applied to a field study in a metal-polluted stream (Riou Mort, France). The most polluted sites were characterized by a catalase activity 4-6 times lower than in the low-polluted site. Results of the comparison process and its application are promising for the use of catalase activity as an early warning biomarker of toxicity using biofilms in the laboratory and in the field.

  9. Chloride mass-balance method for estimating ground water recharge in arid areas: Examples from western Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bazuhair, A.S.; Wood, W.W.

    1996-01-01

    The chloride mass-balance method, which integrates time and aerial distribution of ground water recharge, was applied to small alluvial aquifers in the wadi systems of the Asir and Hijaz mountains in western Saudi Arabia. This application is an extension of the method shown to be suitable for estimating recharge in regional aquifers in semi-arid areas. Because the method integrates recharge in time and space it appears to be, with certain assumptions, particularly well suited for and areas with large temporal and spatial variation in recharge. In general, recharge was found to be between 3 to 4% of precipitation - a range consistent with recharge rates found in other arid and semi-arid areas of the earth.

  10. A Simple Method to Predict Regional Fish Abundance: An Example in the McKenzie River Basin, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional assessments of fisheries resources are increasingly called for, but tools with which to perform them are limited. We present a simple method that can be used to estimate regional carrying capacity and apply it to the McKenzie River Basin, Oregon. First, we use a macroeco...

  11. Using Case-Mix Adjustment Methods To Measure the Effectiveness of Substance Abuse Treatment: Three Examples Using Client Employment Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Lane; Fields, Errol L.; Dall, Timothy M.; Ameen, Ansari Z.; Harwood, Henrick J.

    This report demonstrates three applications of case-mix methods using regression analysis. The results are used to assess the relative effectiveness of substance abuse treatment providers. The report also examines the ability of providers to improve client employment outcomes, an outcome domain relatively unexamined in the assessment of provider…

  12. Electrical Resistivity Methods to Characterize Sediment Deformation; Examples from Large-scale Glaciotectonic Structures in Michigan, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    An outcrop at the western edge of a large NW-SE trending ridge along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan south of Ludington contains Late Wisconsin deformation structures. Differential loading associated with a glacial re-advance caused glaciolacustrine loamy material to deform into several narrow anticlinal structures that rise from below beach level to near the top of the ~50 m high cliff. The anticlines separate ~100 m broad synclines that control local ground water flow and impact cliff stability. The objective of this study was to characterize the orientation and lateral extent of the structures below the ridge using different galvanic electrical resistivity methods. These methods exploit the large electrical contrast between the glaciolacustrine loams and overlying sandy outwash material. Electrical resistivity methods have long been part of the geophysical tool set. Recent advances, including the availability of multi-electrode systems and advanced data processing software, have made electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) a popular tool to obtain 2D models of subsurface resistivity. In this study, vertical electrical soundings (VES) were combined with borehole logs and lab-derived petrophysical relationships to characterize the site stratigraphy. Constant-spread traverses (CST) and ERT data were used to map the spatial extent of deformation structures. Field, lab, and modeling results presented in this work identify various strengths and limitations of electrical resistivity methods for the characterization of deformation structures in general and glaciotectonic structures in particular.

  13. [X-ray radiography as a method of detailing the analysis of sedimentary facies, based on example of the Cergowa sandstones (Flysch Carpathians)].

    PubMed

    Pszonka, Joanna; Wendorff, Marek; Jucha, Katarzyna; Bartynowska, Karolina; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the X-ray radiography as a method useful for the visualization of sedimentary structures in macroscopically homogeneous rocks. The radiographic analysis presented here bases on the example the Cergowa turbidite sandstones. The applied technique reveals that some of the apparently homogeneus Cergowa sandstones possess internal sedimentary structure of cross-lamination, which reflects on the sedimentological interpretation of the depositional mechanisms of this rock unit. This is the first application of this method in research on the Carpathian Flysch sedimentation.

  14. Method of Determining the Filtration Properties of oil-Bearing Crops in the Process of Their Pressing by the Example of Rape-oil Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, E. V.; Petrov, I. A.

    2014-07-01

    A method of determining the change in the fi ltration properties of oil-bearing crops in the process of their pressing by repeated dynamic loading is proposed. The use of this method is demonstrated by the example of rape-oil extrusion. It was established that the change in the mass concentration of the oil in a rape mix from 0.45 to 0.23 leads to a decrease in the permeability of the mix by 101.5-102 times depending on the pressure applied to it. It is shown that the dependence of the permeability of this mix on the pressure applied to it is nonmonotone in character.

  15. Application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method to Mantle Melting: An Example from REE Abundances in Abyssal Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, B.; Liang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation is a powerful statistical method in solving inverse problems that arise from a wide range of applications, such as nuclear physics, computational biology, financial engineering, among others. In Earth sciences applications of MCMC are primarily in the field of geophysics [1]. The purpose of this study is to introduce MCMC to geochemical inverse problems related to trace element fractionation during concurrent melting, melt transport and melt-rock reaction in the mantle. MCMC method has several advantages over linearized least squares methods in inverting trace element patterns in basalts and mantle rocks. First, MCMC can handle equations that have no explicit analytical solutions which are required by linearized least squares methods for gradient calculation. Second, MCMC converges to global minimum while linearized least squares methods may be stuck at a local minimum or converge slowly due to nonlinearity. Furthermore, MCMC can provide insight into uncertainties of model parameters with non-normal trade-off. We use MCMC to invert for extent of melting, amount of trapped melt, and extent of chemical disequilibrium between the melt and residual solid from REE data in abyssal peridotites from Central Indian Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In the first step, we conduct forward calculation of REE evolution with melting models in a reasonable model space. We then build up a chain of melting models according to Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to represent the probability of specific model. We show that chemical disequilibrium is likely to play an important role in fractionating LREE in residual peridotites. In the future, MCMC will be applied to more realistic but also more complicated melting models in which partition coefficients, diffusion coefficients, as well as melting and melt suction rates vary as functions of temperature, pressure and mineral compositions. [1]. Sambridge & Mosegarrd [2002] Rev. Geophys.

  16. A method for multi-hazard mapping in poorly known volcanic areas: an example from Kanlaon (Philippines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, M.; Le Cozannet, G.; Thierry, P.; Bignami, C.; Ruch, J.

    2013-08-01

    Hazard mapping in poorly known volcanic areas is complex since much evidence of volcanic and non-volcanic hazards is often hidden by vegetation and alteration. In this paper, we propose a semi-quantitative method based on hazard event tree and multi-hazard map constructions developed in the frame of the FP7 MIAVITA project. We applied this method to the Kanlaon volcano (Philippines), which is characterized by poor geologic and historical records. We combine updated geological (long-term) and historical (short-term) data, building an event tree for the main types of hazardous events at Kanlaon and their potential frequencies. We then propose an updated multi-hazard map for Kanlaon, which may serve as a working base map in the case of future unrest. The obtained results extend the information already contained in previous volcanic hazard maps of Kanlaon, highlighting (i) an extensive, potentially active ~5 km long summit area striking north-south, (ii) new morphological features on the eastern flank of the volcano, prone to receiving volcanic products expanding from the summit, and (iii) important riverbeds that may potentially accumulate devastating mudflows. This preliminary study constitutes a basis that may help local civil defence authorities in making more informed land use planning decisions and in anticipating future risk/hazards at Kanlaon. This multi-hazard mapping method may also be applied to other poorly known active volcanoes.

  17. Switching industrial production processes from complex to defined media: method development and case study using the example of Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are versatile cell factories and widely used for the production of antibiotics, organic acids, enzymes and other industrially relevant compounds at large scale. As a fact, industrial production processes employing filamentous fungi are commonly based on complex raw materials. However, considerable lot-to-lot variability of complex media ingredients not only demands for exhaustive incoming components inspection and quality control, but unavoidably affects process stability and performance. Thus, switching bioprocesses from complex to defined media is highly desirable. Results This study presents a strategy for strain characterization of filamentous fungi on partly complex media using redundant mass balancing techniques. Applying the suggested method, interdependencies between specific biomass and side-product formation rates, production of fructooligosaccharides, specific complex media component uptake rates and fungal strains were revealed. A 2-fold increase of the overall penicillin space time yield and a 3-fold increase in the maximum specific penicillin formation rate were reached in defined media compared to complex media. Conclusions The newly developed methodology enabled fast characterization of two different industrial Penicillium chrysogenum candidate strains on complex media based on specific complex media component uptake kinetics and identification of the most promising strain for switching the process from complex to defined conditions. Characterization at different complex/defined media ratios using only a limited number of analytical methods allowed maximizing the overall industrial objectives of increasing both, method throughput and the generation of scientific process understanding. PMID:22727013

  18. Constraining recent fault offsets with statistical and geometrical methods: Example from the Jasneuf Fault (Western Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billant, Jérémy; Bellier, Olivier; Godard, Vincent; Hippolyte, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    We propose two new approaches regarding recent fault offset measurements by studying the seismogenic potential of the Jasneuf Fault. The NE trending right-lateral strike-slip Jasneuf Fault is the southwestern extension of the Belledonne fault system in the Vercors Massif. This fault, which is located in an intraplate domain, does not show strongly associated seismicity but displays morphological anomalies that are related to recent faulting (right-lateral offset of Late Cenozoic cliffs, recent talwegs, and post Günz scarps). The two methods that we use to quantify fault slip are as follows. 1 - Recursive measurements of stream offsets are conducted. This analysis reveals that a stream network can display characteristic distances between streams that can be mistakenly interpreted as long-term cumulative fault offsets. A comparison of the apparent stream offset values and stream spacing values is necessary to identify the true offsets. 2 - We propose a new method that enables us to determine the fault offset and kinematics by using recursive measurements of topographic apparent offsets to counter the lack of morphologic features that are used to determine piercing points or lines. This method enables us to define each possible slip vector for numerous artificial piercing points along a fault. The slip vector that is shared by these piercing points is the true slip vector. By applying these methodologies, we determine that the Jasneuf Fault has accumulated slip since the Messinian, which corresponds to an average slip rate of 0.13 ± 0.03 mm year-1. The extension of the fault is poorly constrained. Nevertheless, if we do not consider the potential aseismic (creep slip) component of the faulting, we calculate that this fault could generate Mw 5.7 earthquakes every 500 years according to Wells and Coppersmith's scaling laws and by assuming that the faulting is limited to the sedimentary cover and the Vercors Plateau.

  19. A target enrichment method for gathering phylogenetic information from hundreds of loci: An example from the Compositae1

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; Dikow, Rebecca B.; Funk, Vicki A.; Masalia, Rishi R.; Staton, S. Evan; Kozik, Alex; Michelmore, Richard W.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: The Compositae (Asteraceae) are a large and diverse family of plants, and the most comprehensive phylogeny to date is a meta-tree based on 10 chloroplast loci that has several major unresolved nodes. We describe the development of an approach that enables the rapid sequencing of large numbers of orthologous nuclear loci to facilitate efficient phylogenomic analyses. • Methods and Results: We designed a set of sequence capture probes that target conserved orthologous sequences in the Compositae. We also developed a bioinformatic and phylogenetic workflow for processing and analyzing the resulting data. Application of our approach to 15 species from across the Compositae resulted in the production of phylogenetically informative sequence data from 763 loci and the successful reconstruction of known phylogenetic relationships across the family. • Conclusions: These methods should be of great use to members of the broader Compositae community, and the general approach should also be of use to researchers studying other families. PMID:25202605

  20. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system.

    PubMed

    Beckon, William N

    2016-07-01

    For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment).

  1. An Efficient Method of Modeling Material Properties Using a Thermal Diffusion Analogy: An Example Based on Craniofacial Bone

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julian L.; Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Strait, David S.; Grosse, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to incorporate detailed geometry into finite element models has allowed researchers to investigate the influence of morphology on performance aspects of skeletal components. This advance has also allowed researchers to explore the effect of different material models, ranging from simple (e.g., isotropic) to complex (e.g., orthotropic), on the response of bone. However, bone's complicated geometry makes it difficult to incorporate complex material models into finite element models of bone. This difficulty is due to variation in the spatial orientation of material properties throughout bone. Our analysis addresses this problem by taking full advantage of a finite element program's ability to solve thermal-structural problems. Using a linear relationship between temperature and modulus, we seeded specific nodes of the finite element model with temperatures. We then used thermal diffusion to propagate the modulus throughout the finite element model. Finally, we solved for the mechanical response of the finite element model to the applied loads and constraints. We found that using the thermal diffusion analogy to control the modulus of bone throughout its structure provides a simple and effective method of spatially varying modulus. Results compare favorably against both experimental data and results from an FE model that incorporated a complex (orthotropic) material model. This method presented will allow researchers the ability to easily incorporate more material property data into their finite element models in an effort to improve the model's accuracy. PMID:21347288

  2. An exploratory method to detect tephras from quantitative XRD scans: Examples from Iceland and east Greenland marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, John T.; Eberl, D.D.; Kristjansdottir, G.B.

    2006-01-01

    Tephras, mainly from Iceland, are becoming increasingly important in interpreting leads and lags in the Holocene climate system across NW Europe. Here we demonstrate that Quantitative Phase Analysis of x-ray diffractograms of the 150 um fraction and identify these same peaks in XRD scans - two of these correlate geochemically and chronologically with Hekla 1104 and 3. At a distal site to the WNW of Iceland, on the East Greenland margin (core MD99-2317), the weight% of volcanic glass reaches values of 11% at about the time of the Saksunarvatn tephra. The XRD method identifies the presence of volcanic glass but not its elemental composition; hence it will assist in focusing attention on specific sections of sediment cores for subsequent geochemical fingerprinting of tephras. ?? 2006 SAGE Publications.

  3. Spatially Resolved Chemical Imaging for Biosignature Analysis: Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, R.; Wanger, G.; Orphan, V. J.; Fries, M.; Rowe, A. R.; Nealson, K. H.; Abbey, W. J.; DeFlores, L. P.; Beegle, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Detection of in situ biosignatures on terrestrial and planetary missions is becoming increasingly more important. Missions that target the Earth's deep biosphere, Mars, moons of Jupiter (including Europa), moons of Saturn (Titan and Enceladus), and small bodies such as asteroids or comets require methods that enable detection of materials for both in-situ analysis that preserve context and as a means to select high priority sample for return to Earth. In situ instrumentation for biosignature detection spans a wide range of analytical and spectroscopic methods that capitalize on amino acid distribution, chirality, lipid composition, isotopic fractionation, or textures that persist in the environment. Many of the existing analytical instruments are bulk analysis methods and while highly sensitive, these require sample acquisition and sample processing. However, by combining with triaging spectroscopic methods, biosignatures can be targeted on a surface and preserve spatial context (including mineralogy, textures, and organic distribution). To provide spatially correlated chemical analysis at multiple spatial scales (meters to microns) we have employed a dual spectroscopic approach that capitalizes on high sensitivity deep UV native fluorescence detection and high specificity deep UV Raman analysis.. Recently selected as a payload on the Mars 2020 mission, SHERLOC incorporates these optical methods for potential biosignatures detection on Mars. We present data from both Earth analogs that operate as our only examples known biosignatures and meteorite samples that provide an example of abiotic organic formation, and demonstrate how provenance effects the spatial distribution and composition of organics.

  4. A general method to measure the Hall effect in nanowires: examples of FeS2 and MnSi.

    PubMed

    DeGrave, John P; Liang, Dong; Jin, Song

    2013-06-12

    We present a general methodology for measuring the Hall effect on nanostructures with one-dimensional (1D) nanowire morphology. Relying only on typical e-beam lithography, the methodology developed herein utilizes an angled electrode evaporation technique so that the nanowire itself is a shadow mask and an intimate sidewall contact can be formed for the Hall electrodes. A six-contact electrode scheme with offset transverse contacts is utilized that allows monitoring of both the longitudinal resistivity and the Hall resistivity which is extracted from the raw voltage from the transverse electrodes using an antisymmetrization procedure. Our method does not require the use of a highly engineered lithographic process to produce directly opposing Hall electrodes with a very small gap. Hall effect measurements on semiconducting iron pyrite (FeS2) nanowire devices are validated by comparing to Hall effect measurements in the conventional Hall geometry using FeS2 plate devices. This Hall effect measurement is further extended to MnSi nanowires, and the distinct anomalous Hall effect signature is identified for the first time in chiral magnetic MnSi nanowires, a significant step toward identifying the topological Hall effect due to skyrmions in chiral magnetic nanowires.

  5. Methods and approaches to support Indigenous water planning: An example from the Tiwi Islands, Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoverman, Suzanne; Ayre, Margaret

    2012-12-01

    SummaryIndigenous land owners of the Tiwi Islands, Northern Territory Australia have begun the first formal freshwater allocation planning process in Australia entirely within Indigenous lands and waterways. The process is managed by the Northern Territory government agency responsible for water planning, the Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport, in partnership with the Tiwi Land Council, the principal representative body for Tiwi Islanders on matters of land and water management and governance. Participatory planning methods ('tools') were developed to facilitate community participation in Tiwi water planning. The tools, selected for their potential to generate involvement in the planning process needed both to incorporate Indigenous knowledge of water use and management and raise awareness in the Indigenous community of Western science and water resources management. In consultation with the water planner and Tiwi Land Council officers, the researchers selected four main tools to develop, trial and evaluate. Results demonstrate that the tools provided mechanisms which acknowledge traditional management systems, improve community engagement, and build confidence in the water planning process. The researchers found that participatory planning approaches supported Tiwi natural resource management institutions both in determining appropriate institutional arrangements and clarifying roles and responsibilities in the Islands' Water Management Strategy.

  6. [Thoughts and methods of study on acupuncture medical history: an example of Mr. MA Ji-Xing].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ling

    2014-03-01

    Mr. MA Ji-xing has devoted himself into the study of acupuncture medical history for more than 70 years. As a result, a great work of Zhenjiuxue Tongshi (see text), History of Acupuncture-Moxibustion) has been completed. The author has expensively studied for history of acupuncture medicine in time and space. Base on abundant historical materials, deliberate textual research as well as strategically situated academic view, it is considered as a masterpiece of acupuncture on real significance. It is worthwhile to note that the book has a systematic and profound explanation on Bian-stone therapy, unearthed literature relics of acupuncture, the bronze figure or illustration of acupoint as well as special topics of Japan and Korea acupuncture history. Filled several gaps of the field, and explored some significant new paths of study, it laid the groundwork for the profound study and unscramble of traditional acupuncture theory as well as the investigation of the academic history, which is considered to have a profound and persistent influence. The careful sorting and profound digging of many distinguish thoughts and methods of Mr. MA Ji-xing in the study of acupuncture medical history has significant meaning in references and enlightenment of the future research on acupuncture medical history.

  7. Thermodynamic evaluation and restoration of volcanic gas analyses: an example based on modern collection and analytical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic evaluation and restoration procedures are applied to a set of 10 volcanic gas analyses obtained by modern collection and analytical methods. The samples were collected from a vigorously fuming fissure during episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea Volcano in 1983. A variety of analytical techniques were used to determine the gas compositions. In most samples, the combined amounts of N2 + Ar + O2 are far less abundant than H2, CO, or H2S, suggesting little or no contamination or reaction with atmospheric gases. Thermodynamic evaluation shows that 6 of the 10 analyses are equilibrium compositions, and 4 analyses are disequilibrium compositions. Three of the disequilibrium analyses involve samples affected by minor spilling of NaOH solution from the sample bottles during collection. The deviation of these analyses from equilibrium is dominated by the effects of disequilibrium water-loss. The fourth disequilibrium analysis is contaminated with meteoric water. In all 4 cases, the restoration procedures retrieve the original equilibrium compositions. -from Author

  8. Enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio in ophthalmic optical coherence tomography by image registration--method and clinical examples.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thomadsen, Jakob; Christensen, Ulrik; Soliman, Wael; Sander, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has already proven an important clinical tool for imaging and diagnosing retinal diseases. Concerning the standard commercial ophthalmic OCT systems, speckle noise is a limiting factor with respect to resolving relevant retinal features. We demonstrate successful suppression of speckle noise from mutually aligning a series of in vivo OCT recordings obtained from the same retinal target using the Stratus system from Humphrey-Zeiss. Our registration technique is able to account for the axial movements experienced during recording as well as small transverse movements of the scan line from one scan to the next. The algorithm is based on a regularized shortest path formulation for a directed graph on a map formed by interimage (B-scan) correlations. The resulting image enhancement typically increases the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with a factor of three or more and facilitates segmentation and quantitative characterization of pathologies. The method is currently successfully being applied by medical doctors in a number of specific retinal case studies.

  9. A formal method for identifying distinct states of variability in time-varying sources: SGR A* as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.; Witzel, G.; Ghez, A. M.; Longstaff, F. A.

    2014-08-10

    Continuously time variable sources are often characterized by their power spectral density and flux distribution. These quantities can undergo dramatic changes over time if the underlying physical processes change. However, some changes can be subtle and not distinguishable using standard statistical approaches. Here, we report a methodology that aims to identify distinct but similar states of time variability. We apply this method to the Galactic supermassive black hole, where 2.2 μm flux is observed from a source associated with Sgr A* and where two distinct states have recently been suggested. Our approach is taken from mathematical finance and works with conditional flux density distributions that depend on the previous flux value. The discrete, unobserved (hidden) state variable is modeled as a stochastic process and the transition probabilities are inferred from the flux density time series. Using the most comprehensive data set to date, in which all Keck and a majority of the publicly available Very Large Telescope data have been merged, we show that Sgr A* is sufficiently described by a single intrinsic state. However, the observed flux densities exhibit two states: noise dominated and source dominated. Our methodology reported here will prove extremely useful to assess the effects of the putative gas cloud G2 that is on its way toward the black hole and might create a new state of variability.

  10. New route to synthesis of unexpected 1,5-bis(1-benzofuran-2-yl) pentane-1,5-dione derivatives: Their structure determination with spectroscopic and X-ray methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coskun, Demet

    2017-02-01

    The new 1,5-bis(1-benzofuran-2-yl)-1,5-dione derivatives were obtained by the reaction of 2-acetyl benzofuran derivatives (1a-b) and suitable aromatic aldehyde derivatives (2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, 2-fluoro and 3-fluorobenzaldehyde) in the presence of sodium hydroxide as the base. Importantly, a new process was explored for the synthesis of new bis benzofuran dione derivatives. The structures of the compounds was identified with infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HSQC and HMBC spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. A representative X-ray crystallographic analysis of 3c was given, and its X-ray data were discussed in detail.

  11. Method for Finding Metabolic Properties Based on the General Growth Law. Liver Examples. A General Framework for Biological Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for finding metabolic parameters of cells, organs and whole organisms, which is based on the earlier discovered general growth law. Based on the obtained results and analysis of available biological models, we propose a general framework for modeling biological phenomena and discuss how it can be used in Virtual Liver Network project. The foundational idea of the study is that growth of cells, organs, systems and whole organisms, besides biomolecular machinery, is influenced by biophysical mechanisms acting at different scale levels. In particular, the general growth law uniquely defines distribution of nutritional resources between maintenance needs and biomass synthesis at each phase of growth and at each scale level. We exemplify the approach considering metabolic properties of growing human and dog livers and liver transplants. A procedure for verification of obtained results has been introduced too. We found that two examined dogs have high metabolic rates consuming about 0.62 and 1 gram of nutrients per cubic centimeter of liver per day, and verified this using the proposed verification procedure. We also evaluated consumption rate of nutrients in human livers, determining it to be about 0.088 gram of nutrients per cubic centimeter of liver per day for males, and about 0.098 for females. This noticeable difference can be explained by evolutionary development, which required females to have greater liver processing capacity to support pregnancy. We also found how much nutrients go to biomass synthesis and maintenance at each phase of liver and liver transplant growth. Obtained results demonstrate that the proposed approach can be used for finding metabolic characteristics of cells, organs, and whole organisms, which can further serve as important inputs and constraints for many applications in biology (such as protein expression), biotechnology (synthesis of substances), and medicine. PMID:24940740

  12. USING AN INTENSIVE ASSESSMENT METHOD TO CALIBRATE A RAPID WETLAND ASSESSMENT METHOD: AN EXAMPLE FROM NANTICOKE BASIN, DELAWARE AND MARYLAND, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of rapid assessment methods has become a priority for many organizations that want to report on the condition of wetlands at larger scales requiring many sampling sites. To have faith in these rapid methods, however, requires that they be verified with more compr...

  13. Statistical comparison of methods for estimating sediment thickness from Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) seismic methods: An example from Tylerville, Connecticut, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Lane, John

    2016-01-01

    Determining sediment thickness and delineating bedrock topography are important for assessing groundwater availability and characterizing contamination sites. In recent years, the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic method has emerged as a non-invasive, cost-effective approach for estimating the thickness of unconsolidated sediments above bedrock. Using a three-component seismometer, this method uses the ratio of the average horizontal- and vertical-component amplitude spectrums to produce a spectral ratio curve with a peak at the fundamental resonance frequency. The HVSR method produces clear and repeatable resonance frequency peaks when there is a sharp contrast (>2:1) in acoustic impedance at the sediment/bedrock boundary. Given the resonant frequency, sediment thickness can be determined either by (1) using an estimate of average local sediment shear-wave velocity or by (2) application of a power-law regression equation developed from resonance frequency observations at sites with a range of known depths to bedrock. Two frequently asked questions about the HVSR method are (1) how accurate are the sediment thickness estimates? and (2) how much do sediment thickness/bedrock depth estimates change when using different published regression equations? This paper compares and contrasts different approaches for generating HVSR depth estimates, through analysis of HVSR data acquired in the vicinity of Tylerville, Connecticut, USA.

  14. X-Ray Absorption And EPR Spectroscopic Studies of the Biotransformations of Chromium(Vi) in Mammalian Cells. Is Chromodulin An Artifact of Isolation Methods?

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, A.; Harris, H.H.; Lay, P.A.; /Sydney U.

    2007-07-10

    Very different biological activities are usually ascribed to Cr(VI) (a toxin and carcinogen) and Cr(III) (an antidiabetic agent), although recent evidence suggests that both these types of actions are likely to arise from cellular uptake of varying concentrations of Cr(VI). The first systematic study of XANES spectra of Cr(III) complexes formed in Cr(VI)-treated mammalian cells (A549, HepG2, V79, and C2C12 cell lines), and in subcellular fractions of A549 cells, has been performed using a library of XANES spectra of model Cr(III) complexes. The results of multiple linear regression analyses of XANES spectra, in combination with multiple-scattering fits of XAFS spectra, indicate that Cr(III) formed in Cr(VI)-treated cells is most likely to bind to carboxylato, amine, and imidazole residues of amino acids, and to a lesser extent to hydroxo or aqua ligands. A combination of XANES and EPR spectroscopic data for Cr(VI)-treated cells indicates that the main component of Cr(III) formed in such cells is bound to high-molecular-mass ligands (>30 kDa, probably proteins), but significant redistribution of Cr(III) occurs during the cell lysis, which leads to the formation of a low-molecular-mass (<30 kDa) Cr(III)-containing fraction. The spectroscopic (XANES, XAFS, and EPR) properties of this fraction were strikingly similar to those of the purported natural Cr(III)-containing factor, chromodulin, that was reported to be isolated from the reaction of Cr(VI) with liver. These data support the hypothesis that a chromodulin-like species, which is formed from such a reaction, is an artifact of the reported isolation procedure.

  15. A Spectroscopic-Based Laboratory Experiment for Protein Conformational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Carlos Henrique I.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a practical experiment for teaching basic spectroscopic techniques to introduce the topic of protein conformational change to students in the field of molecular biology, biochemistry, or structural biology. The spectroscopic methods employed in the experiment are absorbance, for protein concentration measurements, and…

  16. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifzadeh, Lida; Balasubramanian, K.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 21 electronic states of AsF are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) and multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. The computed spectroscopic constants agree with the experimental values for the observed states.

  17. The Origin, Composition and History of Comets from Spectroscopic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    A wealth of information essential to understanding the composition and physical structure of cometary ice and hence gain deep insight into the comet's origin and history, can be gleaned by carrying out a full range of spectroscopic studies on the returned sample. These studies ought to be among the first performed as they are generally non-destructive and will provide a broad data bank which will be crucial in planning subsequent analysis. Examples of the spectroscopic techniques along with relative sensitivities and transitions probed, are discussed. Different kind of "spectroscopy" is summarized, with emphasis placed on the kind of information each provides. Infrared spectroscopy should be the premier method of analysis as the mid-IR absorption spectrum of a substance contains more global information about the identity and structure of that material than any other property. In fact, the greatest strides in our understanding of the composition of interstellar ices (thought by many to be the primordial material from which comets have formed) have been taken during the past ten years or so because this was when high quality infrared spectra of the interstellar medium (ISM) first became available. The interpretation of the infrared spectra of mixtures, such as expected in comets, is often (not always) ambiguous. Consequently, a full range of other non-destructive, complementary spectroscopic measurements are required to fully characterize the material, to probe for substances for which the IR is not well suited and to lay the groundwork for future analysis. Given the likelihood that the icy component (including some of the organic and mineral phases) of the returned sample will be exceedingly complex, these techniques must be intensely developed over the next decade and then made ready to apply flawlessly to what will certainly be one of the most precious, and most challenging, samples ever analyzed.

  18. Spectroscopic measurements of solar wind generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Withbroe, G. L.; Zapata, C. A.; Noci, G.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopically observable quantities are described which are sensitive to the primary plasma parameters of the solar wind's source region. The method is discussed in which those observable quantities are used as constraints in the construction of empirical models of various coronal structures. Simulated observations are used to examine the fractional contributions to observed spectral intensities from coronal structures of interest which co-exist with other coronal structures along simulated lines-of-sight. The sensitivity of spectroscopic observables to the physical parameters within each of those structures is discussed.

  19. Deciphering P-T paths in metamorphic rocks involving zoned minerals using quantified maps (XMapTools software) and thermodynamics methods: Examples from the Alps and the Himalaya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, P.; Vidal, O.; Schwartz, S.; Riel, N.; Guillot, S.; Lewin, E.

    2012-04-01

    Metamorphic rocks are made by mosaic of local thermodynamic equilibria involving minerals that grew at different temporal, pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions. These local (in space but also in time) equilibria can be identified using micro-structural and textural criteria, but also tested using multi-equilibrium techniques. However, linking deformation with metamorphic conditions requires spatially continuous estimates of P and T conditions in least two dimensions (P-T maps), which can be superimposed to the observed structures of deformation. To this end, we have developed a new Matlab-based GUI software for microprobe X-ray map processing (XMapTools, http://www.xmaptools.com) based on the quantification method of De Andrade et al. (2006). XMapTools software includes functions for quantification processing, two chemical modules (Chem2D, Triplot3D), the structural formula functions for common minerals, and more than 50 empirical and semi-empirical geothermobarometers obtained from the literature. XMapTools software can be easily coupled with multi-equilibrium thermobarometric calculations. We will present examples of application for two natural cases involving zoned minerals. The first example is a low-grade metapelite from the paleo-subduction wedge in the Western Alps (Schistes Lustrés unit) that contains only both zoned chlorite and phengite, and also quartz. The second sample is a Himalayan eclogite from the high-pressure unit of Stak (Pakistan) with an eclogitic garnet-omphacite assemblage retrogressed into clinopyroxene-plagioclase-amphibole symplectite, and later into amphibole-biotite during the collisional event under crustal conditions. In both samples, P-T paths were recovered using multi-equilibrium, or semi-empirical geothermobarometers included in the XMapTools package. The results will be compared and discussed with pseudosections calculated with the sample bulk composition and with different local bulk rock compositions estimated with XMap

  20. How specific Raman spectroscopic models are: a comparative study between different cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Kumar, K. Kalyan; Chowdary, M. V. P.; Maheedhar, K.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2010-02-01

    Optical spectroscopic methods are being contemplated as adjunct/ alternative to existing 'Gold standard' of cancer diagnosis, histopathological examination. Several groups are actively pursuing diagnostic applications of Ramanspectroscopy in cancers. We have developed Raman spectroscopic models for diagnosis of breast, oral, stomach, colon and larynx cancers. So far, specificity and applicability of spectral- models has been limited to particular tissue origin. In this study we have evaluated explicitly of spectroscopic-models by analyzing spectra from already developed spectralmodels representing normal and malignant tissues of breast (46), cervix (52), colon (25), larynx (53), and oral (47). Spectral data was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using scores of factor, Mahalanobis distance and Spectral residuals as discriminating parameters. Multiparametric limit test approach was also explored. The preliminary unsupervised PCA of pooled data indicates that normal tissue types were always exclusive from their malignant counterparts. But when we consider tissue of different origin, large overlap among clusters was found. Supervised analysis by Mahalanobis distance and spectral residuals gave similar results. The 'limit test' approach where classification is based on match / mis-match of the given spectrum against all the available spectra has revealed that spectral models are very exclusive and specific. For example breast normal spectral model show matches only with breast normal spectra and mismatch to rest of the spectra. Same pattern was seen for most of spectral models. Therefore, results of the study indicate the exclusiveness and efficacy of Raman spectroscopic-models. Prospectively, these findings might open new application of Raman spectroscopic models in identifying a tumor as primary or metastatic.

  1. Construction of sequences of exact analytical solutions for heat diffusion in graded heterogeneous materials by the Darboux transformation method. Examples for half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapez, J.-C.

    2016-09-01

    The Darboux transformation is a differential transformation which, like other related methods (supersymmetry quantum mechanics-SUSYQM, factorization method) allows generating sequences of solvable potentials for the stationary 1D Schrodinger equation. It was recently shown that the heat equation in graded heterogeneous media, after a Liouville transformation, reduces to a pair of Schrödinger equations sharing the same potential function, one for the transformed temperature and one for the square root of effusivity. Repeated joint PROperty and Field Darboux Transformations (PROFIDT method) then yield two sequences of solutions: one of new solvable effusivity profiles and one of the corresponding temperature fields. In this paper we present and discuss the outcome in the case of a graded half-space domain. The interest in this methodology is that it provides closed-form solutions based on elementary functions. They are thus easily amenable to an implementation in an inversion process aimed, for example, at retrieving a subsurface effusivity profile from a modulated or transient surface temperature measurement (photothermal characterization).

  2. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  3. A modified spectroscopic method for the determination of the transbilayer distribution of phosphatidylethanolamine in soya-bean asolectin small unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sarti, P; Molinari, A; Arancia, G; Meloni, A; Citro, G

    1995-01-01

    A spectroscopic kinetic approach for determining the relative concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) exposed on the external and internal layers of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) used as a model system and prepared by sonication of purified soya-bean asolectin is proposed, based on the use of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) and N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP). The known reactions between PE and TNBS and/or SDPD were used, separately or in combination, to derivatize PE in preformed vesicles. We have observed that mixing SUVs with excess TNBS results in a biphasic time course. Kinetic analysis of the data supports the conclusion that external PE is rapidly derivatized (fast phase) with a half-time of 2 min. In the next (slow) phase (half-time 70 min), TNBS permeates the vesicle membrane and also reacts with PE molecules facing the internal liposomal compartment. Under the experimental conditions chosen, SPDP reacted with only the external PE molecules. The reaction of SUVs first derivatized with SPDP and then with TNBS further demonstrates that the two phases, observed with TNBS, are due to modification of external and internal PE. Approx. 30% of PE was found to be facing the external bulk phase, thus confirming the asymmetric distribution of the molecules in SUVs. The maximum number of thiol arms covalently linked by means of SPDP modification of PE on the surface of a single liposome was estimated at about 10(2). Images Figure 1 PMID:8526881

  4. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  5. Application of correlation constrained multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares methods for determination of compounds of interest in biodiesel blends using NIR and UV-visible spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Rocha; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes; Tauler, Romà; de Juan, Anna

    2014-07-01

    This study describes two applications of a variant of the multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method with a correlation constraint. The first application describes the use of MCR-ALS for the determination of biodiesel concentrations in biodiesel blends using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data. In the second application, the proposed method allowed the determination of the synthetic antioxidant N,N'-Di-sec-butyl-p-phenylenediamine (PDA) present in biodiesel mixtures from different vegetable sources using UV-visible spectroscopy. Well established multivariate regression algorithm, partial least squares (PLS), were calculated for comparison of the quantification performance in the models developed in both applications. The correlation constraint has been adapted to handle the presence of batch-to-batch matrix effects due to ageing effects, which might occur when different groups of samples were used to build a calibration model in the first application. Different data set configurations and diverse modes of application of the correlation constraint are explored and guidelines are given to cope with different type of analytical problems, such as the correction of matrix effects among biodiesel samples, where MCR-ALS outperformed PLS reducing the relative error of prediction RE (%) from 9.82% to 4.85% in the first application, or the determination of minor compound with overlapped weak spectroscopic signals, where MCR-ALS gave higher (RE (%)=3.16%) for prediction of PDA compared to PLS (RE (%)=1.99%), but with the advantage of recovering the related pure spectral profile of analytes and interferences. The obtained results show the potential of the MCR-ALS method with correlation constraint to be adapted to diverse data set configurations and analytical problems related to the determination of biodiesel mixtures and added compounds therein.

  6. Using qualitative methods to inform the trade-off between content validity and consistency in utility assessment: the example of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Key stakeholders regard generic utility instruments as suitable tools to inform health technology assessment decision-making regarding allocation of resources across competing interventions. These instruments require a 'descriptor', a 'valuation' and a 'perspective' of the economic evaluation. There are various approaches that can be taken for each of these, offering a potential lack of consistency between instruments (a basic requirement for comparisons across diseases). The 'reference method' has been proposed as a way to address the limitations of the Quality-Adjusted Life Year (QALY). However, the degree to which generic measures can assess patients' specific experiences with their disease would remain unresolved. This has been neglected in the discussions on methods development and its impact on the QALY values obtained and resulting cost per QALY estimate underestimated. This study explored the content of utility instruments relevant to type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease (AD) as examples, and the role of qualitative research in informing the trade-off between content coverage and consistency. Method A literature review was performed to identify qualitative and quantitative studies regarding patients' experiences with type 2 diabetes or AD, and associated treatments. Conceptual models for each indication were developed. Generic- and disease-specific instruments were mapped to the conceptual models. Results Findings showed that published descriptions of relevant concepts important to patients with type 2 diabetes or AD are available for consideration in deciding on the most comprehensive approach to utility assessment. While the 15-dimensional health related quality of life measure (15D) seemed the most comprehensive measure for both diseases, the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI 3) seemed to have the least coverage for type 2 diabetes and the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) for AD. Furthermore, some of the utility instruments contained items that

  7. Comprehensive analysis of TEM methods for LiFePO4/FePO4 phase mapping: spectroscopic techniques (EFTEM, STEM-EELS) and STEM diffraction techniques (ACOM-TEM).

    PubMed

    Mu, X; Kobler, A; Wang, D; Chakravadhanula, V S K; Schlabach, S; Szabó, D V; Norby, P; Kübel, C

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used intensively in investigating battery materials, e.g. to obtain phase maps of partially (dis)charged (lithium) iron phosphate (LFP/FP), which is one of the most promising cathode material for next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Due to the weak interaction between Li atoms and fast electrons, mapping of the Li distribution is not straightforward. In this work, we revisited the issue of TEM measurements of Li distribution maps for LFP/FP. Different TEM techniques, including spectroscopic techniques (energy filtered (EF)TEM in the energy range from low-loss to core-loss) and a STEM diffraction technique (automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM)), were applied to map the lithiation of the same location in the same sample. This enabled a direct comparison of the results. The maps obtained by all methods showed excellent agreement with each other. Because of the strong difference in the imaging mechanisms, it proves the reliability of both the spectroscopic and STEM diffraction phase mapping. A comprehensive comparison of all methods is given in terms of information content, dose level, acquisition time and signal quality. The latter three are crucial for the design of in-situ experiments with beam sensitive Li-ion battery materials. Furthermore, we demonstrated the power of STEM diffraction (ACOM-STEM) providing additional crystallographic information, which can be analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the LFP/FP interface properties such as statistical information on phase boundary orientation and misorientation between domains.

  8. Potential and limitations of the ESR dating method applied to Lower Pleistocene epoch: some examples from Orce (Guadix-Baza basin, Andalusia, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Mathieu; Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Voinchet, Pierre; Grün, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The range of absolute dating methods potentially applicable in archaeological and/or geological context appears quite limited for the Lower Pleistocene epoch. Indeed, their use is constrained by several factors such as the sedimentary context, the kind of material in situ available or the studied time range. Among these methods, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) is undoubtedly the most commonly used for ancient archaeological sites, mainly because it can be applied to a large range of material: flowstone, sedimentary quartz and fossil teeth for example. The development of this method is therefore really crucial in order to complete the chronostratigraphical framework of the first human settlement in Europe. To illustrate this, we worked on several sites in the Guadix-Baza basin (Andalusia, Spain), one of the foremost places in Europe with evidence of early human occupation. The basin has accumulated a massive sequence of Neogen-Quaternary sediments which contains a detailed archive of palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic changes since the Miocene. The numerous palaeontological remains discovered from more than a hundred sites, together with a well-defined magnetostratigraphical framework, have established the basin as a reference sequence for the European Pliocene-Quaternary period. The most famous Plio-Pleistocene localities are located in the eastern part of the basin, near the village of Orce. The sites of Fuente Nueva III and Barranco León have delivered an archaic lithic industry associated with Early Pleistocene fauna, indicating one of the oldest occupations of Western Europe. A third site, Venta Micena, which contained large and detailed palaeontological assemblages (several thousands of remains), has become a reference locality for the Early Pleistocene biochronology. The chronostratigraphical framework of these sites was established mainly by the combination of several methods: biochronology (small and large-mammals) and palaeomagnetism. In order to

  9. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  10. From vision to action: roadmapping as a strategic method and tool to implement climate change adaptation - the example of the roadmap 'water sensitive urban design 2020'.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J U; Weingaertner, D E

    2016-01-01

    As the central product of the BMBF-KLIMZUG-funded Joint Network and Research Project (JNRP) 'dynaklim - Dynamic adaptation of regional planning and development processes to the effects of climate change in the Emscher-Lippe region (North Rhine Westphalia, Germany)', the Roadmap 2020 'Regional Climate Adaptation' has been developed by the various regional stakeholders and institutions containing specific regional scenarios, strategies and adaptation measures applicable throughout the region. This paper presents the method, elements and main results of this regional roadmap process by using the example of the thematic sub-roadmap 'Water Sensitive Urban Design 2020'. With a focus on the process support tool 'KlimaFLEX', one of the main adaptation measures of the WSUD 2020 roadmap, typical challenges for integrated climate change adaptation like scattered knowledge, knowledge gaps and divided responsibilities but also potential solutions and promising chances for urban development and urban water management are discussed. With the roadmap and the related tool, the relevant stakeholders of the Emscher-Lippe region have jointly developed important prerequisites to integrate their knowledge, to clarify vulnerabilities, adaptation goals, responsibilities and interests, and to foresightedly coordinate measures, resources, priorities and schedules for an efficient joint urban planning, well-grounded decision-making in times of continued uncertainties and step-by-step implementation of adaptation measures from now on.

  11. Use of new field methods of semen analysis in the study of occupational hazards to reproduction: the example of ethylene dibromide

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, S.M.; Ratcliffe, J.M.; Turner, T.W.; Hornung, R.W.

    1987-12-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to the use of semen analysis as an indicator of exposure to potential mutagenic and reproductive hazards. In the infertility clinic setting, semen evaluations include the measurement of sperm concentration, volume, pH, motility, velocity and morphology, the analysis of seminal plasma to evaluate accessory sex gland function and, in some cases, the in vitro evaluation of fertilization capacity and sperm-cervical mucus interaction. To date, however, the study of semen characteristics of occupationally exposed populations has been confined principally to the measurement of sperm concentration and sperm morphology. This has been largely due to the unavailability of portable equipment suitable for the measurement of other semen characteristics and the difficulty of obtaining fresh semen samples in the field setting. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health researchers have developed mobile laboratory facilities which enable us to evaluate fresh samples, in the field, for semen characteristics in addition to concentration and morphology. This paper describes the application of these methods using the example of our recent cross-sectional study of workers occupationally exposed to ethylene dibromide in the papaya fumigation industry. We discuss our findings in the context of the usefulness of semen analysis as an indicator of occupational hazards to male reproduction.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  13. Spectroscopic Properties and Potential Energy Curves of SnF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.; Xu, H.

    1995-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties and potential energy curves of several electronic states of SnF+ are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that include up to 1.6 million configurations. Spin-orbit effects were incorporated using the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. Spectroscopic properties of several excited electronic states of SnF+ are reported, none of which is observed at present.

  14. A Comparison of Near- and Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Methods for the Analysis of Several Nutritionally Important Chemical Substances in the Chinese Yam (Dioscorea opposita): Total Sugar, Polysaccharides, and Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hua; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita) is a basic food in Asia and especially China. Consequently, an uncomplicated, reliable method should be available for the analysis of the quality and origin of the yams. Thus, near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopic methods were developed to discriminate among Chinese yam samples collected from four geographical regions. The yam samples were analyzed also for total sugar, polysaccharides, and flavonoids. These three analytes were used to compare the performance of the analytical methods. Overlapping spectra were resolved using chemometrics methods. Such spectra were compared qualitatively using principal component analysis (PCA) and quantitatively using partial least squares (PLS) and least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM) models. We discriminated among the four sets of yam data using PCA, and the NIR data performed somewhat better than the mid-IR data. We constructed the PLS and LS-SVM calibration models for the prediction of the three key variables, and the LS-SVM model produced better results. Also, the NIR prediction model produced better outcomes than the mid-IR prediction model. Thus, both infrared (IR) techniques performed well for the analysis of the three key analytes, and the samples were qualitatively discriminated according to their provinces of origin. Both techniques may be recommended for the analysis of Chinese yams, although the NIR technique would be preferred.

  15. Spectroscopic remote sensing for material identification, vegetation characterization, and mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Lewis, Paul E.; Shen, Sylvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying materials by measuring and analyzing their reflectance spectra has been an important procedure in analytical chemistry for decades. Airborne and space-based imaging spectrometers allow materials to be mapped across the landscape. With many existing airborne sensors and new satellite-borne sensors planned for the future, robust methods are needed to fully exploit the information content of hyperspectral remote sensing data. A method of identifying and mapping materials using spectral feature analyses of reflectance data in an expert-system framework called MICA (Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm) is described. MICA is a module of the PRISM (Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements) software, available to the public from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2011/1155/. The core concepts of MICA include continuum removal and linear regression to compare key diagnostic absorption features in reference laboratory/field spectra and the spectra being analyzed. The reference spectra, diagnostic features, and threshold constraints are defined within a user-developed MICA command file (MCF). Building on several decades of experience in mineral mapping, a broadly-applicable MCF was developed to detect a set of minerals frequently occurring on the Earth's surface and applied to map minerals in the country-wide coverage of the 2007 Afghanistan HyMap data set. MICA has also been applied to detect sub-pixel oil contamination in marshes impacted by the Deepwater Horizon incident by discriminating the C-H absorption features in oil residues from background vegetation. These two recent examples demonstrate the utility of a spectroscopic approach to remote sensing for identifying and mapping the distributions of materials in imaging spectrometer data.

  16. Spectroscopic Constants and Potential Energy Curves for GeF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D. W.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-01-01

    The spectroscopic constants of the electronic states of GeF lying below the 60000 cm -1 region are obtained using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI. SOCI) methods which included up to a million configurations. The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states are also computed. The computed spectroscopic constants confirm the assignments of the X, A, a, C, C', and D' states of GeF. In addition the spectroscopic constants of several electronic states of GeF are predicted which are yet to be observed.

  17. Spectroscopic Constants and Potential Energy Curves for GeBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D. W.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of several low-lying electronic states of the GeBr radical are computed using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent filed (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods which included up to a million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants confirm the assignments of X, A, A‧, B, and C states. Spectroscopic properties of several other electronic states below 30 000 cm-1 are predicted, which are yet to be observed.

  18. Discussion about decision support systems using continuous multi-criteria methods for planning in areas with hydro-basins, agriculture and forests, from examples in Argentine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, J. M.; Grau, J. B.; Tarquis, A. M.; Andina, D.; Cisneros, J. M.; Sanchez, E.

    2012-04-01

    The authors were involved last years in projects considering diverse decision problems on the use of some regions in Argentine, and also related to rivers or rural services in them. They used sets of multi-criteria decision methods, first discrete when the problem included few distinct alternatives, such as e.g. forestry, traditional or intensive agriculture. For attributes they were different effects, classified then in environmental, economic and social criteria. Extending to other gentler areas, such as at South of the Province of Córdoba, Arg., they have balanced more delicately effects of continuous levels of actions, with a combination of Goal Programming linked methods, and they adopted compromises to have precise solutions. That has shown, and in part open, a line of research, as the setting of such models require various kinds of definitions and valuations, including optimizations, goals with penalties in deviations and restrictions. That can be in diverse detail level and horizon, in presence of various technical and human horizons, and that can influence politics of use of terrain and production that will require public and private agents. The research will consider consideration of use and conservation of soils, human systems and agro productions, and hence models for optimization, preferably in such Goal Programming ways. That will require considering various systems of models, first in theory to be reliable, and then in different areas to evaluate the quality of conclusions, and maybe that successively if results are found advantageous. The Bayesian ways will be considered, but they would require a prospective of sets of precise future states of nature or markets with elicited probabilities, which are neither evident nor decisive for the moment, as changes may occur in years but will be very unexpected or uncertain. The results will be lines of models to aid to establish policies of use of territories, by public agencies setting frames for private

  19. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Andrew V; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2017-01-16

    Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, are robust, label free and inherently non-destructive methods with a high chemical specificity and sensitivity that are frequently employed in forensic science research and practices. This review aims to discuss the applications and recent developments of these methodologies in this field. Furthermore, the use of recently emerged Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging in transmission, external reflection and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) modes are summarised with relevance and potential for forensic science applications. This spectroscopic imaging approach provides the opportunity to obtain the chemical composition of fingermarks and information about possible contaminants deposited at a crime scene. Research that demonstrates the great potential of these techniques for analysis of fingerprint residues, explosive materials and counterfeit drugs will be reviewed. The implications of this research for the examination of different materials are considered, along with an outlook of possible future research avenues for the application of vibrational spectroscopic methods to the analysis of forensic samples.

  1. Spectroscopically Accurate Line Lists for Application in Sulphur Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. S.; Azzam, A. A. A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    for inclusion in standard atmospheric and planetary spectroscopic databases. The methods involved in computing the ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces involved minor corrections to the equilibrium S-O distance, which produced a good agreement with experimentally determined rotational energies. However the purely ab initio method was not been able to reproduce an equally spectroscopically accurate representation of vibrational motion. We therefore present an empirical refinement to this original, ab initio potential surface, based on the experimental data available. This will not only be used to reproduce the room-temperature spectrum to a greater degree of accuracy, but is essential in the production of a larger, accurate line list necessary for the simulation of higher temperature spectra: we aim for coverage suitable for T ? 800 K. Our preliminary studies on SO3 have also shown it to exhibit an interesting "forbidden" rotational spectrum and "clustering" of rotational states; to our knowledge this phenomenon has not been observed in other examples of trigonal planar molecules and is also an investigative avenue we wish to pursue. Finally, the IR absorption bands for SO2 and SO3 exhibit a strong overlap, and the inclusion of SO2 as a complement to our studies is something that we will be interested in doing in the near future.

  2. Spectroscopic investigations on NO+(X1Σ+, a3Σ+, A1Π) ion using multi-reference configuration interaction method and correlation-consistent sextuple basis set augmented with diffuse functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Xiang-Dong

    2011-06-01

    Three low-lying electronic states (X1Σ+, a3Σ+, and A1Π) of NO+ ion are studied using the complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) method followed by highly accurate valence internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach in combination of the correlation-consistent sextuple basis set augmented with diffuse functions, aug-cc-pV6Z. The potential energy curves (PECs) of the NO+(X1Σ+, a3Σ+, A1Π) are calculated. Based on the PECs, the spectroscopic parameters Re, De, ωe, ωeχe, αe, Be, and D0 are reproduced, which are in excellent agreement with the available measurements. By numerically solving the radial Schrödinger equation of nuclear motion using the Numerov method, the first 20 vibrational levels, inertial rotation and centrifugal distortion constants of NO+(X1Σ+, a3Σ+, A1Π) ion are derived when the rotational quantum number J is equal to zero (J = 0) for the first time, which accord well with the available measurements. Finally, the analytical potential energy functions of these states are fitted, which are used to accurately derive the first 20 classical turning points when J = 0. These results are compared in detail with those of previous investigations reported in the literature.

  3. Validated spectrophotometric method for the determination, spectroscopic characterization and thermal structural analysis of duloxetine with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2012-03-01

    A novel, selective, sensitive and simple spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of the antidepressant duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the reaction of duloxetine hydrochloride with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) in alkaline media to yield orange colored product. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-visible, FTIR, 1H NMR, Mass spectra techniques and thermal analysis. This method was validated for various parameters according to ICH guidelines. Beer's law is obeyed in a range of 5.0-60 μg/mL at the maximum absorption wavelength of 480 nm. The detection limit is 0.99 μg/mL and the recovery rate is in a range of 98.10-99.57%. The proposed methods was validated and applied to the determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The results were statistically analyzed and compared to those of a reference UV spectrophotometric method.

  4. Reflectance near-infrared spectroscopic method with a chemometric technique using partial least squares multivariate calibration for simultaneous determination of chondroitin, glucosamine, and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Alaa; Attia, Khalid Abdel-Salam; Nassar, Mohammad Wafaa; El-Abasawy, Nasr M A; Shoeib, Maisra Al-shabrawi

    2012-01-01

    A reflectance near-infrared (RNIR) spectroscopy method was developed for simultaneous determination of chondroitin (CH), glucosamine (GO), and ascorbic acid (AS) in capsule powder. A simple preparation of the sample was done by grinding, sieving, and compression of the powder sample for improving RNIR spectra. Partial least squares (PLS-1 and PLS-2) was successfully applied to quantify the three components in the studied mixture using information included in RNIR spectra in the 4240-9780 cm(-1) range. The calibration model was developed with the three drug concentrations ranging from 50 to 150% of the labeled amount. The calibration models using pure standards were evaluated by internal validation, cross-validation, and external validation using synthetic and pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was applied for analysis of two pharmaceutical products. Both pharmaceutical products had the same active principle and similar excipients, but with different nominal concentration values. The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of a pharmacopoeial method for the same pharmaceutical products. No significant differences between the results were found. The standard error of prediction was 0.004 for CH, 0.003 for GO, and 0.005 for AS. The correlation coefficient was 0.9998 for CH, 0.9999 for GO, and 0.9997 for AS. The highly accurate and precise RNIR method can be used for QC of pharmaceutical products.

  5. Laser irradiated gas jet: A spectroscopic experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.; Matthews, D.L.; Koppel, L.; Busch, G.E.; Charatis, G.; Dunning, M.J.; Mayer, F.J.

    1983-09-01

    We present x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the longitudinal electron density profile and the longitudinal and transverse electron temperature profiles for a laser irradiated gas jet. We attempt to verify our spectroscopic method by laser interferometry and by comparison of inferred quantities to those determined from laser plasma interaction simulations. Because temperature profiles were time dependent, we used a theoretical time dependent radiation transport code to analyze the data.

  6. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of GeF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Balasubramanian, K.

    1995-05-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 27 electronic states of GeF + are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that included up to 1.6 million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of the 1Σ+ electronic state fit well with the experimentally observed X ground state. Other yet to be observed properties of several excited electronic states are reported.

  7. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of SnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dingguo; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-07-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 20 electronic states of SnF arising from valence dissociation limits are computed using the complete active space MCSCF (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods, which included up to one million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of five electronic states fit well with the experimentally observed X, A, a, and C states. The dipole moments and other yet to be observed properties of several electronic states are reported.

  8. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  9. Mathematical Simulation of Satellite Measurements to Develop Spectroscopic Methods of CO2 Determination in the Presence of Thin or Broken Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rublev, A.; Uspensky, A.; Trotsenko, A.; Udalova, T.; Zhitnitsky, E.

    2009-03-01

    Using mathematical modeling of measurements of SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT spectrometer, the method of CO2 concentration determination under conditions of the semi-transparent and broken clouds has been developed. The method is based on simultaneous measurements of solar spectral reflectivities of the "underlying surface+atmosphere" system within absorption bands of oxygen (near 760 nm) and carbon dioxide (near 1600 nm) for channel pairs specifically selected within each band. The criterion for their selection is the equality of change ranges of relative optical thickness or their linear combinations by transition from clear sky conditions to cloud cover ones. Such approach allows to reach the accuracy of CO2 concentration measurements of approximately 1÷2% for a broad set of cloudy scenes.

  10. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  11. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and UV-Vis) investigation on benzil dioxime using quantum computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, D.; Periandy, S.; Xavier, S.

    2016-03-01

    The spectral analysis of benzil dioxime is carried out using the FTIR, FT Raman, FT NMR and UV-Vis spectra of the compound with the help of quantum computations by density functional theories. The FT-IR (4000 - 400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm-1) spectra are recorded in solid phase, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO phase and the UV spectrum (200-400 nm) in ethanol phase. The different conformers of the compound and their minimum energies are studied by potential energy surface scan, using semi-empirical method PM6. The computed wavenumbers from different methods are scaled so as to agree with the experimental values and the scaling factors are reported. All the fundamental modes have been assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) values and the structure the molecule is analyzed interms of parameters like bond length, bond angle and dihedral angles predicted byB3LYP and CAM-B3LYP methods with cc-pVDZ basis sets. The values of dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and hyperpolarizability (β) of the molecule are reported, using which the non -linear optical property of the molecule is discussed. The HOMO-LUMO mappings are reported which reveals the different charge transfer possibilities within the molecule. The isotropic chemical shifts predicted for 1H and 13C atoms using gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) theory show good agreement with experimental shifts and the same is discussed in comparison with atomic charges, predicted by Mullikan and APT charge analysis. NBO analysis is carried out to picture the probable electronic transitions in the molecule.

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of highly transient pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, K.; Engel, A.; Lebert, R.; Rosmej, O.N.; Rosmej, F.B.; Gavrilescu, C.; Neff, W.

    1997-11-01

    The temporal evolution of neon pinch plasmas, generated in a 2 kJ plasma focus device, has been investigated by x-ray spectroscopic methods for two sets of device parameters. These two sets lead to characteristic differences of the K-shell emission. Stationary models are shown to fail to explain the experimental observations even qualitatively. Transient spectra analysis shows that the characteristic differences observed can be referred to different transient modes of plasma dynamics. The spectra analysis includes beside resonance lines also dielectronic satellites and recombination continua. The results concerning the development of the plasma parameters achieved by the spectra modeling are supported by independent measurements of the time resolved K-shell emission and by optical streak images of the pinch plasma dynamics, which confirms the reliability of the transient spectroscopic analysis presented. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Data Acquisition System for Instructional Spectroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. B. S. B.; Hetem, A.

    2014-10-01

    This article aims to present the software for data acquisition developed in scientific initiation program - IC, for use in the design of a spectrometer built by students. The program was built in C++, a language in wide use today. The origin of spectra used is a simplified model of rustic spectroscope. This equipment basically consists of a box that does not allow light to enter, except through a slit made in the side of it, a diffraction media and a camera for data acquisition. After the image acquisition, one executes the data processing, followed by the usual steps of reduction and analysis of this type of tool. We have implemented a method for calibrating the spectroscope, through which one can compare the incidence of the photons with characteristic of each monochromatic wave. The final result is a one-dimensional spectrum that can be subsequently analyzed.

  14. Spectroscopic Sensitivity Workout: First-order modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    We will observe the primary flux standards G191B2B, GD71 and GD153, obtaining first-order spectra in all L-modes {G191B2B only in the CCD modes due to its high brightness in the UV}. By comparing observed and model spectra, we will update calibration reference files describing spectroscopic sensitivity {and CTE loss} as a function of time. On visit of GD71 will be spent on verifying the recently derived CTE formula for STIS Spectroscopic modes with the CCD, by stepping the target along the slit {7 positions} with two {short} exposure times. This will verify the results using the two-amplifier readout method, and provide high-S/N data at low intensity levels and low background level.

  15. Early stage phase separation in pharmaceutical solid dispersion thin films under high humidity: improved spatial understanding using probe-based thermal and spectroscopic nanocharacterization methods.

    PubMed

    Qi, Sheng; Moffat, Jonathan G; Yang, Ziyi

    2013-03-04

    Phase separation in pharmaceutical solid dispersion thin films under high humidity is still poorly understood on the submicrometer scale. This study investigated the phase separation of a model solid dispersion thin film, felodipine-PVP K29/32, prepared by spin-coating and analyzed using probe-based methods including atomic force microscopy, nanothermal analysis, and photothermal infrared microspectroscopy. The combined use of these techniques revealed that the phase separation process occurring in the thin films under high humidity is different from that in dry conditions reported previously. The initial stage of phase separation is primarily initiated in the bulk of the films as amorphous drug domains. Drug migration toward the surface of the solid dispersion film was then observed to occur under exposure to increased humidity. PVP cannot prevent phase separation of felodipine under high humidity but can minimize the crystallization of amorphous felodipine domains in the solid dispersion thin films. This study demonstrates the unique abilities of these nanocharacterization methods for studying, in three dimensions, the phase separation of thin films for pharmaceutical applications.

  16. Multisyringe flow injection analysis hyphenated with liquid core waveguides for the development of cleaner spectroscopic analytical methods: improved determination of chloride in waters.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the hyphenation of the multisyringe flow injection analysis technique with a 100-cm-long pathlength liquid core waveguide has been accomplished. The Cl-/Hg(SCN)2/Fe3+ reaction system for the spectrophotometric determination of chloride (Cl(-)) in waters was used as chemical model. As a result, this classic analytical methodology has been improved, minimizing dramatically the consumption of reagents, in particular, that of the highly biotoxic chemical Hg(SCN)2. The proposed method features a linear dynamic range composed of two steps between (1) 0.2-2 and (2) 2-8 mg Cl- L(-1), thus extended applicability due to on-line sample dilution (up to 400 mg Cl- L(-1)). It also presents improved limits of detection and quantification of 0.06 and 0.20 mg Cl- L(-1), respectively. The coefficient of variation and the injection throughput were 1.3% (n = 10, 2 mg Cl- L(-1)) and 21 h(-1). Furthermore, a very low consumption of reagents per Cl- determination of 0.2 microg Hg(II) and 28 microg Fe3+ has been achieved. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Cl- in different types of water samples. Finally, the proposed system is critically compared from a green analytical chemistry point of view against other flow systems for the same purpose.

  17. Determination of structural and vibrational spectroscopic features of neutral and anion forms of dinicotinic acid by using NMR, infrared and Raman experimental methods combined with DFT and HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, E.; Bardak, F.; Atac, A.; Karabacak, M.; Cipiloglu, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    In this study; the experimental (NMR, infrared and Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) analysis of dinicotinic acid were presented. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution and chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of dinicotinic acid were recorded by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-10 cm-1 and 4000-400 cm-1, respectively. To determine the most stable neutral conformer of molecule, the selected torsion angle was changed every 10° and molecular energy profile was calculated from 0° to 360°. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for all conformers form from density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) and HF with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. However, the results of the most stable neutral and two anion forms (anion-1 and anion-2 forms) of dinicotinic acid are reported here. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational wavenumbers, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program.

  18. Determination of structural and vibrational spectroscopic features of neutral and anion forms of dinicotinic acid by using NMR, infrared and Raman experimental methods combined with DFT and HF.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Bardak, F; Atac, A; Karabacak, M; Cipiloglu, M A

    2013-10-01

    In this study; the experimental (NMR, infrared and Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) analysis of dinicotinic acid were presented. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution and chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of dinicotinic acid were recorded by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-10 cm(-1) and 4000-400 cm(-1), respectively. To determine the most stable neutral conformer of molecule, the selected torsion angle was changed every 10° and molecular energy profile was calculated from 0° to 360°. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for all conformers form from density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) and HF with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. However, the results of the most stable neutral and two anion forms (anion(-1) and anion(-2) forms) of dinicotinic acid are reported here. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational wavenumbers, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program.

  19. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  20. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  1. Aplisulfamines, new sulfoxide-containing metabolites from an aplidium tunicate: absolute stereochemistry at chiral sulfur and carbon atoms assigned through an original combination of spectroscopic and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Anna; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Imperatore, Concetta; Luciano, Paolo; Menna, Marialuisa; Vitalone, Rocco

    2012-01-01

    Two new sulfoxide-containing metabolites, aplisulfamines A and B, have been isolated from an Aplidium sp. collected in the Bay of Naples. Their planar structure and geometry of a double bond were readily determined by using standard methods, mainly NMR spectroscopy. An original approach was used to assign the absolute configuration at the three contiguous chiral centers present in the structures of both aplisulfamines, two at carbon and one at sulfur. This involved Electronic Circular Dichroism (ECD) studies, J-based configuration analysis and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and represents an interesting integration of modern techniques in stereoanalysis, which could contribute to the enhancement of theoretical protocols recently applied to solve stereochemical aspects in structure elucidation.

  2. Improvement of near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) analysis of caffeine in roasted Arabica coffee by variable selection method of stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Bin; Chen, Weizhong; Kelly, Declan P; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zheng, Kaiyi; Du, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is the most heavily consumed beverage in the world after water, for which quality is a key consideration in commercial trade. Therefore, caffeine content which has a significant effect on the final quality of the coffee products requires to be determined fast and reliably by new analytical techniques. The main purpose of this work was to establish a powerful and practical analytical method based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and chemometrics for quantitative determination of caffeine content in roasted Arabica coffees. Ground coffee samples within a wide range of roasted levels were analyzed by NIR, meanwhile, in which the caffeine contents were quantitative determined by the most commonly used HPLC-UV method as the reference values. Then calibration models based on chemometric analyses of the NIR spectral data and reference concentrations of coffee samples were developed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to construct the models. Furthermore, diverse spectra pretreatment and variable selection techniques were applied in order to obtain robust and reliable reduced-spectrum regression models. Comparing the respective quality of the different models constructed, the application of second derivative pretreatment and stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS) variable selection provided a notably improved regression model, with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.375 mg/g and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.918 at PLS factor of 7. An independent test set was used to assess the model, with the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.378 mg/g, mean relative error of 1.976% and mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.707%. Thus, the results provided by the high-quality calibration model revealed the feasibility of NIR spectroscopy for at-line application to predict the caffeine content of unknown roasted coffee samples, thanks to the short analysis time of a few seconds and non

  3. Improvement of near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) analysis of caffeine in roasted Arabica coffee by variable selection method of stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Bin; Chen, Weizhong; Kelly, Declan P.; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zheng, Kaiyi; Du, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is the most heavily consumed beverage in the world after water, for which quality is a key consideration in commercial trade. Therefore, caffeine content which has a significant effect on the final quality of the coffee products requires to be determined fast and reliably by new analytical techniques. The main purpose of this work was to establish a powerful and practical analytical method based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and chemometrics for quantitative determination of caffeine content in roasted Arabica coffees. Ground coffee samples within a wide range of roasted levels were analyzed by NIR, meanwhile, in which the caffeine contents were quantitative determined by the most commonly used HPLC-UV method as the reference values. Then calibration models based on chemometric analyses of the NIR spectral data and reference concentrations of coffee samples were developed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to construct the models. Furthermore, diverse spectra pretreatment and variable selection techniques were applied in order to obtain robust and reliable reduced-spectrum regression models. Comparing the respective quality of the different models constructed, the application of second derivative pretreatment and stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS) variable selection provided a notably improved regression model, with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.375 mg/g and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.918 at PLS factor of 7. An independent test set was used to assess the model, with the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.378 mg/g, mean relative error of 1.976% and mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.707%. Thus, the results provided by the high-quality calibration model revealed the feasibility of NIR spectroscopy for at-line application to predict the caffeine content of unknown roasted coffee samples, thanks to the short analysis time of a few seconds and non

  4. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-06

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response.

  5. Are AB Initio Quantum Chemistry Methods Able to Predict Vibrational States up to the Dissociation Limit for Multi-Electron Molecules Close to Spectroscopic Accuracy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Péter G.; Holka, Filip; Fremont, Julien; Rey, Michael; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the limits of initio methods towards the description of excited vibrational levels up to the dissociation limit for molecules having more than two electrons. To this end a high level ab initio potential energy function was constructed for the four-electron LiH molecule in order to accurately predict a complete set of bound vibrational levels corresponding to the electronic ground state. It was composed from: a) an ab initio non-relativistic potential obtained at the MR-CISD level including size-extensivity corrections and quintuple-sextuple ζ extrapolation of the basis, b) MVD (Mass-velocity-Darwin) relativistic corrections obtained at icMR-CISD/cc-pwCV5Z level, and c) DBOC (Diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction) obtained at the MR-CISD/cc-pwCVTZ level. Finally, the importance of non-adiabatic effects was also tested by using atomic masses in the vibrational kinetic energy operator and by calculation of non-adiabatic coupling by ab initio methods. The calculated vibrational levels were compared with those obtained from experimental data [J.A. Coxon and C.S. Dickinson, J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 121, 9378]. Our best estimate of the potential curve results in vibrational energies with a RMS deviation of only ˜1 wn\\ for the entire set of all empirically determined vibrational levels known so far. These results represent a drastic improvement over previous theoretical predictions of vibrational levels of ^7LiH up to dissociation, D_0, which was predicted to be 19594 Cm-1. In addition, rotational levels have also been calculated. The RMS deviation between our ab initio calculations and empirical results by Coxon and Dickinson for rotational spacings Δ E = E(v, J = 1)-E(v, J = 0) over all available vibrational states of ^7LiH from v = 0 to v= 20 is 0.010 wn (with nuclear masses) and 0.006 wn (with atomic masses). Note that for high vibrational states with v > 6 this falls within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  6. One pot synthesis of Curcumin-NSAIDs prodrug, spectroscopic characterization, conformational analysis, chemical reactivity, intramolecular interactions and first order hyperpolarizability by DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sangeeta; Gupta, Preeti; Sethi, Arun; Singh, Ranvijay Pratap

    2016-08-01

    A novel Curcumin-NSAIDs prodrug 4-((1E, 3Z, 6E)-3-hydroxy-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxohepta-1,3,3-trienyl)-2-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propanoate (2) derivative was synthesized by Steglich esterification in high yield and characterized with the help of 1H, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, UV, FT-IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The molecular geometry of synthesized compound was calculated in ground state by Density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) using two different basis set 6-31G (d, p) and 6-311G (d, p). Conformational analysis of 2 was carried out to determine the most stable conformation. Stability of the molecule as a result of hyperconjugative interactions and electron delocalization were analysed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Intramolecular interactions were analysed by AIM (Atom in molecule) approach. Global and local reactivity descriptors were calculated to study the reactive site within molecule. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies were calculated using time dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated using DFT method and assigned with the help of potential energy distribution (PED). First hyperpolarizability value has been calculated to describe the nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the synthesized compound. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) for synthesized compounds have also been determined to check their electrophilic or nucleophilic reactivity.

  7. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopic study of the effect of the thermal treatment and extraction methods on the characteristics of ayocote bean starches.

    PubMed

    Bernardino-Nicanor, Aurea; Acosta-García, Gerardo; Güemes-Vera, Norma; Montañez-Soto, José Luis; de Los Ángeles Vivar-Vera, María; González-Cruz, Leopoldo

    2017-03-01

    Starches isolated from four ayocote bean varieties were modified by thermal treatment to determinate the effect of the treatment on the structural changes of ayocote bean starch. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the starch granules have oval and round shapes, with heterogeneous sizes and fractures when the extraction method is used. The presence of new bands at 2850 and 1560 cm(-1) in the FT-IR spectra showed that the thermal treatment of ayocote beans induced an interaction between the protein or lipid and the amylose or amylopectin, while the sharpest band at 3400 cm(-1) indicated a dehydration process in the starch granule in addition to the presence of the band at 1260 cm(-1), indicating the product of the retrogradation process. The thermal treatment reduced the crystallinity as well as short-range order. Raman spectroscopy revealed that acute changes occurred in the polysaccharide bonds after thermal treatment. This study showed that the thermal treatment affected the structural properties of ayocote bean starches, the interactions of the lipids and proteins with starch molecules and the retrogradation process of starch.

  8. Study of fluorescence interaction and conformational changes of bovine serum albumin with histamine H₁ -receptor--drug epinastine hydrochloride by spectroscopic and time-resolved fluorescence methods.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Girish G; Naik, Praveen N; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2015-11-01

    The fluorescence, ultraviolet (UV) absorption, time resolved techniques, circular dichroism (CD), and infrared spectral methods were explored as tools to investigate the interaction between histamine H1 drug, epinastine hydrochloride (EPN), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under simulated physiological conditions. The experimental results showed that the quenching of the BSA by EPN was static quenching mechanism and also confirmed by lifetime measurements. The value of n close to unity indicated that one molecule of EPN was bound to protein molecule. The binding constants (K) at three different temperatures were calculated (7.1 × 10(4), 5.5 × 10(4), and 3.9 × 10(4) M(-1)). Based on the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(0), ΔG(0), and ΔS(0)), the nature of binding forces operating between drug and protein was proposed. The site of binding of EPN in the protein was proposed to be Sudlow's site I based on displacement experiments using site markers viz, warfarin, ibuprofen, and digitoxin. Based on the Förster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (EPN) was evaluated and found to be 4.48 nm. The UV-visible, synchronous fluorescence, CD, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectral results revealed the changes in secondary structure of the protein upon its interaction with EPN.

  9. Probing the binding mechanisms of α-tocopherol to trypsin and pepsin using isothermal titration calorimetry, spectroscopic, and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Ni, Tianjun

    2016-06-01

    α-Tocopherol is a required nutrient for a variety of biological functions. In this study, the binding of α-tocopherol to trypsin and pepsin was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods. Thermodynamic investigations reveal that α-tocopherol binds to trypsin/pepsin is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy. The fluorescence experimental results indicate that α-tocopherol can quench the fluorescence of trypsin/pepsin through a static quenching mechanism. The binding ability of α-tocopherol with trypsin/pepsin is in the intermediate range, and one molecule of α-tocopherol combines with one molecule of trypsin/pepsin. As shown by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, α-tocopherol may induce conformational changes of trypsin/pepsin. Molecular modeling displays the specific binding site and gives information about binding forces and α-tocopherol-tryptophan (Trp)/tyrosine (Tyr) distances. In addition, the inhibition rate of α-tocopherol on trypsin and pepsin was studied. The study provides a basic data set for clarifying the binding mechanisms of α-tocopherol with trypsin and pepsin and is helpful for understanding its biological activity in vivo.

  10. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2005-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar+ laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm-1, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm2. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  11. Improving the classification accuracy for IR spectroscopic diagnosis of stomach and colon malignancy using non-linear spectral feature extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanguk; Kim, Kyoungok; Lee, Hyeseon; Jun, Chi-Hyuck; Chung, Hoeil; Park, Jong-Jae

    2013-07-21

    Non-linear feature extraction methods, neighborhood preserving embedding (NPE) and supervised NPE (SNPE), were employed to effectively represent the IR spectral features of stomach and colon biopsy tissues for classification, and improve the classification accuracy for diagnosis of malignancy. The motivation was to utilize the NPE and SNPE's capability of capturing non-linear spectral behaviors by simultaneously preserving local relationships in order that minute spectral differences among classes would be effectively recognized. NPE and SNPE derive an optimal embedding feature such that the local neighborhood structure can be preserved in reduced spaces (variables). The IR spectra collected from stomach and colon tissues were represented by several new variables through NPE and SNPE, and also by using the principal component analysis (PCA). Then, the feature-extracted variables were subsequently classified into normal, adenoma and cancer tissues by using both k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) and support vector machine (SVM), and the resulting accuracies were compared with each other. In both cases, the combination of SNPE-SVM provided the best classification performance, and the accuracy was substantially improved compared to when PCA-SVM was used. Overall results demonstrate that NPE and SNPE could be potential feature-representation strategies useful in biomedical diagnosis based on vibrational spectroscopy where effective recognition of minute spectral differences is critical.

  12. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of methyl isocyanate, methyl cyanate, methyl fulminate, and acetonitrile N-oxide using highly correlated ab initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbouha, S.; Senent, M. L.; Komiha, N.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.

    2016-09-01

    Various astrophysical relevant molecules obeying the empirical formula C2H3NO are characterized using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T)-F12). Rotational and rovibrational parameters are provided for four isomers: methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO), methyl cyanate (CH3OCN), methyl fulminate (CH3ONC), and acetonitrile N-oxide (CH3CNO). A CH3CON transition state is inspected. A variational procedure is employed to explore the far infrared region because some species present non-rigidity. Second order perturbation theory is used for the determination of anharmonic frequencies, rovibrational constants, and to predict Fermi resonances. Three species, methyl cyanate, methyl fulminate, and CH3CON, show a unique methyl torsion hindered by energy barriers. In methyl isocyanate, the methyl group barrier is so low that the internal top can be considered a free rotor. On the other hand, acetonitrile N-oxide presents a linear skeleton, C3v symmetry, and free internal rotation. Its equilibrium geometry depends strongly on electron correlation. The remaining isomers present a bend skeleton. Divergences between theoretical rotational constants and previous parameters fitted from observed lines for methyl isocyanate are discussed on the basis of the relevant rovibrational interaction and the quasi-linearity of the molecular skeleton.

  13. Application of spectroscopic methods for identification (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy) and determination (UV, EPR) of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside. Experimental and DFT based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczkowska, Magdalena; Lewandowska, Kornelia; Bednarski, Waldemar; Mizera, Mikołaj; Podborska, Agnieszka; Krause, Anna; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-04-01

    Vibrational (FT-IR, Raman) and electronic (UV, EPR) spectral measurements were performed for an analysis of rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) obtained from Rutaofficinalis. The identification of rutin was done with the use of FT-IR and Raman spectra. Those experimental spectra were determined with the support of theoretical calculations based on a DFT method with the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The application of UV and EPR spectra was found to be a suitable analytical approach to the evaluation of changes in rutin exposed to certain physicochemical factors. Differences in absorbance observed in direct UV spectra were used to monitor changes in the concentration of rutin in degraded samples. Spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance allowed studying the process of free-radical quenching in rutin following its exposure to light. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbitals (LUMO-HOMO) were also determined in order to predict structural changes and reactive sites in rutin.

  14. Application of spectroscopic methods for identification (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy) and determination (UV, EPR) of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside. Experimental and DFT based approach.

    PubMed

    Paczkowska, Magdalena; Lewandowska, Kornelia; Bednarski, Waldemar; Mizera, Mikołaj; Podborska, Agnieszka; Krause, Anna; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-04-05

    Vibrational (FT-IR, Raman) and electronic (UV, EPR) spectral measurements were performed for an analysis of rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) obtained from Rutaofficinalis. The identification of rutin was done with the use of FT-IR and Raman spectra. Those experimental spectra were determined with the support of theoretical calculations based on a DFT method with the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The application of UV and EPR spectra was found to be a suitable analytical approach to the evaluation of changes in rutin exposed to certain physicochemical factors. Differences in absorbance observed in direct UV spectra were used to monitor changes in the concentration of rutin in degraded samples. Spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance allowed studying the process of free-radical quenching in rutin following its exposure to light. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbitals (LUMO-HOMO) were also determined in order to predict structural changes and reactive sites in rutin.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation (FTIR spectrum), NBO, HOMO-LUMO energies, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamideby DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherin Percy Prema Leela, J.; Hemamalini, R.; Muthu, S.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-07-01

    Capsicum a hill grown vegetable is also known as red pepper or chili pepper. Capsaicin(8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component in chili peppers, which is currently used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, psoriasis and cancer. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of Capsaicin in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and analyzed. The vibrational frequencies of the title compound were obtained theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing the standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and were compared with Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Complete vibrational assignment analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. The vibrational harmonic frequencies were scaled using scale factor, yielding a good agreement between the experimentally recorded and the theoretically calculated values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intra molecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ∗ and π∗ antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E (2) confirm the occurrence of intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the molecule has been computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  16. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of methyl isocyanate, methyl cyanate, methyl fulminate, and acetonitrile N-oxide using highly correlated ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    Dalbouha, S; Senent, M L; Komiha, N; Domínguez-Gómez, R

    2016-09-28

    Various astrophysical relevant molecules obeying the empirical formula C2H3NO are characterized using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T)-F12). Rotational and rovibrational parameters are provided for four isomers: methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO), methyl cyanate (CH3OCN), methyl fulminate (CH3ONC), and acetonitrile N-oxide (CH3CNO). A CH3CON transition state is inspected. A variational procedure is employed to explore the far infrared region because some species present non-rigidity. Second order perturbation theory is used for the determination of anharmonic frequencies, rovibrational constants, and to predict Fermi resonances. Three species, methyl cyanate, methyl fulminate, and CH3CON, show a unique methyl torsion hindered by energy barriers. In methyl isocyanate, the methyl group barrier is so low that the internal top can be considered a free rotor. On the other hand, acetonitrile N-oxide presents a linear skeleton, C3v symmetry, and free internal rotation. Its equilibrium geometry depends strongly on electron correlation. The remaining isomers present a bend skeleton. Divergences between theoretical rotational constants and previous parameters fitted from observed lines for methyl isocyanate are discussed on the basis of the relevant rovibrational interaction and the quasi-linearity of the molecular skeleton.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation (FTIR spectrum), NBO, HOMO-LUMO energies, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamideby DFT methods.

    PubMed

    Leela, J Sherin Percy Prema; Hemamalini, R; Muthu, S; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A

    2015-07-05

    Capsicum a hill grown vegetable is also known as red pepper or chili pepper. Capsaicin(8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component in chili peppers, which is currently used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, psoriasis and cancer. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of Capsaicin in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and analyzed. The vibrational frequencies of the title compound were obtained theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing the standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and were compared with Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Complete vibrational assignment analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. The vibrational harmonic frequencies were scaled using scale factor, yielding a good agreement between the experimentally recorded and the theoretically calculated values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intra molecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ∗ and π∗ antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E (2) confirm the occurrence of intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the molecule has been computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  18. Quantification of zinc-porphyrin in dry-cured ham products by spectroscopic methods Comparison of absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Kristoffer; Adamsen, Christina E; Laursen, Jens; Olsen, Karsten; Møller, Jens K S

    2008-03-01

    Zinc-protoporphyrin (Zn-pp), which has been identified as the major pigment in certain dry-cured meat products, was extracted with acetone/water (75%) and isolated from the following meat products: Parma ham, Iberian ham and dry-cured ham with added nitrite. The quantification of Zn-pp by electron absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy was compared (concentration range used [Zn-pp]=0.8-9.7μM). All three hams were found to contain Zn-pp, and the results show no significant difference among the content of Zn-pp quantified by fluorescence, absorbance and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for Parma ham and Iberian ham. All three methods can be used for quantification of Zn-pp in acetone/water extracts of different ham types if the content is higher than 1.0ppm. For dry-cured ham with added nitrite, XRF was not applicable due to the low content of Zn-pp (<0.1ppm). In addition, XRF spectroscopy provides further information regarding other trace elements and can therefore be advantageous in this aspect. This study also focused on XRF determination of Fe in the extracts and as no detectable Fe was found in the three types of ham extracts investigated (limit of detection; Fe⩽1.8ppm), it allows the conclusion that iron containing pigments, e.g., heme, do not contribute to the noticeable red colour observed in some of the extracts.

  19. A grid matrix-based Raman spectroscopic method to characterize different cell milieu in biopsied axillary sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Som, Dipasree; Tak, Megha; Setia, Mohit; Patil, Asawari; Sengupta, Amit; Chilakapati, C Murali Krishna; Srivastava, Anurag; Parmar, Vani; Nair, Nita; Sarin, Rajiv; Badwe, R

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy which is based upon inelastic scattering of photons has a potential to emerge as a noninvasive bedside in vivo or ex vivo molecular diagnostic tool. There is a need to improve the sensitivity and predictability of Raman spectroscopy. We developed a grid matrix-based tissue mapping protocol to acquire cellular-specific spectra that also involved digital microscopy for localizing malignant and lymphocytic cells in sentinel lymph node biopsy sample. Biosignals acquired from specific cellular milieu were subjected to an advanced supervised analytical method, i.e., cross-correlation and peak-to-peak ratio in addition to PCA and PC-LDA. We observed decreased spectral intensity as well as shift in the spectral peaks of amides and lipid bands in the completely metastatic (cancer cells) lymph nodes with high cellular density. Spectral library of normal lymphocytes and metastatic cancer cells created using the cellular specific mapping technique can be utilized to create an automated smart diagnostic tool for bench side screening of sampled lymph nodes. Spectral library of normal lymphocytes and metastatic cancer cells created using the cellular specific mapping technique can be utilized to develop an automated smart diagnostic tool for bench side screening of sampled lymph nodes supported by ongoing global research in developing better technology and signal and big data processing algorithms.

  20. Synthesis of a novel hydrazone derivative and biophysical studies of its interactions with bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic, electrochemical, and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang-Fang; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Han, Xiao-Le; Xiang, Chen; Ge, Yu-Shu; Li, Jia-Han; Zhang, Yue; Li, Ran; Ding, Xin-Liang; Liu, Yi

    2010-11-25

    Hydrazone derivatives possess potential antitumor activities based on modulation of the iron metabolism in cancer cell. A novel hydrazone, N'-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide (DBH), has been synthesized and characterized, which is an analogue of 311 possessing potent anticancer activity. The interactions between DBH and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been investigated systematically by fluorescence, molecular docking, circular dichroism (CD), UV-vis absorption, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching observed is attributed to the formation of a complex between BSA and DBH, and the reverse temperature effect of the fluorescence quenching has been found and discussed. The primary binding pattern is determined by hydrophobic interaction occurring in Sudlow's site I of BSA. DBH could slightly change the secondary structure and induce unfolding of the polypeptides of protein. An average binding distance of ~4.0 nm has been determined on the basis of the Förster resonance energy theory (FRET). The effects of iron on the system of DBH-BSA have also been investigated. It is found that iron could compete against BSA to bind DBH. All of these results are supported by a docking study using a BSA crystal model. It is shown that DBH can efficiently bind with BSA and be transported to the focuses needed. Subsequent antitumor test and detailed anticancer mechanism are undergoing in our lab.

  1. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  2. Validation of an in-line Raman spectroscopic method for continuous active pharmaceutical ingredient quantification during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Saerens, L; Segher, N; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T

    2014-01-02

    significant influence of any of the process settings on the predicted concentration values. Raman spectroscopy proved to be a fast, non-destructive and reliable method for the quantification of MPT during hot-melt extrusion. From the accuracy profile of the MCR model based on averaged spectra, it was concluded that for each MPT concentration in the validated concentration range, 95 out 100 future routine measurements will be included within the acceptance limits (10%).

  3. Spectroscopic properties of alexandrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Richard C.; Xi, Lin; Gang, Xu; Quarles, Gregory J.; Walling, John C.

    1985-09-01

    Details of the optical-spectroscopic properties of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) crystals were studied by different laser-spectroscopy techniques. The temperature dependences of the fluorescence lifetimes and widths of the zero-phonon lines were found to be quite different for Cr3+ ions in the mirror and inversion crystal-field sites. The results indicate that direct phonon-absorption processes dominate both thermal line broadening and lifetime quenching for ions in the mirror sites while phonon-scattering processes dominate the line broadening of inversion-site ions and leave their lifetime independent of temperature. Tunable-dye-laser site-selection methods were used to obtain the excitation spectra of the Cr3+ ions in inversion sites at low temperature and to identify six types of exchange-coupled pairs of Cr3+ ions in the lattice. Time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy was used to monitor the energy transfer between Cr3+ ions in mirror and inversion sites at both low and high temperature. Finally, high-power, picosecond pulse excitation was used to produce two-photon absorption, and the resulting emission spectrum was found to exhibit a new fluorescence band in the 400-nm spectral region.

  4. The mass ratio in spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducati, J. R.; Penteado, E. M.; Turcati, R.

    2003-08-01

    The process of formation of binary and multiple stars is not yet fully understood. Possibilities range from simultaneous processes of condensation from the primeval nebula, to isolated star formation and eventual capture to form a double system. Models exist that predict success probabilities for each theoretical process, and comparison with observational data is crucial. Spectroscopic binaries are specially suited to be used as observational data, since several biases that can arise from general catalogues of binary stars can be avoided, including dominance of systems with large separations between components. A very important parameter in these studies is the mass ratio, the quocient of the masses of primary and secundary members. The histogram of mass ratios provides crucial information to models of binary formation, linked to condensation processes and evolutionaty rates.In this case, spectroscopic binaries can be chosen as the observational sample, provided that the spectrum of the primary is from a non-evolved, main-sequence star,whose mass can be derived reliably from its spectral type. Defining an adequate limiting magnitude (6.5), one avoids bias from eclipsing systems with high inclinations, since nearly all systems up to 6.5 mag were detected. In this paper, a critical review is presented of the existing methods for deriving the distribution of the mass ratios from spectroscopic binary orbital data. After showing the incorrectness of some results published in the litterature, the available data (Batten's 8th Catalogue, 1989) is discussed. Simulations for several distributions of mass ratios (constant, quadratic, etc) are performed. It is shown that the existing data permits only to assert that the spectroscopic binaries with small mass ratios (q < 0.4) are more frequent that those with large mass ratios (q = 0.9 to 1.0).

  5. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  6. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  7. Synthetic Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Indices in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a progress report on the calculation of ultraviolet spectroscopic indices by using the UVBLUE library of synthetic spectra. The ensemble of indices are aimed at complementing empirical databases for the study of stellar populations. The definitions for the set of indices are mainly those empirically built upon data collected with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Because the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) and mid-ultraviolet (mid-UV) are sensitive to quite dissimilar stellar populations, they are presented separately. We provide a few examples on the effects of the leading atmospheric parameters on index values. This analysis is, to our knowledge, the first based upon high resolution synthetic spectra and we envisage important applications on the study of stellar aggregates at UV wavelengths.

  8. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  9. Mapping of Brain Metabolite Distributions by Volumetric Proton MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI)

    PubMed Central

    Maudsley, A.A.; Domenig, C; Govind, V; Darkazanli, A.; Studholme, C.; Arheart, K.; Bloomer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Distributions of proton MR-detected metabolites have been mapped throughout the brain in a group of normal subjects using a volumetric MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) acquisition with an interleaved water reference. Data were processed with intensity and spatial normalization to enable voxel-based analysis methods to be applied across a group of subjects. Results demonstrate significant regional, tissue, and gender-dependent variations of brain metabolite concentrations, and variations of these distributions with normal aging. The greatest alteration of metabolites with age was observed for white-matter choline and creatine. An example of the utility of the normative metabolic information is then demonstrated for analysis of data acquired from a subject who suffered a traumatic brain injury. This study demonstrates the ability to obtain proton spectra from a wide region of the brain and to apply fully automated processing methods. The resultant data provide a normative reference for subsequent utilization for studies of brain injury and disease. PMID:19111009

  10. Progress in spectroscopic plasma diagnostics and atomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, W.; Breger, P.; Core, W. G.; Gerstel, U.; Hawkes, N. C.; Howman, A.; König, R. W. T.; Maggi, C. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Morgan, P. D.; Svensson, J.; Stamp, M. F.; Summers, H. P.; Wolf, R. C.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    1995-09-01

    The paper illustrates the role of quantitative spectroscopy for the diagnosis of fusion plasmas and the importance of extensive consistency checks. Four examples are given of recent spectroscopic observations which have triggered new approaches both to plasma modeling and atomic excitation processes. The examples highlight the role of passive charge exchange emission and its implication for plasma edge physics, non-thermal features in the He II spectrum and temperature anisotropies observed in high power neutral beam heated plasmas, the importance of geometric mapping in an arbitrary magnetic configuration for the evaluation of line integrand spectra, and finally the complexity of atomic processes involved in the spectral analysis for helium transport studies.

  11. Methods for comparing data across differently designed agronomic studies: examples of different meta-analysis methods used to compare relative composition of plant foods grown using organic or conventional production methods and a protocol for a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Kirsten; Srednicka-Tober, Dominika; Barański, Marcin; Sanderson, Roy; Leifert, Carlo; Seal, Chris

    2013-07-31

    Meta-analyses are methods to combine outcomes from different studies to investigate consistent effects of relatively small magnitude, which are difficult to distinguish from random variation within a single study. Several published meta-analyses addressed whether organic and conventional production methods affect the composition of plant foods differently. The meta-analyses were carried out using different options for the methodology and resulted in different conclusions. The types of designs of field trials and farm comparisons widely used in horticultural and agronomic research differ substantially from the clinical trials and epidemiological studies that most meta-analysis methodologies were developed for. Therefore, it is proposed that a systematic review and meta-analysis be carried out with the aim of developing a consolidated methodology. If successful, this methodology can then be used to determine effects of different production systems on plant food composition as well as other comparable factors with small but systematic effects across studies.

  12. An investigation using Spectroscopic Ellipsometery in Bio-Physical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Galen; Thompson, Daniel; Berberov, Emil; Woollam, John; Bleiweiss, Michael; Datta, Timir

    2001-03-01

    The present work is an investigation of bio-physical systems using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), with wavelengths ranging from deep-ultraviolet to the far infrared. Recent advances in SE hardware, software and data analysis permit rapid, non-contact investigation of physical properties of nano-dimensional soft-material films and interfaces such as bio-films under liquids. The kinetics of attachment, layer thickness, density of coverage, and identification of interfacial chemistry of proteins, for example, on surfaces is of practical and fundamental importance in biology and medicine, and are potentially measurable by SE. Our initial findings determine adsorption rates of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and other bio-films on gold and polystyrene substrates, as well as their spatial distributions. We were also able to identify attachment of a 2.5 nm layer of the diarrhea causing E. coli enterotoxin (LT) to ganglioside (GM1) receptor, potentially simplifying and providing more information to standard enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Results of studies of several different bio-physical systems using SE will be discussed.

  13. Polarization sensitive spectroscopic optical coherence tomography for multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strąkowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; Strąkowska, Paulina; Trojanowski, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive method for 3D and cross-sectional imaging of biological and non-biological objects. The OCT measurements are provided in non-contact and absolutely safe way for the tested sample. Nowadays, the OCT is widely applied in medical diagnosis especially in ophthalmology, as well as dermatology, oncology and many more. Despite of great progress in OCT measurements there are still a vast number of issues like tissue recognition or imaging contrast enhancement that have not been solved yet. Here we are going to present the polarization sensitive spectroscopic OCT system (PS-SOCT). The PS-SOCT combines the polarization sensitive analysis with time-frequency analysis. Unlike standard polarization sensitive OCT the PS-SOCT delivers spectral information about measured quantities e.g. tested object birefringence changes over the light spectra. This solution overcomes the limits of polarization sensitive analysis applied in standard PS-OCT. Based on spectral data obtained from PS-SOCT the exact value of birefringence can be calculated even for the objects that provide higher order of retardation. In this contribution the benefits of using the combination of time-frequency and polarization sensitive analysis are being expressed. Moreover, the PS-SOCT system features, as well as OCT measurement examples are presented.

  14. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed.

  15. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  16. Benefits and challenges to using DNA-based identification methods: An example study of larval fish from nearshore areas of Lake Superior

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification methods could increase the ability of aquatic resource managers to track patterns of invasive species, especially for taxa that are difficult to identify morphologically. Nonetheless, use of DNA-based identification methods in aquatic surveys is still unc...

  17. Developing the Model of "Pedagogical Art Communication" Using Social Phenomenological Analysis: An Introduction to a Research Method and an Example for Its Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Social phenomenological analysis is presented as a research method for museum and art education. After explaining its methodological background, it is shown how this method has been applied in a study of gallery talks or guided tours in art museums: Analyzing the situation by description and interpretation, a model for understanding gallery talks…

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Poonam

    Nanotechnology has revolutionalized the landscape of modern science and technology, including materials, electronics, therapeutics, bioimaging, sensing, and the environment. Research in the past decade has examined the fate of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo, as well as the interactions between nanoparticles and biological and ecosystems using primarily toxicological and ecotoxicological approaches. However, due to the versatility in the physical and physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, and due to the vast complexity of their hosting systems, the solubility, transformation, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials are still poorly understood. Nanotechnology has been undergoing tremendous development in recent decades, driven by realized perceived applications of nanomaterials in electronics, therapeutics, imaging, sensing, environmental remediation, and consumer products. Nanoparticles on entering the blood stream undergo an identity change, they become coated with proteins. There are different kind of proteins present in blood. Proteins compete for getting coated over the surface of nanoparticle and this whole entity of proteins coated over nanoparticle surface is called Protein Corona. Proteins tightly bound to the surface of nanoparticle form hard corona and the ones loosely bound on the outer surface form soft corona. This dissertation is aimed at spectroscopic investigation of Protein Corona. Chapter I of this dissertation offers a comprehensive review of the literature based on nanomaterials with the focus on carbon based nanomaterilas and introduction to Protein Corona. Chapter II is based different methods used for Graphene Synthesis,different types of defects and doping. In Chapter III influence of defects on Graphene Protein Corona was investigated. Chapter IV is based on the study of Apoptosis induced cell death by Gold and silver nanoparticles. In vitro study of effect of Protein Corona on toxicity of cells was done.

  19. Investigation of tautomeric behavior of 3-amino-4-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-4,5-dihydro-1,2,5-thiadiazole 1,1-dioxide using Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic methods: A density functional theory supported study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertürk, Aliye Gediz; Gümüş, Sedat; Dikmen, Gökhan; Alver, Özgür

    2016-09-01

    Sulfonamide derivatives have been widely incorporated in different types of studies, particularly in bioorganics and medicinal chemistry. Molecular conformation or tautomeric forms of molecules are directly related to their pharmaceutical and biological activities. In the scope of this work two possible tautomeric forms of 3-amino-4-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-4,5-dihydro-1,2,5-thiadiazole 1,1-dioxide (C10H14N4O2S) molecule were tried to be identified by employing infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic methods. Obtained spectroscopic results suggest that 3-amino-4-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-4,5-dihydro-1,2,5-thiadiazole 1,1-dioxide in its powder form shows the traces of both conformers (amino and imino) while in its liquid state in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide it is mainly in imino form.

  20. Comparison of gestational dating methods and implications for exposure-outcome associations: an example with PM2.5 and preterm birth

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVES: Estimating gestational age is usually based on date of last menstrual period (LMP) or clinical estimation (CE); both approaches introduce potential bias. Differences in methods of estimation may lead to misclassificat ion and inconsistencies in risk estimates, particu...

  1. LC-Q/TOF mass spectrometry data driven identification and spectroscopic characterisation of a new 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-benzyl cathinone (BMDP).

    PubMed

    Fornal, Emilia; Stachniuk, Anna; Wojtyla, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The recent increase in the sell and abuse of substituted cathinones has developed the requirement for fast and reliable screening methods for these compounds in legal high products. This paper shows an example of the successful application of liquid chromatography-high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to detection and identification of a new synthetic cathinone 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-benzylcathinone (BMDP) in legal high samples. It discusses the mass spectrometric, the nuclear resonance spectroscopic and infrared spectroscopic data of BMDP. BMDP was first seized in United Kingdom in 2010, it was also seized in Poland in winter of 2010. The structure elucidation of the drug was carried out by high resolution product ion spectrometry after collision induced dissociation, and the product ion spectrometry after electron ionisation and one and two-dimensional (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy supported the findings.

  2. Methods and Tools to Align Curriculum to the Skills and Competencies Needed by the Workforce - an Example from Geospatial Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Geospatial science and technology (GST) including geographic information systems, remote sensing, global positioning systems and mobile applications, are valuable tools for geoscientists and students learning to become geoscientists. GST allows the user to analyze data spatially and temporarily and then visualize the data and outcomes in multiple formats (digital, web and paper). GST has evolved rapidly and it has been difficult to create effective curriculum as few guidelines existed to help educators. In 2010, the US Department of Labor (DoL), in collaboration with the National Geospatial Center of Excellence (GeoTech Center), a National Science Foundation supported grant, approved the Geospatial Technology Competency Mode (GTCM). The GTCM was developed and vetted with industry experts and provided the structure and example competencies needed across the industry. While the GTCM was helpful, a more detailed list of skills and competencies needed to be identified in order to build appropriate curriculum. The GeoTech Center carried out multiple DACUM events to identify the skills and competencies needed by entry-level workers. DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) is a job analysis process whereby expert workers are convened to describe what they do for a specific occupation. The outcomes from multiple DACUMs were combined into a MetaDACUM and reviewed by hundreds of GST professionals. This provided a list of more than 320 skills and competencies needed by the workforce. The GeoTech Center then held multiple workshops across the U.S. where more than 100 educators knowledgeable in teaching GST parsed the list into Model Courses and a Model Certificate Program. During this process, tools were developed that helped educators define which competency should be included in a specific course and the depth of instruction for that competency. This presentation will provide details about the process, methodology and tools used to create the Models and suggest how they can be used

  3. Starfish: Robust spectroscopic inference tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekala, Ian; Andrews, Sean M.; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Hogg, David W.; Green, Gregory M.

    2015-05-01

    Starfish is a set of tools used for spectroscopic inference. It robustly determines stellar parameters using high resolution spectral models and uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to explore the full posterior probability distribution of the stellar parameters. Additional potential applications include other types of spectra, such as unresolved stellar clusters or supernovae spectra.

  4. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.; Fank, J.; Kroulik, M.

    2011-12-01

    iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment. The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the methodological procedure on two different examples. Example A focuses on the turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM) since many soil functions in a direct or indirect way depend on SOM and SOM depletion is amongst the worst soil threats. Example B deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The applied CANDY model (Franko et al. 1995) was developed to describe dynamics of soil organic matter and mineral nitrogen as well as soil water and temperature. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences (Krüger et al. 2011). The methodological procedure of example A illustrates a model application for a field site in the Czech Republic using generated soil maps from combined geophysical data. Modelling requires a complete set of soil parameters. Combining measured soil properties and data of geophysical measurements (electrical conductivity and gamma spectrometry) is the basis for digital soil mapping which provided data about clay, silt and sand as well as SOC content. With these data pedotransfer functions produce detailed soil input data (e.g. bulk and particle density, field capacity, wilting point, saturated conductivity) for the rooted soil profile. CANDY calculated different indicators for SOM and gave hints about

  5. Methods for analyzing observational longitudinal prognosis studies for rheumatic diseases: a review & worked example using a clinic-based cohort of juvenile dermatomyositis patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lily Siok Hoon; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Moineddin, Rahim; Gladman, Dafna D; Silverman, Earl D; Feldman, Brian M

    2017-03-29

    Most outcome studies of rheumatic diseases report outcomes ascertained on a single occasion. While single assessments are sufficient for terminal or irreversible outcomes, they may not be sufficiently informative if outcomes change or fluctuate over time. Consequently, longitudinal studies that measure non-terminal outcomes repeatedly afford a better understanding of disease evolution.Longitudinal studies require special analytic methods. Newer longitudinal analytic methods have evolved tremendously to deal with common challenges in longitudinal observational studies. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have used longitudinal design. This review aims to help readers understand and apply the findings from longitudinal studies. Using a cohort of children with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), we illustrate how to study evolution of disease activity in JDM using longitudinal methods.

  6. A cross-site comparison of methods used for hydrogeologic characterization of the Galena-Platteville aquifer in Illinois and Wisconsin, with examples from selected Superfund sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Mills, Patrick C.; Dunning, Charles P.; Yeskis, Douglas J.; Ursic, James R.; Vendl, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of 28 methods used to characterize the fractured Galena-Platteville aquifer at eight sites in northern Illinois and Wisconsin is evaluated. Analysis of government databases, previous investigations, topographic maps, aerial photographs, and outcrops was essential to understanding the hydrogeology in the area to be investigated. The effectiveness of surface-geophysical methods depended on site geology. Lithologic logging provided essential information for site characterization. Cores were used for stratigraphy and geotechnical analysis. Natural-gamma logging helped identify the effect of lithology on the location of secondary- permeability features. Caliper logging identified large secondary-permeability features. Neutron logs identified trends in matrix porosity. Acoustic-televiewer logs identified numerous secondary-permeability features and their orientation. Borehole-camera logs also identified a number of secondary-permeability features. Borehole ground-penetrating radar identified lithologic and secondary-permeability features. However, the accuracy and completeness of this method is uncertain. Single-point-resistance, density, and normal resistivity logs were of limited use. Water-level and water-quality data identified flow directions and indicated the horizontal and vertical distribution of aquifer permeability and the depth of the permeable features. Temperature, spontaneous potential, and fluid-resistivity logging identified few secondary-permeability features at some sites and several features at others. Flowmeter logging was the most effective geophysical method for characterizing secondary-permeability features. Aquifer tests provided insight into the permeability distribution, identified hydraulically interconnected features, the presence of heterogeneity and anisotropy, and determined effective porosity. Aquifer heterogeneity prevented calculation of accurate hydraulic properties from some tests. Different methods, such as flowmeter

  7. Reconstruction of Detached Divertor Plasma Conditions in DIII-D Using Spectroscopic and Probe Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stangeby, P; Fenstermacher, M

    2004-12-03

    For some divertor aspects, such as detached plasmas or the private flux zone, it is not clear that the controlling physics has been fully identified. This is a particular concern when the details of the plasma are likely to be important in modeling the problem--for example, modeling co-deposition in detached inner divertors. An empirical method of ''reconstructing'' the plasma based on direct experimental measurements may be useful in such situations. It is shown that a detached plasma in the outer divertor leg of DIII-D can be reconstructed reasonably well using spectroscopic and probe data as input to a simple onion-skin model and the Monte Carlo hydrogenic code, EIRENE. The calculated 2D distributions of n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the detached divertor were compared with direct measurements from the divertor Thomson scattering system, a diagnostic capability unique to DIII-D.

  8. Methods for Estimating Uncertainty in PMF Solutions: Examples with Ambient Air and Water Quality Data and Guidance on Reporting PMF Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    The new version of EPA’s positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF) software, 5.0, includes three error estimation (EE) methods for analyzing factor analytic solutions: classical bootstrap (BS), displacement of factor elements (DISP), and bootstrap enhanced by displacement (BS-DISP)...

  9. Tuberculosis - A global emergency: Tools and methods to monitor, understand, and control the epidemic with specific example of the Beijing lineage.

    PubMed

    Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-06-01

    We argue in favor of a concerted and coordinated response to stop tuberculosis (TB) by monitoring global TB spread, drug-resistance surveillance and populations at risk using available molecular and web tools to identify circulating clones of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). We took specific example of the Beijing lineage associated with worldwide emergence of both multiple, and extensively drug resistant (MDR/XDR)-TB. The study dataset (n=10,850 isolates, 92 countries of patient origin) was extracted from our multimarker SITVIT2 database on MTBC genotyping (n=111,635 isolates, 169 countries of patient origin). Epidemiological and demographic information in conjunction with spoligotyping (n=10,850), MIRU-VNTR minisatellites (n=2896), and drug resistance (n=2846) data was mapped at macro-geographical (United Nations subregions) and country level, followed by statistical, bioinformatical, and phylogenetical analysis. The global male/female sex ratio was 1.96, the highest being 4.93 in Russia vs. range of 0.8-1.13 observed in Central America, Caribbean, Eastern Africa and Northern Europe (p < 0.0001). The major patient age-group was 21-40 yrs worldwide except Japan (with majority of patients >60 yrs). Younger patients were more common in South America, South Asia, and Western Africa since 25-33% of TB cases due to Beijing genotype occurred in the age group 0-20 yrs. A continuous progression in the proportion of MDR and XDR strains is visible worldwide since 2003 and 2009 respectively. Pansusceptible TB mainly concerned older patients >60 yrs (44%) whereas Drug resistant, MDR and XDR-TB concerned patients preferentially aged 21-40 yrs (between 52 and 58%). Although the proportion of SIT1 pattern vs. other patterns was very high (93%); the proportion of MDR was highest for an emerging genotype SIT190 (p < 0.0001). Lastly, proportion of pansusceptible strains was highest in Japan, while MDR/XDR strains were most common in Russia and Northern Europe. We

  10. A Novel Method to Couple Electrophysiological Measurements and Fluorescence Imaging of Suspended Lipid Membranes: The Example of T5 Bacteriophage DNA Ejection

    PubMed Central

    Chiaruttini, Nicolas; Letellier, Lucienne; Viasnoff, Virgile

    2013-01-01

    We present an innovative method to couple electrophysiological measurements with fluorescence imaging of functionalized suspended bilayers. Our method combines several advantages: it is well suited to study transmembrane proteins that are difficult to incorporate in suspended bilayers, it allows single molecule resolution both in terms of electrophysiological measurements and fluorescence imaging, and it enables mechanical stimulations of the membrane. The approach comprises of two steps: first the reconstitution of membrane proteins in giant unilamellar vesicles; then the formation of a suspended bilayer spanning a 5 to 15 micron-wide aperture that can be visualized by high NA microscope objectives. We exemplified how the technique can be used to detect in real time the translocation of T5 DNA across the bilayer during its ejection from the bacteriophage capsid. PMID:24376806

  11. Spectroscopic Characterization of Isomerization Transition States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Joshua H.; Changala, Bryan; Mellau, Georg Ch.; Stanton, John F.; Merer, Anthony; Field, Robert W.

    2016-06-01

    Transition state theory is central to our understanding of chemical reaction dynamics. We demonstrate here a method for extracting transition state energies and properties from a characteristic pattern found in frequency domain spectra of isomerizing systems. This pattern, a dip in the spacings of certain barrier-proximal vibrational levels, can be understood using the concept of effective frequency, ωeff. The method is applied to the cis-trans conformational change in the S_1 state of C2H2 and the bond-breaking HCN-HNC isomerization. In both cases, the barrier heights derived from spectroscopic data agree extremely well with previous ab initio calculations. We also show that it is possible to distinguish between vibrational modes that are actively involved in the isomerization process and those that are passive bystanders. (This work has been published in J. H. Baraban, P. B. Changala, G. Ch. Mellau, J. F. Stanton, A. J. Merer, and R. W. Field. Spectroscopic characterization of isomerization transition states. Science, 350(6266):1338--1342, 2015.)

  12. A facile method for the fabrication of magnetic molecularly imprinted stir-bars: A practical example with aflatoxins in baby foods.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bao, Mónica; Regal, Patricia; Barreiro, Rocío; Fente, Cristina A; Cepeda, Alberto

    2016-11-04

    A fast and facile method for the fabrication of magnetic molecularly imprinted stir-bars (MMIP-SB) has been developed, using a combination of imprinting technology and magnetite. Magnetite was prepared in the laboratory from the raw and embedded into molecularly imprinted polymers through a process of bulk polymerization. This novel design was applied to the analysis of aflatoxins, one of the most important groups of mycotoxins in terms of occurrence and toxicity. In the context of food safety, molecularly imprinted polymers are a promising tool to achieve selective and accessible methods of extraction for different residues and contaminants. Considering the toxicity of aflatoxins, a dummy template was preferred for the synthesis of the imprinted polymers. A rapid and affordable extraction method for isolating five different aflatoxins that may be present in food was developed. The MMIP-SB was used as a conventional stir-bar and combined with high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for the determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk powder (infant formulas) and aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 in cereal-based baby foods. The results showed an average recovery of 60%, 43, 40, 44 and 39%, respectively, and RSD below 10%. These in-house prepared stir-bars featured good stirring and extraction performance, and recognition abilities, offering a good alternative to more complicated.

  13. Methods for estimating uncertainty in PMF solutions: examples with ambient air and water quality data and guidance on reporting PMF results.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven G; Eberly, Shelly; Paatero, Pentti; Norris, Gary A

    2015-06-15

    The new version of EPA's positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF) software, 5.0, includes three error estimation (EE) methods for analyzing factor analytic solutions: classical bootstrap (BS), displacement of factor elements (DISP), and bootstrap enhanced by displacement (BS-DISP). These methods capture the uncertainty of PMF analyses due to random errors and rotational ambiguity. To demonstrate the utility of the EE methods, results are presented for three data sets: (1) speciated PM2.5 data from a chemical speciation network (CSN) site in Sacramento, California (2003-2009); (2) trace metal, ammonia, and other species in water quality samples taken at an inline storage system (ISS) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (2006); and (3) an organic aerosol data set from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) measurements in Las Vegas, Nevada (January 2008). We present an interpretation of EE diagnostics for these data sets, results from sensitivity tests of EE diagnostics using additional and fewer factors, and recommendations for reporting PMF results. BS-DISP and BS are found useful in understanding the uncertainty of factor profiles; they also suggest if the data are over-fitted by specifying too many factors. DISP diagnostics were consistently robust, indicating its use for understanding rotational uncertainty and as a first step in assessing a solution's viability. The uncertainty of each factor's identifying species is shown to be a useful gauge for evaluating multiple solutions, e.g., with a different number of factors.

  14. An Improved Method for TIMS High Precision Nd Isotopic Analysis of Very Small Aliquots (1- 10ng) With Example Application in Garnet Sm/Nd Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, E. F.; Harvey, J.; Mehl, L. Y.; Peterman, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    Technological and scientific developments have demonstrated both the attainability and the utility of very high precision (i.e. 5-20ppm 2 σ) Nd isotopic measurements with TIMS. However such high precision has been limited to relatively large aliquots of Nd, on the order of several hundred nanograms. Several potential applications of precise Nd isotopic measurements, including garnet Sm/Nd geochronology, do not always permit such large samples, instead yielding only a few nanograms of Nd. We have explored and tested an improved method for Nd isotopic analysis of such small (1-10ng) aliquots of Nd using the NdO+ method with a Triton TIMS at Boston University. Analyzing Nd isotopes as the oxide is a well known technique, frequently involving an oxygen bleed valve. Instead, we forego the bleed valve and load samples with a TaO slurry which provides the oxygen source. Using an in-house Nd isotopic standard solution, 4ng loads easily yield stable 2.0-2.5 volt beams resulting in internal precisions of 10ppm 2 σ RSE. Within barrel external precision of 4ng loads of the Nd standard is 13ppm 2 σ RSD (n=20). Long term (6 months, six analysts) external precision of 4ng loads of the standard is currently 23ppm 2 σ RSD (n=55) suggesting that further improvements are possible. As a further test of this method, we dissolved a natural rock sample (a metapelite), separated the Nd using TRU- spec and MLA column chemistry, and loaded nineteen 4ng loads in one barrel. Within barrel external precision was 21ppm 2 σ RSD (n=18). This precision represents a significant advance over previous NdO+ analyses of small samples using an oxygen bleed valve. The TaO loading method for small Nd aliquots is useful in Sm/Nd garnet geochronology as exemplified by two case studies. Garnets from eclogite facies gneisses from Norway ran very well with 2.4-18ng loads and yielded age precision as good as 0.8 million years 2 σ. Conversely, garnets from blueschist facies rocks from Sifnos, Greece, ran

  15. Cosmic Ray Removal in Fiber Spectroscopic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhongrui; Zhang, Haotong; Yuan, Hailong; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Guangwei; Lei, Yajuan; Dong, Yiqiao; Yang, Huiqin; Zhao, Yongheng; Cao, Zihuang

    2017-02-01

    Single-exposure spectra in large spectral surveys are valuable for time domain studies such as stellar variability, but there is no available method to eliminate cosmic rays for single-exposure, multi-fiber spectral images. In this paper, we describe a new method to detect and remove cosmic rays in multi-fiber spectroscopic single exposures. Through the use of two-dimensional profile fitting and a noise model that considers the position-dependent errors, we successfully detect as many as 80% of the cosmic rays and correct the cosmic ray polluted pixels to an average accuracy of 97.8%. Multiple tests and comparisons with both simulated data and real LAMOST data show that the method works properly in detection rate, false detection rate, and validity of cosmic ray correction.

  16. Monte Carlo Example Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kalos, M.

    2006-05-09

    The Monte Carlo example programs VARHATOM and DMCATOM are two small, simple FORTRAN programs that illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Mathematical technique for calculating the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  18. Fine characterization of ITO layers by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.; Suzuki, Y.

    1996-08-01

    Indium tin oxide films (ITO) are characterized precisely by spectroscopic ellipsometry which determines not only the thickness of the layers but also the optical indices in a large spectral range. The quality of the ITO films is checked by the transparency of the layers in the visible range 0.4 to 0.6 micrometers . Indeed, target degradation is detected by the occurrence of an absorption band in this region. The electrical conductivity of the layer can also be deduced by the Drude model applied to the absorption in the infrared region. Moreover, spectroscopic ellipsometry can give all these information on all the surface of the panels, checking at the same time the homogeneity and the stability of the deposition process. Different experimental examples will be presented and discussed.

  19. About the problems to interpret spectroscopic data from plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Guedda, E. H.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Capes, H.; Stamm, R.

    2006-01-01

    Continued developments of quantitative spectroscopy and related atomic physics are originating from inertial and magnetic fusion research. In almost all experimental facilities, non-equilibrium phenomena are now a central issue and the interpretation of related spectroscopic data is a great challenge. We discuss new general diagnostic/spectroscopic approaches and usual point of views: high density methods and high density atomic physics for magnetic fusion research like ITER and the Virtual Contour Shape Kinetic Theory VCSKT which unifies low and high density plasma regimes and therefore allows to employ complex satellite transitions in non-equilibrium, non-LTE and non-Coronal plasmas.

  20. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves for TaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1991-09-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 21 electronic states of the diatomic TaH are computed using complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations. In addition spin-orbit effects were included using the relativistic configuration interaction method (RCI). The ground state of TaH was found to be a 0 + state, which is a mixture of 5Δ(0 +), 5Π(0 +), 3Σ -(0 +), and 3Π(0 +). The spin-orbit effects were found to be significant for TaH. Several spectroscopic transitions are predicted for TaH none of which is observed.

  1. Differential cross sections and product rotational polarization in A + BC reactions using wave packet methods: H+ + D2 and Li + HF examples.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, A; Roncero, O; González-Lezana, T; Rodríguez-López, A; Aguado, A; Sanz-Sanz, C; Gómez-Carrasco, S

    2009-12-31

    The state-to-state differential cross sections for some atom + diatom reactions have been calculated using a new wave packet code, MAD-WAVE3, which is described in some detail and uses either reactant or product Jacobi coordinates along the propagation. In order to show the accuracy and efficiency of the coordinate transformation required when using reactant Jacobi coordinates, as recently proposed [ J. Chem. Phys. 2006 , 125 , 054102 ], the method is first applied to the H + D(2) reaction as a benchmark, for which exact time-independent calculations are also performed. It is found that the use of reactant coordinates yields accurate results, with a computational effort slightly lower than that when using product coordinates. The H(+) + D(2) reaction, with the same masses but a much deeper insertion well, is also studied and exhibits a completely different mechanism, a complex-forming one which can be treated by statistical methods. Due to the longer range of the potential, product Jacobi coordinates are more efficient in this case. Differential cross sections for individual final rotational states of the products are obtained based on exact dynamical calculations for some selected total angular momenta, combined with the random phase approximation to save the high computational time required to calculate all partial waves with very long propagations. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with available exact time-independent calculations. Finally, the method is applied to the Li + HF system for which reactant coordinates are very well suited, and quantum differential cross sections are not available. The results are compared with recent quasiclassical simulations and experimental results [J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 244304]. Furthermore, the polarization of the product angular momenta is also analyzed as a function of the scattering angle.

  2. A new method for distinguishing between enantiomers and racemates and assignment of enantiomeric purity by means of solid-state NMR. Examples from oxazaphosphorinanes.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Marek J; Tadeusiak, Elzbieta; Misiura, Konrad; Ciesielski, Włodzimierz; Bujacz, Grzegorz; Tekely, Piotr

    2002-11-04

    It is shown that enantiomers and racemates that have identical isotropic NMR chemical shift as well as anisotropic chemical-shift tensor parameters can be easily distinguished by means of the ODESSA (One Dimensional Exchange Spectroscopy by Sideband Alternation) technique. The method is based on the fact that the molecular symmetries and packing of enantiomers and racemates are usually significantly different. The power of the proposed approach is demonstrated by employing as model compounds P-chiral oxazaphosphorine derivatives, which are widely used in clinical oncology. Correlation of the amplitude of the ODESSA decay (AOD) with enantiomeric excess is also presented.

  3. An objective method for mapping hazardous flow deposits from the stratigraphic record of stratovolcanoes: a case example from Montagne Pelée

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, M. L.; Wadge, G.; Curnow, R. N.

    2001-06-01

    A method is described that enables a variety of maps, which indicate the probabilities of deposition, to be constructed in a reproducible manner from the stratigraphie information typically available at well-studied stratovoicanoes. These maps can then be used as a basis for hazard assessment. The sampling of the deposits of previous eruptions is subject to uncertainties due to erosion, sectoral deposition and non-exposure. A model-based, iterative algorithm is used to compensate for the incomplete sampling. For each site, the available evidence from the other sites is used to estimate the probability of deposition for missing deposits. A geographical information system (GIS)-based method that uses Thiessen polygons to represent the presence or absence of deposits, together with simple cartographic rules based on depositional processes, then defines the extent of deposition. The combined operation of these two techniques is presented for Montagne Pelée in Martinique, using the amended stratigraphic record of Smith and Roobol (1990) for the past 6000 years. Three types of maps are created: maps for individual depositional events (the 1902 block-and-ash flow and surge deposits are used to verify the technique); maps for different deposit types aggregated over 6000 years of activity; and scenario maps which, in Montagne Pelée’s case, recognise that during the next Peléean or Plinian eruption a variety of hazards will have to be confronted.

  4. A numerical method for retrieving high oxygen isotope temperatures from plutonic igneous rocks: An example from the Laramie Anorthosite Complex, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, J.; Chacko, T. . Dept. of Geology); Frost, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The Sybille Pit is a late-stage magnetite-ilmenite-plagioclase-bearing differentiate of the Laramie Anorthosite with a wide range of grain sizes and modal mineralogy. This variability makes Sybille an ideal locality in which to study the factors that affect isotopic thermometry in plutonic environments. The authors have developed a numerical model based on isotope exchange trajectories that retrieves close to magmatic temperatures for samples from Sybille. This method is based on the premise that hand sample-scale sub-systems close to exchange with each other at temperatures that exceed those of the constituent minerals. The temperature of hand-sample scale closure is retrieved by back calculating the isotope exchange trajectories to the temperature at which two samples with widely different model compositions are in isotopic equilibrium. Application of these methods to samples from Sybille provides promising results. Whereas conventional isotopic thermometry of individual samples yields a wide range of temperatures ([approximately]600 to > 1000 C) depending on the mineral-pair chosen, application of this numerical model to multiple samples yields temperatures of 1,070 [+-] 100 C which corresponds closely to the inferred solidus for these rocks.

  5. Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: Theory, implementation, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Zuev, Dmitry; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.

    2013-03-28

    Theory and implementation of complex-scaled variant of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for excitation energies with single and double substitutions (EOM-EE-CCSD) is presented. The complex-scaling formalism extends the EOM-EE-CCSD model to resonance states, i.e., excited states that are metastable with respect to electron ejection. The method is applied to Feshbach resonances in atomic systems (He, H{sup -}, and Be). The dependence of the results on one-electron basis set is quantified and analyzed. Energy decomposition and wave function analysis reveal that the origin of the dependence is in electron correlation, which is essential for the lifetime of Feshbach resonances. It is found that one-electron basis should be sufficiently flexible to describe radial and angular electron correlation in a balanced fashion and at different values of the scaling parameter, {theta}. Standard basis sets that are optimized for not-complex-scaled calculations ({theta} = 0) are not sufficiently flexible to describe the {theta}-dependence of the wave functions even when heavily augmented by additional sets.

  6. Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: theory, implementation, and examples.

    PubMed

    Bravaya, Ksenia B; Zuev, Dmitry; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-03-28

    Theory and implementation of complex-scaled variant of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for excitation energies with single and double substitutions (EOM-EE-CCSD) is presented. The complex-scaling formalism extends the EOM-EE-CCSD model to resonance states, i.e., excited states that are metastable with respect to electron ejection. The method is applied to Feshbach resonances in atomic systems (He, H(-), and Be). The dependence of the results on one-electron basis set is quantified and analyzed. Energy decomposition and wave function analysis reveal that the origin of the dependence is in electron correlation, which is essential for the lifetime of Feshbach resonances. It is found that one-electron basis should be sufficiently flexible to describe radial and angular electron correlation in a balanced fashion and at different values of the scaling parameter, θ. Standard basis sets that are optimized for not-complex-scaled calculations (θ = 0) are not sufficiently flexible to describe the θ-dependence of the wave functions even when heavily augmented by additional sets.

  7. Application of LiDAR Date to Assess the Landslide Susceptibility Map Using Weights of Evidence Method - AN Example from Podhale Region (southern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Mirosław

    2016-06-01

    Podhale is a region in southern Poland, which is the northernmost part of the Central Carpathian Mountains. It is characterized by the presence of a large number of landslides that threaten the local infrastructure. In an article presents application of LiDAR data and geostatistical methods to assess landslides susceptibility map. Landslide inventory map were performed using LiDAR data and field work. The Weights of Evidence method was applied to assess landslides susceptibility map. Used factors for modeling: slope gradient, slope aspect, elevation, drainage density, faults density, lithology and curvature. All maps were subdivided into different classes. Then were converted to grid format in the ArcGIS 10.0. The conditional independence test was carried out to determine factors that are conditionally independent of each other with landslides. As a result, chi-square test for further GIS analysis used only five factors: slope gradient, slope aspect, elevation, drainage density and lithology. The final prediction results, it is concluded that the susceptibility map gives useful information both on present instability of the area and its possible future evolution in agreement with the morphological evolution of the area.

  8. Physiognomic structure of agro-forestry landscapes: method of evaluation and guidelines for design, on the example of the West Polesie Biosphere Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Tadeusz J.; Kułak, Agnieszka; Michalik-Śnieżek, Malwina; Lorens, Bogdan

    2016-10-01

    Harmonious planning of agro-forestry landscapes plays a increasing role in building a social satisfaction flowing from the high quality of the environment on the rural areas. It is also a very good way to create a unique place identity of protected areas, rest areas etc. especially valuable regions. The objectives of the paper are: 1) elaboration the method of evaluation and mapping the physiognomic landscape composition on the rural areas with a high natural values; 2) testing this method on dominated by forests, peatbogs and arable lands the central part of the West Polesie UNESCO Biosphere Reserve (Eastern Poland); 3) formulation of guidelines on the design of landscape interiors and view openings composition, highlighting the unique features of West Polesie landscape and building a sense of the place identity; 4) to show the necessary to enshrine the values of physiognomic landscape composition in land use policy. In evaluation and mapping the landscape composition, a special attention was paid to the role of agro-forest ecotones. The results of the research part of the study as well as a guidelines on landscape design have been presented in the form of a map, study figures and a description.

  9. Evaluating methods used for fission track dating of tephras: examples from the Afar Depression, Ethiopia, and the Denali fault zone, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, A. E.; Warfel, T. S.; Phillips, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although fission track geochronology has been successfully used to date volcanic glasses and tephras in several studies, a variety of approaches have been used (see Westgate et al., 2013), and no consensus for a standardized methodology has emerged. As a result, this technique is rarely employed, despite having the potential to date tephras and glasses that cannot be dated by other methods, such as K-Ar dating. We have been evaluating the various approaches used to address the technical issues in fission track dating of tephras, by applying them to standards of known ages, including Moldavite tektite, and Huckleberry and Bishop Tuffs. Some of these issues include track etching and counting protocol, and corrections for the effects of track fading at low temperatures. Track etching is generally done in 24% HF for 75 or more seconds, but the time necessary for optimal etching appears to vary according to sample composition and grain size. To correct for track fading, we are using the diameter correction technique of Sandhu and Westgate (1995). We have obtained tephra samples from two regions, the Afar Depression in Ethiopia, an area with significant early hominid fossils, and the Denali fault zone in Alaska, an area with a complicated tectonic evolution. For both of these regions, we have samples that have been dated by other methods for calibration purposes, and we will explore the application of a Zeta correction to the technique. This underutilized technique can provide powerful constraints on studies of timing in diverse geologic environments.

  10. A New Method of Providing Communities With High-Resolution Maps of Present and Future Inundation Pathways: Two Examples From Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, M.; Mague, S. T.; Smith, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    A new method of mapping storm-tide (inundation) pathways and linking those data with tidal elevations in real-time for local managers is being developed. Separate, ongoing studies in two coastal towns in Massachusetts have demonstrated the strengths of this method. High-resolution lidar datasets are imported into 3D data visualization software and water levels are raised incrementally from the highest spring tide of the year to the storm of record +1 m. This range was identified to include 'nuisance flooding' as well as present and future inundation pathways not yet observed by local authorities caused by storms superimposed on projected sea level rise. Potential storm-tide pathways are identified using Lidar data but are then verified with extensive fieldwork using RTK-GPS instruments (tested vertical accuracy of 4.9 cm at 95%) to overcome the vertical uncertainty associated with Lidar data. The fieldwork serves two purposes, first is to field check the lidar data with the highest resolution instrument available and, second to verify and document the presence or absence of a storm-tide pathway. Having developed the map of storm tide pathways within a GIS environment referenced to a geodetic datum (NAVD88), a tide gauge or staff is installed in the town's harbor or other sheltered coastal area and the elevations of all storm tide pathways are then referenced to the local tidal datum. The benefit here is three-fold. First, local officials can use the high-resolution data set that is tied to a local tidal datum to autonomously monitor predicted storm surges and be prepared for inundation at sites prior to flooding. Second, storm-tide pathways that have heretofore never been inundated can be identified and steps can be taken to remove or minimize flooding hazards. Finally, identification of present and future storm tide pathways can be used to prioritize and budget proactive solutions in response to increases in chronic, nuisance and more frequent flooding associated

  11. Review of Spectroscopic Data for Measurements of Stratospheric Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A. (Editor); Hoell, J. M., Jr. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Results and recommendations from a two day workshop are discussed. A review of the current status of experimental and theoretical spectroscopic data on molecules of stratospheric interest is given along with recommendations for additional research. Methods for disseminating new and existing data are also discussed.

  12. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  13. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of PF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifzadeh, Lida; Balasubramanian, K.

    1995-09-01

    Spectroscopic constants of low-lying bound electronic states and potential energy curves of 19 electronic states of PF arising from the valence dissociation limits are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods, which included up to 0.9 million configurations.

  14. Development of a local-scale urban stream assessment method using benthic macroinvertebrates: An example from the Santa Clara Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.L.; Purcell, A.H.; Fend, S.V.; Resh, V.H.

    2009-01-01

    Research that explores the biological response to urbanization on a site-specific scale is necessary for management of urban basins. Recent studies have proposed a method to characterize the biological response of benthic macroinvertebrates along an urban gradient for several climatic regions in the USA. Our study demonstrates how this general framework can be refined and applied on a smaller scale to an urbanized basin, the Santa Clara Basin (surrounding San Jose, California, USA). Eighty-four sampling sites on 14 streams in the Santa Clara Basin were used for assessing local stream conditions. First, an urban index composed of human population density, road density, and urban land cover was used to determine the extent of urbanization upstream from each sampling site. Second, a multimetric biological index was developed to characterize the response of macroinvertebrate assemblages along the urban gradient. The resulting biological index included metrics from 3 ecological categories: taxonomic composition ( Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera), functional feeding group (shredder richness), and habit ( clingers). The 90th-quantile regression line was used to define the best available biological conditions along the urban gradient, which we define as the predicted biological potential. This descriptor was then used to determine the relative condition of sites throughout the basin. Hierarchical partitioning of variance revealed that several site-specific variables (dissolved O2 and temperature) were significantly related to a site's deviation from its predicted biological potential. Spatial analysis of each site's deviation from its biological potential indicated geographic heterogeneity in the distribution of impaired sites. The presence and operation of local dams optimize water use, but modify natural flow regimes, which in turn influence stream habitat, dissolved O2, and temperature. Current dissolved O2 and temperature regimes deviate from natural

  15. A method and example of seismically imaging near‐surface fault zones in geologically complex areas using Vp, Vs, and their ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Goldman, Mark R.; Sickler, Robert R.; Criley, Coyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of near‐surface (vadose zone and slightly below) fault locations and geometries is important because assessment of ground rupture, strong shaking, geologic slip rates, and rupture histories occurs at shallow depths. However, seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths can be difficult due to near‐surface complexities, such as weathering, groundwater saturation, massive (nonlayered) rocks, and vertically layered strata. Combined P‐ and S‐wave seismic‐refraction tomography data can overcome many of the near‐surface, fault‐zone seismic‐imaging problems because of differences in the responses of elastic (bulk and shear) moduli of P and S waves to shallow‐depth, fault‐zone properties. We show that high‐resolution refraction tomography images of P‐ to S‐wave velocity ratios (VP/VS) can reliably identify near‐surface faults. We demonstrate this method using tomography images of the San Andreas fault (SAF) surface‐rupture zone associated with the 18 April 1906 ∼M 7.9 San Francisco earthquake on the San Francisco peninsula in California. There, the SAF cuts through Franciscan mélange, which consists of an incoherent assemblage of greywacke, chert, greenstone, and serpentinite. A near‐vertical zone (∼75° northeast dip) of high P‐wave velocities (up to 3000  m/s), low S‐wave velocities (∼150–600  m/s), high VP/VS ratios (4–8.8), and high Poisson’s ratios (0.44–0.49) characterizes the main surface‐rupture zone to a depth of about 20 m and is consistent with nearby trench observations. We suggest that the combined VP/VSimaging approach can reliably identify most near‐surface fault zones in locations where many other seismic methods cannot be applied.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of polymers: report

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.L.

    1987-10-01

    Polymer characterization has presented major difficulties to the analytical chemist, who has had to develop techniques to cope with the challenge. Even the elementary problem of measuring molecular weight is not easy. Yet such measurements are essential, because the physical, mechanical, and flow properties depend on the length of the polymer chain. Because of the limited solubility and high viscosity of polymers, many classical techniques have been of little use or have had to be extensively modified to measure the molecular weight of polymers. Size-exclusion chromatographic techniques such as gel permeation have been developed to measure these molecular weight distributions. Special chromatographic instruments with a range of spectroscopic detectors (including infrared and laser-light scattering) have emerged commercially to aid the analytical chemist in the fundamental endeavor to measure the length of the polymer chain and its distribution. The author describes the advantages and disadvantages and disadvantages of various spectroscopic techniques.

  17. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  18. Knockout, Transfer and Spectroscopic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Kirby; Keeley, Nicholas; Rusek, Krzysztof

    2011-10-01

    As derived quantities rather than observables, spectroscopic factors extracted from fits to data are model dependent. The main source of uncertainty is the choice of binding potential, but other factors such as adequate modeling of the reaction mechanism, the Perey effect, choice of distorting nuclear potentials etc. can also play a significant role. Recently, there has been some discussion of apparent discrepancies in spectroscopic factors derived from knockout reactions compared to those obtained from low-energy direct reactions. It should be possible to reconcile these discrepancies and we explore this prospect by attempting to describe the 10Be(d,t)9Be data of Nucl. Phys. A157, 305 (1970) using the 10Be/9Be form factors from a recent knockout study, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 162502 (2011). The influence of such factors as choice of distorting potentials and multi-step reactions paths will be explored.

  19. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Vergo, Norma; Walter, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed.

  20. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  1. Active Learning with Irrelevant Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    An improved active learning method has been devised for training data classifiers. One example of a data classifier is the algorithm used by the United States Postal Service since the 1960s to recognize scans of handwritten digits for processing zip codes. Active learning algorithms enable rapid training with minimal investment of time on the part of human experts to provide training examples consisting of correctly classified (labeled) input data. They function by identifying which examples would be most profitable for a human expert to label. The goal is to maximize classifier accuracy while minimizing the number of examples the expert must label. Although there are several well-established methods for active learning, they may not operate well when irrelevant examples are present in the data set. That is, they may select an item for labeling that the expert simply cannot assign to any of the valid classes. In the context of classifying handwritten digits, the irrelevant items may include stray marks, smudges, and mis-scans. Querying the expert about these items results in wasted time or erroneous labels, if the expert is forced to assign the item to one of the valid classes. In contrast, the new algorithm provides a specific mechanism for avoiding querying the irrelevant items. This algorithm has two components: an active learner (which could be a conventional active learning algorithm) and a relevance classifier. The combination of these components yields a method, denoted Relevance Bias, that enables the active learner to avoid querying irrelevant data so as to increase its learning rate and efficiency when irrelevant items are present. The algorithm collects irrelevant data in a set of rejected examples, then trains the relevance classifier to distinguish between labeled (relevant) training examples and the rejected ones. The active learner combines its ranking of the items with the probability that they are relevant to yield a final decision about which item

  2. A new scheme for perturbative triples correction to (0,1) sector of Fock space multi-reference coupled cluster method: Theory, implementation, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar E-mail: s.pal@ncl.res.in; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav E-mail: s.pal@ncl.res.in

    2015-01-28

    We propose a new elegant strategy to implement third order triples correction in the light of many-body perturbation theory to the Fock space multi-reference coupled cluster method for the ionization problem. The computational scaling as well as the storage requirement is of key concerns in any many-body calculations. Our proposed approach scales as N{sup 6} does not require the storage of triples amplitudes and gives superior agreement over all the previous attempts made. This approach is capable of calculating multiple roots in a single calculation in contrast to the inclusion of perturbative triples in the equation of motion variant of the coupled cluster theory, where each root needs to be computed in a state-specific way and requires both the left and right state vectors together. The performance of the newly implemented scheme is tested by applying to methylene, boron nitride (B{sub 2}N) anion, nitrogen, water, carbon monoxide, acetylene, formaldehyde, and thymine monomer, a DNA base.

  3. Improved gold chloride staining method for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings in the shoulder capsule and labrum as examples of loose and dense fibrous tissues.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, J W; Smirnova, I V; McIff, T E

    2014-07-01

    Consistency in gold chloride staining is essential for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings. The gold chloride stain for this purpose has been modified by many investigators, but often yields inconsistent staining, which makes it difficult to differentiate structures and to determine nerve ending distribution in large tissue samples. We introduce additional steps and major changes to the modified Gairns' protocol. We controlled the temperature and mixing rate during tissue staining to achieve consistent staining and complete solution penetration. We subjected samples to sucrose dehydration to improve cutting efficiency. We then exposed samples to a solution containing lemon juice, formic acid and paraformaldehyde to produce optimal tissue transparency with minimal tissue deformity. We extended the time for gold chloride impregnation 1.5 fold. Gold chloride was reduced in the labrum using 25% formic acid in water for 18 h and in the capsule using 25% formic acid in citrate phosphate buffer for 2 h. Citrate binds gold nanoparticles, which minimizes aggregation in the tissue. We stored samples in fresh ultrapure water at 4° C to slow reduction and to maintain color contrast in the tissue. Tissue samples were embedded in Tissue Tek and sectioned at 80 and 100 μm instead of using glycerin and teasing the tissue apart as in Gairns' modified gold chloride method. We attached sections directly to gelatin subbed slides after sectioning with a cryostat. The slides then were processed and coverslipped with Permount. Staining consistency was demonstrated throughout the tissue sections and neural structures were clearly identifiable.

  4. Optimization of the Acetic Acid method for microfossil extraction from lithified carbonate rocks: Examples from the Jurassic and Miocene of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Septriandi; Malik, Muhammad; Kaminski, Michael; Babalola, Lamidi

    2016-04-01

    We report the first ever use of the acetic acid processing method for the extraction of microfossils from indurated limestones in Saudi Arabia. Two different limestone samples from Middle Jurassic and Middle Miocene formation in Saudi Arabia were tested under different concentrations of acid from 50% to 100% and with processing times from 2 hours to 10 hours, in an attempt to optimize the processing methodology. The recovery of acid residues shows a similar trend for both Jurassic and Miocene samples. The weight percentage of residue particle size > 1 mm decreases as acid concentration increases, especially in the 50 to 80% acid concentration range, and the weight percentage of the smallest size particles >0.063 mm increases as acid concentration increases. The small fraction of residue between 0.50 - 0.063 mm was split into 3 g subsamples and picked for microfossils in order to assess their preservation. All concentrations of acetic acid tested show promising results for both the Jurassic Dhruma and Miocene Dam formation carbonates. Higher acid concentrations with longer reaction times yield better recovery than higher concentrations with less reaction time. Based on our experiment, we recommended a 60% concentration of acetic acid to be the optimal concentration for use on routine micropaleontological samples of Saudi Arabian carbonate rocks. By lowering the concentration of acetic acid from 80% to 60%, the consumption of acid is reduced without compromising the recovery of microfossils, and the sample can be processed in a more environmentally friendly manner.

  5. Evaluation of endogenous allergens for the safety evaluation of genetically engineered food crops: review of potential risks, test methods, examples and relevance.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Panda, Rakhi; Ariyarathna, Harsha

    2013-09-04

    The safety of food produced from genetically engineered (GE) crops is assessed for potential risks of food allergy on the basis of an international consensus guideline outlined by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (2003). The assessment focuses on evaluation of the potential allergenicity of the newly expressed protein(s) as the primary potential risk using a process that markedly limits risks to allergic consumers. However, Codex also recommended evaluating a second concern, potential increases in endogenous allergens of commonly allergenic food crops that might occur due to insertion of the gene. Unfortunately, potential risks and natural variation of endogenous allergens in non-GE varieties are not understood, and risks from increases have not been demonstrated. Because regulatory approvals in some countries are delayed due to increasing demands for measuring endogenous allergens, we present a review of the potential risks of food allergy, risk management for food allergy, and test methods that may be used in these evaluations. We also present new data from our laboratory studies on the variation of the allergenic lipid transfer protein in non-GE maize hybrids as well as data from two studies of endogenous allergen comparisons for three GE soybean lines, their nearest genetic soy lines, and other commercial lines. We conclude that scientifically based limits of acceptable variation cannot been established without an understanding of natural variation in non-GE crops. Furthermore, the risks from increased allergen expression are minimal as the risk management strategy for food allergy is for allergic individuals to avoid consuming any food containing their allergenic source, regardless of the crop variety.

  6. Improved gold chloride staining method for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings in the shoulder capsule and labrum as examples of loose and dense fibrous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Witherspoon, J W; Smirnova, IV; McIff, TE

    2014-01-01

    Consistency in gold chloride staining is essential for anatomical analysis of sensory nerve endings. The gold chloride stain for this purpose has been modified by many investigators, but often yields inconsistent staining, which makes it difficult to differentiate structures and to determine nerve ending distribution in large tissue samples. We introduce additional steps and major changes to the modified Gairns’ protocol. We controlled the temperature and mixing rate during tissue staining to achieve consistent staining and complete solution penetration. We subjected samples to sucrose dehydration to improve cutting efficiency. We then exposed samples to a solution containing lemon juice, formic acid and paraformaldehyde to produce optimal tissue transparency with minimal tissue deformity. We extended the time for gold chloride impregnation 1.5 fold. Gold chloride was reduced in the labrum using 25% formic acid in water for 18 h and in the capsule using 25% formic acid in citrate phosphate buffer for 2 h. Citrate binds gold nanoparticles, which minimizes aggregation in the tissue. We stored samples in fresh ultrapure water at 4° C to slow reduction and to maintain color contrast in the tissue. Tissue samples were embedded in Tissue Tek and sectioned at 80 and 100 μm instead of using glycerin and teasing the tissue apart as in Gairns’ modified gold chloride method. We attached sections directly to gelatin subbed slides after sectioning with a cryostat. The slides then were processed and coverslipped with Permount. Staining consistency was demonstrated throughout the tissue sections and neural structures were clearly identifiable. PMID:24476562

  7. Evaluating simplistic methods to understand current distributions and forecast distribution changes under climate change scenarios: An example with coypu (Myocastor coypus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E; Sheffels, Trevor R.; Carter, Jacoby; Systma, Mark D.; Talbert, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species provide a unique opportunity to evaluate factors controlling biogeographic distributions; we can consider introduction success as an experiment testing suitability of environmental conditions. Predicting potential distributions of spreading species is not easy, and forecasting potential distributions with changing climate is even more difficult. Using the globally invasive coypu (Myocastor coypus [Molina, 1782]), we evaluate and compare the utility of a simplistic ecophysiological based model and a correlative model to predict current and future distribution. The ecophysiological model was based on winter temperature relationships with nutria survival. We developed correlative statistical models using the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling and biologically relevant climate data with a global extent. We applied the ecophysiological based model to several global circulation model (GCM) predictions for mid-century. We used global coypu introduction data to evaluate these models and to explore a hypothesized physiological limitation, finding general agreement with known coypu distribution locally and globally and support for an upper thermal tolerance threshold. Global circulation model based model results showed variability in coypu predicted distribution among GCMs, but had general agreement of increasing suitable area in the USA. Our methods highlighted the dynamic nature of the edges of the coypu distribution due to climate non-equilibrium, and uncertainty associated with forecasting future distributions. Areas deemed suitable habitat, especially those on the edge of the current known range, could be used for early detection of the spread of coypu populations for management purposes. Combining approaches can be beneficial to predicting potential distributions of invasive species now and in the future and in exploring hypotheses of factors controlling distributions.

  8. [A new herbs traceability method based on DNA barcoding-origin-morphology analysis--an example from an adulterant of 'Heiguogouqi'].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-qin; Song, Xiao-na; Zang, Yi-mei; Li Yan-peng; Ma, Chang-hua; Zhao, Bai-xiao; Liu, Chun-sheng

    2014-12-01

    The fruit of Lycium ruthenicum is a common folk medicine in China. Now it is popular for its antioxidative effect and other medical functions. The adulterants of the herb confuse consumers. In order to identify a new adulterant of L. ruthenicum, a research was performed based on NCBI Nucleotide Database ITS Sequence, combined analysis of the origin and morphology of the adulterant to traceable varieties. Total genomic DNA was isolated from the materials, and nuclear DNA ITS sequences were amplified and sequenced; DNA fragments were collated and matched by using ContingExpress. Similarity identification of BLAST analysis was performed. Besides, the distribution of plant origin and morphology were considered to further identification and verification. Families and genera were identified by molecular identification method. The adulterant was identified as plant belonging to Berberis. Origin analysis narrowed the range of sample identification. Seven different kinds of plants in Berberis were potential sources of the sample. Adulterants variety was traced by morphological analysis. The united molecular identification-origin-morphology research proves to be a preceding way to medical herbs traceability with time-saving and economic advantages and the results showed the new adulterant of L. ruthenicum was B. kaschgarica. The main differences between B. kaschgarica and L. ruthenicum are as follows: in terms of the traits, the surface of B. kaschgarica is smooth and crispy, and that of L. ruthenicum is shrinkage, solid and hard. In microscopic characteristics, epicarp cells of B. aschgarica thickening like a string of beads, stone cells as the rectangle, and the stone cell walls of L. ruthenicum is wavy, obvious grain layer. In molecular sequences, the length of ITS sequence of B. kaschgarica is 606 bp, L. ruthenicum is 654 bp, the similarity of the two sequences is 53.32%.

  9. Spectroscopic detection of nitrogen concentrations in sagebrush

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. MITCHELL; N. F. GLENN; T.T. SANKEY; D. R. DERRYBERRY; R. C. HRUSKA; M. O. Anderson

    2012-07-01

    The ability to estimate foliar nitrogen (N) in semi-arid landscapes can yield information on nutritional status and improve our limited understanding of controls on canopy photosynthesis. We examined two spectroscopic methods for estimating sagebrush dried leaf and live shrub N content: first derivative reflectance (FDR) and continuum removal. Both methods used partial least squares (PLS) regression to select wavebands most significantly correlated with N concentrations in the samples. Sagebrush dried leaf spectra produced PLS models (R2 = 0.76–0.86) that could predict N concentrations within the dataset more accurately than PLS models generated from live shrub spectra (R2 = 0.41–0.63). Inclusion of wavelengths associated with leaf water in the FDR transformations appeared to improve regression results. Findings are encouraging and warrant further exploration into sagebrush reflectance spectra to characterize N concentrations.

  10. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-03-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data from the whole class. This pedagogical method was reported earlier, and the present article offers a few more examples of such "whole class" laboratories.

  11. Code query by example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  12. Teaching Responsibility through Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Toni A.

    2008-01-01

    As Literacy Outreach Coordinator for Opportunity to Read (OTR), the Watsonville (CA) Public Library literacy program, this author has recognized the concept of responsibility through example. Adult learners incorporate concepts easily when these concepts are specifically demonstrated for them by someone similar to them. Sounds simple, but putting…

  13. A Unifying Probability Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an example from probability and statistics that ties together several topics including the mean and variance of a discrete random variable, the binomial distribution and its particular mean and variance, the sum of independent random variables, the mean and variance of the sum, and the central limit theorem. Uses Excel to illustrate these…

  14. Data mining in big data sets of spectroscopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, A.-Li

    2015-08-01

    More and more spectroscopic surveys provide many big datasets, in which various rare objects could be found. In this presentation, we suggested two different data mining approaches based on spectral feature by detection and machine learning way respectively. The most difficult thing of data mining is try to understand the result, and most of found outliers were finally identified as bad data. Candidates need follow up observations or multi waveband data to be confirmed. Some successful examples of newly discovered rare objects in SDSS and LAMOST data release are presented in this talk.

  15. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, R. J.; Hounsell, R. A.; Downing, S.; Pan, Y.-C.; Scolnic, D.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph (wavelength range 3100 - 7100) on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope.

  16. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  17. Spectroscopic properties of chlorophyll f.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Zheng-Li; Chen, Min

    2013-09-26

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll f (newly discovered in 2010) have been measured in acetone and methanol at different temperatures. The spectral analysis and assignment are compared with the spectra of chlorophyll a and d under the same experimental conditions. The spectroscopic properties of these chlorophylls have further been studied by the aid of density functional CAM-B3LYP and high-level symmetric adapted coupled-cluster configuration interaction calculations. The main Q and Soret bands and possible sidebands of chlorophylls have been determined. The photophysical properties of chlorophyll f are discussed.

  18. Mobile Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Archaeometry Research.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Donais, Mary Kate

    2016-01-01

    Mobile instrumentation is of growing importance to archaeometry research. Equipment is utilized in the field or at museums, thus avoiding transportation or risk of damage to valuable artifacts. Many spectroscopic techniques are nondestructive and micro-destructive in nature, which preserves the cultural heritage objects themselves. This review includes over 160 references pertaining to the use of mobile spectroscopy for archaeometry. Following a discussion of terminology related to mobile instrumental methods, results of a literature survey on their applications for cultural heritage objects is presented. Sections devoted to specific techniques are then provided: Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and less frequently used techniques. The review closes with a discussion of combined instrumental approaches.

  19. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  20. Transient full-field vibration measurement using spectroscopical stereo photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kaiduan; Li, Zhongke; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Shan

    2010-12-20

    Contrasted with other vibration measurement methods, a novel spectroscopical photogrammetric approach is proposed. Two colored light filters and a CCD color camera are used to achieve the function of two traditional cameras. Then a new calibration method is presented. It focuses on the vibrating object rather than the camera and has the advantage of more accuracy than traditional camera calibration. The test results have shown an accuracy of 0.02 mm.

  1. Systematic reviews. Some examples.

    PubMed Central

    Knipschild, P.

    1994-01-01

    Reviewing the literature is a scientific inquiry that needs a clear design to preclude bias. It is a real enterprise if one aims at completeness of the literature on a certain subject. Going through refereed English language journals is not enough. On line databases are helpful, but mainly as a starting point. This article gives examples of systematic reviews on vitamin C and the common cold, pyridoxine against the premenstrual syndrome, homeopathy, and physiotherapy. Images p720-a PMID:7950526

  2. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  3. Spectroscopic insight for tablet compression.

    PubMed

    Lakio, S; Ylinärä, H; Antikainen, O; Räikkönen, H; Yliruusi, J

    2015-02-01

    Tablet compression process has been studied over the years from various perspectives. However what exactly happens to material during compression is still unknown. In this study a novel compression die which enables real-time spectroscopic measurements during the compression of material is represented. Both near infrared and Raman spectroscope probes can be attached to the die. In this study the usage of the die is demonstrated by using Raman spectroscopy. Eicosane, d-glucose anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and xylitol were used in the study because their compression behavior and bonding properties during compression were assumed to be different. The intensity of the Raman signal changed during compression with all of the materials. However, the intensity changes were different within the materials. The biggest differences were within the xylitol spectra. It was noticed that some peaks disappeared with higher compression pressures indicating that the pressure affected variously on different bonds in xylitol structure. These reversible changes were supposed to relate the changes in conformation and crystal structure. As a conclusion, the die was found to be a significant addition for studying compression process in real-time. It can help to reveal Process induced transformations (PITs) occurring during powder compaction.

  4. Ultraminiature one-shot Fourier-spectroscopic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shun; Qi, Wei; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nogo, Kosuke; Hosono, Satsuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    We propose one-shot Fourier-spectroscopic tomography as a method of ultraminiature spectroscopic imaging. The apparatus used in this technique consists solely of a glass slab with a portion of its surface polished at a certain inclination angle-a device we term a relative-inclination phase shifter-simply mounted on an infinite-distance-corrected optical imaging system. For this reason, the system may be ultraminiaturized to sizes on the order of a few tens of millimeters. Moreover, because our technique uses a near-common-path wavefront-division phase-shift interferometer and has absolutely no need for a mechanical drive unit, it is highly robust against mechanical vibrations. In addition, because the proposed technique uses Fourier-transform spectroscopy, it offers highly efficient light utilization and an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio compared to devices that incorporate distributed or hyperspectral acousto-optical tunable filters. The interferogram, which is a pattern formed by interference of waves at all wavelengths, reflects the spatial variation in the intensity of the interference depending on the magnitude of the phase shift. We first discuss the design of the phase shifter and the results of tests to validate the principles underlying one-shot Fourier-spectroscopic tomography. We then report the results of one-dimensional spectroscopic imaging using this technique.

  5. Effects of Worked Examples, Example-Problem, and Problem-Example Pairs on Novices' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gog, Tamara; Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that instruction that relies more heavily on example study is more effective for novices' learning than instruction consisting of problem solving. However, "a heavier reliance on example study" has been implemented in different ways. For example, worked examples only (WE), example-problem pairs (WE-PS), or problem-example…

  6. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cheu, Elliott; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Alex; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Menard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rhodes, Jason; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-03-15

    in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the moments themselves small. Calibration may be done with the same spectroscopic dataset used for training if that dataset is extremely high in redshift completeness (i.e., no populations of galaxies to be used in analyses are systematically missed). Accurate photo-z calibration is necessary for all imaging experiments; Requirements: If extremely low levels of systematic incompleteness (<~0.1%) are attained in training samples, the same datasets described above should be sufficient for calibration. However, existing deep spectroscopic surveys have failed to yield secure redshifts for 30–60% of targets, so that would require very large improvements over past experience. This incompleteness would be a limiting factor for training, but catastrophic for calibration. If <~0.1% incompleteness is not attainable, the best known option for calibration of photometric redshifts is to utilize cross-correlation statistics in some form. The most direct method for this uses cross-correlations between positions on the sky of bright objects of known spectroscopic redshift with the sample of objects that we wish to calibrate the redshift distribution for, measured as a function of spectroscopic z. For such a calibration, redshifts of ~100,000 objects over at least several hundred square degrees, spanning the full redshift range of the samples used for dark energy, would be necessary; and Options: The proposed BAO experiment eBOSS would provide sufficient spectroscopy for basic calibrations, particularly for ongoing and near-future imaging experiments. The planned DESI experiment would provide excellent calibration with redundant cross-checks, but will start after the conclusion of some imaging projects. An extension of DESI to the Southern hemisphere would provide the best possible calibration from cross-correlation methods for DES and LSST. We thus anticipate that our two primary needs for spectroscopy

  7. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-15

    uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the moments themselves small. Calibration may be done with the same spectroscopic dataset used for training if that dataset is extremely high in redshift completeness (i.e., no populations of galaxies to be used in analyses are systematically missed). Accurate photo-z calibration is necessary for all imaging experiments; Requirements: If extremely low levels of systematic incompleteness (<~0.1%) are attained in training samples, the same datasets described above should be sufficient for calibration. However, existing deep spectroscopic surveys have failed to yield secure redshifts for 30–60% of targets, so that would require very large improvements over past experience. This incompleteness would be a limiting factor for training, but catastrophic for calibration. If <~0.1% incompleteness is not attainable, the best known option for calibration of photometric redshifts is to utilize cross-correlation statistics in some form. The most direct method for this uses cross-correlations between positions on the sky of bright objects of known spectroscopic redshift with the sample of objects that we wish to calibrate the redshift distribution for, measured as a function of spectroscopic z. For such a calibration, redshifts of ~100,000 objects over at least several hundred square degrees, spanning the full redshift range of the samples used for dark energy, would be necessary; and Options: The proposed BAO experiment eBOSS would provide sufficient spectroscopy for basic calibrations, particularly for ongoing and near-future imaging experiments. The planned DESI experiment would provide excellent calibration with redundant cross-checks, but will start after the conclusion of some imaging projects. An extension of DESI to the Southern hemisphere would provide the best possible calibration from cross-correlation methods for DES and LSST. We thus anticipate that our two primary needs for spectroscopy

  8. FLAPS (Fatigue Life Analysis Programs): Computer Programs to Predict Cyclic Life Using the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning and Other Life Prediction Methods. Users' Manual and Example Problems, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This manual presents computer programs FLAPS for characterizing and predicting fatigue and creep-fatigue resistance of metallic materials in the high-temperature, long-life regime for isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue. The programs use the Total Strain version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP), and several other life prediction methods described in this manual. The user should be thoroughly familiar with the TS-SRP and these life prediction methods before attempting to use any of these programs. Improper understanding can lead to incorrect use of the method and erroneous life predictions. An extensive database has also been developed in a parallel effort. The database is probably the largest source of high-temperature, creep-fatigue test data available in the public domain and can be used with other life-prediction methods as well. This users' manual, software, and database are all in the public domain and can be obtained by contacting the author. The Compact Disk (CD) accompanying this manual contains an executable file for the FLAPS program, two datasets required for the example problems in the manual, and the creep-fatigue data in a format compatible with these programs.

  9. Working towards accreditation by the International Standards Organization 15189 Standard: how to validate an in-house developed method an example of lead determination in whole blood by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garcia Hejl, Carine; Ramirez, Jose Manuel; Vest, Philippe; Chianea, Denis; Renard, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories working towards accreditation by the International Standards Organization (ISO) 15189 standard are required to demonstrate the validity of their analytical methods. The different guidelines set by various accreditation organizations make it difficult to provide objective evidence that an in-house method is fit for the intended purpose. Besides, the required performance characteristics tests and acceptance criteria are not always detailed. The laboratory must choose the most suitable validation protocol and set the acceptance criteria. Therefore, we propose a validation protocol to evaluate the performance of an in-house method. As an example, we validated the process for the detection and quantification of lead in whole blood by electrothermal absorption spectrometry. The fundamental parameters tested were, selectivity, calibration model, precision, accuracy (and uncertainty of measurement), contamination, stability of the sample, reference interval, and analytical interference. We have developed a protocol that has been applied successfully to quantify lead in whole blood by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In particular, our method is selective, linear, accurate, and precise, making it suitable for use in routine diagnostics.

  10. Atmospheric and Spectroscopic Research in the Far Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Kwangjai

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic measurements of molecular parameters constitute one of the major areas of our research program. This part of our program has been conducted in close collaboration with Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The references on HO2, OH, and O2 that appear on the publication list are examples of this type of work completed during the grant period. These pressure-broadening studies have provided the kind of improvements needed in the database for retrieving atmospheric profiles from far infrared limb sensing data. One example of this linkage between the pressure broadening studies and the improvements in data retrieval is described in the paper on HBr (paper #4, publication list). The retrieval of the concentration profile of this important species from the IBEX data was facilitated by a number of performance improvement factors, not the least of which was the database improvements.

  11. Procedure and Program Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Here some modules, procedures and whole programs are described, that may be useful to the reader, as they have been, to the author. They are all in Fortran 90/95 and start with a generally useful module, that will be used in most procedures and programs in the examples, and another module useful for programs using a Rosenbrock variant. The source texts (except for the two modules) are not reproduced here, but can be downloaded from the web site www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=issue &issn=1616-6361&volume=666 (the two lines form one contiguous URL!).

  12. Germanium monochloride (GeCl). Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Dai-Wei; Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-10-01

    The electronic states, potential energy curves and spectroscopic properties of the GeCl radical were calculated by means of the relativistic ab initio complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods which included up to a million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants are in good agreement with the experiment for the observed states. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of several other electronic states are computed which are yet to be observed. We also show that a previous rotational analysis of the B—X system is incorrect.

  13. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    registered for on line use of GEISA. Refs: 1. Jacquinet-Husson N., N.A. Scott, A. Chédin,L. Crépeau, R. Armante, V. Capelle, J. Orphal, A. Coustenis, C. Boonne, N. Poulet-Crovisier, et al. THE GEISA SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE: Current and future archive for Earth and planetary atmosphere studies. JQSRT, 109, 1043-1059, 2008 2. Jacquinet-Husson N., N.A. Scott, A. Chédin, K. Garceran, R. Armante, et al. The 2003 edition of the GEISA/IASI spectroscopic database. JQSRT, 95, 429-67, 2005. 3. Scott, N.A. and A. Chedin, 1981: A fast line-by-line method for atmospheric absorption computations: The Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas. J. Appl. Meteor., 20,556-564.

  14. Spectroscopic problems in ITER diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsa, V. S.; Bureyeva, L. A.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kadomtsev, M. B.; Krupin, V. A.; Levashova, M. G.; Medvedev, A. A.; Mukhin, E. E.; Shurygin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Vukolov, K. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Problems of spectroscopic diagnostics of ITER plasma are under consideration. Three types of diagnostics are presented: 1) Balmer lines spectroscopy in the edge and divertor plasmas; 2) Thomson scattering, 3) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The Zeeman-Stark structure of line shapes is discussed. The overlapping of isotopes H-D-T spectral line shapes are presented for the SOL and divertor conditions. The polarization measurements of H-alpha spectral lines for H-D mixture on T-10 tokamak are shown in order to separate Zeeman splitting in more details. The problem of plasma background radiation emission for Thomson scattering in ITER is discussed in details. The line shape of P-7 hydrogen spectral line having a wave length close to laser one is presented together with continuum radiation. The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) is discussed in details. The data on Dα, HeII and CVI measurements in CXRS experiments on T-10 tokamak are presented.

  15. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, Molly S.; Tumlinson, Jason; Fox, Andrew; Aloisi, Alessandra; Ayres, Thomas R.; Danforth, Charles; Fleming, Scott W.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Keeney, Brian A.; Oliveira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    With no future space ultraviolet instruments currently planned, the data from the UV spectrographs aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have a legacy value beyond their initial science goals. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive will provide to the community new science-grade combined spectra for all publicly available data obtained by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). These data will be packaged into "smart archives" according to target type and scientific themes to facilitate the construction of archival samples for common science uses. A new "quick look" capability will make the data easy for users to quickly access, assess the quality of, and download for archival science starting in Cycle 24, with the first generation of these products for the FUV modes of COS available online via MAST in early 2016.

  16. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect

    McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Eremenko, V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Lui, Y. W.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-04-17

    The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  17. Transition moment directions and selected spectroscopic properties of Ivabradine.

    PubMed

    Synak, A; Pikul, P; Bojarski, P; Nowakowska, J; Wiczk, W; Łukaszewicz, A; Kubicki, A A

    2013-01-15

    Based on the Kawski-Gryczynski method the value of angle β=38° between absorption and fluorescence transition moments of Ivabradine was determined. Such a high value of β is responsible for low emission anisotropy of Ivabradine in a rigid polyvinyl alcohol matrix and in anhydrous glycerol despite the elongated shape of the fluorophore. Selected steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic results support the analysis.

  18. Transition moment directions and selected spectroscopic properties of Ivabradine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synak, A.; Pikul, P.; Bojarski, P.; Nowakowska, J.; Wiczk, W.; Łukaszewicz, A.; Kubicki, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Kawski-Gryczynski method the value of angle β = 38° between absorption and fluorescence transition moments of Ivabradine was determined. Such a high value of β is responsible for low emission anisotropy of Ivabradine in a rigid polyvinyl alcohol matrix and in anhydrous glycerol despite the elongated shape of the fluorophore. Selected steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic results support the analysis.

  19. Interactions of Isophorone Derivatives with DNA: Spectroscopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deiana, Marco; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Massin, Julien; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Andraud, Chantal; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of three new isophorone derivatives, Isoa Isob and Isoc with salmon testes DNA have been investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. All the studied compounds interact with DNA through intercalative binding mode. The stoichiometry of the isophorone/DNA adducts was found to be 1:1. The fluorescence quenching data revealed a binding interaction with the base pairs of DNA. The CD data indicate that all the investigated isophorones induce DNA modifications. PMID:26069963

  20. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere . The impact on stellar and planetary mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Mortier, A.; Tsantaki, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Neves, V.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods: To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results: We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. Conclusions: We conclude that the stellar mass estimations for giant stars should be managed with extreme caution when using them to compute the planetary masses. We report examples within this sample where the differences in planetary mass can be as high as 100% in the most extreme cases. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées and the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France (Run ID L131N11 - OPTICON_2013A_027).

  1. Spectroscopic Survey Of Delta Scuti Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman Alicavus, Filiz; Niemczura, Ewa; Polinska, Magdalena; Helminiak, Krzysztof G.; Lampens, Patricia; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Ukita, Nobuharu; Kambe, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic study of pulsating stars of Delta Scuti type. The spectral types and luminosity classes, fundamental atmospheric parameters (the effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity), detailed chemical composition and projected rotational velocities of a significant number of Delta Scuti-type stars were derived. The spectral classification was performed by comparing the spectra of our targets with the spectra of standard stars. The atmospheric parameters were determined by using different methods. The initial atmospheric parameters were derived from the analysis of photometric indices, the spectral energy distribution and the hydrogen lines, while the final atmospheric parameters were obtained from the analysis of iron lines. The spectrum synthesis method was used to determine chemical compositions of the investigated stars. As a result, we derived accurate atmospheric parameters, the projected rotational velocities and the abundance patterns of analysed sample. These results allow us to examine the position of Delta Scuti-type stars in the H-R diagram, and to investigate the effect of the rotational velocity on pulsation properties and a chemical difference between the Delta Scuti-type stars and the Gamma Doradus and A-F type hybrid stars.

  2. Spectroscopic Constants and Potential Energy Curves of PbI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavidesgarcia, M.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-10-01

    The spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the PbI diatomic were computed using complete active space SCF (CASSCF) followed by first-order CI (FOCI) and second-order CI (SOCI) calculations which included 607 000 configurations. Spin-orbit coupling was studied using the relativistic CI (RCI) method. The spectroscopic properties of the 2Π1/2 state are Re = 2.885 Å, ωe, = 153 cm-1, and De = 2.54(eV), while for the 2Π3/2 state the corresponding values are Re = 2.859 Å, ωe = 162 cm-1, and Te = 8255 cm-1. Our computed constants are in good agreement with experiment for the observed states. We also computed the properties and curves for several excited states which are yet to be observed.

  3. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, A; McCall, S K

    2011-10-24

    The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and distinguished from other chemical species that may be simultaneously present, is particularly challenging. Aside from the laboratory-based method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), where samples may be collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or cryofocusing, the other major approaches for gas-phase detection employ lasers typically operating in the mid-infrared wavelength region. While mass spectrometry can readily detect noble gases - the helium leak detector is an obvious example - laser-based methods such as infrared (IR) or Raman spectroscopy are completely insensitive to them as their monatomic nature precludes a non-zero dipole moment or changes in polarizability upon excitation. Therefore, noble gases can only be detected by one of two methods: (1) atomic emission spectroscopies which require the generation of plasmas through laser-induced breakdown, electrical arcing, or similar means; (2) non-spectroscopic methods which measure one or more physical properties (e.g., mass, thermal conductivity, density). In this report, we present our progress during Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) in the research and development of a non-spectroscopic method for noble gas detection. During Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), we demonstrated via proof-of-concept experiments that the combination of thermal conductivity detection (TCD) and coating-free damped resonance detection (CFDRD) using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could provide selective sensing of these inert species. Since the MEMS-based TCD technology was directly adapted from a brassboard prototype commissioned by a previous chemical sensing project, FY11 efforts focused on advancing the state of the newer CFDRD method. This work, guided by observations previously reported in the open literature, has not only

  4. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). III. 142 Additional O-type Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sota, A.; Arias, J. I.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; Leão, J. R. S.; Herrero, A.; Gamen, R. C.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    This is the third installment of the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS), a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ˜ 2500 digital observations selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog. In this paper, we present 142 additional stellar systems with O stars from both hemispheres, bringing the total of O-type systems published within the project to 590. Among the new objects, there are 20 new O stars. We also identify 11 new double-lined spectroscopic binaries, 6 of which are of O+O type and 5 of O+B type, and an additional new tripled-lined spectroscopic binary of O+O+B type. We also revise some of the previous GOSSS classifications, present some egregious examples of stars erroneously classified as O-type in the past, introduce the use of luminosity class IV at spectral types O4-O5.5, and adapt the classification scheme to the work of Arias et al. The GOSSS spectroscopic data in this article were gathered with five facilities: the 1.5 m Telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO), the 3.5 m Telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA), and the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM).

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of III-V semiconductor nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, Shanna Marie

    through a novel spectroscopic technique first formulated for the rather different purpose of dispersion engineering for slow-light schemes. The frequency-resolved technique combined with the unusual (110) quantum wells in a furthermore atypical waveguide experimental geometry has revealed fascinating behavior of electron spin splitting which points to the possibility of optically orienting electron spins with linearly polarized light---an experimental result supporting a theoretical description of the phenomenon itself only a few years old. Lastly, to explore a space of further-restricted dimensionality, the final chapters describe InP semiconductor nanowires with dimensions small enough to be considered truly one-dimensional. Like the bulk GaAs of the first few chapters, the InP nanowires here crystallize in a wurtzite structure. In the InP nanowire case, though, the experimental techniques explored for characterization are temperature-dependent time-integrated photoluminescence at the single-wire level (including samples with InAsP insertions) and time-resolved photoluminescence at the ensemble level. The carrier dynamics revealed through these time-resolved studies are the first of their kind for wurtzite InP nanowires. The chapters are thus ordered as a progression from three (bulk), to two (quantum well), to one (nanowire), to zero dimensions (axially-structured nanowire), with the uniting theme the emphasis on connecting the semiconductor nanomaterials' crystallinity to its exhibited properties by relevant experimental spectroscopic techniques, whether these are standard methods or effectively invented for the case at hand.

  6. MDM OSMOS Spectroscopic classification of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhash; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Klusmeyer, J.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Shappee, B.; Shields, J.; Brown, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates 2016hgd (ATel #9651), 2016hli (ATel #9685), CSS161013:015319+171853 and CSS161013:020130+141534 (http://nesssi.cacr.caltech.edu/catalina/AllSN.html).

  7. CSP Spectroscopic Classification of LSQ16oi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, N.; Phillips, M.; Lira, P.; Ellman, N.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rostami, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of a La Silla-QUEST (LSQ) supernova (Baltay et al. 2013, PASP, 125, 683) taken using WFCCD on the 2.5-m du Pont Telescope as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP).

  8. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounsell, R. A.; Miller, J. A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR 4-m telescope. Targets were supplied by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST).

  9. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2017awk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner; Pastorello, P.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G

    2017-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-17co The target was supplied by All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN).

  10. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2017mf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Pastorello, P.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of SN2017mf. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.22-m Galileo Telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph).

  11. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  12. Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 108 Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data (Web, free access)   This handbook provides a selection of the most important and frequently used atomic spectroscopic data. The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). The wavelengths, intensities, and spectrum assignments are given for each element, and the data for the approximately 12,000 lines of all elements are also collected into a single table.

  13. An overview of methods for monitoring social disparities in cancer with an example using trends in lung cancer incidence by area-socioeconomic position and race-ethnicity, 1992-2004.

    PubMed

    Harper, Sam; Lynch, John; Meersman, Stephen C; Breen, Nancy; Davis, William W; Reichman, Marsha E

    2008-04-15

    The authors provide an overview of methods for summarizing social disparities in health using the example of lung cancer. They apply four measures of relative disparity and three measures of absolute disparity to trends in US lung cancer incidence by area-socioeconomic position and race-ethnicity from 1992 to 2004. Among females, measures of absolute and relative disparity suggested that area-socioeconomic and race-ethnic disparities increased over these 12 years but differed widely with respect to the magnitude of the change. Among males, the authors found substantial disagreement among summary measures of relative disparity with respect to the magnitude and the direction of change in disparities. Among area-socioeconomic groups, the index of disparity increased by 47% and the relative concentration index decreased by 116%, while for race-ethnicity the index of disparity increased by 36% and the Theil index increased by 13%. The choice of a summary measure of disparity may affect the interpretation of changes in health disparities. Important issues to consider are the reference point from which differences are measured, whether to measure disparity on the absolute or relative scale, and whether to weight disparity measures by population size. A suite of indicators is needed to provide a clear picture of health disparity change.

  14. Learning by Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    A dialog shows how student-teacher interaction on problems can help students learn. Fifty sample problems are provided as starting points for class discussions from grade three through college. Six purposes such problems can serve are identified. A method of classroom presentation, the mathematical scavenger hunt, is discussed. (MP)

  15. Improved Reconstruction for MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maudsley, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity limitations of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) require that the extent of spatial-frequency (k-space) sampling be limited, thereby reducing spatial resolution and increasing the effects of Gibbs ringing that is associated with the use of Fourier transform reconstruction. Additional problems occur in the spectral dimension, where quantitation of individual spectral components is made more difficult by the typically low signal-to-noise ratios, variable lineshapes, and baseline distortions, particularly in areas of significant magnetic field inhomogeneity. Given the potential of in vivo MRSI measurements for a number of clinical and biomedical research applications, there is considerable interest in improving the quality of the metabolite image reconstructions. In this report, a reconstruction method is described that makes use of parametric modeling and MRI-derived tissue distribution functions to enhance the MRSI spatial reconstruction. Additional preprocessing steps are also proposed to avoid difficulties associated with image regions containing spectra of inadequate quality, which are commonly present in the in vivo MRSI data. PMID:17518063

  16. Integrated Capture and Spectroscopic Detection of Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Crystal A.; Wilhelm, Allison A.; Williams, Jeremy; Lucas, Pierre; Reynolds, Kelly A.; Riley, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an online monitoring scheme for detection of viruses in flowing drinking water. The approach applies an electrodeposition process that is similar to the use of charged membrane filters previously employed for collection of viruses from aqueous samples. In the present approach, charged materials are driven onto a robust optical sensing element which has high transparency to infrared light. A spectroscopic measurement is performed using the evanescent wave that penetrates no more than 1 μm from the surface of an infrared optical element in an attenuated total reflectance measurement scheme. The infrared measurement provides quantitative information on the amount and identity of material deposited from the water. Initial studies of this sensing scheme used proteins reversibly electrodeposited onto germanium chips. The results of those studies were applied to design a method for collection of viruses onto an attenuated total reflectance crystal. Spectral signatures can be discriminated between three types of protein and two viruses. There is the potential to remove deposited material by reversing the voltage polarity. This work demonstrates a novel and practical scheme for detection of viruses in water systems with potential application to near-continual, automated monitoring of municipal drinking water. PMID:19700543

  17. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Wilson, Christy; Grant, Gerald; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging holds a pivotal role in medicine due to its ability to provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms at molecular and cellular levels. To this end, various techniques have been developed for molecular imaging, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, fluorescence imaging achieves micrometre-scale resolution, but has low penetration depths and is mostly limited to exogenous agents. Here, we demonstrate molecular imaging of endogenous and exogenous chromophores using a novel form of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Our approach consists of using a wide spectral bandwidth laser source centred in the visible spectrum, thereby allowing facile assessment of haemoglobin oxygen levels, providing contrast from readily available absorbers, and enabling true-colour representation of samples. This approach provides high spectral fidelity while imaging at the micrometre scale in three dimensions. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (METRiCS OCT) has significant implications for many biomedical applications including ophthalmology, early cancer detection, and understanding fundamental disease mechanisms such as hypoxia and angiogenesis.

  18. The power of example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliana Gheorghian, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    beginning of the XXI century" with the participation of several schools in the country in 2009 and 2011. The papers presented were diverse and gave examples of various teaching experiences and scientific information. Topics by the teachers: The impact of tourism on the environment, Tornadoes, Natural science and environmental education in school, Air Pollution and health, Ecological education of children from primary school, The effects of electromagnetic radiation, Formation of an ecological mentality using chemistry, Why should we protect water, Environmental education, Education for the future, SOS Nature, Science in the twenty-first century, etc. Topics by students: Nature- the palace of thermal phenomena, Life depends on heat, Water Mysteries, Global Heating, The Mysterious universe, etc. In March 2013 our school hosted an interesting exchange of ideas on environmental issues between our students and those from Bulgaria, Poland and Turkey, during a symposium of the Comenius multilateral project "Conserving Nature". In order to present the results of protecting nature in their communities, two projects "Citizen" qualified in the Program Civitas in the autumn of 2013. "The Battle" continues both in nature and in classrooms, in order to preserve the environment.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, C. J.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we describe the spectroscopic and infrared properties of a sample of 25 merging galaxy pairs, selected from the catalog of Arp & Madore, and we compare them with those observed in a similar sample of interacting galaxies (Donzelli & Pastoriza). It is noted that mergers as well as interacting systems comprise a wide range of spectral types, going from those corresponding to well-evolved stellar populations (older than 200 Myr) to those that show clear signatures of H II regions with stellar populations younger than 8 Myr. However, merger galaxies show on average more excited spectra than interacting pairs, which could be attributed to lower gas metallicity. From the emission lines we also found that merging systems show on average higher (about a factor of 2) star formation rates than interacting galaxies. Classical diagnostic diagrams show that only three of 50 of the galaxies (6%) present some form of nuclear activity: two Seyfert galaxies and one LINER. However, through a detailed analysis of the pure emission-line spectra, we conclude that this fraction may raise up to 23% of the mergers if we consider that some galaxies host a low-luminosity active nucleus surrounded by strong star-forming regions. This latter assumption is also supported by the infrared colors of the galaxies. Regarding to the total infrared luminosities, the merging galaxies show on average an IR luminosity, log(Lir)=10.7, lower than that of interacting systems, log(Lir)=10.9. We find that only three mergers of the sample (12%) can be classified as luminous infrared galaxies, while this fraction increases to 24% in the interacting sample. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  20. EEL spectroscopic tomography: towards a new dimension in nanomaterials analysis.

    PubMed

    Yedra, Lluís; Eljarrat, Alberto; Arenal, Raúl; Pellicer, Eva; Cabo, Moisés; López-Ortega, Alberto; Estrader, Marta; Sort, Jordi; Baró, Maria Dolors; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca

    2012-11-01

    Electron tomography is a widely spread technique for recovering the three dimensional (3D) shape of nanostructured materials. Using a spectroscopic signal to achieve a reconstruction adds a fourth chemical dimension to the 3D structure. Up to date, energy filtering of the images in the transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) is the usual spectroscopic method even if most of the information in the spectrum is lost. Unlike EFTEM tomography, the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum images (SI) for tomographic reconstruction retains all chemical information, and the possibilities of this new approach still remain to be fully exploited. In this article we prove the feasibility of EEL spectroscopic tomography at low voltages (80 kV) and short acquisition times from data acquired using an aberration corrected instrument and data treatment by Multivariate Analysis (MVA), applied to Fe(x)Co((3-x))O(4)@Co(3)O(4) mesoporous materials. This approach provides a new scope into materials; the recovery of full EELS signal in 3D.

  1. Evaluation of Her2 status using photoacoustic spectroscopic CT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Michael; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of using photacoustic CT spectroscopy(PCT-s) to track a near infrared dye conjugated with trastuzumab in vivo. Materials and Methods: An animal model was developed which contained both high and low Her2 expression tumor xenografts on the same mouse. The tumors were imaged at multiple wavelengths (680- 950nm) in the PCT scanner one day prior to injection of the near infrared conjugated probe. Baseline optical imaging data was acquired and the probe was then injected via the tail vein. Fluorescence data was acquired over the next week, PCT spectroscopic data was also acquired during this timeframe. The mice were sacrificed and tumors were extirpated and sent to pathology for IHC staining to verify Her2 expression levels. The optical fluorescence images were analyzed to determine probe uptake dynamics. Reconstructed PCT spectroscopic data was analyzed using IDL routines to deconvolve the probe signal from endogenous background signals, and to determine oxygen saturation. Results: The location of the NIR conjugate was able to be identified within the tumor utilizing IDL fitting routines, in addition oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentrations were discernible from the spectroscopic data. Conclusion: Photacoustic spectroscopy allows for the determination of in vivo tumor drug delivery at greater depths than can be determined from optical imaging techniques.

  2. HEARTBEAT STARS: SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTIONS FOR SIX ECCENTRIC BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.

    2015-08-01

    We present multi-epoch spectroscopy of “heartbeat stars,” eccentric binaries with dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations originally discovered with the Kepler satellite. Optical spectra of six known heartbeat stars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 m telescope allow measurement of stellar effective temperatures and radial velocities from which we determine orbital parameters including the periods, eccentricities, approximate mass ratios, and component masses. These spectroscopic solutions confirm that the stars are members of eccentric binary systems with eccentricities e > 0.34 and periods P = 7–20 days, strengthening conclusions from prior works that utilized purely photometric methods. Heartbeat stars in this sample have A- or F-type primary components. Constraints on orbital inclinations indicate that four of the six systems have minimum mass ratios q = 0.3–0.5, implying that most secondaries are probable M dwarfs or earlier. One system is an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary with roughly equal-mass mid-A components (q = 0.95), while another shows double-lined behavior only near periastron, indicating that the F0V primary has a G1V secondary (q = 0.65). This work constitutes the first measurements of the masses of secondaries in a statistical sample of heartbeat stars. The good agreement between our spectroscopic orbital elements and those derived using a photometric model support the idea that photometric data are sufficient to derive reliable orbital parameters for heartbeat stars.

  3. QUANTIFYING THE BIASES OF SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    SciTech Connect

    Arneson, Ryan A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S. E-mail: joelbrownstein@astro.utah.edu

    2012-07-01

    Spectroscopic selection has been the most productive technique for the selection of galaxy-scale strong gravitational lens systems with known redshifts. Statistically significant samples of strong lenses provide a powerful method for measuring the mass-density parameters of the lensing population, but results can only be generalized to the parent population if the lensing selection biases are sufficiently understood. We perform controlled Monte Carlo simulations of spectroscopic lens surveys in order to quantify the bias of lenses relative to parent galaxies in velocity dispersion, mass axis ratio, and mass-density profile. For parameters typical of the SLACS and BELLS surveys, we find (1) no significant mass axis ratio detection bias of lenses relative to parent galaxies; (2) a very small detection bias toward shallow mass-density profiles, which is likely negligible compared to other sources of uncertainty in this parameter; (3) a detection bias toward smaller Einstein radius for systems drawn from parent populations with group- and cluster-scale lensing masses; and (4) a lens-modeling bias toward larger velocity dispersions for systems drawn from parent samples with sub-arcsecond mean Einstein radii. This last finding indicates that the incorporation of velocity-dispersion upper limits of non-lenses is an important ingredient for unbiased analyses of spectroscopically selected lens samples. In general, we find that the completeness of spectroscopic lens surveys in the plane of Einstein radius and mass-density profile power-law index is quite uniform, up to a sharp drop in the region of large Einstein radius and steep mass-density profile, and hence that such surveys are ideally suited to the study of massive field galaxies.

  4. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodák, Jiří; Nečas, David; Pavliňák, David; Macak, Jan M.; Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman; Ohlídal, Miloslav

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  5. Spectroscopic studies (FTIR, FT-Raman and UV), potential energy surface scan, normal coordinate analysis and NBO analysis of (2R,3R,4R,5S)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl) piperidine-3,4,5-triol by DFT methods.

    PubMed

    Isac Paulraj, E; Muthu, S

    2013-05-01

    This work presents the characterization of (2R,3R,4R,5S)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)piperidine-3,4,5-triol (abbreviated as HEHMPT) by quantum chemical calculations and spectral techniques. The spectroscopic properties were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis techniques. The FT-IR spectrum (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman spectrum (4000-100 cm(-1)) in solid phase was recorded for HEHMPT. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the HEHMPT that dissolved in water was recorded in the range of 100-400 nm. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule were obtained from B3LYP and M06-2X with 6-31G(d,p) basis set calculations. The theoretical wavenumbers were scaled and compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the normal co-ordinate analysis (NCA), experimental results and potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method, interpreted in terms of fundamental modes. The stable geometry of the compound has been determined from the potential energy surface scan. The stability of molecule has been analyzed by NBO analysis. The molecule orbital contributions were studied by using the total (TDOS), partial (PDOS), and overlap population (OPDOS) density of states. The electronic properties like UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO energies were reported. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies shows that charge transfer interactions taking place within the molecule. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated.

  6. CADDIS Volume 3. Examples and Applications: Analytical Examples

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Examples illustrating the use of statistical analysis to support different types of evidence, stream temperature, temperature inferred from macroinverterbate, macroinvertebrate responses, zinc concentrations, observed trait characteristics.

  7. Fast frequency-sweep spectroscopic imaging with an ultra-low flip angle

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junyu; Patay, Zoltan; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging has become an important tool in clinical settings for noninvasively obtaining spatial and metabolic information on a molecular scale. Conventional spectroscopic imaging is acquired in the time domain, and its clinical application is limited by the long acquisition time, restricted spatial coverage, and complex suppression and reconstruction procedures. We introduce a fast MR spectroscopic imaging technique in the frequency domain, termed phase-cycled spectroscopic imaging (PCSI). PCSI uses a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence with an ultra-low flip angle to achieve very high acquisition efficiency with a short repetition time. This approach enables faster frequency sweeping by changing the cycled RF phase and using flexible non-uniform sampling, and it greatly reduces the RF energy deposition in tissue. With its intrinsic water and fat suppression, PCSI more closely resembles routine clinical scans because it eliminates the suppression steps. We demonstrate that it is feasible to acquire PCSI spectra in a phantom and in humans and that PCSI provides an efficient spectroscopic imaging method, even for J-coupled metabolites. PCSI may enable spectroscopic imaging to play a larger role in the clinical assessment of the spatial tissue distribution of metabolites. PMID:27440077

  8. A Qualitative Research on Example Generation Capabilities of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Yasemin; Dost, Senol

    2016-01-01

    Examples which are used in exploring a procedure or comprehending/concretizing a mathematical concept are powerful teaching tools. Generating examples other than conventional ones is both a means for research and a pedagogical method. The aim of this study is to determine the transition process between example generation strategies, and the…

  9. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  10. sick: The Spectroscopic Inference Crank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-03-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  11. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  12. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  13. Comprehensive spectroscopic probing the interaction and conformation impairment of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by herbicide butachlor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Ling, Zhaoxing; Zhou, Xing; Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Butachlor is an effective herbicide to deal with undesired weeds selectively and is used at high levels in Asian countries. However, its interaction and impairment effect on BSA was still not clear. In this study, we investigated the interaction between butachlor and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by multi-spectroscopic methods including UV absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and fluorescence spectra under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The results revealed that there was a static quenching of BSA induced by butachlor stemmed from the formation of complex. Based on thermodynamic data, the interaction of butachlor with BSA was due to happen, and van der Waals force as well as hydrogen bond were the major forces contributed to the interaction. The binding constant Kb and number of binding site of butachlor with BSA were 5.158×10(5) and 1.372 at 303K, respectively. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (butachlor) was 0.113nm, obtained according to the Förster theory. The results revealed that butachlor induced conformational changes in BSA but the secondary structure of BSA was still retained. In addition, the microenvironment around chromophore residues of BSA, for example, tryptophan, changed as well, resulting from the formation of more hydrogen bonds.

  14. Computer Software Cataloging: Techniques and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberlein, Deanne

    1986-01-01

    Examples of catalog entries for microcomputer software data files are given in three sections: educational software (elementary and secondary level, college level); educational game software; business-related software. Catalog record elements, simplification methods for cataloging of machine-readable data files, and future considerations are…

  15. Regression Analysis by Example. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samprit; Hadi, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. "Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition" has been expanded and thoroughly…

  16. Constructing Programs from Example Computations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierman, A. W.; Krishnaswamy, R.

    This paper describes the construction and implementation of an autoprogramming system. An autoprogrammer is an interactive computer programming system which automatically constructs computer programs from example computations executed by the user. The example calculations are done in a scratch pad fashion at a computer display, and the system…

  17. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  18. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Usami, M; Iwamoto, T; Fukasawa, R; Tani, M; Watanabe, M; Sakai, K

    2002-11-07

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated.

  19. Selecting Variables for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganson, Eric; TDSS; SDSS; Pan-STARRS1

    2014-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey is an eBOSS subprogram that will obtain spectroscopy for 400,000 objects that vary more than 0.1 magnitudes. 100,000 of these objects will be unique to TDSS and 300,000 will be shared with other subprograms. We use a combination of Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS photometry to select a sample of variables that is 95% pure and 60% complete. This sample is obtained with three dimension Kernel Density Analysis. Our data and method are particularly effective at selecting long term variables, and more than 300,000 of our variables will be quasars.

  20. Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectroscopy was used on acetylene and on formyl radical. An attempt was made for pattern recognition based on statistics; a method was invented that combined CNPI (complete nuclear permutation-inversion) group theory and SCC (spectral cross-correlation). But the direction away from statistical pattern recognition back to traditional spectroscopic pattern recognition was taken. Vibrational states and quantum numbers are discussed. For the formyl radical, the fluorescence excitation spectrum was recorded and a rotational analysis of the 0(sup 0)(sub 0) band performed.