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Sample records for spectroscopic phase microscopy

  1. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  2. Structural studies on Si:H network before and after solid phase crystallization using spectroscopic ellipsometry: Correlation with Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Romyani; Ray, Swati

    2013-10-01

    The structure of hydrogenated silicon films (Si:H) before and after solid phase crystallization (SPC) has been investigated by detailed study of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The Si:H films have been deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) system varying deposition power density from 0.03 W/cm2 to 0.46 W/cm2, just below the onset of amorphous to nano-crystalline transition region. Solid phase crystallization of the Si:H network has been done by thermal annealing of the films in a vacuum furnace. Different bulk compositions of the as deposited Si:H network and annealed (polycrystalline) films have been calculated from the fitted parameters obtained from the simulation of the ellipsometry data by Bruggeman effective medium approximation (BEMA) method. More compact and void free structure in the bulk layer of the as deposited films has been observed at low power deposition region. Whereas void fraction in the bulk and surface roughness layer has increased with increase of deposition power density. For the annealed films higher crystallinity at the bulk layer with fewer voids has been observed at the low power region but in the surface roughness layer void fraction dominates in all the low and high power deposited films. The results obtained from the spectroscopic ellipsometry study have been correlated with Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy for both the as deposited and annealed films.

  3. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  4. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F

    2016-07-25

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm-a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  5. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm—a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra. PMID:27452975

  6. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy methods for spectroscopic imaging of subsurface interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method for spatially-resolved, spectroscopic investigation of subsurface interface structure has been developed. The method, Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM), is based on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) techniques. BEEM combines STM vacuum tunneling with unique ballistic electron spectroscopy capabilities. BEEM enables, for the first time, direct imaging of subsurface interface electronic properties with nanometer spatial resolution. STM topographic images of surface structure and BEEM images of subsurface properties are obtained simultaneously. BEEM capabilities are demonstrated by investigation of important metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  7. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of skin intrinsic signals for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Strupler, Mathias; Boulesteix, Thierry; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2006-02-01

    We recorded multiphoton images of human skin biopsies using endogenous sources of nonlinear optical signals. We detected simultaneously two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) from intrinsic fluorophores and second harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. We observed SHG from fibrillar collagens in the dermis, whereas no SHG was detectable from the non fibrillar type IV collagen in the basal laminae. We compared these distinct behaviours of collagens I and IV in SHG microscopy to polarization-resolved surface SHG experiments on thin films of collagens I and IV molecules. We observed similar signals for both types of molecular films, except for the chiroptical contributions which are present only for collagen I and enhance the signal typically by a factor of 2. We concluded that SHG microscopy is a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in biological tissues. In order to elucidate the origin of the endogenous fluorescence signals, we recorded 2PEF spectra at various positions in the skin biopsies, and compared these data to in vitro spectroscopic analysis. In particular, we studied the keratin fluorescence and determined its 2PEF action cross section. We observed a good agreement between 2PEF spectra recorded in the keratinized upper layers of the epidermis and in a solution of purified keratin. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of this technique, we recorded 2PEF/SHG images of skin biopsies obtained from patients of various ages.

  9. Phase imaging with intermodulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Hutter, Carsten; von Bieren, Arndt C; Haviland, David B

    2010-05-01

    Intermodulation atomic force microscopy (IMAFM) is a dynamic mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with two-tone excitation. The oscillating AFM cantilever in close proximity to a surface experiences the nonlinear tip-sample force which mixes the drive tones and generates new frequency components in the cantilever response known as intermodulation products (IMPs). We present a procedure for extracting the phase at each IMP and demonstrate phase images made by recording this phase while scanning. Amplitude and phase images at intermodulation frequencies exhibit enhanced topographic and material contrast.

  10. Interferometric phase microscopy of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Tang, Xian; Wang, Yin; Wang, Shouyu

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative phase imaging of cells with high accuracy in a completely noninvasive manner is a challenging task. To provide a proper solution to this important need, interferometric phase microscopy is described which relies on the off-axis interferometry, confocal microscopy and high-speed image capture technology. Phase retrieval from the single interferogram is done by algorithms based on the fast Fourier transform, traditional Hilbert transform and two-step Hilbert transform, respectively. Furthermore, a phase aberrations compensation approach is applied to correct the phase distribution of the red blood cells obtained via the three methods mentioned before without the pre-known knowledge for removing the wave front curvature introduced by the microscope objectives, off-axis imaging, etc., which otherwise hinders the phase reconstruction. The improved results reveal the better inner structures of the red blood cells. The development of quantitative phase imaging technique is shedding light on their future directions and applications for basic and clinical research.

  11. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π.

  12. Photorefractive phase-conjugation digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ching; Chan, Huang-Tian; Shiu, Min-Tzung; Chew, Yang-Kun

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative method for digital holographic microscopy named as photorefractive phaseconjugation digital holographic microscopy (PPCDHM) technique based on the phase conjugation dynamic holographic process in photorefractive BaTiO3 crystal and the retrieval of phase and amplitude of the object wave were performed by a reflection-type digital holographic method. Both amplitude and phase reconstruction benefit from the prior amplification by self-pumped conjugation (SPPC) as they have an increased SNR. The interest of the PPCDHM is great, because its hologram is created by interfered the amplified phase-conjugate wave field generated from a photorefractive phase conjugator (PPC) correcting the phase aberration of the imaging system and the reference wave onto the digital CCD camera. Therefore, a precise three-dimensional description of the object with high SNR can be obtained digitally with only one hologram acquisition. The method requires the acquisition of a single hologram from which the phase distribution can be obtained simultaneously with distribution of intensity at the surface of the object.

  13. Video-rate tomographic phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Holbrow, Charles J.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic phase microscopy measures the 3-D refractive index distribution of cells and tissues by combining the information from a series of angle-dependent interferometric phase images. In the original device, the frame rate was limited to 0.1 frames per second (fps) by the technique used to acquire phase images, preventing measurements of moving or rapidly changing samples. We describe an improved tomographic phase microscope in which phase images are acquired via a spatial fringe pattern demodulation method, enabling a full tomogram acquisition rate of 30 fps. In addition, in this system the refractive index is calculated by a diffraction tomography algorithm that accounts for the effects of diffraction in the 3-D reconstruction. We use the instrument to quantitatively monitor rapid changes in refractive index within defined subregions of cells due to exposure to acetic acid or changes in medium osmolarity.

  14. Spectroscopic analysis of keratin endogenous signal for skin multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Strupler, M.; Boulesteix, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2005-08-01

    We recorded one-photon excited fluorescence (1PEF) and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) spectra of purified keratin from human epidermis, and determined the action cross section of this endogenous chromophore. We used this spectroscopic analysis to analyse multiphoton images of skin biopsies and assign the intrinsic fluorescence signals in the epidermis. We observed a good agreement between in situ and in vitro 2PEF spectra of keratin. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the 2PEF signal of the keratins from the epidermis, and will be of practical interest for multiphoton imaging of the skin.

  15. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  16. Local tomographic phase microscopy from differential projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, G. N.; Levin, G. G.; Minaev, V. L.; Nekrasov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    It is proposed to use local tomography for optical studies of the internal structure of transparent phase microscopic objects, for example, living cells. From among the many local tomography methods that exist, the algorithms of back projection summation (in which partial derivatives of projections are used as projection data) are chosen. The application of local tomography to living cells is reasonable because, using optical phase microscopy, one can easily obtain projection data in the form of first-order derivatives of projections applying the methods of differential interference contrast and shear interferometry. The mathematical fundamentals of local tomography in differential projections are considered, and a computer simulation of different local tomography methods is performed. A tomographic phase microscope and the results of reconstructing a local tomogram of an erythrocyte from a set of experimental differential projections are described.

  17. Lensless phase microscopy using phase retrieval with multiple illumination wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Bao, Peng; Situ, Guohai; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    A phase retrieval method for microscopy using multiple illumination wavelengths is proposed. A fast algorithm suitable for calculations with high numerical aperture is used for the iterative retrieval of the object wavefront. The advantages and limitations of the technique are systematically analyzed and demonstrated by both simulation and experimental results.

  18. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tan H; Kandel, Mikhail; Shakir, Haadi M; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Arikkath, Jyothi; Do, Minh N; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-03-24

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Acquiring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons.

  19. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Kandel, Mikhail; Shakir, Haadi M.; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Arikkath, Jyothi; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Acquiring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons.

  20. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Kandel, Mikhail; Shakir, Haadi M.; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Arikkath, Jyothi; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Acquiring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons. PMID:28338086

  1. Near-infrared spectroscopic photoacoustic microscopy using a multi-color fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Takashi; Wilkinson, Benjamin C.; Sheehan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple multi-wavelength optical source suitable for spectroscopic optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) of lipid-rich tissue. 1064 nm laser pulses are converted to multiple wavelengths beyond 1300 nm via nonlinear optical propagation in a birefringent optical fiber. OR-PAM experiments with lipid phantoms clearly show the expected absorption peak near 1210 nm. We believe this simple multi-color technique is a promising cost-effective approach to spectroscopic OR-PAM of lipid-rich tissue. PMID:26309746

  2. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  3. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  4. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  5. Vibrational Spectroscopic Microscopy: Raman, Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, E. Neil; Levin, Ira W.

    1995-02-01

    New instrumental approaches for performing vibrational Raman, near-infrared and mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging microscopy are described. The instruments integrate imaging quality filters such as acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), with visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and infrared focal-plane array detectors. These systems are used in conjunction with infinity-corrected, refractive microscopes for operation in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions and with Cassegrainian reflective optics for operation in the mid-infrared spectral interval. Chemically specific images at moderate spectral resolution (2 nm) and high spatial resolution (1 [mu]m) can be collected rapidly and noninvasively. Image data are presented containing 128 × 128 pixels, although significantly larger format images can be collected in approximately the same time. The instruments can be readily configured for both absorption and reflectance spectroscopies. We present Raman emission images of polystyrene microspheres and a lipid/amino acid mixture and near-infrared images of onion epidermis and a hydrated phospholipid dispersion. Images generated from mid-infrared spectral data are presented for a KBr disk containing nonhomogeneous domains of lipid and for 50-[mu]m slices of monkey cerebellum. These are the first results illustrating the use of infrared focal-plane array detectors as chemically specific spectroscopic imaging devices and demonstrating their application in biomolecular areas. Extensions and future applications of the various vibrational spectroscopic imaging techniques are discussed.

  6. Quantitative phase microscopy with asynchronous digital holography.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Kevin J; Brown, William J; Wax, Adam

    2007-03-19

    We demonstrate a new method of measuring quantitative phase in imaging of biological materials. This method, asynchronous digital holography, employs knowledge of a moving fringe created by acousto-optic modulators to execute phase-shifting interferometry using two near-simultaneous interferograms. The method can be used to obtain quantitative phase images of dynamic biological samples on millisecond time scales. We present results on a standard sample, and on live cell samples.

  7. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  8. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D phase and absorption recovery from partially coherent intensity images captured with a programmable LED array source. Images are captured through-focus with four different illumination patterns. Using first Born and weak object approximations (WOA), a linear 3D differential phase contrast (DPC) model is derived. The partially coherent transfer functions relate the sample’s complex refractive index distribution to intensity measurements at varying defocus. Volumetric reconstruction is achieved by a global FFT-based method, without an intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Because the illumination is spatially partially coherent, the transverse resolution of the reconstructed field achieves twice the NA of coherent systems and improved axial resolution. PMID:27867705

  9. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) optical phase and amplitude reconstruction based on coded source illumination using a programmable LED array. Multiple stacks of images along the optical axis are computed from recorded intensities captured by multiple images under off-axis illumination. Based on the first Born approximation, a linear differential phase contrast (DPC) model is built between 3D complex index of refraction and the intensity stacks. Therefore, 3D volume reconstruction can be achieved via a fast inversion method, without the intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Our system employs spatially partially coherent illumination, so the transverse resolution achieves twice the NA of coherent systems, while axial resolution is also improved 2× as compared to holographic imaging.

  10. Growth of vacuum evaporated ultraporous silicon studied with spectroscopic ellipsometry and scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, Kate; Amassian, Aram; Martinu, Ludvik; Robbie, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Using a combination of variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the scaling behavior of uniaxially anisotropic, ultraporous silicon manufactured with glancing angle deposition. We found that both the diameter of the nanocolumns and the spacing between them increase with film thickness according to a power-law relationship consistent with self-affine fractal growth. An ellipsometric model is proposed to fit the optical properties of the anisotropic silicon films employing an effective medium approximation mixture of Tauc-Lorentz oscillator and void. This study shows that the optical response of silicon films made at glancing incidence differs significantly from that of amorphous silicon prepared by other methods due to highly oriented nanocolumn formation and power-law scaling.

  11. Partial wave spectroscopic microscopy can predict prostate cancer progression and mitigate over-treatment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Graff, Taylor; Crawford, Susan; Subramanian, Hariharan; Thompson, Sebastian; Derbas, Justin R.; Lyengar, Radha; Roy, Hemant K.; Brendler, Charles B.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. While prostate specific antigen (PSA) test has been widely used for screening PC, >60% of the PSA detected cancers are indolent, leading to unnecessary clinical interventions. An alternative approach, active surveillance (AS), also suffer from high expense, discomfort and complications associated with repeat biopsies (every 1-3 years), limiting its acceptance. Hence, a technique that can differentiate indolent from aggressive PC would attenuate the harms from over-treatment. Combining microscopy with spectroscopy, our group has developed partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, which can quantify intracellular nanoscale organizations (e.g. chromatin structures) that are not accessible by conventional microscopy. PWS microscopy has previously been shown to predict the risk of cancer in seven different organs (N ~ 800 patients). Herein we use PWS measurement of label-free histologically-normal prostatic epithelium to distinguish indolent from aggressive PC and predict PC risk. Our results from 38 men with low-grade PC indicated that there is a significant increase in progressors compared to non-progressors (p=0.002, effect size=110%, AUC=0.80, sensitivity=88% and specificity=72%), while the baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different. We further improved the diagnostic power by performing nuclei-specific measurements using an automated system that separates in real-time the cell nuclei from the remaining prostate epithelium. In the long term, we envision that the PWS based prognostication can be coupled with AS without any change to the current procedure to mitigate the harms caused by over-treatment.

  12. High-speed quantitative interferometric microscopy based phase imaging cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Yan, Keding; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-11-01

    The paper proposed a simple large scale bio-sample phase detecting equipment called gravity driven phase detecting cytometer, which is based on quantitative interferometric microscopy to realize flowing red blood cells phase distribution detection. The method has advantages on high throughput phase detecting and statistical analysis with high detecting speed and in real-time. The statistical characteristics of red blood cells are useful for biological analysis and disease detection. We believe this method is shedding more light on quantitatively measurement of the phase distribution of bio-samples.

  13. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  14. Spectroscopic microscopy can quantify the statistics of subdiffractional refractive-index fluctuations in media with random rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Capoglu, Ilker; Subramanian, Hariharan; Chandler, John; Thompson, Sebastian; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2015-11-01

    We previously established that spectroscopic microscopy can quantify subdiffraction-scale refractive index (RI) fluctuations in a label-free dielectric medium with a smooth surface. However, to study more realistic samples, such as biological cells, the effect of rough surface should be considered. In this Letter, we first report an analytical theory to synthesize microscopic images of a rough surface, validate this theory by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of Maxwell's equations, and characterize the spectral properties of light reflected from a rough surface. Then, we report a technique to quantify the RI fluctuations beneath a rough surface and demonstrate its efficacy on FDTD-synthesized spectroscopic microscopy images, as well as experimental data obtained from biological cells.

  15. Spectroscopic microscopy can quantify the statistics of subdiffractional refractive-index fluctuations in media with random rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Di; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Capoglu, Ilker; Subramanian, Hariharan; Chandler, John; Thompson, Sebastian; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We previously established that spectroscopic microscopy can quantify subdiffraction-scale refractive index (RI) fluctuations in a label-free dielectric medium with a smooth surface. However, to study more realistic samples, such as biological cells, the effect of rough surface should be considered. In this Letter, we first report an analytical theory to synthesize microscopic images of a rough surface, validate this theory by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of Maxwell’s equations, and characterize the spectral properties of light reflected from a rough surface. Then, we report a technique to quantify the RI fluctuations beneath a rough surface and demonstrate its efficacy on FDTD-synthesized spectroscopic microscopy images, as well as experimental data obtained from biological cells. PMID:26512486

  16. Newly designed, simple relief phase contrast for microscopy of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zižka, Z

    2010-11-01

    A new method providing a relief phase contrast for investigation of microorganisms by optical microscopy used a neutral filter Zeiss NG 10/1 that could be controllably slid at a certain azimuthal angle below the aperture condenser diaphragm of the microscope phase contrast. Two ways of application are described depending on the type of the microscope: (1) in a special holder, and (2) fixed on a rubber ring. The device enabled us to obtain excellent results in the area of both optical microscopy and microphotography. With the microorganisms visualized, a better resolution, higher contrast and a significant 3D effect were obtained; outer morphology and organelles (chloroplasts, nuclei, granules, oil reserve vacuoles, etc.) could also be investigated.

  17. Label-free imaging of the native, living cellular nanoarchitecture using partial-wave spectroscopic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Almassalha, Luay M; Bauer, Greta M; Chandler, John E; Gladstein, Scott; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Weinberg, Samuel; Zhang, Di; Thusgaard Ruhoff, Peder; Roy, Hemant K; Subramanian, Hariharan; Chandel, Navdeep S; Szleifer, Igal; Backman, Vadim

    2016-10-18

    The organization of chromatin is a regulator of molecular processes including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. The structures within chromatin that regulate these processes span from the nucleosomal (10-nm) to the chromosomal (>200-nm) levels, with little known about the dynamics of chromatin structure between these scales due to a lack of quantitative imaging technique in live cells. Previous work using partial-wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, a quantitative imaging technique with sensitivity to macromolecular organization between 20 and 200 nm, has shown that transformation of chromatin at these length scales is a fundamental event during carcinogenesis. As the dynamics of chromatin likely play a critical regulatory role in cellular function, it is critical to develop live-cell imaging techniques that can probe the real-time temporal behavior of the chromatin nanoarchitecture. Therefore, we developed a live-cell PWS technique that allows high-throughput, label-free study of the causal relationship between nanoscale organization and molecular function in real time. In this work, we use live-cell PWS to study the change in chromatin structure due to DNA damage and expand on the link between metabolic function and the structure of higher-order chromatin. In particular, we studied the temporal changes to chromatin during UV light exposure, show that live-cell DNA-binding dyes induce damage to chromatin within seconds, and demonstrate a direct link between higher-order chromatin structure and mitochondrial membrane potential. Because biological function is tightly paired with structure, live-cell PWS is a powerful tool to study the nanoscale structure-function relationship in live cells.

  18. Label-free imaging of the native, living cellular nanoarchitecture using partial-wave spectroscopic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Almassalha, Luay M.; Bauer, Greta M.; Chandler, John E.; Gladstein, Scott; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Weinberg, Samuel; Zhang, Di; Thusgaard Ruhoff, Peder; Roy, Hemant K.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Szleifer, Igal; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    The organization of chromatin is a regulator of molecular processes including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. The structures within chromatin that regulate these processes span from the nucleosomal (10-nm) to the chromosomal (>200-nm) levels, with little known about the dynamics of chromatin structure between these scales due to a lack of quantitative imaging technique in live cells. Previous work using partial-wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, a quantitative imaging technique with sensitivity to macromolecular organization between 20 and 200 nm, has shown that transformation of chromatin at these length scales is a fundamental event during carcinogenesis. As the dynamics of chromatin likely play a critical regulatory role in cellular function, it is critical to develop live-cell imaging techniques that can probe the real-time temporal behavior of the chromatin nanoarchitecture. Therefore, we developed a live-cell PWS technique that allows high-throughput, label-free study of the causal relationship between nanoscale organization and molecular function in real time. In this work, we use live-cell PWS to study the change in chromatin structure due to DNA damage and expand on the link between metabolic function and the structure of higher-order chromatin. In particular, we studied the temporal changes to chromatin during UV light exposure, show that live-cell DNA-binding dyes induce damage to chromatin within seconds, and demonstrate a direct link between higher-order chromatin structure and mitochondrial membrane potential. Because biological function is tightly paired with structure, live-cell PWS is a powerful tool to study the nanoscale structure–function relationship in live cells. PMID:27702891

  19. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Lianqing E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang; Li, Guangyong E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu

    2014-08-04

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  20. Common-path phase-shifting lensless holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; García, Javier

    2010-12-01

    We present an approach capable of high-NA imaging in a lensless digital in-line holographic microscopy layout even outside the Gabor's regime. The method is based on spatial multiplexing at the sample plane, allowing a common-path interferometric architecture, where two interferometric beams are generated by a spatial light modulator (SLM) prior to illuminating the sample. The SLM allows phase-shifting interferometry by phase modulation of the SLM diffracted beam. After proper digital processing, the complex amplitude distribution of the diffracted object wavefront is recovered and numerically propagated to image the sample. Experimental results are reported that validate the proposed method.

  1. Movable aperture lensless transmission microscopy: a novel phase retrieval algorithm.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, H M L; Rodenburg, J M

    2004-07-09

    We propose an iterative phase retrieval method that uses a series of diffraction patterns, measured only in intensity, to solve for both amplitude and phase of the image wave function over a wide field of view and at wavelength-limited resolution. The new technique requires an aperture that is scanned to two or more positions over the object wave function. A simple implementation of the method is modeled and demonstrated, showing how the algorithm uses overlapping data in real space to resolve ambiguities in the solution. The technique opens up the possibility of practical transmission lensless microscopy at subatomic resolution using electrons, x rays, or nuclear particles.

  2. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  3. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging. PMID:23162708

  4. Phase stretch transform for super-resolution localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Jalali, Bahram; Asghari, Mohammad H.; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution localization microscopy has revolutionized the observation of living structures at the cellular scale, by achieving a spatial resolution that is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the diffraction limit. These methods localize single events from isolated sources in repeated cycles in order to achieve super-resolution. The requirement for sparse distribution of simultaneously activated sources in the field of view dictates the acquisition of thousands of frames in order to construct the full super-resolution image. As a result, these methods have slow temporal resolution which is a major limitation when investigating live-cell dynamics. In this paper we present the use of a phase stretch transform for high-density super-resolution localization microscopy. This is a nonlinear frequency dependent transform that emulates the propagation of light through a physical medium with a specific warped diffractive property and applies a 2D phase function to the image in the frequency domain. By choosing properly the transform parameters and the phase kernel profile, the point spread function of each emitter can be sharpened and narrowed. This enables the localization of overlapping emitters, thus allowing a higher density of activated emitters as well as shorter data collection acquisition rates. The method is validated by numerical simulations and by experimental data obtained using a microtubule sample. PMID:27867725

  5. Zernike phase contrast in scanning microscopy with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Christian; Feser, Michael; Vogt, Stefan; Hornberger, Benjamin; Baines, Stephen B; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-11-01

    Scanning X-ray microscopy focuses radiation to a small spot and probes the sample by raster scanning. It allows information to be obtained from secondary signals such as X-ray fluorescence, which yields an elemental mapping of the sample not available in full-field imaging. The analysis and interpretation from these secondary signals can be considerably enhanced if these data are coupled with structural information from transmission imaging. However, absorption often is negligible and phase contrast has not been easily available. Originally introduced with visible light, Zernike phase contrast(1) is a well-established technique in full-field X-ray microscopes for visualization of weakly absorbing samples(2-7). On the basis of reciprocity, we demonstrate the implementation of Zernike phase contrast in scanning X-ray microscopy, revealing structural detail simultaneously with hard-X-ray trace-element measurements. The method is straightforward to implement without significant influence on the resolution of the fluorescence images and delivers complementary information. We show images of biological specimens that clearly demonstrate the advantage of correlating morphology with elemental information.

  6. Phase mask optimization for 3D parallax EDF microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Ingeborg E.; Gierlack, Michael; Höppel, Robert; Landskron, Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    Extended depth-of-field (EDF) microscopy is a well-investigated and very simple method to obtain projection images with an extended depth of focus. Despite its advantages of being a real-time method applicable to any microscopic mode with high lateral resolution that can be simply realized by extending a commercial microscope, the lack of z-correlation is still a problem. In this work we present a combined technique of EDF and stereomicroscopy. By cross-correlation depth information is obtained. Finally, 3D images are reconstructed for best phase masks and simulation results are evaluated experimentally.

  7. Fresnel particle tracing in three dimensions using diffraction phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for tracking small particles in three dimensions with nanometer accuracy. The longitudinal positioning of a micrometer-sized particle is determined by using the Fresnel approximation to describe the transverse distribution of the wavefront that originated in the particle. The method utilizes the high-sensitivity quantitative phase imaging capability of diffraction phase microscopy recently developed in our laboratory. We demonstrate the principle of the technique with experiments on Brownian particles jittering in water both in bulk and in the vicinity of a boundary. The particles are localized in space within an error cube of 20 nm x 20 nm x 20 nm for a 33 Hz acquisition rate and 20s recording time.

  8. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Junesch, Juliane; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows "disposal" of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape.

  9. Digital holographic microscopy of phase separation in multicomponent lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzam Rad, Vahideh; Moradi, Ali-Reza; Darudi, Ahmad; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-12-01

    Lateral in-homogeneities in lipid compositions cause microdomains formation and change in the physical properties of biological membranes. With the presence of cholesterol and mixed species of lipids, phospholipid membranes segregate into lateral domains of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Coupling of two-dimensional intralayer phase separations and interlayer liquid-crystalline ordering in multicomponent membranes has been previously demonstrated. By the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHMicroscopy), we quantitatively analyzed the volumetric dynamical behavior of such membranes. The specimens are lipid mixtures composed of sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. DHMicroscopy in a transmission mode is an effective tool for quantitative visualization of phase objects. By deriving the associated phase changes, three-dimensional information on the morphology variation of lipid stacks at arbitrary time scales is obtained. Moreover, the thickness distribution of the object at demanded axial planes can be obtained by numerical focusing. Our results show that the volume evolution of lipid domains follows approximately the same universal growth law of previously reported area evolution. However, the thickness of the domains does not alter significantly by time; therefore, the volume evolution is mostly attributed to the changes in area dynamics. These results might be useful in the field of membrane-based functional materials.

  10. Combined atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to the analysis of lipid-protein thin films.

    PubMed

    Finot, Eric; Markey, Laurent; Hane, Francis; Amrein, Mathias; Leonenko, Zoya

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins and forms a thin film at the lung alveolar interface separating air from liquid environment. The film reduces the work of breathing during repeatable compressions of the alveoli which form a characteristic multilayer upon compression. In this work, we investigated the structure of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES). We analysed the BLES films by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in order to provide combined characterization of both morphology and thickness of surfactant films. We show how the spectroscopic ellipsometry can be used to supplement the data obtained by AFM. We demonstrate that indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate used for spectroscopic ellipsometry is preferable over glass substrate to enhance the optical contrast. An optical model was proposed to account for non-uniform film morphology. We obtained good correlations between the multilayer surface coverage, determined by both AFM and SE. SE measures the thickness of the first uniform monolayer as 2.6 nm that cannot be achieved by AFM imaging alone.

  11. Imaging red blood cell dynamics by quantitative phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease.

  12. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification—an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel. PMID:28152023

  13. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Zachary F; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  14. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Raman spectral acquisition, within the window defined by the broadband pulse, at the speed of 32 microseconds and with close to shot-noise limited detection sensitivity. Incorporated with multivariate curve resolution analysis, our platform allows compositional mapping of lipid droplets in single live cells, observation of intracellular retinoid metabolism, discrimination of fat droplets from protein-rich organelles in Caenorhabditis elegans, spectral detection of fast flowing tumor cells, and monitoring drug diffusion through skin tissue in vivo. The reported technique opens new opportunities for compositional analysis of cellular compartment in a microscope setting and high-throughput spectral profiling of single cells in a flow cytometer setting. PMID:26167336

  15. Three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging via tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Micah H; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    The field of three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging (3D QPI) is expanding rapidly with applications in biological, medical, and industrial research, development, diagnostics, and metrology. Much of this research has centered on developing optical diffraction tomography (ODT) for biomedical applications. In addition to technical difficulties associated with coherent noise, ODT is not congruous with optical microscopy utilizing partially coherent light, which is used in most biomedical laboratories. Thus, ODT solutions have, for the most part, been limited to customized optomechanical systems which would be relatively expensive to implement on a wide scale. In the present work, a new phase reconstruction method, called tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy (TDPM), is described which makes use of commercial microscopy hardware in realizing 3D QPI. TDPM is analogous to methods used in deconvolution microscopy which improve spatial resolution and 3D-localization accuracy of fluorescence micrographs by combining multiple through-focal scans which are deconvolved by the system point spread function. TDPM is based on the 3D weak object transfer function theory which is shown here to be capable of imaging "nonweak" phase objects with large phase excursions. TDPM requires no phase unwrapping and recovers the entire object spectrum via object rotation, mitigating the need to fill in the "missing cone" of spatial frequencies algorithmically as in limited-angle ODT. In the present work, TDPM is demonstrated using optical fibers, including single-mode, polarization-maintaining, and photonic-crystal fibers as well as an azimuthally varying CO2-laser-induced long-period fiber grating period as test phase objects.

  16. Silver nanoparticle-induced degranulation observed with quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Jiyong; Bae, Yoonsung; Kim, Dugyoung

    2010-02-01

    The use of AgNP is becoming more and more widespread in biomedical field. But compared with the promising bactericidal function, other physiological effects of AgNP on cells are relatively scant. In this research, we propose quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) as a new method to study the degranulation, and AgNP-induced RBL-2H3 cell degranulation is studied as well. Firstly, HeLa cells as the cell control and PBS as the solvent control, we measured the cell volume and cross section profile (x-z plane) with QPM. The results showed that the volume and cross section profile changed only the RBL-2H3 cells exposed to calcium ionophore A23187, which demonstrates the validity of QPM in degranulation research. Secondly, 50μg/mL of AgNP was used instead of A23187, and the measurement of cell volume and cross section profile was carried out again. RBL-2H3 cell volume increased immediately after AgNP was added, and cross section profile showed that the cell surface became granulated, but HeLa cell was lack of that effect. Phase images obviously indicated the RBL-2H3 cell deformation. Thirdly, stained with Fluo-3/AM, intracellular calcium Ca2+]i of single RBL-2H3 cell treated with AgNP was observed with fluorescent microscopy; incubated with AgNP for 20min, the supernatant of RBL-2H3 cells was collected and reacted with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), then the fluorescent intensity of histamine-OPA complex was assayed with spectrofluorometer. The results of Ca2+]i and histamine increase showed that degranulation of AgNP-induced RBL-2H3 cell occurred. So, the cell volume was used as a parameter of degranulation in our study and AgNP-induced RBL-2H3 cells degranulation was confirmed by the cell volume increment, cross section profile change, and [Ca2+]i and histamine in supernatant increase.

  17. Polymorphic phases of galactocerebrosides: spectroscopic evidence of lamellar crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Bou Khalil, M; Carrier, D; Wong, P T; Tanphaichitr, N

    2001-06-06

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was applied to study the structural and thermal properties of bovine brain galactocerebroside (GalCer) containing amide linked non-hydroxylated or alpha-hydroxy fatty acids (NFA- and HFA-GalCer, respectively). Over the temperature range 0-90 degrees C, both GalCer displayed complex thermal transitions, characteristic of polymorphic phase behavior. Upon heating, aqueous dispersions of NFA- and HFA-GalCer exhibited high order-disorder transition temperatures near 80 and 72 degrees C, respectively. En route to the chain melting transition, the patterns of the amide I band of NFA-GalCer were indicative of two different lamellar crystalline phases, whereas those of HFA-GalCer were suggestive of lamellar gel and crystalline bilayers. Cooling from the liquid-crystalline phase resulted in the formation of another crystalline phase of NFA-GalCer and a gel phase of HFA-GalCer, with a phase transition near 62 and 66 degrees C, respectively. Prolonged incubation of GalCer bilayers at 38 degrees C revealed conversions among lamellar crystalline phases (NFA-GalCer) or between lamellar gel and crystalline bilayer structures (HFA-GalCer). Spectral changes indicated that the temperature and/or time induced formation of the lamellar crystalline structures of NFA- and HFA-GalCer was accompanied by partial dehydration and by rearrangements of the hydrogen bonding network and bilayer packing mode of GalCer.

  18. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTIFYING CYTOMETRIC APPLICATIONS WITH SPECTROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  19. Study of spatial homogeneity and nitridation of an Al nanopattern template with spectroscopic photoemission and low energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Ólafsson, S.; Zakharov, A. A.; Göthelid, M.; Agnarsson, B.; Gislason, H. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report a study on the spatial homogeneity and nitridation of a nanopattern template using a spectroscopic photoemission and low energy electron microscopy. The template was composed of Al nanodots which were patterned into a SiO2/Si(1 1 1) surface using e-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The template exhibited a global inhomogeneity in terms of the local topography, Al composition and structure of the individual nanopatterns. After nitridation, the individual nanopatterns were diminished, more corrugated and faceted. The nitridated nanopatterns were structurally ordered but differently orientated. The nitridation effectively removed the fluorine contaminants by decomposition of the fluorocarbon sidewalls, resulting in the AlN nanopatterns and partially nitridated Si substrate surface outside the nanopattern domains.

  20. Silver nanoparticle-induced degranulation observed with quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Jiyong; Bae, Yoonsung; Kim, Dugyoung

    2010-07-01

    Monitoring a degranulation process in a live mast cell is a quite important issue in immunology and pharmacology. Because the size of a granule is normally much smaller than the resolution limit of an optical microscope system, there is no direct real-time live cell imaging technique for observing degranulation processes except for fluorescence imaging techniques. In this research, we propose optical quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) as a new observation tool to study degranulation processes in a live mast cell without any fluorescence labeling. We measure the cell volumes and the cross sectional profiles (x-z plane) of an RBL-2H3 cell and a HeLa cell, before and after they are exposed to calcium ionophore A23187 and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). We verify that the volume and the cross sectional line profile of the RBL-2H3 cell were changed significantly when it was exposed to A23187. When 50 μg/mL of AgNP is used instead of A23187, the measurements of cell volume and cross sectional profiles indicate that RBL-2H3 cells also follow degranulation processes. Degranulation processes for these cells are verified by monitoring the increase of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and histamine with fluorescent methods.

  1. On measuring cell confluence in phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, K. P.; Richardson, J. B.; Lam, K. P.

    2014-03-01

    A principal focus highlighting recent advances in cell based therapies concerns the development of effective treatments for osteoarthritis. Earlier clinicaltrials have shown that 80% of patients receiving mesenchymal stem cell(MSC) based treatment have improved their quality of life by alleviating pain whilst extending the life of their natural joints. The current challenge facing researchers is to identify the biological differences between the treatments that have worked and those which have shown little improvement. One possible candidate for the difference in treatment prognosis is an examination of the proliferation of the ( type) cells as they grow. To further understanding of the proliferation and differentiation of MSC, non-invasive live cell imaging techniques have been developed which capture important cell events and dynamics in cell divisions over an extended period of time. An automated image analysis procedure capable of tracking cell confluence over time has also been implemented, providing an objective and realistic estimation of cell growth within continuous live cell cultures. The proposed algorithm accounts for the halo artefacts that occur in phase microscopy. In addition to a favourable run-time performance, the method was also validated using continuous live MSC cultures, with consistent and meaningful results.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of the endometrium during the secretory phase.

    PubMed Central

    Motta, P M; Andrews, P M

    1976-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface morphology of the rabbit endometrium during the secretory phase of the oestrous cycle. The free surfaces of ciliated and of inactive active secretory cells are described. Changes in secretory cell surface morphology resulting from accumulation and secretion of material involve the apparent retraction of microvilli and the formation of one or more bulbous protrusions of the cell's apical surface. These protrusions may be relatively smooth surfaced or exhibit long slender micro-extensions. The protrusions grow in size and are eventually pinched off. Loss of the bulbous protrusions often leaves behind crater-like invaginations of the cell's surface. Secretory cells adjacent to the endometrial glands are the first to exhibit signs of mucin accumulation and secretion. The single cilium of a secretory cell is not apparently affected by the secretory process. Signs of ciliated and secretory cell degeneration, and possible sloughing, are also described. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:1033932

  3. Analytical electron microscopy in mineralogy; exsolved phases in pyroxenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nord, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy has been successfully used to characterize the structure and composition of lamellar exsolution products in pyroxenes. At operating voltages of 100 and 200 keV, microanalytical techniques of x-ray energy analysis, convergent-beam electron diffraction, and lattice imaging have been used to chemically and structurally characterize exsolution lamellae only a few unit cells wide. Quantitative X-ray energy analysis using ratios of peak intensities has been adopted for the U.S. Geological Survey AEM in order to study the compositions of exsolved phases and changes in compositional profiles as a function of time and temperature. The quantitative analysis procedure involves 1) removal of instrument-induced background, 2) reduction of contamination, and 3) measurement of correction factors obtained from a wide range of standard compositions. The peak-ratio technique requires that the specimen thickness at the point of analysis be thin enough to make absorption corrections unnecessary (i.e., to satisfy the "thin-foil criteria"). In pyroxenes, the calculated "maximum thicknesses" range from 130 to 1400 nm for the ratios Mg/Si, Fe/Si, and Ca/Si; these "maximum thicknesses" have been contoured in pyroxene composition space as a guide during analysis. Analytical spatial resolutions of 50-100 nm have been achieved in AEM at 200 keV from the composition-profile studies, and analytical reproducibility in AEM from homogeneous pyroxene standards is ?? 1.5 mol% endmember. ?? 1982.

  4. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1990-01-01

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  5. Electronic Structure of the Cuprate Superconducting and Pseudogap Phases from Spectroscopic Imaging STM

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Schmidt, A.R.; Fujita, K.; Kim, E.-A.; Lawler, M.J.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lee, D.-H.

    2011-06-21

    We survey the use of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) to probe the electronic structure of underdoped cuprates. Two distinct classes of electronic states are observed in both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor, existing below a lower energy scale E = {Delta}{sub 0}. We find that the Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) signatures of delocalized Cooper pairing are restricted to a k-space arc, which terminates near the lines connecting k = {+-}({pi}/a{sub 0},0) to k = {+-}(0,{pi}/a{sub 0}). This arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density such that Luttinger's theorem could be satisfied if it represents the front side of a hole-pocket that is bounded behind by the lines between k = {+-}({pi}/a{sub 0},0) and k = {+-}(0,{pi}/a{sub 0}). In both phases, the only broken symmetries detected for the |E| < {Delta}{sub 0} states are those of a d-wave superconductor. The second class of states occurs proximate to the PG energy scale E = {Delta}{sub 1}. Here the non-dispersive electronic structure breaks the expected 90{sup o}-rotational symmetry of electronic structure within each unit cell, at least down to 180{sup o}-rotational symmetry. This electronic symmetry breaking was first detected as an electronic inequivalence at the two oxygen sites within each unit cell by using a measure of nematic (C{sub 2}) symmetry. Incommensurate non-dispersive conductance modulations, locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries, coexist with this intra-unit-cell electronic symmetry breaking at E = {Delta}{sub 1}. Their characteristic wavevector Q is determined by the k-space points where Bogoliubov QPI terminates and therefore changes continuously with doping. The distinct broken electronic symmetry states (intra-unit-cell and finite Q) coexisting at E {approx} {Delta}{sub 1} are

  6. Photoelectrochemical fabrication of spectroscopic diffraction gratings, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David; Carrabba, Michael M.; Li, Jianguo; Cartland, Robert F.; Hachey, John P.; Mathew, Sam

    1990-01-01

    This program was directed toward the production of Echelle diffraction gratings by a light-driven, electrochemical etching technique (photoelectrochemical etching). Etching is carried out in single crystal materials, and the differential rate of etching of the different crystallographic planes used to define the groove profiles. Etching of V-groove profiles was first discovered by us during the first phase of this project, which was initially conceived as a general exploration of photoelectrochemical etching techniques for grating fabrication. This highly controllable V-groove etching process was considered to be of high significance for producing low pitch Echelles, and provided the basis for a more extensive Phase 2 investigation.

  7. Global Abundance and Temperature Constraints via Joint Spectroscopic Phase Curve Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Line, Michael R.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic thermal emission phase curves can provide us with a global view of an exoplanet's atmosphere. Different wavelengths probe different atmospheric depths whereas different phases probe different planetary longitudes. This in essence allows us to reconstruct the "3D" thermal and compositional structure of these atmospheres. In this contribution I will discuss the application of powerful atmospheric retrieval approaches to spectroscopic phase curve data, specifically the WFC3+Spitzer IRAC observations of the hot-Jupiter WASP-43b. First I will show the variation in thermal structures and molecular abundances with phase, assuming each phase is independent. Secondly, I will present a new framework for performing a joint retrieval on multiple phases simultaneously. In such a framework, I will test, via Bayesian hypothesis testing, a variety of assumptions. For instance, can the absorption features across all phases be explained with a global metallicity and C-to-O ratio under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium? Can chemical quenching perturb the abundances on the cooler phases more than the hotter phases? Can we tell the difference? Can a global thermal structure "shape" explain all phases or is there structure variation with phase? Answering such questions are critical to understanding the complex interactions of atmospheric dynamics, chemical processes, and radiative energy balance in exoplanet atmospheres.

  8. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  9. Condensed phase photoacoustic spectroscopic detection of porphyrins and dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Voigtman, E.; Jurgensen, A.; Winefordner, J.

    1981-08-01

    A simple piezoelectric detection system suitable for performing highly sensitive liquid-phase photoacoustic spectroscopy is presented. Performance of the system with respect to linearity, solvent effects, and excitation pulse characteristics is experimentally evaluated and compared with theoretical figures of merit. Limits of detection for various porphyrins, laser dyes, and drugs are presented.

  10. Reconstruction of explicit structural properties at the nanoscale via spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum registered by a reflected-light bright-field spectroscopic microscope (SM) can quantify the microscopically indiscernible, deeply subdiffractional length scales within samples such as biological cells and tissues. Nevertheless, quantification of biological specimens via any optical measures most often reveals ambiguous information about the specific structural properties within the studied samples. Thus, optical quantification remains nonintuitive to users from the diverse fields of technique application. In this work, we demonstrate that the SM signal can be analyzed to reconstruct explicit physical measures of internal structure within label-free, weakly scattering samples: characteristic length scale and the amplitude of spatial refractive-index (RI) fluctuations. We present and validate the reconstruction algorithm via finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations on an example of exponential spatial correlation of RI. We apply the validated algorithm to experimentally measure structural properties within isolated cells from two genetic variants of HT29 colon cancer cell line as well as within a prostate tissue biopsy section. The presented methodology can lead to the development of novel biophotonics techniques that create two-dimensional maps of explicit structural properties within biomaterials: the characteristic size of macromolecular complexes and the variance of local mass density.

  11. Reconstruction of explicit structural properties at the nanoscale via spectroscopic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum registered by a reflected-light bright-field spectroscopic microscope (SM) can quantify the microscopically indiscernible, deeply subdiffractional length scales within samples such as biological cells and tissues. Nevertheless, quantification of biological specimens via any optical measures most often reveals ambiguous information about the specific structural properties within the studied samples. Thus, optical quantification remains nonintuitive to users from the diverse fields of technique application. In this work, we demonstrate that the SM signal can be analyzed to reconstruct explicit physical measures of internal structure within label-free, weakly scattering samples: characteristic length scale and the amplitude of spatial refractive-index (RI) fluctuations. We present and validate the reconstruction algorithm via finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations on an example of exponential spatial correlation of RI. We apply the validated algorithm to experimentally measure structural properties within isolated cells from two genetic variants of HT29 colon cancer cell line as well as within a prostate tissue biopsy section. The presented methodology can lead to the development of novel biophotonics techniques that create two-dimensional maps of explicit structural properties within biomaterials: the characteristic size of macromolecular complexes and the variance of local mass density.

  12. Reconstruction of explicit structural properties at the nanoscale via spectroscopic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The spectrum registered by a reflected-light bright-field spectroscopic microscope (SM) can quantify the microscopically indiscernible, deeply subdiffractional length scales within samples such as biological cells and tissues. Nevertheless, quantification of biological specimens via any optical measures most often reveals ambiguous information about the specific structural properties within the studied samples. Thus, optical quantification remains nonintuitive to users from the diverse fields of technique application. In this work, we demonstrate that the SM signal can be analyzed to reconstruct explicit physical measures of internal structure within label-free, weakly scattering samples: characteristic length scale and the amplitude of spatial refractive-index (RI) fluctuations. We present and validate the reconstruction algorithm via finite-difference time-domain solutions of Maxwell’s equations on an example of exponential spatial correlation of RI. We apply the validated algorithm to experimentally measure structural properties within isolated cells from two genetic variants of HT29 colon cancer cell line as well as within a prostate tissue biopsy section. The presented methodology can lead to the development of novel biophotonics techniques that create two-dimensional maps of explicit structural properties within biomaterials: the characteristic size of macromolecular complexes and the variance of local mass density. PMID:26886803

  13. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created “on the fly” by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role. PMID:25331897

  14. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  15. A spectroscopic and catalytic investigation of active phase-support interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support on which the active phase is dispersed can affect the percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Our objective is to characterize the physical chemistry of the active phase-oxide support by spectroscopic methods and to correlate this structure with catalytic function. The three systems discussed in this progress report are Ag/TiO{sub 2}, Ru-Cu/SiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Intensity and phase fields behind Phase Shifting Masks studied with High Resolution Interference Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Weichelt, Tina; Zeitner, Uwe; Vogler, Uwe; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    The proximity printing industry is in real need of high resolution results and it can be done using Phase Shift Mask (PSM) or by applying Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). In our research we are trying to find out details of how light fields behind the structures of photo masks develop in order to determine the best conditions and designs for proximity printing. We focus here on parameters that are used in real situation with gaps up to 50 μm and structure sizes down to 2 μm. The light field evolution behind the structures is studied and delivers insight in to precisions and tolerances that need to be respected. It is the first time that an experimental analysis of light propagation through mask is presented in detail, which includes information on intensity and phase. The instrument we use is known as High Resolution Interference Microscopy (HRIM). HRIM is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer which is capable of recording three dimensional distributions of intensity and phase with diffraction limited resolution. Our characterization technique allows plotting the evolution of the desired light field and therefore printable structure till the desired proximity gap. In this paper we discuss in detail the evolution of intensity and phase fields of elbow or corner structure at different position behind a phase mask and interpret the main parameters. Of particular interest are tolerances against proximity gap variation and the resolution in printed structures.

  17. Development of in-situ full-field spectroscopic imaging analysis and application on Li-ion battery using transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen K.; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the advance in spectroscopic imaging technique and analysis method from the newly developed transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) at the beamline X8C of National Synchrotron Light Source. Through leastsquares linear combination fitting we developed on the in situ spectroscopic images, a time-dependent and spatially resolved chemical composition mapping can be obtained and quantitatively analyzed undergone chemical/electrochemical reactions. A correlation of morphological evolution, chemical state distribution changes and reaction conditions can be revealed. We successfully applied this method to study the electrochemical evolution of CuO, an anode material of Li-ion battery, during the lithiation-delitiation cycling.

  18. A view of the implanted SiC damage by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Battistig, G.; Khanh, N. Q.; Petrik, P.; Lohner, T.; Dobos, L.; Pecz, B.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Morilla, Y.

    2006-11-01

    4H-SiC single crystalline substrates were implanted at room temperature with 150 keV Al{sup +} ions using fluences of 4x10{sup 14}, 1x10{sup 15}, and 2x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} with current density of 2.5 {mu}A cm{sup -2}. The samples were subsequently annealed at 1100 deg. C in N{sub 2} for 1 h in order to analyze their structural recovery. The disorder induced in both sublattices by the Al{sup +} ions was studied by backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry with a 3.5 MeV He{sup 2+} beam. The results were compared with the optical properties of the samples measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. In a previous work, we concluded that during the postimplantation annealing of a highly damaged SiC crystalline material the short distance order can be recovered, while the long distance disorder remains. We also presented the possibility to have grains of different polytypes oriented faraway from the original direction. Now, this alternative is confirmed by the cross-sectional transmission and high resolution electron microscopy studies, carried out to obtain information about the crystal structure.

  19. Phase-shifting by means of an electronically tunable lens: quantitative phase imaging of biological specimens with digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Carlos; Doblas, Ana; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The use of an electronically tunable lens (ETL) to produce controlled phase shifts in interferometric arrangements is shown. The performance of the ETL as a phase-shifting device is experimentally validated in phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy. Quantitative phase maps of a section of the thorax of a Drosophila melanogaster fly and of human red blood cells have been obtained using our proposal. The experimental results validate the possibility of using the ETL as a reliable phase-shifter device.

  20. Lensless phase contrast microscopy based on multiwavelength Fresnel diffraction.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Eikema, Kjeld S E; Witte, Stefan

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate a compact, wide-field, quantitative phase contrast microscope that does not require lenses for image formation. High-resolution images are retrieved from Fresnel diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths, combined with a robust iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Quantitative phase contrast images of living cultured neurons are obtained with a transverse resolution of <2 μm. Our system is well suited for high-resolution live cell imaging and provides a compact, cost-effective alternative to full-sized phase-contrast microscopes.

  1. In-vivo analysis of human cancer cells by means of laser phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Graschev, G.; Balanos, Evangelos; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    1999-12-01

    Phase images of human colon carcinoma cells CX1, HCT15, HCT116 and human urinary bladder carcinoma cells EJ28 were obtained with laser phase microscope and have been analyzed. The phase shift images are compared with conventional light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy data in order to detect the correspondence between morphological peculiarities and phase characteristics of measured cell. Influence of interactions between human carcinoma cells and specific antibodies (CC18 monoclonal antibody to cytokeratin and MRK 16 monoclonal antibody) on the cells phase images was studied.

  2. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy using a Fresnel Zone Plate and a Transmission Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-06-23

    We report on a hard X-ray phase imaging microscopy (a phase-difference microscopy) that consists of an objective and a transmission grating. The simple optical system provides a quantitative phase image, and does not need a wave field mostly coherent on the objective. Our method has a spatial resolution almost same as that of the absorption contrast microscope image obtained by removing the grating. We demonstrate how our approach provides a phase image from experimentally obtained images. Our approach is attractive for easily appending a quantitative phase-sensitive mode to normal X-ray microscopes, and has potentially broad applications in biology and material sciences.

  3. Dynamic phase imaging of host cells attacked by Vibrio vulnificus using quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungrag; Yang, Wenzhong; Lee, Ji Yong; Cha, Mi Hye; Kim, Young Ran; Kim, Dug Young

    2010-02-01

    We present the real time quantitative analysis of Vibrio vulnificus-infected host cells using high stability quantitative phase microscopy (HSQPM). It provides the ability to retrieve the phase or optical path length distribution over the cell from a single interferogram image, which has been measured with nanometer path length sensitivity for long periods of time. We have applied HSQPM to study dynamic cell morphologic changes and to quantify noninvasively cell volumes of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells infected with pathogenic bacteria V. vulnificus strains, wild type (MO6-24/O) and RTX toxin mutant (CMM770). During the process of V. vulnificus wild type infection to RBL-2H3 cells, the dynamic changes of quantitative phase images, cell volumes and areas were observed in real time using HSQPM. In contrast, the dramatic changes were not detected in RBL-2H3 cells infected with RTX toxin mutant. The results showed the good correlation between HSQPM analysis and biochemical assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and β-hexosaminidase release assay. We suggest that HSQPM is useful real time quantitative method to study the dynamic process of host cells infected with pathogen in a noninvasive manner.

  4. Transfer characteristics of rectangular phase gratings in interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Xie, Weichang; Niehues, Jan

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, the transfer characteristics of rectangular periodic phase objects are studied. It turns out that there are significant differences compared to amplitude objects. The imaging of an amplitude object can be understood as a linear process, whereas phase objects behave nonlinearly. It is shown that under certain conditions the correct shape of a rectangular phase grating can be obtained by an interference microscope as long as the first order diffraction component passes the optical imaging system. This result is in a good agreement with experimental observations and computer simulation results.

  5. 4D phase-space multiplexing for fluorescent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsiou-Yuan; Zhong, Jingshan; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Phase-space measurements enable characterization of second-order spatial coherence properties and can be used for digital aberration removal or 3D position reconstruction. Previous methods use a scanning aperture to measure the phase space spectrogram, which is slow and light inefficient, while also attenuating information about higher-order correlations. We demonstrate a significant improvement of speed and light throughput by incorporating multiplexing techniques into our phase-space imaging system. The scheme implements 2D coded aperture patterning in the Fourier (pupil) plane of a microscope using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), while capturing multiple intensity images in real space. We compare various multiplexing schemes to scanning apertures and show that our phase-space reconstructions are accurate for experimental data with biological samples containing many 3D fluorophores.

  6. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well.

  7. Compact diffraction phase microscopy for quantitative visualization of cells in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaikova, N. A.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a simplified and compact scheme of interference phase microscopy using a diffraction grating and spatial filtering of the diffracted field, i.e., diffraction phase microscopy. The scheme and the parameters of the device with the possibility of using the optical system of a smartphone and its software are analysed. The results of experimental determination of the spatial structure parameters of erythrocytes are presented.

  8. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    PubMed

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications.

  9. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  10. Thermomorphic phase separation in ionic liquid-organic liquid systems--conductivity and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Berg, Rolf W; van Hal, Roy; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2005-08-21

    Electrical conductivity, FT-Raman and NMR measurements are demonstrated as useful tools to probe and determine phase behavior of thermomorphic ionic liquid-organic liquid systems. To illustrate the methods, consecutive conductivity measurements of a thermomorphic methoxyethoxyethyl-imidazolium ionic liquid/1-hexanol system are performed in the temperature interval 25-80 degrees C using a specially constructed double-electrode cell. In addition, FT-Raman and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies performed on the phase-separable system in the same temperature interval confirm the mutual solubility of the components in the system, the liquid-liquid equilibrium phase diagram of the binary mixture, and signify the importance of hydrogen bonding between the ionic liquid and the hydroxyl group of the alcohol.

  11. Spectroscopic and Structural Investigations of alpha-beta-, and gamma-AIH3 Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Manciu, F.S.; Graetz, J.; Reza, L.; Durrer, W.G.; Bronson, A.; Lacina, D.

    2010-07-01

    With its reputation as a high-energy density fuel, aluminum hydride (AlH{sub 3}) has received renewed attention as a material that is particularly suitable, not only for hydrogen storage but also for rocket propulsion. While the various phases of AlH{sub 3} have been investigated theoretically, there is a shortage of experimental studies corroborating the theoretical findings. In response to this, we present here an investigation of these compounds based primarily on two research areas in which there is the greatest scarcity of information in the literature, namely Raman and infrared (IR) absorption analysis. To the authors knowledge, this is the first report of experimental far-IR absorption results on these compounds. Two different samples prepared by broadly similar ethereal reactions of AlCl{sub 3} with LiAlH{sub 4} were analyzed. Both Raman and IR absorption measurements indicate that one sample is purely {gamma}-AlH{sub 3} and that the other is a mixture of {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {gamma}-AlH{sub 3} phases. X-ray diffraction confirms the spectroscopic findings, most notably for the {beta}-AlH{sub 3} phase, for which optical spectroscopic data are reported here for the first time.

  12. Quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells using phase-shifting white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Mehta, Dalip; Srivastava, Vishal

    2012-11-01

    We report quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs) using phase-shifting interference microscopy. Five phase-shifted white light interferograms are recorded using colour charge coupled device camera. White light interferograms were decomposed into red, green, and blue colour components. The phase-shifted interferograms of each colour were then processed by phase-shifting analysis and phase maps for red, green, and blue colours were reconstructed. Wavelength dependent refractive index profiles of RBCs were computed from the single set of white light interferogram. The present technique has great potential for non-invasive determination of refractive index variation and morphological features of cells and tissues.

  13. Spectroscopic evidence of α,α-dimethylbenzyl radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Youl; Lim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2016-11-01

    We report the spectroscopic evidence of the jet-cooled α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical, which was generated in a technique of corona excited supersonic expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle. For identification of the α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical, precursors that form a common molecular radical, as a result of dissociation of either a Csbnd H bond or Csbnd C bond of alkyl group in a corona discharge, were employed. Based on comparisons of the spectra observed from the corona discharges of isopropylbenzene and tert-butylbenzene, evidence was obtained of the existence of the α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical in the gas phase.

  14. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  15. A phase space model of Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    A new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), uses a sequence of low-resolution images captured under varied illumination to iteratively converge upon a high-resolution complex sample estimate. Here, we propose a mathematical model of FPM that explicitly connects its operation to conventional ptychography, a common procedure applied to electron and X-ray diffractive imaging. Our mathematical framework demonstrates that under ideal illumination conditions, conventional ptychography and FPM both produce datasets that are mathematically linked by a linear transformation. We hope this finding encourages the future cross-pollination of ideas between two otherwise unconnected experimental imaging procedures. In addition, the coherence state of the illumination source used by each imaging platform is critical to successful operation, yet currently not well understood. We apply our mathematical framework to demonstrate that partial coherence uniquely alters both conventional ptychography’s and FPM’s captured data, but up to a certain threshold can still lead to accurate resolution-enhanced imaging through appropriate computational post-processing. We verify this theoretical finding through simulation and experiment. PMID:24514995

  16. Two-step phase-shifting fluorescence incoherent holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Yao, Hai; Qu, Xinghua; Gao, Bruce Z

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence holographic microscope (FINCHSCOPE) is a motionless fluorescence holographic imaging technique based on Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) that shows promise in reconstructing three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens with three holograms. We report a developing two-step phase-shifting method that reduces the required number of holograms from three to two. Using this method, we resolved microscopic fluorescent beads that were three-dimensionally distributed at different depths with two interferograms captured by a CCD camera. The method enables the FINCHSCOPE to work in conjunction with the frame-straddling technique and significantly enhance imaging speed.

  17. Phase contrast hard x-ray microscopy with submicron resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S.; Cedola, A.; Cloetens, P.; Di Fonzo, S.; Jark, W.; Soullie, G.; Riekel, C.

    1997-11-01

    In this letter we present a hard x-ray phase contrast microscope based on the divergent and coherent beam exiting an x-ray waveguide. It uses lensless geometrical projection to magnify spatial variations in optical path length more than 700 times. Images of a nylon fiber and a gold test pattern were obtained with a resolution of 0.14 {mu}m in one direction. Exposure times as short as 0.1 s gave already visible contrast, opening the way to high resolution, real time studies. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Two-step phase-shifting fluorescence incoherent holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Yao, Hai; Qu, Xinghua; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence holographic microscope (FINCHSCOPE) is a motionless fluorescence holographic imaging technique based on Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) that shows promise in reconstructing three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens with three holograms. We report a developing two-step phase-shifting method that reduces the required number of holograms from three to two. Using this method, we resolved microscopic fluorescent beads that were three-dimensionally distributed at different depths with two interferograms captured by a CCD camera. The method enables the FINCHSCOPE to work in conjunction with the frame-straddling technique and significantly enhance imaging speed. PMID:24972355

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of Cyclopentane under Extreme Conditions and Implications for the P-T Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chunli; Liu, Zhenxian; Cui, Qiliang; Hemley, Russell

    2013-06-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman scattering combined with diamond anvil cell (DAC) and cryogenic techniques have been employed to investigate cyclopentane up to 4 GPa in the temperature range of 100-350 K and isothermal compression up to 84 GPa at room temperature. Four phases including liquid, plastic phases I and II, and truly crystalline phase III are clearly identified in the P-T range studied based on the changes of the ring breathing mode and CH2 rocking modes. The phase diagram is extended to the pressure and temperature range of 0 - 4.0 GPa and 105 - 350 K. Further compression at room temperature up to 84 GPa, another high-pressure phase (IV) is observed based on the appearance of low frequency peaks related to the lattice vibrational modes in the synchrotron far-IR spectra. The spectroscopic results indicate that cyclopentane persists the orientation ordered crystalline phase up to 84 GPa at room temperature. This work was supported by NSF (DMR-0805056; EAR 06-49658, COMPRES) and DOE/ NNSA (DE-FC03-03N00144, CDAC). NSLS is supported by the DOE/BES (DE-AC02-98CH10886).

  20. Controlling stimulated coherent spectroscopy and microscopy by a position-dependent phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Hsu, Julie; Mukamel, Shaul; Potma, Eric O.

    2013-03-01

    We study the role of geometry-dependent phase shifts of the optical electric field in stimulated coherent spectroscopy, a special class of heterodyne optical spectroscopy techniques. We generalize the theoretical description of stimulated spectroscopy to include spatial phase effects, and study the measured material response for several representative excitation and detection configurations. Using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy as an example, we show that different components of the material response are measured by varying the position of the object in focus. We discuss the implications of the position-dependent phase in stimulated coherent microscopy and point out a detection configuration in which its effects are minimized.

  1. Parallel on-axis holographic phase microscopy of biological cells and unicellular microorganism dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Natan T; Newpher, Thomas M; Ehlers, Michael D; Wax, Adam

    2010-05-20

    We apply a wide-field quantitative phase microscopy technique based on parallel two-step phase-shifting on-axis interferometry to visualize live biological cells and microorganism dynamics. The parallel on-axis holographic approach is more efficient with camera spatial bandwidth consumption compared to previous off-axis approaches and thus can capture finer sample spatial details, given a limited spatial bandwidth of a specific digital camera. Additionally, due to the parallel acquisition mechanism, the approach is suitable for visualizing rapid dynamic processes, permitting an interferometric acquisition rate equal to the camera frame rate. The method is demonstrated experimentally through phase microscopy of neurons and unicellular microorganisms.

  2. Quantitative interferometric microscopy with improved full-field phase aberration compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Sun, Nan; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Single-shot quantitative interferometric microscopy (QIM) needs a high-accuracy and rapid phase retrieval algorithm. Retrieved phase distributions are often influenced by phase aberration background caused by both imaging system and phase retrieval algorithms. Here, we propose an improved phase aberration compensation (PAC) approach in order to eliminate the phase aberrations inherent in the data. With this method, sample-free parts are identified and used to calculate the background phase, reducing phase errors induced in samples and providing high-quality phase images. We now demonstrate that QIM based on this PAC approach realizes high-quality phase imaging from a single interferogram. This is of great potential for a real-time speedy diagnosis.

  3. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  4. Phase reconstruction in annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Tanji, Takayoshi; Kodama, Tetsuji; Matsutani, Takaomi; Ogai, Keiko; Ikuta, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    A novel technique for reconstructing the phase shifts of electron waves was applied to Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To realize this method, a new STEM system equipped with an annular aperture, annularly arrayed detectors and an arrayed image processor has been developed and evaluated in experiments. We show a reconstructed phase image of graphite particles and demonstrate that this new method works effectively for high-resolution phase imaging.

  5. Automatic full compensation of quantitative phase imaging in off-axis digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Carlos; Castañeda, Raúl; Piedrahita-Quintero, Pablo; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2016-12-20

    An automatic method that fully compensates the quantitative phase measurements in off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is presented. The two main perturbations of the quantitative phase measurements in off-axis DHM are automatically removed. While the curvature phase flaw introduced by the microscope objective is avoided by the use of an optimized telecentric imaging system for the recording of the holograms, the remaining phase perturbation due to the tilt of the reference wave is removed by the automatic computation of a digital compensating reference wave. The method has been tested on both nonbiological and biological samples with and improving on the quality of the recovered phase maps.

  6. Quantitative interferometric microscopy with two dimensional Hilbert transform based phase retrieval method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Xue, Liang

    2017-01-01

    In order to obtain high contrast images and detailed descriptions of label free samples, quantitative interferometric microscopy combining with phase retrieval is designed to obtain sample phase distributions from fringes. As accuracy and efficiency of recovered phases are affected by phase retrieval methods, thus approaches owning higher precision and faster processing speed are still in demand. Here, two dimensional Hilbert transform based phase retrieval method is adopted in cellular phase imaging, it not only reserves more sample specifics compared to classical fast Fourier transform based method, but also overcomes disadvantages of traditional algorithm according to Hilbert transform which is a one dimensional processing causing phase ambiguities. Both simulations and experiments are provided, proving the proposed phase retrieval approach can acquire quantitative sample phases with high accuracy and fast speed.

  7. Multimodal imaging of human cerebellum - merging X-ray phase microtomography, magnetic resonance microscopy and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Waschkies, Conny; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-11-01

    Imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging and X-ray computed tomography are established methods in daily clinical diagnosis of human brain. Clinical equipment does not provide sufficient spatial resolution to obtain morphological information on the cellular level, essential for applying minimally or non-invasive surgical interventions. Therefore, generic data with lateral sub-micrometer resolution have been generated from histological slices post mortem. Sub-cellular spatial resolution, lost in the third dimension as a result of sectioning, is obtained using magnetic resonance microscopy and micro computed tomography. We demonstrate that for human cerebellum grating-based X-ray phase tomography shows complementary contrast to magnetic resonance microscopy and histology. In this study, the contrast-to-noise values of magnetic resonance microscopy and phase tomography were comparable whereas the spatial resolution in phase tomography is an order of magnitude better. The registered data with their complementary information permit the distinct segmentation of tissues within the human cerebellum.

  8. Spectroscopic Identification of p-CHLORO-α-METHYLBENZYL Radical in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Woon; Lee, Gi Woo; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2009-06-01

    We report the first spectroscopic identification of the p-fluoro-α-methylbenzyl radical in the gas phase. Precursor p-fluoro-ethylbenzene seeded in a large amount of inert carrier gas helium was electrically discharged to produce the benzyl-type radicals in a corona excited supersonic expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle, from which the vibronic emission spectrum was recorded in the visible region using a long path monochromator. From an analysis of the spectrum observed, we found the formation of p-fluoro-α-methylbenzyl radical as well as p-fluorobenzyl radical in the jet from the precursor. After eliminating the bands belonging to p-fluorobenzyl radical using the known data, we identified spectroscopically the formation of the p-fluoro-α-methylbenzyl radical, in which the energy of the D_1 → D_0 electronic transition and a few vibrational mode frequencies in the ground electronic state were determined by comparison with those from an ab initio calculation and with those from the known data of the precursor. S. K. Lee and D. Y. Baek Chem. Phys. Lett. 301(3-4), 407-412 (1999).

  9. The striped phases of ethylthiolate monolayers on the Au(111) surface: a scanning tunneling microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangsen; Tang, Lin; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Gao, Jianzhi; Guo, Quanmin

    2013-05-21

    Striped phases of ethylthiolate monolayers, corresponding to surface coverage in between 0.2 ML and 0.27 ML, were studied using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. Striped phases consist of rows of Au-adatom-diethythiolate (AAD) aligned along the [112] direction. In the perpendicular [110] direction, the AAD rows adjust their spacing according to the surface coverage. A (5√3 × √3)-R30° striped phase with 0.27 ML thiolate and a (6√3 × √3)-R30° striped phase with 0.23 ML thiolate, both with long-range order, are found. A localized (5 × √3)-rect. phase is also found as a minority phase embedded in the 5√3 × √3)-R30° phase. This (5 × √3)-rect. phase can be constructed using di-Au-adatom-tri-thiolate species.

  10. Correlative Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopic Tomography and Atom Probe Tomography of the Phase Separation in an Alnico 8 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Sneed, Brian T.; Zhou, Lin; Tang, Wei; Kramer, Matthew J.; Cullen, David A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-12-21

    Alnico alloys have long been used as strong permanent magnets because of their ferromagnetism and high coercivity. Understanding their structural details allows for better prediction of the resulting magnetic properties. However, quantitative three-dimensional characterization of the phase separation in these alloys is still challenged by the spatial quantification of nanoscale phases. Herein, we apply a dual tomography approach, where correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) tomography and atom probe tomography (APT) are used to investigate the initial phase separation process of an alnico 8 alloy upon non-magnetic annealing. STEM-EDS tomography provides information on the morphology and volume fractions of Fe–Co-rich and Νi–Al-rich phases after spinodal decomposition in addition to quantitative information of the composition of a nanoscale volume. Subsequent analysis of a portion of the same specimen by APT offers quantitative chemical information of each phase at the sub-nanometer scale. Furthermore, APT reveals small, 2–4 nm Fe-rich α1 phases that are nucleated in the Ni-rich α2 matrix. From this information, we show that phase separation of the alnico 8 alloy consists of both spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth processes. Lastly, we discuss the complementary benefits and challenges associated with correlative STEM-EDS and APT.

  11. Correlative Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopic Tomography and Atom Probe Tomography of the Phase Separation in an Alnico 8 Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Sneed, Brian T.; Zhou, Lin; ...

    2016-12-21

    Alnico alloys have long been used as strong permanent magnets because of their ferromagnetism and high coercivity. Understanding their structural details allows for better prediction of the resulting magnetic properties. However, quantitative three-dimensional characterization of the phase separation in these alloys is still challenged by the spatial quantification of nanoscale phases. Herein, we apply a dual tomography approach, where correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) tomography and atom probe tomography (APT) are used to investigate the initial phase separation process of an alnico 8 alloy upon non-magnetic annealing. STEM-EDS tomography provides information on the morphology andmore » volume fractions of Fe–Co-rich and Νi–Al-rich phases after spinodal decomposition in addition to quantitative information of the composition of a nanoscale volume. Subsequent analysis of a portion of the same specimen by APT offers quantitative chemical information of each phase at the sub-nanometer scale. Furthermore, APT reveals small, 2–4 nm Fe-rich α1 phases that are nucleated in the Ni-rich α2 matrix. From this information, we show that phase separation of the alnico 8 alloy consists of both spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth processes. Lastly, we discuss the complementary benefits and challenges associated with correlative STEM-EDS and APT.« less

  12. Spectroscopic-ellipsometric study of native oxide removal by liquid phase HF process

    PubMed Central

    Kurhekar, Anil Sudhakar; Apte, Prakash R

    2014-01-01

    Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of liquid-phase hydrofluoric acid (HF) cleaning on Si<100> surfaces for microelectromechanical systems application. The hydrogen terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was realized as an equivalent dielectric layer, and SE measurements are performed. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 100:5 HF dip with rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed and analyzed by the ex-situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer is studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry, and discussed. This piece of work explains the usage of an ex situ, non-destructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the H-termination of Si<100> surfaces. PMID:24619506

  13. Spectroscopic-ellipsometric study of native oxide removal by liquid phase HF process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurhekar, Anil Sudhakar; Apte, Prakash R.

    2013-02-01

    Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of liquid-phase hydrofluoric acid (HF) cleaning on Si<100> surfaces for microelectromechanical systems application. The hydrogen terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was realized as an equivalent dielectric layer, and SE measurements are performed. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 100:5 HF dip with rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed and analyzed by the ex-situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer is studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry, and discussed. This piece of work explains the usage of an ex situ, non-destructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the H-termination of Si<100> surfaces.

  14. White-light diffraction phase microscopy at doubled space-bandwidth product.

    PubMed

    Shan, Mingguang; Kandel, Mikhail E; Majeed, Hassaan; Nastasa, Viorel; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-12-12

    White light diffraction microscopy (wDPM) is a quantitative phase imaging method that benefits from both temporal and spatial phase sensitivity, granted, respectively, by the common-path geometry and white light illumination. However, like all off-axis quantitative phase imaging methods, wDPM is characterized by a reduced space-bandwidth product compared to phase shifting approaches. This happens essentially because the ultimate resolution of the image is governed by the period of the interferogram and not just the diffraction limit. As a result, off-axis techniques generates single-shot, i.e., high time-bandwidth, phase measurements, at the expense of either spatial resolution or field of view. Here, we show that combining phase-shifting and off-axis, the original space-bandwidth is preserved. Specifically, we developed phase-shifting diffraction phase microscopy with white light, in which we measure and combine two phase shifted interferograms. Due to the white light illumination, the phase images are characterized by low spatial noise, i.e., <1nm pathlength. We illustrate the operation of the instrument with test samples, blood cells, and unlabeled prostate tissue biopsy.

  15. Phase unwrapping method based on multiple recording distances for digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Xiao, Wen; Pan, Feng; Rong, Lu

    2015-07-01

    We present a phase unwrapping approach based on multiple recording distances for digital holographic microscopy. It unwrappes the ambiguous phase image by synthesizing the extracted continuous components from a set of multiple reconstructed phase images obtained from a series of holograms by slightly shifting the specimen longitudinally with a step more than the longitudinal correlation length of the coherent noise field. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a more accurate calculation and better counteraction of phase noise than the methods proposed in previous research.

  16. Phase shifting technique for extended inline holographic microscopy with a pinhole array.

    PubMed

    Graulig, Christian; Kanka, Mario; Riesenberg, Rainer

    2012-09-24

    Digital inline holographic microscopy using a pinhole for sample illumination allows lensless imaging. To overcome restrictions of the sample size and density in the setup additional reference waves are generated by extending the single pinhole to a regular 2D pinhole array illumination. A technique is presented that uses phase shifting between the pinhole waves. Multiple foci with stable phase differences and a phase error (rms) of 0.027 rad generate pinhole waves which illuminate an undiluted, dense blood smear sample. Amplitude and phase images of the blood sample were successfully reconstructed.

  17. Phase stabilized homodyne of infrared scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoji G.; Gilburd, Leonid; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2014-12-29

    Scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows sub diffraction limited spatial resolution. Interferometric homodyne detection in s-SNOM can amplify the signal and extract vibrational responses based on sample absorption. A stable reference phase is required for a high quality homodyne-detected near-field signal. This work presents the development of a phase stabilization mechanism for s-SNOM to provide stable homodyne conditions. The phase stability is found to be better than 0.05 rad for the mid infrared light source. Phase stabilization results in improved near field images and vibrational spectroscopies. Spatial inhomogeneities of the boron nitride nanotubes are measured and compared.

  18. Phase aberration compensation of digital holographic microscopy based on least squares surface fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Jianglei; Zhao, Jianlin; Sun, Weiwei; Jiang, Hongzhen; Yan, Xiaobo

    2009-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy allows the numerical reconstruction of the complex wavefront of samples, especially biological samples such as living cells. In digital holographic microscopy, a microscope objective is introduced to improve the transverse resolution of the sample; however a phase aberration in the object wavefront is also brought along, which will affect the phase distribution of the reconstructed image. We propose here a numerical method to compensate for the phase aberration of thin transparent objects with a single hologram. The least squares surface fitting with points number less than the matrix of the original hologram is performed on the unwrapped phase distribution to remove the unwanted wavefront curvature. The proposed method is demonstrated with the samples of the cicada wings and epidermal cells of garlic, and the experimental results are consistent with that of the double exposure method.

  19. Wideband phase-locked loop circuit with real-time phase correction for frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shunsuke; Asakawa, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a wideband phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with real-time phase correction for high-speed and accurate force measurements by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. A high-speed operation of FM-AFM requires the use of a high frequency cantilever which, however, increases frequency-dependent phase delay caused by the signal delay within the cantilever excitation loop. Such phase delay leads to an error in the force measurements by FM-AFM especially with a low Q factor. Here, we present a method to compensate this phase delay in real time. Combined with a wideband PLL using a subtraction-based phase comparator, the method allows to perform an accurate and high-speed force measurement by FM-AFM. We demonstrate the improved performance by applying the developed PLL to three-dimensional force measurements at a mica/water interface.

  20. Wideband phase-locked loop circuit with real-time phase correction for frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shunsuke; Asakawa, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a wideband phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with real-time phase correction for high-speed and accurate force measurements by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. A high-speed operation of FM-AFM requires the use of a high frequency cantilever which, however, increases frequency-dependent phase delay caused by the signal delay within the cantilever excitation loop. Such phase delay leads to an error in the force measurements by FM-AFM especially with a low Q factor. Here, we present a method to compensate this phase delay in real time. Combined with a wideband PLL using a subtraction-based phase comparator, the method allows to perform an accurate and high-speed force measurement by FM-AFM. We demonstrate the improved performance by applying the developed PLL to three-dimensional force measurements at a mica/water interface.

  1. Parallel-quadrature phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using polarization beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, Dvgln

    2012-11-01

    We present a digital holography microscopy technique based on parallel-quadrature phase-shifting method. Two π/2 phase-shifted holograms are recorded simultaneously using polarization phase-shifting principle, slightly off-axis recording geometry, and two identical CCD sensors. The parallel phase-shifting is realized by combining circularly polarized object beam with a 45° degree polarized reference beam through a polarizing beam splitter. DC term is eliminated by subtracting the two holograms from each other and the object information is reconstructed after selecting the frequency spectrum of the real image. Both amplitude and phase object reconstruction results are presented. Simultaneous recording eliminates phase errors caused by mechanical vibrations and air turbulences. The slightly off-axis recording geometry with phase-shifting allows a much larger dimension of the spatial filter for reconstruction of the object information. This leads to better reconstruction capability than traditional off-axis holography.

  2. Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy for wide-field fluorescence and 3D phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu; Nitta, Koichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy is a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy, the main function of which is to obtain images from fluorescence intensity and quantified phase contrasts, simultaneously. The proposed system is mostly beneficial to biological studies, with the reason that often the studies are depending on fluorescent labeling techniques to detect certain intracellular molecules, while phase information reflecting properties of unstained transparent elements. This paper is presenting our latest researches on applications such as randomly moving micro-fluorescent beads and living cells of Physcomitrella patens. The experiments are succeeded on obtaining a succession of wide-field fluorescent images and holograms from micro-beads, and different depths focusing is realized via numerical reconstruction. Living cells of Physcomitrella patens are recorded in the static manner, the reconstruction distance indicates thickness of cellular structure. These results are implementing practical applications toward many biomedical science researches.

  3. High Resolution Phase-Sensitive Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Microscopy for Tracking Magnetic Microbeads and Cellular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Crecea, Vasilica; Graf, Benedikt W.; Kim, Taewoo; Popescu, Gabriel; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a real-time multimodal near-infrared imaging technology that tracks externally induced axial motion of magnetic microbeads in single cells in culture. The integrated multimodal imaging technique consists of phase-sensitive magnetomotive optical coherence microscopy (MM-OCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM).MPMis utilized for the visualization of multifunctional fluorescent and magnetic microbeads, while MM-OCM detects, with nanometer-scale sensitivity, periodic displacements of the microbeads induced by the modulation of an external magnetic field. Magnetomotive signals are measured from mouse macrophages, human breast primary ductal carcinoma cells, and human breast epithelial cells in culture, and validated with full-field phase-sensitive microscopy. This methodology demonstrates the capability for imaging controlled cell dynamics and has the potential for measuring cell biomechanical properties, which are important in assessing the health and pathological state of cells. PMID:25400496

  4. Total internal reflection holographic microscopy (TIRHM) for quantitative phase characterization of cell-substrate adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, William Mason, III

    Total Internal Reflection Holographic Microscopy (TIRHM) combines near-field microscopy with digital holography to produce a new form of near-field phase microscopy. Using a prism in TIR as a near-field imager, the presence of microscopic organisms, cell-substrate interfaces, and adhesions, causes relative refractive index (RRI) and frustrated TIR (f-TIR) to modulate the object beam's evanescent wave phase front. Quantitative phase images of test specimens such as Amoeba proteus, Dictyostelium Discoideum and cells such as SKOV-3 ovarian cancer and 3T3 fibroblasts are produced without the need to introduce stains or fluorophores. The angular spectrum method of digital holography to compensate for tilt anamorphism due to the inclined TIR plane is also discussed. The results of this work conclusively demonstrate, for the first time, the integration of near-field microscopy with digital holography. The cellular images presented show a correlation between the physical extent of the Amoeba proteus plasma membrane and the adhesions that are quantitatively profiled by phase cross-sectioning of the holographic images obtained by digital holography. With its ability to quantitatively characterise cellular adhesion and motility, it is anticipated that TIRHM can be a tool for characterizing and combating cancer metastasis, as well as improving our understanding of morphogenesis and embryogenesis itself.

  5. Single-shot and phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using a 2-D grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kyoung J; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Youngwoon

    2016-05-02

    We demonstrate digital holographic microscopy that, while being based on phase-shifting interferometry, is capable of single-shot measurements. A two-dimensional (2-D) diffraction grating placed in a Fourier plane of a standard in-line holographic phase microscope generates multiple copies of a sample image on a camera sensor. The identical image copies are spatially separated with different overall phase shifts according to the diffraction orders. The overall phase shifts are adjusted by controlling the lateral position of the grating. These phase shifts are then set to be multiples of π/2. Interferograms composed of four image copies combined with a parallel reference beam are acquired in a single shot. The interferograms are processed through a phase-shifting algorithm to produce a single complex image. By taking advantage of the higher sampling capacity of the in-line holography, we can increase the imaging information density by a factor of 3 without compromising the imaging acquisition speed.

  6. Gravity driven high throughput phase detecting cytometer based on quantitative interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Sun, Nan; Ferraro, Pietro; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Fei

    2014-04-01

    Phase distribution detection of cells and tissues is concerned since it is an important auxiliary method for observing biological samples. High speed and large amount cell detection is needed for its high detecting efficiency. In this paper, we have proposed a simple large scale biological sample phase detection device called gravity driven high throughput phase detecting cytometer based on quantitative interferometric microscopy to obtain flowing red blood cells phase. The system could realize high throughput phase detecting and statistical analysis with high detecting speed and in real time. The statistical characteristics of red blood cells could be obtained which might be helpful for biological analysis and disease detection. We believe this method is a powerful tool to quantitatively measure the phase distribution of biological samples.

  7. Integral refractive index determination of living suspension cells by multifocus digital holographic phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Björn; Kosmeier, Sebastian; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert; Bredebusch, Ilona; Domschke, Wolfram; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    A method for the determination of the integral refractive index of living cells in suspension by digital holographic microscopy is described. Digital holographic phase contrast images of spherical cells in suspension are recorded, and the radius as well as the integral refractive index are determined by fitting the relation between cell thickness and phase distribution to the measured phase data. The algorithm only requires information about the refractive index of the suspension medium and the image scale of the microscope system. The specific digital holographic microscopy advantage of subsequent focus correction allows a simultaneous investigation of cells in different focus planes. Results obtained from human pancreas and liver tumor cells show that the integral cellular refractive index decreases with increasing cell radius.

  8. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  9. Superresolved common-path phase-shifting digital inline holographic microscopy using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; Garcia, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Common-path phase-shifting lensless holographic microscopy has been recently proposed as a novel approach capable of high numerical aperture imaging in a lensless digital inline holographic microscopy layout [Opt. Lett.35, 3919 (2010)]. Here we present proof-of-concept validation for improving the resolution limit imposed by diffraction in such a setup. This is accomplished by shifting the phase lens displayed at the spatial light modulator, which moves the illumination point source to different off-axis positions. For each off-axis position, a set of inline phase-shifted holograms are recorded by the digital sensor and stored at the computer's memory for later digital postprocessing. As a consequence, each recording allows the recovery of different spatial frequency content of the object's diffracted wavefront meaning a superresolved image of the input object. Experimental results are reported validating the proposed method.

  10. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  11. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  12. Phase measurements of erythrocytes affected by metal ions with quantitative interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Shan, Yanke; Xu, Mingfei; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is an important factor in disease diagnosis, however, traditional setups as microscopes and cytometers cannot provide enough quantitative information of cellular morphology for in-depth statistics and analysis. In order to capture variations of erythrocytes affected by metal ions, quantitative interferometric microscopy (QIM) is applied to monitor their morphology changes. Combined with phase retrieval and cell recognition, erythrocyte phase images, as well as phase area and volume, can be accurately and automatically obtained. The research proves that QIM is an effective tool in cellular observation and measurement.

  13. Computational illumination for real-time gigapixel phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    This talk will describe new source coding methods for rapid acquisition of high-resolution phase images across a very large field of view, using a modified commercial microscope with LED array illumination. Our methods are inspired by a hybrid combination of Fourier Ptychography and differential phase contrast imaging, combined with source multiplexing strategies for fast capture and significantly reduced data requirements. Such computational approaches to optical microscopy add significant new capabilities to commercial microscopes without much cost or hardware modification. We demonstrate our system on live samples in vivo, validating our results for unstained, label-free samples against other popular phase retrieval methods.

  14. Pre-phase A: Development of a far-ultraviolet photometric- and spectroscopic-survey small-explorer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    We propose to perform a far ultraviolet photometric and spectroscopic survey covering the lambda lambda 1300-2000 band with a sensitivity comparable to that of the Palomar Sky Survey. This survey will proceed in three phases: an all-sky survey in three bands to 18-19.5(sup m), deep surveys of selected targets of interest in the same bands to 21-22(sup m), and a spectroscopic survey of 2 percent of the sky to 18(sup m) with a resolution of 3-20A. This mission, the Joint Ultraviolet Nightsky Observer (JUNO), can be performed by a Small-Explorer-class satellite.

  15. Using quantitative interference phase microscopy for sperm acrosome evaluation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, Michal; Kalinowski, Ksawery; Levi, Mattan; Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate quantitative assessment of sperm cell morphology, primarily acrosomal volume, using quantitative interference phase microscopy (IPM). Normally, the area of the acrosome is assessed using dyes that stain the acrosomal part of the cell. We have imaged fixed individual sperm cells using IPM. Following, the sample was stained and the same cells were imaged using bright field microscopy (BFM). We identified the acrosome using the stained BFM image, and used it to define a quantitative corresponding area in the IPM image and determine a quantitative threshold for evaluating the volume of the acrosome.

  16. LORENTZ PHASE IMAGING AND IN-SITU LORENTZ MICROSCOPY OF PATTERNED CO-ARRAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding magnetic structures and properties of patterned and ordinary magnetic films at nanometer length-scale is the area of immense technological and fundamental scientific importance. The key feature to such success is the ability to achieve visual quantitative information on domain configurations with a maximum ''magnetic'' resolution. Several methods have been developed to meet these demands (Kerr and Faraday effects, differential phase contrast microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, SEMPA etc.). In particular, the modern off-axis electron holography allows retrieval of the electron-wave phase shifts down to 2{pi}/N (with typical N = 10-20, approaching in the limit N {approx} 100) in TEM equipped with field emission gun, which is already successfully employed for studies of magnetic materials at nanometer scale. However, it remains technically demanding, sensitive to noise and needs highly coherent electron sources. As possible alternative we developed a new method of Lorentz phase microscopy [1,2] based on the Fourier solution [3] of magnetic transport-of-intensity (MTIE) equation. This approach has certain advantages, since it is less sensitive to noise and does not need high coherence of the source required by the holography. In addition, it can be realized in any TEM without basic hardware changes. Our approach considers the electron-wave refraction in magnetic materials (magnetic refraction) and became possible due to general progress in understanding of noninterferometric phase retrieval [4-6] dealing with optical refraction. This approach can also be treated as further development of Fresnel microscopy, used so far for imaging of in-situ magnetization process in magnetic materials studied by TEM. Figs. 1-3 show some examples of what kind information can be retrieved from the conventional Fresnel images using the new approach. Most of these results can be compared with electron-holographic data. Using this approach we can shed more light on fine

  17. Coherent noise reduction in digital holographic phase contrast microscopy by slightly shifting object.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Shuo; Wang, FanJing; Rong, Lu; Li, Rui

    2011-02-28

    A method to reduce coherent noise in digital holographic phase contrast microscopy is proposed. By slightly shifting the specimen, a series of digital holograms with different coherent noise patterns is recorded. Each hologram is reconstructed individually, while the different phase tilts of the reconstructed complex amplitudes due to the specimen shifts are corrected in the hologram plane by using numerical parametric lens method. Afterward, the lateral displacements of the phase maps from different holograms are compensated in the image plane by using digital image registration method. Thus, all phase images have same distribution, but uncorrelated coherent noise patterns. By a proper averaging procedure, the coherent noise of phase contrast image is reduced significantly. The experimental results are given to confirm the proposed method.

  18. One-particle spectroscopic intensities as a signature of shape phase transition: The {gamma}-unstable case

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Vitturi, A.

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the evolution of one-particle spectroscopic intensities as a possible signature of shape phase transitions. The study describes the odd systems in terms of the interacting boson-fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a phase transition from spherical U(5) to {gamma}-unstable O(6) situation. At the critical point, our findings are compared with the one-particle spectroscopic intensities that can be obtained within the E(5/4) model proposed by[F. Iachello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 052503 (2005); F. Iachello, in Symmetries and Low-Energy Phase Transitions in Nuclear Structure Physics, edited by G. Lo Bianco (University of Camerino Press, Camerino, Italy, in press)].

  19. In vivo endoscopic tissue diagnostics based on spectroscopic absorption, scattering, and phase function properties.

    PubMed

    Thueler, Philippe; Charvet, Igor; Bevilacqua, Frederic; St Ghislain, M; Ory, G; Marquet, Pierre; Meda, Paolo; Vermeulen, Ben; Depeursinge, Christian

    2003-07-01

    A fast spectroscopic system for superficial and local determination of the absorption and scattering properties of tissue (480 to 950 nm) is described. The probe can be used in the working channel of an endoscope. The scattering properties include the reduced scattering coefficient and a parameter of the phase function called gamma, which depends on its first two moments. The inverse problem algorithm is based on the fit of absolute reflectance measurements to cubic B-spline functions derived from the interpolation of a set of Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm's robustness was tested with simulations altered with various amounts of noise. The method was also assessed on tissue phantoms of known optical properties. Finally, clinical measurements performed endoscopically in vivo in the stomach of human subjects are presented. The absorption and scattering properties were found to be significantly different in the antrum and in the fundus and are correlated with histopathologic observations. The method and the instrument show promise for noninvasive tissue diagnostics of various epithelia.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of charged defects in polycrystalline pentacene by time- and wavelength-resolved electric force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Luria, Justin L; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Jaquith, Michael J; Hennig, Richard G; Marohn, John A

    2011-02-01

    Spatial maps of topography and trapped charge are acquired for polycrystalline pentacene thin-film transistors using electric and atomic force microscopy. In regions of trapped charge, the rate of trap clearing is studied as a function of the wavelength of incident radiation.

  1. TV-regularized phase reconstruction in differential-interference-contrast (DIC) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebegoldi, Simone; Bautista, Lola; Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Prato, Marco; Zanni, Luca; Plata, Arturo

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we address the problem of reconstructing the phase from color images acquired with differential-interference-contrast (DIC) microscopy. In particular, we reformulate the problem as the minimization of a least-squares fidelity function regularized with a total variation term, and we address the solution by exploiting a recently proposed inexact forward-backward approach. The effectiveness of this method is assessed on a realistic synthetic test.

  2. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies.

    PubMed

    Stan, Gheorghe; Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation), are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip-sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  3. Two-channel interferometric detection for the compensation of phase fluctuation noise in nonlinear infrared microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, J. H.; Lee, J. Y.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an interferometric implementation of nonlinear optical infrared microscopy in which a probe beam interrogates the refractive index change of samples that is induced by molecular vibrational absorption of an infrared pump beam. To compensate for the phase noise caused by the ambient airflow and external vibration, we configure two coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometers sharing a single microscope setup in the sample arm. Proper control over the phase between the two interference channels allows two simultaneous quadrature mode outputs. The validity of our method is proven by imaging polystyrene bead aggregates and comparing the images with the conventional single-channel results.

  4. Projection phase contrast microscopy with a hard x-ray nanofocused beam: Defocus and contrast transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Fuhse, C.; Krueger, S. P.; Tucoulou, R.; Cloetens, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a projection phase contrast microscopy experiment using hard x-ray pink beam undulator radiation focused by an adaptive mirror system to 100-200 nm spot size. This source is used to illuminate a lithographic test pattern with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function with source-to-sample distance in this holographic imaging scheme is quantified and the validity of the weak phase object approximation is confirmed for the experimental conditions.

  5. Digital microscopy using phase-shifting digital holography with two reference waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pengyi; Devaney, Anthony J

    2004-04-15

    A lensless, coherent optical microscope is described that uses a version of phase-shifting digital holography (PSDH) in conjunction with a field backpropagation algorithm to form coherent images of transmission-type objects. The PSDH is implemented by use of only two reference waves, in contrast with the usual implementation that requires four quadrature phase-shifting reference waves. Therefore only two digital holograms need to be recorded, and the complexity of the microscopic system is reduced. Experimental results are presented that compare images generated from conventional Gabor digital holography, two-reference-wave PSDH, and conventional white-light microscopy.

  6. Phase contrast x-ray microscopy study of rabbit primo vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-S.; Oh, S.-W.; Lim, J.-H.; Han, S.-W.

    2010-11-01

    The microstructural properties of the primo-vascular systems of rabbits were examined by phase contrast x-ray microscopy. The primo-vascular systems with an average diameter of 32 μm were extracted from the surfaces of the rabbit internal organs. Phase contrast x-ray imaging showed that the primo-vascular systems were tubules with random holes on their lateral surfaces. The size of the holes on the vascular surface was 2-5 μm. The holes might act as size selective channels for microcells coming in and out and assist in the unidirectional flow of the primo-vascular systems.

  7. [Phase contrast microscopy demonstration of glomerular erythrocytes in urine: practicable in ambulatory practice?].

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, M; Conen, D; Besch, W; Dubach, U C; Thiel, G

    1988-04-16

    The use of phase-contrast microscopy in microhematuria, as proposed in 1979 by Birch and Fairley, renders morphological changes in red cells easily detectable and makes it possible to distinguish glomerular from non-glomerular bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the practicability of this method as a routine laboratory test in ambulatory care. 60 patients with asymptomatic microhematuria (greater than or equal to 2 erythrocytes per high power field) were followed up over a one-year period. All patients were investigated by intravenous pyelography, ultrasound of urinary tract and three cytological examinations of the urine. The description of urine samples was done with phase-contrast microscopy by a first investigator at the beginning of the study and by a second after 12.8 months, blinded to clinical results and previous examinations. In 21 patients a definitive diagnosis was possible. In 18 patients the morphologic descriptions of the two investigators correlated with the clinical results. Only in two patients with established diagnosis there were differences between the urine description of the two investigators, and in one patient the interpretations of both investigators were wrong. These incorrect descriptions concerned patients with low-grade microhematuria. Thus, phase-contrast microscopy is a practicable method for the practitioner's use as a routine laboratory investigation. In low-grade microhematuria the method seems to be of minor value.

  8. Analysis of wavelength error in spectral phase shifting of digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Min

    2016-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is an attractive technology of precision measurement. Phase shifting is required to correctly reconstruct the measured surfaces from interferograms. Spectral phase shifting scheme, as an alternative approach of phase shifting, has drawn intensive attention in recent years. However, the wavelength modulated by the acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is not sufficiently precise. As a consequence, severe measurement errors will be caused. In this paper, an iterative calibration algorithm is proposed. It estimates the unknown wavelength errors in the 3-step spectral phase shifting interferometry and then reconstructs the complex object wave. The actual wavelength is obtained by minimizing the difference between the measured and calculated intensities. Numerical examples have demonstrated that this algorithm can achieve very high accuracy over a wide range of wavelengths.

  9. Interferometric phase microscopy using slightly-off-axis reflective point diffraction interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hongyi; Zhong, Zhi; Shan, Mingguang; Liu, Lei; Guo, Lili; Zhang, Yabin

    2017-03-01

    An interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) is proposed using slightly-off-axis reflective point diffraction interferometry for quantitative phase imaging. A retro-reflector consisting two mirrors is used to generate an angle between the object beam and reference beam, and a 45° tilted polarizing beam splitter is used to split the horizontal and vertical components of the both beams. Two carrier interferograms with π/2 phase-shift can be acquired in one shot, and the phase distribution of a thin specimen can be retrieved using a fast reconstruction method. The new IPM without loss in the utilization of the input-plane field of view combines the real time and optimizing detector bandwidth measurement benefit associated with slightly-off-axis method, high stability associated with common path geometry, and simplicity in terms of procedure and setup. Experiments are carried out on both static and dynamic specimens to demonstrate the validity and stability of the proposed method.

  10. Online quantitative phase imaging of vascular endothelial cells under fluid shear stress utilizing digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenthal-Schnittler, Maria; Schnittler, Hans Joachim; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    We have explored the utilization of quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a novel tool for quantifying the dynamics of morphologic parameters (morphodynamics) of confluent endothelial cell layers under fluid shear stress conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to fluid shear stress in a transparent cone/plate flow device (BioTech-Flow-System) and imaged with a modular setup for quantitative DHM phase imaging for up to 48 h. The resulting series of quantitative phase image sequences were analyzed for the average surface roughness of the cell layers and cell alignment. Our results demonstrate that quantitative phase imaging is a powerful and reliable tool to quantify the dynamics of morphological adaptation of endothelial cells to fluid shear stress.

  11. From images to interactions: high-resolution phase imaging in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, M; Möller, C; Müller, D J; Guckenberger, R

    2001-01-01

    In tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, the phase shift between excitation and response of the cantilever is used as a material-dependent signal complementary to topography. The localization of information in the phase signal is demonstrated with 1.4-nm lateral resolution on purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum in buffer solution. In a first-order approximation, the phase signal is found to correlate with modulations of the tip oscillation amplitude, induced by topography. Extending the analysis to contributions of the tip-sample interaction area as a second-order approximation, a method is proposed to extract information about the interaction from the phase signal for surfaces with a roughness in the order of the tip radius. PMID:11371473

  12. Quantitative phase microscopy using defocusing by means of a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Luis; Micó, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; García, Javier

    2010-03-29

    A new method for recovery the quantitative phase information of microscopic samples is presented. It is based on a spatial light modulator (SLM) and digital image processing as key elements to extract the sample's phase distribution. By displaying a set of lenses with different focal power, the SLM produces a set of defocused images of the input sample at the CCD plane. Such recorded images are then numerically processed to retrieve phase information. This iterative process is based on the wave propagation equation and leads on a complex amplitude image containing information of both amplitude and phase distributions of the input sample diffracted wave front. The proposed configuration is a non-interferometric architecture (conventional transmission imaging mode) where no moving elements are included. Experimental results perfectly correlate with the results obtained by conventional digital holographic microscopy (DHM).

  13. Invited Review Article: Methods for imaging weak-phase objects in electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Glaeser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Contrast has traditionally been produced in electron-microscopy of weak phase objects by simply defocusing the objective lens. There now is renewed interest, however, in using devices that apply a uniform quarter-wave phase shift to the scattered electrons relative to the unscattered beam, or that generate in-focus image contrast in some other way. Renewed activity in making an electron-optical equivalent of the familiar “phase-contrast” light microscope is based in part on the improved possibilities that are now available for device microfabrication. There is also a better understanding that it is important to take full advantage of contrast that can be had at low spatial frequency when imaging large, macromolecular objects. In addition, a number of conceptually new phase-plate designs have been proposed, thus increasing the number of options that are available for development. The advantages, disadvantages, and current status of each of these options is now compared and contrasted. Experimental results that are, indeed, superior to what can be accomplished with defocus-based phase contrast have been obtained recently with two different designs of phase-contrast aperture. Nevertheless, extensive work also has shown that fabrication of such devices is inconsistent, and that their working lifetime is short. The main limitation, in fact, appears to be electrostatic charging of any device that is placed into the electron diffraction pattern. The challenge in fabricating phase plates that are practical to use for routine work in electron microscopy thus may be more in the area of materials science than in the area of electron optics. PMID:24289381

  14. Characterization of Homopolymer and Polymer Blend Films by Phase Sensitive Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Wannemacher, Reinhold; Grill, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    CHARACTERIZATION OF HOMOPOLYMER AND POLYMER BLEND FILMS BY PHASE SENSITIVE ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY W Ngwa, R Wannemacher, W Grill Institute of Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany Abstract We have used phase sensitive acoustic microscopy (PSAM) to study homopolymer thin films of polystyrene (PS) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as well as PS/PMMA blend films. We show from our results that PSAM can be used as a complementary and highly valuable technique for elucidating the three-dimensional (3D) morphology and micromechanical properties of thin films. Three-dimensional image acquisition with vector contrast provides the basis for: complex V(z) analysis (per image pixel), 3D image processing, height profiling, and subsurface image analysis of the polymer films. Results show good agreement with previous studies. In addition, important new information on the three dimensional structure and properties of polymer films is obtained. Homopolymer film structure analysis reveals (pseudo-) dewetting by retraction of droplets, resulting in a morphology that can serve as a starting point for the analysis of polymer blend thin films. The outcome of confocal laser scanning microscopy studies, performed on the same samples are correlated with the obtained results. Advantages and limitations of PSAM are discussed.

  15. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies.

  16. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy for label-free multiplexed protein microarray assay.

    PubMed

    Joo, Chulmin; Ozkumur, Emre; Unlü, M Selim; Boer, Johannes F de

    2009-10-15

    Quantitative measurement of affinities and kinetics of various biomolecular interactions such as protein-protein, protein-DNA and receptor-ligand is central to our understanding of basic molecular and cellular functions and is useful for therapeutic evaluation. Here, we describe a laser-scanning quantitative imaging method, referred to as spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy, as an optical platform for label-free detection of biomolecular interactions. The instrument is based on a confocal interferometric microscope that enables depth-resolved quantitative phase measurements on sensor surface with high spatial resolution and phase stability. We demonstrate picogram per square millimeter surface mass sensitivity, and show its sensing capability by presenting static and dynamic detection of multiplexed protein microarray as immobilized antigens capture their corresponding antibodies.

  17. Measurement of nonlinear characteristics of silver-halide holographic materials by phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2003-05-01

    Lin-curves of plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions were measured for the combinations of AAC developer and the R9 bleaching agent. Then each holographic grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using both medium-power (40 X) and high-power immersion (100 X) objectives. Thus, besides of the Lin-curves, the modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern can also been determined. This latter characteristics is used in coupled wave theory to calculate the diffraction efficiency of holographic gratings, thus the measured diffraction efficiencies can be compared to those predicted by the theory. Moreover, this direct study of the phase profile of the gratings can be used for optimising processing.

  18. Phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with a laboratory setup.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A; Diemoz, Paul C; Lorenzo, Rodolfo; Speller, Robert D; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    We report on the design and realization of an x-ray imaging system for quantitative phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with laboratory-scale instrumentation. Phase and amplitude were separated quantitatively at x-ray energies up to 80 keV with micrometric spatial resolution. The accuracy of the results was tested against numerical simulations, and the spatial resolution was experimentally quantified by measuring a Siemens star phase object. This simple setup should find broad application in those areas of x-ray imaging where high energy and spatial resolution are simultaneously required and in those difficult cases where the sample contains materials with similar x-ray absorption.

  19. Microscopy of non-birefringent transmissive phase samples using Sagnac laser interferometer.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sanjukta; Bhattacharya, K

    2014-11-01

    A cyclic interferometer, appropriately combined with a long working distance microscope objective, is adapted for quantitative phase microscopy. In such an arrangement, the sample information, in terms of the diffracted orders emerging from the sample, is carried by both the counter propagating beams within the cyclic interferometer. However, positioning the sample close to the input/output cube beam splitter and use of a suitably converging laser beam of light as the input to the interferometer ensure that only one of the counter propagating beams carries the object information to the objective while the other beam, which serves as the reference, allows only the undiffracted component to contribute to the process of image formation. Use of suitable polarization optics renders the interferometer its polarization phase shifting property. Using the proposed arrangement, the experimental results showing the quantitative 3D phase rendering of polystyrene microspheres and micro-wells etched in glass are presented.

  20. Laser Spectroscopic Study of Cold Gas-Phase Host-Guest Complexes of Crown Ethers.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The structure, molecular recognition, and inclusion effect on the photophysics of guest species are investigated for neutral and ionic cold host-guest complexes of crown ethers (CEs) in the gas phase. Here, the cold neutral host-guest complexes are produced by a supersonic expansion technique and the cold ionic complexes are generated by the combination of electrospray ionization (ESI) and a cryogenically cooled ion trap. The host species are 3n-crown-n (3nCn; n = 4, 5, 6, 8) and (di)benzo-3n-crown-n ((D)B3nCn; n = 4, 5, 6, 8). For neutral guests, we have chosen water and aromatic molecules, such as phenol and benzenediols, and as ionic species we have chosen alkali-metal ions (M(+) ). The electronic spectra and isomer-specific vibrational spectra for the complexes are observed with various laser spectroscopic methods: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF); ultraviolet-ultraviolet hole-burning (UV-UV HB); and IR-UV double resonance (IR-UV DR) spectroscopy. The obtained spectra are analyzed with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. We will discuss how the host and guest species change their flexible structures for forming best-fit stable complexes (induced fitting) and what kinds of interactions are operating for the stabilization of the complexes. For the alkali metal ion•CE complexes, we investigate the solvation effect by attaching water molecules. In addition to the ground-state stabilization problem, we will show that the complexation leads to a drastic effect on the excited-state electronic structure and dynamics of the guest species, which we call a "cage-like effect".

  1. In situ spectroscopic studies on vapor phase catalytic decomposition of dimethyl oxalate.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shweta; Tharpa, Kalsang; Akuri, Satyanarayana Reddy; K, Rakesh; Kumar, Ajay; Deshpande, Raj; Nair, Sreejit A

    2017-03-15

    Dimethyl Oxalate (DMO) has recently gained prominence as a valuable intermediate for the production of compounds of commercial importance. The stability of DMO is poor and hence this can result in the decomposition of DMO under reaction conditions. The mechanism of DMO decomposition is however not reported and more so on catalytic surfaces. Insights into the mechanism of decomposition would help in designing catalysts for its effective molecular transformation. It is well known that DMO is sensitive to moisture, which can also be a factor contributing to its decomposition. The present work reports the results of decomposition of DMO on various catalytic materials. The materials studied consist of acidic (γ-Al2O3), basic (MgO), weakly acidic (ZnAl2O4) and neutral surfaces such as α-Al2O3 and mesoporous precipitated SiO2. Infrared spectroscopy is used to identify the nature of adsorption of the molecule on the various surfaces. The spectroscopy study is done at a temperature of 200 °C, which is the onset of gas phase decomposition of DMO. The results indicate that the stability of DMO is lower than the corresponding acid, i.e. oxalic acid. It is also one of the products of decomposition. Spectroscopic data suggest that DMO decomposition is related to surface acidity and the extent of decomposition depends on the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Decomposition was also observed on α-Al2O3, which was attributed to the residual surface hydroxyl groups. DMO decomposition to oxalic acid was not observed on the basic surface (MgO).

  2. High-temperature phase transitions, spectroscopic properties, and dimensionality reduction in rubidium thorium molybdate family.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bin; Gesing, Thorsten M; Kegler, Philip; Modolo, Giuseppe; Bosbach, Dirk; Schlenz, Hartmut; Suleimanov, Evgeny V; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2014-03-17

    Four new rubidium thorium molybdates have been synthesized by high-temperature solid-state reactions. The crystal structures of Rb8Th(MoO4)6, Rb2Th(MoO4)3, Rb4Th(MoO4)4, and Rb4Th5(MoO4)12 were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All these compounds construct from MoO4 tetrahedra and ThO8 square antiprisms. The studied compounds adopt the whole range of possible structure dimensionalities from zero-dimensional (0D) to three-dimensional (3D): finite clusters, chains, sheets, and frameworks. Rb8Th(MoO4)6 crystallizes in 0D containing clusters of [Th(MoO4)6](8-). The crystal structure of Rb2Th(MoO4)3 is based upon one-dimensional chains with configuration units of [Th(MoO4)3](2-). Two-dimensional sheets occur in compound Rb4Th(MoO4)4, and a 3D framework with channels formed by thorium and molybdate polyhedra has been observed in Rb4Th5(MoO4)12. The Raman and IR spectroscopic properties of these compounds are reported. Temperature-depended phase transition effects were observed in Rb2Th(MoO4)3 and Rb4Th(MoO4)4 using thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry analysis and high-temperature powder diffraction methods.

  3. Superresolution Microscopy of the Volume Phase Transition of pNIPAM Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Gaurasundar Marc; Nöjd, Sofi; Braibanti, Marco; Schurtenberger, Peter; Scheffold, Frank

    Hierarchical polymer structures such as pNIPAM microgels have been extensively studied for their ability to undergo significant structural and physical transformations that can be controlled by external stimuli such as temperature, pH or solvent composition. Here we discuss in-situ three-dimensional superresolution microscopy of dye-labeled submicron sized PNiPAM microgels. We use direct STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (dSTORM) to study the internal density distribution and the particle-to-particle variability of the volume phase transition. Moreover we discuss the potential of this technique towards future applications to more complex architectures for example microgel with anisotropic shape or ones that are doped or decorated with nanoparticles.

  4. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses surface roughness examined by interferential shifting phase and scanning electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Merindano, M D; Canals, M; Saona, C; Costa, J

    1998-01-01

    The anterior surface roughness of seven factory new rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses has been studied by interferential shifting phase microscopy (ISPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Five lenses were fluorsilicone acrylate and two lenses were silicone acrylate. Their material Dk ranged from 14 to 210. ISPM is shown to be a reliable and non-destructive method to observe and measure the relief of the contact lens surface. Moreover, profile and contour data are easily stored for further quantitative studies. ISPM contour patterns of the studied lenses are qualitatively compared with those obtained by SEM for the same lenses. Results point out that ISPM gives similar accuracy but it is non-destructive and cheaper than SEM. Moreover, the quantitative study of surface roughness suggests that there is a relationship between surface roughness and Dk of the lens material: surface roughness increases with Dk and allows to distinguish between lenses with low, medium and high Dk.

  5. Total three-dimensional imaging of phase objects using defocusing microscopy: Application to red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, P. M. S.; Siman, L.; Amaral, F. T.; Agero, U.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce Defocusing Microscopy (DM), a bright-field optical microscopy technique able to perform total three-dimensional (3D) imaging of transparent objects. By total 3D imaging, we mean the determination of the actual shapes of the upper and lower surfaces of a phase object. We propose a methodology using DM and apply it to red blood cells subject to different osmolality conditions: hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic solutions. For each situation, the shapes of the upper and lower cell surface-membranes (lipid bilayer/cytoskeleton) are completely recovered, displaying the deformation of red blood cell (RBC) surfaces due to adhesion on the glass-substrate. The axial resolution of our technique allowed us to image surface-membranes separated by distances as small as 300 nm. Finally, we determine the volume, surface area, sphericity index, and RBC refractive index for each osmotic condition.

  6. Deconstructing the Late Phase of Vimentin Assembly by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM)

    PubMed Central

    Winheim, Stefan; Hieb, Aaron R.; Silbermann, Marleen; Surmann, Eva-Maria; Wedig, Tatjana; Herrmann, Harald; Langowski, Jörg; Mücke, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative imaging of intermediate filaments (IF) during the advanced phase of the assembly process is technically difficult, since the structures are several µm long and therefore they exceed the field of view of many electron (EM) or atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Thereby quantitative studies become extremely laborious and time-consuming. To overcome these difficulties, we prepared fluorescently labeled vimentin for visualization by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In order to investigate if the labeling influences the assembly properties of the protein, we first determined the association state of unlabeled vimentin mixed with increasing amounts of labeled vimentin under low ionic conditions by analytical ultracentrifugation. We found that bona fide tetrameric complexes were formed even when half of the vimentin was labeled. Moreover, we demonstrate by quantitative atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy that the morphology and the assembly properties of filaments were not affected when the fraction of labeled vimentin was below 10%. Using fast frame rates we observed the rapid deposition of fluorescently labeled IFs on glass supports by TIRFM in real time. By tracing their contours, we have calculated the persistence length of long immobilized vimentin IFs to 1 µm, a value that is identical to those determined for shorter unlabeled vimentin. These results indicate that the structural properties of the filaments were not affected significantly by the dye. Furthermore, in order to analyze the late elongation phase, we mixed long filaments containing either Alexa 488- or Alexa 647-labeled vimentin. The ‘patchy’ structure of the filaments obtained unambiguously showed the elongation of long IFs through direct end-to-end annealing of individual filaments. PMID:21544245

  7. An improved phase shift reconstruction algorithm of fringe scanning technique for X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, S.; Yang, H.; Kudo, H.; Momose, A.; Yashiro, W.

    2015-02-15

    The X-ray phase imaging method has been applied to observe soft biological tissues, and it is possible to image the soft tissues by using the benefit of the so-called “Talbot effect” by an X-ray grating. One type of the X-ray phase imaging method was reported by combining an X-ray imaging microscope equipped by a Fresnel zone plate with a phase grating. Using the fringe scanning technique, a high-precision phase shift image could be obtained by displacing the grating step by step and measuring dozens of sample images. The number of the images was selected to reduce the error caused by the non-sinusoidal component of the Talbot self-image at the imaging plane. A larger number suppressed the error more but increased radiation exposure and required higher mechanical stability of equipment. In this paper, we analyze the approximation error of fringe scanning technique for the X-ray microscopy which uses just one grating and proposes an improved algorithm. We compute the approximation error by iteration and substitute that into the process of reconstruction of phase shift. This procedure will suppress the error even with few sample images. The results of simulation experiments show that the precision of phase shift image reconstructed by the proposed algorithm with 4 sample images is almost the same as that reconstructed by the conventional algorithm with 40 sample images. We also have succeeded in the experiment with real data.

  8. Axial Phase-Darkfield-Contrast (APDC), a new technique for variable optical contrasting in light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Piper, T; Piper, J

    2012-09-01

    Axial phase-darkfield-contrast (APDC) has been developed as an illumination technique in light microscopy which promises significant improvements and a higher variability in imaging of several transparent 'problem specimens'. With this method, a phase contrast image is optically superimposed on an axial darkfield image so that a partial image based on the principal zeroth order maximum (phase contrast) interferes with an image, which is based on the secondary maxima (axial darkfield). The background brightness and character of the resulting image can be continuously modulated from a phase contrast-dominated to a darkfield-dominated character. In order to achieve this illumination mode, normal objectives for phase contrast have to be fitted with an additional central light stopper needed for axial (central) darkfield illumination. In corresponding condenser light masks, a small perforation has to be added in the centre of the phase contrast providing light annulus. These light modulating elements are properly aligned when the central perforation is congruent with the objective's light stop and the light annulus is conjugate with the phase ring. The breadth of the condenser light annulus and thus the intensity of the phase contrast partial image can be regulated with the aperture diaphragm. Additional contrast effects can be achieved when both illuminating light components are filtered at different colours. In this technique, the axial resolution (depth of field) is significantly enhanced and the specimen's three-dimensional appearance is accentuated with improved clarity as well as fine details at the given resolution limit. Typical artefacts associated with phase contrast and darkfield illumination are reduced in our methods.

  9. Accurate phase measurements for thick spherical objects using optical quadrature microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures have resulted in the birth of over three million babies since 1978. Yet the live birth rate in the United States was only 34% in 2005, with 32% of the successful pregnancies resulting in multiple births. These multiple pregnancies were directly attributed to the transfer of multiple embryos to increase the probability that a single, healthy embryo was included. Current viability markers used for IVF, such as the cell number, symmetry, size, and fragmentation, are analyzed qualitatively with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. However, this method is not ideal for quantitative measures beyond the 8-cell stage of development because the cells overlap and obstruct the view within and below the cluster of cells. We have developed the phase-subtraction cell-counting method that uses the combination of DIC and optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells accurately in live mouse embryos beyond the 8-cell stage. We have also created a preliminary analysis to measure the cell symmetry, size, and fragmentation quantitatively by analyzing the relative dry mass from the OQM image in conjunction with the phase-subtraction count. In this paper, we will discuss the characterization of OQM with respect to measuring the phase accurately for spherical samples that are much larger than the depth of field. Once fully characterized and verified with human embryos, this methodology could provide the means for a more accurate method to score embryo viability.

  10. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; ...

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  11. Nanoimaging and spectroscopic analysis of rubber/ZnO interfaces by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shin; Dohi, Hidehiko

    2006-05-09

    Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) was employed for investigating interactions between rubber and ZnO particles in the accelerated vulcanization process. Combining elemental mapping and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) by EFTEM enabled the characterization of the interfaces with spatial resolutions of less than 10 nm and with high elemental detection sensitivity. We found that a sulfur- and zinc-rich compound was generated around ZnO particles, and that product was then revealed to be ZnS-generated as a byproduct in the accelerated vulcanization process. Through this study, it is indicated that the accelerated vulcanization with ZnO does not occur uniformly in the rubber matrix; it occurs locally around ZnO particles at a higher reaction rate, implying that the rubber network structure is not uniform on the nanoscale.

  12. Temporal phase-unwrapping algorithm for dynamic interference pattern analysis in interference-contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Doel, L R; van Vliet, L J

    2001-09-01

    A temporal phase-unwrapping algorithm has been developed for the analysis of dynamic interference patterns generated with interference-contrast microscopy in micromachined picoliter vials. These vials are etched in silicon dioxide, have a typical depth of 6 mum, and are filled with a liquid sample. In this kind of microscopy, fringe patterns are observed at the air-liquid interface. These fringe patterns are caused by interference between the directly reflected part of an incident plane wave and the part of that wave that is reflected on the bottom of the vial. The optical path difference (OPD) between both parts is proportional to the distance to the reflecting bottom of the vial. Evaporation decreases the OPD at the meniscus level and causes alternating constructive and destructive interference of the incident light, resulting in an interferogram. Imaging of the space-varying OPD yields a fringe pattern in which the isophotes correspond to isoheight curves of the meniscus. When the bottom is flat, the interference pattern allows for monitoring of the meniscus as a function of time during evaporation. However, when there are objects on the bottom of the vial, the heights of these objects are observed as phase jumps in the fringes proportional to their heights. First, we present a classical electromagnetic description of interference-contrast microscopy. Second, a temporal phase-unwrapping algorithm is described that retrieves the meniscus profile from the interference pattern. Finally, this algorithm is applied to measure height differences of objects on the bottom in other micromachined vials with a precision of ~5 nm.

  13. Nanoscale nuclear architecture for cancer diagnosis by spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pin; Bista, Rajan K.; Khalbuss, Walid E.; Qiu, Wei; Staton, Kevin D.; Zhang, Lin; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2011-03-01

    Alterations in nuclear architecture are the hallmark diagnostic characteristic of cancer cells. In this work, we show that the nuclear architectural characteristics quantified by spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (SL-QPM), is more sensitive for the identification of cancer cells than conventional cytopathology. We demonstrated the importance of nuclear architectural characteristics in both an animal model of intestinal carcinogenesis - APC/Min mouse model and human cytology specimens with colorectal cancer by identifying cancer from cytologically noncancerous appearing cells. The determination of nanoscale nuclear architecture using this simple and practical optical instrument is a significant advance towards cancer diagnosis.

  14. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  15. Improved phase sensitivity in spectral domain phase microscopy using line-field illumination and self phase-referencing

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Choi, Wonshik; Oh, Seungeun; Lue, Niyom; Park, Yongkeun; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a quantitative phase microscope based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography and line-field illumination. The line illumination allows self phase-referencing method to reject common-mode phase noise. The quantitative phase microscope also features a separate reference arm, permitting the use of high numerical aperture (NA > 1) microscope objectives for high resolution phase measurement at multiple points along the line of illumination. We demonstrate that the path-length sensitivity of the instrument can be as good as 41 pm/Hz, which makes it suitable for nanometer scale study of cell motility. We present the detection of natural motions of cell surface and two-dimensional surface profiling of a HeLa cell. PMID:19550464

  16. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy for live-cell quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slabý, TomáÅ.¡; Křížová, Aneta; Lošt'ák, Martin; Čolláková, Jana; Jůzová, Veronika; Veselý, Pavel; Chmelík, Radim

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) and various examples of observations of living cells including combination of CCHM with fluorescence microscopy. CCHM is a novel technique of quantitative phase imaging (QPI). It is based on grating off-axis interferometer, which is fully adapted for the use of incoherent illumination. This enables high-quality QPI free from speckles and parasitic interferences and lateral resolution of classical widefield microscopes. Label-free nature of QPI makes CCHM a useful tool for long-term observations of living cells. Moreover, coherence-gating effect induced by the use of incoherent illumination enables QPI of cells even in scattering media. Combination of CCHM with common imaging techniques brings the possibility to exploit advantages of QPI while simultaneously identifying the observed structures or processes by well-established imaging methods. We used CCHM for investigation of general parameters of cell life cycles and for research of cells reactions to different treatment. Cells were also visualized in 3D collagen gel with the use of CCHM. It was found that both the cell activity and movement of the collagen fibers can be registered. The method of CCHM in combination with fluorescence microscopy was used in order to obtain complementary information about cell morphology and identify typical morphological changes associated with different types of cell death. This combination of CCHM with common imaging technique has a potential to provide new knowledge about various processes and simultaneously their confirmation by comparison with known imaging method.

  17. New approaches for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, L.; Kaiser, M.; Ketelhut, S.; Pereira, S.; Goycoolea, F.; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables high resolution non-destructive inspection of technical surfaces and minimally-invasive label-free live cell imaging. However, the analysis of confluent cell layers represents a challenge as quantitative DHM phase images in this case do not provide sufficient information for image segmentation, determination of the cellular dry mass or calculation of the cell thickness. We present novel strategies for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative DHM phase contrast utilizing a histogram based-evaluation procedure. The applicability of our approach is illustrated by quantification of drug induced cell morphology changes and it is shown that the method is capable to quantify reliable global morphology changes of confluent cell layers.

  18. Lensless transport-of-intensity phase microscopy and tomography with a color LED matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate lens-less quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED array. Based on multi-wavelength transport-of- intensity phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of ˜3.7μm and an axial resolution of ˜5μm, over wide large imaging FOV of 24mm2. The resolution and FOV can be further improved by using a larger image sensors with small pixels straightforwardly. This compact, low-cost, robust, portable platform with a decent imaging performance may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine needs, or for reducing health care costs for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  19. Spectral-domain phase microscopy with improved sensitivity using two-dimensional detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.; Dion, C.; Ozaki, T.; Lesk, M. R.; Costantino, S.

    2011-02-15

    In this work we demonstrate the use of two-dimensional detectors to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity in spectral-domain phase microscopy for subnanometer accuracy measurements. We show that an increase in SNR can be obtained, from 82 dB to 105 dB, using 150 pixel lines of a low-cost CCD camera as compared to a single line, to compute an averaged axial scan. In optimal mechanical conditions, phase stability as small as 92 {mu}rad, corresponding to 6 pm displacement accuracy, could be obtained. We also experimentally demonstrate the benefit of spatial-averaging in terms of the reduction of signal fading due to an axially moving sample. The applications of the improved system are illustrated by imaging live cells in culture.

  20. Label-free imaging of developing vasculature in zebrafish with phase variance optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Fingler, Jeff; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-03-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to visualize blood flow in the vasculature of zebrafish embryos, without using exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2 μm in tissue, and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Imaging of 2-5 days post-fertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed structures of somites, spinal cord, gut and notochord based on intensity contrast. Visualization of the blood flow in the aorta, veins and intersegmental vessels was achieved with phase variance contrast. The pvOCM vasculature images were confirmed with corresponding fluorescence microscopy of a zebrafish transgene that labels the vasculature with green fluorescent protein. The pvOCM images also revealed functional information of the blood flow activities that is crucial for the study of vascular development.

  1. Au Colloids Formed by Ion Implantation in Muscovite Mica Studied by Vibrational and Electronic Spectroscopes and Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, Y. S.; Henderson, D. O.; Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Collins, W. E.; White, C. W.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zhu, Jane G.

    1997-01-01

    Au was implanted into the (001) surface of Muscovite mica at an energy of 1.1 MeV and at doses of 1, 3, 6, and 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/cu cm. Optical spectra of the as-implanted samples revealed a peak at 2.28 eV (545 nm) which is attributed to the surface plasmon absorption of Au colloids. The infrared reflectance measurements show a decreasing reflectivity with increasing ion dose in the Si-O stretching region (900-1200 /cm). A new peak observed at 967 /cm increases with the ion dose and is assigned to an Si-O dangling bond. Atomic force microscopy images of freshly cleaved samples implanted with 6 and 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/sq cm indicated metal colloids with diameters between 0.9- 1.5 nm. AFM images of the annealed samples showed irregularly shaped structures with a topology that results from the fusion of smaller colloids.

  2. Studies on the interaction of heparin with lysozyme by multi-spectroscopic techniques and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lunfu; Hu, Xiaoli; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Shaopu

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between heparin (Hep) and lysozyme (Lyso) in vitro was studied by fluorescence, UV-vis, circular dichroism (CD), resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) under normal physiological conditions. UV-vis spectra of Lyso showed the absorbance was significantly increased with the addition of Hep. Fluorescence studies revealed that the emission quenching of Lyso with Hep was initiated by static quenching mechanism. CD spectral studies showed that Hep induced conformational changes in the secondary structure of Lyso. RRS spectra of Lyso showed the intensity of scattering was significantly increased with the addition of Hep and the enhanced RRS intensities were proportional to the concentration of Hep in a certain range. Thus, a new RRS method using Lyso as a probe could be used for the determination of Hep. The detection limit for Hep was 3.9 ng mL- 1. In addition, the shape of the complex was characterized by AFM. The possible reaction mechanism and the reasons for the enhancement of RRS intensity had been discussed through experimental results.

  3. Dual-modality wide-field photothermal quantitative phase microscopy and depletion of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turko, Nir A.; Barnea, Itay; Blum, Omry; Korenstein, Rafi; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-03-01

    We review our dual-modality technique for quantitative imaging and selective depletion of populations of cells based on wide-field photothermal (PT) quantitative phase imaging and simultaneous PT cell extermination. The cells are first labeled by plasmonic gold nanoparticles, which evoke local plasmonic resonance when illuminated by light in a wavelength corresponding to their specific plasmonic resonance peak. This reaction creates changes of temperature, resulting in changes of phase. This phase changes are recorded by a quantitative phase microscope (QPM), producing specific imaging contrast, and enabling bio-labeling in phase microscopy. Using this technique, we have shown discrimination of EGFR over-expressing (EGFR+) cancer cells from EGFR under-expressing (EGFR-) cancer cells. Then, we have increased the excitation power in order to evoke greater temperatures, which caused specific cell death, all under real-time phase acquisition using QPM. Close to 100% of all EGFR+ cells were immediately exterminated when illuminated with the strong excitation beam, while all EGFR- cells survived. For the second experiment, in order to simulate a condition where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in blood, we have mixed the EGFR+ cancer cells with white blood cells (WBCs) from a healthy donor. Here too, we have used QPM to observe and record the phase of the cells as they were excited for selective visualization and then exterminated. The WBCs survival rate was over 95%, while the EGFR+ survival rate was under 5%. The technique may be the basis for real-time detection and controlled treatment of CTCs.

  4. Deciphering complex, functional structures with synchrotron-based absorption and phase contrast tomographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Reichold, J.; Weber, B.; Haberthür, D.; Schittny, J.; Eller, J.; Büchi, F. N.; Marone, F.

    2010-09-01

    Nowadays, thanks to the high brilliance available at modern, third generation synchrotron facilities and recent developments in detector technology, it is possible to record volumetric information at the micrometer scale within few minutes. High signal-to-noise ratio, quantitative information on very complex structures like the brain micro vessel architecture, lung airways or fuel cells can be obtained thanks to the combination of dedicated sample preparation protocols, in-situ acquisition schemes and cutting-edge imaging analysis instruments. In this work we report on recent experiments carried out at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source [1] where synchrotron-based tomographic microscopy has been successfully used to obtain fundamental information on preliminary models for cerebral fluid flow [2], to provide an accurate mesh for 3D finite-element simulation of the alveolar structure of the pulmonary acinus [3] and to investigate the complex functional mechanism of fuel cells [4]. Further, we introduce preliminary results on the combination of absorption and phase contrast microscopy for the visualization of high-Z nanoparticles in soft tissues, a fundamental information when designing modern drug delivery systems [5]. As an outlook we briefly discuss the new possibilities offered by high sensitivity, high resolution grating interferomtery as well as Zernike Phase contrast nanotomography [6].

  5. Sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery in holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rivenson, Yair; Wu, Yichen; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging of densely connected samples such as pathology slides using digital in-line holographic microscopy requires the acquisition of several holograms, e.g., at >6–8 different sample-to-sensor distances, to achieve robust phase recovery and coherent imaging of specimen. Reducing the number of these holographic measurements would normally result in reconstruction artifacts and loss of image quality, which would be detrimental especially for biomedical and diagnostics-related applications. Inspired by the fact that most natural images are sparse in some domain, here we introduce a sparsity-based phase reconstruction technique implemented in wavelet domain to achieve at least 2-fold reduction in the number of holographic measurements for coherent imaging of densely connected samples with minimal impact on the reconstructed image quality, quantified using a structural similarity index. We demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging Papanicolaou smears and breast cancer tissue slides over a large field-of-view of ~20 mm2 using 2 in-line holograms that are acquired at different sample-to-sensor distances and processed using sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery. This new phase recovery approach that makes use of sparsity can also be extended to other coherent imaging schemes, involving e.g., multiple illumination angles or wavelengths to increase the throughput and speed of coherent imaging. PMID:27901048

  6. Early responses of human cancer cells upon photodynamic treatment monitored by laser phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Theo A.; Graschew, Georgi; Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment of cancer cells is known to eventually cause cell death in most cases. The precise pathways and the time course seem to vary among different cell types and modes of photodynamic treatment. In this contribution, the focus was put on the responses of human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 within the first 15 minutes after laser irradiation in the presence of Photofrin« II (PII). To monitor the cell response in this early time period laser phase microscopic imaging was used, a method sensitive to changes in overall cell shape and intracellular structures, mediated by changes in the local refractive index. Laser irradiation of cells loaded with PII induced a significant reduction of the phase shifts, which probably reflects the induced damage to the different cellular membrane structures. The data suggest that even within the first 30 s after the onset of laser illumination, a significant reduction of the phase shifts can be detected. These results underline that laser phase microscopy is a suitable diagnostic tool for cellular research, also in the early time domain.

  7. Sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery in holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenson, Yair; Wu, Yichen; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-11-01

    High-resolution imaging of densely connected samples such as pathology slides using digital in-line holographic microscopy requires the acquisition of several holograms, e.g., at >6–8 different sample-to-sensor distances, to achieve robust phase recovery and coherent imaging of specimen. Reducing the number of these holographic measurements would normally result in reconstruction artifacts and loss of image quality, which would be detrimental especially for biomedical and diagnostics-related applications. Inspired by the fact that most natural images are sparse in some domain, here we introduce a sparsity-based phase reconstruction technique implemented in wavelet domain to achieve at least 2-fold reduction in the number of holographic measurements for coherent imaging of densely connected samples with minimal impact on the reconstructed image quality, quantified using a structural similarity index. We demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging Papanicolaou smears and breast cancer tissue slides over a large field-of-view of ~20 mm2 using 2 in-line holograms that are acquired at different sample-to-sensor distances and processed using sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery. This new phase recovery approach that makes use of sparsity can also be extended to other coherent imaging schemes, involving e.g., multiple illumination angles or wavelengths to increase the throughput and speed of coherent imaging.

  8. Sinter-free phase conversion and scanning transmission electron microscopy of FePt nanoparticle monolayers.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; Scarel, Giovanna; Wang, Junwei; Parsons, Gregory N; Tracy, Joseph B

    2011-10-05

    Thermally robust monolayers of 4-6 nm diameter FePt nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated by combining chemical synthesis and atomic layer deposition. Spin-cast monolayers of FePt NPs were coated with thin, 11 nm-thick layers of amorphous Al(2)O(3), followed by annealing to convert the FePt NPs from an alloy (A1) into intermetallic FePt (L1(0)) and FePt(3) (L1(2)) phases. The Al(2)O(3) layer serves as a barrier that prevents sintering between NPs during annealing at temperatures up to 730 °C. Electron and X-ray diffraction in conjunction with high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) show that as-synthesized A1 FePt NPs convert into L1(0) and L1(2) phase NPs through annealing. HAADF-STEM measurements of individual NPs reveal imperfect ordering and show that the NP composition determines which intermetallic phase is obtained. Mixed-phase NPs with L1(0) cores and FePt(3) L1(2) shells were also observed, as well as a smaller number of unconverted A1 NPs. These results highlight the need for improved control over the compositional uniformity of FePt NPs for their use in bit-patterned magnetic recording.

  9. Phase states of water near the surface of a polymer membrane. Phase microscopy and luminescence spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkin, N. F.; Gorelik, V. S.; Kozlov, V. A. Shkirin, A. V. Suyazov, N. V.

    2014-11-15

    Phase microscopy is used to show that the refractive index in the near-surface layer of water at the surface of a polymer Nafion membrane increases by a factor of 1.1 as compared to bulk water. Moreover, this layer exhibits birefringence. Experiments on UV irradiation of dry (anhydrous) and water-soaked Nafion are performed in grazing-incidence geometry to study their stimulated luminescence spectra. These spectra are found to be identical in both cases. For dry Nafion, luminescence can only be excited if probing radiation illuminates the polymer surface. The luminescence of water-soaked Nafion can also be excited if the distance between the optical axis and the surface is several hundred micrometers.

  10. Study on the interaction between pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside and bovine serum albumin using spectroscopic, transmission electron microscopy and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Tang, Lin; Bi, Hongna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the binding behavior between pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside (P3G) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using multi-spectroscopic, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. Fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence showed that the fluorescence of BSA could be quenched remarkably by P3G via a static quenching mechanism, and there is a single class of binding site on BSA. In addition, the thermodynamic functions ΔH and ΔS were -21.69 kJ/mol and 24.46 J/mol/K, indicating that an electrostatic interaction was a main acting force. The distance between BSA and P3G was 2.74 nm according to Förster's theory, illustrating that energy transfer occurred. In addition, the secondary structure of BSA changed with a decrease in the α-helix content from 66.2% to 64.0% as seen using synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, whereas TEM images showed that P3G led to BSA aggregation and fibrillation. Furthermore, site marker competitive experiments and molecular docking indicated that P3G could bind with subdomain IIA of BSA. The calculated results of the equilibrium fraction showed that the concentration of free P3G in plasma was high enough to be stored and transported from the circulatory system to its target sites to provide therapeutic effects.

  11. Hexatic and blue phases in a chiral liquid crystal: optical polarizing microscopy, synchrotron radiation and dielectric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Debashis; Debnath, Asim; Mandal, Pradip Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Phase behavior, structure and molecular dynamics of a chiral liquid crystalline compound, which exhibits SmG*, SmJ*, SmF*, SmI*, SmC*, SmA*, N* and BP*, have been investigated. Observed optical textures, synchrotron radiation diffraction data and frequency dependent dielectric spectroscopic study clearly depict the temperature evolution of the different hexatic smectic phases along with cholesteric and blue phase in a single compound. In hexatic phases dielectric absorption spectra show one low frequency relaxation process, related to the phase fluctuation of the bond orientational order, and one high frequency process related to amplitude fluctuation of the bond orientational order coupled with the polarization and tilt of the molecules. Goldstone and soft mode relaxation processes are detected, respectively, in SmC* and SmA* phases.

  12. Towards non-invasive 3D hepatotoxicity assays with optical coherence phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Treskes, Philipp; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue-engineered models are increasingly recognised as more physiologically-relevant than standard 2D cell culture for pre-clinical drug toxicity testing. However, many types of conventional toxicity assays are incompatible with dense 3D tissues. This study investigated the use of optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) as a novel approach to assess cell death in 3D tissue culture. For 3D micro-spheroid formation Human hepatic C3A cells were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid gels and cultured in 100μl MEME/10%FBS in 96-well plates. After spheroid formation the 3D liver constructs were exposed to acetaminophen on culture day 8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in 3D cultures was evaluated using standard biochemical assays. An inverted OCPM in common path configuration was developed with a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlabs), centred at 930nm and a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and statistics on the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, were analysed over the acquisition time interval to retrieve overall cell viability. OCPM intensity (cell cluster size) and phase fluctuation statistics were directly compared with biochemical assays. In this study, we investigated optical coherence phase tomography to assess cell death in a 3d liver model after exposure to a prototypical hepatotoxin, acetaminophen. We showed that OCPM has the potential to assess noninvasively and label-free drug toxicity in 3D tissue models.

  13. High throughput imaging of blood smears using white light diffraction phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    While automated blood cell counters have made great progress in detecting abnormalities in blood, the lack of specificity for a particular disease, limited information on single cell morphology and intrinsic uncertainly due to high throughput in these instruments often necessitates detailed inspection in the form of a peripheral blood smear. Such tests are relatively time consuming and frequently rely on medical professionals tally counting specific cell types. These assays rely on the contrast generated by chemical stains, with the signal intensity strongly related to staining and preparation techniques, frustrating machine learning algorithms that require consistent quantities to denote the features in question. Instead we opt to use quantitative phase imaging, understanding that the resulting image is entirely due to the structure (intrinsic contrast) rather than the complex interplay of stain and sample. We present here our first steps to automate peripheral blood smear scanning, in particular a method to generate the quantitative phase image of an entire blood smear at high throughput using white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a single shot and common path interferometric imaging technique.

  14. Video-rate processing in tomographic phase microscopy of biological cells using CUDA.

    PubMed

    Dardikman, Gili; Habaza, Mor; Waller, Laura; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-05-30

    We suggest a new implementation for rapid reconstruction of three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) maps of biological cells acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The TPM computational reconstruction process is extremely time consuming, making the analysis of large data sets unreasonably slow and the real-time 3-D visualization of the results impossible. Our implementation uses new phase extraction, phase unwrapping and Fourier slice algorithms, suitable for efficient CPU or GPU implementations. The experimental setup includes an external off-axis interferometric module connected to an inverted microscope illuminated coherently. We used single cell rotation by micro-manipulation to obtain interferometric projections from 73 viewing angles over a 180° angular range. Our parallel algorithms were implemented using Nvidia's CUDA C platform, running on Nvidia's Tesla K20c GPU. This implementation yields, for the first time to our knowledge, a 3-D reconstruction rate higher than video rate of 25 frames per second for 256 × 256-pixel interferograms with 73 different projection angles (64 × 64 × 64 output). This allows us to calculate additional cellular parameters, while still processing faster than video rate. This technique is expected to find uses for real-time 3-D cell visualization and processing, while yielding fast feedback for medical diagnosis and cell sorting.

  15. Thin-Film Phase Plates for Transmission Electron Microscopy Fabricated from Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Dries, Manuel; Hettler, Simon; Schulze, Tina; Send, Winfried; Müller, Erich; Schneider, Reinhard; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Luo, Yuansu; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-10-01

    Thin-film phase plates (PPs) have become an interesting tool to enhance the contrast of weak-phase objects in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thin film usually consists of amorphous carbon, which suffers from quick degeneration under the intense electron-beam illumination. Recent investigations have focused on the search for alternative materials with an improved material stability. This work presents thin-film PPs fabricated from metallic glass alloys, which are characterized by a high electrical conductivity and an amorphous structure. Thin films of the zirconium-based alloy Zr65.0Al7.5Cu27.5 (ZAC) were fabricated and their phase-shifting properties were evaluated. The ZAC film was investigated by different TEM techniques, which reveal beneficial properties compared with amorphous carbon PPs. Particularly favorable is the small probability for inelastic plasmon scattering, which results from the combined effect of a moderate inelastic mean free path and a reduced film thickness due to a high mean inner potential. Small probability plasmon scattering improves contrast transfer at high spatial frequencies, which makes the ZAC alloy a promising material for PP fabrication.

  16. Spatial light modulator phase mask implementation of wavefront encoded 3D computational-optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    King, Sharon V; Doblas, Ana; Patwary, Nurmohammed; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Preza, Chrysanthe

    2015-10-10

    Spatial light modulator (SLM) implementation of wavefront encoding enables various types of engineered point-spread functions (PSFs), including the generalized-cubic and squared-cubic phase mask wavefront encoded (WFE) PSFs, shown to reduce the impact of sample-induced spherical aberration in fluorescence microscopy. This investigation validates dynamic experimental parameter variation of these WFE-PSFs. We find that particular design parameter bounds exist, within which the divergence of computed and experimental WFE-PSFs is of the same order of magnitude as that of computed and experimental conventional PSFs, such that model-based approaches for solving the inverse imaging problem can be applied to a wide range of SLM-WFE systems. Interferometric measurements were obtained to evaluate the SLM implementation of the numeric mask. Agreement between experiment and theory in terms of a wrapped phase, 0-2π, validates the phase mask implementation and allows characterization of the SLM response. These measurements substantiate experimental practice of computational-optical microscope imaging with an SLM-engineered PSF.

  17. Dynamic analysis of pathogen-infected host cells using quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungrag; Kim, Young Ran; Lee, Ji Yong; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Park, Chang-Soo; Kim, Dug Young

    2011-03-01

    We present the real-time quantitative analysis of Vibrio vulnificus-infected host cells using quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) based on interferometric techniques. This provides the ability to retrieve the phase or optical path-length distribution over the cell with nanometer path-length sensitivity from a single interferogram image. We have used QPM to study dynamic cell morphologic changes and to noninvasively quantify the cell volumes of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells infected with V. vulnificus strains: wild type (MO6-24/O) and RtxA1 toxin mutant (CMM770). During the process of V. vulnificus infection in RBL-2H3 cells, the dynamic changes of quantitative phase images, cell volumes, and areas were observed in real time using QPM. In contrast, dramatic changes were not detected in RBL-2H3 cells infected with the noncytotoxic RtxA1 toxin mutant. The results showed good correlation between QPM analysis and biochemical assays, such as lactate dehydrogenase assay or β-hexosaminidase release assay. We suggest that QPM is a powerful quantitative method to study the dynamic process of host cells infected with pathogens in a noninvasive manner.

  18. Spectroscopic evidence of α-methylbenzyl radical in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi Woo; Ahn, Hyeon Geun; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2008-11-01

    We report the observation of the spectroscopic evidence of the α-methylbenzyl radical in a corona excited supersonic expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle for the first time. The precursors, toluene, ethylbenzene, and isopropylbenzene, seeded in a large amount of inert carrier gas helium, were electrically discharged to produce benzyl-type radicals as a result of the breaking off of a C-H or a C-C bond from the alkyl chain. The vibronic emission spectra, obtained in the visible region from the precursors, were compared to identify the species generated in the corona discharge of the precursors, from which we found the spectroscopic evidence of the α-methylbenzyl radical.

  19. X-ray microscopy using two phase contrast imaging techniques: two dimensional grating interferometry and speckle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Pape, Ian; Sawhney, Kawal

    2013-10-01

    Two phase contrast imaging techniques, namely two dimensional grating interferometry and X-ray speckle tracking (XST), have been combined with the use of a Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) for application to X-ray microscopy. Both techniques allows the phase shift introduced by a sample on a hard X-ray beam in two dimensions, to be recovered with a high sensitivity and low requirements on transverse and longitudinal coherence. Sub-micron phase imaging of carbon fibres was achieved using the two methods thanks to the high magnification ratio of the FZP. Advantages, drawbacks and differences between these two techniques for X-ray microscopy are discussed.

  20. Ultrahigh-speed, phase-sensitive full-field interferometric confocal microscopy for quantitative microscale physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sencan, Ikbal; Huang, Brendan K.; Bian, Yong; Mis, Emily; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Cao, Hui; Choma, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We developed ultra-high-speed, phase-sensitive, full-field reflection interferometric confocal microscopy (FFICM) for the quantitative characterization of in vivo microscale biological motions and flows. We demonstrated 2D frame rates in excess of 1 kHz and pixel throughput rates up to 125 MHz. These fast FFICM frame rates were enabled by the use of a low spatial coherence, high-power laser source. Specifically, we used a dense vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) array that synthesized low spatial coherence light through a large number of narrowband, mutually-incoherent emitters. Off-axis interferometry enabled single-shot acquisition of the complex-valued interferometric signal. We characterized the system performance (~2 μm lateral resolution, ~8 μm axial gating depth) with a well-known target. We also demonstrated the use of this highly parallelized confocal microscopy platform for visualization and quantification of cilia-driven surface flows and cilia beat frequency in an important animal model (Xenopus embryos) with >1 kHz frame rate. Such frame rates are needed to see large changes in local flow velocity over small distance (high shear flow), in this case, local flow around a single ciliated cell. More generally, our results are an important demonstration of low-spatial coherence, high-power lasers in high-performance, quantitative biomedical imaging. PMID:27896006

  1. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment. PMID:27973570

  2. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction. PMID:26690165

  3. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-12-04

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction.

  4. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J. Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a “precise color” MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans. PMID:27231594

  5. Fresnel diffraction correction by phase-considered iteration procedure in soft X-ray projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Honda, Toshio; Ito, Atsushi; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Yada, Keiji; Shinohara, Kunio

    2009-09-01

    In soft X-ray projection microscopy, it is easy to alter the magnification by changing the distance between the pinhole and the specimen, while the image is blurred because the soft X-rays are diffracted through the propagation from specimen to CCD detector. We corrected the blurred image by the iteration procedure of Fresnel to inverse Fresnel transformation taking phase distribution of the specimen into account. The experiments were conducted at the BL-11A of the Photon Factory, KEK, Japan for the specimens such as glass-capillaries, latex-particles, dried mammalian cells and human chromosomes. Many of those blurred images were corrected adequately by the iteration procedure, though some images such as those which have high-contrast or are overlapped by small cells still remain to be improved.

  6. Image formation in phase-shifting digital holography and applications to microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, I; Kato, J; Ohta, S; Mizuno, J

    2001-12-01

    We discuss image formation in phase-shifting digital holography by developing an analytical formulation based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. Image-plane position and imaging magnification are derived for general configurations in which a spherical reference is employed. The influences of discrete sampling of the resulting interference patterns by a CCD and numerical reconstruction on qualities of point images are investigated. Dependence of the point images on the ratio of the minimum fringe spacing to pixel pitch of the CCD is numerically analyzed. Two-point resolution and magnification are also investigated as a function of pixel numbers by a simulation using a one-dimensional model. In experiments magnified images of biological objects and a resolution target were reconstructed with the same quality as by conventional microscopy.

  7. Phasing of the Triatoma virus diffraction data using a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Estrozi, L.F.; Neumann, E.; Squires, G.; Rozas-Dennis, G.; Costabel, M.; Rey, F.A.; Guerin, D.M.A. Navaza, J.

    2008-05-25

    The blood-sucking reduviid bug Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vector of American human trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is infected by the Triatoma virus (TrV). TrV has been classified as a member of the Cripavirus genus (type cricket paralysis virus) in the Dicistroviridae family. This work presents the three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction of the TrV capsid at about 25 A resolution and its use as a template for phasing the available crystallographic data by the molecular replacement method. The main structural differences between the cryo-EM reconstruction of TrV and other two viruses, one from the same family, the cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and the human rhinovirus 16 from the Picornaviridae family are presented and discussed.

  8. Identifying ferroelectric phase and domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2014-03-24

    We used angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM), vertical PFM (VPFM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide a systematic interpretation of domain patterns in polycrystalline, near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate. This material was used to illustrate the power of AR-PFM methods in resolving complex domain patterns where multiple phases may be present. AR-PFM was carried out with a 30° rotation interval, and the resulting data were analysed to identify the orientation of the underlying axis of piezoelectricity. The additional information provided by AR-PFM was studied, comparing its capabilities to those of 3-dimensional PFM, consisting of one VPFM image and two orthogonal lateral PFM (LPFM) images. We show that, in certain conditions, using AR-PFM can identify the phases present at the sub-grain scale. This was confirmed using VPFM and EBSD data. Furthermore, the method can discriminate laminated domain patterns that appear similar in VPFM and can reliably expose domain patterns that may not be seen in LPFM data from a single orientation, or even in 3D PFM data.

  9. Comparison of fluorescence microscopy and solid-phase cytometry methods for counting bacteria in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, John T.; Hamilton, Martin A.; Willse, Alan R.; McFeters, Gordon A.

    2004-01-01

    Total direct counts of bacterial abundance are central in assessing the biomass and bacteriological quality of water in ecological and industrial applications. Several factors have been identified that contribute to the variability in bacterial abundance counts when using fluorescent microscopy, the most significant of which is retaining an adequate number of cells per filter to ensure an acceptable level of statistical confidence in the resulting data. Previous studies that have assessed the components of total-direct-count methods that contribute to this variance have attempted to maintain a bacterial cell abundance value per filter of approximately 106 cells filter-1. In this study we have established the lower limit for the number of bacterial cells per filter at which the statistical reliability of the abundance estimate is no longer acceptable. Our results indicate that when the numbers of bacterial cells per filter were progressively reduced below 105, the microscopic methods increasingly overestimated the true bacterial abundance (range, 15.0 to 99.3%). The solid-phase cytometer only slightly overestimated the true bacterial abundances and was more consistent over the same range of bacterial abundances per filter (range, 8.9 to 12.5%). The solid-phase cytometer method for conducting total direct counts of bacteria was less biased and performed significantly better than any of the microscope methods. It was also found that microscopic count data from counting 5 fields on three separate filters were statistically equivalent to data from counting 20 fields on a single filter.

  10. Improved quantitative phase imaging in lensless microscopy by single-shot multi-wavelength illumination using a fast convergence algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Martín; Picazo-Bueno, José Angel; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2015-08-10

    We report on a novel algorithm for high-resolution quantitative phase imaging in a new concept of lensless holographic microscope based on single-shot multi-wavelength illumination. This new microscope layout, reported by Noom et al. along the past year and named by us as MISHELF (initials incoming from Multi-Illumination Single-Holographic-Exposure Lensless Fresnel) microscopy, rises from the simultaneous illumination and recording of multiple diffraction patterns in the Fresnel domain. In combination with a novel and fast iterative phase retrieval algorithm, MISHELF microscopy is capable of high-resolution (micron range) phase-retrieved (twin image elimination) biological imaging of dynamic events. In this contribution, MISHELF microscopy is demonstrated through qualitative concept description, algorithm implementation, and experimental validation using both a synthetic object (resolution test target) and a biological sample (swine sperm sample) for the case of three (RGB) illumination wavelengths. The proposed method becomes in an alternative instrument improving the capabilities of existing lensless microscopes.

  11. Analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast microscopy combining channel-cut and asymmetrically cut crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.

    2007-11-15

    An analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast microscopy (ABM) setup combining a standard analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging (ABI) setup [nondispersive 4-crystal setup (Bonse-Hart setup)] and diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals is presented here. An attenuation-contrast microscopy setup with conventional x-ray source and asymmetrically cut crystals is first analyzed. Edge-enhanced effects attributed to phase jumps or refraction/total external reflection on the fiber borders were detected. However, the long exposure times and the possibility to achieve high contrast microscopies by using extremely low attenuation-contrast samples motivated us to assemble the ABM setup using a synchrotron source. This setup was found to be useful for low contrast attenuation samples due to the low exposure time, high contrast, and spatial resolution found. Moreover, thanks to the combination with the nondispersive ABI setup, the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging algorithm could be applied.

  12. Kinetic precipitation of solution-phase polyoxomolybdate followed by transmission electron microscopy: a window to solution-phase nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Cammers-Goodwin, Arthur; Zhao, Bin; Dozier, Alan; Dickey, Elizabeth C

    2004-05-17

    This study aimed to elucidate the structural nature of the polydisperse, nanoscopic components in the solution and the solid states of partially reduced polyoxomolybdate derived from the [Mo132] keplerate, [(Mo)Mo5]12-[Mo2 acetate]30. Designer tripodal hexamine-tris-crown ethers and nanoscopic molybdate coprecipitated from aqueous solution. These microcrystalline solids distributed particle radii between 2-30 nm as assayed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The solid materials and their particle size distributions were snap shots of the solution phase. The mother liquor of the preparation of the [Mo132] keplerate after three days revealed large species (r=20-30 nm) in the coprecipitate, whereas [Mo132] keplerate redissolved in water revealed small species (3-7 nm) in the coprecipitate. Nanoparticles of coprecipitate were more stable than solids derived solely from partially reduced molybdate. The TEM features of all material analyzed lacked facets on the nanometer length scale; however, the structures diffracted electrons and appeared to be defect-free as evidenced by Moiré patterns in the TEM images. Moiré patterns and size-invariant optical densities of the features in the micrographs suggested that the molybdate nanoparticles were vesicular.

  13. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhou, Xiaobo; King, Randy W; Wong, Stephen TC

    2007-01-01

    Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC), Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS), and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS). Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM) for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM), Neural Network (NN), and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN). Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The experimental results show

  14. Simple and fast spectral domain algorithm for quantitative phase imaging of living cells with digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Min, Junwei; Yao, Baoli; Ketelhut, Steffi; Engwer, Christian; Greve, Burkhard; Kemper, Björn

    2017-01-15

    We present a simple and fast phase aberration compensation method in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for quantitative phase imaging of living cells. By analyzing the frequency spectrum of an off-axis hologram, phase aberrations can be compensated for automatically without fitting or pre-knowledge of the setup and/or the object. Simple and effective computation makes the method suitable for quantitative online monitoring with highly variable DHM systems. Results from automated quantitative phase imaging of living NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the method.

  15. Theoretical Investigation of OCN(-) Charge Transfer Complexes in Condensed Phase Media: Spectroscopic Properties in Amorphous Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jin-Young; Woon, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of cyanate (OCN(-)) charge-transfer complexes were performed to model the "XCN" feature observed in interstellar icy grain mantles. OCN(-) charge-transfer complexes were formed from precursor combinations of HNCO or HOCN with either NH3 or H2O. Three different solvation strategies for realistically modeling the ice matrix environment were explored, including (1) continuum solvation, (2) pure DFT cluster calculations, and (3) an ONIOM DFT/PM3 cluster calculation. The model complexes were evaluated by their ability to reproduce seven spectroscopic measurements associated with XCN: the band origin of the OCN(-) asymmetric stretching mode, shifts in that frequency due to isotopic substitutions of C, N, O, and H, plus two weak features. The continuum solvent field method produced results consistent with some of the experimental data but failed to account for other behavior due to its limited capacity to describe molecular interactions with solvent. DFT cluster calculations successfully reproduced the available spectroscopic measurements very well. In particular, the deuterium shift showed excellent agreement in complexes where OCN(-) was fully solvated. Detailed studies of representative complexes including from two to twelve water molecules allowed the exploration of various possible solvation structures and provided insights into solvation trends. Moreover, complexes arising from cyanic or isocyanic acid in pure water suggested an alternative mechanism for the formation of OCN(-) charge-transfer complexes without the need for a strong base such as NH3 to be present. An extended ONIOM (B3LYP/PM3) cluster calculation was also performed to assess the impact of a more realistic environment on HNCO dissociation in pure water.

  16. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, P.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rappaz, B.; Depeursinge, C.; Jourdain, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  17. A vibrational spectroscopic study on amorphous phase associated with crystallization and deformation behavior of poly(lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shuhui; Hsu, Shaw Ling

    2002-03-01

    We have used Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with differential scanning calorimetry to characterize the structure of biodegradable poly(lactic acid). It is known that crystallization behavior of this bio-commodity polymer is strongly dependent on the amount and sequence of configurational defects, i. e. D isomer. Relatively little effort has been devoted to the study of the amorphous phase. Based on a number of normal coordinate analyses, specific spectroscopic features have been identified which is capable of identifying defect content. By introducing D defects, which have the opposite chirality to native L-unit s, the number of curved conformational sequences increase, or conversely the number of straight conformational sequences decrease. We found that deformation will increase the latter and decrease the former. In addition, the changes in chain persistance length, nucleation rate with different D defects content, sequence distribution, and draw ratio are discussed.

  18. Confocal raman microscopy as a non-invasive tool to investigate the phase composition of frozen complex cryopreservation media.

    PubMed

    Kreiner-Møller, A; Stracke, F; Zimmermann, H

    2013-01-01

    Various cryoprotective agents (CPA) are added to cell media in order to avoid cell injury during cryo preservation. The resulting complex environment of the preserved cell, consisting of crystalline and liquid phases can however not be investigated non-invasively by established methods in cryobiology. This study shows how scanning confocal Raman microscopy can non-invasively extract information on chemical composition, phase domain and distribution at cryogenic temperatures. The formation of the salt hydrate, hydrohalite NaCl∙H2O, in solutions comprised of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) is studied in particular. Scanning confocal Raman microscopy can be used to unambiguously identify hydrohalite in a medium containing DMSO and saline. The confocal Raman microscopy imaging along with differential scanning calorimetric measurements further show that the hydrohalite is formed without eutectic formation. This method also allows for discrimination between closely packed hydrohalite crystals that are oriented differently.

  19. [Linear and nonlinear spectroscopic probing of solute interactions with chemically modified silica surface]. [Stationary phase studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Objective is to understand the surface science underlying liquid chromatographic separations, enabling improvements in design of chromatographic stationary phases. Progress was made both in use of laser spectroscopy to probe chromatographic surfaces and in developing new stationary phases based on self-assembled monolayers.

  20. Phase diagram of ammonium perchlorate: Raman spectroscopic constrains at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-06-01

    We present the pressure-temperature (PT) induced physical and chemical transformations in ammonium perchlorates (APs) up to 50 GPa and 450 °C, using diamond anvil cells and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy, which provide new constraints for the phase diagram of AP. The results show spectral evidences for three new polymorphs (III, IV, and VI) of AP, in addition to two previously known phases (I and II), at various PT conditions with varying degrees of hydrogen bonding and lack of strong spectral evidence for previously known high-temperature cubic phase (phase V). Upon further heating, AP chemically decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O. The present phase diagram is, therefore, in sharp contrast to the previous one, underscoring a rich polymorphism, a large stability field for solids, and a replacement of the melt with a decomposition line.

  1. Microwave spectroscopic observation of distinct electron solid phases in wide quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Hatke, A T; Liu, Yang; Magill, B A; Moon, B H; Engel, L W; Shayegan, M; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Baldwin, K W

    2014-06-20

    In high magnetic fields, two-dimensional electron systems can form a number of phases in which interelectron repulsion plays the central role, since the kinetic energy is frozen out by Landau quantization. These phases include the well-known liquids of the fractional quantum Hall effect, as well as solid phases with broken spatial symmetry and crystalline order. Solids can occur at the low Landau-filling termination of the fractional quantum Hall effect series but also within integer quantum Hall effects. Here we present microwave spectroscopy studies of wide quantum wells that clearly reveal two distinct solid phases, hidden within what in d.c. transport would be the zero diagonal conductivity of an integer quantum-Hall-effect state. Explanation of these solids is not possible with the simple picture of a Wigner solid of ordinary (quasi) electrons or holes.

  2. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  3. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  4. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems. PMID:26915398

  5. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; ...

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase seperated regions. The ability to simultanousely track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of- the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiatedmore » at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, which is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. Lastly, the direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.« less

  6. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A; Dufresne, Eric M; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Parkin, Stuart S P; Freeland, John W; Evans, Paul G; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  7. Spectroscopic Fingerprint of Phase-Incoherent Superconductivity in the Underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Davis, J.; Fujita, K.; Schmidt, A.R.; Kim, C.K.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.

    2009-08-28

    A possible explanation for the existence of the cuprate 'pseudogap' state is that it is a d-wave superconductor without quantum phase rigidity. Transport and thermodynamic studies provide compelling evidence that supports this proposal, but few spectroscopic explorations of it have been made. One spectroscopic signature of d-wave superconductivity is the particle-hole symmetric 'octet' of dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference modulations. Here we report on this octet's evolution from low temperatures to well into the underdoped pseudogap regime. No pronounced changes occur in the octet phenomenology at the superconductor's critical temperature T{sub c}, and it survives up to at least temperature T {approx} 1.5 T{sub c}. In this pseudogap regime, we observe the detailed phenomenology that was theoretically predicted for quasiparticle interference in a phase-incoherent d-wave superconductor. Thus, our results not only provide spectroscopic evidence to confirm and extend the transport and thermodynamics studies, but they also open the way for spectroscopic explorations of phase fluctuation rates, their effects on the Fermi arc, and the fundamental source of the phase fluctuations that suppress superconductivity in underdoped cuprates.

  8. Zernike-type phase contrast X-ray microscopy at 4 keV photon energy with 60 nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäusler, Ulrich; Schneider, Gerd

    2004-05-01

    X-ray microscopy in the multi-keV photon energy range offers unique possibilities to study thick dense samples with high spatial resolution. When employing a high numerical aperture (N.A.) condenser zone plate sample illumination in combination with a high resolution micro zone plate objective lens, a spatial resolution of currently 60 nm is achieved. Since the absorption becomes smaller with increasing photon energy, phase contrast imaging overcomes the limitation for imaging weakly absorbing structures in amplitude contrast mode. We report here on X-ray microscopy of advanced microelectronic devices imaged in Zernike phase contrast mode. While the amplitude contrast between copper and silicon dioxide in these samples is only 7 %, negative as well as positive phase contrast were demonstrated with a contrast of 40 % and 45 %, respectively.

  9. Origin of p(2 x 1) phase on Si(001) by noncontact atomic force microscopy at 5 k.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Jun; Nomura, Hikaru; Ozaki, Naoyuki; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Kageshima, Masami; Sugawara, Yasuhiro; Hobbs, Chris; Kantorovich, Lev

    2006-03-17

    The controversial issue of the origin of the p(2 x 1) reconstruction of the Si(001) surface observed in recent low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy experiments is clarified here using 5 K noncontact atomic force microscopy. The c(4 x 2) phase is observed at separations corresponding to weak tip-surface interactions, confirming that it is the ground state of the surface. At larger frequency shifts the p(2 x 1) phase of symmetric dimers is observed. By studying the interaction of a reactive Si tip with the c(4 x 2) Si(001) surface using an ab initio method, we find that the observed change in the surface reconstruction is an apparent effect caused by tip induced dimer flipping resulting in a modification of the surface structure and appearance of the p(2 x 1) phase in the image. Using an appropriate scanning protocol, one can manipulate the surface reconstruction at will, which has significance in nanotechnology.

  10. Optomechanical properties of cancer cells revealed by light-induced deformation and quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Budde, Björn; Isbach, Michael; Rommel, Christina; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in cell biology and clinical diagnostics in label-free, optical techniques as the interaction with the sample is minimized and substances like dyes or fixatives do not affect the investigated cells. Such techniques include digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and the optical stretching by fiber optical two beam traps. DHM enables quantitative phase contrast imaging and thereby the determination of the cellular refractive index, dry mass and the volume, whereas optical cell stretching reveals the deformability of cells. Since optical stretching strongly depends on the optical properties and the shape of the investigated material we combined the usage of fiber optical stretching and DHM for the characterization of pancreatic tumor cells. The risk of tumors is their potential to metastasize, spread through the bloodstream and build distal tumors/metastases. The grade of dedifferentiation in which the cells lose their cell type specific properties is a measure for this metastatic potential. The less differentiated the cells are, the higher is their risk to metastasize. Our results demonstrate that pancreatic tumor cells, which are from the same tumor but vary in their grade of differentiation, show significant differences in their deformability. The retrieved data show that differentiated cells have a higher stiffness than less differentiated cells of the same tumor. Even cells that differ only in the expression of a single tumor suppressor gene which is responsible for cell-cell adhesions can be distinguished by their mechanical properties. Additionally, results from DHM measurements yield that the refractive index shows only few variations, indicating that it does not significantly influence optical cell stretching. The obtained results show a promising new approach for the phenotyping of different cell types, especially in tumor cell characterization and cancer diagnostics.

  11. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with low-repetition-rate pulsed light source through phase-domain sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2016-10-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows spectroscopic imaging with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. With suitable light sources, s-SNOM is instrumental in numerous discoveries at the nanoscale. So far, the light sources have been limited to continuous wave or high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers. Low-repetition-rate pulsed sources cannot be used, due to the limitation of the lock-in detection mechanism that is required for current s-SNOM techniques. Here, we report a near-field signal extraction method that enables low-repetition-rate pulsed light sources. The method correlates scattering signals from pulses with the mechanical phases of the oscillating s-SNOM probe to obtain near-field signal, by-passing the apparent restriction imposed by the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem on the repetition rate. The method shall enable s-SNOM with low-repetition-rate pulses with high-peak-powers, such as femtosecond laser amplifiers, to facilitate investigations of strong light-matter interactions and nonlinear processes at the nanoscale.

  12. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with low-repetition-rate pulsed light source through phase-domain sampling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2016-01-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows spectroscopic imaging with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. With suitable light sources, s-SNOM is instrumental in numerous discoveries at the nanoscale. So far, the light sources have been limited to continuous wave or high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers. Low-repetition-rate pulsed sources cannot be used, due to the limitation of the lock-in detection mechanism that is required for current s-SNOM techniques. Here, we report a near-field signal extraction method that enables low-repetition-rate pulsed light sources. The method correlates scattering signals from pulses with the mechanical phases of the oscillating s-SNOM probe to obtain near-field signal, by-passing the apparent restriction imposed by the Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem on the repetition rate. The method shall enable s-SNOM with low-repetition-rate pulses with high-peak-powers, such as femtosecond laser amplifiers, to facilitate investigations of strong light–matter interactions and nonlinear processes at the nanoscale. PMID:27748360

  13. Serpentines, talc, chlorites, and their high-pressure phase transitions: a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, Bruno; Bezacier, Lucile; Caracas, Razvan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectra of magnesian phyllosilicates belonging to the serpentine, talc, and chlorite groups have been obtained at ambient conditions, and at high pressures and up to 200 °C in order to study high-pressure transformations in the 10 GPa range. The complex and distinct Raman spectra of these minerals allow straightforward identification, which may otherwise be difficult from optical microscopy. High-pressure measurements are in good agreement with DFT calculations for talc and lizardite. Pressure-induced displacive modifications are identified in lizardite and antigorite serpentines, and in chlorite at ~4, 7 and 8 GPa, respectively, while talc shows no transition up to ~11 GPa. At high temperature, the high-pressure distortions of serpentines shift to higher pressures. Given the stability limits of these minerals, and the natural range of P-T conditions, none of the high-pressure distortions observed at high pressure are likely to occur at depth in the Earth.

  14. Mineralogical composition and phase-to-phase relationships in natural hydraulic lime and/or natural cement - raw materials and burnt products revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Racek, Martin; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to modern process of production of cement clinker, traditional burning of natural hydraulic lime below sintering temperature relied on the formation of new phases from ion migration between neighbouring mineral grains composing raw material. The importance of the mineralogical composition and spatial distribution of rock-forming minerals in impure limestones used as a raw material for natural hydraulic lime presents not well explored issue in the scientific literature. To fill this gap, the recent study focuses in detailed analysis of experimentally burnt impure limestones (mostly from Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif). The phase changes were documented by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) coupled with x-ray elemental mapping. The latest allowed for visualization of distribution of elements within raw materials and burnt products. SEM/EDS study brought valuable data on the presence of transitional and/or minor phases, which were poorly detectable by other methods.

  15. Direct measurement of the refractive index profile of phase gratings, recorded in silver halide holographic materials by phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2003-11-01

    Plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions and processed by the combination of AAC developer and the R-9 bleaching agent were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using high-power immersion (100×) objective. Thus the modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern can also be determined. Measured diffraction efficiencies were compared to those predicted by coupled wave theory, using the measured refractive index modulations. Direct measurement of the phase profile of the gratings can be used for optimizing processing.

  16. FTIR spectroscopic study of the mechanism for the gas-phase reaction between ozone and tetramethylethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Niki, H.; Maker, P.D.; Savage, C.M.; Breitenbach, L.P.; Hurley, M.D.

    1987-02-12

    Long-path FTIR spectroscopic product studies were made of mixtures containing part-per-million concentrations of O/sub 3/ and (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/C double bonded C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (TME) in 700 Torr of O/sub 2/-N/sub 2/ to determine the formation and reactions of the dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/COO expected from O/sub 3/ + TME ..-->.. (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/COO + (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/C double bonded O. The observed stoichiometry, ..delta..-(TME)/..delta..(O/sub 3/), was typically 1.7, and among the products were CO, CO/sub 2/, HCHO, CH/sub 3/OH, CH/sub 3/OOH, CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)OH, CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)OOH, (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/C double bonded O, CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)CHO, CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)OCH/sub 3/, CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)CH/sub 2/(OH), and products tentatively identified as (CH/sub 2/)/sub 2/C(OH)-C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/OOH AND CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)CH/sub 2/(OOH). In addition, /sup 16/O- and /sup 18/O-labeled products were identified in /sup 18/O/sub 3/-TME-air mixtures, and the effects of added HCHO, CH/sub 3/CHO, and NO/sub 2/ (or /sup 15/NO/sub 2/) on the product distribution were determined. The results indicate that ca. 25% of the (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/COO moiety formed was thermally stable, and that the remainder largely dissociated to yield the following free radicals, i.e., (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/COO ..-->.. CH/sub 3/C(OOH)double bonded CH/sub 2/ ..-->.. CH/sub 3/C(double bonded O)CH/sub 2/ + HO. The HO-initiated oxidation of TME was shown to account for the excess consumption of TME over O/sub 3/ as well as for some of the major products observed.

  17. Spectroscopically characterized cadmium sulfide quantum dots lengthening the lag phase of Escherichia coli growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiganesh, T.; Daisy Vimala Rani, J.; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2012-06-01

    The present study reports the effect of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots on the life cycle of Escherichia coli. CdS quantum dots were synthesized by pH sensitive organochemical route using cadmium chloride and sodium sulfide as precursors and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as capping agent. It is observed that varying concentration of MPA leads to the production of different sized quantum dots with inverse proportionality and increment in the fluorescence quantum yield. The investigation also shows that CdS quantum dots have no antibacterial activity except it delays the log phase growth of bacteria in terms of size of the particles. The largest synthesized particles significantly elongate the lag phase growth.

  18. Mid-infrared spectroscopic study of crystallization of cubic spinel phase from metakaolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ptacek, Petr

    2011-10-15

    The structural changes during thermal conversion of metakaolinite into cubic spinel phase that was in literature considered as Al-Si spinel or {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using medium ordered kaolin with high content of kaolinite. Spectrum features were studied in the mid-infrared region from 4000 to 400 cm{sup -1} as function of fractional conversion that resulted from DSC experiments. The increasing contends of Al-O bonds in the octahedral position (AlO{sub 6}) was observed during thermal transformation. The high ratio of antisymmetric stretching of {identical_to}Si-O-Al= and {identical_to}Si-O-Si{identical_to} bands and bands belonging to stretching of =Al-O bonds in the (AlO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and (AlO{sub 6}) octahedra decreases exponentially with fractional conversion. The antisymmetric stretching band of {identical_to}Si-O-Si{identical_to} bond in the (SiO{sub 4}) tetrahedra becomes more expressive due to formation of amorphous SiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: The thermal conversion of metakaolinite into spinel phase was investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy to found relationship between bands features and fractional convesrion. Highlights: > Formation of spinel phase from metakaolinite was studied by FT-IR. > Relationship between spectrum features and fractional conversion was investigated. > Intensity ratios of (AlO{sub 4}) and (AlO{sub 6}) decreases exponentially. > Antisymmetric stretching of (SiO{sub 4}) becomes more expressive during transformation.

  19. Direct observation of dopant distribution in GaAs compound semiconductors using phase-shifting electron holography and Lorentz microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirokazu; Otomo, Shinya; Minato, Ryuichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa

    2014-06-01

    Phase-shifting electron holography and Lorentz microscopy were used to map dopant distributions in GaAs compound semiconductors with step-like dopant concentration. Transmission electron microscope specimens were prepared using a triple beam focused ion beam (FIB) system, which combines a Ga ion beam, a scanning electron microscope, and an Ar ion beam to remove the FIB damaged layers. The p-n junctions were clearly observed in both under-focused and over-focused Lorentz microscopy images. A phase image was obtained by using a phase-shifting reconstruction method to simultaneously achieve high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Differences in dopant concentrations between 1 × 10(19) cm(-3) and 1 × 10(18) cm(-3) regions were clearly observed by using phase-shifting electron holography. We also interpreted phase profiles quantitatively by considering inactive layers induced by ion implantation during the FIB process. The thickness of an inactive layer at different dopant concentration area can be measured from the phase image.

  20. Comprehensive Size-Determination of Whole Virus Vaccine Particles Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecular Analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  1. In-situ microscopy of the first-order magnetic phase transition in FeRh thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldasseroni, Chloe

    Simple ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) materials such as Fe and Cr become paramagnetic when heated above some critical temperature, in what is known as a second-order phase transition. Less usual magnetic transitions are found in the magnetic world, for example a first-order magnetic phase transition from AF to FM with increasing temperature. Equiatomic FeRh has been known to exhibit such a transition for over 50 years, with a transition temperature slightly above room temperature. Interest in this material has been renewed in the recent years due to its potential application for heat-assisted magnetic recording, as well as a test system for fundamental studies of the physics of magnetic phase transitions. Similarly to crystallization, this AF-FM transition is expected to proceed by nucleation of magnetic domains but the features of the first-order hysteretic transition have been difficult to study with macroscopic measurements and very few microscopic studies have been performed. In this work, FeRh thin films were synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structurally and magnetically characterized. A membrane-based heating device was designed to enable temperature-dependent microscopy measurements, providing a thermally uniform and well-controlled sample area. Synchrotron x-ray magnetic microscopy was used to study the temperature-driven AF-FM phase transition in epitaxial FeRh thin films in zero field. Using magnetic microscopy with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, the different stages of nucleation, growth and coalescence of FM domains were observed across the transition and details of the nucleation were identified. The FM phase nucleates into single domain islands and the width of the transition of the individual nuclei upon heating is sharper than that of the macroscopic transition. Using magnetic microscopy with x-ray magnetic linear dichroism, the evolution of the AF phase was studied. Differences in the morphology of AF and FM phases were

  2. Parallel on-axis phase-shifting holographic phase microscopy based on reflective point-diffraction interferometer with long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongli; Yao, Baoli; Gao, Peng; Min, Junwei; Han, Jun; Yu, Xun; Lei, Ming; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2013-05-20

    Parallel on-axis two-step phase-shifting reflective point-diffraction interferometry for holographic phase microscopy based on Michelson architecture is proposed. A cube beamsplitter splits the object wave into two copies within the two arms. The reference wave is rebuilt by low-pass filtering with a pinhole-masked mirror. Both object and reference waves are split into two beams by a grating in a 4f imaging system; thus, two interferograms with quadrature phase-shift can be acquired simultaneously with the aid of polarization elements. The approach has the merit of nanometers-scale phase stability over hours due to its quasi-common-path geometry. It can make full use of camera spatial bandwidth while its temporal resolution is as fast as the camera frame rate. Phase imaging on microscale specimen is implemented, and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is suitable for investigating dynamic processes.

  3. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques. PMID:27958348

  4. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  5. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-13

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm(2) without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  6. Optical spectroscopic and reverse-phase HPLC analyses of Hg(II) binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, R K; Miclat, J; Kodati, V R; Abdullah, R; Hunter, T C; Mulchandani, P

    1996-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and reverse-phase HPLC were used to investigate the binding of Hg(II) to plant metal-binding peptides (phytochelatins) with the structure (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly, (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly. Glutathione-mediated transfer of Hg(II) into phytochelatins and the transfer of the metal ion from one phytochelatin to another was also studied using reverse-phase HPLC. The saturation of Hg(II)-induced bands in the UV/visible and CD spectra of (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly suggested the formation of a single Hg(II)-binding species of this peptide with a stoichiometry of one metal ion per peptide molecule. The separation of apo-(gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly from its Hg(II) derivative on a C18 reverse-phase column also indicated the same metal-binding stoichiometry. The UV/visible spectra of both (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly at pH 7.4 showed distinct shoulders in the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer region at 280-290 mm. Two distinct Hg(II)-binding species, occurring at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.0 Hg(II) ions per peptide molecule, were observed for (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly. These species exhibited specific spectral features in the charge-transfer region and were separable by HPLC. Similarly, two main Hg(II)-binding species of (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly were observed by UV/visible and CD spectroscopy at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.5 respectively. Only a single peak of Hg(II)-(gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly complexes was resolved under the conditions used for HPLC. The overall Hg(II)-binding stoichiometries of phytochelatins were similar at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.4, indicating that pH did not influence the final Hg(II)-binding capacity of these peptides. The reverse-phase HPLC assays indicated a rapid transfer of Hg(II) from glutathione to phytochelatins. These assays also demonstrated a facile transfer of the metal ion from shorter- to longer-chain phytochelatins. The strength of Hg(II) binding to glutathione and phytochelatins followed the

  7. Monitoring Rates and Heterogeneity of High-Pressure Germination of Bacillus Spores by Phase-Contrast Microscopy of Individual Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The germination of multiple individual Bacillus subtilis spores by a high pressure (HP) of 140-150 (unless noted...public release; distribution is unlimited. Monitoring Rates and Heterogeneity of High-Pressure Germination of Bacillus Spores by Phase-Contrast Microscopy...ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Bacillus , spores, spore germination, high pressure, pressure

  8. Molecular resolution of a dioleoyl-Sn-glycero-phosphocholine lipid bilayer in liquid by phase modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoel, Antonin; Osaki, Toshihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji; Volz, Sebastian; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2012-08-01

    We present a molecular resolved image of a supported lipid bilayer using atomic force microscopy in liquid conditions. Due to the well-known molecular diffusion processes with velocities of a few nm/s occurring in free-standing membranes, this type of mapping is difficult to achieve. We have obtained a sub-nanometer scale resolution of a dioleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine membrane because of the high sensitivity of our phase modulated microscope and the slowed down diffusion due to the interaction with the substrate. A pair function analysis has revealed local disordered and gel phases with an order range limited to the first neighbour.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic study of thermotropic phase behavior of newly developed synthetic biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bista, Rajan K; Bruch, Reinhard F; Covington, Aaron M

    2011-10-15

    The thermotropic phase behavior of a suite of newly developed self-forming synthetic biopolymers has been investigated by variable-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy. The temperature-induced infrared spectra of these artificial biopolymers (lipids) composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycerol-3-dodecaethylene glycol (GDM-12), 1,2-dioleoyl-rac-glycerol-3-dodecaethylene glycol (GDO-12) and 1,2-distearoyl-rac-glycerol-3-triicosaethylene glycol (GDS-23) in the spectral range of 4000-500 cm(-1) have been acquired by using a thin layered FT-IR spectrometer in conjunction with a custom built temperature-controlled demountable liquid cell having a pathlength of ∼15 μm. The lipids under consideration have long hydrophobic acyl chains and contain various units of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) headgroups. In contrast to conventional phospholipids, this new kind of lipids forms liposomes or nanovesicles spontaneously upon hydration, without requiring external activation energy. We have found that the thermal stability of the PEGylated lipids differs greatly depending upon the acyl chain-lengths as well as the nature of the associated bonds and the number of PEG headgroup units. In particular, GDM-12 (saturated 14 hydrocarbon chains with 12 units of PEG headgroup) exhibits one sharp order-disorder phase transition over a temperature range increasing from 3°C to 5°C. Similarly, GDS-23 (saturated 18 hydrocarbon chains with 23 units of PEG headgroup) displays comparatively broad order-disorder phase transition profiles between temperature 17°C and 22°C. In contrast, GDO-12 (monounsaturated 18 hydrocarbon chains with 12 units of PEG headgroup) does not reveal any order-disorder transition phenomena demonstrating a highly disordered behavior for the entire temperature range. To confirm these observations, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to the samples and revealed good agreement with the infrared spectroscopy results

  10. A Combined Gas-Phase Photoelectron Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study of Zeise's Anion and Its Bromine and Iodine Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Gaolei; Wen, Hui; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Zheng, Weijun; Kowalski, Karol; Govind, Niranjan; Wang, Xue B.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2012-06-25

    We report the first photoelectron spectroscopic study of Zeise’s anion, [PtCl3(C2H4)], and its Br- and I- analogs in the gas phase. Well-resolved and rich spectral features are obtained for each species, yielding detailed electronic structure information, which is assigned with the aid of highlevel electronic structure calculations at the Coupled Cluster (CC) level of theory. The electron binding energies of [PtX3(C2H4)] are found to decrease with the size of halogen (4.57, 4.51, and 4.18 eV for X = Cl, Br, and I, respectively). The calculations indicate a synergistic η2 interaction [with interaction strengths of 1.54 (Cl), 1.37 (Br) and 1.10 eV (I)] between the perpendicular C2H4 fragment and the nearly horizontal planar PtX3- anions, resulting in activating the ethylene molecule. The detailed insights of the chemical bonding and underlying electronic structure can be used to benchmark interactions between olefins and transition metal complexes, which are crucial to a wide range of catalytic processes.

  11. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  12. Recovering correct phase information in multiwavelength digital holographic microscopy by compensation for chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, S; Finizio, A; Pierattini, G; Alfieri, D; Grilli, S; Sansone, L; Ferraro, P

    2005-10-15

    We demonstrate experimentally that correct phase imaging without 2pi ambiguity is obtainable in digital holography by using a multiwavelength approach in the microscope configuration. We describe a general approach for removing chromatic aberrations and for controlling the pixel size of the reconstructed phase image in multiwavelength digital holography when the Fourier transform method is adopted for the numerical reconstruction of digital holograms. The retrieved phase is affected by the unavoidable, unwanted chromatic aberration. The correct phase can be obtained by evaluating the phase from the reference holograms reconstructed at different wavelengths to compensate for the chromatic aberration.

  13. A computational and spectroscopic study of the gas-phase conformers of adrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çarçabal, P.; Snoek, L. C.; van Mourik, T.

    The conformational landscapes of the neurotransmitter l-adrenaline (l-epinephrine) and its diastereoisomer pseudo-adrenaline, isolated in the gas phase and un-protonated, have been investigated by using a combination of mass-selected ultraviolet and infrared holeburn spectroscopy, following laser desorption of the sample into a pulsed supersonic argon jet, and DFT and ab initio computation (at the B3LYP/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G* and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory). Both for adrenaline and its diastereoisomer, pseudo-adrenaline, one dominant molecular conformation, very similar to the one seen in noradrenaline, has been observed. It could be assigned to an extended side-chain structure (AG1a) stabilized by an OH → N intramolecular hydrogen bond. An intramolecular hydrogen bond is also formed between the neighbouring hydroxyl groups on the catechol ring. The presence of further conformers for both diastereoisomers could not be excluded, but overlapping electronic spectra and low ion signals prevented further assignments.

  14. Characterization of U(VI)-phases in corroded cement products by micro(μ)-spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, J.; Brendebach, B.; Bube, C.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Metz, V.; Prüßmann, T.; Rickers-Appel, K.; Schild, D.; Soballa, E.; Vitova, T.

    2013-04-01

    Cementation is an industrial scale conditioning method applied to fix and solidify liquid low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LLW/ILW) prior to underground disposal in geological formations.To assist prognosis of the long-term safety of cemented waste, alteration of uranium doped cement productswas studied in chloride-rich solutions relevant for final LLW/ILW disposal in rock salt. After long-time exposure of the full-scale LLW/ILW simulates to concentrated NaCl and MgCl2 brines, solid samples were retrieved for chemical and mineralogical analysis with an emphasis on uranium speciation in the corroded cement matrix.Bulk and recent spatially resolved micro(μ) U L3-XAFS measurements point to the occurrence of a diuranate type U(VI) phase forming throughout the corroded cement monoliths. U-enriched hot spots with dimensions up to several tens of μm turn out to be generally X-ray amorphous.

  15. Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate-monohydrate: Effects of relative humidity and new spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudia; Casati, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Brambilla, Luigi; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    New data on vibrational properties of calcium oxalates and their controversial transformation mechanism are presented. We have focused on whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O) and weddellite [CaC2O4·(2 + x) H2O], the most common phases of calcium oxalate; these compounds occur in many organisms, in kidney stones and in particular kinds of films found on the surface of many works of art. Low temperature experiments carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have highlighted both the high structural order in the crystalline state of whewellite and the disordered distribution of the zeolitic water molecules in weddellite. The synthesised nanocrystals of weddellite have been kept under different hygrometric conditions in order to study, by X-ray powder diffraction, the role of “external” water molecules on their stability. Moreover, in order to identify the different kinds of water molecules, a re-investigation, supported by quantum chemical calculations, of the observed vibrational spectra (IR and Raman) of whewellite has been conducted.

  16. Fractional pressure measurements in the W7-X startup phase with a spectroscopically assisted Penning gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremeyer, Thierry; Schmitz, Oliver; Wenzel, Uwe; Flesch, Kurt; W7-X Team

    2016-10-01

    Studies of helium exhaust from stellarator divertors is important to qualify for maintaining low overall helium concentrations for future reactors. Penning gauges assisted by spectroscopy were used to measure total neutral pressure and to resolve the D and He partial pressures. A similar system was installed on an outboard vacuum flange as a generic feasibility test for W7-X. In this contribution, initial results from the W7-X startup phase are shown. A compact CCD spectrometer with a range from 500 to 1000 nm was used to observe the Penning discharge. With a long integration time of 25s, He lines can be seen down to 10-5 mbar and Hα lines down to 10-6 mbar. The impact of He cleaning discharges on the in-situ neutral gas spectrum was measured and will be discussed in comparison to the mass spectrometers on the device. This initial test is the basis for developing optimized Penning gauges, which will be deployed to measure the D/He pressure ratios inside of the island divertor. The status of this development will be discussed. This work was funded in part by the Department of Energy under Grants DE-SC0012315 and DE-SC0014210 and from EUROfusion under Grant No 633053.

  17. In-focus electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated biological samples with a Boersch phase plate.

    PubMed

    Barton, B; Rhinow, D; Walter, A; Schröder, R; Benner, G; Majorovits, E; Matijevic, M; Niebel, H; Müller, H; Haider, M; Lacher, M; Schmitz, S; Holik, P; Kühlbrandt, W

    2011-12-01

    We report the implementation of an electrostatic Einzel lens (Boersch) phase plate in a prototype transmission electron microscope dedicated to aberration-corrected cryo-EM. The combination of phase plate, C(s) corrector and Diffraction Magnification Unit (DMU) as a new electron-optical element ensures minimal information loss due to obstruction by the phase plate and enables in-focus phase contrast imaging of large macromolecular assemblies. As no defocussing is necessary and the spherical aberration is corrected, maximal, non-oscillating phase contrast transfer can be achieved up to the information limit of the instrument. A microchip produced by a scalable micro-fabrication process has 10 phase plates, which are positioned in a conjugate, magnified diffraction plane generated by the DMU. Phase plates remained fully functional for weeks or months. The large distance between phase plate and the cryo sample permits the use of an effective anti-contaminator, resulting in ice contamination rates of <0.6 nm/h at the specimen. Maximal in-focus phase contrast was obtained by applying voltages between 80 and 700 mV to the phase plate electrode. The phase plate allows for in-focus imaging of biological objects with a signal-to-noise of 5-10 at a resolution of 2-3 nm, as demonstrated for frozen-hydrated virus particles and purple membrane at liquid-nitrogen temperature.

  18. Comparison of mounting methods for the evaluation of fibers by phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Pang, Thomas W S; Nelson, John; Andrew, Mike; Harper, Martin

    2011-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate mounting methods for fiber examination of air sample filters by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and to evaluate differences in fiber counts that might be due to fiber movement. Acetone/triacetin (AT) with various amounts of triacetin and acetone/Euparal (AE) where the mounting medium was placed between the cleared filter wedge and the coverslip were tested as a function of time. Field sample slides collected from a taconite iron-ore processing mill, a tremolitic talc-ore processing mill, and from around a crusher in a meta-basalt stone quarry were prepared with relocatable coverslips to revisit the same field areas on the slides. For each slide, three or four field areas were randomly selected and pictures were taken every 2 weeks to determine any sign of fiber movement over time. For 11 AT slides (named as AT-3.5) prepared with 3.5 μl of the mounting medium according to the NIOSH 7400 method, no fiber movements were detected over 59 weeks. On the other hand, AT slides prepared with larger quantities (10, 15, and 20 μl) of the mounting medium (named as AT-10) and AE slides prepared with ∼10 μl mounting medium showed fiber movement from the eighth day at the earliest. Fiber movement began earlier for the slides mounted with excess triacetin than for those mounted with Euparal. The sample slide storage method, either vertically or horizontally, did not seem to accelerate fiber movement. Additionally, two other modified methods, dimethylformamide solution/Euparal (mDE) and dimethylformamide solution/triacetin (mDT), were also prepared where the mounting medium was placed between the cleared filter wedge and the glass slide. The findings of fiber movements were similar; when 3.5 μl of triacetin was used for the mDT slides, fiber movements were not detected, while fibers on slides prepared with 10 μl triacetin (mDT-10) moved around. No fiber movements were observed for the mDE slides at any time during 59 weeks. Once

  19. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of phase separation in GaInAsSb films grown on GaSb substrate.

    PubMed

    Szczeszek, P; Amariei, A; Schöne, J; Zoulis, G; Vouroutzis, N; Polychroniadis, E K; Stróz, D

    2006-10-01

    The GaSb-based quaternary alloys are a good choice for thermophotovoltaic applications. The thermophotovoltaic cell converts infrared radiation to electricity, using the same principles as photovoltaic devices. The aim of the present work was the microstructural study of such an alloy, namely Ga(0.84)In(0.16)As(0.12)Sb(0.88). A thin film of the material was grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on a (100)alpha-->[111]B (alpha = 2 degrees, 4 degrees, 6 degrees) GaSb substrate. The GaInAsSb alloy has an appropriate band gap, but suffers from a phase separation consisting of GaAs-rich and InSb-rich regions that is disadvantageous for cell efficiency. In this work, we employed a morphological approach to phase separation, with the use of conventional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The phase separation occurs in two different orientations: parallel to the growth direction (vertical) and inclined (lateral). After application of fast Fourier transformation filtering, the vertical periodicity was found to be lambda = 5 nm for the pair (black and white) of layers independently of the cut-off angle, whereas the lateral periodicity was related to it.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of TEM methods for LiFePO4/FePO4 phase mapping: spectroscopic techniques (EFTEM, STEM-EELS) and STEM diffraction techniques (ACOM-TEM).

    PubMed

    Mu, X; Kobler, A; Wang, D; Chakravadhanula, V S K; Schlabach, S; Szabó, D V; Norby, P; Kübel, C

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used intensively in investigating battery materials, e.g. to obtain phase maps of partially (dis)charged (lithium) iron phosphate (LFP/FP), which is one of the most promising cathode material for next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Due to the weak interaction between Li atoms and fast electrons, mapping of the Li distribution is not straightforward. In this work, we revisited the issue of TEM measurements of Li distribution maps for LFP/FP. Different TEM techniques, including spectroscopic techniques (energy filtered (EF)TEM in the energy range from low-loss to core-loss) and a STEM diffraction technique (automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM)), were applied to map the lithiation of the same location in the same sample. This enabled a direct comparison of the results. The maps obtained by all methods showed excellent agreement with each other. Because of the strong difference in the imaging mechanisms, it proves the reliability of both the spectroscopic and STEM diffraction phase mapping. A comprehensive comparison of all methods is given in terms of information content, dose level, acquisition time and signal quality. The latter three are crucial for the design of in-situ experiments with beam sensitive Li-ion battery materials. Furthermore, we demonstrated the power of STEM diffraction (ACOM-STEM) providing additional crystallographic information, which can be analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the LFP/FP interface properties such as statistical information on phase boundary orientation and misorientation between domains.

  1. Dynamic phase microscopy, a new method to detect viable and killed spores and to estimate the heterogeneity of spore populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, V. P.; Mulyukin, A. L.; Lisovskii, V. V.; Nikolaev, Yu. A.; Kretushev, A. V.; Vyshenskaya, T. V.; Suzina, N. E.; Duda, V. I.; El-Registan, G. I.

    One of the challenging tasks in monitoring studies is to estimate heterogeneity of microbial populations by the physiological state and potential viability of individual cells especially with regard of their ability to withstand various environmental assaults Previously we described some approaches based on electron microscopy methods to discriminate vegetative dormant and dead cells in both aged microbial cultures and environmental samples including permafrost In this communication we propose to extend the arsenal of microscopy methods for monitoring studies by a new non-invasive and informative method - dynamic phase microscopy DPM The substantial advantage of DPM is that it gives quantitative digitized data of un-destroyed living microscopic objects exemplified in our work by Bacillus licheniformis spores Using DPM made it possible to record interference images of objects spores and to produce picture of their phase thickness PT that is the optical path difference in nm Thus it was demonstrated the remarkable difference in the PT of spores at different physiological states dormant germinating and heat-killed spores had PT values of 80 nm 40-50 nm and 20 nm respectively The other found criterion to distinguish between spores was the PT fluctuations In contrast to dormant and killed spores the PT of germinating spores oscillated with amplitude of up to 7 nm with typical frequencies of 1 3 and 3 4 Hz A combination of the recorded PT values and PT fluctuations gave a key to detect viable and dead cells Under the conditions that did not

  2. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy principle embodiment into Q-PHASE microscope: story of a successful technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostak, M.; Chmelik, R.

    2016-03-01

    Curiously, the coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) was brought into the world owing to the endeavor of Chmelik's team at Brno University of Technology (BUT) to avoid scanning in confocal microscopy. As coherence gating seemed to be the way, the Leith & Upatnieks proposal of incoherent holography had been considered attractive. Their method made interference system free from strict dependence on both spatial and temporal coherence. Off axis holographic system proposed on such basis has been proved capable of coherence based depth discrimination in single wide-field shot in reflected-light arrangement. Consequently, extremely low-coherence holographic imaging had been found highly contributive also to the image quality depriving it from coherence artefacts and improving its transversal resolution. This is why CCHM promised high precision of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) in transmitted light set up that was realized for cell biology. However the cost of necessarily complicated optical design and need of very precise mechanics forced the team of prof Chmelik at BUT to search for a company capable of mastering the instrument. It was TESCAN ORSAY the highly successful scanning electron microscopes producer that finally took charge of the commercial design. Long-term collaboration of the company with BUT made possible both the CCHM technology successful transfer up to Q-PHASE microscope production as well as the company Light microscopy division reinforcement. This contribution merges views of CCHM technology author and the TESCAN development team.

  3. Enhanced quantitative phase imaging in self-interference digital holographic microscopy using an electrically focus tunable lens

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Robin; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Kemper, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Self-interference digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been found particular suitable for simplified quantitative phase imaging of living cells. However, a main drawback of the self-interference DHM principle are scattering patterns that are induced by the coherent nature of the laser light which affect the resolution for detection of optical path length changes. We present a simple and efficient technique for the reduction of coherent disturbances in quantitative phase images. Therefore, amplitude and phase of the sample illumination are modulated by an electrically focus tunable lens. The proposed method is in particular convenient with the self-interference DHM concept. Results from the characterization of the method show that a reduction of coherence induced disturbances up to 70 percent can be achieved. Finally, the performance for enhanced quantitative imaging of living cells is demonstrated. PMID:25574433

  4. Superconducting scanning tunneling microscopy tips in a magnetic field: Geometry-controlled order of the phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Eltschka, Matthias Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R.; Kondrashov, Oleg V.; Skvortsov, Mikhail A.; Kern, Klaus

    2015-09-21

    The properties of geometrically confined superconductors significantly differ from their bulk counterparts. Here, we demonstrate the geometrical impact for superconducting scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips, where the confinement ranges from the atomic to the mesoscopic scale. To this end, we compare the experimentally determined magnetic field dependence for several vanadium tips to microscopic calculations based on the Usadel equation. For our theoretical model of a superconducting cone, we find a direct correlation between the geometry and the order of the superconducting phase transition. Increasing the opening angle of the cone changes the phase transition from first to second order. Comparing our experimental findings to the theory reveals first and second order quantum phase transitions in the vanadium STM tips. In addition, the theory also explains experimentally observed broadening effects by the specific tip geometry.

  5. Phase-resolved imaging of edge-mode spin waves using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Cao, W.; Bailey, W. E.

    2017-02-01

    We have imaged the excitation of small-amplitude spin-wave eigenmodes, localized within ∼100 nm of the vertices of nanoscale Ni81Fe19 ellipses, using time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) at 2 GHz and resolution of 70 nm. Taking advantage of the buried-layer sensitivity of STXM, we find that the magnetization precession at the two vertices changes from predominantly in-phase to out-of-phase in samples with and without a conductive layer deposited over the ellipses. As a plausible interpretation for the reversal in phase, we propose that unexpectedly strong Oersted fields are generated in the discontinuous overlayer, although effects of edge roughness cannot be fully excluded. The results demonstrate the capabilities of STXM to image small-amplitude, GHz magnetization dynamics with the potential to map rf magnetic fields on the nanoscale.

  6. Quartz tuning fork-based frequency modulation atomic force spectroscopy and microscopy with all digital phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    An, Sangmin; Hong, Mun-heon; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Lee, Manhee; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-11-01

    We present a platform for the quartz tuning fork (QTF)-based, frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) system for quantitative study of the mechanical or topographical properties of nanoscale materials, such as the nano-sized water bridge formed between the quartz tip (~100 nm curvature) and the mica substrate. A thermally stable, all digital phase-locked loop is used to detect the small frequency shift of the QTF signal resulting from the nanomaterial-mediated interactions. The proposed and demonstrated novel FM-AFM technique provides high experimental sensitivity in the measurement of the viscoelastic forces associated with the confined nano-water meniscus, short response time, and insensitivity to amplitude noise, which are essential for precision dynamic force spectroscopy and microscopy.

  7. Quartz tuning fork-based frequency modulation atomic force spectroscopy and microscopy with all digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Hong, Mun-heon; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Lee, Manhee; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-11-01

    We present a platform for the quartz tuning fork (QTF)-based, frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) system for quantitative study of the mechanical or topographical properties of nanoscale materials, such as the nano-sized water bridge formed between the quartz tip (˜100 nm curvature) and the mica substrate. A thermally stable, all digital phase-locked loop is used to detect the small frequency shift of the QTF signal resulting from the nanomaterial-mediated interactions. The proposed and demonstrated novel FM-AFM technique provides high experimental sensitivity in the measurement of the viscoelastic forces associated with the confined nano-water meniscus, short response time, and insensitivity to amplitude noise, which are essential for precision dynamic force spectroscopy and microscopy.

  8. Dissecting eukaryotic cells by coherent phase microscopy: quantitative analysis of quiescent and activated T lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.; Kretushev, Alexander V.; Vyshenskaya, Tatiana V.; Shtil, Alexander A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a concept for quantitative characterization of a functional state of an individual eukaryotic cell based on interference imaging. The informative parameters of the phase images of quiescent and mitogen-activated T lymphocytes included the phase thickness, phase volume, the area, and the size of organelles. These parameters were obtained without a special hypothesis about cell structure. Combinations of these parameters generated a ``phase portrait'' of the cell. A simplified spherical multilayer optic model of a T lymphocyte was used to calculate the refractivity profile, to identify structural elements of the image with the organelles, and to interpret the parameters of the phase portrait. The values of phase image parameters underwent characteristic changes in the course of mitogenic stimulation of T cells; thereby, the functional state of individual cells can be described using these parameters. Because the values of the components of the phase portrait are measured in absolute units, it is possible to compare the parameters of images obtained with different interference microscopes. Thus, the analysis of phase portraits provides a new and perspective approach for quantitative, real-time analysis of subcellular structure and physiologic state of an individual cell.

  9. Super resolution microscopy of lipid bilayer phases and single molecule kinetic studies on merocyanine 540 bound lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Kuei

    Recently, observing biological process and structural details in live cell became feasible after the introduction of super-resolution microscopy. Super-resolution microscopy by single molecule localization is the method that has commonly been used for such purpose. There are mainly three approaches to it: stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), and point accumulation in nanoscale topology (PAINT). STORM and PALM rely on external laser control and use of photoactivable fluorescent protein or photoswitchable dyes and are technically challenging. The PAINT method relies on the control of thermal reaction rates to enable the switching between bright and dark states. Therefore, many conventional fluorescent probes can be applied in PAINT method and the images denote different information composed of interactions between the probe and its immediate environment by variations of probe parameters. The existence of lipid rafts has been under debates for decades due to the lack of a tool to directly visualize them in live cells. In the thesis, we combine PAINT with a phase sensitive dye, Merocyanine 540, to enable nanoscale observation of phase separation on supported lipid bilayers of mixed liquid/gel phases. The imaging results are presented in the chapter 3. Given that this is the first example of visualization of nanoscale phase separation of lipid bilayers using an optical microscope, we further looked into the kinetics of MC540 monomer dimer equilibrium in lipid bilayers using single molecule intensity time trajectory analysis and polarization dependent imaging. Our finding confirms that perpendicular monomeric MC540 (to the membrance surface) is the emitting speices in our system and it stays fluorescent for roughly 3 ms before it switches off to dark states. This part of analysis is presented in the chapter 4. All the materials, procedures to carry out experiments and data analysis, methods involved in our

  10. The HCP To BCC Phase Transformation in Ti Characterized by Nanosecond Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G; LaGrange, T; King, W; Colvin, J; Ziegler, A; Browning, N; Kleinschmidt, H; Bostanjoglo, O

    2005-06-21

    The general class of martensitic phase transformations occurs by a rapid lattice-distortive mechanism, where kinetics and morphology of the transformation are dominated by the strain energy. Since transformation is diffusionless, phase fronts propagate through a crystal with great speed that can approach the speed of sound. We have observed a particular example of this class of phase transformation, the hexagonal close packed (HCP) to body centered cubic (BCC) transformation in titanium that is driven by a rapid increase in temperature. We have used a novel nanosecond electron microscope (the dynamic transmission electron microscope, DTEM) to acquire diffraction and imaging information on the transformation, which is driven in-situ by nanosecond laser irradiation. Using nanosecond exposure times that are possible in the DTEM, data can be collected about the transient events in these fast transformations. We have identified the phase transformation with diffraction patterns and correlated the time of the phase transformation with calculated conditions in the sample.

  11. Physical compensation of phase curvature in digital holographic microscopy by use of programmable liquid lens.

    PubMed

    Doblas, Ana; Hincapie-Zuluaga, Diego; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative phase measurements obtained with digital holographic microscopes are strongly dependent on the optical arrangement of the imaging system. The nontelecentric operation provides phase measurements affected by a parabolic phase factor and requires numerical postprocessing, which does not always remove all the perturbation. Accurate phase measurements are achieved by using the imaging system in telecentric mode. Unfortunately, this condition is not accomplished when a commercial microscope is used as the imaging system. In this paper, we present an approach for obtaining accurate phase measurements in nontelecentric imaging systems without the need for numerical postprocessing. The method uses an electrically tunable liquid lens to illuminate the sample so that the perturbing parabolic wavefront is cancelled out. Experimental holograms of a Fresnel lens and a section of the thorax of a Drosophila melanogaster fly are captured to verify the proposed method.

  12. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies of the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of a homologous series of linear saturated phosphatidylserines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    2000-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of the even-numbered, N-saturated 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylserines was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and by Fourier-transform infrared and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At pH 7.0, 0.1 M NaCl and in the absence of divalent cations, aqueous dispersions of these lipids, which have not been incubated at low temperature, exhibit a single calorimetrically detectable phase transition that is fully reversible, highly cooperative, and relatively energetic, and the transition temperatures and enthalpies increase progressively with increases in hydrocarbon chain length. Our spectroscopic observations confirm that this thermal event is a lamellar gel (L(beta))-to-lamellar liquid crystalline (L(alpha)) phase transition. However, after low temperature incubation, the L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine is replaced by a higher temperature, more enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition, and an additional lower temperature, less enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition appears in the longer chain phosphatidylserines. Our spectroscopic results indicate that this change in thermotropic phase behavior when incubated at low temperatures results from the conversion of the L(beta) phase to a highly ordered lamellar crystalline (L(c)) phase. Upon heating, the L(c) phase of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine converts directly to the L(alpha) phase at a temperature slightly higher than that of its original L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition. Calorimetrically, this process is manifested by a less cooperative but considerably more energetic, higher-temperature phase transition, which replaces the weaker L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition alluded to above. However, with the longer chain compounds, the L(c) phase first converts to the L(beta) phase at temperatures some 10-25 degrees C below that at which the L(beta) phase converts to the L(alpha) phase

  13. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J. K.; Roy, S.; Skinner, J. L.; Zabuga, A. V.; Rizzo, T. R.

    2014-06-14

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed “maps,” which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala){sub 5}-Lys-H{sup +} in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly {sup 13}C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and {sup 13}C{sup 18}O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm{sup −1} for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  14. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Carr, J K; Zabuga, A V; Roy, S; Rizzo, T R; Skinner, J L

    2014-06-14

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed "maps," which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H(+) in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly (13)C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and (13)C(18)O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm(-1) for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  15. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed "maps," which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm-1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  16. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    PubMed Central

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed “maps,” which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm−1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides. PMID:24929378

  17. Direct observation of mesoscopic phase separation in KxFeySe2 by scanning microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Atsutaka; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Yoshinori

    2015-03-01

    KxFeySe2 is isostructural to 122-FeAs compounds. However, its electronic structure is unique among Fe-based superconductors in the sense that hole Fermi pocket is absent at the center of the Brillouin zone. Therefore, it is important to study this compounds in terms of the mechanism of superconductivity since some pairing (for example, s +/- -wave) needs the interaction between hole and electron Fermi pockets. However, the phase separation in this material makes studies using conventional macroscopic measurement techniques very difficult. Scanning near-field microwave microscope (SMM), which can measure local electric property of inhomogeneous conducting samples, should be a powerful tool. Recently we developed the combined instrument of STM and SMM with high sensitivity, and investigated the local electric property of KxFeySe2 (x = 0.8, y = 1.6 ~2, Tc = 31 K) using this scanning tunneling/microwave microscope. The characteristic pattern of mesoscopic phase separation of the metallic and the semiconducting phase was observed. From the comparison with previously reported SEM/EDS result we identified the metallic phase and the semiconducting phase as the minor Fe-rich phase and the major K2Fe4Se5 phase, respectively.

  18. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Guiwen; Yu, Jing; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-05-01

    This protocol describes a method combining phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers to characterize the germination of single bacterial spores. The characterization consists of the following steps: (i) loading heat-activated dormant spores into a temperature-controlled microscope sample holder containing a germinant solution plus a nucleic acid stain; (ii) capturing a single spore with optical tweezers; (iii) simultaneously measuring phase-contrast images, Raman spectra and fluorescence images of the optically captured spore at 2- to 10-s intervals; and (iv) analyzing the acquired data for the loss of spore refractility, changes in spore-specific molecules (in particular, dipicolinic acid) and uptake of the nucleic acid stain. This information leads to precise correlations between various germination events, and takes 1-2 h to complete. The method can also be adapted to use multi-trap Raman spectroscopy or phase-contrast microscopy of spores adhered on a cover slip to simultaneously obtain germination parameters for multiple individual spores.

  19. Single grating phase contrast imaging for x-ray microscopy and microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pauwels, B.

    2014-09-01

    The grating based approach to phase contrast imaging is rather inefficient in the use of the available x-ray flux due to the presence of two absorption gratings and it requires longer scan times compared to conventional CT because multiple images are needed at each projection angle. To avoid these drawbacks, a proof-of-principle experiment was developed to obtain absorption, phase contrast (DPC) and dark field images (DCI) in a single exposure using only a non-absorbing phase grating, a micro-focus source in cone-beam geometry and a highresolution x-ray detector.

  20. Electron microscopy analyses and electrical properties of the layered Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase

    SciTech Connect

    Taoufyq, A.; Ait Ahsaine, H.; Patout, L.; Benlhachemi, A.; Ezahri, M.; and others

    2013-07-15

    The bismuth tungstate Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was synthesized using a classical coprecipitation method followed by a calcination process at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analyses. The Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction clearly confirmed the Pca2{sub 1} non centrosymmetric space group previously proposed for this phase. The layers Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2−} have been directly evidenced from the HRTEM images. The electrical properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} compacted pellets systems were determined from electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and direct current (DC) analyses, under air and argon, between 350 and 700 °C. The direct current analyses showed that the conduction observed from EIS analyses was mainly ionic in this temperature range, with a small electronic contribution. Electrical change above the transition temperature of 660 °C is observed under air and argon atmospheres. The strong conductivity increase observed under argon is interpreted in terms of formation of additional oxygen vacancies coupled with electron conduction. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron microscopy: inverse fast Fourier transform giving the layered structure of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase, with a representation of the cell dimensions (b and c vectors). The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2−} sandwiches are visible in the IFFT image. - Highlights: • Using transmission electron microscopy, we visualize the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • Electrical analyses under argon gas show some increase in conductivity. • The phase transition at 660 °C is evidenced from electrical modification.

  1. Direct observation by laser scanning confocal microscopy of microstructure and phase migration of PVC gels in an applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong; Ueki, Takamitsu; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2011-02-01

    The fluorescent probe lucigenin was incorporated in poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) gels, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to clarify the internal structures of the gels. From the two-dimensional and three-dimensional information by LSCM, we first observed the internal structure of the PVC gel at a wet status, where the PVC gels comprised a polymer-rich phase and a polymer-poor phase uniformly with a three-dimensional network structure. After an electric field was applied, an effect of the electric field resulted in the change of internal structure in the gels. The polymer-poor phase moved from the cathode to the anode and the polymer-rich phase formed linelike arrangement between electrodes due to the attraction force. On the other hand, the freeze-dried PVC gels with/without in-situ dc voltage casting were particularly fabricated to confirm above results by the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). It was found that many craters remained on the surface of the gel near the anode due to sublimation in freeze-drying. This phenomenon did not appear on the surface near the cathode. The results of in-situ dc voltage casting also suggested that a substantial amount of polymer-poor phase was moved and fixed at the anode. Thus, results of both LSCM and in-situ dc voltage casting corresponded to the effect of electric field on PVC gels and provided a convincing evidence for the interpretation of the deformation mechanism of PVC gel actuators by an applied electric field.

  2. Integrated quantitative phase and birefringence microscopy for imaging malaria-infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengshuai; Chen, Shichao; Klemba, Michael; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-09-01

    A dual-modality birefringence/phase imaging system is presented. The system features a crystal retarder that provides polarization mixing and generates two interferometric carrier waves in a single signal spectrum. The retardation and orientation of sample birefringence can then be measured simultaneously based on spectral multiplexing interferometry. Further, with the addition of a Nomarski prism, the same setup can be used for quantitative differential interference contrast (DIC) imaging. Sample phase can then be obtained with two-dimensional integration. In addition, birefringence-induced phase error can be corrected using the birefringence data. This dual-modality approach is analyzed theoretically with Jones calculus and validated experimentally with malaria-infected red blood cells. The system generates not only corrected DIC and phase images, but a birefringence map that highlights the distribution of hemozoin crystals.

  3. Interface morphology studies of liquid phase epitaxy grown HgCdTe films by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M. A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we report an investigation of the morphology of the interfaces of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) grown HgCdTe thin films on CdTe and CdZnTe substrates by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on freshly cleaved (110) crystallographic planes. An empirical observation which may be linked to lattice mismatch was indicated by an angle between the cleavage steps of the substrate to those of the film. The precipitates with size ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm were found to be most apparent near the interface.

  4. Calorimetric and spectroscopic evidence of chain-melting in smectic E and smectic A phases of 4-alkyl-4'-isothiocyanatobiphenyl (nTCB).

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Adachi, Takuya; Miyazawa, Takahito; Horiuchi, Katsuya; Sumita, Masato; Massalska-Arodź, Maria; Urban, Stanisław; Saito, Kazuya

    2012-08-02

    To confirm the molten state of the alkyl chain in soft crystalline phase, smectic E (SmE) phase, thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses were performed on 4-n-alkyl-4'-isothiocyanatobiphenyl (nTCB, n: the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group). DSC results of 11TCB and 12TCB, having extra smectic A phase besides smectic E phase, show that their chain-length dependence of entropies of transition (Δ(trs)S) from the ordered crystalline (OC) phase to the SmE phase matches the trend found for nTCB (n = 4-10), while no chain-length dependence is observed in Δ(trs)S at the SmE-to-SmA and SmA-to-isotropic liquid (IL) phase transitions in 11TCB and 12TCB. Temperature dependences of FT-IR spectra of six compounds (n = 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12) were recorded. The CH stretching modes of the chain exhibited more pronounced change at the transition from the OC to the SmE phase than at the transition from the SmE phase to the IL or SmA phase. These results indicate that the alkyl chain is molten in the SmE phase as in IL. The disordering process of nTCB molecules from the OC to IL via anisotropic mesophases is discussed in terms of entropy.

  5. Phase transitions in a LiMn2O4 nanowire battery observed by operando electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soyeon; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Hosono, Eiji; Zhou, Haoshen; Kim, Kyungsu; Chang, Hansen M; Kanno, Ryoji; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2015-01-27

    Fast charge-discharge process has been reported to give a high capacity loss. A nanobattery consisting of a single LiMn2O4 nanowire cathode, ionic liquid electrolyte and lithium titanium oxide anode was developed for in situ transmission electron microscopy. When it was fully charged or discharged within a range of 4 V in less than half an hour (corresponding average C rate: 2.5C), Li-rich and Li-poor phases were observed to be separated by a transition region, and coexisted during whole process. The phase transition region moved reversibly along the nanowire axis which corresponds to the [011] direction, allowing the volume fraction of both phases to change. In the electron diffraction patterns, the Li-rich phase was seen to have the (100) orientation with respect to the incident electron beam, while the Li-poor phase had the (111̅) orientation. The orientation was changed as the transition region moved. However, the nanowire did not fracture. This suggests that a LiMn2O4 nanowire has the advantage of preventing capacity fading at high charge rates.

  6. The nanoscale phase distinguishing of PCL-PB-PCL blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the bulk phase distinguishing of the poly(ε-caprolactone)-polybutadiene-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PB-PCL) triblock copolymer blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). We found that at a set-point amplitude ratio (rsp) less than or equal to 0.85, a clear phase contrast could be obtained using a probe with a force constant of 40 N/m. When rsp was decreased to 0.1 or less, the measured size of the PB-rich domain relatively shrank; however, the height images of the PB-rich domain would take reverse (translating from the original light to dark) at rsp = 0.85. Force-probe measurements were carried out on the phase-separated regions by TM-AFM. According to the phase shift angle vs. rsp curve, it could be concluded that the different force exerting on the epoxy matrix or on the PB-rich domain might result in the height and phase image reversion. Furthermore, the indentation depth vs. rsp plot showed that with large tapping force (lower rsp), the indentation depth for the PB-rich domain was nearly identical for the epoxy resin matrix. PMID:22360980

  7. Disturbance-free digital holographic microscopy via a micro-phase-step approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ching; Shiu, Ming-Tzung; Wang, Je-Chung; Wu, Chia-Hao; Chew, Yang-Kun

    2015-05-01

    This work proposes a cost-effective, simple, micro-phase-step (MPS) method for suppressing the zero-order diffraction and conjugate-image interferences that are caused during digital holographic microscopic image reconstruction. The proposed MPS method replaces the conventional phase modulation approach; it uses a rotatable cover glass that enables smooth modification of the incidence angle and the optical path of the reference beam. This setup allows the phase step to be accurately estimated by shifting the reference wave phase more freely close to π/2, at which the background noise can be suppressed more effectively. In the proposed MPS method, the optimal conditions for suppressing conjugate-image interference are identified using a relatively moderate intensity distribution and suppression of noise in the numerically reconstructed object wave-field. In addition, the proposed method mitigates the effect of disturbances that are caused by environmental factors, such as minor vibrations and small changes in temperature and humidity. Importantly, only two holograms are required to satisfy the objective of image reconstruction. The results in this work reveal that even with intentional interference caused by minor vibrations, conjugate-image interference can still be suppressed by determining the phase deviation between the two original holograms.

  8. Optical detection and measurement of living cell morphometric features with single-shot quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Merlin, Marine; Wattellier, Benoît; Monneret, Serge

    2012-07-01

    We present a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer used as a wavefront sensor and mounted on a commercial non-modified transmission white-light microscope as a quantitative phase imaging technique. The setup is designed to simultaneously make measurements with both quantitative transmission phase and fluorescence modes: phase enables enhanced contrasted visualization of the cell structure including intracellular organelles, while fluorescence allows a complete and precise identification of each component. After the characterization of the phase measurement reliability and sensitivity on calibrated samples, we use these two imaging modes to measure the characteristic optical path difference between subcellular elements (mitochondria, actin fibers, and vesicles) and cell medium, and demonstrate that phase-only information should be sufficient to identify some organelles without any labeling, like lysosomes. Proof of principle results show that the technique could be used either as a qualitative tool for the control of cells before an experiment, or for quantitative studies on morphology, behavior, and dynamics of cells or cellular components.

  9. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-06-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  10. Repeated crack healing in MAX-phase ceramics revealed by 4D in situ synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sloof, Willem G.; Pei, Ruizhi; McDonald, Samuel A.; Fife, Julie L.; Shen, Lu; Boatemaa, Linda; Farle, Ann-Sophie; Yan, Kun; Zhang, Xun; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Lee, Peter D.; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    MAX phase materials are emerging as attractive engineering materials in applications where the material is exposed to severe thermal and mechanical conditions in an oxidative environment. The Ti2AlC MAX phase possesses attractive thermomechanical properties even beyond a temperature of 1000 K. An attractive feature of this material is its capacity for the autonomous healing of cracks when operating at high temperatures. Coupling a specialized thermomechanical setup to a synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy endstation at the TOMCAT beamline, we captured the temporal evolution of local crack opening and healing during multiple cracking and autonomous repair cycles at a temperature of 1500 K. For the first time, the rate and position dependence of crack repair in pristine Ti2AlC material and in previously healed cracks has been quantified. Our results demonstrate that healed cracks can have sufficient mechanical integrity to make subsequent cracks form elsewhere upon reloading after healing. PMID:26972608

  11. Lensless phase microscopy and diffraction tomography with multi-angle and multi-wavelength illuminations using a LED matrix.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate lensless quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED matrix. Based on the multi-wavelength phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of 3.72μm and an axial resolution of 5μm, across a wide field-of-view of 24mm2. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging cheek cells, micro-beads, and fertilized eggs of Parascaris equorum. Such high-throughput and miniaturized imaging device can provide a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications and point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  12. Repeated crack healing in MAX-phase ceramics revealed by 4D in situ synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sloof, Willem G; Pei, Ruizhi; McDonald, Samuel A; Fife, Julie L; Shen, Lu; Boatemaa, Linda; Farle, Ann-Sophie; Yan, Kun; Zhang, Xun; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Lee, Peter D; Withers, Philip J

    2016-03-14

    MAX phase materials are emerging as attractive engineering materials in applications where the material is exposed to severe thermal and mechanical conditions in an oxidative environment. The Ti2AlC MAX phase possesses attractive thermomechanical properties even beyond a temperature of 1000 K. An attractive feature of this material is its capacity for the autonomous healing of cracks when operating at high temperatures. Coupling a specialized thermomechanical setup to a synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy endstation at the TOMCAT beamline, we captured the temporal evolution of local crack opening and healing during multiple cracking and autonomous repair cycles at a temperature of 1500 K. For the first time, the rate and position dependence of crack repair in pristine Ti2AlC material and in previously healed cracks has been quantified. Our results demonstrate that healed cracks can have sufficient mechanical integrity to make subsequent cracks form elsewhere upon reloading after healing.

  13. Multiscale phase mapping of LiFePO4-based electrodes by transmission electron microscopy and electron forward scattering diffraction.

    PubMed

    Robert, Donatien; Douillard, Thierry; Boulineau, Adrien; Brunetti, Guillaume; Nowakowski, Pawel; Venet, Denis; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Cayron, Cyril

    2013-12-23

    LiFePO4 and FePO4 phase distributions of entire cross-sectioned electrodes with various Li content are investigated from nanoscale to mesoscale, by transmission electron microscopy and by the new electron forward scattering diffraction technique. The distributions of the fully delithiated (FePO4) or lithiated particles (LiFePO4) are mapped on large fields of view (>100 × 100 μm(2)). Heterogeneities in thin and thick electrodes are highlighted at different scales. At the nanoscale, the statistical analysis of 64 000 particles unambiguously shows that the small particles delithiate first. At the mesoscale, the phase maps reveal a core-shell mechanism at the scale of the agglomerates with a preferential pathway along the electrode porosities. At larger scale, lithiation occurs in thick electrodes "stratum by stratum" from the surface in contact with electrolyte toward the current collector.

  14. Phase variance optical coherence microscopy for label-free imaging of the developing vasculature in zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Trinh, Le A.; Fingler, Jeff; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-12-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to image blood flow in the microvasculature of zebrafish embryos, without the use of exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2.8 μm in tissue and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Images of 2 to 5 days postfertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed anatomical structure based on OCM intensity contrast. Phase variance contrast offered visualization of blood flow in the arteries, veins, and capillaries. The pvOCM images of the vasculature were confirmed by direct comparisons with fluorescence microscopy images of transgenic embryos in which the vascular endothelium is labeled with green fluorescent protein. The ability of pvOCM to capture activities of regional blood flow permits it to reveal functional information that is of great utility for the study of vascular development.

  15. Phase retrieval using polychromatic illumination for transmission X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C.; Wang, Junyue; Meirer, Florian; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu; Pianetta, Piero

    2011-01-01

    An alternative method for quantitative phase retrieval in a transmission X-ray microscope system at sub-50-nm resolution is presented. As an alternative to moving the sample in the beam direction in order to analyze the propagation-introduced phase effect, we have illuminated the TXM using X-rays of different energy without any motor movement in the TXM system. Both theoretical analysis and experimental studies have confirmed the feasibility and the advantage of our method, because energy tuning can be performed with very high energy resolution using a double crystal monochromator at a synchrotron beam line, and there is zero motor error in TXM system in our approach. High-spatial-resolution phase retrieval is accomplished using the proposed method. PMID:21263593

  16. Field-Induced Reversible Phase Manipulation in Metal-Insulator Transition using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Se Jun

    2005-03-01

    Reversible electronic switching between insulating and metallic phases is a novel idea that may allow new types of field effect devices feasible.^1 Here we demonstrate the reversible manipulation between metallic and insulating phases in two-dimensional In nanowire arrays on Si(111) surface near the metal-insulator transition temperature (Tc). The electronic switching of phases was induced by local electric field applied by the probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The field-dependent hysteresis behavior was also observed in tip height measurements as a function of the sample bias, under the constraint of constant tunneling current. A model including the intrinsic bi-stability of the nanometer-scale domains of In nanowire arrays will be discussed. ^1C. Ahn, J. Triscone, J. Mannhart, Nature 6952, 1015 (2003)

  17. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  18. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    PubMed

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-07

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels.

  19. Optofluidic bioimaging platform for quantitative phase imaging of lab on a chip devices using digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2016-01-20

    We propose a versatile 3D phase-imaging microscope platform for real-time imaging of optomicrofluidic devices based on the principle of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Lab-on-chip microfluidic devices fabricated on transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glass substrates have attained wide popularity in biological sensing applications. However, monitoring, visualization, and characterization of microfluidic devices, microfluidic flows, and the biochemical kinetics happening in these devices is difficult due to the lack of proper techniques for real-time imaging and analysis. The traditional bright-field microscopic techniques fail in imaging applications, as the microfluidic channels and the fluids carrying biological samples are transparent and not visible in bright light. Phase-based microscopy techniques that can image the phase of the microfluidic channel and changes in refractive indices due to the fluids and biological samples present in the channel are ideal for imaging the fluid flow dynamics in a microfluidic channel at high resolutions. This paper demonstrates three-dimensional imaging of a microfluidic device with nanometric depth precisions and high SNR. We demonstrate imaging of microelectrodes of nanometric thickness patterned on glass substrate and the microfluidic channel. Three-dimensional imaging of a transparent PDMS optomicrofluidic channel, fluid flow, and live yeast cell flow in this channel has been demonstrated using DHM. We also quantify the average velocity of fluid flow through the channel. In comparison to any conventional bright-field microscope, the 3D depth information in the images illustrated in this work carry much information about the biological system under observation. The results demonstrated in this paper prove the high potential of DHM in imaging optofluidic devices; detection of pathogens, cells, and bioanalytes on lab-on-chip devices; and in studying microfluidic dynamics in real time based on phase changes.

  20. Laser phase microscopy and functional imaging of living human cancer cells during the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Graschew, Georgi; Balanos, Evangelos; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to elaborate a new method of functional imaging of living tumor cells. Human colon carcinoma cells HCT116 were investigated with a conventional light microscope, confocal laser scanning microscope and with a laser phase microscope (LPM). The LPM is a functional imaging technique providing information about cell morphology which is imposed by the physiological inhomogeneity of the refractive index. The phase of the light wave passing through an object contains quantitative information about the object thickness, the shape, and the spatial distribution of the refractive index varying with morphology and chemical composition inhomogeneity inside the object. The new method of investigation of the cells in different stages of the cell cycle is developed. Every phase image of the investigated cells has been compared with conventional light microscopic and confocal microscopic images of the same cell. the relation between the cell state, their morphological peculiarities and the phase characteristics of the measured cell is determined. Data thus acquired, quantitatively characterizing intra- and intercellular processes during the cell cycle, and the method of measurements can be used to investigate with high optic resolution the mechanisms of different physical, chemical and biomolecular interactions with the tumor cells.

  1. Deciphering the internal complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy: a multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Laperrousaz, Bastien; Berguiga, Lotfi; Boyer-Provera, Elise; Elezgaray, Juan; Nicolini, Franck E.; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell contributes in a nonintuitive manner to its optical phase image and quite rarely can be inverted to recover its internal structure. The interpretation of the quantitative phase images of living cells remains a difficult task because (1) we still have very little knowledge on the impact of its internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (2) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by the internal cell bodies. We propose to implement a two-dimensional wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries based on their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are the morphological indicators suited for comparing cells of different origins and/or to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare nonadherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins and to assess the internal transformation of hematopoietic stem cells by the transduction of the BCR-ABL oncogene responsible for the chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  2. Spectroscopic and theoretical study of the "azo"-dye E124 in condensate phase: evidence of a dominant hydrazo form.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Mariana R; Stephani, Rodrigo; Dos Santos, Hélio F; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C

    2010-01-14

    Spectroscopic techniques, including Raman, IR, UV/vis, and NMR were used to characterize the samples of the azo dye Ponceau 4R (also known as E124, New Coccine; Cochineal Red; C.I. no. 16255; Food Red No. 102), which is 1,3-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 7-hydroxy-8-[(4-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl) azo] trisodium salt in aqueous solution and solid state. In addition, first principle calculations were carried out for the azo (OH) and hydrazo (NH) tautomers in order to assist in the assignment of the experimental data. The two intense bands observed in the UV/vis spectrum, centered at 332 and 507 nm, can be compared to the calculated values at 296 and 474 nm for azo and 315 and 500 nm for hydrazo isomer, with the latter in closer agreement to the experiment. The Raman spectrum is quite sensitive to tautomeric equilibrium; in solid state and aqueous solution, three bands were observed around 1574, 1515, and 1364 cm(-1), assigned to mixed modes including deltaNH + betaCH + nuCC, deltaNH + nuC horizontal lineO + nuC horizontal lineN + betaCH and nuCC vibrations, respectively. These assignments are predicted only for the NH species centered at 1606, 1554, and 1375 cm(-1). The calculated Raman spectrum for the azo (OH) tautomer showed two strong bands at 1468 (nuN = N + deltaOH) and 1324 cm(-1) (nuCC + nuC-N), which were not obtained experimentally. The (13)C NMR spectrum showed a very characteristic peak at 192 ppm assigned to the carbon bound to oxygen in the naphthol ring; the predicted values were 165 ppm for OH and 187 for NH isomer, supporting once again the predominance of NH species in solution. Therefore, all of the experimental and theoretical results strongly suggest the food dye Ponceau 4R or E124 has a major contribution of the hydrazo structure instead of the azo form as the most abundant in condensate phase.

  3. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  4. Mapping phase diagrams of supported lipid bilayers by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Jordi H; Montero, M Teresa; Domènech, Òscar

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the method followed to construct a pseudophase diagram of two phospholipids: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol). Two different techniques, DSC and AFM, have been used based in the determination of the onset (Tonset ) and completion (Toffset ) temperatures of the gel-to-liquid crystalline phases (Lβ →Lα ), the first from the endotherms from liposomes and the second from the topographic images of supported lipid bilayers. The features of both phase diagrams are discussed emphasizing the influence of Ca(2+) presence and the substrate (mica) on the transition undergone by the phospholipid mixture. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:4-10, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Phase imaging microscopy for the diagnostics of plasma-cell interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohene, Yolanda; Marinov, Ilya; de Laulanié, Lucie; Dupuy, Corinne; Wattelier, Benoit; Starikovskaia, Svetlana

    2015-06-01

    Phase images of biological specimens were obtained by the method of Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometry (QWLSI). The QWLSI technique produces, at high resolution, phase images of the cells having been exposed to a plasma treatment and enables the quantitative analysis of the changes in the surface area of the cells over time. Morphological changes in the HTori normal thyroid cells were demonstrated using this method. There was a comparison of the cell behaviour between control cells, cells treated by plasma of a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge, including cells pre-treated by catalase, and cells treated with an equivalent amount of H2O2. The major changes in the cell membrane morphology were observed at only 5 min after the plasma treatment. The primary role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this degradation is suggested. Deformation and condensation of the cell nucleus were observed 2-3 h after the treatment and are supposedly related to apoptosis induction. The coupling of the phase QWLSI with immunofluorescence imaging would give a deeper insight into the mechanisms of plasma induced cell death.

  6. Comparison of fiber counting by TV screen and eyepieces of phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, I-Fang; Yeh, Hui-Roung; Chen, Mei-Lien

    2002-01-01

    This study designed a modified light path of a phase-contrast microscope to evaluate the feasibility of fiber counting on a television screen (TVS). A comparison also was made of the fiber counts, fiber density, and precision derived from repeatedly counting fibers through eyepieces (EPs) and on a TVS connected to a phase contrast microscope. Thirty asbestos fiber samples were counted 10 times repeatedly. Ten samples were counted by viewing the same field through an EP and on a TVS alternately, whereas the other 20 samples were counted separately by using an EP and a TVS. The A rules of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) 7400 method was quoted. No statistically significant difference of fiber density (p = 0.39) or fiber counts (p > 0.05) was observed between the TVS and EP methods, though TVS gave a slightly lower value than EP did. The bias of the two methods was 7.7 +/- 8.0% on an average. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for both methods were the same, 0.40, which resembled the theoretical RSD, 0.44, of NIOSH 7400. Meanwhile, the theoretical and experimental RSDs were not significantly different for either method (p > 0.05). The modified light path of a phase contrast microscope provided a compatible view with less eye strain on a TVS than a conventional EP. Moreover, operator biases and variability might be greatly reduced by training several counters simultaneously on the TVS.

  7. Lab on chip optical imaging of biological sample by quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Gennari, O.; Mugnano, M.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative imaging and three dimensional (3D) morphometric analysis of flowing and not-adherent cells is an important aspect for diagnostic purposes at Lab on Chip scale. Diagnostics tools need to be quantitative, label-free and, as much as possible, accurate. In recent years digital holography (DH) has been improved to be considered as suitable diagnostic method in several research field. In this paper we demonstrate that DH can be used for retrieving 3D morphometric data for sorting and diagnosis aims. Several techniques exist for 3D morphological study as optical coherent tomography and confocal microscopy, but they are not the best choice in case of dynamic events as flowing samples. Recently, a DH approach, based on shape from silhouette algorithm (SFS), has been developed for 3D shape display and calculation of cells biovolume. Such approach, adopted in combination with holographic optical tweezers (HOT) was successfully applied to cells with convex shape. Unfortunately, it's limited to cells with convex surface as sperm cells or diatoms. Here, we demonstrate an improvement of such procedure. By decoupling thickness information from refractive index ones and combining this with SFS analysis, 3D shape of concave cells is obtained. Specifically, the topography contour map is computed and used to adjust the 3D shape retrieved by the SFS algorithm. We prove the new procedure for healthy red blood cells having a concave surface in their central region. Experimental results are compared with theoretical model.

  8. Characterization of LiBC by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, Frank; Wörle, Michael; Reibisch, Philipp; Nesper, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    LiBC was used as a model compound for probing the applicability of phase-contrast (PC) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to visualize lithium distributions. In the LiBC structure, boron and carbon are arranged to hetero graphite layers between which lithium is incorporated. The crystal structure is reflected in the PC-STEM images recorded perpendicular to the layers. The experimental images and their defocus dependence match with multi-slice simulations calculated utilizing the reciprocity principle. The observation that a part of the Li positions is not occupied is likely an effect of the intense electron beam triggering Li displacement.

  9. Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy reveals 100 kDa component in a protein complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Chang, Jen-wei; Chen, Yi-yun; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chang, Wei-Hau

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a powerful technique for obtaining near atomic structures for large protein assemblies or large virus particles, but the application to protein particles smaller than 200-300 kDa has been hampered by the feeble phase contrast obtained for such small samples and the limited number of electrons tolerated by them without incurring excessive radiation damage. By implementing a thin-film quarter-wave phase plate to a cryo-EM, Nagayama, one of the present authors, has recently restored the long-lost very low spatial frequencies, generating in-focus phase contrast superior to that of conventional defocusing phase contrast, and successfully applied the so-called Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM to target various biological samples in native state. Nevertheless, the sought-after goal of using enhanced phase contrast to reveal a native protein as small as 100 kDa waits to be realized. Here, we report a study in which 200 kV Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM with a plate cut-on periodicity of 36 nm was applied to visualize 100 kDa components of various protein complexes, including the small domains on the surface of an icosahedral particle of ˜38 nm derived from the dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV) and the labile sub-complex dissociated from yeast RNA polymerase III of 17 nm. In the former case, we observed a phase contrast reversal phenomenon at the centre of the icosahedral particle and traced its root cause to the near matching of the cut-on size and the particle size. In summary, our work has demonstrated that Zernike phase-plate implementation can indeed expand the size range of proteins that can be successfully investigated by cryo-EM, opening the door for countless proteins. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of using a transfer lens system to enlarge the cut-on periodicity without further miniaturizing the plate pinhole.

  10. Quantitative phase imaging of biological cells and tissues using singleshot white light interference microscopy and phase subtraction method for extended range of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Dalip Singh; Sharma, Anuradha; Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Veena; Ahmad, Azeem

    2016-03-01

    We present a single-shot white light interference microscopy for the quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological cells and tissues. A common path white light interference microscope is developed and colorful white light interferogram is recorded by three-chip color CCD camera. The recorded white light interferogram is decomposed into the red, green and blue color wavelength component interferograms and processed it to find out the RI for different color wavelengths. The decomposed interferograms are analyzed using local model fitting (LMF)" algorithm developed for reconstructing the phase map from single interferogram. LMF is slightly off-axis interferometric QPI method which is a single-shot method that employs only a single image, so it is fast and accurate. The present method is very useful for dynamic process where path-length changes at millisecond level. From the single interferogram a wavelength-dependent quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs) are reconstructed and refractive index is determined. The LMF algorithm is simple to implement and is efficient in computation. The results are compared with the conventional phase shifting interferometry and Hilbert transform techniques.

  11. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; McKay, David S.

    1987-05-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  12. Phase-contrast imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, F; Müller, E; Wepf, R A

    2013-06-01

    Although the presence of phase-contrast information in bright field images recorded with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been known for a long time, its systematic exploitation for the structural characterization of materials began only with the availability of aberration-corrected microscopes that allow sufficiently large illumination angles. Today, phase-contrast STEM (PC-STEM) imaging represents an increasingly important alternative to the well-established HRTEM method. In both methods, the image contrast is coherently generated and thus depends not only on illumination and collection angles but on defocus and specimen thickness as well. By PC-STEM, a projection of the crystal potential is obtained in thin areas, with the scattering sites being represented either with dark or bright contrast at two different defocus values which are both close to Gaussian defocus. This imaging behavior can be further investigated by image simulations performed with standard HRTEM simulation software based on the principle of reciprocity. As examples for the application of this method, PC-STEM results obtained on metal nanoparticles and dodecagonal quasicrystals dd-(Ta,V)₁.₆Te are discussed.

  13. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mckay, David S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  14. Interaction potentials of anisotropic nanocrystals from the trajectory sampling of particle motion using in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qian; Cho, Hoduk; Manthiram, Karthish; ...

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate a generalizable strategy to use the relative trajectories of pairs and groups of nanocrystals, and potentially other nanoscale objects, moving in solution which can now be obtained by in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the interaction potentials between nanocrystals. Such nanoscale interactions are crucial for collective behaviors and applications of synthetic nanocrystals and natural biomolecules, but have been very challenging to measure in situ at nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution. Here we use liquid phase TEM to extract the mathematical form of interaction potential between nanocrystals from their sampled trajectories. We show the power ofmore » this approach to reveal unanticipated features of nanocrystal–nanocrystal interactions by examining the anisotropic interaction potential between charged rod-shaped Au nanocrystals (Au nanorods); these Au nanorods assemble, in a tip-to-tip fashion in the liquid phase, in contrast to the well-known side-by-side arrangements commonly observed for drying-mediated assembly. These observations can be explained by a long-range and highly anisotropic electrostatic repulsion that leads to the tip-selective attachment. As a result, Au nanorods stay unassembled at a lower ionic strength, as the electrostatic repulsion is even longer-ranged. Our study not only provides a mechanistic understanding of the process by which metallic nanocrystals assemble but also demonstrates a method that can potentially quantify and elucidate a broad range of nanoscale interactions relevant to nanotechnology and biophysics.« less

  15. Direct observation of martensitic phase-transformation dynamics in iron by 4D single-pulse electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Baskin, J Spencer; Barwick, Brett; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-11-01

    The in situ martensitic phase transformation of iron, a complex solid-state transition involving collective atomic displacement and interface movement, is studied in real time by means of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy. The iron nanofilm specimen is heated at a maximum rate of approximately 10(11) K/s by a single heating pulse, and the evolution of the phase transformation from body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic crystal structure is followed by means of single-pulse, selected-area diffraction and real-space imaging. Two distinct components are revealed in the evolution of the crystal structure. The first, on the nanosecond time scale, is a direct martensitic transformation, which proceeds in regions heated into the temperature range of stability of the fcc phase, 1185-1667 K. The second, on the microsecond time scale, represents an indirect process for the hottest central zone of laser heating, where the temperature is initially above 1667 K and cooling is the rate-determining step. The mechanism of the direct transformation involves two steps, that of (barrier-crossing) nucleation on the reported nanosecond time scale, followed by a rapid grain growth typically in approximately 100 ps for 10 nm crystallites.

  16. Liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloy observed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Katja; Trampert, Achim

    2016-11-05

    Melting and crystallization dynamics of the multi-component Ge-Sb-Te alloy have been investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Starting point of the phase transition study is an ordered hexagonal Ge1Sb2Te4 thin film on Si(111) where the crystal structure and the chemical composition are verified by scanning TEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, respectively. The in-situ observation of the liquid phase at 600°C including the liquid-solid and liquid-vacuum interfaces and their movements was made possible due to an encapsulation of the TEM sample. The solid-liquid interface during melting displays a broad and diffuse transition zone characterized by a vacancy induced disordered state. Although the velocities of interface movements are measured to be in the nanometer per second scale, both, for crystallization and solidification, the underlying dynamic processes are considerably different. Melting reveals linear dependence on time, whereas crystallization exhibits a non-linear time-dependency featuring a superimposed start-stop motion. Our results may provide valuable insight into the atomic mechanisms at interfaces during the liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloys.

  17. Interaction Potentials of Anisotropic Nanocrystals from the Trajectory Sampling of Particle Motion using in Situ Liquid Phase Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a generalizable strategy to use the relative trajectories of pairs and groups of nanocrystals, and potentially other nanoscale objects, moving in solution which can now be obtained by in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the interaction potentials between nanocrystals. Such nanoscale interactions are crucial for collective behaviors and applications of synthetic nanocrystals and natural biomolecules, but have been very challenging to measure in situ at nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution. Here we use liquid phase TEM to extract the mathematical form of interaction potential between nanocrystals from their sampled trajectories. We show the power of this approach to reveal unanticipated features of nanocrystal–nanocrystal interactions by examining the anisotropic interaction potential between charged rod-shaped Au nanocrystals (Au nanorods); these Au nanorods assemble, in a tip-to-tip fashion in the liquid phase, in contrast to the well-known side-by-side arrangements commonly observed for drying-mediated assembly. These observations can be explained by a long-range and highly anisotropic electrostatic repulsion that leads to the tip-selective attachment. As a result, Au nanorods stay unassembled at a lower ionic strength, as the electrostatic repulsion is even longer-ranged. Our study not only provides a mechanistic understanding of the process by which metallic nanocrystals assemble but also demonstrates a method that can potentially quantify and elucidate a broad range of nanoscale interactions relevant to nanotechnology and biophysics. PMID:27162944

  18. Stain-Free Quantification of Chromosomes in Live Cells Using Regularized Tomographic Phase Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Wonshik; Lue, Niyom; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2012-01-01

    Refractive index imaging is a label-free technique that enables long-term monitoring of the internal structures and molecular composition in living cells with minimal perturbation. Existing tomographic methods for the refractive index imaging lack 3-D resolution and result in artifacts that prevent accurate refractive index quantification. To overcome these limitations without compromising the capability to observe a sample in its most native condition, we have developed a regularized tomographic phase microscope (RTPM) enabling accurate refractive index imaging of organelles inside intact cells. With the enhanced accuracy, we quantify the mass of chromosomes in intact living cells, and differentiate two human colon cancer lines, HT-29 and T84 cells, solely based on the non-aqueous (dry) mass of chromosomes. In addition, we demonstrate chromosomal imaging using a dual-wavelength RTPM, which shows its potential to determine the molecular composition of cellular organelles in live cells. PMID:23166689

  19. Multiplexed off-axis interferometric phase microscopy for dynamic cell measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Frenklach, Irena

    2015-03-01

    We present a new approach of optically multiplexing several off-axis interferograms on the same digital camera, each of which encodes a different field of view of the sample. Since the fringes of these interferograms are in different directions, as obtained experimentally by the optical system, we are able to double or even triple the amount of information that can be acquired in a single camera exposure, with the same number of camera pixels, while sharing the camera dynamic range. We show that this method can partially solve the problem of limited off-axis interferometric field of view due to low-coherence illumination. Our experimental demonstrations include quantitative phase imaging of microscopic diatom shells, fast swimming sperm cells and microorganisms, and contracting cardiomyocytes.

  20. Enhancing two-color absorption, self-phase modulation, and Raman microscopy signatures in tissue with femtosecond laser pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin C.; Piletic, Ivan; Fu, Dan; Matthews, Thomas E.; Liu, Henry; Samineni, Prathyush; Li, Baolei; Warren, Warren S.

    2009-02-01

    Nonlinear microscopies (most commonly, two-photon fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)) have had notable successes in imaging a variety of endogenous and exogenous targets in recent years. These methods generate light at a color different from any of the exciting laser pulses, which makes the signal relatively easy to detect. Our work has focused on developing microscopy techniques using a wider range of nonlinear signatures (two-photon absorption of nonfluorescent species, self phase modulation) which have some specific advantages - for example, in recent papers we have shown that we can differentiate between different types of melanin in pigmented lesions, image hemoglobin and its oxygenation, and measure neuronal activity. In general, these signatures do not generate light at a different color and we rely on the advantages of femtosecond laser pulse shaping methods to amplify the signals and make them visible (for example, using heterodyne detection of the induced signal with one of the co-propagating laser pulses). Here we extend this work to stimulated Raman and CARS geometries. In the simplest experiments, both colors arise from filtering a single fs laser pulse, then modulating afterwards; in other cases, we demonstrate that spectral reshaping can retain high frequency resolution in Raman and CARS geometries with femtosecond laser pulses.

  1. Helium ion microscopy based wall thickness and surface roughness analysis of polymer foams obtained from high internal phase emulsion.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, C; Viswanathan, P; Jepson, M A E; Liu, X; Battaglia, G

    2014-04-01

    Due to their wide range of applications, porous polymers obtained from high internal phase emulsions have been widely studied using scanning electron microscopy. However, due to their lack of electrical conductivity, quantitative information of wall thicknesses and surface roughness, which are of particular interest to tissue engineering, has not been obtained. Here, Helium Ion Microscopy is used to examine uncoated polymer foams and some very strong but unexpected contrast is observed, the origin of which is established here. Based on this analysis, a method for the measurement of wall thickness variations and wall roughness measurements has been developed, based on the modeling of Helium ion transmission. The results presented here indicate that within the walls of the void structure there exist small features with height variations of ~30 nm and wall thickness variations from ~100 nm to larger 340 nm in regions surrounding interconnecting windows within the structure. The suggested imaging method is applicable to other porous carbon based structures with wall thicknesses in the range of 40-340 nm.

  2. Solid-phase immune electron microscopy with human immunoglobulin M for serotyping of Norwalk-like viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D C; Lightfoot, N F; Pether, J V

    1988-01-01

    A solid-phase immune electron microscopy method that uses protein A, goat anti-human immunoglobulin M (IgM), and human serum is described. Evaluation of the method with different immunoglobulin fractions showed that human IgM constituted the major virus capture antibody. The method appeared to distinguish between two Norwalk-like virus serotypes and demonstrated specific IgM responses to these serotypes in infected individuals. Further work is being carried out to define the relationship of these two serotypes to the previously described Norwalk agent (A. Z. Kapikian, R. G. Wyatt, R. Dolin, T. S. Thornhill, A. R. Kalica, and R. M. Chanock, J. Virol. 10:1075-1081, 1972), and four subsequent hospital outbreaks are being studied. PMID:2838506

  3. Insights into the nanoscale lateral and vertical phase separation in organic bulk heterojunctions via scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintala, R.; Tait, J. G.; Eyben, P.; Voroshazi, E.; Surana, S.; Fleischmann, C.; Conard, T.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-02-01

    Solution processed polymer (donor) and fullerene (acceptor) bulk heterojunctions are widely used as the photo active layer in organic solar cells. Intimate mixing of these two materials is essential for efficient charge separation and transport. Identifying relative positions of acceptor and donor rich regions in the bulk heterojunction with nanometer scale precision is crucial in understanding intricate details of operation. In this work, a combination of Ar+2000 gas cluster ion beam and scanning probe microscopy is used to examine the lateral and vertical phase separation within regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT):phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) bulk heterojunction. While the Ar+2000 gas cluster ion beam is used as a sputter tool to expose the underneath layers, scanning probe microscopy techniques are used to obtain two-dimensional (2D) electrical maps (with sub-2 nm lateral resolution). The electrical mapping is decoded to chemical composition, essentially producing lateral and vertical maps of phase separation. Thermal stress causes large PCBM-rich hillocks to form, and consequently affecting the balance of P3HT:PCBM heterojunctions, hence a negative impact on the efficiency of the solar cell. We further developed a method to analyze the efficiency of exciton dissociation based on the current maps and a loss of 20% in efficiency is observed for thermally degraded samples compared to fresh un-annealed samples.Solution processed polymer (donor) and fullerene (acceptor) bulk heterojunctions are widely used as the photo active layer in organic solar cells. Intimate mixing of these two materials is essential for efficient charge separation and transport. Identifying relative positions of acceptor and donor rich regions in the bulk heterojunction with nanometer scale precision is crucial in understanding intricate details of operation. In this work, a combination of Ar+2000 gas cluster ion beam and scanning probe microscopy is used to examine the

  4. Alterations of filopodia by near infrared photoimmunotherapy: evaluation with 3D low-coherent quantitative phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuko; Nagaya, Tadanobu; Sato, Kazuhide; Harada, Toshiko; Okuyama, Shuhei; Choyke, Peter L.; Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-01-01

    Filopodia are highly organized cellular membrane structures that facilitate intercellular communication. Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a newly developed cancer treatment that causes necrotic cell death. Three-dimensional low-coherent quantitative phase microscopy (3D LC-QPM) is based on a newly established low-coherent interference microscope designed to obtain serial topographic images of the cellular membrane. Herein, we report rapid involution of filopodia after NIR-PIT using 3D LC-QPM. For 3T3/HER2 cells, the number of filopodia decreased immediately after treatment with significant differences. Volume and relative height of 3T3/HER2 cells increased immediately after NIR light exposure, but significant differences were not observed. Thus, disappearance of filopodia, evaluated by 3D LC-QPM, is an early indicator of cell membrane damage after NIR-PIT. PMID:27446702

  5. Determination of partition coefficients of biomolecules in a microfluidic aqueous two phase system platform using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, D F C; Azevedo, A M; Fernandes, P; Chu, V; Conde, J P; Aires-Barros, M R

    2017-03-03

    Aqueous two phase systems (ATPS) offer great potential for selective separation of a wide range of biomolecules by exploring differences in molecular solubility in each of the two immiscible phases. However, ATPS use has been limited due to the difficulty in predicting the behavior of a given biomolecule in the partition environment together with the empirical and time-consuming techniques that are used for the determination of partition and extraction parameters. In this work, a fast and novel technique based on a microfluidic platform and using fluorescence microscopy was developed to determine the partition coefficients of biomolecules in different ATPS. This method consists of using a microfluidic device with a single microchannel and three inlets. In two of the inlets, solutions containing the ATPS forming components were loaded while the third inlet was fed with the FITC tagged biomolecule of interest prepared in milli-Q water. Using fluorescence microscopy, it was possible to follow the location of the FITC-tagged biomolecule and, by simply varying the pumping rates of the solutions, to quickly test a wide variety of ATPS compositions. The ATPS system is allowed 4min for stabilization and fluorescence micrographs are used to determine the partition coefficient.The partition coefficients obtained were shown to be consistent with results from macroscale ATPS partition. This process allows for faster screening of partition coefficients using only a few microliters of material for each ATPS composition and is amenable to automation. The partitioning behavior of several biomolecules with molecular weights (MW) ranging from 5.8 to 150kDa, and isoelectric points (pI) ranging from 4.7 to 6.4 was investigated, as well as the effect of the molecular weight of the polymer ATPS component.

  6. The measurement of red blood cell volume change induced by Ca2+ based on full field quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Ji Yong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Young

    2009-02-01

    We present the measurement of red blood cell (RBC) volume change induced by Ca2+ for a live cell imaging with full field quantitative phase microscopy (FFQPM). FFQPM is based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer combined with an inverted microscopy system. We present the effective method to obtain a clear image and an accurate volume of the cells. An edge detection technique is used to accurately resolve the boundary between the cell line and the suspension medium. The measurement of the polystyrene bead diameter and volume has been demonstrated the validity of our proposed method. The measured phase profile can be easily converted into thickness profile. The measured polystyrene bead volume and the simulated result are about 14.74 μm3 and 14.14 μm3, respectively. The experimental results of our proposed method agree well with the simulated results within less than 4 %. We have also measured the volume variation of a single RBC on a millisecond time scale. Its mean volume is 54.02 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.52 μm3. With the proposed system, the shape and volume changes of RBC induced by the increased intracellular Ca2+ are measured after adding ionophore A23187. A discocyte RBC is deformed to a spherocyte due to the increased intracellular Ca2+ in RBC. The volume of the spherocyte is 47.88 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.19 μm3. We have demonstrated that the volume measurement technique is easy, accurate, and robust method with high volume sensitivity (<0.0000452 μm3) and this provides the ability to study a biological phenomenon in Hematology.

  7. High-Resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Fully Hydrated Ripple-Phase Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Woodward IV, J. T.; Zasadzinski, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    A modified freeze-fracture replication technique for use with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has provided a quantitative, high-resolution description of the waveform and amplitude of rippled bilayers in the Pβ, phase of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in excess water. The ripples are uniaxial and asymmetrical, with a temperature-dependent amplitude of 2.4 nm near the chain melting temperature that decreases to zero at the chain crystallization temperature. The wavelength of 11 nm does not change with temperature. The observed ripple shape and the temperature-induced structural changes are not predicted by any current theory. Calibration and reproducibility of the STM/replica technique were tested with replicas of well-characterized bilayers of cadmium arachidate on mica that provide regular 5.5-nm steps. STM images were analyzed using a cross-correlation averaging program to eliminate the effects of noise and the finite size and shapes of the metal grains that make up the replica. The correlation averaging allowed us to develop a composite ripple profile averaged over hundreds of individual ripples measured on different samples with different STM tips. The STM/replica technique avoids many of the previous artifacts of biological STM imaging and can be used to examine a variety of periodic hydrated lipid and protein samples at a lateral resolution of about 1 nm and a vertical resolution of about 0.3 nm. This resolution is superior to conventional and tapping mode AFM of soft biological materials; the technique is substrate-free, and the conductive and chemically uniform replicas make image interpretation simple and direct. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 5 PMID:9017222

  8. Construction of the Magnetic Phase Diagram of FeMn/Ni/Cu(001) Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Scholl, A.; Arenholz, E.; Hwang, C.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-01-04

    Single crystalline FeMn/Ni bilayer was epitaxially grown on Cu(001) substrate and investigated by photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). The FeMn and Ni films were grown into two cross wedges to facilitate an independent control of the FeMn (0-20 ML) and Ni (0-20 ML) film thicknesses. The Ni magnetic phases were determined by Ni domain images as a function of the Ni thickness (d{sub Ni}) and the FeMn thickness (d{sub FeMn}). The result shows that as the Ni thickness increases, the Ni film undergoes a paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic state transition at a critical thickness of d{sub FM} and an in-plane to out-of-plane spin reorientation transition at a thicker thickness d{sub SRT}. The phase diagram shows that both d{sub FM} and d{sub SRT} increase as the FeMn film establishes its antiferromagnetic order.

  9. A hybrid analog-digital phase-locked loop for frequency mode non-contact scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M M; Chandrasekhar, V

    2014-01-01

    Non-contact scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has developed into a powerful technique to image many different properties of samples. The conventional method involves monitoring the amplitude, phase, or frequency of a cantilever oscillating at or near its resonant frequency as it is scanned across the surface of a sample. For high Q factor cantilevers, monitoring the resonant frequency is the preferred method in order to obtain reasonable scan times. This can be done by using a phase-locked-loop (PLL). PLLs can be obtained as commercial integrated circuits, but these do not have the frequency resolution required for SPM. To increase the resolution, all-digital PLLs requiring sophisticated digital signal processors or field programmable gate arrays have also been implemented. We describe here a hybrid analog/digital PLL where most of the components are implemented using discrete analog integrated circuits, but the frequency resolution is provided by a direct digital synthesis chip controlled by a simple peripheral interface controller (PIC) microcontroller. The PLL has excellent frequency resolution and noise, and can be controlled and read by a computer via a universal serial bus connection.

  10. GPU-based rapid reconstruction of cellular 3D refractive index maps from tomographic phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardikman, Gili; Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    We present highly parallel and efficient algorithms for real-time reconstruction of the quantitative three-dimensional (3-D) refractive-index maps of biological cells without labeling, as obtained from the interferometric projections acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The new algorithms are implemented on the graphic processing unit (GPU) of the computer using CUDA programming environment. The reconstruction process includes two main parts. First, we used parallel complex wave-front reconstruction of the TPM-based interferometric projections acquired at various angles. The complex wave front reconstructions are done on the GPU in parallel, while minimizing the calculation time of the Fourier transforms and phase unwrapping needed. Next, we implemented on the GPU in parallel the 3-D refractive index map retrieval using the TPM filtered-back projection algorithm. The incorporation of algorithms that are inherently parallel with a programming environment such as Nvidia's CUDA makes it possible to obtain real-time processing rate, and enables high-throughput platform for label-free, 3-D cell visualization and diagnosis.

  11. ViriChip: a solid phase assay for detection and identification of viruses by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettikadan, Saju R.; Johnson, James C.; Vengasandra, Srikanth G.; Muys, James; Henderson, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Bionanotechnology can be viewed as the integration of tools and concepts in nanotechnology with the attributes of biomolecules. We report here on an atomic force microscopy-immunosensor assay (AFMIA) that couples AFM with solid phase affinity capture of biological entities for the rapid detection and identification of group B coxsackievirus particles. Virus identification is based on type-specific immunocapture and the morphological properties of the captured viruses as obtained by the AFM. Representatives of the six group B coxsackieviruses have been specifically captured from 1 µl volumes of clarified cell lysates, body fluids and environmental samples. Concentration and kinetic profiles for capture indicate that detection is possible at 103 TCID50 µl-1 and the dynamic range of the assay spans three logs. The results demonstrate that the melding of a nanotechnological tool (AFM) with biotechnology (solid phase immunocapture of virus particles) can create a clinically relevant platform, useful for the detection and identification of enterovirus particles in a variety of samples.

  12. Quantitative Phase Microscopy of microstructures with extended measurement range and correction of chromatic aberrations by multiwavelength digital holography.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, P; Miccio, L; Grilli, S; Paturzo, M; De Nicola, S; Finizio, A; Osellame, R; Laporta, P

    2007-10-29

    Quantitative Phase Microscopy (QPM) by interferometric techniques can require a multiwavelength configuration to remove 2pi ambiguity and improve accuracy. However, severe chromatic aberration can affect the resulting phase-contrast map. By means of classical interference microscope configuration it is quite unpractical to correct such aberration. We propose and demonstrate that by Digital Holography (DH) in a microscope configuration it is possible to clear out the QPM map from the chromatic aberration in a simpler and more effective way with respect to other approaches. The proposed method takes benefit of the unique feature of DH to record in a plane out-of-focus and subsequently reconstruct numerically at the right focal image plane. In fact, the main effect of the chromatic aberration is to shift differently the correct focal image plane at each wavelength and this can be readily compensated by adjusting the corresponding reconstruction distance for each wavelength. A procedure is described in order to determine easily the relative focal shift among different imaging wavelengths by performing a scanning of the numerical reconstruction along the optical axis, to find out the focus and to remove at the same time the chromatic aberration.

  13. Determination of electrostatic force and its characteristics based on phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kesheng; Cheng, Jia; Yao, Shiji; Lu, Yijia; Ji, Linhong; Xu, Dengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Electrostatic force measurement at the micro/nano scale is of great significance in science and engineering. In this paper, a reasonable way of applying voltage is put forward by taking an electrostatic chuck in a real integrated circuit manufacturing process as a sample, applying voltage in the probe and the sample electrode, respectively, and comparing the measurement effect of the probe oscillation phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy. Based on the phase difference obtained from the experiment, the quantitative dependence of the absolute magnitude of the electrostatic force on the tip-sample distance and applied voltage is established by means of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The results show that the varying characteristics of the electrostatic force with the distance and voltage at the micro/nano scale are similar to those at the macroscopic scale. Electrostatic force gradually decays with increasing distance. Electrostatic force is basically proportional to the square of applied voltage. Meanwhile, the applicable conditions of the above laws are discussed. In addition, a comparison of the results in this paper with the results of the energy dissipation method shows the two are consistent in general. The error decreases with increasing distance, and the effect of voltage on the error is small.

  14. Iodine-water-alkanol and potassium iodide-water-alkanol systems: Phase diagrams and regularities of association according to IR and NMR spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monakhova, Yu. B.; Varlamova, T. M.; Rubtsova, E. M.; Mushtakova, S. P.

    2015-04-01

    The variation of the iodine and potassium iodide solubilities in water-monoatomic alcohol (ethanol, propanol, isopropanol) solvents is considered from the standpoint of IR spectroscopic and chemometric data on association in water-alkanol binary mixtures. The iodine and potassium iodide solubilities in the mixed solvents vary nonlinearly with solvent composition because of the formation of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 water-alcohol heteroassociates and alcohol homoassociates. Different kinds of phase diagram are observed for the iodine-water-alcohol systems: the I2-H2O-1-C3H7OH and the I2-H2O-2-C3H7OH diagrams have a phase separation region, while the I2-H2O-C2H5OH diagram does not. This fact is explained in terms of the interaction between the components of the systems. The variation of the potassium iodide solubility in the mixed solvent is discussed: a decrease in the KI solubility is symbatic to an increase in the relative concentration of 1 : 1 associates in the water-alcohol solution. The run of the iodine and potassium iodide solubility curves at low alcohol concentrations is explained on the basis of NMR spectroscopic data on association in aqueous solutions of the monoatomic alcohols.

  15. One- and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies of solution-phase homogeneous catalysis and spin-forbidden reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Karma Rae

    2008-12-01

    Understanding chemical reactions requires the knowledge of the elementary steps of breaking and making bonds, and often a variety of experimental techniques are needed to achieve this goal. The initial steps occur on the femto- through picosecond time-scales, requiring the use of ultrafast spectroscopic methods, while the rate-limiting steps often occur more slowly, requiring alternative techniques. Ultrafast one and two-dimensional infrared and step-scan FTIR spectroscopies are used to investigate the photochemical reactions of four organometallic complexes. The analysis leads to a detailed understanding of mechanisms that are general in nature and may be applicable to a variety of reactions.

  16. Use of Raman Spectroscopy and Phase-Contrast Microscopy To Characterize Cold Atmospheric Plasma Inactivation of Individual Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwei; Doona, Christopher J.; Setlow, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raman spectroscopy and phase-contrast microscopy were used to examine calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA) levels and rates of nutrient and nonnutrient germination of multiple individual Bacillus subtilis spores treated with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP). Major results for this work include the following: (i) >5 logs of spores deposited on glass surfaces were inactivated by CAP treatment for 3 min, while deposited spores placed inside an impermeable plastic bag were inactivated only ∼2 logs in 30 min; (ii) >80% of the spores treated for 1 to 3 min with CAP were nonculturable and retained CaDPA in their core, while >95% of spores treated with CAP for 5 to 10 min lost all CaDPA; (iii) Raman measurements of individual CAP-treated spores without CaDPA showed differences from spores that germinated with l-valine in terms of nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins; and (iv) 1 to 2 min of CAP treatment killed 99% of spores, but these spores still germinated with nutrients or exogenous CaDPA, albeit more slowly and to a lesser extent than untreated spores, while spores CAP treated for >3 min that retained CaDPA did not germinate via nutrients or CaDPA. However, even after 1 to 3 min of CAP treatment, spores germinated normally with dodecylamine. These results suggest that exposure to the present CAP configuration severely damages a spore's inner membrane and key germination proteins, such that the treated spores either lose CaDPA or can neither initiate nor complete germination with nutrients or CaDPA. Analysis of the various CAP components indicated that UV photons contributed minimally to spore inactivation, while charged particles and reactive oxygen species contributed significantly. IMPORTANCE Much research has shown that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a promising tool for the inactivation of spores in the medical and food industries. However, knowledge about the effects of plasma treatment on spore properties is limited, especially at the single-cell level. In this

  17. The Use of Graphene and Its Derivatives for Liquid-Phase Transmission Electron Microscopy of Radiation-Sensitive Specimens.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hoduk; Jones, Matthew R; Nguyen, Son C; Hauwiller, Matthew R; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2017-01-11

    One of the key challenges facing liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of biological specimens has been the damaging effects of electron beam irradiation. The strongly ionizing electron beam is known to induce radiolysis of surrounding water molecules, leading to the formation of reactive radical species. In this study, we employ DNA-assembled Au nanoparticle superlattices (DNA-AuNP superlattices) as a model system to demonstrate that graphene and its derivatives can be used to mitigate electron beam-induced damage. We can image DNA-AuNP superlattices in their native saline environment when the liquid cell window material is graphene, but not when it is silicon nitride. In the latter case, initial dissociation of assembled AuNPs was followed by their random aggregation and etching. Using graphene-coated silicon nitride windows, we were able to replicate the observation of stable DNA-AuNP superlattices achieved with graphene liquid cells. We then carried out a correlative Raman spectroscopy and TEM study to compare the effect of electron beam irradiation on graphene with and without the presence of water and found that graphene reacts with the products of water radiolysis. We attribute the protective effect of graphene to its ability to efficiently scavenge reactive radical species, especially the hydroxyl radicals which are known to cause DNA strand breaks. We confirmed this by showing that stable DNA-AuNP assemblies can be imaged in silicon nitride liquid cells when graphene oxide and graphene quantum dots, which have also recently been reported as efficient radical scavengers, are added directly to the solution. We anticipate that our study will open up more opportunities for studying biological specimens using liquid-phase TEM with the use of graphene and its derivatives as biocompatible radical scavengers to alleviate the effects of radiation damage.

  18. Identifying the crystallinity, phase, and arsenic uptake of the nanomineral schwertmannite using analytical high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. A.; Kim, B.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Schwertmannite, an iron oxyhydroxide sulfate nanomineral, plays a significant role in the geochemistry of acid mine drainage (AMD) as a metastable phase with respect to goethite and by retaining toxic metals, e.g. arsenic [1]. Schwertmannite’s characteristic morphology is needles 100-300 nm long and only 5-10 nm in diameter extending from a dense aggregate. The poorly-and nano-crystalline nature of this mineral requires using high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) to be fully characterized. We used HRTEM to identify the polyphasic nature of natural samples of schwertmannite collected from the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain. In order to analyze the dense core, samples were prepared in thin section using an ultramicrotome. Data on a sample identified as pure schwertmannite through powder XRD shows the presence of 5-10 nm goethite nanocrystals making up a significant portion of one of the nanoneedle tips (Figure 1). These nanocrystals exhibit lattice fringes and faceted surfaces, both of which match that expected for goethite. The great majority of the nanoneedles are poorly-crystalline (no lattice fringes) with atomically rough surfaces which may be highly active in the uptake of As. The presence of a range of phases and crystallinities in this sample demonstrate incipient stages of the mechanism that results in transformation of schwertmannite to goethite. Further analytical TEM analyses will help us track sorption/desorption, as well as the specific locations of As within these materials upon initial formation, as well as during transformation. [1] Acero et al. (2006) GCA 70, 4130-4139. Figure 1. HRTEM image of 'schwertmannite' nanoneedle with FFT data (inset).

  19. Dynamic phase microscopy, a new method to detect viable and killed spores and to estimate the heterogeneity of spore populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.; Mulyukin, Andrey L.; Lisovskii, Vitalii V.; Nikolaev, Yury A.; Kretushev, Aleksander V.; Vyshenskaya, Tatyana V.; Suzina, Nataliya E.; Duda, Vitalii I.; El-Registan, Galina I.

    One of the challenging tasks in monitoring studies is to estimate heterogeneity of microbial populations by the physiological state and potential viability of individual cells, especially with regard of their ability to withstand various environmental assaults. Previously, we described some approaches based on electron microscopy methods to discriminate vegetative, dormant, and dead cells in both aged microbial cultures and environmental samples, including permafrost. We propose to extend the arsenal of microscopy methods for monitoring studies by a new non-invasive and informative method - dynamic phase microscopy (DPM). The substantial advantage of DPM is that it gives quantitative (digitized) data of undestroyed (living) microscopic objects, exemplified in our work by Bacillus licheniformis spores. Using DPM made it possible to record interference images of objects (spores) and to produce picture of their "phase thickness" (PT) that is the optical path difference in nm. Thus, it was demonstrated the remarkable difference in the PT of spores at different physiological states: dormant, germinating, and heat-killed spores had PT values of 80, 40-50, and 20 nm, respectively. The other found criterion to distinguish between spores was the PT fluctuations. In contrast to dormant and killed spores, the PT of germinating spores oscillated with amplitude of up to 7 nm, with typical frequencies of 1.3 and 3.4 Hz. A combination of the recorded PT values and PT fluctuations gave a key to detect viable and dead cells. Under the conditions that did not support germination (the lack of nutrients), we were able to follow the response of a single dormant spore and a spore population to heating from 25 °C to 70 °C. Thus, a very small temperature change (from 40 °C to 42 °C) under conditions non-favorable for germination, caused a drastic decrease in the spores' PT; the second drop in the PT values was observed during heating from 60 °C to 70 °C. These changes were

  20. The study on RBC characteristic in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) patients using common path interferometric quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byung Jun; Won, Youngjae; Kim, Byungyeon; Lee, Seungrag

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the RBC membrane properties between a normal RBC and a RBC in Paroxysrnal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) patient using common path interferometric quantitative phase microscopy (CPIQPM). CPIQPM system has provided the subnanometer optical path length sensitivity on a millisecond. We have measured the dynamic thickness fluctuations of a normal RBC membrane and a RBC membrane in PNH patient over the whole cell surface with CPIQPM. PNH is a rare and serious disease of blood featured by destruction of red blood cells (RBCs). This destruction happens since RBCs show the defect of protein which protects RBCs from the immune system. We have applied CPIQPM to study the characteristic of RBC membrane in PNH patient. We have shown the morphological shape, volume, and projected surface for both different RBC types. The results have showed both RBCs had the similar shape with donut, but membrane fluctuations in PNH patient was shown to reveal the difference of temporal properties compared with a normal RBC. In order to demonstrate the practical tool of the CPIQPM technique, we have also obtained the time series thickness fluctuation outside a cell.

  1. Correlative transmission electron microscopy and electrical properties study of switchable phase-change random access memory line cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Voogt, F. C.; Attenborough, K.; Verheijen, M. A.; Hurkx, G. A. M.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2015-02-14

    Phase-change memory line cells, where the active material has a thickness of 15 nm, were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation such that they still could be switched and characterized electrically after the preparation. The result of these observations in comparison with detailed electrical characterization showed (i) normal behavior for relatively long amorphous marks, resulting in a hyperbolic dependence between SET resistance and SET current, indicating a switching mechanism based on initially long and thin nanoscale crystalline filaments which thicken gradually, and (ii) anomalous behavior, which holds for relatively short amorphous marks, where initially directly a massive crystalline filament is formed that consumes most of the width of the amorphous mark only leaving minor residual amorphous regions at its edges. The present results demonstrate that even in (purposely) thick TEM samples, the TEM sample preparation hampers the probability to observe normal behavior and it can be debated whether it is possible to produce electrically switchable TEM specimen in which the memory cells behave the same as in their original bulk embedded state.

  2. Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography for Structure Determination at Nanometer and Sub-Nanometer Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Liu, Xiangan; Danev, Radostin; Jakana, Joanita; Schmid, Michael F.; King, Jonathan; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy (ZPC-cryoEM) is an emerging technique which is capable of producing higher image contrast than conventional cryoEM. By combining this technique with advanced image processing methods, we achieved subnanometer resolution for two biological specimens: 2-D bacteriorhodopsin crystal and epsilon15 bacteriophage. For an asymmetric reconstruction of epsilon15 bacteriophage, ZPC-cryoEM can reduce the required amount of data by a factor of ~3 compared to conventional cryoEM. The reconstruction was carried out to 13 Å resolution without the need to correct the contrast transfer function. New structural features at the portal vertex of the epsilon15 bacteriophage are revealed in this reconstruction. Using ZPC cryo-electron tomography (ZPC-cryoET), a similar level of data reduction and higher resolution structures of epsilon15 bacteriophage can be obtained relative to conventional cryoET. These results show quantitatively the benefits of ZPC-cryoEM and -cryoET for structural determinations of macromolecular machines at nanometer and subnanometer resolutions. PMID:20696391

  3. Three-dimensional imaging of chemical phase transformations at the nanoscale with full-field transmission X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meirer, Florian; Cabana, Jordi; Liu, Yijin; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C.; Pianetta, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The ability to probe morphology and phase distribution in complex systems at multiple length scales unravels the interplay of nano- and micrometer-scale factors at the origin of macroscopic behavior. While different electron- and X-ray-based imaging techniques can be combined with spectroscopy at high resolutions, owing to experimental time limitations the resulting fields of view are too small to be representative of a composite sample. Here a new X-ray imaging set-up is proposed, combining full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to follow two-dimensional and three-dimensional morphological and chemical changes in large volumes at high resolution (tens of nanometers). TXM XANES imaging offers chemical speciation at the nanoscale in thick samples (>20 µm) with minimal preparation requirements. Further, its high throughput allows the analysis of large areas (up to millimeters) in minutes to a few hours. Proof of concept is provided using battery electrodes, although its versatility will lead to impact in a number of diverse research fields. PMID:21862859

  4. Precession electron diffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy: phase, orientation and strain mapping at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Precession electron diffraction is a technique used in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to collect electron diffraction patterns while precessing the beam in a cone around the optic axis of the microscope. Electrons are strongly scattered by matter, resulting in dynamical diffraction effects and complex intensity distributions. Precession diffraction produces patterns that are nearly kinematical and lack the complicated intensity distributions of dynamical scattering. These patterns are readily indexed by computer, which allows for the structural characterization of the sample at each pixel. This technique is analogous to electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), but with higher spatial resolution. Like EBSD, precession diffraction is used to make phase and orientation maps in polycrystalline aggregates and deformed crystals. The technique also provides quantitative strain mapping at the nanometer scale for characterization of defects and coherent interfaces. This technique is especially useful for characterizing nano-scale intergrowths that are produced in high-pressure experiments and in naturally shocked samples. We are using this technique on our aberration corrects JEOL ARM200F STEM. Examples of experimentally and naturally transformed olivine will be presented.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence for Fermi liquid-like energy and temperature dependence of the relaxation rate in the pseudogap phase of the cuprates.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Seyed Iman; Stricker, Damien; Hancock, Jason N; Berthod, Christophe; Georges, Antoine; van Heumen, Erik; Chan, Mun K; Zhao, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Greven, Martin; Barišić, Neven; van der Marel, Dirk

    2013-04-09

    Cuprate high-Tc superconductors exhibit enigmatic behavior in the nonsuperconducting state. For carrier concentrations near "optimal doping" (with respect to the highest Tcs) the transport and spectroscopic properties are unlike those of a Landau-Fermi liquid. On the Mott-insulating side of the optimal carrier concentration, which corresponds to underdoping, a pseudogap removes quasi-particle spectral weight from parts of the Fermi surface and causes a breakup of the Fermi surface into disconnected nodal and antinodal sectors. Here, we show that the near-nodal excitations of underdoped cuprates obey Fermi liquid behavior. The lifetime τ(ω, T) of a quasi-particle depends on its energy ω as well as on the temperature T. For a Fermi liquid, 1/τ(ω, T) is expected to collapse on a universal function proportional to (ℏω)(2) + (pπk(B)T)(2). Magneto-transport experiments, which probe the properties in the limit ω = 0, have provided indications for the presence of a T(2) dependence of the dc (ω = 0) resistivity of different cuprate materials. However, Fermi liquid behavior is very much about the energy dependence of the lifetime, and this can only be addressed by spectroscopic techniques. Our optical experiments confirm the aforementioned universal ω- and T dependence of 1/τ(ω, T), with p ∼ 1.5. Our data thus provide a piece of evidence in favor of a Fermi liquid-like scenario of the pseudogap phase of the cuprates.

  6. Scanning force microscopy study of phase segregation in fuel cell membrane materials as a function of solvent polarity and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Marilyn Emily; Kim, Yu S; Hjelm, Rex P

    2010-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) phase imaging provides a powerful method for directly studying and comparing phase segregation in fuel cell membrane materials due to different preparation and under different temperature and hwnidity exposures. In this work, we explored two parameters that can influence phase segregation: the properties of the solvents used in casting membrane films and how these solvents alter phase segregation after exposure to boiling water as a function of time. SFM was used under ambient conditions to image phase segregation in Nafion samples prepared using five different solvents. Samples were then subjected to water vapor maintained at 100C for periods ranging from 30 minutes to three hours and re-imaged using the same phase imaging conditions. SFM shows what appears to be an increase in phase segregation as a function of solvent polarity that changes as a function of water exposure.

  7. MR Spectroscopic Imaging of Peripheral Zone in Prostate Cancer Using a 3T MRI Scanner: Endorectal versus External Phased Array Coils.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Margolis, Daniel Ja; Raman, Steven S; Ouellette, David; Sarma, Manoj K; Reiter, Robert E; Thomas, M Albert

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) detects alterations in major prostate metabolites, such as citrate (Cit), creatine (Cr), and choline (Ch). We evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of three-dimensional MRSI of prostate using an endorectal compared to an external phased array "receive" coil on a 3T MRI scanner. Eighteen patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and proton (1H) MRSI were included in this study. Immediately after the endorectal MRSI scan, the PCa patients were scanned with the external phased array coil. The endorectal coil-detected metabolite ratio [(Ch+Cr)/Cit] was significantly higher in cancer locations (1.667 ± 0.663) compared to non-cancer locations (0.978 ± 0.420) (P < 0.001). Similarly, for the external phased array, the ratio was significantly higher in cancer locations (1.070 ± 0.525) compared to non-cancer locations (0.521 ± 0.310) (P < 0.001). The sensitivity and accuracy of cancer detection were 81% and 78% using the endorectal 'receive' coil, and 69% and 75%, respectively using the external phased array 'receive' coil.

  8. Evaluation of the Dark-Medium Objective Lens in Counting Asbestos Fibers by Phase-Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Nelson, John H.; Kashon, Michael L.; Harper, Martin

    2015-01-01

    the AIHA PAT chrysotile slides using the DM objective. The comparison of fiber count ratios (DM/standard) between the AIHA PAT chrysotile samples and chrysotile field samples indicates that there is a fraction of fibers in the PAT samples approaching the theoretical limit of visibility of the phase-contrast microscope with 3-degree phase-shift. These fibers become more clearly visible through the greater contrast from the phase plate absorption of the DM objective. However, as such fibers are not present in field samples, no difference in counts between the two objectives was observed in this study. The DM objective, therefore, could be allowed for routine fiber counting as it will maintain continuity with risk assessments based on earlier phase-contrast microscopy fiber counts from field samples. Published standard methods would need to be modified to allow a higher aperture specification for the objective. PMID:25737333

  9. Evaluation of the dark-medium objective lens in counting asbestos fibers by phase-contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Nelson, John H; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2015-06-01

    AIHA PAT chrysotile slides using the DM objective. The comparison of fiber count ratios (DM/standard) between the AIHA PAT chrysotile samples and chrysotile field samples indicates that there is a fraction of fibers in the PAT samples approaching the theoretical limit of visibility of the phase-contrast microscope with 3-degree phase-shift. These fibers become more clearly visible through the greater contrast from the phase plate absorption of the DM objective. However, as such fibers are not present in field samples, no difference in counts between the two objectives was observed in this study. The DM objective, therefore, could be allowed for routine fiber counting as it will maintain continuity with risk assessments based on earlier phase-contrast microscopy fiber counts from field samples. Published standard methods would need to be modified to allow a higher aperture specification for the objective.

  10. Accelerated proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) using GRAPPA with a 32-channel phased-array coil.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2008-05-01

    Parallel imaging has been demonstrated to reduce the encoding time of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Here we investigate up to 5-fold acceleration of 2D proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T using generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) with a 32-channel coil array, 1.5 cm(3) voxel size, TR/TE of 15/2000 ms, and 2.1 Hz spectral resolution. Compared to an 8-channel array, the smaller RF coil elements in this 32-channel array provided a 3.1-fold and 2.8-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the peripheral region and the central region, respectively, and more spatial modulated information. Comparison of sensitivity-encoding (SENSE) and GRAPPA reconstruction using an 8-channel array showed that both methods yielded similar quantitative metabolite measures (P > 0.1). Concentration values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and the sum of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) for both methods were consistent with previous studies. Using the 32-channel array coil the mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLB) were less than 8% for NAA, tCr, and Cho and less than 15% for mI and Glx at 2-fold acceleration. At 4-fold acceleration the mean CRLB for NAA, tCr, and Cho was less than 11%. In conclusion, the use of a 32-channel coil array and GRAPPA reconstruction can significantly reduce the measurement time for mapping brain metabolites.

  11. Multi-illumination Gabor holography recorded in a single camera snap-shot for high-resolution phase retrieval in digital in-line holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Martin; Picazo-Bueno, Jose A.; Garcia, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    In this contribution we introduce MISHELF microscopy, a new concept and design of a lensless holographic microscope based on wavelength multiplexing, single hologram acquisition and digital image processing. The technique which name comes from Multi-Illumination Single-Holographic-Exposure Lensless Fresnel microscopy, is based on the simultaneous illumination and recording of three diffraction patterns in the Fresnel domain. In combination with a novel and fast iterative phase retrieval algorithm, MISHELF microscopy is capable of high-resolution (micron range) phase-retrieved (twin image elimination) biological imaging of dynamic events (video rate recording speed) since it avoids the time multiplexing needed for the in-line hologram sequence recording when using conventional phase-shifting or phase retrieval algorithms. MISHELF microscopy is validated using two different experimental layouts: one using RGB illumination and detection schemes and another using IRRB as illumination while keeping the RGB color camera as detection device. Preliminary experimental results are provided for both experimental layouts using a synthetic object (USAF resolution test target).

  12. Chemical and spectroscopic investigation on the plaster of a Byzantine church.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Davide; Scarabino, Carla; Inverso, Donato; Proto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of a Byzantine church under the floor of one of the oldest churches of Salerno (Italy) has given us the opportunity to investigate the fine composition of the plaster through chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, considering that plasters are generally formed by a carbonate phase (carbonates) and an inert phase (silicates), the characterization, performed on the carbonate phase by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), has revealed the presence of dolomite minerals. This information indicates that, during the building process, some accessory minerals of marble were added in the mortar to be used like fillers. The carbonate phase makes too difficult the spectroscopic characterization of the inert phase. Only by acid attack of the plaster the inert phase has been isolated and its characterization, by XRD and optical microscopy, has indicated the presence of olivine minerals and other typical silicates of river sands.

  13. Evidence of iso-structural phase transition in high pressure Raman spectroscopic studies of CaCu3Ti4O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Shekhar; Sharma, Gaurav; Sathe, V. G.

    2017-02-01

    High pressure Raman spectroscopic studies on Polycrystalline CaCu3Ti4O12 and SrCu3Ti4O12 compounds are carried out in order to validate the theoretical predictions of a structural transformation near 3-4 GPa and an insulator to metal transition above 7 GPa [S. B. Fagan et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 014106 (2005)]. Our studies showed normal hardening and broadening of peaks with increasing pressure up to 20 GPa besides a discontinuity between 8 and 9 GPa which is attributed to an isostructural phase transition. The Ag(1) peak occurring at 442 cm-1 showed asymmetric Fano lineshape and the lineshape parameter 'q' shows an increase with increasing pressure. This is completely against the theoretical predictions of an insulator to metal transition above 7 GPa.

  14. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, II Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jaewoo, Jeong; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase seperated regions. The ability to simultanousely track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of- the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, which is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. Lastly, the direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  15. Surface charge and carbon contamination on an electron-beam-irradiated hydroxyapatite thin film investigated by photoluminescence and phase imaging in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Tranca, Denis E; Stanciu, Stefan G; Gregor, Maros; Plecenik, Tomas; Truchly, Martin; Roch, Tomas; Tofail, Syed A M; Stanciu, George A

    2014-04-01

    The surface properties of hydroxyapatite, including electric charge, can influence the biological response, tissue compatibility, and adhesion of biological cells and biomolecules. Results reported here help in understanding this influence by creating charged domains on hydroxyapatite thin films deposited on silicon using electron beam irradiation and investigating their shape, properties, and carbon contamination for different doses of incident injected charge by two methods. Photoluminescence laser scanning microscopy was used to image electrostatic charge trapped at pre-existing and irradiation-induced defects within these domains, while phase imaging in atomic force microscopy was used to image the carbon contamination. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy were used as a reference for the atomic force microscopy phase contrast and photoluminescence laser scanning microscopy measurements. Our experiment shows that by combining the two imaging techniques the effects of trapped charge and carbon contamination can be separated. Such separation yields new possibilities for advancing the current understanding of how surface charge influences mediation of cellular and protein interactions in biomaterials.

  16. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed. PMID:26157976

  17. Thickness measurement of soft thin films on periodically patterned magnetic substrates by phase difference magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Dong, C; Angeloni, L; Pantanella, F; Natalizi, T; Berlutti, F; Marianecci, C; Ciccarello, F; Rossi, M

    2014-01-01

    The need for accurate measurement of the thickness of soft thin films is continuously encouraging the development of techniques suitable for this purpose. We propose a method through which the thickness of the film is deduced from the quantitative measurement of the contrast in the phase images of the sample surface acquired by magnetic force microscopy, provided that the film is deposited on a periodically patterned magnetic substrate. The technique is demonstrated by means of magnetic substrates obtained from standard floppy disks. Colonies of Staphylococcus aureus adherent to such substrates were used to obtain soft layers with limited lateral (a few microns) and vertical (hundreds of nanometers) size. The technique is described and its specific merits, limitations and potentialities in terms of accuracy and measurable thickness range are discussed. These parameters depend on the characteristics of the sensing tip/cantilever as well as of the substrates, the latter in terms of spatial period and homogeneity of the magnetic domains. In particular, with the substrates used in this work we evaluated an uncertainty of about 10%, a limit of detection of 50-100 nm and an upper detection limit (maximum measurable thickness) of 1 μm, all obtained with standard lift height values (50-100 nm). Nonetheless, these parameters can be easily optimized by selecting/realizing substrates with suitable spacing and homogeneity of the magnetic domains. For example, the upper detection limit can be increased up to 25-50 μm while the limit of detection can be reduced to a few tens of nanometers or a few nanometers.

  18. Investigation of dynamic morphological changes of cancer cells during photoimmuno therapy (PIT) by low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Iwai, Hidenao; Magata, Yasuhiro; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-03-01

    We have reported a new molecular-targeted cancer phototherapy, photoimmunotherapy (PIT), which killed implanted tumors in mice without side-effects. To understand the mechanism of cell killing with PIT, three-dimentional dynamic low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (3D LC-QPM), a device developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K, was used to detect morphologic changes in cancer cells during PIT. 3T3/HER2 cells were incubated with anti-HER2 trastuzumab-IR700 (10 μg/mL, 0.1 μM as IR700) for 24 hours, then, three-dimensionally imaged with the LC-QPM during the exposure of two different optically filtered lights for excitation of IR700 (500-780 nm) and imaging (780-950 nm). For comparison with traditional PDT, the same experiments were performed with Photofrin (10 and 1 μM). Serial changes in the cell membrane were readily visualized on 3D LC-QPM. 3T3/HER2 cells began to swell rapidly after exposure to 500-780 nm light excitation. The cell volume reached a maximum within 1 min after continuous exposure, and then the cells appeared to burst. This finding suggests that PIT damages the cell membrane by photo-reaction inducing an influx of water into the cell causing swelling and bursting of the cells. Interestingly, even after only 5 seconds of light exposure, the cells demonstrated swelling and bursting albeit more slowly, implying that sufficient cumulative damage occurs on the cell membrane to induce lethal damage to cells even at minimal light exposure. Similar but non-selective membrane damage was shown in PDT-treated cells Photofrin. Thus, PIT induces sufficient damage to the cell membrane within 5 seconds to induce rapid necrotic cell death which can be observed directly with 3D LC-QPM. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the biochemical mechanisms underlying PIT-induced cellular membrane damage.

  19. Early stage phase separation in pharmaceutical solid dispersion thin films under high humidity: improved spatial understanding using probe-based thermal and spectroscopic nanocharacterization methods.

    PubMed

    Qi, Sheng; Moffat, Jonathan G; Yang, Ziyi

    2013-03-04

    Phase separation in pharmaceutical solid dispersion thin films under high humidity is still poorly understood on the submicrometer scale. This study investigated the phase separation of a model solid dispersion thin film, felodipine-PVP K29/32, prepared by spin-coating and analyzed using probe-based methods including atomic force microscopy, nanothermal analysis, and photothermal infrared microspectroscopy. The combined use of these techniques revealed that the phase separation process occurring in the thin films under high humidity is different from that in dry conditions reported previously. The initial stage of phase separation is primarily initiated in the bulk of the films as amorphous drug domains. Drug migration toward the surface of the solid dispersion film was then observed to occur under exposure to increased humidity. PVP cannot prevent phase separation of felodipine under high humidity but can minimize the crystallization of amorphous felodipine domains in the solid dispersion thin films. This study demonstrates the unique abilities of these nanocharacterization methods for studying, in three dimensions, the phase separation of thin films for pharmaceutical applications.

  20. Magnetism in grain-boundary phase of a NdFeB sintered magnet studied by spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kohashi, Teruo Motai, Kumi; Nishiuchi, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Satoshi

    2014-06-09

    The magnetism in the grain-boundary phase of a NdFeB sintered magnet was measured by spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM). A sample magnet was fractured in the ultra-high-vacuum chamber to avoid oxidation, and its magnetizations in the exposed grain-boundary phase on the fracture surface were evaluated through the spin polarization of secondary electrons. Spin-SEM images were taken as the fracture surface was milled gradually by argon ions, and the magnetization in the grain-boundary phase was quantitatively obtained separately from that of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase. The obtained magnetization shows that the grain-boundary phase of this magnet has substantial magnetization, which was confirmed to be ferromagnetic.

  1. Comparative Raman spectroscopic study of phase stability and anharmonic effects in AZr2(PO4)3 (A=K, Rb and Cs).

    PubMed

    Kamali, K; Ravindran, T R; Ravi, C

    2016-02-15

    AZr2(PO4)3 (A=Na, K, Rb, Cs) are a set of framework structured compounds that exhibit tunable ultralow thermal expansion over the wide temperature range of 293-1273K. We report a systematic Raman spectroscopic investigation on AZr2(PO4)3 (A=K, Rb and Cs) compounds as a function of temperature in the range 80-860K and pressures of up to 32GPa. To get insight into the thermal expansion property, phonon anharmonicity has been investigated by studying the temperature and pressure dependence of Raman peak shifts and line widths and computed bulk modulus. We have compared the phase transition and amorphization pressures of the various members of AZr2(PO4)3 to account for the stability of the ambient rhombohedral phase. We find that unlike most of the anomalous thermal expansion materials, in AZr2(PO4)3 (A=K, Rb and Cs), the phonons that are anharmonic with temperature do not necessarily exhibit anharmonicity with pressure.

  2. Noble gases in oxidized residue prepared from the Saratov L4 chondrite and Raman spectroscopic study of residues to characterize phase Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Jun-Ichi; Morishita, Kazuhiko; Nara, Masayuki; Amari, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases in an oxidized residue prepared from a HF-HCl residue of the Saratov L4 chondrite. The Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations in the oxidized residue are two orders of magnitude lower than those in the HF-HCl residue, and they are close to concentrations in the bulk. The He and Ne concentrations are similar in the three samples. The Ne isotopic ratios are almost purely cosmogenic, indicating absence of presolar diamonds (the carrier of the HL component). Thus, Saratov contains phase Q without presolar diamond. A study of the Raman spectroscopic parameters for the HF-HCl residue and the oxidized residue shows large changes due to oxidation. The directions of these changes are the same as observed in Allende, except oxidation increased the ID/IG (intensity ratio of the D band to the G band) in Saratov but decreased in Allende. This difference may be attributed to the different crystalline stages of carbon in both meteorites. The shifts in the Raman parameters to a discrete and/or more expanded region suggest that (1) oxidation changes the crystalline condition of graphitic carbon, (2) phase Q is not a dissolved site, and (3) the release of Q-gas is simply related to the rearrangement of the carbon structure during oxidation.

  3. Nonlinear dipole-dipole interactions and spectroscopic properties of van der waals complexes in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshiev, N. G.

    2003-09-01

    We suggest a semiempirical approach to describing the influence of local nonlinear dipole-dipole interactions on the formation of van der Waals complexes of 1: 1 composition in the gas phase. Based on this approach, we quantitatively interpret the experimental data on the patterns of the shift in the electronic (complexes of a 3-aminophthalimide molecule with water and methanol molecules) and vibrational (complexes of a HCl molecule with acetone and acetonitrile molecules) absorption spectra attributable to the processes of complex formation. We confirm the conclusion that a nonlinear dipole-dipole interaction should be considered as one of the most important physical mechanisms that result in the association of molecules both in the gas phase and, under certain conditions, in the condensed state.

  4. Spectrally resolved phase-shifting interference microscopy: technique based on optical coherence tomography for profiling a transparent film on a patterned substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, Sanjit K.; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kothiyal, Mahendra P.; Hariharan, Parameswaran

    2010-12-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light phase-shifting interference microscopy has been used for measurements of the thickness profile of a transparent thin-film layer deposited upon a patterned structure exhibiting steps and discontinuities. We describe a simple technique, using an approach based on spectrally resolved optical coherence tomography, that makes it possible to obtain directly a thickness profile along a line by inverse Fourier transformation of the complex spectral interference function.

  5. Spectrally resolved phase-shifting interference microscopy: technique based on optical coherence tomography for profiling a transparent film on a patterned substrate.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sanjit K; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kothiyal, Mahendra P; Hariharan, Parameswaran

    2010-12-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light phase-shifting interference microscopy has been used for measurements of the thickness profile of a transparent thin-film layer deposited upon a patterned structure exhibiting steps and discontinuities. We describe a simple technique, using an approach based on spectrally resolved optical coherence tomography, that makes it possible to obtain directly a thickness profile along a line by inverse Fourier transformation of the complex spectral interference function.

  6. Spectrally resolved white-light phase-shifting interference microscopy for thickness-profile measurements of transparent thin film layers on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sanjit K; Kothiyal, Mahendra P; Schmit, Joanna; Hariharan, Parameswaran

    2006-05-29

    We describe how spectrally-resolved white-light phase-shifting interference microscopy with a windowed 8-step algorithm can be used for rapid and accurate measurements of the thickness profile of transparent thin film layers with a wide range of thicknesses deposited upon patterned structures exhibiting steps and discontinuities. An advantage of this technique is that it can be implemented with readily available hardware.

  7. Evaluation of Al3Mg2 precipitates and Mn-rich phase in aluminum-magnesium alloy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yakun; Cullen, David A; Kar, Soumya; Free, Michael P; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to observe intergranular and intragranular -phase (Al3Mg2) formation and growth in as-received sample and long-term (~ 1 year) thermally treated samples of 5083-H131 alloy. Rod-shaped and equiaxed particles rich in Mn, Fe, and Cr were present in the as-received and heat treated samples. The -phase precipitated along grain boundaries as well as around and between preexisting Mn-Fe-Cr rich particles. The measured thickness of -phase along grain boundaries was lower than Zener Hillert diffusion model predicted value and the potential reasons were theoretically analyzed. Dislocation networks, grain boundaries, and different preexisting particles were observed to contribute to Mg diffusion and -phase precipitation.

  8. Quantitative phase separation in multiferroic Bi{sub 0.88}Sm{sub 0.12}FeO{sub 3} ceramics via piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alikin, D. O. Turygin, A. P.; Shur, V. Ya.; Walker, J.; Rojac, T.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-21

    BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) is a classical multiferroic material with both ferroelectric and magnetic ordering at room temperature. Doping of this material with rare-earth oxides was found to be an efficient way to enhance the otherwise low piezoelectric response of unmodified BFO ceramics. In this work, we studied two types of bulk Sm-modified BFO ceramics with compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) prepared by different solid-state processing methods. In both samples, coexistence of polar R3c and antipolar P{sub bam} phases was detected by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD); the non-polar P{sub nma} or P{sub bnm} phase also has potential to be present due to the compositional proximity to the polar-to-non-polar phase boundary. Two approaches to separate the phases based on the piezoresponse force microscopy measurements have been proposed. The obtained fractions of the polar and non-polar/anti-polar phases were close to those determined by quantitative XRD analysis. The results thus reveal a useful method for quantitative determination of the phase composition in multi-phase ceramic systems, including the technologically most important MPB systems.

  9. Laser-induced carbon plasma emission spectroscopic measurements on solid targets and in gas-phase optical breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Laszlo; Keszler, Anna M.; Hornkohl, James O.; Parigger, Christian

    2005-06-20

    We report measurements of time- and spatially averaged spontaneous-emission spectra following laser-induced breakdown on a solid graphite/ambient gas interface and on solid graphite in vacuum, and also emission spectra from gas-phase optical breakdown in allene C3H4 and helium, and in CO2 and helium mixtures. These emission spectra were dominated by CII (singly ionized carbon), CIII (doubly ionized carbon), hydrogen Balmer beta (H{sub b}eta), and Swan C2 band features. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium and thin plasma assumptions, we derived electron number density and electron temperature estimates. The former was in the 1016 cm{sup -3} range, while the latter was found to be near 20000 K. In addition, the vibration-rotation temperature of the Swan bands of the C2 radical was determined to be between 4500 and 7000 K, using an exact theoretical model for simulating diatomic emission spectra. This temperature range is probably caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the laser-induced plasma plume. Differences are pointed out in the role of ambient CO2 in a solid graphite target and in gas-phase breakdown plasma.

  10. Innovative tribometer for in situ spectroscopic analyses of wear mechanisms and phase transformation in ceramic femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Leto, Andrea; Wenliang, Zhu; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The literature on tribological assessments of artificial hip joints usually focuses on correlations between joint composition, size, and specific wear rates, but conspicuously ignores the physical aspects behind the occurrence of degradation mechanisms of friction and wear. Surface degradation in artificial joints occurs because of increases in temperature and local exacerbation of contact stresses inside the moving contact as a consequence of physical and chemical modifications of the sliding surfaces. This article reports about the development of a new pin-on-ball spectroscopy-assisted tribometer device that enables investigating also physical rather than merely engineering aspects of wear processes using in situ Raman and fluorescence techniques. This innovative tribometer is designed to bring about, in addition to conventional tribological parameters, also information of temperature, stress and phase transformations in the femoral heads as received from the manufacturer. Raman and fluorescence spectra at the point of sliding contact are recorded durilng reciprocating hard-on-hard dry-sliding tests. Preliminary results were collected on two different commercially available ceramic-on-ceramic hip joint bearing couples, made of monolithic alumina and alumina-zirconia composites. Although the composite couple showed direct evidence of tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation, which enhanced the coefficient of friction, the specific wear rate was significantly lower than that of the monolithic one (i.e., by a factor 2.63 and 4.48 on the pin and head side, respectively). In situ collected data compared to ex situ analyses elucidated the surface degradation processes and clarified the origin for the higher wear resistance of the composite as compared to the monolithic couple.

  11. Application of maximum likelihood estimator in nano-scale optical path length measurement using spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Motaghian Nezam, S. M. R.; Joo, C; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) measures minute phase changes in transparent biological specimens using a common path interferometer and a spectrometer based optical coherence tomography system. The Fourier transform of the acquired interference spectrum in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is complex and the phase is affected by contributions from inherent random noise. To reduce this phase noise, knowledge of the probability density function (PDF) of data becomes essential. In the present work, the intensity and phase PDFs of the complex interference signal are theoretically derived and the optical path length (OPL) PDF is experimentally validated. The full knowledge of the PDFs is exploited for optimal estimation (Maximum Likelihood estimation) of the intensity, phase, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SD-OCPM. Maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of the intensity, SNR, and OPL images are presented for two different scan modes using Bovine Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (BPAE) cells. To investigate the phase accuracy of SD-OCPM, we experimentally calculate and compare the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the OPL standard deviation and the square root of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (1/2SNR) over 100 BPAE images for two different scan modes. The correction to the OPL measurement by applying ML estimation to SD-OCPM for BPAE cells is demonstrated. PMID:18957999

  12. Validation of diffuse correlation spectroscopic measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-encoded velocity mapping magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hance, Dalton; Pawlowski, Thomas; Lynch, Jennifer; Wilson, Felice B.; Mesquita, Rickson C.; Durduran, Turgut; Diaz, Laura K.; Putt, Mary E.; Licht, Daniel J.; Fogel, Mark A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a novel optical technique that appears to be an excellent tool for assessing cerebral blood flow in a continuous and non-invasive manner at the bedside. We present new clinical validation of the DCS methodology by demonstrating strong agreement between DCS indices of relative cerebral blood flow and indices based on phase-encoded velocity mapping magnetic resonance imaging (VENC MRI) of relative blood flow in the jugular veins and superior vena cava. Data were acquired from 46 children with single ventricle cardiac lesions during a hypercapnia intervention. Significant increases in cerebral blood flow, measured both by DCS and by VENC MRI, as well as significant increases in oxyhemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration, were observed during hypercapnia. Comparison of blood flow changes measured by VENC MRI in the jugular veins and by DCS revealed a strong linear relationship, R=0.88, p<0.001, slope=0.91±0.07. Similar correlations were observed between DCS and VENC MRI in the superior vena cava, R=0.77, slope=0.99±0.12, p<0.001. The relationship between VENC MRI in the aorta and DCS, a negative control, was weakly correlated, R=0.46, slope=1.77±0.45, p<0.001. PMID:22502579

  13. Ruthenium trisbipyridine as a candidate for gas-phase spectroscopic studies in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, Jill R.; Ham, Jason E.; Durham, Bill; ...

    2004-01-01

    Metal polypyridines are excellent candidates for gas-phase optical experiments where their intrinsic properties can be studied without complications due to the presence of solvent. The fluorescence lifetimes of [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 1+ trapped in an optical detection cell within a Fourier transform mass spectrometer were obtained using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization to generate the ions with either 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) or sinapinic acid (SA) as matrix. All transients acquired, whether using DHB or SA for ion generation, were best described as approximately exponential decays. The rate constant for transients derived using DHB as matrix was 4×10 7 s −1 ,more » while the rate constant using SA was 1×10 7 s −1 . Some suggestions of multiple exponential decay were evident although limited by the quality of the signals. Photodissociation experiments revealed that [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 1+ generated using DHB can decompose to [Ru(bpy) 2 ] 1+ , whereas ions generated using SA showed no decomposition. Comparison of the mass spectra with the fluorescence lifetimes illustrates the promise of incorporating optical detection with trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques.« less

  14. Direct observation of the intergrown {alpha}-phase in {beta}-TmAlB{sub 4} via high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yubuta, Kunio; Mori, Takao; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Grin, Yuri; Okada, Shigeru; Shishido, Toetsu

    2009-08-05

    A TmAlB{sub 4} crystal with a ThMoB{sub 4}-type ({beta}-type) structure phase related to a hexagonal AlB{sub 2}-type structure was studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy. A high-resolution image clearly exhibits an intergrown lamellar structure of a YCrB{sub 4}-type ({alpha}-type) phase in the matrix of the {beta}-type phase in TmAlB{sub 4} crystal. The lamellar structure can be characterized by a tiling of deformed hexagons, which are a common structure unit in the {alpha}-type and {beta}-type structures. The intergrown nanostructure is considered to be attributed to the origin of low temperature anomalies in physical properties.

  15. Understanding magnetic structures in permanent magnets via in situ Lorentz microscopy, interferometric and non-interferometric phase-reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Volkov, V V; De Graef, M

    2001-01-01

    We present our observations of field- and orientation-dependence of magnetic domains and their reversal nucleation at grain boundaries in polycrystalline Nd2Fe14B, using Fresnel- and Foucault-Lorentz microscopy. The local magnetization associated with the domain and domain-wall in Nd2Fe14B and in precipitated Fe particles was mapped using an interferometric holography as well as a novel non-interferometric method based on the 'transport of intensity' equation.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of H atom transfer in a gas-phase dissociation reaction: McLafferty rearrangement of model gas-phase peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Kerstetter, Dale R; Leavitt, Christopher M; Groenewold, Gary S; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos

    2008-06-14

    Wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon photodissociation (WS-IRMPD) was used to study isotopically-labeled ions generated by McLafferty rearrangement of nicotinyl-glycine-tert-butyl ester and betaine-glycine-tert-butyl ester. The tert-butyl esters were incubated in a mixture of D(2)O and CH(3)OD to induce solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange and then converted to gas-phase ions using electrospray ionization. McLafferty rearrangement was used to generate the free-acid forms of the respective model peptides through transfer of an H atom and elimination of butene. The specific aim was to use vibrational spectra generated by WS-IRMPD to determine whether the H atom remains at the acid group, or migrates to one or more of the other exchangeable sites. Comparison of the IRMPD results in the region from 1200-1900 cm(-1) to theoretical spectra for different isotopically-labeled isomers clearly shows that the H atom is situated at the C-terminal acid group and migration to amide positions is negligible on the time scale of the experiment. The results of this study suggest that use of the McLafferty rearrangement for peptide esters could be an effective approach for generation of H-atom isotope tracers, in situ, for subsequent investigation of intramolecular proton migration during peptide fragmentation studies.

  17. Spectroscopic Investigation of H Atom Transfer in a Gas-phase Dissociation Reaction: McLafferty Rearrangement of Model Gas-phase Peptide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Dale R. Kersetter; Christopher M. Leavitt; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey Steill; Jos Oomens

    2008-07-01

    Wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon photodissociation (WS-IRMPD) was used to study isotopically-labeled ions generated by McLafferty rearrangement of nicotinyl-glycine-tert-butyl ester and betaine-glycine-tert-butyl ester. The tert-butyl esters were incubated in a mixture of D2O and CH3OD to induce solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange and then converted to gas-phase ions using electrospray ionization. McLafferty rearrangement was used to generate the free-acid forms of the respective model peptides through transfer of an H atom and elimination of butene. The specific aim was to use vibrational spectra generated by WS-IRMPD technique to determine whether the H atom remains at the acid group, or migrates to one or more of the other exchangeable sites. Comparison of the IRMPD results in the region from 1200-1900 cm-1 to theoretical spectra for different isotopically-labeled isomers clearly shows that the H atom is situated at the C-terminal acid group and migration to amide positions is negligible on the time scale of the experiment. The results of this study suggest that use of the McLafferty rearrangement for peptide esters could be an effective approach for generation of H-atom isotope tracers, in-situ, for subsequent investigation of intra-molecular proton migration during peptide fragmentation studies.

  18. High-resolution STEM imaging with a quadrant detector--conditions for differential phase contrast microscopy in the weak phase object approximation.

    PubMed

    Majert, S; Kohl, H

    2015-01-01

    Differential phase contrast is a contrast mechanism that can be utilized in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to determine the distribution of magnetic or electric fields. In practice, several different detector geometries can be used to obtain differential phase contrast. As recent high resolution differential phase contrast experiments with the STEM are focused on ring quadrant detectors, we evaluate the contrast transfer characteristics of different quadrant detector geometries, namely two ring quadrant detectors with different inner detector angles and a conventional quadrant detector, by calculating the corresponding phase gradient transfer functions. For an ideal microscope and a weak phase object, this can be done analytically. The calculated phase gradient transfer functions indicate that the barely illuminated ring quadrant detector setup used for imaging magnetic fields in the specimen reduces the resolution limit to about 2.5Å for an aberration corrected STEM. Our results show that the resolution can be drastically improved by using a conventional quadrant detector instead.

  19. Temperature-dependent phonon Raman scattering and spectroscopic ellipsometry of pure and Ca-doped Sr x Ba1-x Nb2O6 ferroelectric ceramics across the phase transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang; Jiang, Kai; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hu, Zhigao; Wang, Genshui; Dong, Xianlin; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    Optical phonons and the phase transition of relaxor ferroelectric ceramics Sr x Ba1-x Nb2O6 (SBN) and Ca y (Sr0.5Ba0.5)1-y Nb2O6 (CSBN) with different composition (0.3≤slant x≤slant 0.5 , 0.1≤slant y≤slant 0.2 ) have been investigated by variable-temperature Raman scattering and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The anomalous temperature dependence of Tauc gap energy (E t ) is used to fit the phonon energy dependence of the permittivity, and the Raman intensity of some interesting optical phonons can be ascribed to the phase transition from a ferroelectric to a paraelectric structure. The Curie temperature of SBN decreases from 556 to 359 K with increasing Sr composition, which can be attributed to the substitution of smaller Sr2+ for Ba2+. On increasing the Ca composition, however, the phase transition temperature of CSBN remains nearly unchanged at about 350 K. This could be due to the fact that most doped Ca2+ ions move into the oxygen ion site and exhibit no obvious effect on the vibrational properties. Therefore, the general disorder which results from Sr2+ substituting Ba2+ , dominates the phase transition process for SBN-based ferroelectric oxides. Meanwhile, the dielectric functions from 200 to 600 K have been evaluated with the aid of the Tauc-Lorentz model. The electronic transition is located at about 5 eV and decreases with increasing temperature for all the samples. Moreover, the phase transition temperature range derived from the spectroscopic ellipsometry agrees well with that from the Raman scattering. It reveals that the variation of the fundamental energy gap may be associated with the phase transition of SBN ceramics. Both Raman scattering and spectroscopic ellipsometry are proven to be a effective method of exploring the phase transition of ferroelectric oxides.

  20. Active phase distribution changes within a catalyst particle during Fischer–Tropsch synthesis as revealed by multi-scale microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cats, K. H.; Andrews, J. C.; Stephan, O.; March, K.; Karunakaran, C.; Meirer, F.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction is one of the most promising processes to convert alternative energy sources, such as natural gas, coal or biomass, into liquid fuels and other high-value products. Despite its commercial implementation, we still lack fundamental insights into the various deactivation processes taking place during FTS. In this work, a combination of three methods for studying single catalyst particles at different length scales has been developed and applied to study the deactivation of Co/TiO2 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. By combining transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) we visualized changes in the structure, aggregate size and distribution of supported Co nanoparticles that occur during FTS. At the microscale, Co nanoparticle aggregates are transported over several μm leading to a more homogeneous Co distribution, while at the nanoscale Co forms a thin layer of ~1-2 nm around the TiO2 support. The formation of the Co layer is the opposite case to the “classical” strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in which TiO2 surrounds the Co, and is possibly related to the surface oxidation of Co metal nanoparticles in combination with coke formation. In other words, the observed migration and formation of a thin CoOx layer are similar to a previously discussed reaction-induced spreading of metal oxides across a TiO2 surface.

  1. Active phase distribution changes within a catalyst particle during Fischer–Tropsch synthesis as revealed by multi-scale microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Cats, K. H.; Andrews, J. C.; Stephan, O.; ...

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction is one of the most promising processes to convert alternative energy sources, such as natural gas, coal or biomass, into liquid fuels and other high-value products. Despite its commercial implementation, we still lack fundamental insights into the various deactivation processes taking place during FTS. In this work, a combination of three methods for studying single catalyst particles at different length scales has been developed and applied to study the deactivation of Co/TiO2 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. By combining transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electronmore » energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) we visualized changes in the structure, aggregate size and distribution of supported Co nanoparticles that occur during FTS. At the microscale, Co nanoparticle aggregates are transported over several μm leading to a more homogeneous Co distribution, while at the nanoscale Co forms a thin layer of ~1-2 nm around the TiO2 support. The formation of the Co layer is the opposite case to the “classical” strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in which TiO2 surrounds the Co, and is possibly related to the surface oxidation of Co metal nanoparticles in combination with coke formation. In other words, the observed migration and formation of a thin CoOx layer are similar to a previously discussed reaction-induced spreading of metal oxides across a TiO2 surface.« less

  2. Nanoscale characterization of β-phase HxLi1-xNbO3 layers by piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Michele; Denning, Denise; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Gallo, Katia

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a non-destructive approach for the characterization of proton exchanged layers in LiNbO3 with sub-micrometric resolution by means of piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Through systematic analyses, we identify a clear correlation between optical measurements on the extraordinary refractive index and PFM measurements on the piezoelectric d33 coefficient. Furthermore, we quantify the reduction of the latter induced by proton exchange as 83 ± 2% and 68 ± 3% of the LiNbO3 value, for undoped and 5 mol. % MgO-doped substrates, respectively.

  3. Use of solid-phase immune electron microscopy for classification of Norwalk-like viruses into six antigenic groups from 10 outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D; Ando, T; Humphrey, C D; Monroe, S S; Glass, R I

    1995-01-01

    Norwalk-like viruses observed in fecal specimens from 10 outbreaks of gastroenteritis investigated in the United States between 1987 and 1992 were analyzed by solid-phase immune electron microscopy. Outbreak virus strains were classified into six antigenic groups: the four types (UK1 to UK4) previously defined in the United Kingdom, Norwalk virus, and the Oklahoma agent that was newly defined in this study. The diversity of antigenic types demonstrated in these outbreaks was greater than previously recognized and will serve as a basis for characterization of these strains at the molecular level. PMID:7714218

  4. Temperature effect on thin lipid film elasticity and phase separation: insights from Langmuir monolayer and fluorescence microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattari, Z.; Maghrabi, M.; Al-Abdullah, T.

    2015-07-01

    Langmuir monolayer pressure isotherms and compressibility modulus measurements of phospholipid mixtures in several Langmuir monolayer systems at the air/water interface were investigated in this study. The ultimate aim was to carry out a comparison of the elasticity modulus for monolayers with different mixtures of l,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), l,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and chicken egg yolk sphingomyelin (eSM), in the presence/absence of cholesterol (Chol). In particular, we were able to propose that the leading force beyond the phase separation into liquid expanded (LE-) and liquid condensed (LC-) phases emerges from the increasing barrier to incorporate DOPC molecules into a highly ordered LC-phase. In addition, our findings suggest that DOPC lipid molecules have a priority to incorporate in a disordered LE-phase, while DPPC and eSM prefer the ordered one. Also, Chol seems to split almost equally into both phases, indicating that Chol has no priority for either phase and there are no particular interactions between Chol and saturated lipid molecules.

  5. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  6. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  7. Phase Boundary Propagation in Li-Alloying Battery Electrodes Revealed by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Leenheer, Andrew J; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Zavadil, Kevin R; Harris, Charles T

    2016-06-28

    Battery cycle life is directly influenced by the microstructural changes occurring in the electrodes during charge and discharge cycles. Here, we image in situ the nanoscale phase evolution in negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries using a fully enclosed liquid cell in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to reveal early degradation that is not evident in the charge-discharge curves. To compare the electrochemical phase transformation behavior between three model materials, thin films of amorphous Si, crystalline Al, and crystalline Au were lithiated and delithiated at controlled rates while immersed in a commercial liquid electrolyte. This method allowed for the direct observation of lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale negative electrodes, revealing that a simplistic model of a surface-to-interior lithiation front is insufficient. For the crystalline films, a lithiation front spread laterally from a few initial nucleation points, with continued grain nucleation along the growing interface. The intermediate lithiated phases were identified using electron diffraction, and high-resolution postmortem imaging revealed the details of the final microstructure. Our results show that electrochemically induced solid-solid phase transformations can lead to highly concentrated stresses at the laterally propagating phase boundary which should be considered for future designs of nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

  8. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Diane N. H.; Teitell, Michael A.; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples. PMID:26305212

  9. Phase transformation mechanism in lithium manganese nickel oxide revealed by single-crystal hard X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppan, Saravanan; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Yijin; Chen, Guoying

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the reaction pathway and kinetics of solid-state phase transformation is critical in designing advanced electrode materials with better performance and stability. Despite the first-order phase transition with a large lattice mismatch between the involved phases, spinel LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 is capable of fast rate even at large particle size, presenting an enigma yet to be understood. The present study uses advanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional nano-tomography on a series of well-formed LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0<=x<=1) crystals to visualize the mesoscale phase distribution, as a function of Li content at the sub-particle level. Inhomogeneity along with the coexistence of Li-rich and Li-poor phases are broadly observed on partially delithiated crystals, providing direct evidence for a concurrent nucleation and growth process instead of a shrinking-core or a particle-by-particle process. Superior kinetics of (100) facets at the vertices of truncated octahedral particles promote preferential delithiation, whereas the observation of strain-induced cracking suggests mechanical degradation in the material.

  10. Phase transformation mechanism in lithium manganese nickel oxide revealed by single-crystal hard X-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Kuppan, Saravanan; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Yijin; ...

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the reaction pathway and kinetics of solid-state phase transformation is critical in designing advanced electrode materials with better performance and stability. Despite the first-order phase transition with a large lattice mismatch between the involved phases, spinel LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 is capable of fast rate even at large particle size, presenting an enigma yet to be understood. The present study uses advanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional nano-tomography on a series of well-formed LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) crystals to visualize the mesoscale phase distribution, as a function of Li content at the sub-particle level. Inhomogeneity along with the coexistence of Li-rich andmore » Li-poor phases are broadly observed on partially delithiated crystals, providing direct evidence for a concurrent nucleation and growth process instead of a shrinking-core or a particle-by-particle process. As a result, superior kinetics of (100) facets at the vertices of truncated octahedral particles promote preferential delithiation, whereas the observation of strain-induced cracking suggests mechanical degradation in the material.« less

  11. Phase Boundary Propagation in Li-Alloying Battery Electrodes Revealed by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Leenheer, Andrew J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; ...

    2016-05-31

    Battery cycle life is directly influenced by the microstructural changes occurring in the electrodes during charge and discharge cycles. In this study, we image in situ the nanoscale phase evolution in negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries using a fully enclosed liquid cell in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to reveal early degradation that is not evident in the charge–discharge curves. To compare the electrochemical phase transformation behavior between three model materials, thin films of amorphous Si, crystalline Al, and crystalline Au were lithiated and delithiated at controlled rates while immersed in a commercial liquid electrolyte. This method allowed formore » the direct observation of lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale negative electrodes, revealing that a simplistic model of a surface-to-interior lithiation front is insufficient. For the crystalline films, a lithiation front spread laterally from a few initial nucleation points, with continued grain nucleation along the growing interface. The intermediate lithiated phases were identified using electron diffraction, and high-resolution postmortem imaging revealed the details of the final microstructure. Lastly, our results show that electrochemically induced solid–solid phase transformations can lead to highly concentrated stresses at the laterally propagating phase boundary which should be considered for future designs of nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries.« less

  12. Phase transformation mechanism in lithium manganese nickel oxide revealed by single-crystal hard X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuppan, Saravanan; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Yijin; Chen, Guoying

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the reaction pathway and kinetics of solid-state phase transformation is critical in designing advanced electrode materials with better performance and stability. Despite the first-order phase transition with a large lattice mismatch between the involved phases, spinel LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 is capable of fast rate even at large particle size, presenting an enigma yet to be understood. The present study uses advanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional nano-tomography on a series of well-formed LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0≤x≤1) crystals to visualize the mesoscale phase distribution, as a function of Li content at the sub-particle level. Inhomogeneity along with the coexistence of Li-rich and Li-poor phases are broadly observed on partially delithiated crystals, providing direct evidence for a concurrent nucleation and growth process instead of a shrinking-core or a particle-by-particle process. Superior kinetics of (100) facets at the vertices of truncated octahedral particles promote preferential delithiation, whereas the observation of strain-induced cracking suggests mechanical degradation in the material. PMID:28145406

  13. Phase Boundary Propagation in Li-Alloying Battery Electrodes Revealed by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, Andrew J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Harris, Charles T.

    2016-05-31

    Battery cycle life is directly influenced by the microstructural changes occurring in the electrodes during charge and discharge cycles. In this study, we image in situ the nanoscale phase evolution in negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries using a fully enclosed liquid cell in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to reveal early degradation that is not evident in the charge–discharge curves. To compare the electrochemical phase transformation behavior between three model materials, thin films of amorphous Si, crystalline Al, and crystalline Au were lithiated and delithiated at controlled rates while immersed in a commercial liquid electrolyte. This method allowed for the direct observation of lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale negative electrodes, revealing that a simplistic model of a surface-to-interior lithiation front is insufficient. For the crystalline films, a lithiation front spread laterally from a few initial nucleation points, with continued grain nucleation along the growing interface. The intermediate lithiated phases were identified using electron diffraction, and high-resolution postmortem imaging revealed the details of the final microstructure. Lastly, our results show that electrochemically induced solid–solid phase transformations can lead to highly concentrated stresses at the laterally propagating phase boundary which should be considered for future designs of nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

  14. Influence of sample preparation and reliability of automated numerical refocusing in stain-free analysis of dissected tissues with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for high resolution non-destructive quantitative phase imaging of surfaces and multi-modal minimally-invasive monitoring of living cell cultures in-vitro. DHM provides quantitative monitoring of physiological processes through functional imaging and structural analysis which, for example, gives new insight into signalling of cellular water permeability and cell morphology changes due to toxins and infections. Also the analysis of dissected tissues quantitative DHM phase contrast prospects application fields by stain-free imaging and the quantification of tissue density changes. We show that DHM allows imaging of different tissue layers with high contrast in unstained tissue sections. As the investigation of fixed samples represents a very important application field in pathology, we also analyzed the influence of the sample preparation. The retrieved data demonstrate that the quality of quantitative DHM phase images of dissected tissues depends strongly on the fixing method and common staining agents. As in DHM the reconstruction is performed numerically, multi-focus imaging is achieved from a single digital hologram. Thus, we evaluated the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on different types of dissected tissues and revealed that on moderately stained samples highly reproducible holographic autofocussing can be achieved. Finally, it is demonstrated that alterations of the spatial refractive index distribution in murine and human tissue samples represent a reliable absolute parameter that is related of different degrees of inflammation in experimental colitis and Crohn's disease. This paves the way towards the usage of DHM in digital pathology for automated histological examinations and further studies to elucidate the translational potential of quantitative phase microscopy for the clinical management of patients, e.g., with inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    PubMed

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The infrared chemical imaging component of the system utilized photothermal expansion of the sample at the tip of the atomic force microscopy probe recorded at infrared wave numbers specific to the different surface constituents. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for thermolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup, operation, and image correlation procedures are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated poly(2-vinylpyridine)/poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer thin film. The topography and both the infrared and mass spectral chemical images showed that the valley regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of poly(2-vinylpyridine) and hill or plateau regions were primarily poly(methyl methacrylate). The spatial resolution of the mass spectral chemical images was estimated to be 1.6 μm based on the ability to distinguish surface features in those images that were also observed in the topography and infrared images of the same surface.

  16. A semi-Markov model for mitosis segmentation in time-lapse phase contrast microscopy image sequences of stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-An; Li, Kang; Kanade, Takeo

    2012-02-01

    We propose a semi-Markov model trained in a max-margin learning framework for mitosis event segmentation in large-scale time-lapse phase contrast microscopy image sequences of stem cell populations. Our method consists of three steps. First, we apply a constrained optimization based microscopy image segmentation method that exploits phase contrast optics to extract candidate subsequences in the input image sequence that contains mitosis events. Then, we apply a max-margin hidden conditional random field (MM-HCRF) classifier learned from human-annotated mitotic and nonmitotic sequences to classify each candidate subsequence as a mitosis or not. Finally, a max-margin semi-Markov model (MM-SMM) trained on manually-segmented mitotic sequences is utilized to reinforce the mitosis classification results, and to further segment each mitosis into four predefined temporal stages. The proposed method outperforms the event-detection CRF model recently reported by Huh as well as several other competing methods in very challenging image sequences of multipolar-shaped C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. For mitosis detection, an overall precision of 95.8% and a recall of 88.1% were achieved. For mitosis segmentation, the mean and standard deviation for the localization errors of the start and end points of all mitosis stages were well below 1 and 2 frames, respectively. In particular, an overall temporal location error of 0.73 ± 1.29 frames was achieved for locating daughter cell birth events.

  17. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  18. Phase transition and surface morphology of MnAs/GaAs(001) studied with in situ variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitwieser, R.; Vidal, F.; Graff, I. L.; Marangolo, M.; Eddrief, M.; Boulliard, J.-C.; Etgens, V. H.

    2009-07-01

    The MnAs phase transition from the hexagonal ferromagnetic α to the orthorhombic paramagnetic β phase has been investigated in situ by variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as a function of epilayer thickness. The α-β phase coexistence leads to the formation of a self-organized stripes pattern of alternating α and β regions. The morphology evolution of the α-β periodic array of domains has been imaged in detail. The period and corrugation of this pattern are linear functions of the epilayer thickness with a domain periodicity nearly five times larger than film thickness. Also, STM local imaging through the phase-coexistence region (10-45°C) shows unambiguously the absence of mass transport during the transition. The self-organization of α-β stripes is consistent with an elastic-energy equilibrium state of the heteroepitaxial system at each temperature, as previously proposed for the origin of the modulated structure [V. M. Kaganer , Phys. Rev. B 66, 045305 (2002)]. Independently of self-organized α-β regions, the surface displays anisotropic mounds that are elongated along MnAs a axis. This facetting process leads to a peculiar, highly anisotropic surface with oriented facets and submicron periodic modulation along the hexagonal c axis. Smoother surfaces with larger terraces are obtained following postgrowth annealing. These results suggest that a careful control of the growth temperature and annealing procedure can be used to tailor the surface morphology for specific applications requiring anisotropic templates.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy studying of structural features of NiTi B2 phase formed under pulsed electron-beam impact

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Ludmila L.; Semin, Viktor O.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y.; Neiman, Alexey A. Lotkov, Alexander I.; Ostapenko, Marina G.; Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D.

    2015-10-27

    By transmission electron microscopy method the evolution of structural-phase states on a depth of close to equiatomic NiTi modified layer has been studied. Modification performed by pulse impact on its surface low-energy high-current electron beam (beam energy density 10 J/sm{sup 2}, 10 pulses, pulse duration 50mks). It is established that during the treatment in the layer thickness of 8–10 μm, the melting of primary B2 phase and contained therein as Ti2Ni phase particles occurs. The result is change in the concentration ratio of titanium and nickel in the direction of increasing titanium content, which was confirmed by X-ray analysis in the form of increased unit cell parameter B2 phase. Analysis of the electron diffraction pattern showed that the modified layer is characterized as a highly distorted structure on the basis of bcc lattice. Lattice distortions are maximal near the surface and extends to a depth of melt. In subjacent layer there is gradual decline lattice distortions is observed.

  20. Abnormal cubic-tetragonal phase transition of barium strontium titanate nanoparticles studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Chen; Gao, Ran; Xia, Feng; Li, YueSheng; Che, Renchao

    2015-11-02

    Phase stability of the ferroelectric materials at high temperature is extremely important to their device performance. Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) nanoparticles with different Sr contents (x = 1, 0.91, 0.65, 0.4, and 0) are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. Using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses under in situ heating conditions (up to 300 °C), the phase transitions of BST nanoparticles between 25 °C and 280 °C are comprehensively investigated. The original Curie temperature of BST nanoparticles decreases abruptly with the increase in Sr content, which is more obvious than in the bulk or film material. Besides, an abnormal phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure is observed from BST nanoparticles and the transition temperature rises along with the increase in Sr content. Direct TEM evidences including a slight lattice distortion have been provided. Differently, BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles remained in the tetragonal phase during the above temperature ranges.

  1. Structure refinement of the δ1p phase in the Fe-Zn system by single-crystal X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Norihiko L; Tanaka, Katsushi; Yasuhara, Akira; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the δ1p phase in the iron-zinc system has been refined by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large hexagonal unit cell of the δ1p phase with the space group of P63/mmc comprises more or less regular (normal) Zn12 icosahedra, disordered Zn12 icosahedra, Zn16 icosioctahedra and dangling Zn atoms that do not constitute any polyhedra. The unit cell contains 52 Fe and 504 Zn atoms so that the compound is expressed with the chemical formula of Fe13Zn126. All Fe atoms exclusively occupy the centre of normal and disordered icosahedra. Iron-centred normal icosahedra are linked to one another by face- and vertex-sharing forming two types of basal slabs, which are bridged with each other by face-sharing with icosioctahedra, whereas disordered icosahedra with positional disorder at their vertex sites are isolated from other polyhedra. The bonding features in the δ1p phase are discussed in comparison with those in the Γ and ζ phases in the iron-zinc system.

  2. Multi-Layer Phase Analysis: Quantifying the Elastic Properties of Soft Tissues and Live Cells with Ultra-High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuegen; Akhtar, Riaz; Nijenhuis, Nadja; Wilkinson, Steven J.; Murphy, Lilli; Ballestrem, Christoph; Sherratt, Michael. J.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Derby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy is potentially a powerful tool for characterising the elastic properties of soft biological tissues and cells. In this paper, we present a method, Multi-Layer Phase Analysis (MLPA), which can be used to extract local speed of sound values, for both thin tissue sections mounted on glass slides and cultured cells grown on cell culture plastic, with a resolution close to 1 μm. The method exploits the phase information that is preserved in the interference between the acoustic wave reflected from the substrate surface and internal reflections from the acoustic lens. In practice, a stack of acoustic images are captured beginning with the acoustic focal point 4 μm above the substrate surface and moving down in 0.1 μm increments. Scanning parameters, such as acoustic wave frequency and gate position, were adjusted to obtain optimal phase and lateral resolution. The data were processed offline to extract the phase information with the contribution of any inclination in the substrate removed prior to the calculation of sound speed. Here, we apply this approach to both skin sections and fibroblast cells, and compare our data with the V(f) (voltage vs frequency) method that has previously been used for characterisation of soft tissues and cells. Compared with the V(f) method, the MPLA method not only reduces signal noise but can be implemented without making a priori assumptions with regards to tissue or cell parameters. PMID:22547273

  3. In-Situ X-Ray Microscopy of Phase and Composition Distributions in Metal Alloys During Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 3 gm can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid inter-face. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause vafiations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lameilae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Keywords: x-ray, microscope, solidification, microfocus, real-time, microstructure

  4. Microcoil-based MR phase imaging and manganese enhanced microscopy of glial tumor neurospheres with direct optical correlation.

    PubMed

    Baxan, Nicoleta; Kahlert, Ulf; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Nikkhah, Guido; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2012-07-01

    Susceptibility differences among tissues were recently used for highlighting complementary contrast in MRI different from the conventional T(1), T(2), or spin density contrasts. This method, based on the signal phase, previously showed improved image contrast of human or rodent neuroarchitecture in vivo, although direct MR phase imaging of cellular architecture was not available until recently. In this study, we present for the first time the ability of microcoil-based phase MRI to resolve the structure of human glioma neurospheres at significantly improved resolutions (10 × 10 μm(2)) with direct optical image correlation. The manganese chloride property to function as a T(1) contrast agent enabled a closer examination of cell physiology with MRI. Specifically the temporal changes of manganese chloride uptake, retention and release time within and from individual clusters were assessed. The optimal manganese chloride concentration for improved MR signal enhancement was determined while keeping the cellular viability unaffected. The presented results demonstrate the possibilities to reveal structural and functional observation of living glioblastoma human-derived cells. This was achieved through the combination of highly sensitive microcoils, high magnetic field, and methods designed to maximize contrast to noise ratio. The presented approach may provide a powerful multimodal tool that merges structural and functional information of submilimeter biological samples.

  5. Plane wave illumination for correct phase analysis and alternative phase unwrapping in dual-type (transmission and reflection) three-dimensional digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moonseok; Hong, Sukjoon; Shim, Seongbo; Soh, Kwangsup; Shin, Sanghoon; Son, Jung-Young; Lee, Jaesung; Kim, Jaisoon

    2010-05-01

    The digital holographic microscope (DHM) has emerged as a useful tool for verifying the three-dimensional structure of an object. A dual-type inline DHM that can be used with both transmission and reflection imaging in a single device is developed. The proper modes (between transmission and reflection imaging) can be easily changed according to the characteristics of the object in this system. The optimum condition for retrieving the correct phase information is illuminating a plane wave to an object. In contrast to the transmission imaging, it is difficult to illuminate an object using a plane wave without deformations in the reflection imaging. We developed an adequate relay lens module for illumination that can be adapted to any type of microscope objective without significant aberrations in the reflection imaging. The relationship between the illuminating condition and the measured phase based on the wave optics is analyzed. A specially designed and manufactured phase mask is observed in this system, and an alternative method for overcoming the limitation of phase unwrapping is introduced for the inspection of that object.

  6. Single shot white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis for quantitative phase imaging of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Mehta, D. S.

    2013-02-01

    To quantitatively obtain the phase map of Onion and human red blood cell (RBC) from white light interferogram we used Hilbert transform color fringe analysis technique. The three Red, Blue and Green color components are decomposed from single white light interferogram and Refractive index profile for Red, Blue and Green colour were computed in a completely non-invasive manner for Onion and human RBC. The present technique might be useful for non-invasive determination of the refractive index variation within cells and tissues and morphological features of sample with ease of operation and low cost.

  7. Quantitative phase imaging of cell division in yeast cells and E.coli using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) is an emerging quantitative phase imaging technique with unique imaging scales and resolutions leading to multitude of applications. DHM is promising as a novel investigational and applied tool for cell imaging, studying the morphology and real time dynamics of cells and a number of related applications. The use of numerical propagation and computational digital optics offer unique flexibility to tune the depth of focus, and compensate for image aberrations. In this work, we report imaging the dynamics of cell division in E.coli and yeast cells using a DHM platform. We demonstrate 3-D and depth imaging as well as reconstruction of phase profiles of E.coli and yeast cells using the system. We record a digital hologram of E.coli and yeast cells and reconstruct the image using Fresnel propagation algorithm. We also use aberration compensation algorithms for correcting the aberrations that are introduced by the microscope objective in the object path using linear least square fitting techniques. This work demonstrates the strong potential of a DHM platform in 3-D live cell imaging, fast clinical quantifications and pathological applications.

  8. STED microscopy detects and quantifies liquid phase separation in lipid membranes using a new far-red emitting fluorescent phosphoglycerolipid analogue.

    PubMed

    Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Hell, Stefan W; Eggeling, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a bright, photostable, and far-red emitting fluorescent phosphoglycerolipid analogue to probe diffusion characteristics of lipids in membranes. The lipid analogue consists of a saturated (C18) phosphoethanolamine and a hydrophilic far-red emitting fluorescent dye (KK114) that is tethered to the head group by a long polyethylenglycol linker. In contrast to reported far-red emitting fluorescent lipid analogues, this one partitions predominantly into liquid ordered domains of phase-separated ternary bilayers. We performed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with a super-resolution STED microscope (STED-FCS) to measure the lateral diffusion of the new lipid analogue in the liquid ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) phase. On a mica support, we observed micrometer large phases and found that the lipid analogue diffuses freely on all tested spatial scales (40-250 nm) in both the Ld and Lo phase with diffusion coefficients of 1.8 microm2 s(-1) and 0.7 microm2 s(-1) respectively. This indicates that the tight molecular packing of the Lo phase mainly slows down the diffusion rather than causing anomalous sub-diffusion. The same ternary mixture deposited on acid-cleaned glass forms Lo nanodomains of < 40 nm to 300 nm in diameter as only revealed by STED microscopy, which demonstrates the severe influence of interactions with the substrate on the sizes of domains in membranes. When averaging over different positions, STEd-FCS measurements on such glass supported membranes displayed anomalous sub-diffusion. This anomaly can be attributed to a transient partitioning of the lipid analogue into the nano-domains, where diffusion is slowed down. Our results suggest that STED-FCS in combination with a Lo-partitioning fluorescent lipid analogue can directly probe the presence of Lo nano-domains, which in the future should allow the study of potential lipid rafts in live-cell membranes.

  9. Interaction potentials of anisotropic nanocrystals from the trajectory sampling of particle motion using in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian; Cho, Hoduk; Manthiram, Karthish; Yoshida, Mark; Ye, Xingchen; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate a generalizable strategy to use the relative trajectories of pairs and groups of nanocrystals, and potentially other nanoscale objects, moving in solution which can now be obtained by in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the interaction potentials between nanocrystals. Such nanoscale interactions are crucial for collective behaviors and applications of synthetic nanocrystals and natural biomolecules, but have been very challenging to measure in situ at nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution. Here we use liquid phase TEM to extract the mathematical form of interaction potential between nanocrystals from their sampled trajectories. We show the power of this approach to reveal unanticipated features of nanocrystal–nanocrystal interactions by examining the anisotropic interaction potential between charged rod-shaped Au nanocrystals (Au nanorods); these Au nanorods assemble, in a tip-to-tip fashion in the liquid phase, in contrast to the well-known side-by-side arrangements commonly observed for drying-mediated assembly. These observations can be explained by a long-range and highly anisotropic electrostatic repulsion that leads to the tip-selective attachment. As a result, Au nanorods stay unassembled at a lower ionic strength, as the electrostatic repulsion is even longer-ranged. Our study not only provides a mechanistic understanding of the process by which metallic nanocrystals assemble but also demonstrates a method that can potentially quantify and elucidate a broad range of nanoscale interactions relevant to nanotechnology and biophysics.

  10. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  11. Quantitative phase imaging of live cells with near on-axis digital holographic microscopy using constrained optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Khare, Kedar; John, Renu

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate a single-shot near on-axis digital holographic microscope that uses a constrained optimization approach for retrieval of the complex object function in the hologram plane. The recovered complex object is back-propagated from the hologram plane to image plane using the Fresnel back-propagation algorithm. A numerical aberration compensation algorithm is employed for correcting the aberrations in the object beam. The reference beam angle is calculated automatically using the modulation property of Fourier transform without any additional recording. We demonstrate this approach using a United States Air Force (USAF) resolution target as an object on our digital holographic microscope. We also demonstrate this approach by recovering the quantitative phase images of live yeast cells, red blood cells and dynamics of live dividing yeast cells.

  12. Characterising the structural properties of polymer separators for lithium-ion batteries in 3D using phase contrast X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegan, Donal P.; Cooper, Samuel J.; Tjaden, Bernhard; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O.; Gelb, Jeff; Hinds, Gareth; Brett, Dan J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-11-01

    Separators are an integral component for optimising performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries; therefore, a clear understanding of how their microstructure affects cell performance and safety is crucial. Phase contrast X-ray microscopy is used here to capture the microstructures of commercial monolayer, tri-layer, and ceramic-coated lithium-ion battery polymer separators. Spatial variations in key structural parameters, including porosity, tortuosity factor and pore size distribution, are determined through the application of 3D quantification techniques and stereology. The architectures of individual layers in multi-layer membranes are characterised, revealing anisotropy in porosity, tortuosity factor and mean pore size of the three types of separator. Detailed structural properties of the individual layers of multi-layered membranes are then related with their expected effect on safety and rate capability of cells.

  13. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy characterization of twinned CdO thin films grown on a-plane sapphire by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Tomás, M. C.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Vennéguès, P.; Tottereau, O.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2007-07-01

    In the frame of studying II VI oxides of interest in optoelectronic technologies, the structural properties of CdO films grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates have been analysed. The study has been performed by means of X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy measurements. CdO films have been found to grow along [111] with the presence of twinned domains. Asymmetrical reflections have been used to study the crystalline quality of the twinned domains, independent of each other, as well as to determine their relative population. The analysis has been made as a function of growth conditions: VI/II precursors molar ratio and growth temperature.

  14. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-11-11

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of a calcite crystal growth process in water at one frame per second. The significant improvement in the imaging speed should enable various studies on unexplored atomic-scale interfacial processes.

  15. Lorentzian amplitude and phase pulse shaping for nonresonant background suppression and enhanced spectral resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Blades, Michael W; Turner, Robin F B

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy offers several advantages over spontaneous Raman spectroscopy due to the inherently high sensitivity and low average power deposition in the sample. Femtosecond CARS can be implemented in a collinear pump/probe beam configuration for microspectroscopy applications and has emerged as a powerful technique for chemical imaging of biological specimens. However, one serious limitation of this approach is the presence of a high nonresonant background component that often obscures the resonant signals of interest. We report here an innovative pulse-shaping method based on Lorentzian amplitude and phase spectral modulation of a broadband femtosecond probe pulse that yields spectra with both high spectral resolution and no nonresonant background. No further mathematical analysis is needed to extract Raman spectra. The utility of the proposed method for CARS microscopy is demonstrated using a mixture of polystyrene and latex beads, as well as dry-fixed embryonic stem cells.

  16. Liquid-phase sample preparation method for real-time monitoring of airborne asbestos fibers by dual-mode high-throughput microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myoung-Ock; Kim, Jung Kyung; Han, Hwataik; Lee, Jeonghoon

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos that had been used widely as a construction material is a first-level carcinogen recognized by the World Health Organization. It can be accumulated in body by inhalation causing virulent respiratory diseases including lung cancer. In our previous study, we developed a high-throughput microscopy (HTM) system that can minimize human intervention accompanied by the conventional phase contrast microscopy (PCM) through automated counting of fibrous materials and thus significantly reduce analysis time and labor. Also, we attempted selective detection of chrysotile using DksA protein extracted from Escherichia coli through a recombinant protein production technique, and developed a dual-mode HTM (DM-HTM) by upgrading the HTM device. We demonstrated that fluorescently-labeled chrysotile asbestos fibers can be identified and enumerated automatically among other types of asbestos fibers or non-asbestos particles in a high-throughput manner through a newly modified HTM system for both reflection and fluorescence imaging. However there is a limitation to apply DM-HTM to airborne sample with current air collecting method due to the difficulty of applying the protein to dried asbestos sample. Here, we developed a technique for preparing liquid-phase asbestos sample using an impinger normally used to collect odor molecules in the air. It would be possible to improve the feasibility of the dual-mode HTM by integrating a sample preparation unit for making collected asbestos sample dispersed in a solution. The new technique developed for highly sensitive and automated asbestos detection can be a potential alternative to the conventional manual counting method, and it may be applied on site as a fast and reliable environmental monitoring tool.

  17. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  18. High-throughput, label-free, single-cell, microalgal lipid screening by machine-learning-equipped optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Jiang, Yiyue; Tanaka, Yo; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-04-11

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels to petroleum is required to tackle the global energy crisis. One such alternative is microalgal biofuel, which is expected to play a key role in reducing the detrimental effects of global warming as microalgae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Unfortunately, conventional analytical methods only provide population-averaged lipid amounts and fail to characterize a diverse population of microalgal cells with single-cell resolution in a non-invasive and interference-free manner. Here high-throughput label-free single-cell screening of lipid-producing microalgal cells with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy was demonstrated. In particular, Euglena gracilis, an attractive microalgal species that produces wax esters (suitable for biodiesel and aviation fuel after refinement), within lipid droplets was investigated. The optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscope is based on an integration of a hydrodynamic-focusing microfluidic chip, an optical time-stretch quantitative phase microscope, and a digital image processor equipped with machine learning. As a result, it provides both the opacity and phase maps of every single cell at a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s, enabling accurate cell classification without the need for fluorescent staining. Specifically, the dataset was used to characterize heterogeneous populations of E. gracilis cells under two different culture conditions (nitrogen-sufficient and nitrogen-deficient) and achieve the cell classification with an error rate of only 2.15%. The method holds promise as an effective analytical tool for microalgae-based biofuel production. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Three-dimensional morphological imaging of human induced pluripotent stem cells by using low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Kakuno, Yumi; Goto, Kentaro; Fukami, Tadashi; Sugiyama, Norikazu; Iwai, Hidenao; Mizuguchi, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing need for non-invasive imaging techniques in the field of stem cell research. Label-free techniques are the best choice for assessment of stem cells because the cells remain intact after imaging and can be used for further studies such as differentiation induction. To develop a high-resolution label-free imaging system, we have been working on a low-coherence quantitative phase microscope (LC-QPM). LC-QPM is a Linnik-type interference microscope equipped with nanometer-resolution optical-path-length control and capable of obtaining three-dimensional volumetric images. The lateral and vertical resolutions of our system are respectively 0.5 and 0.93 μm and this performance allows capturing sub-cellular morphological features of live cells without labeling. Utilizing LC-QPM, we reported on three-dimensional imaging of membrane fluctuations, dynamics of filopodia, and motions of intracellular organelles. In this presentation, we report three-dimensional morphological imaging of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells). Two groups of monolayer hiPS cell cultures were prepared so that one group was cultured in a suitable culture medium that kept the cells undifferentiated, and the other group was cultured in a medium supplemented with retinoic acid, which forces the stem cells to differentiate. The volumetric images of the 2 groups show distinctive differences, especially in surface roughness. We believe that our LC-QPM system will prove useful in assessing many other stem cell conditions.

  20. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  1. Combining gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA), light scattering, field flow fractionation and cryo electron microscopy in a multidimensional approach to characterize liposomal carrier vesicles.

    PubMed

    Urey, Carlos; Weiss, Victor U; Gondikas, Andreas; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Marko-Varga, György; Andersson, Roland

    2016-11-20

    For drug delivery, characterization of liposomes regarding size, particle number concentrations, occurrence of low-sized liposome artefacts and drug encapsulation are of importance to understand their pharmacodynamic properties. In our study, we aimed to demonstrate the applicability of nano Electrospray Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analyser (nES GEMMA) as a suitable technique for analyzing these parameters. We measured number-based particle concentrations, identified differences in size between nominally identical liposomal samples, and detected the presence of low-diameter material which yielded bimodal particle size distributions. Subsequently, we compared these findings to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and results from light scattering experiments coupled to Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4), the latter improving the detectability of smaller particles in polydisperse samples due to a size separation step prior detection. However, the bimodal size distribution could not be detected due to method inherent limitations. In contrast, cryo transmission electron microscopy corroborated nES GEMMA results. Hence, gas-phase electrophoresis proved to be a versatile tool for liposome characterization as it could analyze both vesicle size and size distribution. Finally, a correlation of nES GEMMA results with cell viability experiments was carried out to demonstrate the importance of liposome batch-to-batch control as low-sized sample components possibly impact cell viability.

  2. Temperature-depending growth and surface structures of low-coverage Al phases on Si(100) observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, H.; Itoh, J.; Schmid, A.; Ichinokawa, T.

    1994-02-01

    The surface structures of Al on the Si(100) surface, at coverages less than one monolayer deposited at various temperatures, were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Surface structures of 2 × 2 and 2 × 3 phases formed at temperatures below 350°C consist of Al-dimer lines with the dimerization parallel to that of the Si-dimers. From the STM images, we can find that a filled state of Al-Si backbonds and an empty state of Al-Al dimer bonds are observed prominently at about -3 and +1 eV at positions on the Si-dimer rows and between the Si-dimer rows, respectively. For deposition above 500°C, the Al-dimer lines change into molecular clusters, each one of them consisting of five or six Al atoms. These molecules form the c(4 × 2 n) structure with buckling of underlying Si-dimer rows. At the same time, two-dimensional (2D) Si and Al islands with 2 × 1 and 2 × 2 structures were formed in the second layer on the c(4 × 2 n) structure. The local structures of the low-coverage Al phases on Si(100), depending on the deposition temperature and coverage, are analyzed by STM.

  3. Three-dimensional motion-picture imaging of dynamic object by parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using an inverted magnification optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takahito; Shinomura, Masato; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Matoba, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    We constructed a parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy (PPSDHM) system using an inverted magnification optical system, and succeeded in three-dimensional (3D) motion-picture imaging for 3D displacement of a microscopic object. In the PPSDHM system, the inverted and afocal magnification optical system consisted of a microscope objective (16.56 mm focal length and 0.25 numerical aperture) and a convex lens (300 mm focal length and 82 mm aperture diameter). A polarization-imaging camera was used to record multiple phase-shifted holograms with a single-shot exposure. We recorded an alum crystal, sinking down in aqueous solution of alum, by the constructed PPSDHM system at 60 frames/s for about 20 s and reconstructed high-quality 3D motion-picture image of the crystal. Then, we calculated amounts of displacement of the crystal from the amounts in the focus plane and the magnifications of the magnification optical system, and obtained the 3D trajectory of the crystal by that amounts.

  4. Using immuno-scanning electron microscopy for the observation of focal adhesion-substratum interactions at the nano- and microscale in S-phase cells.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Manus J P; Richards, R Geoff; Dalby, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that the nano/microtopography of a biomaterial in vivo is of first importance in influencing focal adhesion formation and subsequent cellular behaviour. When considering next-generation biomaterials, where the material's ability to elicit a regulated cell response will be key to device success, focal adhesion analysis is an useful indicator of cytocompatibility and can be used to determine functionality. Here, a methodology is described to allow simultaneous high-resolution imaging of focal adhesion sites and the material topography using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, through the use of BrdU pulse labelling and immunogold detection, S-phase cells can be selected from a near-synchronised population of cells to remove artefacts due to cell cycle phase. This is a key factor in adhesion quantification as there is natural variation in focal adhesion density as cells progress through the cell cycle, which can skew the quantitative analysis of focal adhesion formation on fabricated biomaterials.

  5. Correlative Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  6. Comparison of two direct-reading instruments (FM-7400 and Fibrecheck FC-2) with phase contrast optical microscopy to measure the airborne fibre number concentration.

    PubMed

    Kauffer, E; Martin, P; Grzebyk, M; Villa, M; Vigneron, J C

    2003-07-01

    The use of direct-reading instruments to measure the airborne fibre number concentration is on the increase. The response of two of these instruments (FM-7400 and Fibrecheck FC-2) was compared with the conventional method of sampling on filters and counting by phase contrast microscopy. Four types of fibres were studied at different concentrations and relative humidity levels. The FM-7400 can be calibrated by the manufacturer for two different levels of sensitivity (standard and high). For the tests where it was set to the sensitivity level with which it had been calibrated, the ratio of the concentration measured by the instrument to the concentration obtained by the conventional method varied in the range 0.5-1 for the different types of fibres studied (chrysotile, glass wool and ceramic fibres). The Fibrecheck FC-2 is a much less versatile instrument. On the basis of a calibration allowing correct detection of asbestos fibres, it greatly overestimated the concentration of man-made mineral fibres. In its normal calibration state a fine chrysotile aerosol was poorly detected. For man-made mineral fibres, the response was highly dependent on the nature of the fibres. These instruments require calibration with the type of fibres to be studied. Unfortunately, this operation is not always accessible to the user and may require the services of a specialized laboratory, as the manufacturer is not always in a position to carry this out.

  7. Ab initio structural and spectroscopic study of HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = 0,+1,−1) in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghlane, Saida Ben; Cotton, C. Eric; Francisco, Joseph S. E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr; Linguerri, Roberto; Hochlaf, Majdi E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr

    2013-11-07

    Accurate ab initio computations of structural and spectroscopic parameters for the HPS/HSP molecules and corresponding cations and anions have been performed. For the electronic structure computations, standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster techniques in conjunction with large basis sets have been adopted. In particular, we present equilibrium geometries, rotational constants, harmonic vibrational frequencies, adiabatic ionization energies, electron affinities, and, for the neutral species, singlet-triplet relative energies. Besides, the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) for HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = −1,0,1) systems have been generated at the standard coupled cluster level with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality. By applying perturbation theory to the calculated PESs, an extended set of spectroscopic constants, including τ, first-order centrifugal distortion and anharmonic vibrational constants has been obtained. In addition, the potentials have been used in a variational approach to deduce the whole pattern of vibrational levels up to 4000 cm{sup −1} above the minima of the corresponding PESs.

  8. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-06

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response.

  9. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  10. Multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légaré, François; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Ganikhanov, Feruz

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for high spatial resolution thick tissue imaging. In its simple version, it uses a high repetition rate femtosecond oscillator laser source focussed and scanned across biological sample that contains fluorophores. However, not every biological structure is inherently fluorescent or can be stained without causing biochemical changes. To circumvent these limitations, other non-invasive nonlinear optical imaging approaches are currently being developed and investigated with regard to different applications. These techniques are: (1) second harmonic generation (SHG), (2) third harmonic generation (THG), and (3) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The main advantage of the above mentioned techniques is that they derive their imaging contrast from optical nonlinearities that do not involve fluorescence process. As a particular application example we investigated collagen arrays. We show that combining SHG-THG-CARS onto a single imaging platform provides complementary information about the sub-micron architecture of the tissue. SHG microscopy reveals the fibrillar architecture of collagen arrays and confirm a rather high degree of heterogeneity of χ(2) within the focal volume, THG highlights the boundaries between the collagen sheets, and CH2 spectroscopic contrast with CARS.

  11. Accurate calculations on 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states of NSe radical in the gas phase: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Li, Peiling; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 28 Ω states generated from 9 Λ-S states (X2Π, 14Π, 16Π, 12Σ+, 14Σ+, 16Σ+, 14Σ-, 24Π and 14Δ) are studied for the first time using an ab initio quantum chemical method. All the 9 Λ-S states correlate to the first two dissociation limits, N(4Su) + Se(3Pg) and N(4Su) + Se(3Dg), of NSe radical. Of these Λ-S states, the 16Σ+, 14Σ+, 16Π, 24Π and 14Δ are found to be rather weakly bound states. The 12Σ+ is found to be unstable and has double wells. And the 16Σ+, 14Σ+, 14Π and 16Π are found to be the inverted ones with the SO coupling included. The PEC calculations are made by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson modification. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The convergence of the present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and the level of theory. Core-valence correlation corrections are included with a cc-pCVTZ basis set. Scalar relativistic corrections are calculated by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The variation with internuclear separation of spin-orbit coupling constants is discussed in brief for some Λ-S states with one shallow well on each PEC. The spectroscopic parameters of 9 Λ-S and 28 Ω states are determined by fitting the first ten vibrational levels whenever available, which are calculated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation with Numerov's method. The splitting energy in the X2Π Λ-S state is determined to be about 864.92 cm-1, which agrees favorably with the measurements of 891.80 cm-1. Moreover, other spectroscopic parameters of Λ-S and Ω states involved here are also in fair agreement with available measurements. It

  12. Theoretical calculations on 12 Λ-S and 23 Ω states of CBr+ cation in the gas phase: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Niu, Xianghong; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of X1Σ+, a3Π, 13Σ+, 13Δ, 11Δ, 11Σ-, 13Σ-, 11Π, 21Σ+, 23Π, 21Π and 23Σ+ Λ-S states of CBr+ cation and corresponding 23 Ω states are calculated for the first time using the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. All the Λ-S states involved are found to be bound and dissociate into the first dissociation limit of CBr+ cation. Of these Λ-S states, only the 13Σ+ and 13Σ- are inverted ones. The spin-orbit (SO) coupling is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Core-valence correlation is included by a cc-pCVTZ basis set. Relativistic correction is calculated with the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of cc-pVQZ basis set. To obtain more reliable results, the PECs obtained by the MRCI calculations are corrected for size-extensivity errors by means of the Davidson modification. The PEC crossings of different Λ-S states are studied. With these PECs, the spectroscopic parameters of all the Λ-S and Ω states involved are obtained by fitting the first ten vibrational levels whenever available, which are calculated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation using the Numerov's method. The spectroscopic parameters are compared with those reported in the literature. Excellent agreement is found between the present results and available measurements. In particular, the energy separation of 352.26 cm-1 between the a3Π0+ and the a3Π1 Ω states agrees well with the measurements of 369±8 cm-1, and the ωe results of 907.45 and 907.08 cm-1 for the a3Π0+ and a3Π1 Ω states are in excellent agreement with the measurements of 906±2 and 903±6 cm-1, respectively. These show that the spectroscopic parameters obtained in the present paper can be expected to be reliable predicted ones.

  13. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  14. A calorimetric and spectroscopic comparison of the effects of cholesterol and its sulfur-containing analogs thiocholesterol and cholesterol sulfate on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2016-02-01

    We performed differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the effects of cholesterol (Chol), thiocholesterol (tChol) and cholesterol sulfate (CholS) on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Our DSC results indicate that Chol and tChol incorporation produce small temperature increases in the main phase transition broad component while CholS markedly decreases it, but Chol decreases cooperativity and enthalpy more strongly than CholS and especially tChol. Hence, Chol and tChol thermally stabilize fluid DPPC bilayer sterol-rich domains while CholS markedly destabilizes them, and CholS and particularly tChol are less miscible in such domains. Our FTIR spectroscopic results indicate that Chol incorporation increases the rotational conformational order of fluid DPPC bilayers to a slightly and somewhat greater degree than tChol and CholS, respectively, consistent with our DSC findings. Also, Chol and CholS produce comparable degrees of H-bonding (hydration) of the DPPC ester carbonyls in fluid bilayers, whereas tChol increases H-bonding. At low temperatures, Chol is fully soluble in gel-state DPPC bilayers, whereas tChol and CholS are not. Thus tChol and CholS incorporation can produce considerably different effects on DPPC bilayers. In particular, the tChol thiol group markedly reduces its lateral miscibility and increases DPPC carbonyl H-bonding without significantly affecting the other characteristic effects of Chol itself, while the CholS sulfate group significantly reduces its ability to thermally stabilize and order fluid DPPC membranes. This latter result suggests that the molecular basis for the purported ability of CholS to "stabilize" various biological membranes should be re-examined.

  15. Spectroscopic study on the active site of a SiO2 supported niobia catalyst used for the gas-phase Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime to ε-caprolactam.

    PubMed

    Maronna, M M; Kruissink, E C; Parton, R F; Soulimani, F; Weckhuysen, B M; Hoelderich, W F

    2016-08-10

    NbOx/SiO2 with a very high catalytic activity for the gas-phase Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime to ε-caprolactam, was investigated by different spectroscopic methods in order to obtain new insights in the formation and nature of the active sites. FT-IR spectroscopy in combination with pyridine adsorption measurements revealed that the catalyst material contains Lewis-acidic sites, most probably related to the Nb[double bond, length as m-dash]O groups of isolated tetrahedral NbO4 surface species, whereas no Brønsted-acidic sites were observed. Results from in situ Raman and complementary FT-IR measurements strongly suggest that Brønsted-acidic Nb-OH sites can be generated from Nb[double bond, length as m-dash]O groups by reaction with ethanol. This is in agreement with the observation that ethanol is essential for obtaining a very good catalyst performance. However, the Brønsted-acidic sites can be detected in significant amounts in particular in the presence of a Lewis-base, e.g. pyridine, most probably because the formation and/or the stability of these Brønsted-acidic sites are enhanced by a basic molecule. Assuming that cyclohexanone oxime, being a base, can play a similar role as pyridine, we propose on the basis of the spectroscopic findings obtained in this work and our kinetic results published recently, a reaction scheme for the formation of the active site at the Nb[double bond, length as m-dash]O group as well as for the recovery of the Nb[double bond, length as m-dash]O site during the final stage of the gas-phase Beckmann rearrangement.

  16. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7 GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ∼8.9 GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0} = 132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24 GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  17. Label-free imaging of the dynamics of cell-to-cell string-like structure bridging in the free-space by low-coherent quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Iwai, Hidenao; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2013-03-01

    We succeeded in utilizing our low-coherent quantitative phase microscopy (LC-QPM) to achieve label-free and three-dimensional imaging of string-like structures bridging the free-space between live cells. In past studies, three dimensional morphology of the string-like structures between cells had been investigated by electron microscopies and fluorescence microscopies and these structures were called "membrane nanotubes" or "tunneling nanotubes." However, use of electron microscopy inevitably kills these cells and fluorescence microscopy is itself a potentially invasive method. To achieve noninvasive imaging of live cells, we applied our LC-QPM which is a reflection-type, phase resolved and full-field interference microscope employing a low-coherent light source. LC-QPM is able to visualize the three-dimensional morphology of live cells without labeling by means of low-coherence interferometry. The lateral (diffraction limit) and longitudinal (coherence-length) spatial resolution of LC-QPM were respectively 0.49 and 0.93 micrometers and the repeatability of the phase measurement was 0.02 radians (1.0 nm). We successfully obtained three-dimensional morphology of live cultured epithelial cells (cell type: HeLa, derived from cervix cancer) and were able to clearly observe the individual string-like structures interconnecting the cells. When we performed volumetric imaging, a 80 micrometer by 60 micrometer by 6.5 micrometer volume was scanned every 5.67 seconds and 70 frames of a three-dimensional movie were recorded for a duration of 397 seconds. Moreover, the optical phase images gave us detailed information about the three-dimensional morphology of the string-like structure at sub-wavelength resolution. We believe that our LC-QPM will be a useful tool for the study of three-dimensional morphology of live cells.

  18. Direct Spectroscopic Evidence for Phase Competition between the Pseudogap and Superconductivity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Nowadnick, Elizabeth A.; He, Rui-Hua; Vishik, Inna M.; Moritz, Brian; He, Yu; Tanaka, Kiyohisa; Moore, Robert G.; Lu, Donghui; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Sasagawa, Takao; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Shigeyuku; Uchida, Shinichi; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Hussain, Zahid; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2014-11-02

    In the high-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors, increasing evidence suggests that the pseudogap, existing below the pseudogap temperature T*, has a distinct broken electronic symmetry from that of superconductivity. Particularly, recent scattering experiments on the underdoped cuprates have suggested that a charge ordering competes with superconductivity. However, no direct link of this physics and the important low-energy excitations has been identified. We report an antagonistic singularity at Tc in the spectral weight of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ as a compelling evidence for phase competition, which persists up to a high hole concentration p ~ 0.22. Comparison with a theoretical calculation confirms that the singularity is a signature of competition between the order parameters for the pseudogap and superconductivity. Our observation of the spectroscopic singularity at finite temperatures over a wide doping range provides new insights into the nature of the competitive interplay between the two intertwined phases and the complex phase diagram near the pseudogap critical point.

  19. Theoretical spectroscopic investigations of HNS{sup q} and HSN{sup q} (q = 0, +1, −1) in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Yaghlane, S. E-mail: saidayagh@gmail.com; Jaidane, N.-E.; Cotton, C. E.; Francisco, J. S.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Linguerri, R. E-mail: saidayagh@gmail.com; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-06-28

    We performed accurate ab initio investigations of the geometric parameters and the vibrational structure of neutral HNS/HSN triatomics and their singly charged anions and cations. We used standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster approaches in connection with large basis sets. At the highest levels of description, we show that results nicely approach those obtained at the complete basis set limit. Moreover, we generated the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (3D PESs) for these molecular entities at the coupled cluster level with singles and doubles and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, along with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality (aug-cc-pV5Z). A full set of spectroscopic constants are deduced from these potentials by applying perturbation theory. In addition, these 3D PESs are incorporated into variational treatment of the nuclear motions. The pattern of the lowest vibrational levels and corresponding wavefunctions, up to around 4000 cm{sup −1} above the corresponding potential energy minimum, is presented for the first time.

  20. Spectroscopic properties of poly(9,9‐dioctylfluorene) thin films possessing varied fractions of β‐phase chain segments: enhanced photoluminescence efficiency via conformation structuring

    PubMed Central

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Chander, Nathan; Kim, Ji‐Seon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poly(9,9‐dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is a widely studied blue‐emitting conjugated polymer, the optoelectronic properties of which are strongly affected by the presence of a well‐defined chain‐extended “β‐phase” conformational isomer. In this study, optical and Raman spectroscopy are used to systematically investigate the properties of PFO thin films featuring a varied fraction of β‐phase chain segments. Results show that the photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE) of PFO films is highly sensitive to both the β‐phase fraction and the method by which it was induced. Notably, a PLQE of ∼69% is measured for PFO films possessing a ∼6% β‐phase fraction induced by immersion in solvent/nonsolvent mixtures; this value is substantially higher than the average PLQE of ∼55% recorded for other β‐phase films. Furthermore, a linear relationship is observed between the intensity ratios of selected Raman peaks and the β‐phase fraction determined by commonly used absorption calibrations, suggesting that Raman spectroscopy can be used as an alternative means to quantify the β‐phase fraction. As a specific example, spatial Raman mapping is used to image a mm‐scale β‐phase stripe patterned in a glassy PFO film, with the extracted β‐phase fraction showing excellent agreement with the results of optical spectroscopy. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1995–2006

  1. Multivariate Analysis of Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopic Data to Confirm Phase Partitioning in Methacrylate-Based Dentin Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qiang; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Abedin, Farhana; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    Water is ubiquitous in the mouths of healthy individuals and is a major interfering factor in the development of a durable seal between the tooth and composite restoration. Water leads to the formation of a variety of defects in dentin adhesives; these defects undermine the tooth-composite bond. Our group recently analyzed phase partitioning of dentin adhesives using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration measurements provided by HPLC offered a more thorough representation of current adhesive performance and elucidated directions to be taken for further improvement. The sample preparation and instrument analysis using HPLC are, however, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The objective of this work was to develop a methodology for rapid, reliable, and accurate quantitative analysis of near-equilibrium phase partitioning in adhesives exposed to conditions simulating the wet oral environment. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical methods, including partial least squares (PLS) regression and principal component regression (PCR), were used for multivariate calibration to quantify the compositions in separated phases. Excellent predictions were achieved when either the hydrophobic-rich phase or the hydrophilic-rich phase mixtures were analyzed. These results indicate that FT-IR spectroscopy has excellent potential as a rapid method of detection and quantification of dentin adhesives that experience phase separation under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment. PMID:24359662

  2. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  3. Calorimetric, spectroscopic and structural investigations of phase polymorphism in [Ru(NH3)6](BF4)3. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dołęga, Diana; Mikuli, Edward; Inaba, Akira; Górska, Natalia; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Nitek, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Four crystalline phases of the coordination compound [Ru(NH3)6](BF4)3 are identified by adiabatic calorimetry. Three phase transitions, one at TC3(IV→III)=30.7 K, the second at TC2(III→II)=91.7 K (both accompanied by comparable entropy changes 3.0 and 3.1 J K-1 mol-1, respectively) and the third at TC1(II→I)=241.6 K (accompanied by an entropy change of 8.1 J K-1 mol-1) were discovered. X-ray single crystal diffraction (at 293 K) demonstrates that phase I is a highly dynamic disordered cubic phase (Fm3¯m, No. 225) with two types of BF4- anions differing in a degree of disorder. In phase II (at 170 K) the structure remains cubic (Ia3¯, No. 206), with two different types of cations and four different types of anions. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with NH3 ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a lowering of the symmetry of the [Ru(NH3)6]3+ complex cation. Both NH3 ligands and BF4- anions perform fast reorientations (τR≈10-12 s), which are significantly slowed down below the phase transition at TC3. 1H NMR studies led to estimate the values of the activation energy of NH3 ligands reorientation in the phases II and I as equal to ˜8 kJ mol-1. In phase I the whole hexammineruthenium(III) cations reorientation as a tumbling process can be noticed. The activation energy value of this motion is ˜24 kJ mol-1. 19F NMR studies give the values of the activation energy of BF4- anions reorientation as ˜6 kJ mol-1. Above the phase transition temperature half of BF4- anions perform a tumbling motion with Ea≈8 kJ mol-1.

  4. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  5. Applied quantum chemistry: Spectroscopic detection and characterization of the F2BS and Cl2BS free radicals in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bing; Sheridan, Phillip M; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2015-03-28

    In this and previous work [D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 244309 (2014)], the spectroscopic signatures of the X2BY (X = H, halogen, Y = O, S) free radicals have been predicted using high level ab initio theory. The theoretical results have been used to calculate the electronic absorption and single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of the radicals under typical jet-cooled conditions. Using these diagnostic predictions, the previously unknown F2BS and Cl2BS free radicals have been identified and characterized. The radicals were prepared in a free jet expansion by subjecting precursor mixtures of BF3 or BCl3 and CS2 vapor to an electric discharge at the exit of a pulsed molecular beam valve. The B̃(2)A1-X̃(2)B2 laser-induced fluorescence spectra were found within 150 cm(-1) of their theoretically predicted positions with vibronic structure consistent with our Franck-Condon simulations. The B̃(2)A1 state emits down to the ground state and to the low-lying Ã(2)B1 excited state and the correspondence between the observed and theoretically derived SVL emission Franck-Condon profiles was used to positively identify the radicals and make assignments. Excited state Coriolis coupling effects complicate the emission spectra of both radicals. In addition, a forbidden component of the electronically allowed B̃-X̃ band system of Cl2BS is evident, as signaled by the activity in the b2 modes in the spectrum. Symmetry arguments indicate that this component gains intensity due to a vibronic interaction of the B̃(2)A1 state with a nearby electronic state of (2)B2 symmetry.

  6. Devitrite (Na2Ca3Si6O16)—structural, spectroscopic and computational investigations on a crystalline impurity phase in industrial soda-lime glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlenberg, Volker; Girtler, Daniela; Arroyabe, Erik; Kaindl, Reinhard; Többens, Daniel M.

    2010-09-01

    Single crystals of devitrite (Na2Ca3Si6O16) were synthesized as pale-yellow transparent needle shaped crystals using a Na2MoO4-flux. Experiments aiming to prepare the K-equivalent of devitrite from the corresponding K2MoO4-flux were unsuccessful. The crystal structure of devitrite was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (Mo-Kα radiation, 2θmax. = 25.34°, Rint = 2.66%) and refined in space group P bar{1} (no. 2) to R(|F|) = 3.08% using 2,513 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). Unit-cell parameters are: a = 7.2291(8), b = 10.1728(12), c = 10.6727(12) Å, α = 95.669(9), β = 109.792(10), γ = 99.156(9)°, V = 719.19(14) Å3, Z = 2. The structure belongs to the group of multiple chain silicates consisting of dreier quadruple chains, i.e. the crystallochemical formula can be written as {N}{{a}_2}{C}{{a}_3}left\\{ {{mathbf{uB}}{,4}_infty^1} right\\}left[ {^3{S}{{i}_6}} right.left. {{{O}_{16}}} right\\} . Linkage between the bands running along [100] is provided by double chains of edge sharing CaO6-octahedra as well as additional more irregularly coordinated Na- and Ca-cations located in the tunnel-like cavities of the mixed tetrahedral-octahedral framework. Structural investigations were completed by Raman and infrared spectroscopical studies. The allocation of the bands to certain vibrational species was aided by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  7. Applied quantum chemistry: Spectroscopic detection and characterization of the F{sub 2}BS and Cl{sub 2}BS free radicals in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Bing; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Sheridan, Phillip M.

    2015-03-28

    In this and previous work [D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 244309 (2014)], the spectroscopic signatures of the X{sub 2}BY (X = H, halogen, Y = O, S) free radicals have been predicted using high level ab initio theory. The theoretical results have been used to calculate the electronic absorption and single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of the radicals under typical jet-cooled conditions. Using these diagnostic predictions, the previously unknown F{sub 2}BS and Cl{sub 2}BS free radicals have been identified and characterized. The radicals were prepared in a free jet expansion by subjecting precursor mixtures of BF{sub 3} or BCl{sub 3} and CS{sub 2} vapor to an electric discharge at the exit of a pulsed molecular beam valve. The B{sup ~2}A{sub 1}–X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2} laser-induced fluorescence spectra were found within 150 cm{sup −1} of their theoretically predicted positions with vibronic structure consistent with our Franck-Condon simulations. The B{sup ~2}A{sub 1} state emits down to the ground state and to the low-lying A{sup ~2}B{sub 1} excited state and the correspondence between the observed and theoretically derived SVL emission Franck-Condon profiles was used to positively identify the radicals and make assignments. Excited state Coriolis coupling effects complicate the emission spectra of both radicals. In addition, a forbidden component of the electronically allowed B{sup ~}–X{sup ~} band system of Cl{sub 2}BS is evident, as signaled by the activity in the b{sub 2} modes in the spectrum. Symmetry arguments indicate that this component gains intensity due to a vibronic interaction of the B{sup ~2}A{sub 1} state with a nearby electronic state of {sup 2}B{sub 2} symmetry.

  8. Magnetic phase transitions in two-dimensional frustrated Cu3R(SeO3)2O2Cl. Spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimin, S. A.; Budkin, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Using optical study of electronic spectra of rare-earth (RE) ions, magnetic phase transitions in the low-dimensional frustrated RE magnets Cu3R(SeO3)2O2Cl (R = Sm, Yb, Er, Nd, Pr, Eu) were investigated. Phase transitions were registered either by splittings of crystal-field (CF) doublets or by repulsion of CF levels of f-ions in a staggered magnetic field. Different scenarios of magnetic order in isostructural compounds of the francisite family are discussed.

  9. FT-IR Spectroscopic Evidence Of Phase Transition For NaA-ROH-Kerosine-H2O Microemulsion System Containing Nd3+ Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hua; Xu, Zhen-Hua; Shi, Nai; Wu, Jin-Guang; Xu, Guang-Xian

    1989-12-01

    In the previous investigation, the saponification of naphthenic acid extractant system has been proved to be a process of the formation of a microemulsion of 14/0 type, and its full extraction of rare earths is a process of destruction of the W/O microemulsion[1]. When NdCl3 is partially extracted with NaA (sodium naphthenate) secoctylalcohol-- kerosine-- water microemulsion system (ME), both the NdA3 and the NaA co-exist in the same organic phase. However,the formation mechanism of microemulsion containing neodymium has not been much studied. In this paper, 10 aliquots of fully saponificated extractants were equilibrated with various amounts of NdC13 solutions respectively, then ten organic phases with different extraction efficiencies of neodymium from 094 to 9094 were obtained. After extraction,the volume of neodymium containing organic phase increased by 5 to 4594, because of the transfer of water molecules. The appearance of these organic phase still remained clear and transparent. The average hydrodynamic radius of the drops were found to be 100-300 Angstrom by using light scattering techniques. The results give a direct evidence of the microemulsion formation in the organic phase. Their FT-IR spectra were measured with CaFa liquid cells utilizing a Nicolet 7199B FT-IR spectrometer. The presence of various amounts of water in the organic phases was clearly detected from the relative intensity changes of 1644 cm-I, which is assigned to the bending mode of 1110 molecules. Fig.1 shows the change of water contents to the percent extraction of neodymium. Comparsion with the FT-IR spectra, it is seen that the 1560 cm-1 peak of the full saponificated extractant is attributed to the asym. stretching vibration of COO''' group, it shifted to 1536 for 100% extration of Nd ions, indicating the formation of neodymium naphthenate (NdA ) from ionic sodium naphthenate. The sym. strethching vibration of COO''' located at 1406 cm-1, it shifted to 1408 cm in 45% Nd extration

  10. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Kottaisamy, M.

    2014-02-15

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  11. Theoretical interpretation of electron energy-loss spectroscopic images

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, L. J.; D'Alfonso, Adrian J.; Findlay, Scott D.; ...

    2008-04-10

    In this paper, we discuss the theory of electron energy-loss spectroscopic images in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Three case studies are presented which have as common themes issues of inelastic scattering, coherence and image interpretation. The first is a state-by-state inelastic transitions analysis of a spectroscopic image which does not admit direct visual interpretation. The second compares theory and experiment for two-dimensional mapping. Finally, the third considers imaging in three dimensions via depth sectioning.

  12. A new miniature hydrostatic pressure chamber for microscopy. Strain- free optical glass windows facilitate phase-contrast and polarized- light microscopy of living cells. Optional fixture permits simultaneous control of pressure and temperature

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a miniature, temperature- controlled, stainless steel pressure chamber which uses strain-free optical glass for windows. It is directly adaptable to standard phase- contrast and polarized-light microscopes and requires a minimum amount of equipment to generate and measure pressure. Birefringence retardation (BR) og 0.1 nm up to 3,000 psi, 0.4 nm up to 5,000 psi and 1.0 nm up to 10,000 psi can be detected over a 0.75-mm central field with two strain-free Leitz 20 times UM objectives, one used as a condenser. In phase-contrast studies a Nikon DML 40 times phase objective and Zeiss model IS long working-distance phase condenser were used, with little deterioration of image quality or contrast at pressures as high as 12,000 psi. The actual design process required a synthesis of various criteria which may be categorized under four main areas of consideration: (a) specimen physiology; (b) constraints imposed by available optical equipment and standard microscope systems; (c) mechanical strength and methods for generating pressure; and (d) optical requirements of the chamber windows. Procedures for using the chambers, as well as methods for shifting and controlling the temperature within the chamber, are included. PMID:1094021

  13. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of the kinetics of a first-order phase transition in tridecanoic acid CH3(CH2)11COOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. A.; Myasnikova, L. P.; Radovanova, E. I.; Volchek, B. Z.; Medvedeva, D. A.

    2017-02-01

    The structural changes in crystalline lamella cores of tridecanoic acid CH3(CH2)11COOH during heating in the range from the temperature T 1 = 13.5°C to T 2 > T m = 41.6°C have been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The behavior of the bands of rocking (in the region of 720 cm-1) and bending (in the region of 1470 cm-1) vibrations of CH2 groups in tridecanoic acid methylene segments has been analyzed. It has been shown that, in the first-order phase transition region ( T s-s 36°C) within a narrow temperature range (Δ T 1 ≤ 1 K), there is a gradual transformation of the initial triclinic subcell into the hexagonal subcell. The mechanism of this transition has been considered in terms of the theory of diffuse first-order phase transitions.

  14. On the abnormal "forced hydration" behavior of P(MEA-co-OEGA) aqueous solutions during phase transition from infrared spectroscopic insights.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-06-21

    Turbidity, DLS and FTIR measurements in combination with the perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) technique and 2D correlation spectroscopy (2Dcos) analysis have been utilized to investigate the LCST-type transition of a oligo ethylene glycol acrylate-based copolymer (POEGA) in aqueous solutions in this work. As demonstrated in turbidity and DLS curves, the macroscopic phase separation was sharp and slightly concentration dependent. Moreover, individual chemical groups along polymer chains also display abrupt changes in temperature-variable IR spectra. However, according to conventional IR analysis, the C-H groups present obvious dehydration, whereas C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O-C groups exhibit anomalous "forced hydration" during the steep phase transition. From these analyses together with the PCMW and 2Dcos results, it has been confirmed that the hydrophobic interaction among polymer chains drove the chain collapse and dominated the phase transition. In addition, the unexpected enhanced hydration behavior of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O-C groups was induced by forced hydrogen bonding between polar groups along polymer chains and entrapped water molecules in the aggregates, which originated from the special chemical structure of POEGA.

  15. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-02-18

    This article describes how the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  16. Thin film microscopy of lead on germanium(111) phase transitions and iron(x)/nickel(1-x) on copper(111) magnetic surface alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yu

    The manner in which one phase develops is a manifestation of its physical properties at a particular coverage in the phase diagram. Thus, studying the growth of phases and phase transitions that occur between them can provide a better understanding of the surface. In the first part of this dissertation, a low energy electron microscope (LEEM) was used to investigate the growth, the phase diagram, and a novel mechanism through which the order-disorder phase transition can happen for the Pb/Ge(111). LEEM data indicate that when Pb is initially deposited on the c(2x8) reconstructed Ge(111) surface, Pb atoms replace the Ge adatoms. Then the dilute 3x3 R30° structure (alpha phase) starts to nucleate over the surface and coalesces at 0.33ML. Above 0.33ML, the alpha phase transforms to the (1x1) phase in a step flow manner until the surface saturates. The (1x1) phase is a disordered phase and continues to accommodate more Pb atoms until it is dense enough to transform into the dense 3x3 R30° structure (beta phase) with a saturation coverage of 1.33ML. The transition of the beta phase into the (1x1) phase at high temperature has remained controversial despite numerous studies. Within the coexistence region of the two phases, I have discovered a novel phase separation mechanism involving the phase fluctuations of small domains and that a subtle difference in the Pb atomic density influences the transformation significantly. This striking mechanism occurs because nanoscale-size domains can have density fluctuations comparable to the density difference between the two phases. The change in the transformation behavior with a change in the coverage is attributed to the change in the vacancy concentration and its effect on the occurrence of the phase fluctuation. In the second part of the dissertation, using a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM), the dependence of the magnetic domains of a thin ferromagnetic alloy film on the film thickness and alloy composition was

  17. A Direct Link from the Gas to the Condensed Phase: A Rotational Spectroscopic Study of 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol Trimers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Javix; Seifert, Nathan A; Jäger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2017-02-23

    Rotational spectra of the three most stable conformers (I, II, III) of the ternary 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) cluster were measured using Fourier transform microwave spectrometers, and unambiguously assigned with the aid of ab initio calculations. The most stable conformer, I, contains one trans-TFE subunit which is unstable in its isolated gas phase form. The study offers new insights into how the trans conformation is stabilized in TFE clusters of increasing size, and eventually becomes a dominant conformation in the liquid phase. A detailed analysis shows that while O-H⋅⋅⋅O-H and O-H⋅⋅⋅F-C hydrogen bonds are the most significant attractive interactions which stabilize all three conformers, the main driving force for the stability of I over III, which has all gauche-TFE subunits, is the attractive interaction of C-F⋅⋅⋅F-C contact pairs. A new type of three-point F⋅⋅⋅F⋅⋅⋅F attractive contact interaction is also identified.

  18. Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies on the chiral recognition of sulfated beta-cyclodextrin as chiral mobile phase additive enantiomeric separation of a chiral amine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengli; Shen, Sherry; Haddad, Nizar; Tang, Wenjun; Wang, Jing; Lee, Heewon; Yee, Nathan; Senanayake, Chris; Grinberg, Nelu

    2009-02-20

    A fast enantiomeric separation of a chiral aromatic amine was achieved, using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography and highly sulfated beta-cyclodextrin (S-beta-CD) as a chiral additive in the mobile phase. The stationary phase consisted of a core-shell support with a particle size of 2.7mum. Under these conditions the base-line separation was obtained within 2.5min. The influence of the concentration of the additive, along with the thermodynamics of the separation, was studied. Vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy was applied to assess the absolute configuration of the two enantiomeric analytes, as well as the interaction of these enantiomers with the S-beta-CD. The VCD results revealed that S-beta-CD undergoes a temperature-induced conformational change. Further, VCD experiments indicate that the interactions of the two enantiomers with the S-beta-CD occur through an inclusion of the aromatic part of the analyte, as well as through electrostatic interaction between the protonated amine and the sulfate groups located at the narrow part of the S-beta-CD. Molecular mechanics calculations performed according to the VCD results are consistent with experimental data, providing further evidence of these interactions.

  19. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  20. X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic study of the influence of cis- and trans-unsaturation on the α-phase of triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Chikayo; Kaneko, Fumitoshi

    2013-07-25

    In order to clarify how cis- and trans-unsaturation of acyl chains influences the structure and properties of the metastable α-phase of triacylglycerols (TAGs), the conformation and packing of acyl chains and their temperature dependence were investigated by means of vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman) and powder X-ray diffractometry for typical saturated and cis- and trans-unsaturated TAGs, namely, tristearin, triolein, and trielaidin, which have clarified the following characteristics of each TAG. In the high-temperature range close to the melting point, the acyl chains form the hexagonal subcell for tristearin and trielaidin but they build the pseudohexagonal subcell for triolein. On the other hand, both cis- and trans-double bonds have a significant influence on the conformation of acyl chains. In triolein and trielaidin where the acyl chains are divided into two parts by a C═C bond, namely, the methyl-sided and the glycerol-sided chains, the glycerol-sided chain exhibits selective conformational disordering in the α-phase of these TAGs. The structural changes of acyl chains caused by cooling are also significantly affected by cis- and trans-unsaturation. For tristearin, the greater part of hydrocarbon segments change their packing from the hexagonal subcell to the pseudohexagonal subcell by cooling, while the greater part of hydrocarbon segments keep the hexagonal subcell structure and only the smaller part of them transform to the pseudohexagonal subcell for trielaidin. On the other hand, triolein does not exhibit any major changes with respect to subcell structure on cooling.

  1. Spectroscopic study on the structural isomers of 7-azaindole(ethanol)n (n=1-3) and multiple-proton transfer reactions in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Kenji; Komure, Noriyuki; Ishikawa, Wataru; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    The resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RE2PI) and laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra were recorded for the S1-S0(ππ ∗) region of the 7-azaindole(ethanol)n (n =1-3) [7AI(EtOH)n (n =1-3)] clusters in the gas phase to investigate the geometrical structures and the multiple-proton/hydrogen atom transfer reaction dynamics. Four and two structural isomers were identified for 7AI(EtOH)2 and 7AI(EtOH)3, respectively. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31++G∗∗/6-31G∗ level predicted four different conformations of the ethyl group for 7AI(EtOH)2, in good agreement with the observation of the four structural isomers in the RE2PI spectra. Visible fluorescence from the tautomeric forms was observed in the S1 states for all isomers of 7AI(EtOH)2, but no sign of double-proton/hydrogen atom transfer and quadruple-proton/hydrogen atom transfer has been obtained in the electronic spectra of 7AI(EtOH)1 and 7AI(EtOH)3, respectively. These results suggest that the multiple-proton transfer reaction is cluster-size selective, and the triple-proton/hydrogen atom transfer potential is dominated by the cyclic hydrogen-bonded network in 7AI(EtOH)2. The excitation of the in-phase intermolecular stretching vibration prominently enhances the excited-state triple-proton/hydrogen atom transfer reaction.

  2. A Raman spectroscopic study of the phase transition of BaZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}: Evidence for a trigonal structure of the high-temperature polymorph

    SciTech Connect

    Geisler, Thorsten . E-mail: tgeisler@nwz.uni-muenster.de; Popa, Karin; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Popa, Aurelian F.

    2006-05-15

    We have studied the structural evolution of monoclinic BaZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} during heating up to 835K by Raman spectroscopy. In agreement with previous studies we found a first-order phase transition at about 730K during heating while upon cooling the reverse transition occurs at 705K. However, some disagreement about the crystal structure of the high-temperature polymorph occurs in the literature. While the space group has not yet been determined, the X-ray diffraction pattern of the high-temperature phase has been indexed on either an orthorhombic or a hexagonal unit cell. We found that the number of Raman active internal PO{sub 4} vibrational modes decrease from nine to six during the transition. A group theoretical survey through all orthorhombic, trigonal, and hexagonal factor groups revealed that the observed number of vibrations would only be consistent with the Ba and Zr atoms located at a D{sub 3d}(3-bar m) site, the P and two O atoms at a C{sub 3v}(3m), and six O atoms at a C{sub s}(m) site in the D{sub 3d} factor group. Based on our Raman data, the space group of the high-temperature polymorph is thus either D{sub 3d}{sup 1}(P3-bar 1m), D{sub 3d}{sup 3}(P3-bar m1), or D{sub 3d}{sup 5}(R3-bar m)

  3. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Lau, Janis E.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Tin, Padetha; Wilt, David M.; Pal, Anna Maria; Fahey, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to determine the in situ optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials has become especially important as the size of device architectures has decreased and the development of complex microsystems has increased. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy, or STORM, can interrogate the optical bandgap as a function of its position within a semiconductor micro-structure. This technique uses a tunable solidstate titanium-sapphire laser whose output is "chopped" using a spatial light modulator and is coupled by a fiber-optic connector to a scanning tunneling microscope in order to illuminate the tip-sample junction. The photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current is spectroscopically measured using a lock-in technique. The capabilities of this technique were verified using semiconductor microstructure calibration standards that were grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Bandgaps characterized by STORM measurements were found to be in good agreement with the bulk values determined by transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence and with the theoretical values that were based on x-ray diffraction results.

  4. Growth models of coexisting p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases on an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface studied by noncontact atomic force microscopy at 78 K.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Jun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kinoshita, Yukinori; Ma, Zong Min; Wen, Huanfei; Nomura, Hikaru; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-20

    We present an experimental study of coexisting p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases on an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) at 78 K. Ball models of the growth processes of coexisting p(2 × 1)/c(6 × 2) phases on a terrace and near a step are proposed. We found that the p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases are grown from the super Cu atoms on both sides of O-Cu-O rows of an atomic spacing. In this paper, we summarize our investigations of an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface by NC-AFM employing O- and Cu-terminated tips. Also, we state several problems and issues for future investigation.

  5. Spectroscopic and modeling investigations of the gas-phase chemistry and composition in microwave plasma activated B2H6/Ar/H2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Richley, James C; Davies, David R W; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2010-02-25

    This paper describes a three-pronged study of microwave (MW) activated B(2)H(6)/Ar/H(2) plasmas as a precursor to diagnosis of the B(2)H(6)/CH(4)/Ar/H(2) plasmas used for the chemical vapor deposition of B-doped diamond. Absolute column densities of B atoms and BH radicals have been determined by cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a function of height (z) above a molybdenum substrate and of the plasma process conditions (B(2)H(6) and Ar partial pressures, total pressure, and supplied MW power). Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to explore variations in the relative densities of electronically excited BH, H, and H(2) species as a function of the same process conditions and of time after introducing B(2)H(6) into a pre-existing Ar/H(2) plasma. The experimental measurements are complemented by extensive 2-D(r, z) modeling of the plasma chemistry, which results in refinements to the existing B/H chemistry and thermochemistry and demonstrates the potentially substantial loss of gas-phase BH(x) species through reaction with trace quantities of air/O(2) in the process gas mixture and heterogeneous processes occurring at the reactor wall.

  6. Confocal microscopy in transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Becker, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    We developed a confocal microscope for transmitted light to visualize fine details in phase objects like unstained biological specimens. The main difficulty of confocal microscopy in transmission is the alignment of illumination and detector pinholes. This alignment was achieved by using "electronic pinholes" on the detector side. As a first step, we were able to image cells in onion skin at greater depths and with higher resolution than by using conventional microscopy.

  7. Probing microstructure and phase evolution of α-MoO3 nanobelts for sodium-ion batteries by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Weiwei; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Chongyang; ...

    2016-07-15

    The fundamental electrochemical reaction mechanisms and the phase transformation pathways of layer-structured α-MoO3 nanobelt during the sodiation/desodiation process to date remain largely unknown. In this study, to observe the real-time sodiation/desodiaton behaviors of α-MoO3 during electrochemical cycling, we construct a MoO3 anode sodium-ion battery inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Utilizing in situ TEM and electron diffraction pattern (EDP) observation, α-MoO3 nanobelts are found to undergo a unique multi-step phase transformation. Upon the first sodiation, α-MoO3 nanobelts initially form amorphous NaxMoO3 phase and are subsequently sodiated into intermediate phase of crystalline NaMoO2, finally resulting in the crystallized Mo nanograins embeddedmore » within the Na2O matrix. During the first desodiation process, Mo nanograins are firstly re-oxidized into intermediate phase NaMoO2 that is further transformed into amorphous Na2MoO3, resulting in an irreversible phase transformation. Upon subsequent sodiation/desodiation cycles, however, a stable and reversible phase transformation between crystalline Mo and amorphous Na2MoO3 phases has been revealed. In conclusion, our work provides an in-deepth understanding of the phase transformation pathways of α-MoO3 nanobelts upon electrochemical sodiation/desodiation processes, with the hope of assistance in designing sodium-ion batteries with enhanced performance.« less

  8. Phase transformations in 40-60-GPa shocked gneisses from the Haughton Crater (Canada): An Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (ATEM) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, I.; Guyot, F.; Schaerer, U.

    1992-01-01

    In order to better understand phase transformations, chemical migration, and isotopic disequilibrium in highly shocked rocks, we have performed a microprobe and an ATEM study on gneisses shocked up to 60 GPa from the Haughton Crater. This study reveals the following chemical and structural characteristics: (1) SiO2 dominant areas are formed by a mixture of pure SiO2 polycrystalline quartz identified by electron diffraction pattern and chemical analysis and a silica-rich amorphous phase containing minor amounts of aluminium, potassium, and iron; (2) Areas with biotitelike composition are formed by less than 200-nm grains of iron-rich spinels embedded in a silica-rich amorphous phase that is very similar to the one described above; (3) Layers with feldsparlike composition are constituted by 100-200-nm-sized alumina-rich grains (the indexation of the crystalline structure is under progress) and the silica-rich amorphous phase; (4) Zones characterized by the unusual Al/Si ratio close to 1 are formed by spinel grains (200-nm-sized) embedded in the same silica-rich amorphous phase; and (5) The fracturated sillimanites contain domains with a lamellar structure, defined by the intercalation of 100-nm-wide lamellae of mullite crystals and of a silica-rich amorphous phase. These mullite crystals preserved the crystallographical orientation of the preshock sillimanite. All compositional domains, identified at the microprobe scale, can thus be explained by a mixture in different proportion between the following phases: (1) a silica-rich amorphous phase, with minor Al and K; (2) quartz crystals; (3) spinel crystals and alumina-rich crystals; (4) sillimanite; and (5) mullite. Such mixtures of amorphous phases and crystals in different proportions explain disturbed isotope systems in these rocks and chemical heterogeneities observed on the microprobe.

  9. Spectroscopic evidence of spinel phase clustering in solid solutions Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se (0.03 ≤ x ≤ 0.1).

    PubMed

    Lamonova, K; Ivanchenko, I; Orel, S; Paranchich, S; Tkach, V; Zhitlukhina, E; Popenko, N; Pashkevich, Yu

    2009-01-28

    The diluted magnetic semiconductors Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se (0.03≤x≤0.1) were prepared by the solid state recrystallization method. The structure microanalysis of the Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se compounds, performed by using a scanning electron spectrometer, has shown that the HgCr(2)Se(4) spinel-like inclusions are present in the host matrix Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se and their amount increases when the chromium content grows. ESR studies of Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se samples were carried out in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. ESR spectra of the samples with different chromium contents demonstrate the same g-factors at room temperature and similar fine structure development with the temperature decrease. Numerical studies of g-factors, performed by the modified crystal field approach (MCFA), allowed us to reveal that Cr(2+)/Cr(3+) ions in the tetrahedral environment of the solid solution Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se cannot lead to the ESR signal. The experimental g-factor is well reproduced by a numerical g-factor for Cr(3+) ions located in the octahedral environment, being specific for the HgCr(2)Se(4) spinel phase. The onset of the ESR fine structure is determined by the trigonal distortions of the (CrSe(6))(9-) octahedral cell. From our study it has been found that the spinel clusters are present in the Hg(1-x)Cr(x)Se solid solution even at low chromium content.

  10. Temperature dependence of Peierls-Hubbard phase transition in [Pd(cptn)2Br]Br2 studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomi, Yuka; Yoshida, Shoji; Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takefumi; Takaishi, Shinya; Takeuchi, Osamu; Yamashita, Masahiro; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the Peierls-Hubbard phase transition in [Pd(cptn)2Br]Br2 (cptn: 1R,2R-diaminocyclopentane) was directly observed using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. A short ligand without alkyl chains was used to form a rigid crystal lattice to reduce the effect of structural changes in the crystal with temperature. The hysteresis in the temperature dependence of the ratio between the areas of the charge density wave (CDW) state produced by the PdII-PdIV mixed-valence state and the Mott-Hubbard (MH) state with a PdIII-averaged valence state which is a characteristic of the first-order phase transition, was directly observed at the atomic scale. Pinning of the CDW phase by defects was observed below the critical temperature, suggesting the growth of the CDW phase with defects as nuclei.

  11. Perhydroazulene-based liquid-crystalline materials with smectic phases.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zakir; Hopf, Henning; Eichhorn, S Holger

    2012-01-01

    New liquid-crystalline materials with a perhydroazulene core were synthesized and the stereochemistry of these compounds was investigated. The mesomorphic properties of the new LC compounds were investigated by differential scanning colorimetry, polarizing optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We report here on the LC properties of nonchiral materials, which predominantly exhibit smectic phases and display nematic phases only within narrow temperature ranges. The dependence of the mesogenic behavior of the new materials on the stereochemistry of the core system was also investigated. All newly synthesized compounds were fully characterized by the usual spectroscopic and analytical methods.

  12. Quasiparticles in the pseudogap Phase of Underdoped Cuprate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Yang, H; Johnson, P; Rice, T; Zhang, F

    2009-01-01

    Recent angle-resolved photoemission (Yang H.-B. et al., Nature, 456 (2008) 77) and scanning tunneling microscopy (Kohsaka Y. et al., Nature, 454 (2008) 1072) measurements on underdoped cuprates have yielded new spectroscopic information on quasiparticles in the pseudogap phase. New features of the normal state such as particle-hole asymmetry, maxima in the energy dispersion, and accompanying drops in the spectral weight of quasiparticles agree with the ansatz of Yang et al. for the single-particle propagator in the pseudogap phase. The coherent quasiparticle dispersion and reduced asymmetry in the tunneling density of states in the superconducting state can also be described by this propagator.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and transmitted electron backscatter diffraction examination of asbestos standard reference materials, amphibole particles of differing morphology, and particle phase discrimination from talc ores.

    PubMed

    Bandli, Bryan R; Gunter, Mickey E

    2014-12-01

    Since 1972, when the US Occupational Health and Safety Administration established the first limits on occupational exposure to asbestos fibers, numerous analytical methods employing several microscopy techniques have been developed to identify a group of minerals defined by legislation as asbestos. While transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is implemented in standardized analytical methods, these methods specify the use of selected area electron diffraction. Because of this constraint, the diffraction data a TEM can provide are often underutilized due to challenges associated with collecting and interpreting individual diffraction patterns. It has been shown that transmission electron backscatter diffraction (tEBSD) produces diffraction patterns nearly identical to electron backscatter diffraction, but from smaller crystal domains. This paper explores the utility of tEBSD for characterization of asbestiform particles from reference asbestos materials, a suite of amphibole minerals of varying morphologies to determine if there is a correlation between mineral habit (i.e., crystal form), microscopic particle shape preferred orientation, and mineral specimens from an industrial talc deposit to provide a case study of the utility and limitations of the technique.

  14. Photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Favro, L. D.; Kuo, P. K.

    1982-09-01

    Considerable improvements have been achieved in the design of the photoacoustic microscope, including new sample cells, and better microcomputer hardware, firmware, and software for the scan control and data acquisition. The ND:YAG laser system has been made operational and has been used to obtain preliminary data in the development of a time-domain photoacoustic microscope (pulse-echo termal wave imaging). Scan control instrumentation has been developed for this instrument, as well as electronics for data acquisition in the time domain. Theoretical calculations of pulsed thermal wave propagation and scattering have been carried out for comparison with experiment. Calculations for photoacoustic signals (CW) from model subsurface defects have carried out and compared with experimental results. A key result is the theoretical prediction, and experimental verification that closed subsurface lateral cracks have a very characteristic photoacoustic phase signature which allows their discrimination from subsurface voids (or open cracks). Calculations have also been carried out for subsurfaces spherical voids and tilted closed cracks. These calculations themselves were made possible because of our development of a very genera theorem for SPAM using gas-filled cells, which greatly simplifies the theoretical calculations of the effects of thermal wave scattering from arbitrarily shaped flaws in solids.

  15. Temperature-dependent quantitative 3omega scanning thermal microscopy: Local thermal conductivity changes in NiTi microstructures induced by martensite-austenite phase transition.

    PubMed

    Chirtoc, M; Gibkes, J; Wernhardt, R; Pelzl, J; Wieck, A

    2008-09-01

    We develop the theoretical description of 3omega signals from the resistive Wollaston thermal probe (ThP) of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) in terms of an equivalent low-pass filter. The normalized amplitude and phase frequency spectra are completely characterized by a single parameter, the crossover frequency f(c)(k) depending on the sample thermal conductivity k. The application concerns polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy microstructured by focused Ga ion beam milling and implantation. The calibration of the ThP combined with a novel two-step normalization procedure allowed quantitative exploitation of 3omega signal variations as small as -1.75% in amplitude and 0.60 degrees in phase upon heating the sample from room temperature to 100 degrees C. This corresponds to k increase of 23.9% that is consistent with the expected thermal conductivity variation due to martensite-austenite structural phase transition. To our knowledge this is for the first time that SThM 3omega phase information is used quantitatively as well. The static, calibrated 3omega measurements are complementary to 3omega SThM images of the patterned sample surface. The local SThM measurement of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity opens the possibility to imaging structural phase transitions at submicron scale.

  16. Polarized light microscopy study on the reentrant phase transition in a (Ba1–xKx)Fe2As2 single crystal with x = 0.24

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yong; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Timmons, Erik; ...

    2016-11-09

    In this study, a sequence of structural/magnetic transitions on cooling is reported in the literature for hole-doped iron-based superconductor (Ba1–xKx)Fe2As2 with x = 0.24. By using polarized light microscopy, we directly observe the formation of orthorhombic domains in (Ba1–xKx)Fe2As2 (x = 0.24) single crystal below a temperature of simultaneous structural/magnetic transition TN ~ 80 K. The structural domains vanish below ~30 K, but reappear below T = 15 K. Our results are consistent with reentrance transformation sequence from high-temperature tetragonal (HTT) to low temperature orthorhombic (LTO1) structure at TN ~ 80 K, LTO1 to low temperature tetragonal (LTT) structure atmore » Tc ~ 25 K, and LTT to low temperature orthorhombic (LTO2) structure at T ~ 15 K.« less

  17. Piezoelectric force microscopy studies of PbTiO{sub 3} thin films grown via layer-by-layer gas phase reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.; Hong, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Buehlmann, S.; Kim, Y. K.; No, K.; Materials Science Division; Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology; Imperial Col.; Samsung Electronics

    2009-01-01

    We fabricated 20 nm thick PbTiO{sub 3} films via reactive magnetron sputtering and studied the domain switching phenomena and retention properties using piezoresponse force microscopy. We found that multistep deposited PbTiO{sub 3} thin films showed 29% smaller rms roughness (2.5 versus 3.5 nm), 28% smaller coercive voltage (1.68 versus 2.32 V), 100% higher d{sub 33} value, and improved retention characteristic (89% versus 52% of remained poled domain area in 1280 min after poling) than single-step deposited PbTiO{sub 3} thin films. We attribute the improvement to the more complete chemical reaction between PbO and TiO{sub 2} during the film growth.

  18. Space group and atomic structure determination of a nano-sized ordered phase derived from a f c c structure in maraging steel 12Cr-9Ni-4Mo-2Cu using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping

    2003-04-01

    The unique properties of maraging steel Sandvik 1RK91 were attributed to unique precipitation: a nano-sized L phase in addition to the quasi-crystalline R' phase, which differs from any precipitation system in conventional maraging steels. The L phase was observed after ageing at either 748 or 823 K. It has flake morphology with dimensions approximately 100 x 500 x 500 A. In the present study the structure of the L phase was examined using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The L phase could be described as Ti(19)Fe(9)Mo(9)Al(8)Cr(5)Ni(50) or simply M(50)Ni(50) (M = Ti, Fe, Mo, Al and Cr). The L phase is isostructural to FeNi. Its crystal structure was determined to have the ordered structure of the uAu-I type (L1(0), P4/mmm, a = 3.52, c = 3.63 A and Z = 2) with two Ni atoms at (1/2) 0 (1/2) and 0 (1/2) (1/2), and two M atoms at 0 0 0 and (1/2) (1/2) 0. The crystal structure of the L phase can also be described using a primitive tetragonal cell and lattice parameters: a = 2.49 and c = 3.63 A, Z = 1. The Volume of the primitive tetragonal unit cell is 22.5 A(3) and the density is approximately 6.98 g cm(-3). The present study has demonstrated the possibility of determining the structure of an extremely small crystal by utilizing the information from CBED, EDX analysis and HREM.

  19. The structure of dodecagonal (Ta,V){sub 1.6}Te imaged by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krumeich, F.; Mueller, E.; Wepf, R.A.; Conrad, M.; Reich, C.; Harbrecht, B.; Nesper, R.

    2012-10-15

    While HRTEM is the well-established method to characterize the structure of dodecagonal tantalum (vanadium) telluride quasicrystals and their periodic approximants, phase-contrast imaging performed on an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) represents a favorable alternative. The (Ta,V){sub 151}Te{sub 74} clusters, the basic structural unit in all these phases, can be visualized with high resolution. A dependence of the image contrast on defocus and specimen thickness has been observed. In thin areas, the projected crystal potential is basically imaged with either dark or bright contrast at two defocus values close to Scherzer defocus as confirmed by image simulations utilizing the principle of reciprocity. Models for square-triangle tilings describing the arrangement of the basic clusters can be derived from such images. - Graphical abstract: PC-STEM image of a (Ta,V){sub 151}Te{sub 74} cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub s}-corrected STEM is applied for the characterization of dodecagonal quasicrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The projected potential of the structure is mirrored in the images. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase-contrast STEM imaging depends on defocus and thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For simulations of phase-contrast STEM images, the reciprocity theorem is applicable.

  20. Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  1. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W

    2003-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C{sub 6}A{sub 2}S-bar{sub 2}H{sub 34} or {l_brace}Ca{sub 6}[Al(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O{r_brace}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2}. If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125.

  2. A scanning tunnelling microscopy study of C and N adsorption phases on the vicinal Ni(100) surfaces Ni(810) and Ni(911)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. M.; Toomes, R. L.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of N and C chemisorption on the morphology and local structure of nominal Ni(810) and Ni(911) surfaces, both vicinal to (100) but with [001] and [ 01 1 bar ] step directions, respectively, has been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction. Ni(911) undergoes substantial step bunching in the presence of both adsorbates, with the (911)/N surface showing (411) facets, whereas for Ni(810), multiple steps 2-4 layers high are more typical. STM atomic-scale images show the (2 × 2)pg 'clock' reconstruction on the (100) terraces of the (810) surfaces with both C and N, although a second c(2 × 2) structure, most readily reconciled with a 'rumpling' reconstruction, is also seen on Ni(810)/N. On Ni(911), the clock reconstruction is not seen on the (100) terraces with either adsorbate, and these images are typified by protrusions on a (1 × 1) mesh. This absence of clock reconstruction is attributed to the different constraints imposed on the lateral movements of the surface Ni atoms adjacent to the up-step edge of the terraces with a [ 01 1 bar ] step direction.

  3. Motility imaging via optical coherence phase microscopy enables label-free monitoring of tissue growth and viability in 3D tissue-engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christina; Tabrizian, Maryam; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O

    2015-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering continues to progress, there is a deep need for non-invasive, label-free imaging technologies that can monitor tissue growth and health within thick three-dimensional (3D) constructs. Amongst the many imaging modalities under investigation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a promising tool, enabling non-destructive in situ characterization of scaffolds and engineered tissues. However, the lack of optical contrast between cells and scaffold materials using this technique remains a challenge. In this communication, we show that mapping the optical phase fluctuations resulting from cellular viability and motility allows for the distinction of live cells from their surrounding scaffold environment. Motility imaging was performed via a common-path optical coherence phase microscope (OCPM), an OCT modality that has been shown to be sensitive to nanometer-level fluctuations. More specifically, we examined the development of human adipose-derived stem cells and/or murine pre-osteoblasts within two distinct scaffold systems, commercially available alginate sponges and custom-microfabricated poly(d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fibrous scaffolds. Cellular motility is demonstrated as an endogenous source of contrast for OCPM, enabling real-time, label-free monitoring of 3D engineered tissue development.

  4. On Ultrafast Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy in the Condensed Phase: Linear Spectroscopic Measurements of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Astrochemical Ice Analogs and Nonlinear TeraHertz Kerr Effect Measurements of Vibrational Quantum Beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allodi, Marco A.

    Much of the chemistry that affects life on planet Earth occurs in the condensed phase. The TeraHertz (THz) or far-infrared (far-IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum (from 0.1 THz to 10 THz) has been shown to provide unique possibilities in the study of condensed-phase processes. The goal of this work is to expand the possibilities available in the THz region and undertake new investigations of fundamental interest to chemistry. Since we are fundamentally interested in condensed-phase processes, this thesis focuses on two areas where THz spectroscopy can provide new understanding: astrochemistry and solvation science. To advance these fields, we had to develop new instrumentation that would enable the experiments necessary to answer new questions in either astrochemistry or solvation science. We first developed a new experimental setup capable of studying astrochemical ice analogs in both the TeraHertz (THz), or far-Infrared (far-IR), region (0.3 - 7.5 THz; 10 - 250 wavenumbers) and the mid-IR (400 - 4000 wavenumbers). The importance of astrochemical ices lies in their key role in the formation of complex organic molecules, such as amino acids and sugars in space. Thus, the instruments are capable of performing variety of spectroscopic studies that can provide especially relevant laboratory data to support astronomical observations from telescopes such as the Herschel Space Telescope, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The experimental apparatus uses a THz time-domain spectrometer, with a 1750/875 nm plasma source and a GaP detector crystal, to cover the bandwidth mentioned above with 10 GHz (0.3 wavenumber) resolution. Using the above instrumentation, experimental spectra of astrochemical ice analogs of water and carbon dioxide in pure, mixed, and layered ices were collected at different temperatures under high-vacuum conditions with the goal of investigating the structure of the ice

  5. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscusgraniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Giurginca, Andrei; Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Giurginca, Maria; Matei, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscusgraniger (Frivaldsky, 1863) showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330-385 nm), using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) in samples of two subspecies of Mesoniscusgraniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm) emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase) and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract). The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics.

  6. SEM, EDX, infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the silicate mineral yuksporite.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Theiss, Frederick L; Romano, Antônio Wilson

    2015-02-25

    The mineral yuksporite (K,Ba)NaCa2(Si,Ti)4O11(F,OH)⋅H2O has been studied using the combination of SEM with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy shows a single pure phase with cleavage fragment up to 1.0 mm. Chemical analysis gave Si, Al, K, Na and Ti as the as major elements with small amounts of Mn, Ca, Fe and REE. Raman bands are observed at 808, 871, 930, 954, 980 and 1087 cm(-1) and are typical bands for a natural zeolite. Intense Raman bands are observed at 514, 643 and 668 cm(-1). A very sharp band is observed at 3668 cm(-1) and is attributed to the OH stretching vibration of OH units associated with Si and Ti. Raman bands resolved at 3298, 3460, 3562 and 3628 cm(-1) are assigned to water stretching vibrations.

  7. Vibrational nano-spectroscopic imaging correlating structure with intermolecular coupling and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin; Muller, Eric A; Hinrichs, Karsten; Raschke, Markus B

    2014-04-11

    Molecular self-assembly, the function of biomembranes and the performance of organic solar cells rely on nanoscale molecular interactions. Understanding and control of such materials have been impeded by difficulties in imaging their properties with the desired nanometre spatial resolution, attomolar sensitivity and intermolecular spectroscopic specificity. Here we implement vibrational scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy with high spectral precision to investigate the structure-function relationship in nano-phase separated block copolymers. A vibrational resonance is used as a sensitive reporter of the local chemical environment and we image, with few nanometre spatial resolution and 0.2 cm(-1) spectral precision, solvatochromic Stark shifts and line broadening correlated with molecular-scale morphologies. We discriminate local variations in electric fields between nano-domains with quantitative agreement with dielectric continuum models. This ability to directly resolve nanoscale morphology and associated intermolecular interactions can form a basis for the systematic control of functionality in multicomponent soft matter systems.

  8. Optical characteristics of pulsed laser deposited Ge-Sb-Te thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, P.; Prikryl, J.; Frumar, M.; Nazabal, V.

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of (GeTe){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub x} (x = 0, 0.33, 0.50, 0.66, and 1) amorphous thin films. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (rocksaltlike) layers. In order to extract optical functions of the films, the Cody-Lorentz model was applied for the analysis of ellipsometric data. Fitted sets of Cody-Lorentz model parameters are discussed in relation with chemical composition and the structure of the layers. The GeTe component content was found to be responsible for the huge optical functions and thickness changes upon amorphous-to-fcc phase transition.

  9. SEM, EDX, Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the silicate mineral yuksporite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Theiss, Frederick L.; Romano, Antônio Wilson

    2015-02-01

    The mineral yuksporite (K,Ba)NaCa2(Si,Ti)4O11(F,OH)ṡH2O has been studied using the combination of SEM with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy shows a single pure phase with cleavage fragment up to 1.0 mm. Chemical analysis gave Si, Al, K, Na and Ti as the as major elements with small amounts of Mn, Ca, Fe and REE. Raman bands are observed at 808, 871, 930, 954, 980 and 1087 cm-1 and are typical bands for a natural zeolite. Intense Raman bands are observed at 514, 643 and 668 cm-1. A very sharp band is observed at 3668 cm-1 and is attributed to the OH stretching vibration of OH units associated with Si and Ti. Raman bands resolved at 3298, 3460, 3562 and 3628 cm-1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations.

  10. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  11. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  12. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  13. Intergrowth structure of α-phase in β-type TmAlB{sub 4} compound studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yubuta, Kunio; Mori, Takao; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Borrmann, Horst; Grin, Yuri; Okada, Shigeru; Shishido, Toetsu

    2014-11-15

    Nanostructure of a ThMoB{sub 4}-type (β-type) TmAlB{sub 4} compound, in which YCrB{sub 4}-type (α-type) domains are locally intergrown, is studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Z-contrast images by HAADF-STEM directly represent the arrangements of Tm atoms located at centers of heptagonal atomic columns of B atoms as bright dots, and give us detailed information of intergrowth of type domains in the matrix of the β-type phase, which coherently occurs. Structural and bonding analyses for β-TmAlB{sub 4} point out the closeness in atomic interactions and energy of the α- and β-type structures which support the easy formation of such nanostructure intergrowths. From combination between HAADF-STEM and electronic structure calculation, a detailed local crystal structure with intrinsic building defects is effectively revealed. - Graphical abstract: Nanostructure of a ThMoB{sub 4}-type (β-type) TmAlB{sub 4} compound, in which YCrB{sub 4}-type (α-type) domains are locally intergrown, is studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Z-contrast images by HAADF-STEM directly represent arrangements of Tm atoms located at centers of heptagonal atomic columns of B atoms as bright dots, and give us detailed information of the characteristic intergrowth structure of type domains in the matrix of the β-type phase. - Highlights: • HAADF-STEM images directly represent arrangements of Tm atoms as bright dots. • The α-type planar domains coherently intergrown in the β-type matrix. • Bright strips appear at overlapped regions of Tm hexagons along interfaces between α- and β-type domains.

  14. DHMI: dynamic holographic microscopy interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Zheng, Yujie; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a powerful in-vitro biological imaging tool. In this paper, we report a fully automated off-axis digital holographic microscopy system completed with a graphical user interface in the Matlab environment. The interface primarily includes Fourier domain processing, phase reconstruction, aberration compensation and autofocusing. A variety of imaging operations such as region of interest selection, de-noising mode (filtering and averaging), low frame rate imaging for immediate reconstruction and high frame rate imaging routine ( 27 fps) are implemented to facilitate ease of use.

  15. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    PubMed

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  16. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  17. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging: beyond fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy (including stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon absorption) and pump-probe microscopy (including excited-state absorption, stimulated emission, and ground-state depletion), provides new image contrasts for nonfluorescent species. Thanks to the high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, these imaging techniques exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles and excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques.

  18. Investigation of the structure, elemental and phase compositions of Fe3O4-SiO2 composite layers by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and thermal nitrogen desorption methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'myashev, V. I.; Gareev, K. G.; Ionin, S. A.; Levitskii, V. S.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Terukov, E. I.

    2014-11-01

    The composite layers formed by drying a Fe3O4-SiO2-based colloidal solution were studied. The colloidal solution was obtained by the precipitation of Fe3O4 in the presence of highly dispersed silicon dioxide synthesized by the sol-gel method from a tetraethoxysilane alcohol solution. The microstructure and composition of the layers were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, thermal nitrogen desorption, and Raman spectroscopy. The emphasis was placed on the study of phase transitions in iron oxides under laser radiation. It was found that the tetraethoxysilane content has a substantial influence on the ratio of iron oxide and silicon dioxide in the layer, the specific surface area of SiO2 powders, the threshold laser radiation power necessary to induce the Fe3O4 α -Fe2O3 phase transformation, and on the position of the maximum of the absorption band corresponding to the A 1 g vibrations in α-Fe2O3.

  19. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  20. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of the optical properties of manganese doped bismuth vanadate thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Neelam; Krupanidhi, S.B.; Varma, K.B.R.

    2010-04-15

    The optical properties of Bi{sub 2}V{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 5.5-x} {l_brace}x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2 at.%{r_brace} thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on platinized silicon substrates were studied in UV-visible spectral region (1.51-4.17 eV) using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The optical constants and thicknesses of these films have been obtained by fitting the ellipsometric data ({Psi} and {Delta}) using a multilayer four-phase model system and a relaxed Lorentz oscillator dispersion relation. The surface roughness and film thickness obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry were found to be consistent with the results obtained by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. The refractive index measured at 650 nm does not show any marginal increase with Mn content. Further, the extinction coefficient does not show much decrease with increasing Mn content. An increase in optical band gap energy from 2.52 to 2.77 eV with increasing Mn content from x = 0.05 to 0.15 was attributed to the increase in oxygen ion vacancy disorder.