Science.gov

Sample records for spectrum radio galaxies

  1. Steep Spectrum Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Tracy E.

    2012-05-01

    Steep spectrum radio emission associated with galaxy clusters comes from compact central active galactic nuclei (AGN) driven radio sources in dense cool core clusters as well as from large regions of diffuse (halo and relic) emission associated with dynamically complex merging systems. These radio halos and relics are best traced at low radio frequencies where details of their morphology, location and spectral index distribution can be used to probe the underlying acceleration mechanism(s) as well as important details of large scale structure formation. Low frequency radio observations also play an important role in the study of AGN feedback into the intracluster medium and the regulation of cooling cores. While spectacular results are coming from the current generation of low frequency instruments, there will soon be a new revolution in studies of steep spectrum sources with the upcoming generation of low frequency interferometers on Earth and ultimately the moon.

  2. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  3. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  4. Flat-spectrum radio source C1 in M33 is a background radio galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.P.; Fix, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    A candidate Crab-like supernova remnant in M33 discovered in a high-resolution survey of compact radio sources (Reynolds and Fix, 1987) has been observed. VLA observations at 1465 and 4885 MHz show that it is simply the flat-spectrum core of a completely normal double-lobed radio galaxy. This eliminates the last candidate Crab-like object in M33 whose size and brightness do not at all resemble those of the Crab Nebula, and confirms the dearth of Crab-like supernova remnants reported earlier. 7 references.

  5. The Nearest GHz Peaked-Spectrum Radio Galaxy, PKS 1718-649

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; King, E. A.; Preston, R. A.; Lovell, J. E.; McCulloch, P. M.; Costa, M. E.; Nicolson, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we identify PKS 1718-649, at a distance of 56 Mpc (z = 0.014; H(sub o) = 75 km/s/Mpc, q(sub o) = 0), as the nearest GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxy, more than four times closer than any previously known. Extensive observations at radio wavelengths with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Southern Hemisphere VLBI Experiment array, and the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope have allowed us to determine the properties of the radio source: PKS 1718-649 consists of two compact sub-pc-scale components separated by approximately 2 pc, the overall radio polarization is low, and the radio spectrum is peaked near 3 GHz. Order-of-magnitude agreement between the quantitative model for GPS sources of Bicknell et al. and the radio data we present, as well as data at optical wavelengths from the literature, raises the interesting possibility that PKS 1718-649 may be frustrated in its development by the nuclear environment of its host galaxy, NGC 6328. The model of Bicknell et al. suggests free-free absorption as an explanation of the PKS 1718-649 radio spectrum. However, both free-free absorption and synchrotron self-absorption mechanisms are plausible for this source and both may contribute to the overall radio spectrum. PKS 1718-649 provides evidence to strengthen the speculative suggestion that GPS sources arise as a consequence of galaxy merger activity.

  6. The Nearest GHz Peaked-Spectrum Radio Galaxy, PKS 1718-649

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; King, E. A.; Preston, R. A.; Lovell, J. E.; McCulloch, P. M.; Costa, M. E.; Nicolson, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we identify PKS 1718-649, at a distance of 56 Mpc (z = 0.014; H(sub o) = 75 km/s/Mpc, q(sub o) = 0), as the nearest GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxy, more than four times closer than any previously known. Extensive observations at radio wavelengths with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Southern Hemisphere VLBI Experiment array, and the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope have allowed us to determine the properties of the radio source: PKS 1718-649 consists of two compact sub-pc-scale components separated by approximately 2 pc, the overall radio polarization is low, and the radio spectrum is peaked near 3 GHz. Order-of-magnitude agreement between the quantitative model for GPS sources of Bicknell et al. and the radio data we present, as well as data at optical wavelengths from the literature, raises the interesting possibility that PKS 1718-649 may be frustrated in its development by the nuclear environment of its host galaxy, NGC 6328. The model of Bicknell et al. suggests free-free absorption as an explanation of the PKS 1718-649 radio spectrum. However, both free-free absorption and synchrotron self-absorption mechanisms are plausible for this source and both may contribute to the overall radio spectrum. PKS 1718-649 provides evidence to strengthen the speculative suggestion that GPS sources arise as a consequence of galaxy merger activity.

  7. DISCOVERY OF ULTRA-STEEP SPECTRUM GIANT RADIO GALAXY WITH RECURRENT RADIO JET ACTIVITY IN ABELL 449

    SciTech Connect

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-20

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  8. Complete identification of the Parkes half-Jansky sample of GHz peaked spectrum radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, N.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Lehnert, M. D.; Bremer, M. N.

    2007-03-01

    Context: Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies are generally thought to be the young counterparts of classical extended radio sources. Statistically complete samples of GPS sources are vital for studying the early evolution of radio-loud AGN and the trigger of their nuclear activity. The "Parkes half-Jansky" sample of GPS radio galaxies is such a sample, representing the southern counterpart of the 1998 Stanghellini sample of bright GPS sources. Aims: As a first step of the investigation of the sample, the host galaxies need to be identified and their redshifts determined. Methods: Deep R-band VLT-FORS1 and ESO 3.6 m EFOSC II images and long slit spectra have been taken for the unidentified sources in the sample. Results: We have identified all twelve previously unknown host galaxies of the radio sources in the sample. Eleven have host galaxies in the range 21.0 < RC < 23.0, while one object, PKS J0210+0419, is identified in the near infrared with a galaxy with Ks = 18.3. The redshifts of 21 host galaxies have been determined in the range 0.474 < z < 1.539, bringing the total number of redshifts to 39 (80%). Analysis of the absolute magnitudes of the GPS host galaxies show that at z>1 they are on average a magnitude fainter than classical 3C radio galaxies, as found in earlier studies. However their restframe UV luminosities indicate that there is an extra light contribution from the AGN, or from a population of young stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile (ESO prog. ID No. 073.B-0289(B)) and the European Southern Observatory 3.6 m Telescope, La Silla, Chile (prog. ID No. 073.B-0289(A)). Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. The X-ray view of giga-hertz peaked spectrum radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengstrand, O.; Guainazzi, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Fonseca Bonilla, N.; Labiano, A.; Worrall, D. M.; Grandi, P.; Piconcelli, E.

    2009-07-01

    Context: This paper presents the X-ray properties of a flux- and volume-limited complete sample of 16 giga-hertz peaked spectrum (GPS) galaxies. Aims: This study addresses three basic questions in our understanding of the nature and evolution of GPS sources: a) What is the physical origin of the X-ray emission in GPS galaxies? b) Which physical system is associated with the X-ray obscuration? c) What is the “endpoint” of the evolution of compact radio sources? Methods: We discuss in this paper the results of the X-ray spectral analysis, and compare the X-ray properties of the sample sources with radio observables. Results: We obtain a 100% (94%) detection fraction in the 0.5-2 keV (0.5-10 keV) energy band. GPS galaxy X-ray spectra are typically highly obscured (< N_HGPS > = 3 × 1022 cm-2; σN_H ≃ 0.5 dex). The X-ray column density is larger than the HI column density measured in the radio by a factor 10 to 100. GPS galaxies lie well on the extrapolation to high radio powers of the correlation between radio and X-ray luminosity known in low-luminosity FR I radio galaxies. On the other hand, GPS galaxies exhibit a comparable X-ray luminosity to FR II radio galaxies, notwithstanding their much larger radio luminosity. Conclusions: The X-ray to radio luminosity ratio distribution in our sample is consistent with the bulk of the high-energy emission being produced by the accretion disk, as well as with dynamical models of GPS evolution where X-rays are produced by Compton upscattering of ambient photons. Further support to the former scenario comes from the location of GPS galaxies in the X-ray to O[iii] luminosity ratio versus NH plane. We propose that GPS galaxies are young radio sources, which would reach their full maturity as classical FR II radio galaxies. However, column densities ≳ 1022 cm-2 could lead to a significant underestimate of dynamical age determinations based on the hotspot recession velocity measurements.

  10. The Remarkable X-ray Spectrum of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2007-01-01

    The nearby (z=0.057) radio-loud source 3C 445, optically classified as a Broad-Line Radio Galaxy, exhibits an X-ray spectrum strongly reminiscent of an obscured AGN, suggesting we are seeing this source at a relatively large angle from the radio jet. Here we present an archival 15 ks XMM-Newton observation of 3C 445 which confirms the remarkable complexity of its X-ray emission. The X-ray emission is described by a power law continuum with GAMMA approximately equal to 1.4, absorbed by several layers of cold gas, plus strong cold reflection. A narrow, unresolved Fe Kalpha emission line is detected, confirming previous findings, with EW approximately equal to 400 eV. A soft excess is present below 2 keV over the extrapolation of the hard X-ray power law, which we model with a power law with the same photon index and absorbed by a column density N(sub H)5 approximately equal to 10(sup 20) cm(sup -2) in excess to Galactic. Remarkably, a host of emission lines are present below 2 keV, confirming previous indications from ASCA, due to H- and He-like O, Mg, and Si. The detection of two features at 0.74 and 0.87 keV, identified with OVII and OVIII Radiative Recombination Continuum features, suggest an origin of the lines from a photoionized gas, with properties very similar to radio-quiet obscured AGN. Two different ionized media, or a single stratified medium, are required to fit the soft X-ray data satisfactorily. The similarity of the X-ray spectrum of 3C 445 to Seyferts underscores that the central engines of radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN similarly host both cold and warm gas.

  11. VLBA Observations of Low Luminosity Flat Spectrum Radio Galaxies and BL Lac Objects: Polarisation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Stanghellini, C.; Marchã, M. J. M.

    We obtained two-epoch VLBA observations at 5 GHz of a list of radio galaxies drawn from the 200 mJy sample (Marcha et al. 1996). The objects selected for milli-arcsecond scale observations are classified, on the basis of their optical spectroscopic and polarimetric properties, as BL Lac objects, normal weak line radio galaxies, broad line radio galaxies, and transition objects (those with intermediate properties). We present preliminary results on the radio polarization properties, on the milli-arcsecond scale, of objects with different optical properties and discuss structural variations detected from the two epochs.

  12. Testing for Shock-Heated X-Ray Gas around Compact Steep Spectrum Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; O'Dea, Christopher; Worrall, Diana M.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Tremblay, Grant; Baum, Stefi; Christiansen, Kevin; Mullarkey, Christopher; Mittal, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray, VLA radio, and optical observations of two CSS radio galaxies. B3 1445+410 is a low excitation emission line galaxy with possibly a hybrid FRI/II (or Fat Double) radio morphology. The Chandra observations are point-like and well fit with a power-law consistent with emission from a Doppler boosted core. PKS B1017-325 is a galaxy with a bent double radio morphology. The XMM-Newton observations are consistent with an ISM with a contribution from hot shocked gas. We compile selected radio and X-ray properties of the nine CSS radio galaxies with X-ray detections so far. We find that 1/3 show evidence for hot shocked gas. We note that the counts in the sources are low and the properties of the 3 sources with evidence for hot shocked gas are typical of the other CSS radio galaxies. We suggest that hot shocked gas may be typical of CSS radio galaxies due to their propagation through their host galaxies.

  13. A Journey In The Radio Galaxy IC 1531: Through The Linear Scale, Across The Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Tiziana; Migliori, G.; Grandi, P.; Vignali, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present a multi-scale and multi-frequency study of the radio galaxy IC1531 (z=0.026) with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Fermi. The Chandra image shows an X-ray core and 5 extended emission with the radio jet. The X-ray spectrum of the core is well fitted by a power law (Γ=2.2). The X-ray emission of the large scale jet is most-likely synchrotron emission, further confirming the low-power source classication. The gamma-ray analisys shows a 5-days variability, from which it is possible to estimate the size of the emitting region. We present a study of the spectral energy distribution of the core of IC1531 from radio to gamma-ray emission. The models allowed us to determine the nature of the gamma-ray emission and infer the jet kinetic power at sub-pc scales. The jet power at kpc scales is estimated from the total radio luminosity at 151 MHz. Finally, we compare the jet power with the disk luminosity. We discuss our results in terms of the formation and evolution of the jet.

  14. Properties of flat-spectrum radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foschini, L.; Berton, M.; Caccianiga, A.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; Peterson, B. M.; Angelakis, E.; Braito, V.; Fuhrmann, L.; Gallo, L.; Grupe, D.; Järvelä, E.; Kaufmann, S.; Komossa, S.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Lister, M. L.; Mathur, S.; Richards, J. L.; Romano, P.; Sievers, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tammi, J.; Tibolla, O.; Tornikoski, M.; Vercellone, S.; La Mura, G.; Maraschi, L.; Rafanelli, P.

    2015-03-01

    We have conducted a multiwavelength survey of 42 radio loud narrow-1ine Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s), selected by searching among all the known sources of this type and omitting those with steep radio spectra. We analyse data from radio frequencies to X-rays, and supplement these with information available from online catalogues and the literature in order to cover the full electromagnetic spectrum. This is the largest known multiwavelength survey for this type of source. We detected 90% of the sources in X-rays and found 17% at γ rays. Extreme variability at high energies was also found, down to timescales as short as hours. In some sources, dramatic spectral and flux changes suggest interplay between a relativistic jet and the accretion disk. The estimated masses of the central black holes are in the range ~106-8 M⊙, lower than those of blazars, while the accretion luminosities span a range from ~0.01 to ~0.49 times the Eddington limit, with an outlier at 0.003, similar to those of quasars. The distribution of the calculated jet power spans a range from ~1042.6 to ~1045.6 erg s-1, generally lower than quasars and BL Lac objects, but partially overlapping with the latter. Once normalised by the mass of the central black holes, the jet power of the three types of active galactic nuclei are consistent with each other, indicating that the jets are similar and the observational differences are due to scaling factors. Despite the observational differences, the central engine of RLNLS1s is apparently quite similar to that of blazars. The historical difficulties in finding radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies might be due to their low power and to intermittent jetactivity. Tables 4-9 and Figs. 8-13 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Radio-Excess IRAS Galaxies. II. Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Catherine L.; McGregor, Peter J.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2004-09-01

    This is the second of a series of papers studying a sample of radio-excess IRAS galaxies. These galaxies have radio emission in excess of that expected due to star formation, but largely fall between the traditional categories of radio-loud and radio-quiet active galaxies. R-band images of the hosts of far-infrared (FIR)-luminous radio-excess galaxies are presented and analyzed. The hosts of the FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies are luminous galaxies, on average 0.8 mag brighter than M*R. Their optical luminosities and morphologies are similar to comparison samples of radio-loud compact steep-spectrum and gigahertz peaked-spectrum sources and extended radio galaxies. We find a similar fraction of galaxies in our sample (~70%) with companions or distorted morphologies as in radio-loud comparison samples. This is consistent with radio activity being associated with tidal interaction. The majority (65%) of the FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies have radio source sizes that are smaller than the optical host by more than an order of magnitude. These compact radio sources may be young precursors to classical radio galaxies or a different population of radio sources, possibly confined by the host interstellar medium. The host galaxy types were determined by analysis of the surface brightness distributions. The elliptical hosts have effective surface brightnesses and radii consistent with known ellipticals but inconsistent with a population of brightest cluster galaxies. Thus, it is unlikely these objects are the precursors of FR I radio galaxies. The disk hosts have smaller sizes and low radio excesses. However, they have a range of radio source sizes, which is not expected if they are radio-``loud'' Seyfert galaxies.

  16. SDSS J143244.91+301435.3: a link between radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies and compact steep-spectrum radio sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccianiga, A.; Antón, S.; Ballo, L.; Dallacasa, D.; Della Ceca, R.; Fanali, R.; Foschini, L.; Hamilton, T.; Kraus, A.; Maccacaro, T.; Mack, K.-H.; Marchã, M. J.; Paulino-Afonso, A.; Sani, E.; Severgnini, P.

    2014-06-01

    We present SDSS J143244.91+301435.3, a new case of a radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) with a relatively high radio power (P1.4 GHz = 2.1 × 1025 W Hz-1) and large radio-loudness parameter (R1.4 = 600 ± 100). The radio source is compact with a linear size below ˜1.4 kpc but, in contrast to most of the RL NLS1 discovered so far with such a high R1.4, its radio spectrum is very steep (α = 0.93, Sν ∝ ν-α) and does not support a `blazar-like' nature. Both the small mass of the central supermassive black hole and the high accretion rate relative to the Eddington limit estimated for this object (3.2 × 107 M⊙ and 0.27, respectively, with a formal error of ˜0.4 dex for both quantities) are typical of the NLS1 class. Through modelling the spectral energy distribution of the source, we have found that the galaxy hosting SDSS J143244.91+301435.3 is undergoing quite intense star formation (SFR = 50 M⊙ yr-1), which, however, is expected to contribute only marginally (˜1 per cent) to the observed radio emission. The radio properties of SDSS J143244.91+301435.3 are remarkably similar to those of compact steep-spectrum (CSS) radio sources, a class of active galactic nuclei (AGN) mostly composed of young radio galaxies. This may suggest a direct link between these two classes of AGN, with CSS sources possibly representing the misaligned version (the so-called `parent population') of RL NLS1 showing blazar characteristics.

  17. Compact steep-spectrum sources as the parent population of flat-spectrum radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, M.; Caccianiga, A.; Foschini, L.; Peterson, B. M.; Mathur, S.; Terreran, G.; Ciroi, S.; Congiu, E.; Cracco, V.; Frezzato, M.; La Mura, G.; Rafanelli, P.

    2016-06-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are an interesting subclass of active galactic nuclei (AGN), which tipically does not exhibit any strong radio emission. Seven percent of them, though, are radio-loud and often show a flat radio-spectrum (F-NLS1s). This, along to the detection of γ-ray emission coming from them, is usually interpreted as a sign of a relativistic beamed jet oriented along the line of sight. An important aspect of these AGN that must be understood is the nature of their parent population, in other words how do they appear when observed under different angles. In the recent literature it has been proposed that a specific class of radio-galaxies, compact-steep sources (CSS) classified as high excitation radio galaxies (HERG), can represent the parent population of F-NLS1s. To test this hypothesis in a quantitative way,in this paper we analyzed the only two statistically complete samples of CSS/HERGs and F-NLS1s available in the literature. We derived the black hole mass and Eddington ratio distributions, and we built for the first time the radio luminosity function of F-NLS1s. Finally, we applied a relativistic beaming model to the luminosity function of CSS/HERGs, and compared the result with the observed function of F-NLS1s. We found that compact steep-spectrum sources are valid parent candidates and that F-NLS1s, when observed with a different inclination, might actually appear as CSS/HERGs.

  18. High-frequency excess in the radio continuum spectrum of the type-1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Akihiro; Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    The Seyfert galaxy NGC 985 is known to show a high-frequency excess in its radio continuum spectrum at a milli-Jansky level on the basis of previous observations at 1.4-15 GHz; a steep spectrum at low frequencies (a spectral index, α = -1.10 ± 0.03) changes at ˜10 GHz into an inverted spectrum at higher frequencies (α = +0.86 ± 0.09). We conduct new observations at 15-43 GHz using the Very Large Array and at 100 GHz using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array. As a result, the high-frequency excess has been confirmed as continuing at even higher radio frequencies, up to 43 GHz. The non-detection at 100 GHz was not so strong a constraint, and therefore the spectral behavior above 43 GHz remains unclear. The astrometric position of the high-frequency excess component coincides with the optical position of the Seyfert nucleus and the low-frequency radio position to an accuracy of 0{^''.}1, corresponding to ˜80 pc; the radio source size is constrained to be <0{^''.}02, corresponding to <16 pc. We discuss the physical origin of the observed high-frequency excess component. Dust emission at the Rayleigh-Jeans regime, free-free emission from X-ray radiating high-temperature plasma, free-free emission from the ensemble of broad-line region clouds, or thermal synchrotron from hot accretion flow cannot be responsible for the observed radio flux. Compact jets under synchrotron self-absorption may be unlikely in terms of observed time scales. Alternatively, we cannot rule out the hypotheses of synchrotron jets free-free absorbed by a circumnuclear photo-ionized region, and self-absorbed nonthermal synchrotron from disk corona, as the origin of the high-frequency excess component.

  19. Evolution of radio galaxies to z = 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.; Weadock, J.; Roberts, L.; Ryneveld, S.; Gower, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report Very Large Array (VLA) A-configuration studies of a sample of 49 radio galaxies at redshift less than 1. These were selected with no prior knowledge of their morphology and were chosen to match the redshift and luminosity distribution of a previously studied sample of radio-loud quasars. We compare the radio galaxies with the quasar sample and also with a sample of 29 radio galaxies selected for steep spectrum and double-lobe structure. We find that the radio galaxies have more luminous lobes and mostly weaker cores, and there is no population of one-sided sources associated with the galaxies. The radio galaxies' lobe length ratios and lobe power ratios differ from quasars. The overall sizes of the two types of sources are similar, but the radio galaxies have a 3 times larger upper envelope. The distribution of bend angles is similar but the radio galaxies have fewer very bent and straight sources. We discuss these and other comparisons in detail and suggest that while quasars appear to be viewed within a cone and radio galaxies outside it, the two types of source also have intrinsic differences, and both have individual growth and evolution scenarios. This is supported by previously observed differences in optical properties between the two source types.

  20. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  1. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  2. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  3. Energy distributions of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Impey, Chris; Gregorini, Loretta

    1993-01-01

    Far-infrared observations of 140 radio galaxies which span a range of over four orders of magnitude in radio power, (from weak nuclear sources in nearby galaxies, to powerful FR II doubled lobed sources at moderate redshift) are presented. The strength of the far-infrared emission is more closely correlated with core than total radio emission. Far-infrared emission in radio galaxies represents star formation that is more closely tied to the active nucleus than to the global properties of the galaxy. The far-infrared luminosity function shows good continuity between radio galaxies and radio loud quasars.

  4. Highest redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W

    2000-03-14

    At low redshifts powerful radio sources are uniquely associated with massive galaxies, and are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes. Modern 8m-10m telescopes may be used to find their likely progenitors at very high redshifts to study their formation and evolution.

  5. MUSE three-dimensional spectroscopy and kinematics of the gigahertz peaked spectrum radio galaxy PKS 1934-63: interaction, recently triggered active galactic nucleus and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Nathan; Humphrey, Andrew; Lagos, Patricio; Papaderos, Polychronis; Silva, Marckelson; Cardoso, Leandro S. M.; Gomes, Jean Michel

    2016-07-01

    We observe the radio galaxy PKS 1934-63 (at z = 0.1825) using the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The radio source is a gigahertz peaked spectrum source and is compact (0.13 kpc), implying an early stage of evolution (≤104 yr). Our data show an interacting pair of galaxies, with projected separation 9.1 kpc and velocity difference Δ(v) = 216 km s-1. The larger galaxy is a M* ≃ 1011 M⊙ spheroidal with the emission-line spectrum of a high-excitation young radio active galactic nucleus (AGN; e.g. strong [O I]6300 and [O III]5007). Emission-line ratios indicate a large contribution to the line luminosity from high-velocity shocks (≃ 550 km s-1). The companion is a non-AGN disc galaxy, with extended Hα emission from which its star formation rate is estimated as 0.61 M⊙ yr-1. Both galaxies show rotational velocity gradients in Hα and other lines, with the interaction being prograde-prograde. The SE-NW velocity gradient of the AGN host is misaligned from the E-W radio axis, but aligned with a previously discovered central ultraviolet source, and a factor of 2 greater in amplitude in Hα than in other (forbidden) lines (e.g. [O III]5007). This could be produced by a fast rotating (100-150 km s-1) disc with circumnuclear star formation. We also identify a broad component of [O III]5007 emission, blueshifted with a velocity gradient aligned with the radio jets, and associated with outflow. However, the broad component of [O I]6300 is redshifted. In spectral fits, both galaxies have old stellar populations plus ˜0.1 per cent of very young stars, consistent with the galaxies undergoing first perigalacticon, triggering infall and star formation from ˜40 Myr ago followed by the radio outburst.

  6. Galaxy clusters: Radio relics from fossil electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    The detection of a tailed radio galaxy in a galaxy cluster conjoined to a region of diffuse radio emission confirms that radio galaxies provide the energetic electrons needed to explain the origin of this enigmatic emission.

  7. Radio spectrum surveillance station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a general and functional description of a low-cost surveillance station designed as the first phase of NASA's program to develop a radio spectrum surveillance capability for deep space stations for identifying radio frequency interference sources. The station described has identified several particular interferences and is yielding spectral signature data which, after cataloging, will serve as a library for rapid identification of frequently observed interference. Findings from the use of the station are discussed.

  8. Radio galaxies and their environment

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.

    1993-02-24

    The relationships between radio galaxies and their environment are varied, complex, and evolve with cosmic epoch. Basic questions are what role the environment plays in triggering and fuelling (radio) galaxy activity what the effects of this activity are on its environment, and how radio galaxies and environment evolve. Clearly, this could be the topic of a workshop all in itself and the scope of this review will necessarily be limited. A review of the connections between environment and galaxy activity in general has been given by Heckman. First, I will briefly summarize the relationships between parent galaxy and cluster environments, and radio galaxies. A more detailed discussion of various aspects of this will be given elsewhere by F. Owen, J.0. Burns and R. Perley. I will then discuss the current status of investigations of extended emission-line regions in radio galaxies, again referring elsewhere in this volume for more detailed discussions of some particular aspects (kinematics and ionization mechanisms by K. Meisenheimer; polarization and spectral index lobe asymmetries by G. Pooley). I will conclude with a brief discussion of the current status of observations of high redshift radio galaxies.

  9. Evolution of luminous IRAS galaxies: Radio imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Hutchings, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    In a recent study of IRAS galaxies' optical morphologies, we found that luminous IR sources lie in the IR color-luminosity plane in groups which separate out by optical spectroscopic type and also by degree of tidal disturbance. We found that the most luminous steep-IR-spectrum sources are generally galaxies in the initial stages of a major tidal interaction. Galaxies with active nuclei were generally found to have flatter IR spectra, to cover a range of IR luminosity, and to be in the later stages of a tidal interaction. We proposed a sequence of events by which luminous IR sources evolve: they start as interacting or merging galaxies, some develop active nuclei, and most undergo extensive star-formation in their central regions. Another way to study these objects and their individual evolution is to study their radio morphologies. Radio emission may arise at a detectable level from supernovae in star-forming regions and/or the appearance of an active nucleus can be accompanied by a nuclear radio source (which may develop extended structure). Therefore, the compact radio structure may trace the evolution of the inner regions of IRAS-luminous sources. If the radio sources are triggered by the interactions, we would expect to find the radio morphology related to the optical 'interactivity' of the systems. Here, we explore using the radio emission of IRAS galaxies as a possible tracer of galaxy evolution. We present and discuss observations of the compact radio morphology of 111 luminous IRAS-selected active galaxies covering a wide range of IR and optical properties.

  10. Radio frequency spectrum management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujdak, E. J., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This thesis is a study of radio frequency spectrum management as practiced by agencies and departments of the Federal Government. After a brief introduction to the international agency involved in radio frequency spectrum management, the author concentrates on Federal agencies engaged in frequency management. These agencies include the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). Based on an analysis of Department of Defense frequency assignment procedures, recommendations are given concerning decentralizing military frequency assignment by delegating broader authority to unified commanders. This proposal includes a recommendation to colocate the individual Service frequency management offices at the Washington level. This would result in reduced travel costs, lower manpower requirements, and a common tri-Service frequency management data base.

  11. Very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) provide unique targets for the study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters at very high redshifts. We discuss how efficient HzRG samples ae selected, the evidence for strong morphological evolution at near-infracd wavelengths, and for jet-induced star formation in the z = 3 800 HzRG 4C41 17

  12. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  13. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  14. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  15. The IRAS galaxy 0421+040P06: An active spiral (?) galaxy with extended radio lobes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C. A.; Wynn-Williams, C. G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Persson, S. E.; Heasley, J. N.; Miley, G. K.; Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Houck, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The infrared bright galaxy 0421+040P06 detected by IRAS at 25 and 60 microns was studied at optical, infrared, and radio wavelength. It is a luminous galaxy with apparent spiral structure emitting 4 x 10 to the 37th power from far-infrared to optical wavelengths. Optical spectroscopy reveals a Seyfert 2 emission line spectrum, making 0421+040P06 the first active galaxy selected from an unbiased infrared survey of galaxies. The fact that this galaxy shows a flatter energy distribution with more 25 micron emission than other galaxies in the infrared sample may be related to the presence of an intense active nucleus. The radio observations reveal the presence of a non-thermal source that, at 6 cm, shows a prominent double lobed structure 20 to 30 kpc in size extending beyond the optical confines of the galaxy. The radio source is three to ten times larger than structures previously seen in spiral galaxies.

  16. Spread Spectrum Mobile Radio Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    for radio frequency spectrum has led to a wide variety of techniques for solving the problem of spectral conjestion. Spectrally efficient modulation ...Kenkichi Hirade, " GMSK Modulation for Digital Mobile Radio Telephcny", IEEE Trans. on Commun., Vol. COM-29, No. 7, July 1981, pp. 1044-1050. [20.] .C...necessary and Identify by block number) Spread Spectrum Mobile Packet Radio Network Carrier Sense Multiple Access Spectrally Efficient Modulation Speech

  17. Highest redshift radio galaxy known in the Southern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect

    De Breuck, C., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a z = 4 13 galaxy TN J1338-1942, the most distant radio galaxy in the southern hemisphere known to date The source was selected from a sample of Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS; {alpha}<-1 3; S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}) radio sauces using the Texas and NVSS catalogs The discovery spectrum, obtained with the ES0 3 6m telescope, shows bright extended Ly-{alpha} emission The radio source has a very asymmetric morphology, suggesting a strong interaction with an inhomogeneous surrounding medium

  18. Integrated radio continuum spectra of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of –0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, –0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and –0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = –0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later

  19. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  20. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  1. SETI radio spectrum surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, B.; Lokshin, A.; Marina, M.; Ching, L.

    1985-01-01

    The SETI Radio Spectrum Surveillance System (SRSSS) will provide a data base for assessing the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment for SETI and minimizing RFI disruptions during the search. The system's hardware and software are described and the sensitivity of the system is discussed.

  2. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  3. Radio properties of fossil galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    We study 1.4 GHz radio properties of a sample of fossil galaxy groups using GMRT radio observations and the FIRST survey catalog. Fossil galaxy groups, having no recent major mergers in their dominant galaxies and also group scale mergers, give us the opportunity to investigate the effect of galaxy merger on AGN activity. In this work, we compare the radio properties of a rich sample of fossil groups with a sample of normal galaxy groups and clusters and show that the brightest group galaxies in fossil groups are under luminous at 1.4 GHz, relative to the general population of the brightest group galaxies, indicating that the dynamically relaxed nature of fossil groups has influenced the AGN activity in their dominant galaxy.

  4. Giant radio galaxies and cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinämäki, Pekka

    2016-10-01

    Giant radio galaxies create the welldistinguishable class of sources.These sources are characterized with edge-brightened radio lobes withhighly collimated radio jets and large linear sizes which make themthe largest individual structures in the Universe. They are also knownto be hosted by elliptical/disturbed host galaxies and avoid clustersand high galaxy density regions. Because of GRG, large linear sizeslobes extend well beyond the interstellar media and host galaxyhalo the evolution of the radio lobes may depend on interactionwith this environment. Using our method to extract filamentarystructure of the galaxies in our local universe we study whetherradio lobe properties in some giant radio galaxies are determinedon an interaction of this filament ambient.

  5. Remnant radio galaxies in the LOFAR Lockman Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienza, Marisa; Godfrey, Leith; Morganti, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    I will present recent 150-MHz deep observations performed with the Low-frequency Array (LOFAR) of the well-known extragalactic region of the Lockman Hole. Thanks to its high sensitivity and resolution this data allows us to perform new studies of the radio loud AGN population at low radio frequencies. In particular, we conducted a systematic search of remnant radio galaxies, which represent the final "dying" phase of the radio galaxy evolution, when the jets have switched off. This class of sources is best to investigate the life-cycle of radio loud AGN as well as to quantify the role of radio AGN feedback. Indeed, the modelling of their radio spectrum provides constraints on the time-scales of activity and quiescence of the radio source and on its energy output. For a long time there have been claims that deep low-frequency surveys would have enhanced the detection of this class of sources, which are usually rare in flux limited samples.With our search, we thus intend to provide good statistics on the detection and properties of remnant radio galaxies. To avoid selection biases towards any specific class of objects we used both morphological and spectral selection criteria. To do this we combined the LOFAR data with publicly available surveys at other frequencies as well as dedicated deep observations. We find that the fraction of candidate remnant sources is < 6-8% of the entire radio source population and is dominated by steep spectrum sources. To better understand the observed fraction we developed mock catalogues of the radio sky population based on radio galaxy evolution models. These models are used to constrain the main mechanisms contributing to the source luminosity evolution i.e. adiabatic expansion, radiative losses, as well as to make predictions on their fraction in flux limited samples.

  6. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  7. Similarity of jet radiation between flat spectrum radio quasars and GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies: a universal δ-L c correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong-Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Hai-Ming; Liang, En-Wei; Yan, Da-Hai; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-11-01

    By modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a typical flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ, 3C 279) and two GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s, PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342) in different flux stages with one-zone leptonic models, we find a universal correlation between their Doppler factors (δ) and peak luminosities (L c) of external Compton scattering bumps. Compiling a combined sample of FSRQs and GeV NLS1s, it is found that both FSRQs and GeV NLS1s in different stages and in different sources follow the same δ-L c correlation well. This indicates that the variations of observed luminosities may be essentially due to the Doppler boosting effect. The universal δ-L c relation between FSRQs and GeV NLS1s in different stages may be further evidence that the particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms for the two kinds of sources are similar. In addition, by replacing L c with the observed luminosity in the Fermi/LAT band (L LAT), this correlation holds and it may serve as an empirical indicator of δ. We estimate the δ values with L LAT for 484 FSRQs in the Fermi/LAT Catalog and they range from 3 to 41, with a median of 16, which are statistically consistent with the values derived by other methods.

  8. Feedback in high redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Breuck, Carlos; Nesvadba, Nicole; Lehnert, Matthew; Best, Philip

    High redshift radio galaxies are among the best objects to study AGN feedback in action, as they are among the most massive galaxies (1011 - 1012 M ) hosting powerful radio-loud AGN. I will present near-infrared imaging spectroscopy of a sample of over 50 radio galaxies at 2 < z < 5 using SINFONI at the VLT. We identify kpc-sized outflows of few x 1010 M of ionized gas, located along the radio source axis. Velocity fields are consistent with bipolar outflows, with total velocity offsets of 1000 km/s. FWHMs 1000 km/s suggest strong turbulence. The geometry is consistent with the radio source driving these outflows. Over the lifetime of the radio source (˜ 107 yr), these outflows can eject up to 1011 M of gas out of the gravitational potential of the host galaxy. Such mass loss would be sufficient to terminate star formation within the host galaxy. I will also present results from an ongoing follow-up programme to study the molecular gas in these high z radio galaxies using the IRAM interferometer. In several sources, we find a remarkable deficit in cold molecular relative to ionized gas, which may imply that significant fractions of the interstellar medium of these galaxies are participating in the winds.

  9. The Properties of Primordial Stars and Galaxies measured from the 21-cm Global Spectrum using the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Fialkov, Anastasia; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham; Mirocha, Jordan; Monsalve, Raul A.; Rapetti, David; Tauscher, Keith; Wollack, Edward

    2017-01-01

    DARE is a mission concept designed to observe the formation of primordial stars, black holes, and galaxies (z=11-35) by measuring their spectral effects on the redshifted 21-cm hydrogen line. The UV and X-ray radiation emitted by these first objects ionized and heated the intergalactic medium and imprinted characteristic features in the 21-cm spectrum. The 1.4 GHz signal is redshifted into the radio band 40-120 MHz. DARE will take advantage of the quietest RF environment in the inner solar system by using the Moon as a shield from human radio frequency interference and solar emissions via observations on the lunar farside. DARE’s science objectives are to determine: when the first stars turned on and their properties, when the first black holes began accreting and their masses, the reionization history of the early Universe, and if evidence exists for exotic physics in the Dark Ages such as Dark Matter decay. Wideband crossed-dipole antennas, pilot tone stablized radiometric receivers, a polarimeter, and a digital spectrometer constitute the science instrument. DARE’s radiometer is precisely calibrated with a featureless spectral response, controlled systematics, and heritage from CMB missions. Models for the instrument main beam and sidelobes, antenna reflection coefficient, gain variations, and calibrations will be validated with electromagnetic simulations, laboratory and anechoic chamber measurements, and verified on-orbit. The unique frequency structure of the 21-cm spectrum, its uniformity over large angular scales, and its unpolarized state are unlike the spectrally featureless, spatially-varying, polarized emission of the bright Galactic foreground, allowing the signal to be cleanly separated from the foreground. The 21-cm signal will be extracted in the presence of foregrounds using a Bayesian framework with a Markov Chain Monto Carlo (MCMC) numerical inference technique. The DARE data analysis pipeline enables efficient, simultaneous, and self

  10. The TANGO Project: Thorough ANalysis of radio-Galaxies Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña Flaquer, Breezy; Leon Tanne, Stephane; Combes, Francoise; Lim, Jeremy

    2010-05-01

    We present a sample of radio galaxies selected only on the basis of radio continuum emission and we confirm that these galaxies have lower molecular gas mass than other elliptical galaxies with different selection criteria.

  11. The Radio Spectrum of Capella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, R. A.; Harper, G. M.; Brown, A.

    2003-03-01

    Capella's soft X-ray and EUV spectrum are dominated by emission lines and continua from high temperature, T ≈ 6-8 MK plasma. In contrast to most other X-ray bright late-type stellar sources, whose radio emissions are due to nonthermal processes, Capella's radio emission appears to be dominated by thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from the same high temperature plasma that produces copious X-rays. Radio and X-ray observations of thermal bremsstrahlung emission offer complimentary information on the distribution of the high temperature plasma. During the Emission Line Project observations of Capella with the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 1999 September, simultaneous observations of Capella were performed with the LETGS, EUVE, HST/STIS, and the VLA spanning an order of magnitude in frequency. Contemporanous observations with the HETGS were also performed. We report on modelling the differential emission measure distribution from chromospheric to coronal temperatures, and comparison of predicted radio fluxes with observed fluxes. The spectrum of excess radio emission is investigated to look for evidence of gyroresonance or gyrosynchrotron emission. RAO acknowledges support from NRAO through a Jansky fellowship.

  12. Hard X-Ray Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; La Franca, F.; Landi, R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in AGN with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT AGN catalogues. They represent 7-10% of the total AGN population and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities and high Eddington ratios. The radio morphology is typical of FRII galaxies and all of them have an optical classification and a measure of the column density. The observed fraction of absorbed AGN is around 40% among the total sample, and 75% among type 2 AGN. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is 2-3%. In this talk we will discuss the obscuration characteristics of radio galaxies compared to non-radio galaxies selected at hard X-rays.

  13. Are all radio galaxies genuine ellipticals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M. P.; Véron, P.

    2001-09-01

    Classical double radio sources are believed to be powered by a strong relativistic jet due to the presence of a rapidly spinning black hole in the center of a giant E galaxy formed by the merging of two galaxies. If this is true, no radio source should have been found in spiral or S0 galaxies. A number of radio S0s have been reported, but most of them are probably misclassified Es. However, our own observations confirm that NGC 612 is an S0 although it is associated with the FR II radio source PKS 0131-36. We conclude that S0s can be classical radio sources, but that such occurences are extremely rare. Partly based on observations obtained with the ESO 3.6 m telescope, La Silla, Chile.

  14. HI absorption in nearby compact radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, M.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Deng, C.; Parry, R.; Sligo, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    HI absorption studies yield information on both AGN feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for HI absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 < z < 0.096 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. In total, we obtained seven detections, five of which are new, with a large range of peak optical depths (3% to 87%). Of the detections, 71% exhibit asymmetric, broad (ΔvFWHM > 100 km s-1) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disk. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with HI detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic disks. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of HI content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous HI surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.

  15. Multicolor surface photometry of powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    CCD images of 72 powerful radio galaxies have been obtained with the KPNO 2.1m, 4m and CTIO 4m telescopes utilizing B, V, and R filters to study the colors and other photometric properties of these large systems. The GASP software package was used for the data reduction and detailed 2-d surface photometry. In addition, image modeling techniques were employed to investigate the contributions to galaxy properties by point-like nuclear sources seen in some of these galaxies. It was found that powerful radio galaxies show a much higher frequency than normal bright ellipticals of having optical morphologies which deviate from elliptical symmetry. Approximately 50% of the sample exhibit non-elliptically symmetric isophotes. These prominent distortions are present at surface brightness levels of {le} 25 V mag/(arc sec){sup 2}. In addition, a large fraction ({approximately}50%) of the remaining radio galaxies without the aforementioned morphological peculiarities have large isophotal twists ({Delta}P.A. {ge} 10{degree}) or ellipticity gradients. Significantly {approximately}50% of the galaxies with strong optical emission lines in their spectra display optically peculiar structures very similar to those found by Toomre and Toomre (1972) in their simulations of interacting disk galaxies. The galaxies with weak emission lines in their spectra are less frequently ({approximately}10%) distorted from elliptical shape. Those that are exhibit features like isophote twists, double nuclei and close companion galaxies embedded in the radio galaxy optical isophotes. The (B-V) colors of many of the powerful radio galaxies with strong emission lines are blue relative to normal giant ellipticals at the same redshift.

  16. A Radio Galaxy at z = 5.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Wil; De Breuck, Carlos; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, Daniel; Röttgering, Huub; Miley, George

    1999-06-01

    We report the discovery of the most distant known active galactic nucleus, the radio galaxy TN J0924-2201 at z=5.19. The radio source was selected from a new sample of ultrasteep spectrum sources, has an extreme radio spectral index α1.4GHz365MHz=-1.63, and is identified at near-IR wavelengths with a very faint, K=21.3+/-0.3 object. Spectroscopic observations show a single emission line at λ~7530 Å, which we identify as Lyα. The K-band image, sampling rest-frame U band, shows a multicomponent, radio-aligned morphology, which is typical of lower-redshift radio galaxies. TN J0924-2201 extends the near-IR Hubble, or K-z, relation for powerful radio galaxies to z>5 and is consistent with models of massive galaxies forming at even higher redshifts. Based on observations at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the University of California, the California Institute of Technology, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  17. High-energy neutrinos from radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker Tjus, J.; Eichmann, B.; Halzen, F.; Kheirandish, A.; Saba, S. M.

    2014-06-01

    The IceCube experiment has recently reported the first observation of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. Their origin is still unknown. In this paper, we investigate the possibility that they originate in active galaxies. We show that hadronic interactions (pp) in the generally less powerful, more frequent, FR-I radio galaxies are one of the candidate source classes being able to accommodate the observation while the more powerful, less frequent, class of FR-II radio galaxies has too low of a column depths to explain the signal.

  18. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  19. The effect of local galaxy density on the production of powerful radio sources by early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, T. M.; Carty, T. J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have quantitatively analyzed the POSS prints and a set of CCD images obtained at KPNO in order to investigate the local galaxy density around samples of 47 radio-loud and 46 radio-quiet elliptical and lenticular galaxies. The radio sources studied are dominated by steep-spectrum components, not by compact, flat-spectrum ones. The local galaxy density has been measured by weighting the companion galaxies according to their relative size (or luminosity) and/or projected proximity. The primary conclusion is that all measures of average local galaxy density (applied to both the large POSS data set and smaller CCD data set) are larger (by at least a factor of 2 - 3) for the radio-loud galaxies. The statistical significance levels of these results are very high (typically >99.9%). It is argued that the evidence that galaxy interactions foster nuclear activity is now strong and may apply to the whole "zoo" of active extragalactic objects (nuclear starburst galaxies, Seyfert galaxies, Liners, radio galaxies, quasars).

  20. Radio observations of nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Su, Bumei

    1999-05-01

    Six nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies have been observed at two wavelength by using the Australian AT. Among them, radio emissions have been detected for two galaxies, i.e. IRAS 20272-4738 and IRAS 23156-4238, and their radio parameters, like radio fluxes, peak positions, source sizes and spectral indices, are obtained. The radio sources are confirmed with infrared, radio and optical observations. Some characteristics of the radio emissions of these galaxies are discussed with previous observational data.

  1. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Dress, William B.

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  2. THE COMPACT RADIO STRUCTURE OF RADIO-LOUD NARROW LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Minfeng; Chen Yongjun

    2010-06-15

    We present the compact radio structure of three radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies from the Very Long Baseline Array archive data at 2.3, 5, and 8.4 GHz. In RXS J16290+4007, the radio structure is mostly unresolved. The combination of compact radio structure, high brightness temperature, and inverted spectrum between simultaneous 2.3 and 8.4 GHz strongly favors jet relativistic beaming. Combined with the very long baseline interferometry data at 1.6 and 8.4 GHz from the literature, we argue that RXS J16333+4718 also may harbor a relativistic jet, with resolved core-jet structure in 5 GHz. B3 1702+457 is clearly resolved with a well-defined jet component. The overall radio steep spectrum indicates that B3 1702+457 is likely a source optically defined as NLS1 with radio definition of compact steep spectrum sources. From these three sources, we found that radio loud NLS1s can be either intrinsically radio loud (e.g., B3 1702+457) or apparently radio loud due to jet beaming effects (e.g., RXS J16290+4007 and RXS J16333+4718).

  3. Brightest cluster galaxies in the extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Cassano, R.; Giacintucci, S.; Bardelli, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Zucca, E.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: First-ranked galaxies in clusters, usually referred to as brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. They are the most massive elliptical galaxies and show the highest probability to be radio loud. Moreover, their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment in shaping their radio properties. In the attempt to separate the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment on their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. Methods: We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS), which consists of 65 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4, with X-ray luminosity LX ≥ 5 × 1044 erg s-1, and quantitative information on their dynamical state from high-quality Chandra imaging. We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which we divided into two classes, depending on whether the dynamical state of the host cluster was merging (M) or relaxed (R). Results: Of the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio loud and 31 are radio quiet. The radio-loud sources are favourably located in relaxed clusters (71%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, which are mostly located in merging systems (81%). The fractional radio luminosity function for the BCGs in merging and relaxed clusters is different, and it is considerably higher for BCGs in relaxed clusters, where the total fraction of radio loudness reaches almost 90%, to be compared to the ~30% in merging clusters. For relaxed clusters, we found a positive correlation between the radio power of the BCGs and the strength of the cool core, consistent with previous studies on local samples. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the radio loudness of the BCGs strongly depends on the cluster dynamics; their fraction is

  4. Broad Line Radio Galaxies with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohfink, A.; Ogle, P.; Matt, G.; Lanz, L.; Madejski, G.; Reynolds, C.; Walton, D.; Harrison, F.

    2014-07-01

    The formation of relativistic jets is an open question in AGN physics. Despite significant observational efforts it is still unclear why some AGN show strong radio jets while others do not. Of particular interest to answer this question are broad line radio galaxies, which do show a strong jet but otherwise show an X-ray spectrum similar to their radio-quiet kin. While studies of the standard X-ray band (0.5-10 keV) have not yielded any significant insights, the newly launched X-ray mission NuSTAR offers the possibility to also study the hard X-ray spectra of these sources. In combination with coordinated XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations this provides the best broad-band X-ray spectra of broad line radio galaxies to-date. In this talk I will discuss the first results from the NuSTAR Radio Galaxy program and their implications for our understanding of jet formation.

  5. The Cosmological Evolution of Dust and Gas in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, E. N.

    The main epoch of activity for active galactic nuclei appears to have been z~2. Until very recently, the suspected symbiotic link between star formation, galaxy mergers and nuclear activity led people to believe that star formation activity in the Universe also peaked at z~2, despite the failure of searches to find a primeval galaxy at z>1. When a large population of star-forming galaxies was finally discovered at z>2, the astronomical community believed it had entered a new era of understanding how and when most of the stars of the Universe were formed. However, the star-formation rates observed in these systems are relatively modest, a few tens of solar masses per year, and are unable to build a massive elliptical galaxy in anything less than a Hubble time. Furthermore, the stellar populations in local massive ellipticals appear to have been formed in a short-lived, violent, dusty starburst at high-redshift, although it is not clear whether the formation trigger is a galaxy merger or the collapse of a huge halo of gas. The large quantities of dust that are expected during formation will absorb the optical/ultraviolet emission of the young stellar population and re-emit it in the far-infrared waveband. Locally, all powerful radio sources reside in massive elliptical hosts. It is therefore natural to assume that high-redshift radio galaxies are the progenitors or earlier examples of these local systems. This thesis presents a study of the evolution of dust and gas (and hence star formation) in massive ellipticals. A sample of 47 luminous, steep-spectrum, lobe-dominated radio galaxies spanning a wide range of redshifts, 0.77

  6. Recurrent Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, Marek; Konar, Chiranjib; Machalski, Jerzy; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Saikia, Dhruba; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U.

    2007-10-15

    One of the outstanding issues concerning extragalactic radio sources is the total duration of their active phase and the possible existence of duty cycles of their nuclear activity. A duty cycle can be recognized if there is a mechanism which preserves the information of past activity for a sufficiently long time after a new activity has started up. If a new cycle starts before the radio lobes created during a former activity period have faded, we can recognize this by the observations of a young radio source embedded in an old relic structure.

  7. Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    Our study of radio galaxies combines X-ray, radio, and optical data to address scientific objectives including: Are the radio jets in pressure balance with an external hot medium? What is the rate of fuel supply to the active nuclei? What physical mechanisms produce the nuclear and jet emission? Needs for our data-analysis include the ability to: calibrate, clean, and map radio-synthesis continuum and spectral-line data. regrid images of poorer detector resolution than the radio (such as X-ray), display them superimposed on the radio image, and compare features in the images. perform joint spectral-spatial deconvolution of the photon-limited X-ray data to fit point-source and extended X-ray emission components in the presence of a spectrally- and spatially-dependent point-spread function; resolved components are typically not much larger than the point-spread. take into account absorbing gas when fitting the X-ray spectra; the hydrogen column density is measured in the spectral-line radio work. compare the temperature of X-ray emission thought to be due to hot gas with the maximum for gas in hydrostatic equilibrium; this maximum is indicated by the velocity dispersion of stars associated with the radio galaxy and galaxies in its group. extract surface brightness and temperature profiles across extended X-ray emission associated with hot gas; calculate the pressure at different locations and the cooling time of the gas; compare pressures with published minimum pressures for the radio components. plot a multiwavelength spectrum for a given spatial component of the galaxy, using the data-sets being analyzed and supplemented by results from published work, and fit to analytical or numerical emission models. Our current data-reduction, display, and analysis uses IRAF, AIPS, MONGO, and home-grown FORTRAN programs in a somewhat cumbersome and disjointed fashion, and simplifications are made in the analysis due to the current limitations of the tools and procedures. Work

  8. Serendipitous Discovery of a Radio Transient in the Luminous Radio Galaxy Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Richard A.; Perley, Daniel A.; Carilli, Chris Luke; Dhawan, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Recent Jansky Very Large Array observations of the luminous radio galaxy Cygnus A have revealed the presence of a 3 mJy, flat-spectrum, unresolved radio source located 0.4" (450 pc) from the nucleus. This source was not present in observations made 25 years ago. The luminosity and SED of the transient are comparable to the most luminous supernovae in the universe, and to GRB afterglows, although the most likely interpretation is that the transient represents a luminous flare from the nucleus of a minor galaxy merging with the host of Cygnus A -- possibly in the form of a tidal disruption event. We present our observations and interpretation of this event using recent JVLA and VLBA observations, and discuss its implications for the Cygnus A system and for dusty, merging galaxies generally.

  9. Far-Infrared Observations of Radio Quasars and FR II Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Rieke, G. H.; Hines, D. C.; Neugebauer, G.; Blaylock, M.; Rigby, J.; Egami, E.; Gordon, K. D.; Alonso-Herrero, A.

    2005-08-01

    We report MIPS photometry of 20 radio-loud quasars and galaxies at 24 and 70 μm (and of five at 160 μm). We combine this sample with additional sources detected in the far-infrared by IRAS and ISO for a total of 47 objects, including 23 steep-spectrum type I AGNs: radio-loud quasars and broad-line radio galaxies; and 24 type II AGNs: narrow-line and weak-line FR II radio galaxies. Of this sample, the far-infrared emission of all but 3C 380 appears to be dominated by emission by dust heated by the AGN and by star formation. The AGN appears to contribute more than 50% of the far-infrared luminosity in most of the sources. It is also expected that the material around the nucleus is optically thin in the far-infrared. Thus, the measurements at these wavelengths can be used to test the orientation-dependent unification model. As predicted by the model, the behavior of the sources is consistent with the presence of an obscuring circumnuclear torus; in fact, we find that it may still have significant optical depth at 24 μm. In addition, as expected for the radio-loud quasars, there is a significant correlation between the low-frequency radio (178 MHz) and the 70 μm emission, two presumably isotropic indicators of nuclear activity. This result is consistent with the simple unified scheme. However, there is a population of radio galaxies that are underluminous at 70 μm compared with the radio-loud quasars and hence are a challenge to the simple unified model.

  10. The software system ``Evolution of radio galaxies''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Verkhodanova, N. V.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.

    The project of the informational system creation on the problem of evolution of radio galaxies is described. This system, being developed at present at the server http://sed.sao.ru, allows a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distributions (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data using χ2-method. Authors use SEDs of several models (GISSEL'98 (Bruzual, Charlot, 1996), PEGASE (Fioc, Rocca-Volmerange, 1996, 1998)) for different types of galaxies. Synthetic spectra are smoothed by the filter sensetivity curves before the procedure of age estimation. There is a possibility to calculate extictions in different filters using infrared maps. The server containes full archive of RC-catalog radio galaxy images obtained with 6 m telescope of SAO and VLA data. Modes of HTTP, FTP and FTP access, formats of output result (TABLE and GNUPLOT graphic) and additional functions are described.

  11. System to Study Evolution of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanova, N. V.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.

    The project of the informational system creation on the problem of evolution of radio galaxies is described. This system, being developed at present at the server http:// sed.sao.ru, allows a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distributions (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data using χ2-method. Authors use SEDs of several models (GISSEL'98 (Bruzual, Charlot, 1996), PEGASE (Fioc, Rocca-Volmerange, 1996, 1998)) for different types of galaxies. Synthetic spectra are smoothed by the filter sensetivity curves before the procedure of age estimation. There is a possibility to calculate extictions in different filters using infrared maps. The server containes full archive of RC-catalog radio galaxy images obtained with 6 m telescope of SAO and VLA data. Modes of HTTP, FTP and FTP access, formats of output result (TABLE and GNUPLOT graphic) and additional functions are described.

  12. A pseudo-spectrum analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Oguri, Masamune

    2016-10-01

    We present the application of the pseudo-spectrum method to galaxy-galaxy lensing. We derive explicit expressions for the pseudo-spectrum analysis of the galaxy-shear cross-spectrum, which is the Fourier space counterpart of the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profile. The pseudo-spectrum method corrects observational issues such as the survey geometry, masks of bright stars and their spikes, and inhomogeneous noise, which distort the spectrum and also mix the E-mode and the B-mode signals. Using ray-tracing simulations in N-body simulations including realistic masks, we confirm that the pseudo-spectrum method successfully recovers the input galaxy-shear cross-spectrum. We also show that the galaxy-shear cross-spectrum has an excess covariance relative to the Gaussian covariance at small scales (k ≳ 1h Mpc-1) where the shot noise is dominated in the Gaussian approximation. We find that the excess is consistent with the expectation from the halo sample variance (HSV), which originates from the matter fluctuations at scales larger than the survey area. We apply the pseudo-spectrum method to the observational data of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing survey shear catalogue and three different spectroscopic samples of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy, and Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS and LOWZ galaxies. The galaxy-shear cross-spectra are significantly detected at the level of 7-10σ using the analytic covariance with the HSV contribution included. We also confirm that the observed spectra are consistent with the halo model predictions with the halo occupation distribution parameters estimated from previous work. This work demonstrates the viability of galaxy-galaxy lensing analysis in the Fourier space.

  13. Imaging Radio Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, W. H.; van Breugel, W. J. M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roberts, J.; Fidkowski, K.

    2000-12-01

    We present 42 milli-arcsecond resolution Adaptive Optics near-infrared images of 3C 452 and 3C 294, two powerful radio galaxies at z=0.081 and z=1.79 respectively, obtained with the NIRSPEC/SCAM+AO instrument on the Keck telescope. The observations provide unprecedented morphological detail of radio galaxy components like nuclear dust-lanes, off-centered or binary nuclei, and merger induced starforming structures; all of which are key features in understanding galaxy formation and the onset of powerful radio emission. Complementary optical HST imaging data are used to construct high resolution color images, which, for the first time, have matching optical and near-IR resolutions. Based on these maps, the extra-nuclear structural morphologies and compositions of both galaxies are discussed. Furthermore, detailed brightness profile analysis of 3C 452 allows a direct comparison to a large literature sample of nearby ellipticals, all of which have been observed in the optical and near-IR by HST. Both the imaging data and the profile information on 3C 452 are consistent with it being a relative diminutive and well-evolved elliptical, in stark contrast to 3C 294 which seems to be in its initial formation throes with an active AGN off-centered from the main body of the galaxy. These results are discussed further within the framework of radio galaxy triggering and the formation of massive ellipticals. The work of WdV and WvB was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The work at UCSD has been supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, under agreement No. AST-98-76783.

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the 325 MHz radio luminosity function of AGN and star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Matthew; Mauch, T.; Jarvis, M. J.; McAlpine, K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Fine, S.; Johnston, R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Baldry, I. K.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Bremer, M. N.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Obreschkow, D.; Sadler, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of the evolution of both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-formation in galaxies underpins our understanding of galaxy evolution over cosmic time. Radio continuum observations can provide key information on these two processes, in particular via the mechanical feedback produced by radio jets in AGN, and via an unbiased dust-independent measurement of star formation rates. In this paper, we determine radio luminosity functions at 325 MHz for a sample of AGN and star-forming galaxies by matching a 138 deg2 radio survey conducted with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, with optical imaging and redshifts from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We find that the radio luminosity function at 325 MHz for star-forming galaxies closely follows that measured at 1.4 GHz. By fitting the AGN radio luminosity function out to z = 0.5 as a double power law, and parametrizing the evolution as Φ ∝ (1 + z)k, we find evolution parameters of k = 0.92 ± 0.95 assuming pure density evolution and k = 2.13 ± 1.96 assuming pure luminosity evolution. We find that the Low Excitation Radio Galaxies are the dominant population in space density at lower luminosities. Comparing our 325 MHz observations with radio continuum imaging at 1.4 GHz, we determine separate radio luminosity functions for steep- and flat-spectrum AGN, and show that the beamed population of flat-spectrum sources in our sample can be shifted in number density and luminosity to coincide with the unbeamed population of steep-spectrum sources, as is expected in the orientation-based unification of AGN.

  15. DISCOVERY OF GIANT RELIC RADIO LOBES STRADDLING THE CLASSICAL DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY 3C452

    SciTech Connect

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide ''double-double'' radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  16. Multifrequency radio observations of Cygnus A - Spectral aging in powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Perley, R. A.; Dreher, J. W.; Leahy, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the radio spectrum across the lobes of Cygnus A is presented in order to critically test the synchroton spectral aging theory. The results are in good agreement with the jet model for powerful radio galaxies, involving particle acceleration at the hot spots and outflow into the radio lobes, with subsequent energy loss due to synchrotron radiation. The hot spot spectra are well represented by a spectral aging model involving continuous injection of relativistic particles. Both hot spots have spectral break frequencies around 10 GHz. An injection index of 0.5 is found for both hot spots, consistent with diffusive shock acceleration at a strong nonrelativistic shock in a Newtonian fluid. The LF hot spot emission spectrum falls below the injected power law. This effect is isolated to the hot spots, and is best explained by a low-energy cutoff in the particle distribution.

  17. Spectrophotometry of 2 complete samples of flat radio spectrum quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, E. J.; Gaskell, C. M.; Burke, W. L.; Baldwin, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of two complete samples of flat-spectrum radio quasars show that for these objects there is a strong correlation between the equivalent width of the CIV wavelength 1550 emission line and the luminosity of the underlying continuum. Assuming Friedmann cosmologies, the scatter in this correlation is a minimum for q (sub o) is approximately 1. Alternatively, luminosity evolution can be invoked to give compact distributions for q (sub o) is approximately 0 models. A sample of Seyfert galaxies observed with IUE shows that despite some dispersion the average equivalent width of CIV wavelength 1550 in Seyfert galaxies is independent of the underlying continuum luminosity. New redshifts for 4 quasars are given.

  18. Coding for spread spectrum packet radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    Packet radios are often expected to operate in a radio communication network environment where there tends to be man made interference signals. To combat such interference, spread spectrum waveforms are being considered for some applications. The use of convolutional coding with Viterbi decoding to further improve the performance of spread spectrum packet radios is examined. At 0.00001 bit error rates, improvements in performance of 4 db to 5 db can easily be achieved with such coding without any change in data rate nor spread spectrum bandwidth. This coding gain is more dramatic in an interference environment.

  19. Radiative versus Jet Mode in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the local universe, the vast majority of radio-loud active galaxies show none of the conventional AGN apparatus of accretion disk, torus, corona, or broad/narrow-line regions. Instead such nuclear emission as they have appears to be completely dominated by emission directly from the jet; the accretion, which must be present to drive the jet, appears to be highly radiatively inefficient. However, the most radio-luminous objects in the universe are almost all quasars (type I or type II) which behave in the textbook manner, appearing as a normal radiatively efficient AGN with the addition of a jet. The past decade has seen a substantial evolution in our understanding of the physical origins of these differences, their relation to the host galaxy and environment, and their interpretation in terms of completely unified models of AGN, and I will review our current understanding of these issues in my talk.

  20. Gravitational wave astronomy with radio galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise

    2017-07-01

    In the next decade, new astrophysical instruments will deliver the first large-scale maps of gravitational waves (GWs) and radio sources. Therefore, it is timely to investigate the possibility to combine them to provide new and complementary ways to study the Universe. Using simulated catalogues appropriate to the planned surveys, it is possible to predict measurements of the cross-correlation between radio sources and GW maps and the effects of a stochastic GW background on galaxy maps. Effects of GWs on the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe can be used to investigate the nature of the progenitors of merging black holes, the validity of Einstein's general relativity, models for dark energy and detect a stochastic background of GW. The results obtained show that the galaxy-GW cross-correlation can provide useful information in the near future, while the detection of tensor perturbation effects on the LSS will require instruments with capabilities beyond the currently planned next generation of radio arrays. Nevertheless, any information from the combination of galaxy surveys with the GW maps will help provide additional information for the newly born GW astronomy.

  1. The nature of powerful compact radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Woltjer, L.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Ekers, R. D.

    2000-10-01

    Three compact powerful radio galaxies, PKS 1353- 341, PKS 1814-637 and PKS 1934-638, have been imaged. The three galaxies seem to be giant ellipticals, the last two being bluer than normal gEs by 0.2-0.3 mag in B-I, which is expected if they are the result of recent merging. HI absorption has been detected in all three objects with very different characteristics. The broad absorption in PKS 1353 -341 probably takes place in a torus or a disk with a radius of at least a few tens of pc. For PKS 1814-637 the principal absorption is less broad and the disk radius more likely a few hundreds of pc. The absorption in PKS 1934-638 is very narrow and is probably due to gas not directly connected to the central engine. Data for a dozen of powerful radio galaxies with H I absorption are reviewed. Such absorption seems to be particularly common at high radio power. Based on observations obtained with the Australia Telescope and the 3.6m and NTT telescopes of ESO La Silla (Chile)

  2. Optical emission in the radio lobes of radio galaxies. II - New observations of 21 radio lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, P.; Tyson, J. A.; Saslaw, W. C.

    1983-02-01

    The authors report new identifications of optical emission associated with the radio lobes of double radio galaxies. Optical emission is present in the outer radio structure of the sources 3C 219, 3C 244.1, 3C 247, 3C 252, 3C 268.2, 3C 321, 3C 319, 3C 337, and possibly in 3C 330. The authors have not found emission to the detection limit of V ≡ 24 in the sources 3C 79, 3C 173.1, 3C 223, 3C 325, and 3C 381. Of the 21 separate sources in optical studies of extended lobes of radio galaxies reported to date, 16 radio sources observed so far show significant optical emission within one or both lobes, while in 11 of these the optical object is within 2arcsec of the radio peak.

  3. The Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    Energetic feedback from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) is required to prevent catastrophic cooling of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters. Evidence for this is seen through the inflation of cavities in the ICM by AGN-launched, radio-emitting jets, and understanding this process is an active area of research. Radio observations play an integral role in this, as they trace the active stages of the feedback cycle. Understanding the radio properties of BCGs is therefore paramount for understanding both galaxy clusters and AGN feedback processes globally. Within this thesis, the BCGs in a large (>700) sample of X-ray selected clusters are studied. We observe these BCGs with a wide variety of facilities, building a census of their radio properties across a range of frequencies, timescales and angular resolutions. Radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are built for over 200 BCGs, and then decomposed into two components; a core, attributable to ongoing nuclear activity, and a non-core, attributable to historical accretion. Both components are not only more common, but also significantly more powerful in cool-core (CC) clusters than non-cool core (NCC) clusters. However, it is the presence of an active core that shows BCGs in CC clusters are constantly `on' - explaining how they regulate their environments over gigayear timescales. We observe 35 currently active BCGs at high (15-353 GHz) radio frequencies, and monitor their variability. Self-absorbed, active components are found to be common at high frequency. Little variability is seen on < year timescales, although longer term variation of ~10% annually over few-decade timescales is observed. Evidence is presented for a hitherto unseen component in BCG spectra that may be attributable to a naked Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF). The milli-arcsecond scale radio properties of 59 sources are studied, with a large range of morphologies recovered although no

  4. Obscuration, orientation, and the infrared properties of radio-loud active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Laurikainen, Eija

    1994-01-01

    We report on a study of the mid- and far-infrared (MFIR) properties of several different classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the IRAS database. Our goal is to try to improve the understanding of the possible relationships between the diverse classes of AGNs. The MFIR and radio properties of radio-loud AGNs are especially useful in this regard, since (excluding the blazar class, which we do not study here) the radio emission is thought to be emitted isotropically, and the radio and MFIR radiation should be much less affected by dust obscuration than radiation at shorter wavelengths. We have first compared samples of 3CR broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) and narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) matched in radio flux and mean redshift. We find that the BLRGs are stronger than the NLRGs by a factor of 4-5 in their mid-IR emission but are similar to the NLRGs in the far-IR. This is qualitatively consistent with recent 'unification' models for NLRGs and BLRGs which invoke thermal MFIR emission from dusty 'obscuring tori,' but there may be an additional source of far-IR emission present in the more luminous broad-line objects (the radio-loud quasars) studied previously by Heckman, Chambers & Postman (1992). We have also compared samples of Fanaroff-Riley class I (FRI) and Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) radio galaxies matched in radio flux and redshift. The FRII galaxies are stronger MFIR emitters than the FRI galaxies by a factor of about 4. This is consistent with suggestions that the central engine in FRI galaxies produces relatively little radiant energy per unit jet power (expecially since we find that the weak MFIR emission from the FRI galaxies may not be powered by the AGN). Comparing samples of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) and compact steep spectrum (CSS) sources versus non-GPS-CSS sources, we find that the GPS-CSS and non-GPS-CSS sources have similar MFIR strengths. This suggests that the efficiency of the conversion of jet kinetic energy

  5. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Patten, Brian M.

    1991-01-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals.

  6. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  7. Chandra observations of dying radio sources in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims: We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods: We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results: The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions: We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  8. 3C 220.3: A Radio Galaxy Lensing a Submillimeter Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Martin; Leipski, Christian; Barthel, Peter; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Vegetti, Simona; Bussmann, R. Shane; Willner, S. P.; Westhues, Christian; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Chini, Rolf; Clements, David L.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Horesh, Assaf; Klaas, Ulrich; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Lagattuta, David J.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Stern, Daniel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2014-07-01

    Herschel Space Observatory photometry and extensive multiwavelength follow-up have revealed that the powerful radio galaxy (PRG) 3C 220.3 at z = 0.685 acts as a gravitational lens for a background submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 2.221. At an observed wavelength of 1 mm, the SMG is lensed into three distinct images. In the observed near infrared, these images are connected by an arc of ~1''.8 radius forming an Einstein half-ring centered near the radio galaxy. In visible light, only the arc is apparent. 3C 220.3 is the only known instance of strong galaxy-scale lensing by a PRG not located in a galaxy cluster and therefore it offers the potential to probe the dark matter content of the radio galaxy host. Lens modeling rejects a single lens, but two lenses centered on the radio galaxy host A and a companion B, separated by 1''.5, provide a fit consistent with all data and reveal faint candidates for the predicted fourth and fifth images. The model does not require an extended common dark matter halo, consistent with the absence of extended bright X-ray emission on our Chandra image. The projected dark matter fractions within the Einstein radii of A (1''.02) and B (0''.61) are about 0.4 ± 0.3 and 0.55 ± 0.3. The mass to i-band light ratios of A and B, M/Li ˜ 8 +/- 4 M⊙ L⊙ -1, appear comparable to those of radio-quiet lensing galaxies at the same redshift in the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey, Lenses Structure and Dynamics, and Strong Lenses in the Legacy Survey samples. The lensed SMG is extremely bright with observed f(250 μm) = 440 mJy owing to a magnification factor μ ~ 10. The SMG spectrum shows luminous, narrow C IV λ1549 Å emission, revealing that the SMG houses a hidden quasar in addition to a violent starburst. Multicolor image reconstruction of the SMG indicates a bipolar morphology of the emitted ultraviolet (UV) light suggestive of cones through which UV light escapes a dust-enshrouded nucleus.

  9. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Pursimo, T.; Johnston, Helen M.; Stanford, Laura M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Jauncey, David L.; Zenere, Katrina A.

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ˜160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  10. The BL LAC phenomenon: X-ray observations of transition objects and determination of the x-ray spectrum of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities related to two ROSAT investigations: (1) x-ray properties of radio galaxies thought to contain BL Lac type nuclei; and (2) x-ray spectra of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources. The following papers describing the research are provided as attachments: Multiple X-ray Emission Components in Low Power Radio Galaxies; New X-ray Results on Radio Galaxies; Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies; Separation of X-ray Emission Components in Radio Galaxies; X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies and Quasars; Extended and Compact X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies; and X-ray Spectra of a Complete Sample of Extragalactic Core-dominated Radio Sources.

  11. Evidence for particle re-acceleration in the radio relic in the galaxy cluster PLCKG287.0+32.9

    SciTech Connect

    Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Intema, H. T.; Girardi, M.; Nonino, M.; Kantharia, N.; Van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2014-04-10

    Radio relics are diffuse radio sources observed in galaxy clusters, probably produced by shock acceleration during cluster-cluster mergers. Their large size, of the order of 1 Mpc, indicates that the emitting electrons need to be (re)accelerated locally. The usually invoked diffusive shock acceleration models have been challenged by recent observations and theory. We report the discovery of complex radio emission in the Galaxy cluster PLCKG287.0+32.9, which hosts two relics, a radio halo, and several radio filamentary emission. Optical observations suggest that the cluster is elongated, likely along an intergalactic filament, and displays a significant amount of substructure. The peculiar features of this radio relic are that (1) it appears to be connected to the lobes of a radio galaxy and (2) the radio spectrum steepens on either side of the radio relic. We discuss the origins of these features in the context of particle re-acceleration.

  12. The radio-optical correlation in steep-spectrum quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, Stephen; Rawlings, Steve; Lacy, Mark; Maddox, Stephen J.; Baker, Joanne C.; Clements, Dave; Lilje, Per B.

    1998-03-01

    Using complete samples of steep-spectrum quasars, we present evidence for a correlation between radio and optical luminosity which is not caused by selection effects, nor caused by an orientation dependence (such as relativistic beaming), nor a by-product of cosmic evolution. We argue that this rules out models of jet formation in which there are no parameters in common with the production of the optical continuum. This is arguably the most direct evidence to date for a close link between accretion onto a black hole and the fuelling of relativistic jets. The correlation also provides a natural explanation for the presence of aligned optical/radio structures in only the most radio-luminous high-redshift galaxies.

  13. Radio emission and the forbidden line region of Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulvestad, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an extensive program of mapping Seyfert galaxies using the Very Large Array radio telescope are presented. Unlike the majority of radio galaxies, the radio emission in most Seyferts is confined to the inner few kiloparsecs (or less) of the galaxy. This scale is similar to the size of the region in which optical forbidden line emission occurs. Six double (or triple) radio sources have been mapped now in Seyfert galaxies. Approximately ten more galaxies shown more diffuse emission or are resolved only slightly. In almost all galaxies, the central radio peak, when present, coincides with the optical continuum peak. In every double or triple radio source, the outer radio lobes straddle that optical peak. The major axes of the double and triple radio sources may be correlated with the directions of greatest elongation of the optical line-emitting cloud complexes. However, the radio source axes do not appear to be related to the major or minor axes of the outer optical continuum isophotes of the Seyfert galaxies. Synchrotron emission is the dominant source of radio photons in all the galaxies observed. Thermal processes contribute, on the average, no more than about 6% of the total radio emission at 4.885 GHz. Using standard assumptions, radio luminosities, magnetic fields, and total energy contents have been calculated for the observed galaxies. The triple radio source in NGC 5548 has been studied in detail. The properties of NGC 5548 have been used to investigate some theoretical aspects of the double and triple sources and their relationship to the forbidden line region (FLR).

  14. Rings in Radio Galaxies: a Multiwavelength Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizani, Nectaria A.; Garrett, M. A.; Morganti, R.; Cohen, A.; Kassim, N.; Gonzales-Serrano, I.; Leahy, J. P.

    We are studying the two powerful radio galaxies Hercules A and 3C310 and their clusters. They present many essential and atypical similarities with the striking one being the presence of large-scale rings instead of hotspots. Employing a multiwavelength observational campaign from radio to Gamma-ray wavelengths we are trying to determine the origin of their unusual structure and tenue (compared with the common AGN) and to disentagle the physical mechanisms taking place interior to them and in their clusters. For example: -In the RADIO we probe the pc- and kpc-scale environment. -In the (Near-)INFRARED we try to constrain the nature of the acceleration mechanism in the rings with the corresponding in the usual hotspots investigate the ISM shed light in their evolution. -In the OPTICAL we study of the ionized gas in the accretion disk fuelling the massive black hole. -In the ULTRAVIOLET we explore the nuclear region the ISM and its interaction with the jets. -In the X-RAYS we probe the intracluster medium identify possible interactions between the X-ray and radio emission measure cluster magnetic fields. -In the GAMMA-RAYS we study the intergalactic medium.

  15. Radio properties of narrow-lined Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, James S.; Antonucci, Robert R. J.; Goodrich, Robert W.

    1995-01-01

    We have observed seven narrow-linedd Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies and one high-ionization Seyfert 2 galaxy with the Very Large Array (VLA). Combining these observations with published data, we summarize the radio properties of the NLS1 galaxies for which spectropolarimetry was reported by Goodrich. Fifteen of these 17 objects now have published radio observations of high sensitivity, and only nine of those have been detected. For a Hubble parameter of 75 km/s/Mpc, the 6 cm radio powers range from 10(exp 20) to 10(exp 23) W/Hz, within the range previously found for other types of Seyfert galaxy. The median radio size of the nine VLA-detected galaxies is no larger than 300 pc, similar to the median size found by Ulvestad & Wilson for a distance-limited sample of Seyfert galaxies. Of the six NLS1 galaxies known to have significant intrinsic optical polarization, three have measurable radio axes. Two of those three galaxies have radio major axes close to 90 deg from their polarization position angles, while the third has an inner radio axis that may be nearly parallel to the polarization position angle. The former relationship is expected for a Seyfert 1 in a unified model of Seyfert galaxies, assuming no intrinsic continuum polarization.

  16. `Zwicky's Nonet': a compact merging ensemble of nine galaxies and 4C 35.06, a peculiar radio galaxy with dancing radio jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biju, K. G.; Bagchi, Joydeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Jacob, Joe; Patil, M. K.; Kumar, P. Sunil; Pandge, Mahadev; Dabhade, Pratik; Gaikwad, Madhuri; Dhurde, Samir; Abraham, Sheelu; Vivek, M.; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2017-10-01

    We report the results of our radio, optical and infrared studies of a peculiar radio source 4C 35.06, an extended radio-loud active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the centre of galaxy cluster Abell 407 (z = 0.047). The central region of this cluster hosts a remarkably tight ensemble of nine galaxies, the spectra of which resemble those of passive red ellipticals, embedded within a diffuse stellar halo of ∼1 arcmin size. This system (named 'Zwicky's Nonet') provides unique and compelling evidence for a multiple-nucleus cD galaxy precursor. Multifrequency radio observations of 4C 35.06 with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 610, 235 and 150 MHz reveal a system of 400-kpc scale helically twisted and kinked radio jets and outer diffuse lobes. The outer extremities of jets contain extremely steep-spectrum (spectral index -1.7 to -2.5) relic/fossil radio plasma with a spectral age of a few ×(107-108) yr. Such ultra-steep spectrum relic radio lobes without definitive hotspots are rare and they provide an opportunity to understand the life cycle of relativistic jets and physics of black hole mergers in dense environments. We interpret our observations of this radio source in the context of growth of its central black hole, triggering of its AGN activity and jet precession, all possibly caused by galaxy mergers in this dense galactic system. A slow conical precession of the jet axis due to gravitational perturbation between interacting black holes is invoked to explain the unusual jet morphology.

  17. On the morphological dichotomies observed in the powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Best, P. N.

    2017-06-01

    We study environment and host galaxy properties of powerful radio galaxies with different radio morphologies from compact sources to very extended double lobed radio galaxies and with different optical spectra classified as high excitation (HERG; quasar-mode) and low excitation (LERG; jet-mode) radio galaxies. We use a complete sample of morphologically classified radio sources from [1] and perform three different analyses: i) we compare compact radio sources with the extended sources from the same class of excitation. ii) we compare HERGs with the LERGs using a combined sample of compact and extended sources. iii) we investigate the origin of different morphologies observed in the very extended powerful radio galaxies, historically classified as Fanaroff-Riley (FR) radio galaxies of type I and type II by comparing a sample of FRIs with the FRIIs from the same excitation class. We discuss the results and what causes the differences in each comparison. The role of host galaxy and the central super massive black hole, and the galaxy interactions are all investigated.

  18. NASA Radio Frequency Spectrum Management Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Radio Frequency (RF) Spectrum Management Manual sets forth procedures and guidelines for the management requirements for controlling the use of radio frequencies by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It is applicable to NASA Headquarters and field installations. NASA Management Instruction 1102.3 assigns the authority for management of radio frequencies for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to the Associate Administrator for Space Operations, NASA Headquarters. This manual is issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes.

  19. Smart radio: spectrum access for first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvius, Mark D.; Ge, Feng; Young, Alex; MacKenzie, Allen B.; Bostian, Charles W.

    2008-04-01

    This paper details the Wireless at Virginia Tech Center for Wireless Telecommunications' (CWT) design and implementation of its Smart Radio (SR) communication platform. The CWT SR can identify available spectrum within a pre-defined band, rendezvous with an intended receiver, and transmit voice and data using a selected quality of service (QoS). This system builds upon previous cognitive technologies developed by CWT for the public safety community, with the goal of providing a prototype mobile communications package for military and public safety First Responders. A master control (MC) enables spectrum awareness by characterizing the radio environment with a power spectrum sensor and an innovative signal detection and classification module. The MC also enables spectrum and signal memory by storing sensor results in a knowledge database. By utilizing a family radio service (FRS) waveform database, the CWT SR can create a new communication link on any designated FRS channel frequency using FM, BPSK, QPSK, or 8PSK modulations. With FM, it supports analog voice communications with legacy hand-held FRS radios. With digital modulations, it supports IP data services, including a CWT developed CVSD-based VoIP protocol. The CWT SR coordinates spectrum sharing between analog primary users and digital secondary users by applying a simple but effective channel-change protocol. It also demonstrates a novel rendezvous protocol to facilitate the detection and initialization of communications links with neighboring SR nodes through the transmission of frequency-hopped rendezvous beacons. By leveraging the GNU Radio toolkit, writing key modules entirely in Python, and utilizing the USRP hardware front-end, the CWT SR provides a dynamic spectrum test bed for future smart and cognitive radio research.

  20. On the population of remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies and implications for radio source dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Morganti, R.; Brienza, M.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this work is two-fold: (1) to quantify the occurrence of ultrasteep spectrum remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxies in a 74 MHz flux-limited sample, and (2) perform Monte Carlo simulations of the population of active and remnant FRII radio galaxies to confront models of remnant lobe evolution, and to provide guidance for further investigation of remnant radio galaxies. We find that fewer than 2 per cent of FRII radio galaxies with S74 MHz > 1.5 Jy are candidate ultrasteep spectrum remnants, where we define ultrasteep spectrum as α _74 MHz^1400 MHz > 1.2. Our Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that models involving Sedov-like expansion in the remnant phase, resulting in rapid adiabatic energy losses, are consistent with this upper limit, and predict the existence of nearly twice as many remnants with normal (not ultrasteep) spectra in the observed frequency range as there are ultrasteep spectrum remnants. This model also predicts an ultrasteep remnant fraction approaching 10 per cent at redshifts z < 0.5. Importantly, this model implies the lobes remain overpressured with respect to the ambient medium well after their active lifetime, in contrast with existing observational evidence that many FRII radio galaxy lobes reach pressure equilibrium with the external medium whilst still in the active phase. The predicted age distribution of remnants is a steeply decreasing function of age. In other words, young remnants are expected to be much more common than old remnants in flux-limited samples. For this reason, incorporating higher frequency data ≳5 GHz will be of great benefit to future studies of the remnant population.

  1. Compact radio sources in luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Rodrigo

    2007-08-01

    Radio interferometry is an observational technique of high sensitivity and incomparably high spatial resolution. Moreover, because radio waves can freely propagate through interstellar dust and gas, it allows the study of regions of the universe completely obscured at other wavelengths. This thesis reports the observational and theoretical results of my research during the past four years which are mostly based on interferometric radio data. The COLA sample is an infrared selected sample of active star forming galaxies. We conducted 6 cm VLA and VLBI snapshot observations of the northern half of this sample. The radio emission seen at VLA scales is consistent with being powered by star formation activity because it follows the far infrared to radio correlation. We detect 22% of the sample sources in our VLBI snapshots. Based on luminosity arguments, we argue that these sub-parsec VLBI sources are powered by AGN activity. Furthermore, we find that VLBI detections are preferentially found in sources whose VLA scale structures have the highest peak brightnesses suggesting a strong correlation between compact starburst and AGN activity. This observational result is consistent with the theoretical picture of an Eddington-limited nuclear starburst acting as the last valve in the pipeline transporting the gas from kiloparsec scales onto the accretion disc of a buried AGN. Arp 220 is the archetypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy. For many years this source has been known to harbour a compact (~100 pc) cluster of unresolved 18 cm bright sources believed to be bright core collapse supernovae. Using multiwavelength VLBI observations, we obtained for the first time radio spectra for 18 of these sources. We find that over a half of them have spectra consistent with young supernovae. The rest can be better explained as older supernova remnants interacting with the high density starburst ISM. This finding allowed us to constrain the number of possible scenarios for the Arp 220

  2. PKS 0347+05: a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus system triggered in a major galaxy merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C. N.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Morganti, R.; Holt, J.; Rose, M.; Dicken, D.; Inskip, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present optical, infrared (IR) and radio observations of the powerful Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio source PKS 0347+05 (z = 0.3390), and demonstrate that it is a rare example of a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus (AGN) system, comprising a weak-line radio galaxy (WLRG) separated by 25 kpc (in projection) from a Seyfert 1 nucleus at the same redshift. Our deep Gemini optical images show a highly disturbed morphology, with a warped dust lane crossing through the halo and nuclear regions of the radio galaxy host, tidal tails and a bridge connecting the radio galaxy to the Seyfert 1 nucleus. Spectral synthesis modelling of our Gemini optical spectrum of the radio galaxy shows evidence for a reddened young stellar population of age ≤100 Myr. Further evidence for recent star formation activity in this source is provided by the detection of strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in mid-IR Spitzer/IRS spectra. Together, these observations support a model in which both AGN have been triggered simultaneously in a major galaxy merger. However, despite the presence of a powerful FR II radio source, and the apparently plentiful supply of fuel provided by the merger, the nucleus of the radio galaxy shows only weak, low-ionization emission-line activity. We speculate that the fuel supply to nuclear regions of the radio galaxy has recently switched off (within the last ˜106 yr), but the information about the resulting decrease in nuclear AGN activity has yet to reach the extended lobes and hotspots of the FR II radio source. Based on this scenario, we derive a lower limit on the typical lifetimes of powerful, intermediate-redshift FR II radio sources of τ FR II ≳5×106 yr. Overall, our observations emphasize that the fuelling of AGN activity in major galaxy mergers is likely to be highly intermittent.

  3. Accretion processes of radio galaxies at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    AGN are the luminous (L>10^42 erg/s) cores of active galaxies, powered by accretion onto the central super massive black hole, either via an accretion disk or via a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. There are still several open questions, for example on the launching of jets, which are present in about 10% of the AGN. Another question appeared with the Fermi/LAT gamma-ray survey, which detected many blazars but also a small group of radio galaxies. Radio galaxies are postulated to be blazars where the observer sees the jet at an angle θ>10 degrees allowing a view of both jet and core, rather than only the jet as is the case with blazars. Radio galaxies are divided into two classes, depending on the radio luminosity of the jets. The Fanaroff-Riley I (FR-I) sources have jets that are bright near the core, where the FR-IIs display extended edge-brightened jets. The FR-I sources are connected to the BL Lacs, which are low-luminosity blazars. FR-II types are thought to be the parent population of the luminous FSRQ, which are also blazars. This thesis presents a study of gamma-ray bright radio galaxies. By analysing X-ray and gamma-ray data in addition to creating broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we studied two examples of this new class of sources. For the FR-II source 3C 111 we analysed Suzaku/XIS and PIN and INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI observations to create a X-ray spectrum. We also used a Swift/BAT spectrum from the 58-month survey. The 0.4-200 keV spectrum of the source shows both thermal, Seyfert-like signatures such as an iron K-α line, and non-thermal jet features. We also analysed gamma-ray data from Fermi/LAT. The gamma-ray and X-ray data are combined with historical radio, infrared and optical observations to build the SED, which can be well represented with a non-thermal jet model. The bolometric luminosity of 3C111 is rather low, and the SED model shows rather a BL Lac type than the expected FSRQ. The next source we studied is the nearby FR

  4. Extragalactic Peaked-spectrum Radio Sources at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callingham, J. R.; Ekers, R. D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Line, J. L. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Sadler, E. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Hancock, P. J.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-02-01

    We present a sample of 1483 sources that display spectral peaks between 72 MHz and 1.4 GHz, selected from the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey. The GLEAM survey is the widest fractional bandwidth all-sky survey to date, ideal for identifying peaked-spectrum sources at low radio frequencies. Our peaked-spectrum sources are the low-frequency analogs of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) and compact-steep spectrum (CSS) sources, which have been hypothesized to be the precursors to massive radio galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of known peaked-spectrum candidates, and 95% of our sample have a newly characterized spectral peak. We highlight that some GPS sources peaking above 5 GHz have had multiple epochs of nuclear activity, and we demonstrate the possibility of identifying high-redshift (z > 2) galaxies via steep optically thin spectral indices and low observed peak frequencies. The distribution of the optically thick spectral indices of our sample is consistent with past GPS/CSS samples but with a large dispersion, suggesting that the spectral peak is a product of an inhomogeneous environment that is individualistic. We find no dependence of observed peak frequency with redshift, consistent with the peaked-spectrum sample comprising both local CSS sources and high-redshift GPS sources. The 5 GHz luminosity distribution lacks the brightest GPS and CSS sources of previous samples, implying that a convolution of source evolution and redshift influences the type of peaked-spectrum sources identified below 1 GHz. Finally, we discuss sources with optically thick spectral indices that exceed the synchrotron self-absorption limit.

  5. Spread Spectrum Mobile Radio Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-15

    seconds, yielding Z Y a =XMZ m M .-m The sequence of operacions is illustrated by the matrices of figures ’--3- and 1-3b. Each matrix is either a...sequence of K-bit numbers (code word, address, detection matrix) or a frequency-time spectrogram (traasmit spectrum, receive spectrum). The matrices pertain...and a reduced rank-sum receiver. In figure 3-1, we show the operation of a MRSR by means of matrices . 3-1 Reduced Rank-Sum Receiver With the values of

  6. Low-Frequency Radio Observations of Galaxy Cluster Merger Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, Reinout

    2014-10-01

    In a few dozen merging galaxy clusters diffuse extended radio emission has been found, implying the presence of relativistic particles and magnetic fields in the intracluster medium. A major question is how these particles are accelerated up to such extreme energies. In this talk I will present LOFAR and JVLA radio observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster. The Toothbrush cluster hosts diffuse 2 Mpc extended radio emission in the form of a radio relic and halo. Our deep LOFAR and JVLA observations allow a radio spectral study to test the shock origin of the relic and underlying particle acceleration mechanisms.

  7. Radio-continuum observations of Sersic-Pastoriza galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.; Saikia, D. J.; Pedlar, A.; Axon, D. J.

    1989-07-01

    Preliminary results of radio continuum observations of selected Sersic-Pastoriza galaxies are presented. Subjects reported are their radio properties at 6 and 20 cm, estimates of linear polarization and spectral indices and a discussion of possible relationships between nuclear morphology and radio luminosity.

  8. Searching for Molecular Gas in Southern Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandoni, I.; Laing, R. A.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.

    2012-07-01

    It has recently been proposed that the jets of low-luminosity radio galaxies are powered by direct accretion of the hot phase of the IGM onto the central black hole. Cold gas remains a plausible alternative fuel supply, however. The most compelling evidence that cold gas plays a role in fueling radio galaxies is that dust is detected more commonly and/or in larger quantities in (elliptical) radio galaxies compared with radio-quiet elliptical galaxies. On the other hand, only small numbers of radio galaxies have yet been detected in CO (and even fewer imaged), and whether or not all radio galaxies have enough cold gas to fuel their jets remains an open question. If so, then the dynamics of the cold gas in the nuclei of radio galaxies may provide important clues to the fuelling mechanism. The only instrument capable of imaging the molecular component on scales relevant to the accretion process is ALMA, but very little is yet known about CO in southern radio galaxies. Our aim is to measure the CO content in a complete volume-limited sample of southern radio galaxies, in order to create a well-defined list of nearby targets to be imaged in the near future with ALMA. APEX has been equipped with a receiver (APEX-1) able to observe the 230 GHz waveband. This allows us to search for CO(2-1) line emission in our target galaxies. Here we present the results of CO(2-1) APEX-1 spectroscopy taken in 2008 and 2010 for our southern sample. The experiment was successful with nearly all targets detected, and several indications for double-horned CO line profiles, consistent with ordered rotation.

  9. HOST GALAXIES OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, A.; Cheung, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, active galaxies that emit much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies has an “X”-or winged-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being a realignment of the black hole within the AGN and the second positing that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium, causing backflow and producing secondary wings. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, the distribution of the stellar mass is compared to the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN. Results show elliptical host galaxies with an orthogonal offset between the semi-major axis of the host galaxy and the secondary radio wings, which lends support to the hydrodynamical model. However, results also show circular host galaxies with radio wings, making the realignment scenario a more likely model to describe the formation of these X-shaped radio sources.

  10. Goldstone radio spectrum protection. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaudian, B. A.; Cushman, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Potential electromagnetic interference to the Goldstone tracking receivers due to neighboring military installations is discussed. Coordination of the military and NASA Goldstone activities in the Mojave Desert area is seen to be an effective method to protect the Goldstone radio spectrum while maintaining compatible operations for the military and Goldstone.

  11. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Cheung, C. C.

    2007-05-01

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Classical double-lobed radio galaxies are characterized by a single pair of "active" radio lobes. A small subset show an additional pair of lower surface brightness 'wings' of emission, thus forming an overall winged or X-shaped appearance. Two competing mechanisms have been proposed to explain the "winged" morphology. One model posits that these are the remnants left over from a relatively recent merger of a binary supermassive black hole system. Others have argued that they result naturally from strong backflow in a radio jet cocoon expanding into an asymmetric medium. We used available Sloan Digital Sky Survey r-band images of 11 X-shaped sources to measure the host galaxy ellipticities. By analyzing the host galaxy shapes, we trace the surrounding gas distribution. The radio morphologies are compared to the host galaxy parameters to analogize between differing model expectations. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Student Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  12. The compact radio structure of radio-loud NLS1 galaxies and the relationship to CSS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, M.; Chen, Y.; Komossa, S.; Yuan, W.; Shen, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are thought to be young AGNs with relatively small black hole masses and high accretion rates. Radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s) are very special, because some of them show blazar-like characteristics, while others resemble compact steep-spectrum sources. Relativistic jets were shown to exist in a few RLNLS1s based on VLBI observations and confirmed by the gamma-ray flaring of some of them. These properties may possibly be contrary to typical radio-loud AGNs, in light of the low black-hole masses, and high accretion rates. We present the compact radio structure of fourteen RLNLS1 galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array observations at 5 GHz in 2013. Although all these sources are very radio-loud with {R > 100}, their jet properties are diverse, in terms of their milli-arcsecond (mas) scale (pc scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The core brightness temperatures of our sources are significantly lower than those of blazars, therefore, the beaming effect is generally not significant in our sources, compared to blazars. This implies that the bulk jet speed may likely be low in our sources. The relationship between RLNLS1s and compact steep-spectrum sources, and the implications on jet formation are discussed based on the pc-scale jet properties.

  13. 4C 40.36 - A radio galaxy at a redshift of 2.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, K. C.; Miley, G. K.; Van Breugel, W. J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Long-slit spectroscopy of a faint extended optical object identified with the radio source 4C 40.36 is presented. Three emission lines are detected. Their wavelengths match those of C IV 1549 A, He II 1640 A, and semiforbidden C III 1909 A to within 0.5 percent for a redshift of z = 2.269. The extended continuum emission (20 kpc) together with the large equivalent widths (about 100 A) and narrow profiles (1500 km/s) of the emission lines, all show that 4C 40.36 is a galaxy with properties similar to those of other distant radio galaxies. The redshift of 4C 40.36, however, considerably exceeds that of the most distant radio galaxy (3C 326.1 at z = 1.825) known to date. 4C 40.36 is of additional interest as an excellent example of the recently discovered phenomenon of alignment between the optical and radio axes of powerful distant radio galaxies. The object was investigated as part of a survey of ultra-steep spectrum radio sources, and it is shown that the selection criteria used to discover 4C 40.36 result in a sample of objects having a relatively low dispersion of monochromatic radio luminosities.

  14. Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source. CTIO 4-meter telescope, 1975. NGC 5128, a Type EO peculiar elliptical galaxy in the constellation Centaurus. This galaxy is one of the most luminous and massive galaxies known and is a strong source of both radio and X-ray radiation. Current theories suggest that the nucleus is experiencing giant explosions involving millions of stars and that the dark band across the galactic disk is material being ejected outward. Cerro Toloto 4-meter telescope photo. Photo credit: National Optical Astronomy Observatories

  15. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Imaging of the Host Galaxies of High-RedshiftRadio-loud Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; van Breugel, Wil J. M.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Miley, George K.

    1999-09-01

    host galaxy morphologies and that are responsible for some of the perceived radio/optical misalignments observed in ground-based imaging data. We do find good alignment between the extended Lyα and the radio sources, strong evidence for jet-cloud interactions in two cases, again resembling radio galaxies, and what is possibly the most luminous radio-UV synchrotron jet in one of the hosts at z=2.110. We discuss the significance of jet-cloud collisions in radio-loud quasars and their influence on radio morphologies in the framework of simple orientation-based quasar/radio galaxy unification schemes. Our observations suggest that the host galaxies of radio-loud steep-spectrum quasars are similar to those of radio galaxies and strengthen previous conclusions based on ground-based data that both types of objects are probably members of the same parent population. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, Alessondra; /Wellesley Coll. /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies have an ''X''-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being through the merger of a binary supermassive black hole system and the second being that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, we probe the distribution of the stellar mass to compare the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN.

  17. The Host Galaxies of Micro-Jansky Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchsinger, K. M.; Lacy, M.; Jones, K. M.; Mauduit, J. C.; Pforr, J.; Surace, J. A.; Vaccari, M.; Farrah, D.; Gonzales-Solares, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Maraston, C.; Marchetti, L.; Oliver, S.; Afonso, J.; Cappozi, D.; Sajina, A.

    2015-09-01

    We combine a deep 0.5 deg2, 1.4 GHz deep radio survey in the Lockman Hole with infrared and optical data in the same field, including the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) and UKIDSS near-infrared surveys, to make the largest study to date of the host galaxies of radio sources with typical radio flux densities ˜ 50 μJy. 87% (1274/1467) of radio sources have identifications in SERVS to {AB}≈ 23.1 at 3.6 or 4.5μm, and 9% are blended with bright objects (mostly stars), leaving only 4% (59 objects), which are too faint to confidently identify in the near-infrared. We are able to estimate photometric redshifts for 68% of the radio sources. We use mid-infrared diagnostics to show that the source population consists of a mixture of star-forming galaxies, rapidly accreting (cold mode) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and low accretion rate (hot mode) AGNs, with neither AGNs nor star-forming galaxies clearly dominating. We see the breakdown in the K-z relation in faint radio source samples, and show that it is due to radio source populations becoming dominated by sources with radio luminosities ˜ {10}23 {{WHz}}-1. At these luminosities, both the star-forming galaxies and the cold mode AGNs have hosts with stellar luminosities of about a factor of two lower than those of hot mode AGNs, which continue to reside in only the most massive hosts. We show that out to at least z˜ 2, galaxies with stellar masses \\gt {10}11.5 {M}⊙ have radio-loud fractions up to ˜30%. This is consistent with there being a sufficient number of radio sources for radio-mode feedback to play a role in galaxy evolution.

  18. Dust and ionized gas in active radio elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, D. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present broad and narrow bandwidth imaging of three southern elliptical galaxies which have flat-spectrum active radio cores (NGC 1052, IC 1459 and NGC 6958). All three contain dust and extended low excitation optical line emission, particularly extensive in the case of NGC 1052 which has a large H alpha + (NII) luminosity. Both NGC 1052 and IC 1459 have a spiral morphology in emission-line images. All three display independent strong evidence that a merger or infall event has recently occurred, i.e., extensive and infalling HI gas in NGC 1052, a counter-rotating core in IC 1459 and Malin-Carter shells in NGC 6958. This infall event is the most likely origin for the emission-line gas and dust, and the authors are currently investigating possible excitation mechanisms (Sparks et al. 1990).

  19. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.R.; Patten, B.M. Hawaii, University, Honolulu )

    1991-05-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals. 55 refs.

  20. Mpc-scale diffuse radio emission in two massive cool-core clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Martin W.; Basu, Kaustuv; Intema, Huib; Pacaud, Florian; Bonafede, Annalisa; Babul, Arif; Bertoldi, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Radio haloes are diffuse synchrotron sources on scales of ∼1 Mpc that are found in merging clusters of galaxies, and are believed to be powered by electrons re-accelerated by merger-driven turbulence. We present measurements of extended radio emission on similarly large scales in two clusters of galaxies hosting cool cores: Abell 2390 and Abell 2261. The analysis is based on interferometric imaging with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, Very Large Array and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. We present detailed radio images of the targets, subtract the compact emission components and measure the spectral indices for the diffuse components. The radio emission in A2390 extends beyond a known sloshing-like brightness discontinuity, and has a very steep in-band spectral slope at 1.5 GHz that is similar to some known ultrasteep spectrum radio haloes. The diffuse signal in A2261 is more extended than in A2390 but has lower luminosity. X-ray morphological indicators, derived from XMM-Newton X-ray data, place these clusters in the category of relaxed or regular systems, although some asymmetric features that can indicate past minor mergers are seen in the X-ray brightness images. If these two Mpc-scale radio sources are categorized as giant radio haloes, they question the common assumption of radio haloes occurring exclusively in clusters undergoing violent merging activity, in addition to commonly used criteria for distinguishing between radio haloes and minihaloes.

  1. Sampling Studies Of Quasars, Radio-loud Galaxies, & Radio-quiet Galaxies -- Searching For The Cause Of Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, G.; Salois, Amee; Soechting, I.; Smith, M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparing the environments of Radio-Loud Galaxies, Radio-Quiet Galaxies, and Quasars offers an opportunity to study the evolution of these objects. Our samples have been carefully chosen from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which also includes samples studied in the FIRST survey, and have been cut to determine the best possible results. Our study includes three samples. The Quasar sample currently contains 69 objects, the Radio-Loud Galaxy (RLG) sample has 1,335 objects, and the Radio-Quiet Galaxy (RQG) sample contains 2,436 objects (any updates will be given at the meeting). A number of trims were made to produce (smaller) samples with characteristics suited for precise results. By comparing the environments of these three samples we will be able to see any similarities or differences between them. If similarities are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to 'nature' - in an isolated manner with little environmental feedback, which may or may not have an effect on its evolution, as supposed by Coldwell et al. (2009). If differences are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to `nurture’ and that the environment may have played an important role in the development of their properties. We employ similar procedures used by Coldwell et al. (2009) in their study of blue and red AGNs. Upon the completion of an accurate sample, future work will be pursued studying a number of properties of the environments including studies of: the stellar masses, star formation rates, sersic morphologies, as well as densities and ages of the environments.

  2. An observational study of quasar host galaxies, radio galaxies, and lyman alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak George Bayard

    In this thesis I provide observational constraints on quasar host galaxies, radio galaxies, and Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs). I develop and implement a method to provide stellar age constraints for the host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) quasars. The observational strategy is to spectroscopically observe quasar host galaxies offset from the bright central point source to maximize the signal-to-noise of the stellar light. The central quasar is also spectroscopically observed, so that any nuclear light scattered into our off-axis spectrum can be efficiently modeled and subtracted. The reliability of my technique is tested via a Monte-Carlo routine in which the correspondence between synthetic spectra with known parameters and the model output is determined. Application of this model to a preliminary sample of 10 objects is presented and compared to previous studies. I present 1.4 GHz catalogs for the cluster fields A370 and A2390 observed with the Very Large Array. These are two of the deepest radio images of cluster fields ever taken. I construct differential number counts for each field and find results consistent with previous studies. I emphasize the need to account for cosmic variance. These high resolution, ultra-deep radio catalogs will be vital to future multiwavelength studies. Finally, I apply a newly developed search method to all of the deep GALEX grism fields, which correspond to some of the most intensively studied regions in the sky. My work provides the first large sample of z=0.67-1.16 LAEs (N=60) that can be used to investigate the physical properties of these galaxies. I catalog the candidate z=1 LAE samples in each field and give optical redshifts from both archival and newly obtained observations. With X-ray, UV, and optical data, I determine the false detection rate (cases where the emission line is either not confirmed or is not Lya) and the AGN contamination rate of my sample. With the remaining LAEs, I compute the LAE galaxy luminosity function

  3. Superdisks and the structural asymmetry of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a sample of 16 radio galaxies, each of which is characterized by a wide, elongated emission gap with fairly sharp and straight edges between the two radio lobes. This particular subset of the "superdisk" radio galaxies is chosen because of a highly asymmetric location of the host elliptical galaxy relative to the gap's central axis. In addition to posing a considerable challenge to the existing models, such a morphology also means that the two jets traverse highly unequal distances through the superdisk material. One thus has a possibility to directly investigate if the marked asymmetry between the two jets' interaction with the (much denser) ambient medium, during their propagation, has a significant import for the brightness of the hot spot forming near each jet's extremity. We also propose a new explanation for the formation of superdisks through the merger of a smaller elliptical galaxy with the massive host, in which the gas attached to the infalling galaxy deposits its angular momentum into the host's circumgalactic gas, thereby causing it to flatten into a fat pancake, or superdisk. The asymmetric location of the host galaxy can be assisted by the kick imparted to it during the merger. We also suggest a physical link between these radio galaxies and those with X-shaped and Z-symmetric radio lobes, commonly believed to arise from mergers of two galactic nuclei, each harboring a supermassive black hole.

  4. The Most Distant AGN: A Radio Galaxy at Z = 5.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, W. J. M.; De Breuck, C.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Rottgering, H.; Miley, G. K.

    1999-09-01

    We report the discovery of the most distant known AGN since the discovery of quasars, the radio galaxy TN J0924-2201 at z = 5.19. The radio source was selected from a new sample of ultra-steep spectrum (USS) sources, has an extreme radio spectral index alpha(365 MHz,1.4 GHz) = -1.63, and is identified at near-IR wavelengths with a very faint, K = 21.3 object. Optical spectroscopic observations show a single emission line at 7530 A, which we identify as Lyman alpha. The K-band image, sampling rest-frame U-band, shows a multi-component, radio-aligned morphology, typical of lower-redshift radio galaxies. TN J0924-2201 extends the near-IR Hubble, or K-z, relation for powerful radio galaxies to z > 5, and is consistent with models of massive galaxies forming at even higher redshifts. The work at IGPP/LLNL was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-48. W.v.B. also acknowledges support from NASA grant GO 5940, and D.S. from IGPP/LLNL grant 98-AP017. The observations were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the University of California, the California Institute of Technology, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Radio-optical galaxy shape correlations in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunbridge, Ben; Harrison, Ian; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the correlations in galaxy shapes between optical and radio wavelengths using archival observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. Cross-correlation studies between different wavebands will become increasingly important for precision cosmology as future large surveys may be dominated by systematic rather than statistical errors. In the case of weak lensing, galaxy shapes must be measured to extraordinary accuracy (shear systematics of <0.01 per cent) in order to achieve good constraints on dark energy parameters. By using shape information from overlapping surveys in optical and radio bands, robustness to systematics may be significantly improved without loss of constraining power. Here we use HST-ACS (Hubble Space Telescope-Advanced Camera for Surveys) optical data, Very Large Array (VLA) radio data and extensive simulations to investigate both our ability to make precision measurements of source shapes from realistic radio data and to constrain the intrinsic astrophysical scatter between the shapes of galaxies as measured in the optical and radio wavebands. By producing a new image from the VLA-COSMOS L-band radio visibility data that are well suited to galaxy shape measurements, we are able to extract precise measurements of galaxy position angles. Comparing to corresponding measurements from the HST optical image, we set a lower limit on the intrinsic astrophysical scatter in position angles, between the optical and radio bands, of σα > 0.212π rad (or 38.2°) at a 95 per cent confidence level.

  6. Molecular disks in radio galaxies. The pathway to ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandoni, I.; Laing, R. A.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.

    2010-11-01

    Context. It has recently been proposed that the jets of low-luminosity radio galaxies are powered by direct accretion of the hot phase of the IGM onto the central black hole. Cold gas remains a plausible alternative fuel supply, however. The most compelling evidence that cold gas plays a role in fueling radio galaxies is that dust is detected more commonly and/or in larger quantities in (elliptical) radio galaxies compared with radio-quiet elliptical galaxies. On the other hand, only small numbers of radio galaxies have yet been detected in CO (and even fewer imaged), and whether or not all radio galaxies have enough cold gas to fuel their jets remains an open question. If so, then the dynamics of the cold gas in the nuclei of radio galaxies may provide important clues to the fuelling mechanism. Aims: The only instrument capable of imaging the molecular component on scales relevant to the accretion process is ALMA, but very little is yet known about CO in southern radio galaxies. Our aim is to measure the CO content in a complete volume-limited sample of southern radio galaxies, in order to create a well-defined list of nearby targets to be imaged in the near future with ALMA. Methods: APEX [This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory.] has recently been equipped with a receiver (APEX-1) able to observe the 230 GHz waveband. This allows us to search for CO(2-1) line emission in our target galaxies. Results: Here we present the results for our first three southern targets, proposed for APEX-1 spectroscopy during science verification: NGC 3557, IC 4296 and NGC 1399. The experiment was successful with two targets detected, and possible indications for a double-horned CO line profile, consistent with ordered rotation. These early results are encouraging, demonstrating that APEX can

  7. 50 KPC radio trails behind irregular galaxies in A1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Jaffe, W.

    1987-11-01

    The authors report the discovery of exceptionally bright and extended trails of radio emission behind three irregular galaxies in the periphery of the cluster A 1367, in the Coma Supercluster. Turbulent interaction with the intergalactic medium or a past catastrophic collision between galaxies could have produced the observed phenomenon.

  8. Clustering of Star-forming Galaxies Near a Radio Galaxy at z=5.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overzier, Roderik A.; Miley, G. K.; Bouwens, R. J.; Cross, N. J. G.; Zirm, A. W.; Benítez, N.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Clampin, M.; Demarco, R.; Ford, H. C.; Hartig, G. F.; Illingworth, G. D.; Martel, A. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Venemans, B.; Ardila, D. R.; Bartko, F.; Bradley, L. D.; Broadhurst, T. J.; Coe, D.; Feldman, P. D.; Franx, M.; Golimowski, D. A.; Goto, T.; Gronwall, C.; Holden, B.; Homeier, N.; Infante, L.; Kimble, R. A.; Krist, J. E.; Mei, S.; Menanteau, F.; Meurer, G. R.; Motta, V.; Postman, M.; Rosati, P.; Sirianni, M.; Sparks, W. B.; Tran, H. D.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; White, R. L.; Zheng, W.

    2006-01-01

    We present HST ACS observations of the most distant radio galaxy known, TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. This radio galaxy has six spectroscopically confirmed Lyα-emitting companion galaxies and appears to lie within an overdense region. The radio galaxy is marginally resolved in i775 and z850, showing continuum emission aligned with the radio axis, similar to what is observed for lower redshift radio galaxies. Both the half-light radius and the UV star formation rate are comparable to the typical values found for Lyman break galaxies at z~4-5. The Lyα emitters are sub-L* galaxies, with deduced star formation rates of 1-10 Msolar yr-1. One of the Lyα emitters is only detected in Lyα. Based on the star formation rate of ~3 Msolar yr-1 calculated from Lyα, the lack of continuum emission could be explained if the galaxy is younger than ~2 Myr and is producing its first stars. Observations in V606i775z850 were used to identify additional Lyman break galaxies associated with this structure. In addition to the radio galaxy, there are 22 V606 break (z~5) galaxies with z850<26.5 (5 σ), two of which are also in the spectroscopic sample. We compare the surface density of ~2 arcmin-2 to that of similarly selected V606 dropouts extracted from GOODS and the UDF parallel fields. We find evidence for an overdensity to very high confidence (>99%), based on a counts-in-cells analysis applied to the control field. The excess suggests that the V606 break objects are associated with a forming cluster around the radio galaxy. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9291.

  9. Fast radio burst tied to distant dwarf galaxy (Image 2)

    NSF Multimedia

    2017-06-07

    Radio telescope at Arecibo only localized the fast radio burst to the area inside the two circles in this image, but the Very Large Array was able to pinpoint it as a dwarf galaxy within the square (shown at intersection of cross hairs in enlarged box)

  10. Research of the fine structure of the radio galaxy 3C 234 with radio interferometer URAN-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchishin, R. V.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovsky, S. L.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Bulatsen, V. G.

    2005-06-01

    The brief description and the basic characteristics of the radio interferometer URAN-2 aerial system, included in VLBI decameter system URAN, are presented. The research results of the 3C 234 angular structure with URAN system are submitted. The model of radiobrightness distribution of this source at frequencies of 20 and 25 MHz is obtained. With the URAN-2 radio interferometer compact details in a radio galaxy have been found and their contribution to the general flow of a radio emission at decameter waves is determined. The effect of reabsorption in compact details (hot spots) is found and their true angular size are determined based on the research of the 3C 234 spectrum.

  11. Astronomers Win Protection for Key Part of Radio Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    International Telecommunication Union meet to painstakingly parcel out the radio frequency spectrum between radio-based applications such as personal communications, satellite broadcasting, GPS and amateur radio, and the sciences of radio astronomy, earth exploration and deep space research. The WRC also coordinates sharing between services in the same radio bands. WRC decisions are incorporated into the Radio Regulations that govern radio services worldwide. The new spectrum allocations for radio astronomy are the first since 1979. Millimeter-wave astronomy was then in its infancy and many of its needs were not yet known. As astronomers began to explore this region of the spectrum they found spectral lines from many interesting molecules in space. Many of those lines had not fallen into the areas originally set aside for astronomy, but most will be under the new allocations. "It's a win for millimeter-wave science," said Dr. John Whiteoak of the Australia Telescope National Facility, Australian delegate to WRC-00. "This secures its future." The protection is a significant step for both existing millimeter-wave telescopes and new ones such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) now being planned by a U.S.-European consortium. Even at its isolated site in Chile's Atacama desert, ALMA would be vulnerable to interference from satellite emissions. Sensitive radio astronomy receivers are blinded by these emissions, just as an optical telescope would be by a searchlight. "There is more energy at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths washing through the Universe than there is of light or any other kind of radiation," said ALMA Project Scientist, Dr. Al Wootten of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. "Imaging the sources of this energy can tell us a great deal about the formation of stars and galaxies, and even planets." "But the Earth's atmosphere isn't very kind to us - it has only a few windows at these frequencies, and not very transparent ones at that. They are

  12. Discovery of rare double-lobe radio galaxies hosted in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sievers, Jonathan; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Hilton, Matt; Beelen, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Double-lobe radio galaxies in the local Universe have traditionally been found to be hosted in elliptical or lenticular galaxies. We report the discovery of four spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies (J0836+0532, J1159+5820, J1352+3126, and J1649+2635) that are discovered by cross-matching a large sample of 187 005 spiral galaxies from SDSS DR7 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7) to the full catalogues of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) and NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey). J0836+0532 is reported for the first time. The host galaxies are forming stars at an average rate of 1.7-10 M⊙ yr-1 and possess supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses of a few times 108 M⊙. Their radio morphologies are similar to Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies with total projected linear sizes ranging from 86 to 420 kpc, but their total 1.4-GHz radio luminosities are only in the range 1024-1025 W Hz-1. We propose that the formation of spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies can be attributed to more than one factor, such as the occurrence of strong interactions, mergers, and the presence of unusually massive SMBHs, such that the spiral structures are not destroyed. Only one of our sources (J1649+2635) is found in a cluster environment, indicating that processes other than accretion through cooling flows e.g. galaxy-galaxy mergers or interactions could be plausible scenarios for triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei activity in spiral galaxies.

  13. Gas and radio galaxies: a story of love and hate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Rafaella

    2011-07-01

    Gas in radio galaxies is an important component that plays different roles. Gas can feed the AGN and make it active but dense gas can also be an obstacle for radio jets and (temporarily) destroy their flow. The characteristics of the different phases of gas in the circumnuclear regions of active nuclei hold clear signatures of the influences that the black hole activity has on its surroundings. I will review these effects based on some recent results obtained in the study of neutral hydrogen and CO. In particular, I will concentrate on the effects of radio jets in generating the strong negative feedback of the kind invoked in current scenarios for galaxy evolution.

  14. Extended optical-emission-line gas in powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a search for extended optical-emission-line gas in 43 powerful radio galaxies are presented. Spatially extended optical-emission-line gas is common in these galaxies. The extent and luminosity of the emission-line gas in powerful radio galaxies is an order of magnitude greater than in normal elliptical galaxies of similar optical magnitudes. The total emission-line luminosity is roughly half of the radio luminosity, and the radio luminosity correlates with the narrow-line luminosity over four decades. The near-nuclear emission-line gas is often distributed in a smooth, roughly elliptical feature, centered on and symmetric about the nucleus. The distribution of axial ratios found in these small emission-line nebulae (ELN) is inconsistent with them being disks seen from different orientations. The minor axes of the small regions of emission-line gas show only a weak tendency to align with the position angle of the extended radio source and the major axis of the stellar isophotes. The very extended emission line gas (d{sub neb} > 10 kpc) is filamentary and is found preferentially within the regions occupied by the radio source. The small (d{sub radio} < 100 kpc) radio sources with very extended ELN show evidence of interacting with their gas-rich environments; the large (d{sub radio} > 100 kpc) radio sources with very extended ELN show no signs that they have been disturbed by their surrounding media. Lower limits to the density of the emission line gas at distances of 10 kpc from the galaxy nucleus are {approximately}0.1 cm{sup {minus}3} and upper limits to the total mass in emission line gas are {approximately}10{sup 9} M {circle dot}. The optical nuclear continuum is strongly correlated with the narrow emission line luminosity and is sufficient to photoionize the ELN.

  15. Radio identifications of UGC galaxies - starbursts and monsters

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J.J.; Broderick, J.J.

    1988-07-01

    New and previously published observational data on galaxies with declination less than +82 deg from the Uppsala General Catalog (Nilson, 1973) are compiled in extensive tables and characterized in detail. Optical positions are confirmed by measurement of Palomar Sky Survey O prints, and radio identifications for 176 galaxies are made on the basis of 1.4-GHz Green Bank sky maps or 1.49-GHz observations obtained with the C configuration of the VLA in November-December 1986; contour maps based on the latter observations are provided. Radio-selected and IR-selected galaxy populations are found to be similar (and distinct from optically selected populations), and three radio/IR criteria are developed to distinguish galaxies powered by starbursts from those with supermassive black holes or other monster energy sources. 197 references.

  16. Chemical properties in the most distant radio galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, K.; Nagao, T.; Maiolino, R.; Marconi, A.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2011-08-01

    We present a deep optical spectrum of TN J0924-2201, the most distant radio galaxy at z = 5.19, obtained with FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope. We successfully detect, for the first time, the C ivλ1549 emission line from the narrow-line region. In addition to the emission-line fluxes of Lyα and C iv, we set upper limits on the N v and He ii emissions. We use these line detections and upper limits to constrain the chemical properties of TN J0924-2201. By comparing the observed emission-line flux ratios with photoionization models, we infer that the carbon-to-oxygen relative abundance is already [C/O] > -0.5 at a cosmic age of ~1.1 Gyr. This lower limit on [C/O] is higher than the ratio expected at the earliest phases of the galaxy chemical evolution, indicating that TN J0924-2201 has already experienced significant chemical evolution at z = 5.19.

  17. Polarimetry and Unification of Low-Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Marshall H.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Tran, Hien D.; Goodrich, Robert W.; Miller, Joseph S.

    1999-11-01

    We have made high-quality measurements of the polarization spectra of 13 FR II radio galaxies and taken polarization images for 11 of these with the Keck telescopes. Seven of the eight narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) are polarized, and six of the seven show prominent broad Balmer lines in polarized light. The broad lines are also weakly visible in total flux. Some of the NLRGs show bipolar regions with roughly circumferential polarization vectors, revealing a large reflection nebula illuminated by a central source. Our observations powerfully support the hidden quasar hypothesis for some NLRGs. According to this hypothesis, the continuum and broad lines are blocked by a dusty molecular torus, but can be seen by reflected, hence polarized, light. Classification as a NLRG, a broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG), or a quasar therefore depends on orientation. However, not all objects fit into this unification scheme. Our sample is biased toward objects known in advance to be polarized, but the combination of our results with the 1996 findings of Hill, Goodrich, and DePoy show that at least six out of a complete, volume and flux-limited sample of nine FR II NLRGs have broad lines, seen either in polarization or P{alpha}.The BLRGs in our sample range from 3C 382, which has a quasar-like spectrum, to the highly reddened IRAS source FSC 2217+259. This reddening sequence suggests a continuous transition from unobscured quasar to reddened BLRG to NLRG. Apparently the obscuring torus does not have a distinct edge. The BLRGs have polarization images that are consistent with a point source broadened by seeing and diluted by starlight. We do not detect extended nebular or scattered emission, perhaps because it is swamped by the nuclear source. Our starlight-corrected BLRG spectra can be explained with a two-component model: a quasar viewed through dust and quasar light scattered by dust. The direct flux is more reddened than the scattered flux, causing the polarization to rise

  18. Polarimetry and Unification of Low-Redshift Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marshall H.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Tran, Hien D.; Goodrich, Robert W.; Miller, Joseph S.

    1999-11-01

    We have made high-quality measurements of the polarization spectra of 13 FR II radio galaxies and taken polarization images for 11 of these with the Keck telescopes. Seven of the eight narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) are polarized, and six of the seven show prominent broad Balmer lines in polarized light. The broad lines are also weakly visible in total flux. Some of the NLRGs show bipolar regions with roughly circumferential polarization vectors, revealing a large reflection nebula illuminated by a central source. Our observations powerfully support the hidden quasar hypothesis for some NLRGs. According to this hypothesis, the continuum and broad lines are blocked by a dusty molecular torus, but can be seen by reflected, hence polarized, light. Classification as a NLRG, a broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG), or a quasar therefore depends on orientation. However, not all objects fit into this unification scheme. Our sample is biased toward objects known in advance to be polarized, but the combination of our results with the 1996 findings of Hill, Goodrich, & DePoy show that at least six out of a complete, volume and flux-limited sample of nine FR II NLRGs have broad lines, seen either in polarization or Pα. The BLRGs in our sample range from 3C 382, which has a quasar-like spectrum, to the highly reddened IRAS source FSC 2217+259. This reddening sequence suggests a continuous transition from unobscured quasar to reddened BLRG to NLRG. Apparently the obscuring torus does not have a distinct edge. The BLRGs have polarization images that are consistent with a point source broadened by seeing and diluted by starlight. We do not detect extended nebular or scattered emission, perhaps because it is swamped by the nuclear source. Our starlight-corrected BLRG spectra can be explained with a two-component model: a quasar viewed through dust and quasar light scattered by dust. The direct flux is more reddened than the scattered flux, causing the polarization to rise steeply to

  19. Neutrinos from flat-spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannheim, K.; Stanev, T.; Biermann, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GRO observation (Hartman et al., 1992) of a very strong flux of gamma rays with an energy index close to 2 from the distant quasar 3C279 and other extragalactic flat-spectrum radio sources is in very good agreement with models that advocate the important role of very high energy protons and nuclei in the energy transport in AGN. Protons and nuclei cool by interactions on the nonthermal fields in the nuclear jet of the AGN and generate gamma ray and neutrino fluxes. Ultra high energy neutrinos could be observed with sensitive air shower experiments in outbursts as powerful as the one seen by GRO.

  20. Neutrinos from flat-spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannheim, K.; Stanev, T.; Biermann, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GRO observation (Hartman et al., 1992) of a very strong flux of gamma rays with an energy index close to 2 from the distant quasar 3C279 and other extragalactic flat-spectrum radio sources is in very good agreement with models that advocate the important role of very high energy protons and nuclei in the energy transport in AGN. Protons and nuclei cool by interactions on the nonthermal fields in the nuclear jet of the AGN and generate gamma ray and neutrino fluxes. Ultra high energy neutrinos could be observed with sensitive air shower experiments in outbursts as powerful as the one seen by GRO.

  1. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts.

  2. Very-long-baseline radio interferometry observations of low power radio galaxies.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, G; Cotton, W D; Feretti, L; Lara, L; Venturi, T; Marcaide, J M

    1995-01-01

    The parsec scale properties of low power radio galaxies are reviewed here, using the available data on 12 Fanaroff-Riley type I galaxies. The most frequent radio structure is an asymmetric parsec-scale morphology--i.e., core and one-sided jet. It is shared by 9 (possibly 10) of the 12 mapped radio galaxies. One (possibly 2) of the other galaxies has a two-sided jet emission. Two sources are known from published data to show a proper motion; we present here evidence for proper motion in two more galaxies. Therefore, in the present sample we have 4 radio galaxies with a measured proper motion. One of these has a very symmetric structure and therefore should be in the plane of the sky. The results discussed here are in agreement with the predictions of the unified scheme models. Moreover, the present data indicate that the parsec scale structure in low and high power radio galaxies is essentially the same. PMID:11607596

  3. What Distinguishes the Host Galaxies of Radio-loud and Radio-quiet AGNs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Sikora, M.; Goettems, E. I.; Wójtowicz, A.

    2017-09-01

    We compare the optical properties of the host galaxies of radio-quiet (RQ) and radio-loud (RL) Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to infer whether the jet production efficiency depends on the host properties or is determined just by intrinsic properties of the accretion flows. We carefully select galaxies from SDSS, FIRST, and NVSS catalogs. We confirm previous findings that the fraction of RL AGNs depends on the black-hole (BH) masses, and on the Eddington ratio. The comparison of the nature of the hosts of RL and RQ AGNs, therefore, requires pair-matching techniques. Matching in BH mass and Eddington ratio allows us to study the differences between galaxies hosting RL and RQ AGNs that have the same basic accretion parameters. We show that these two samples differ predominantly in the host-galaxy concentration index, morphological type (in the RL sample the frequency of elliptical galaxies becoming larger with increasing radio loudness), and nebular extinction (galaxies with highest radio loudness showing only low nebular extinction). Contrary to some previous studies, we find no significant difference between our radio-loud and radio-quiet samples regarding merger/interaction features.

  4. A Radio Study of the Ultra-luminous FIR Galaxy NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, E.; Wilson, A. S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1993-05-01

    A number of galaxies observed in the IRAS mission are noted to emit ~ 99% of their bolometric flux in the FIR, with FIR luminosities in excess of 10(11) Lsun. The interacting galaxy NGC 6240 has often been referred to as the ``proto-typical'' ultra-luminous (L_FIR >~ 10(12) Lsun) FIR galaxy. The origin of the FIR excess remains a disputed subject in the literature. New observations of NGC 6240 were taken with the VLA at 20cm in the B-configuration, and at 3.6cm in the A-configuration. No significant radio emission was detected from or near the possible ultra-massive ``dark core'' hypothesized by Bland-Hawthorn et. al. (1991); however, approximately 30% of Seyfert galaxies have 20 cm radio luminosities weaker than the upper limit derived from the radio maps. The non-thermal radio emission from luminous FIR galaxies is tightly correlated with the FIR emission. Previous radio observations of NGC 6240 revealed two compact, steep-spectrum nuclear sources, nearly coincident with the two nuclear sources seen in optical images. The 2 images from the new VLA observations and 5 images from previous VLA observations are used to identify the morphological and spectral features of the strong, compact components in the nuclear regions (<~ 1.5 kpc; D=100 Mpc) and of the weaker ``clumps'' of diffuse emission south and west (>~ 3 kpc) from the nucleus. Feasible explanations for the radio emission are discussed. The models that have been proposed in the literature for the FIR excess of NGC 6240 are evaluated for consistency with the observed radio emission.

  5. Radio Selected Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Joshua; Blanton, Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that three-component radio sources exhibiting some degree of bending between components are likely to be found in galaxy clusters. Often this radio emission is associated with a cD type galaxy at the center of a cluster. We have cross-correlated the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with samples selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) catalog and measured the richness of the cluster environments surrounding three- component sources exhibiting both bent and straight lobes. This has lead to the discovery and classification of a large number of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of z ~ 0.5. For both bent- and straight- lobed sources without an optical counterpart it is likely that the radio emission is associated with a galaxy fainter than m_r=22 (the limiting magnitude of the SDSS) and at a redshift higher than z~0.8. We propose to observe a small sub-sample of these sources with the FLAMINGOS instrument on the Mayall 4-m telescope in an attempt to discover if these sources are located in high redshift (z≳0.8) galaxy clusters. In our visually-selected bent radio source sample, 78% of sources with counterparts in the SDSS are associated with clusters.

  6. Inverse-Compton X-rays from giant radio galaxies at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Blundell, K. M.; Erlund, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We report XMM-Newton observations of three FR II radio galaxies at redshifts between 0.85 and 1.34, which show extended diffuse X-ray emission within the radio lobes, likely due to inverse-Compton up-scattering of the cosmic microwave background. Under this assumption, through spectrum fitting together with archival Very Large Array radio observations, we derive an independent estimate of the magnetic field in the radio lobes of 3C 469.1 and compare it with the equipartition value. We find concordance between these two estimates as long as the turnover in the energy distribution of the particles occurs at a Lorentz factor in excess of ~250. We determine the total energy in relativistic particles in the radio-emitting lobes of all three sources to range between 3 × 1059 and 8 × 1059erg. The nuclei of these X-ray sources are heavily-absorbed powerful active galactic nuclei.

  7. A Radio-Jet-Galaxy Interaction in 3C441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Mark; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Ridgway, Susan E.

    1998-01-01

    Multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopy of the zeta = 0.708 radio galaxy 3C441 and a red aligned optical/infrared component are used to show that the most striking aspect of the radio-optical "alignment effect" in this object is due to the interaction of the radio jet with a companion galaxy in the same group or cluster. The stellar population of the red aligned continuum component is predominately old, but with a small post-starburst population superposed, and it is surrounded by a low surface- brightness halo, possibly a face-on spiral disc. The [OIII]500.7/[OII]372.7 emission line ratio changes dramatically from one side of the component to the other, with the low-ionisation material apparently having passed through the bow shock of the radio source and been compressed. A simple model for the interaction is used to explain the velocity shifts in the emission line gas, and to predict that the ISM of the interacting galaxy is likely to escape once the radio source bow shock has passed though. We also discuss another, much fainter, aligned component, and the sub-arcsecond scale alignment of the radio source host galaxy. Finally we comment on the implications of our explanation of 3C441 for theories of the alignment effect.

  8. Classifying Radio Galaxies with the Convolutional Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniyan, A. K.; Thorat, K.

    2017-06-01

    We present the application of a deep machine learning technique to classify radio images of extended sources on a morphological basis using convolutional neural networks (CNN). In this study, we have taken the case of the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) class of radio galaxies as well as radio galaxies with bent-tailed morphology. We have used archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA)—Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters survey and existing visually classified samples available in the literature to train a neural network for morphological classification of these categories of radio sources. Our training sample size for each of these categories is ˜200 sources, which has been augmented by rotated versions of the same. Our study shows that CNNs can classify images of the FRI and FRII and bent-tailed radio galaxies with high accuracy (maximum precision at 95%) using well-defined samples and a “fusion classifier,” which combines the results of binary classifications, while allowing for a mechanism to find sources with unusual morphologies. The individual precision is highest for bent-tailed radio galaxies at 95% and is 91% and 75% for the FRI and FRII classes, respectively, whereas the recall is highest for FRI and FRIIs at 91% each, while the bent-tailed class has a recall of 79%. These results show that our results are comparable to that of manual classification, while being much faster. Finally, we discuss the computational and data-related challenges associated with the morphological classification of radio galaxies with CNNs.

  9. Constraints on evolutionary properties of GHz Peaked Spectrum galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, S.; de Zotti, G.

    2006-01-01

    We have used the available samples of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) galaxies to investigate their evolution properties in the framework of the "youth" scenario. Care was taken to properly allow for the different selection criteria used to define the samples. We find that the observed redshift and peak frequency distributions can be satisfactorily accounted for in terms of simple luminosity evolution of individual sources, along the lines discussed by Fanti et al. (1995, A&A, 302, 317) and Begelman (1996, in Proc. Cygnus A, Study of Radio Galaxy; 1999, in Proc. of KNAW Colloq.), although the derived parameter values have large uncertainties due to ambiguities in the selection of GPS sources and to the incompleteness of redshift measurements. However the simplest self-similar model, whereby the evolution is controlled only by the radial profile of the density of the ambient medium is not good enough and one additional parameter needs to be introduced. The fit requires a decrease of the emitted power and of the peak luminosity with source age or with decreasing peak frequency, at variance with the Snellen et al. (2000, MNRAS, 319, 445) model. On the other hand, our analysis confirms the rather flat slope of the luminosity function, found by Snellen et al. (2000) who also report indications of a high luminosity break, not required by the data sets we have used. Our results suggest that the GPS galaxies are the precursors of extended radio sources with luminosities below the break of the luminosity function. No cosmological evolution of the GPS galaxy population is required by presently available data.

  10. LOFAR discovery of a 700-kpc remnant radio galaxy at low redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienza, M.; Godfrey, L.; Morganti, R.; Vilchez, N.; Maddox, N.; Murgia, M.; Orru, E.; Shulevski, A.; Best, P. N.; Brüggen, M.; Harwood, J. J.; Jamrozy, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mahony, E. K.; McKean, J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Remnant radio galaxies represent the final dying phase of radio galaxy evolution in which the jets are no longer active. Remnants are rare in flux-limited samples, comprising at most a few percent. As a result of their rarity and because they are difficult to identify, this dying phase remains poorly understood and the luminosity evolution is largely unconstrained. Aims: Here we present the discovery and detailed analysis of a large (700 kpc) remnant radio galaxy with a low surface brightness that has been identified in LOFAR images at 150 MHz. Methods: By combining LOFAR data with new follow-up Westerbork observations and archival data at higher frequencies, we investigated the source morphology and spectral properties from 116 to 4850 MHz. By modelling the radio spectrum, we probed characteristic timescales of the radio activity. Results: The source has a relatively smooth, diffuse, amorphous appearance together with a very weak central compact core that is associated with the host galaxy located at z = 0.051. From our ageing and morphological analysis it is clear that the nuclear engine is currently switched off or, at most, active at a very low power state. We find that the source has remained visible in the remnant phase for about 60 Myr, significantly longer than its active phase of 15 Myr, despite being located outside a cluster. The host galaxy is currently interacting with another galaxy located at a projected separation of 15 kpc and a radial velocity offset of ~ 300 km s-1. This interaction may have played a role in the triggering and/or shut-down of the radio jets. Conclusions: The spectral shape of this remnant radio galaxy differs from most of the previously identified remnant sources, which show steep or curved spectra at low to intermediate frequencies. Our results demonstrate that remnant radio galaxies can show a wide range of evolutionary paths and spectral properties. In light of this finding and in preparation for new-generation deep

  11. MULTI-FREQUENCY STUDIES OF RADIO RELICS IN THE GALAXY CLUSTERS A4038, A1664, AND A786

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-frequency study of radio relics associated with the galaxy clusters A4038, A1664, and A786. Radio images, integrated spectra, spectral index maps, and fits to the integrated spectra in the framework of the adiabatic compression model are presented. Images of the relic in A4038 at 150, 240, and 606 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope have revealed extended ultra-steep spectrum ({alpha} {approx} -1.8 to -2.7) emission of extent 210 Multiplication-Sign 80 kpc{sup 2}. The model of passively evolving radio lobes compressed by a shock fits the integrated spectrum best. The relic with a circular morphology at the outskirts of the cluster A1664 has an integrated spectral index of {approx} - 1.10 {+-} 0.06 and is best fit by the model of radio lobes lurking for {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} yr. The relic near A786 has a curved spectrum and is best fit by a model of radio lobes lurking for {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} yr. At 4.7 GHz, a compact radio source, possibly the progenitor of the A786 relic, is detected near the center of the radio relic. The A786 radio relic is thus likely a lurking radio galaxy rather than a site of cosmological shock as has been considered in earlier studies.

  12. Global Cosmological Parameters Determined Using Classical Double Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Erick J.; Daly, Ruth A.; Wan, Lin

    2000-12-01

    A sample of 20 powerful extended radio galaxies with redshifts between zero and 2 were used to determine constraints on global cosmological parameters. Data for six radio sources were obtained from the VLA archive, analyzed, and combined with the sample of 14 radio galaxies used previously by Guerra & Daly to determine cosmological parameters. The new results are consistent with our previous results, and indicate that the current value of the mean mass density of the universe is significantly less than the critical value. A universe with Ωm of unity in matter is ruled out at 99.0% confidence, and the best-fitting values of Ωm in matter are 0.10+0.25-0.10 and -0.25+0.35-0.25 assuming zero space curvature and zero cosmological constant, respectively. Note that identical results obtain when the low-redshift bin, which includes Cygnus A, is excluded; these results are independent of whether the radio source Cygnus A is included. The method does not rely on a zero-redshift normalization. The radio properties of each source are also used to determine the density of the gas in the vicinity of the source, and the beam power of the source. The six new radio sources have physical characteristics similar to those found for the original 14 sources. The density of the gas around these radio sources is typical of gas in present-day clusters of galaxies. The beam powers are typically about 1045 ergs s-1.

  13. Large rotation measures in radio galaxies at Z > 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athreya, R. M.; Kapahi, V. K.; McCarthy, P. J.; van Breugel, W.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out multifrequency radio polarisation imaging of a sample of 15 radio galaxies at z > 2 from the MRC/1Jy sample using the VLA. We report here the discovery of large rotation measures (RM) in a considerable fraction of the high redshift radio galaxies. Using the difference between the RM values of the two radio lobes in each source and statistical arguments, we show that the Faraday screens responsible for the RMs are most likely to be in the vicinity of the radio sources themselves. Four of the 15 galaxies show intrinsic (redshift corrected) RMs in excess of 1000radm\\pow{-2\\ } with the highest value of ~ 6000radm\\pow{-2\\ } in 1138-262 at z = 2.17. These observations suggest that the environments of the radio galaxies at z > 2 have micro gauss magnetic fields correlated over many kpc (>5--10), at least. We have discussed the problems due to the short time available at those redshifts for the various mechanisms, which are believed to generate and correlate strong magnetic fields on large scales, to operate. In particular, we argue that, unlike at low redshifts, cluster cooling flows are unlikely to have a role in forming deep Faraday screens at high redshifts. It is not clear if the dynamo mechanism is capable of generating such fields in the ambient medium around the radio sources. It appears plausible that condensates of magnetised plasma (galactic or subgalactic sized) are the deep Faraday screens responsible for the observed RMs. We suggest that plasma clumps of as small as \\solmass{9} in the path of the radio jet may generate very large RMs. The presence of such strong and large scale magnetic fields in the medium around the radio sources at such early epochs poses a considerable challenge to models of the origin of magnetic fields in the Universe.

  14. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: disc-halo interactions in radio-selected star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, S. K.; Bryant, J. J.; Ho, I.-T.; Sadler, E. M.; Medling, A. M.; Groves, B.; Kewley, L. J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Croom, S. M.; Wong, O. I.; Brough, S.; Tescari, E.; Sweet, S. M.; Sharp, R.; Green, A. W.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Goodwin, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we compare the radio emission at 1.4 GHz with optical outflow signatures of edge-on galaxies. We report observations of six edge-on star-forming galaxies in the Sydney-AAO Multiobject Integral-field spectrograph Galaxy Survey with 1.4 GHz luminosities >1 × 1021 W Hz-1. Extended minor axis optical emission is detected with enhanced [N II]/H α line ratios and velocity dispersions consistent with galactic winds in three of six galaxies. These galaxies may host outflows driven by a combination of thermal and cosmic ray processes. We find that galaxies with the strongest wind signatures have extended radio morphologies. Our results form a baseline for understanding the driving mechanisms of galactic winds.

  15. Fermi Gamma-Ray Imaging of a Radio Galaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the γ-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved γ-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy γ-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The γ-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton–scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. In conclusion, these measurements provide γ-raymore » constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.« less

  16. THE CHANDRA VIEW OF NEARBY X-SHAPED RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Miller, M. Coleman; Cheung, Chi C.

    2010-02-20

    We present new and archival Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of X-shaped radio galaxies (XRGs) within z {approx} 0.1 alongside a comparison sample of normal double-lobed FR I and II radio galaxies. By fitting elliptical distributions to the observed diffuse hot X-ray emitting atmospheres (either the interstellar or intragroup medium), we find that the ellipticity and the position angle of the hot gas follow that of the stellar light distribution for radio galaxy hosts in general. Moreover, compared to the control sample, we find a strong tendency for X-shaped morphology to be associated with wings directed along the minor axis of the hot gas distribution. Taken at face value, this result favors the hydrodynamic backflow models for the formation of XRGs which naturally explain the geometry; the merger-induced rapid reorientation models make no obvious prediction about orientation.

  17. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-07

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.

  18. Fermi Gamma-Ray Imaging of a Radio Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Celik, O.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, x. J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, x. S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Georganopoulos, M.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocian, x. M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. W.; Sambruna, R.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. L.; Stawarz, L.; Strickman, x. M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Kazanas, D.

    2010-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the γ-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved γ-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy γ-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The γ-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton–scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. In conclusion, these measurements provide γ-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.

  19. Gas disks and supermassive black holes in nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob

    2004-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a set of medium- resolution spectra, obtained by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope, of the emission-line gas present in the nuclei of a complete sample of 21 nearby, early-type galaxies with radio jets. For each galaxy nucleus we present spectroscopic data in the region of hydrogen-alpha and the kinematics derived therefrom. We find in 67% of the nuclei the gas appears to be rotating and, with one exception, the cases where rotation is not seen are either face on or have complex morphologies. We find that in 62% of the nuclei the fit to the central spectrum is improved by inclusion of a broad emission-line component. These broad components have a mean velocity dispersion of 1349 kilometers per second (with a standard deviation of 345 kilometers per second) and are redshifted from the narrow-line components (assuming an origin in hydrogen-alpha) by 486 kilometers per second (with a standard deviation of 443 kilometers per second). We generated model velocity profiles including no black hole, a one hundred million solar mass black hole and a nine hundred million solar mass black hole. We compared the predicted profiles to the observed velocity profiles from the above spectra, finding kinematic signatures compatible with black holes greater than one hundred million solar masses in 53% of the sample. We suspect that hydrodynamic flow of the gas is a significant factor in the nucleus of NGC 2329. We found hints of jet-disk interaction in 24% of the sample nuclei and signs of twists or warps in 19%. Twenty-four percent of the velocity profiles show signs of multiple kinematic components. We suggest that the gas disks in these galaxies are generally not well-settled systems. We characterize the kinematic state of the nuclear gas through three weighted mean parameters, and find that again the disks appear not to be well-settled. We show evidence of a connection between the stellar and gas velocity

  20. ATCA detections of massive molecular gas reservoirs in dusty, high-z radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Contreras, Y.; Smith, D. J. B.; Cooray, A.; Dunne, L.; Gómez, L.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Riechers, D. A.; Werf, P. van der

    2017-02-01

    Observations using the 7-mm receiver system on the Australia Telescope Compact Array have revealed large reservoirs of molecular gas in two high-redshift radio galaxies: HATLAS J090426.9+015448 (z = 2.37) and HATLAS J140930.4+003803 (z = 2.04). Optically, the targets are very faint, and spectroscopy classifies them as narrow-line radio galaxies. In addition to harbouring an active galactic nucleus the targets share many characteristics of sub-mm galaxies. Far-infrared data from Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey suggest high levels of dust (>109 M⊙) and a correspondingly large amount of obscured star formation (˜1000 M⊙ yr-1). The molecular gas is traced via the J = 1 → 0 transition of 12CO, its luminosity implying total H2 masses of (1.7 ± 0.3) × 1011 and (9.5 ± 2.4) × 1010 (αCO/0.8) M⊙ in HATLAS J090426.9+015448 and HATLAS J140930.4+003803, respectively. Both galaxies exhibit molecular line emission over a broad (˜1000 km s-1) velocity range and feature double-peaked profiles. We interpret this as evidence of either a large rotating disc or an on-going merger. Gas depletion time-scales are ˜100 Myr. The 1.4-GHz radio luminosities of our targets place them close to the break in the luminosity function. As such they represent 'typical' z > 2 radio sources, responsible for the bulk of the energy emitted at radio wavelengths from accretion-powered sources at high redshift, and yet they rank amongst the most massive systems in terms of molecular gas and dust content. We also detect 115-GHz rest-frame continuum emission, indicating a very steep high-radio-frequency spectrum, possibly classifying the targets as compact steep spectrum objects.

  1. H I absorption in nearby compact radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, M.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Deng, C.; Parry, R.; Sligo, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    H I absorption studies yield information on both active galactic nucleus (AGN) feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for H I absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 < z < 0.096 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. In total, we obtained seven detections, five of which are new, with a large range of peak optical depths (3-87 per cent). Of the detections, 71 per cent exhibit asymmetric, broad (ΔvFWHM > 100 km s-1) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disc. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with H I detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic discs. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of H I content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous H I surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.

  2. The Granada workshop on High Redshift Radio Galaxies: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2006-03-01

    The Granada workshop on High Redshift Radio Galaxies (HzRGs) gave an excellent overview of the progress that has been made in this field during the last 3 years. Here we briefly review some of the results, with an emphasis on what studies of HzRGs can teach us about the formation and evolution of massive galaxies, clusters and active galactic nuclei (AGN). Of great relevance for this workshop are scenarios that describe certain aspects of the evolution of radio galaxies, including (i) the sequence of events after merging of galaxies that ultimately lead to extended powerful radio sources and (ii) the mass assembly and virialization of the hosting massive galaxies and their associated (proto-)clusters. Furthermore, I briefly discuss two projects that are important for a further understanding of AGN and high redshift radio galaxies. First, using the MIDI instrument mounted on the VLT Interferometer, the dusty tori of nearby AGN can be studied in the range of 8-13 micron at high angular resolution. The first result on the nearby AGN NGC 1068 as presented by Jaffe et al. (2004) indicated the presence of a hot (T > 800 K), compact (1 pc) component, possible identified with the base of the jet and a warm (270 K), well-resolved (3 × 4 pc) component associated with the alleged torus. Second, LOFAR is a new low frequency radio telescope that is currently being build in the Netherlands and is expected to be operational in 2008. With 50 stations spread over an area of 100 km in diameter, its resolution and sensitivity will be unprecedented in the frequency range 10-240 MHz. LOFAR will be a unique instrument that will impact a broad range of astrophysical topics varying from the epoch of reionisation, to gamma ray bursts and cosmic rays. Surveys with LOFAR will be of paramount importance for studies of HzRGs: It will enable (i) defining samples of radio galaxies with redshifts higher than 6, (ii) observations of starbursting galaxies in proto-clusters, and (iii) mapping out

  3. Radio Emission From The Brightest Central Galaxies In The Shapley Concentration Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gennaro, Gabriella; Venturi, T.; Dallacasa, D.; Giacintucci, S.

    2016-10-01

    Extended cluster radio galaxies show different morphologies compared to those found isolated in the field. Indeed, symmetric double radio galaxies are only a small percentage of the total content of radio loud cluster galaxies, which show mainly tailed morphologies. Moreover, cluster mergers can deeply affect the statistical properties of their radio activity. In order to better understand the morphological and radio activity differences of the brightest central galaxies (BCGs) in major merging and non/tidal-merging clusters, we performed a multifrequency study of extended radio galaxies inside two cluster complexes, A3528 and A3558, belonging to the Shapley Concentration Core.

  4. Radio and Submillimeter Continuum Observations of High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Hao; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Williams, Jonathan P.; Owen, Frazer N.

    2013-03-01

    Observing galaxies in the radio and submillimeter continuum has the advantage of being unaffected by dust extinction, which is a major drawback of studying galaxy evolution using optical data. Submillimeter single-dish surveys have made tremendous progress in understanding the high-redshift dusty population, but the low angular resolution of single-dish telescopes has also hampered these studies. Our recent JCMT and SMA imaging of high-redshift submillimeter sources revealed z > 4 objects that are radio and optically faint. Such objects cannot be easily identified with the combination of submillimeter single-dish and radio imaging. We also found a large fraction of multiple objects that are blended in single-dish images. Such objects may be early-stage mergers, or dusty starbursts in group environments. Since our work, larger surveys with PdBI and ALMA have been carried out to further address these issues. Additional to submillimeter imaging, future ultradeep EVLA imaging at 20 cm can also detect large samples of ultraluminous star forming galaxies at z ≳ 2. Sensitivities in radio and submillimeter observations have different redshift and dust temperature dependencies. Radio observations are also less affected by confusion. It will be necessary to combine deep surveys in both wavebands in order to achieve a more complete picture of the evolution of high-redshift star forming galaxies.

  5. Jet Feedback on the Hosts of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, L.; Ogle, P. M.; Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback due to active galactic nuclei is one of the key components of the current paradigm of galaxy evolution; however our understanding of the process remains incomplete. Radio galaxies with strong rotational H_2 emission provide an interesting window into the effect of radio jet feedback on their host galaxies, since the large masses of warm (>100 K) H_2 cannot solely be heated by star formation, instead requiring jet-driven ISM turbulence to power the molecular emission. I will discuss the insights multiwavelength (X-ray to submm) observations of 22 H_2 luminous radio galaxies yield on the process of jet feedback in these galaxies and the impact on star formation activity. Specifically, I find that the diffuse X-ray and warm H_2 emission are consistent with both being powered by dissipation of the jet's mechanical energy into the interstellar medium (ISM) and that the resulting turbulence injected into the ISM by this process results in the suppression of star formation activity by a factor of 3--6. The hosts of these galaxies show a wide range of star formation activity and optical and IR colors, indicating a diversity of evolutionary states in which this process may be active.

  6. Radio observations of nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-sheng; Su, Bu-mei

    Six nearby moderately luminous IRAS galaxies have been observed at two wavelengths with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Radio emission was detected in two of them, IRAS 20272-4738 and IRAS 23156-4238, and their parameters including flux, peak position, size and spectral index, obtained. These sources were confirmed with infrared, radio and optical data. Combining with previous results we discuss their emission characteristics.

  7. RADIO AND X-RAY SHOCKS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: hskang@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-10-10

    Radio relics detected in the outskirts of galaxy clusters are thought to trace radio-emitting relativistic electrons accelerated at cosmological shocks. In this study, using the cosmological hydrodynamic simulation data for the large-scale structure formation and adopting a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for the production of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons, we construct mock radio and X-ray maps of simulated galaxy clusters that are projected in the sky plane. Various properties of shocks and radio relics, including the shock Mach number, radio spectral index, and luminosity, are extracted from the synthetic maps and compared with observations. A substantial fraction of radio and X-ray shocks identified in these maps involve multiple shock surfaces along lines of sight (LOSs), and the morphology of shock distributions in the maps depends on the projection direction. Among multiple shocks in a given LOS, radio observations tend to pick up stronger shocks with flatter radio spectra, while X-ray observations preferentially select weaker shocks with larger kinetic energy flux. As a result, in some cases the shock Mach numbers and locations derived from radio and X-ray observations could differ from each other. We also find that the distributions of the spectral index and radio power of the synthetic radio relics are somewhat inconsistent with those of observed real relics; a bit more radio relics have been observed closer to the cluster core and with steeper spectral indices. We suggest that the inconsistency could be explained if very weak shocks with M{sub s} ≲ 2 accelerate CR electrons more efficiently, compared with the DSA model adopted here.

  8. Extensive gaseous haloes surrounding giant elliptical galaxies - Evidence from depolarization in radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.; Jaegers, W. J.

    1988-04-01

    Radio polarization measurements have been used to investigate large scale gaseous components associated with some thirteen double radio sources. At 49 cm a significant proportion of the bridge emission, roughly centered on the parent galaxy, is invariably found to be unpolarized. The authors present evidence that this lack of polarization at long wavelengths is the result of differential Faraday rotation in a large scale halo associated with the central (usually elliptical) galaxy. The haloes, which extend beyond 100 kpc, appear to be the outer envelopes of hot gas such as that observed in the form of extended X-ray emission associated with a number of nearby early-type galaxies.

  9. Contemporaneous observations of the radio galaxy NGC 1275 from radio to very high energy γ -rays

    DOE PAGES

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; ...

    2014-03-27

    The radio galaxy NGC 1275, recently identified as a very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) γ-ray emitter by MAGIC, is one of the few non-blazar active galactic nuclei detected in the VHE regime. The purpose of this work is to better understand the origin of the γ-ray emission and locate it within the galaxy. We studied contemporaneous multifrequency observations of NGC 1275 and modeled the overall spectral energy distribution. We analyzed unpublished MAGIC observations carried out between October 2009 and February 2010, and the previously published observations taken between August 2010 and February 2011. Here, we studied the multiband variabilitymore » and correlations by analyzing data of Fermi-LAT in the 100 MeV–100 GeV energy band, as well as Chandra (X-ray), KVA (optical), and MOJAVE (radio) data taken during the same period. Using customized Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to early MAGIC stereoscopic data, we detect NGC 1275 also in the earlier MAGIC campaign. The flux level and energy spectra are similar to the results of the second campaign. The monthly light curve above 100 GeV shows a hint of variability at the 3.6σ level. In the Fermi-LAT band, both flux and spectral shape variabilities are reported. Furthermore, the optical light curve is also variable and shows a clear correlation with the γ-ray flux above 100 MeV. In radio, three compact components are resolved in the innermost part of the jet. One of these components shows a similar trend as the Fermi-LAT and KVA light curves. The γ-ray spectra measured simultaneously with MAGIC and Fermi-LAT from 100 MeV to 650 GeV can be well fitted either by a log-parabola or by a power-law with a subexponential cutoff for the two observation campaigns. A single-zone synchrotron-self-Compton model, with an electron spectrum following a power-law with an exponential cutoff, can explain the broadband spectral energy distribution and the multifrequency behavior of the source. But, this model suggests an

  10. Giant Radio Jet Coming From Wrong Kind of Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Giant jets of subatomic particles moving at nearly the speed of light have been found coming from thousands of galaxies across the Universe, but always from elliptical galaxies or galaxies in the process of merging -- until now. Using the combined power of the Hubble Space Telescope, the Very Large Array (VLA) and the 8-meter Gemini-South Telescope, astronomers have discovered a huge jet coming from a spiral galaxy similar to our own Milky Way. Radio-optical view of galaxy Combined HST and VLA image of the galaxy 0313-192. Optical HST image shows the galaxy edge-on; VLA image, shown in red, reveals giant jet of speeding particles. For more images, see this link below. CREDIT: Keel, Ledlow & Owen; STScI,NRAO/AUI/NSF, NASA "We've always thought spirals were the wrong kind of galaxy to generate these huge jets, but now we're going to have to re-think some of our ideas on what produces these jets," said William Keel, a University of Alabama astronomer who led the research team. Keel worked with Michael Ledlow of Gemini Observatory and Frazer Owen of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The scientists reported their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Seattle, Washington. "Further study of this galaxy may provide unique insights on just what needs to happen in a galaxy to produce these powerful jets of particles," Keel said. In addition, Owen said, "The loose-knit nature of the cluster of galaxies in which this galaxy resides may play a part in allowing this particular spiral to produce jets." Astronomers believe such jets originate at the cores of galaxies, where supermassive black holes provide the tremendous gravitational energy to accelerate particles to nearly the speed of light. Magnetic fields twisted tightly by spinning disks of material being sucked into the black hole are presumed to narrow the speeding particles into thin jets, like a nozzle on a garden hose. Both elliptical and spiral galaxies are believed to harbor supermassive

  11. Radio Galaxy Zoo: discovery of a poor cluster through a giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Andernach, H.; Kapińska, A. D.; Rudnick, L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cotter, G.; Vaughan, S.; Jones, T. W.; Heywood, I.; Wing, J. D.; Wong, O. I.; Matorny, T.; Terentev, I. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.; Shabala, S. S.; Willett, K. W.

    2016-08-01

    We have discovered a previously unreported poor cluster of galaxies (RGZ-CL J0823.2+0333) through an unusual giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy found in the Radio Galaxy Zoo project. We obtained a spectroscopic redshift of z = 0.0897 for the E0-type host galaxy, 2MASX J08231289+0333016, leading to Mr = -22.6 and a 1.4 GHz radio luminosity density of L1.4 = 5.5 × 1024 W Hz-1. These radio and optical luminosities are typical for wide-angle tailed radio galaxies near the borderline between Fanaroff-Riley classes I and II. The projected largest angular size of ≈8 arcmin corresponds to 800 kpc and the full length of the source along the curved jets/trails is 1.1 Mpc in projection. X-ray data from the XMM-Newton archive yield an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of the thermal emission surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 at 1.2-2.6 × 1043 erg s-1 for assumed intracluster medium temperatures of 1.0-5.0 keV. Our analysis of the environment surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 indicates that RGZ J082312.9+033301 lies within a poor cluster. The observed radio morphology suggests that (a) the host galaxy is moving at a significant velocity with respect to an ambient medium like that of at least a poor cluster, and that (b) the source may have had two ignition events of the active galactic nucleus with 107 yr in between. This reinforces the idea that an association between RGZ J082312.9+033301 and the newly discovered poor cluster exists.

  12. Radio galaxy jets as probes of galactic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Saslaw, W.C.; Whittle, M.

    1988-02-01

    It has been noted that the central source of an asymmetric nuclear galactic radio jet may experience considerable net thrust and consequently behave like a massive rocket. In this paper, simple models for the motion of a rocket through a galaxy are examined. It is found that the density distribution of the galaxy is important, and determines whether a given source can escape. Thus, observations of the location and velocity of a source relative to its galactic center may provide new constraints on models of the density distribution in galaxies. 35 references.

  13. Full Duplex, Spread Spectrum Radio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to support the development of a full duplex, spread spectrum voice communications system. The assembly and testing of a prototype system consisting of a Harris PRISM spread spectrum radio, a TMS320C54x signal processing development board and a Zilog Z80180 microprocessor was underway at the start of this project. The efforts under this project were the development of multiple access schemes, analysis of full duplex voice feedback delays, and the development and analysis of forward error correction (FEC) algorithms. The multiple access analysis involved the selection between code division multiple access (CDMA), frequency division multiple access (FDMA) and time division multiple access (TDMA). Full duplex voice feedback analysis involved the analysis of packet size and delays associated with full loop voice feedback for confirmation of radio system performance. FEC analysis included studies of the performance under the expected burst error scenario with the relatively short packet lengths, and analysis of implementation in the TMS320C54x digital signal processor. When the capabilities and the limitations of the components used were considered, the multiple access scheme chosen was a combination TDMA/FDMA scheme that will provide up to eight users on each of three separate frequencies. Packets to and from each user will consist of 16 samples at a rate of 8,000 samples per second for a total of 2 ms of voice information. The resulting voice feedback delay will therefore be 4 - 6 ms. The most practical FEC algorithm for implementation was a convolutional code with a Viterbi decoder. Interleaving of the bits of each packet will be required to offset the effects of burst errors.

  14. THE UNIFICATION OF POWERFUL QUASARS AND RADIO GALAXIES AND THEIR RELATION TO OTHER MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Podigachoski, Pece; Barthel, Peter; Haas, Martin; Leipski, Christian; Wilkes, Belinda

    2015-06-10

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies (RGs) and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that RGs and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming (SF) galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from SF galaxies.

  15. Cluster X-Ray Substructure and Radio Galaxy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.; Burns, J. O.

    1994-12-01

    Current wisdom suggests that X-ray substructure in the intracluster medium (ICM) is fairly common in galaxy clusters. This substructure takes the form of elongations, isophotal twisting, asymmetries, and sub-clumping. Substructure is also frequently present in kinematical analysis of the galaxy velocity and spatial distributions. These features include bimodality, kurtosis or skewness, and non-Gaussian velocity distributions. Consistent with the observations, Hydro/N-Body simulations suggest that cluster-subcluster mergers may be the culprit to explain these features in the ICM gas distribution, and would indicate that many clusters, even at the present epoch, are still undergoing significant dynamical evolution. From a sample of X-ray images from the Einstein satellite and, more recently, the ROSAT mission, Burns et al. (1994) found a significant correlation between the positions of radio galaxies and subclumps within the cluster-scale X-ray emission. Burns et al. have suggested that radio galaxies reside in the residue of cluster/sub-cluster merging sites, and may therefore act as pointers to clusters with ongoing and intersting dynamical activity. We are following up these ideas with a detailed substructure analysis, and a comparison to a sample of clusters without radio galaxies. In order to determine the signficance of substructure, we have reanalyzed the X-ray images using a Bootstrap-Resampling Monte-Carlo technique. In this method, asymmetries, elongations, and other forms of substructure are evaluated using a moment-analysis similar to M{o}hr et al. (1994), with the advantage that we need not assume apriori any specific substructure-free model for the source (\\ie\\ a Beta-model). The significance of individual features is determined solely from a comparison to statistical fluctuations (including noise) of the actual data. Using this technique, we place limits on the fraction of clusters with significant substructure and test the radio galaxy

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the environments of high- and low-excitation radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, J. H. Y.; Croom, S. M.; Sadler, E. M.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Brough, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Colless, M.; Driver, S. P.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Johnston, H. M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Pracy, M. B.; Steele, O.; Thomas, D.; Wang, L.

    2017-08-01

    We study the environments of low- and high-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs and HERGs, respectively) in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.4, using a sample of 399 radio galaxies and environmental measurements from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. In our analysis we use the fifth nearest neighbour density (Σ5) and the GAMA galaxy groups catalogue (G3Cv6) and construct control samples of galaxies matched in stellar mass and colour to the radio-detected sample. We find that LERGs and HERGs exist in different environments and that this difference is dependent on radio luminosity. High-luminosity LERGs (LNVSS ≳ 1024 W Hz-1) lie in much denser environments than a matched radio-quiet control sample (about three times as dense, as measured by Σ5), and are more likely to be members of galaxy groups (82^{+5}_{-7} per cent of LERGs are in GAMA groups, compared to 58^{+3}_{-3} per cent of the control sample.). In contrast, the environments of the HERGs and lower luminosity LERGs are indistinguishable from that of a matched control sample. Our results imply that high-luminosity LERGs lie in more massive haloes than non-radio galaxies of similar stellar mass and colour, in agreement with earlier studies. When we control for the preference of LERGs to be found in groups, both high- and low-luminosity LERGs are found in higher-mass haloes (˜0.2 dex; at least 97 per cent significant) than the non-radio control sample.

  17. TANGO I: Interstellar medium in nearby radio galaxies. Molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña Flaquer, B.; Leon, S.; Combes, F.; Lim, J.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies that are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless, gas is needed at their very center to feed the nuclear activity. Aims: We study the molecular gas properties (i.e., mass, kinematics, distribution, origin) of these objects, and compare them with results for other known samples. Methods: At the IRAM-30m telescope, we performed a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. Results: The main result of our survey is that the molecular gas content of these galaxies is very low compared to spiral or FIR-selected galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass, including detections and upper limits, is 2.2 × 108 M⊙. When separated into FR-I and FR-II types, a difference in their H2 masses is found. The median value of FR-I galaxies is about 1.9 × 108 M⊙ and higher for FR-II galaxies, at about 4.5 × 108 M⊙. Which is probably entirely because of a Malmquist bias. Our results contrast with those of previous surveys, whose targets were mainly selected by means of their FIR emission, implying that we measure higher observed masses of molecular gas. Moreover, the shape of CO spectra suggest that a central molecular gas disk exists in 30% of these radio galaxies, a lower rate than in other active galaxy samples. Conclusions: We find a low level of molecular gas in our sample of radio-selected AGNs, indicating that galaxies do not need much molecular gas to host an AGN. The presence of a molecular gas disk in some galaxies and the wide range of molecular gas masses may be indicative of different origins for the gas, which we can not exclude at present (e.g., minor/major mergers, stellar mass loss, or accretion). Appendices and Figure 15 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. A new intermediate Seyfert galaxy - X-ray, optical, and radio properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghigo, F. D.; Wyckoff, S.; Wardle, J. F. C.; Cohen, N. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the X-ray source X0459 + 034 is a Seyfert galaxy of intermediate type, and optical spectroscopy and radio observations were performed to study the nature of the object. The object appears almost stellar and slightly diffuse on Palomar Sky Survey prints. The source is identified as a Type 1.5 Seyfert with broad and narrow line components of redshift 0.016 + or - 0.001, according to H-Beta line profile. In addition, the broad line component H-Beta equivalent width is larger than that of the narrow line component by a factor of three. Finally, it is shown that this is a weak radio source with a steep nonthermal spectrum and an angular extent of approximately 3 in., and the composite radio-to-X-ray spectrum suggests that in different spectral regions, different relativistic electron populations or emission mechanisms are contributing factors.

  19. Mutual distance dependence drives the observed jet-power-radio-luminosity scaling relations in radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Shabala, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetic power of radio jets is a quantity of fundamental importance to studies of the AGN feedback process and radio galaxy physics. A widely used proxy for jet power is the extended radio luminosity. A number of empirical methods have been used to calibrate a scaling relationship between jet power (Q) and radio luminosity (L) of the form log (Q) = βL log (L) + C. The regression slope has typically been found to be βL ˜ 0.7-0.8. Here we show that the previously reported scaling relations are strongly affected by the confounding variable, distance. We find that in a sample of FRI X-ray cavity systems, after accounting for the mutual distance dependence, the jet power and radio luminosity are only weakly correlated, with slope βL ≈ 0.3: significantly flatter than previously reported. We also find that in previously used samples of high-power sources, no evidence for an intrinsic correlation is present when the effect of distance is accounted for. Using a simple model we show that βL is expected to be significantly lower in samples of FRI radio galaxies than it is for FRIIs, due to the differing dynamics for these two classes of radio source. For FRI X-ray cavity systems the model predicts βL(FRI) ≳ 0.5 in contrast to FRII radio galaxies, for which βL(FRII) ≳ 0.8. We discuss the implications of our finding for studies of radio mode feedback, and radio galaxy physics.

  20. Multiphase ISM in Radio Loud Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Chaware, Laxmikant; Pandey, S. K.

    We present optical, IR and X-ray photometric study of a sample of radio loud early type galaxies chosen from B2 sample. To get radial profiles of various photometric and geometrical parameters, We per- formed multiband surface photometry on CCD images of our sample gala- xies in ’BVR’ broad band filter and Hα narrow band filter obtained from IUCAA Girawali Observatory(IGO 2m telescope) Pune(INDIA),that descri- be elliptical isophotes fitted to the 2D light distribution of the galaxies. The main focus of our study is to analyze radial profiles of quantities such as the (local) surface brightness, the ellipticity, and the deviations from elliptical isophotes parametrized by the Fourier coefficients. We generated color maps,residual maps,dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps and x-ray diffuse maps (obtained from CHANDRA data archive) of the galaxies to study the morphology of the dust, ionized and hot gas content present in the galaxies. We carried out detailed analysis of the dust properties(mass and temperature of the dust) for sample galaxies. We also made use of the HST(WFPC2) archival optical images to investigate properties of the dust in the central region(˜10 arcsec) of our sample galaxies, including this we also estimated molecular gas mass, mass loss by red giant stars and mass loss rate from evolved stars in the sample galaxies obtained from IRAS fluxes. This multiwavelength study of our sample galaxies enabled us to find physical correlation among different phases of ISM also to address various issues related to dust i.e origin, nature and ate(evolution)of dust in radio-loud early type galaxies, coexistence of multiphase ISM in extra-galactic environment and its possible implications for the scenarios of formation and evolution of galaxies.

  1. Goldstone radio spectrum signal identification, March 1980 - March 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaudian, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The signal identification process is described. The Goldstone radio spectrum environment contains signals that are a potential source of electromagnetic interference to the Goldstone tracking receivers. The identification of these signals is accomplished by the use of signal parameters and environment parameters. Statistical data on the Goldstone radio spectrum environment from 2285 to 2305 MHz are provided.

  2. Goldstone radio spectrum signal identification, March 1980 - March 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaudian, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The signal identification process is described. The Goldstone radio spectrum environment contains signals that are a potential source of electromagnetic interference to the Goldstone tracking receivers. The identification of these signals is accomplished by the use of signal parameters and environment parameters. Statistical data on the Goldstone radio spectrum environment from 2285 to 2305 MHz are provided.

  3. A Comparison of Radio-loud and Radio-quiet E+A Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Yssavo; Wallack, Nicole; Learis, Anna; Liu, Charles

    2015-01-01

    E+A galaxies are systems undergoing an important evolutionary transition. Their optical spectra show significant numbers of A-type stars in an elliptical galaxy that has little to no star formation (SF). These galaxies have likely experienced a recent starburst (< 1 Gyr) followed by an even more recent quench in their SF. What caused their recent SF quench remains one of the most prominent questions surrounding E+A galaxies. Within the Goto (2007, MNRAS 381,187) catalogue of 564 E+A galaxies, there is a small fraction (~3%) that have detectable radio continuum emission from FIRST or NVSS. One possible cause for the observed radio continuum is active galactic nuclei (AGN). AGN feedback is believed to be important in galaxy evolution, including SF quenching (Dubois et al. 2013, MNRAS 433, 3297). In an effort to understand better the differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet E+As, we obtained and compared their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the publicly available data from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE. We also compared them to the SEDs of other known galaxy types. We find that the radio-loud and radio-quiet samples exhibit statistically insignificant differences in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared bands. We also compare the two samples on a (J-H) vs. (H-K) color-color diagram. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation via grant AST-1004583 to the CUNY College of Staten Island, and grant AST-1004591 to the American Museum of Natural History.

  4. EXTREME HOST GALAXY GROWTH IN POWERFUL EARLY-EPOCH RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, Peter; Haas, Martin; Leipski, Christian; Wilkes, Belinda

    2012-10-01

    During the first half of the universe's life, a heyday of star formation must have occurred because many massive galaxies are in place after that epoch in cosmic history. Our observations with the revolutionary Herschel Space Observatory reveal vigorous optically obscured star formation in the ultra-massive hosts of many powerful high-redshift 3C quasars and radio galaxies. This symbiotic occurrence of star formation and black hole driven activity is in marked contrast to recent results dealing with Herschel observations of X-ray-selected active galaxies. Three archetypal radio galaxies at redshifts 1.132, 1.575, and 2.474 are presented here, with inferred star formation rates of hundreds of solar masses per year. A series of spectacular coeval active galactic nucleus/starburst events may have formed these ultra-massive galaxies and their massive central black holes during their relatively short lifetimes.

  5. An X-ray and radio study of steep-spectrum radio sources. II - Four fields from a 22 MHz polar cap survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewdney, P. E.; Mchardy, I.; Willis, A. G.; Harris, D. E.; Costain, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    Four fields containing radio sources with spectral indices greater than unity at low frequencies have been observed over a wide range of radio wavelengths and at X-ray wavelengths. For most of the steep-spectrum sources no optical identifications have been found to the detection limit of the Palomar Schmidt prints, even with the positional precision of about 1 arcsec from VLA maps. This implies that the associated galaxies or clusters lie at a great distance. X-ray emission was not detected from any of the steep-spectrum radio sources. In one case, an extended source appears to be a radio halo in an uncataloged cluster of galaxies at a redshift of 0.125, and it is suggested that this object is a promising candidate for the detection of inverse Compton X-rays, since it is not a high-luminosity source of thermal X-rays.

  6. Radio Selection of the Most Distant Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi, E.; Jin, S.; Strazzullo, V.; Sargent, M. T.; Wang, T.; Ferrari, C.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčić, V.; Calabró, A.; Coogan, R.; Delhaize, J.; Delvecchio, I.; Elbaz, D.; Gobat, R.; Gu, Q.; Liu, D.; Novak, M.; Valentino, F.

    2017-09-01

    We show that the most distant X-ray-detected cluster known to date, Cl J1001 at {z}{spec}=2.506, hosts a strong overdensity of radio sources. Six of them are individually detected (within 10\\prime\\prime ) in deep 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 75 resolution VLA 3 GHz imaging, with {S}3{GHz}> 8 μ {Jy}. Of the six, an active galactic nucleus (AGN) likely affects the radio emission in two galaxies, while star formation is the dominant source powering the remaining four. We searched for cluster candidates over the full COSMOS 2 deg2 field using radio-detected 3 GHz sources and looking for peaks in {{{Σ }}}5 density maps. Cl J1001 is the strongest overdensity by far with > 10σ , with a simple {z}{phot}> 1.5 preselection. A cruder photometric rejection of z< 1 radio foregrounds leaves Cl J1001 as the second strongest overdensity, while even using all radio sources Cl J1001 remains among the four strongest projected overdensities. We conclude that there are great prospects for future deep and wide-area radio surveys to discover large samples of the first generation of forming galaxy clusters. In these remarkable structures, widespread star formation and AGN activity of massive galaxy cluster members, residing within the inner cluster core, will ultimately lead to radio continuum as one of the most effective means for their identification, with detection rates expected in the ballpark of 0.1–1 per square degree at z≳ 2.5. Samples of hundreds such high-redshift clusters could potentially constrain cosmological parameters and test cluster and galaxy formation models.

  7. The evolution of the radio SED of high-z powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouart, G.

    2016-08-01

    The SKA_LOW pathfinder MWA (Murchison Wide Array) executed the first all-sky radio survey in the 80-230MHz range, revealing more than 300000 extragalactic sources. Combined with data up to 20GHz, we build exquisite radio SEDs (>~30 data-points) of a sample of a well-known sample of 70 high redshift radio galaxies (the HeRGE sample: L_3GHz restframe > 10^26 W/Hz and z>1). The synchrotron emission is composed of the core, jet and the lobe emission, providing insight on the direct vicinity of the galaxy and the accretion properties of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Combined with our previous multi-wavelength campaign from optical to submm (including VLT, Keck, HST, Spitzer, Herschel, SCUBA, LABOCA, and more recently ALMA), providing information on the host galaxy, we now investigate simultaneously the mechanical (from radio) and radiative (from IR) of the SMBH hosted in these progenitors of our local massive galaxies. I will present the results from our radio SED fitting and discuss the connection with our previous results in term of radio loud AGN evolution at the peak of activity in the Universe.

  8. Jet-Intracluster Medium Interactions of the Head Tail Radio Galaxy 3C 129

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczynski, Henric S. W.

    2005-01-01

    The 50 ksec XMM observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 were taken as scheduled, and the data are of good quality. We analyzed the data in the following way. After standard cleaning, we flat-fielded the XMM surface brightness maps. Combining the data from the EPIC MOS and PN Camera CCDs, we performed a cross-correlation analysis of the X-ray surface brightness distribution with the 1.4 GHz VLA radio map. We found evidence for cavities in the X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) associated with the radio tail of the head-tail radio galaxy 3C 129. This discovery is very interesting as it excludes the presence of a large fraction of thermal plasma in the radio tail. Together with the observation of an apparent pressure mismatch between the radio plasma and the ICM, and an upper limit on the magnetic field inside the radio tail (from the radio spectral indices map) the observation implies that the tail pressure is dominated either by low-energy electrons/positrons, or, by relativistic protons. Furthermore, we studied the energy spectrum of an X-ray "hot-spot" associated with the head of the radio galaxy 3C 129. It seems likely that the X-ray hot-spot originates from shocked gas in front of the radio galaxy. , The analysis turned out to be much more difficult than anticipated. The main reason is the lack of a comprehensive, publicly available background model that is key for the analysis of extended sources. Small groups like our do not have the man-power to come up with a background model themselves. We used the model from Read & Ponman (A&A 409, 395, 2003). However, the background subtracted X-ray surface brightness maps show a bright ring in the outer 20% of the camera. We tried to get rid of this ring and contacted the XMM helpdesk and Read & Ponman, the authors of the background paper. However, up to this day, we did not entirely succeed to remove the brightness enhancement at the outer parts of the camera. Unfortunately, our results are somewhat sensitive

  9. Deep IR imaging of two gas-rich radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    1997-07-01

    We propose deep, high resolution continuum, line and polarization imaging of the two best candidates for recent mergers amongst the low-redshift radio galaxies: 3C 305 and 3C 293. Our primary aim is to obtain a deep IR image to locate the true nuclei and clarify the structure of the galaxies in order to test merger models, since our optical view is confused by dense dust lanes, scattering, and strong emission lines associated with the kpc-scale radio jets. The results will help assess popular models in which mergers trigger AGN activity. Our secondary aim is to image the shock-excited 1.64 micron Fe ii line to trace fast shocks and hence help understand the relationship between the radio jets and the {possibly collimated} ionizing continuum. These two galaxies provide a very rare opportunity to study the impact of the jets on their environment, because they are interacting directly with the cold interstellar medium {absent in normal elliptical radio galaxies}. The extended optical emission lines are already well studied, but interpretation has been hampered by confusion between shock- and photo-ionization. Our tertiary aim is to obtain 2 micron polarimetry to trace regions of electron scattering, to check the apparent 90degrees misalignment between the jet axis and that of the scattering ``cone'' in 3C 305, and to ensure location of even deeply-buried nuclei, either by picking up direct long- wavelength emission, or by locating the centre of the scattering pattern.

  10. Radio identifications of UGC galaxies - Starbursts and monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, J. J.; Broderick, J. J.

    1988-07-01

    Radio identifications of galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies with δ < +82° were made from the Green Bank 1400 MHz sky maps. Every source having peak flux density SP ≥ 150 mJy in the ≈12 arcmin FWHM map point-source response and position <5 arcmin in both coordinates from the optical position of any UGC galaxy was considered a candidate identification to ensure that very extended (up to 1 Mpc) and asymmetric sources would not be missed. Maps in the literature or new 1.49 GHz VLA C array maps made with 18 arcsec resolution were used to confirm or reject candidate identifications. The resulting list of 176 confirmed identifications should be complete, reliable, and suitable for statistical investigations of radio emission from nearby (D < 300 Mpc for H0 = 50 km s-1Mpc-1) galaxies of all morphological types. Three criteria for distinguishing starbursts from monsters on the basis of radio and far-infrared continuum only are given and used to classify the dominant energy sources in the N = 176 confirmed galaxy identifications.

  11. Weak Radio Galaxies. I. Broad-Band Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, R.; Cruz-González, I.; Guichard, J.

    1997-04-01

    We report on a study of the optical properties of weak radio galaxies (WRGs) from the B2 survey, to obtain the broad-band photometric properties and morphology information crucial for our narrow-band imaging at Hα and [O III] study (Carrillo et al. 1997). This paper contains optical CCD images of 30 radio galaxies obtained at V, R and I. We present the morphological and photometric results and discuss their relationship to the radio structure and environmental properties. We find that most WRGs are E galaxies, have peculiar morphologies and are located in high galaxy density environments. Optical colors of WRGs are unusual if compared to colors of normal ellipticals, but similar to AGN colors. The surface brightness profiles of most WRGs follow the de Vaucouleurs law expected for ellipticals at most radii, but in all cases a turnover or flatness is observed in the innermost portion of the profiles, possibly produced by an additional nuclear emission source. The tidal effects produced by galaxy companions described by Kormendy (1977) for ellipticals, are clearly evident in the outer parts of the WRGs profiles and can be associated to interaction effects.

  12. Deep Radio Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Röttgering, H.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; de Gasperin, F.; Bonafede, A.; Pizzo, R.; Ferrari, C.; Orrù, E.; Ogrean, G. A.; LOFAR Busyweek Team; surveys KSP, LOFAR

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR and JVLA radio observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster. The Toothbrush cluster hosts diffuse 2 Mpc extended radio emission in the form of a radio relic and halo. XMM-Newton X-ray observations show that the cluster is undergoing a major merger event. Both the radio relic and halo are likely related to this ongoing merger. Radio relics are proposed to be direct tracers of shock waves in the intracluster medium. The XMM observations indeed reveal a shock, but there is a puzzling 200 kpc spatial offset between the shock position and relic. Our deep LOFAR and JVLA observations allow a detailed spectral study to test the shock origin of the relic and underlying particle acceleration mechanisms. Finally, the LOFAR observations highlight the science that could be obtained from a deep low-frequency all-sky survey.

  13. High Resolution Radio Imaging of the Merging Galaxies NGC3256 and NGC4194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of the merging galaxy systems NGC3256 and NGC4194. NGC3256 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 1 in. or approx. 190pc; NGC4194 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 0.3 in. or approx. 50pc. In both systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse radio emission. We detect 65 compact sources in NGC3256 at 6cm and we detect 46 compact sources in NGC4194, both to a limiting luminosity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 18) W/ Hz or approx. 5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Most of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active star forming regions but not with specific optical emission sources. Several compact radio sources in NGC3256 are near positions of compact X-ray sources detected by Lira et al.. In both NGC3256 and NGC4194, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find in NGC3256 approx. 20% have nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) while approx. 80% have nominally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants). In NGC4194, half the compact radio sources have flat spectral indices and half have steep indices. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the number of young massive stars and the associated ionized gas masses. For the steep-spectrum sources, we estimate supernova rates. We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  14. Circumnuclear gaseous kinematics and excitation of four local radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, G. S.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Riffel, R. A.; Kharb, P.; Lena, D.; Schnorr-Müller, A.

    2017-07-01

    We present our results using optical integral field spectroscopy of four nearby (z<0.07) radio galaxies obtained with GMOS in Gemini North and South telescopes. The field-of-view probes a circumnuclear region of ≍3.5"×5", with average spatial resolution of ≍0.6". In this presentation, we will resume our results for two galaxies of our sample, Arp 102B and Pictor A, which are already published (Couto et al. 2013, 2016), as well as discuss the preliminary results for the other two, 3C 33 and 4C +29.30. While these galaxies present different characteristics, like radio jet morphology, they display in common signatures of interactions or merger events.

  15. A velocity dipole in the distribution of radio galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blake, Chris; Wall, Jasper

    2002-03-14

    The motion of our Galaxy through the Universe is reflected in a systematic shift in the temperature of the cosmic microwave background-because of the Doppler effect, the temperature of the background is about 0.1 per cent higher in the direction of motion, with a correspondingly lower temperature in the opposite direction. This effect is known as dipole anisotropy. If our standard cosmological model is correct, a related dipole effect should also be present as an enhancement in the surface density of distant galaxies in the direction of motion. The main obstacle to finding this signal is the uneven distribution of galaxies in the local supercluster, which drowns out the small cosmological signal. Here we report a detection of the expected cosmological dipole anisotropy in the distribution of galaxies. We use a survey of radio galaxies that are mainly located at cosmological distances, so the contamination from nearby clusters is small. When local radio galaxies are removed from the sample, the resulting dipole is in the same direction as the temperature anisotropy of the microwave background, and close to the expected amplitude. The result therefore confirms the standard cosmological interpretation of the microwave background.

  16. A radio study of the superwind galaxy NGC 1482

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hota, Ananda; Saikia, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    We present multifrequency radio continuum as well as HI observations of the superwind galaxy NGC 1482, with both the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Very Large Array (VLA). This galaxy has a remarkable hourglass-shaped optical emission-line outflow as well as bipolar soft X-ray bubbles on opposite sides of the galactic disc. The low-frequency, lower-resolution radio observations show a smooth structure. From the non-thermal emission, we estimate the available energy in supernovae, and examine whether this would be adequate to drive the observed superwind outflow. The high-frequency, high-resolution radio image of the central starburst region located at the base of the superwind bi-cone shows one prominent peak and more extended emission with substructure. This image has been compared with the infrared, optical red continuum, Hα, and soft and hard X-ray images from Chandra to understand the nature and relationship of the various features seen at different wavelengths. The peak of the infrared emission is the only feature that is coincident with the prominent radio peak, and possibly defines the centre of the galaxy. The HI observations with the GMRT show two blobs of emission on opposite sides of the central region. These are rotating about the centre of the galaxy and are located at ~2.4 kpc from it. In addition, these observations also reveal a multicomponent HI absorption profile against the central region of the radio source, with a total width of ~250 km s-1. The extreme blue- and redshifted absorption components are at 1688 and 1942 km s-1, respectively, while the peak absorption is at 1836 km s-1. This is consistent with the heliocentric systemic velocity of 1850 +/- 20 km s-1, estimated from a variety of observations. We discuss possible implications of these results.

  17. The radio luminosity function of spiral galaxies - Correlations with aggregation and Hubble type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Trinchieri, G.

    1981-04-01

    The Radio Luminosity Function of spiral galaxies is derived from the Arecibo observations of UGC galaxies at 2380 MHz. It is found that the average radio power and the optical luminosity are linearly correlated (αL1) and that, at any given radio power, the probability for a spiral galaxy to become a radio source scales with the optical luminosity as L1.3. Both results confirm the analysis of Hummel (1980, b) who studied with the Westerbork radio telescope (WSRT) the 1415 MHz continuum emission from nearby spiral galaxies. It is also attempted to correlate the radio emission from spiral galaxies with their detailed Hubble type and cluster membership. A weak evidence is found that early type galaxies and cluster members are slightly deficient in radio emission with respect to late type or isolated galaxies, particularly among the optically brightest objects.

  18. A Large-Scale Jet and FR I Radio Source in a Spiral Galaxy: The Host Properties and External Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, Michael J.; Owen, Frazer N.; Yun, Min S.; Hill, John M.

    2001-05-01

    We have identified a large (~200 h-175 kpc), powerful double radio source whose host galaxy is clearly a disk and most likely a spiral. This FR I-like radio galaxy is located very near the center of the richness class 0 cluster A428. The existence of such an object violates a fundamental paradigm for radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In our first paper, we showed that this object was most consistent with a spiral host classification with optical emission-line ratios and colors suggestive of an active nucleus. However, we were not able to confirm actual radio jet emission based on the maps available at that time. In this paper, we present new, higher resolution radio imaging, a radio/millimeter continuum spectrum for the nucleus, a detection of H I absorption against the bright radio core, an upper limit to CO emission and the gas mass, and 70 (68 new) optical redshifts measured in the direction of A428. We confirm the existence of a radio jet at 20 cm, extending 42 h-175 into the southern lobe. At 3.6 cm, we also detect a nuclear jet similar in length to that in M87, although 10 times weaker. We believe that this is the first detection of a radio jet on these scales in a disk/spiral host galaxy. The nuclear radio spectrum is similar to many blazar- or quasar-like objects, suggesting that the galaxy harbors an imbedded and obscured AGN. We model a turnover in the spectrum at low frequencies as a result of free-free absorption. We detect very strong and narrow H I absorption, with nearly the entire 20 cm continuum flux of the core being absorbed, implying an unusually large optical depth (τ~1). The most consistent model is that we are viewing the nucleus through a disklike distribution of gas in the interstellar medium, possibly through a spiral arm or a warp to account for the above-average column density. From the radial velocity distribution, we find that A428 is in fact made up of at least two clumps of galaxies separated by ~3300 km s-1, which

  19. NUclei of GAlaxies. V. Radio emission in 7 NUGA sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krips, M.; Eckart, A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Pott, J.-U.; Leon, S.; Neri, R.; García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Boone, F.; Baker, A. J.; Tacconi, L. J.; Schinnerer, E.; Hunt, L. K.

    2007-03-01

    We present high angular resolution radio snap-shot observations of seven nearby low-luminosity active galaxies (LLAGN) from the NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA) survey. The observations were conducted with MERLIN and EVN/VLBI at 18 cm and 6 cm. At all observed angular resolutions and frequencies, we find indications for extended emission in about ~40% of the sources, consistent with the decrease of flux with increasing angular resolution. The extended components resemble jet emission in a majority of cases, consistent with the optically thin synchrotron emission implied by their steep spectra. We consider the compact 6 cm EVN/VLBI radio emission of our sources in the context of the "fundamental plane" that previous LLAGN studies identified within the three-dimensional parameter space of radio luminosity, X-ray luminosity, and black hole mass. We demonstrate, using NGC 7217 and NGC 1068 as particular examples, that high-resolution, multi-epoch radio observations offer useful information about the origin of offsets from the fundamental plane. EVN: The European VLBI Network is a joint facility of European, Chinese, South African and other radio astronomy institutes funded by their national research councils. MERLIN is a national facility operated by the University of Manchester on behalf of PPARC. VLBI including the VLBA: The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. HIghZ: A search for HI absorption in high-redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J.; Callingham, J.; Sadler, E.; Wayth, R.; Curran, S.; Mahoney, E.

    2017-01-01

    We will use the unique low-frequency spectral capability of the MWA to carry out a pilot survey for neutral gas in the interstellar medium of the most distant (z>5) radio galaxies in the Universe. Through detection of the HI 21-cm line in absorption we aim to place stringent lower limits on the source redshift, confirming its location in the early Universe. Our sample makes use of the excellent wide-band spectral information available from the recently completed MWA GLEAM survey, from which we have selected a sample of ultra-steep peaked-spectrum radio sources that have a spectral turnover below 300 MHz. These sources should be ideal candidates for high-redshift compact radio galaxies since they have (a) spectral peaks that turnover below 1GHz and (b) very steep (alpha < -1.0) spectral indices that are consistent with the high density environments expected for radio galaxies in the early Universe. Using the MWA, we aim to verify this hypothesis through the detection of significant column densities of cold HI. This pathfinder project will provide important technical information that will inform future absorption surveys both with the MWA and, ultimately, the SKA-LOW telescope.

  1. Time-Dependence of VHE Gamma-Ray induced Pair Cascades in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustazadeh, Parisa; Boettcher, Markus; Thrush, Samantha

    2016-04-01

    Recently, several intermediate frequency peaked BL Lac objects (IBL), low frequency peaked BL Lac objects (LBL) and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) were detected as very high energy ( VHE, E > 100 ˜ GeV) γ-ray sources. These discoveries suggest that γγ absorption and pair cascades might occur in those objects, leading to excess γ-ray emission which may be observable also in off-axis viewing directions (i.e., like in radio galaxies) when deflected by moderately strong magnetic fields. Here, we investigate the time dependence of the Compton γ-ray emission from such VHE γ-ray induced pair cascades. We show that the cascade emission is variable on time scales much shorter than the light-crossing time across the characteristic extent of the external radiation field, depending on the viewing angle and γ-ray energy. Thus, we find that the cascade Compton interpretation for the Fermi γ-ray emission from radio galaxies is still consistent with the day-scale variability detected in the Fermi γ-ray emission of radio galaxies, such as NGC 1275, which we use as a specific example.

  2. Ionization cones and radio ejecta in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. S.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.

    1994-01-01

    We report radio mapping at three frequencies of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5252, which is known to exhibit a spectacular pair of 'ionization cones' in optical emission-line images. The radio structure of the galaxy comprises an unresolved (less than 50 pc) source coincident with the optical nucleus, weak, narrow features extending approximately equal to 900 pc to north and south from the nucleus, and an unresolved radio source some 10 kpc from the nucleus. The inner parts of the extended radio structure and the off-nuclear source align well with the axis of the ionization cones. There are currently 11 Seyfert galaxies known to possess an ionization cone or a bi-cone; 8 of these galaxies also contain a linear (double, triple, or jet-like) nuclear radio structure. For this limited, incomplete sample, there is a tight alignment between cone and radi axes: the formal mean difference between the measured projections of these axes on the sky is only 6 deg, and the alignment may well be better than this at the location(s) closer to the nucleus where the collimation occurs. Although the degree of collimation is much worse for the ionizing photons than for the radio plasma, it is clear that they are collimated by the same, or coplanar, nulcear disks or tori. In particular, if the ionization cones result from absorption by dusty tori on the pc scale and the radio ejecta from accretion disks around the central black hole, the absence of differential precession indicates that either the gravitating mass distribution is close to spherical or the dusty torus has settled into a preferred plane. The cones currently known in late-type (but not early-type) spirals show a trend to align with the axis of the galaxy stellar disk. We argue that this alignment is either an observational selection effect or indicates that the gas accreted to power the nuclear activity has an internal origin in late-type spirals, but may have an external origin (e.g., a galaxy merger) in early-types. .

  3. Kiloparsec-scale radio emission in Seyfert and LINER galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Beelen, Alexandre; Kharb, Preeti

    2015-01-01

    Seyfert and LINER galaxies are known to exhibit compact radio emission on ˜10-100 pc scales, but larger Kiloparsec-Scale Radio structures (KSRs) often remain undetected in sub-arcsec high-resolution observations. We investigate the prevalence and nature of KSRs in Seyfert and LINER galaxies using the 1.4 GHz VLA FIRST and NVSS observations. Our sample consists of 2651 sources detected in FIRST and of these 1737 sources also have NVSS counterparts. Considering the ratio of total to peak flux density (θ = (Sint/Speak)1/2) as a parameter to infer the presence of extended radio emission we show that ≥30 per cent of FIRST-detected sources possess extended radio structures on scales larger than 1.0 kpc. The use of low-resolution NVSS observations help us to recover faint extended KSRs that are resolved out in FIRST observations and results in ≥42.5 per cent KSR sources in FIRST-NVSS sub-sample. This fraction is only a lower limit owing to the combination of projection, resolution and sensitivity effects. Our study demonstrates that KSRs may be more common than previously thought and are found across all redshifts, luminosities and radio loudness. The extranuclear radio luminosity of KSR sources is found to be positively correlated with the core radio luminosity as well as the [O III] λ5007 Å line luminosity and this can be interpreted as KSRs being powered by AGN rather than star formation. The distributions of the FIR-to-radio ratios and mid-IR colours of KSR sources are also consistent with their AGN origin. However, contribution from star formation cannot be ruled out particularly in sources with low radio luminosities.

  4. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo; Norman, Michael L.; Cen Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  5. VERITAS Upper Limit on the Very High Energy Emission from the Radio Galaxy NGC 1275

    DOE PAGES

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; ...

    2009-11-16

    We report the recent detection by the Fermi γ-ray space telescope of high-energy γ-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 that makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE γ-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. Finally, a 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at themore » decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.« less

  6. VERITAS UPPER LIMIT ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Celik, O.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.

    2009-12-01

    The recent detection by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope of high-energy gamma-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE gamma-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. A 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  7. VERITAS Upper Limit on the Very High Energy Emission from the Radio Galaxy NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Toner, J. A.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.; Kataoka, J.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cheung, C. C.; Lott, B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tosti, G.

    2009-11-16

    We report the recent detection by the Fermi γ-ray space telescope of high-energy γ-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 that makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE γ-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. Finally, a 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  8. The radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247: The hot spots of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chernikov, P. A.

    2013-06-01

    The physical conditions in the radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247 are studied assuming that the low-frequency spectral turnovers are due to synchrotron self-absorption. The physical parameters of the radio sources are estimated using a technique based on a nonuniform synchrotron source model. It is shown that the magnetic-field distributions in the dominant compact components of these radio sources are strongly inhomogeneous. The magnetic fields at the center of the sources are B ˜ 10-1 G, and the fields are two to three orders of magnitude weaker at the periphery. The magnetic field averaged over the compact component is B ˜ 10-3 G, and the density of relativistic electrons is n e ˜ 10-3 cm-3. Assuming that there is equipartition of the energies of the magnetic field and relativistic particles, averaged over the source, < E H > = < E e > ˜ 10-7-10-6 erg cm-3. The energy density of the magnetic field exceeds that of the relativistic electrons at the centers of the radio sources. The derived parameters of CTA 21 and OF+247 are close to those of the hot spots in the radio galaxy Cygnus A. On this basis, it is suggested that CTA 21 and OF+247 are radio galaxies at an early stage of their evolution, when the hot spots (dominant compact radio components) have appeared, and the radio lobes (weak extended components) are still being formed.

  9. Blue Fermi flat spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.; Sbarrato, T.; Ghirlanda, G.; Maraschi, L.

    2012-09-01

    Many blazars detected by the Fermi satellite, observed spectroscopically in the optical, are line-less, and have been classified as BL Lac objects. Optical-ultraviolet (UV) photometry of nearly 100 of them allowed us to determine the redshift for a handful of objects and redshift upper limits in the great majority. A few of these are candidates to be 'blue quasars', namely flat spectrum radio quasars whose broad emission lines are hidden by an overwhelming synchrotron emission peaking in the UV. This implies that the emitting electrons have high energies. In turn, this requires relatively weak radiative cooling, a condition that can be met if the main radiative dissipation of the jet power occurs outside the broad-line region. We confirm this hypothesis by studying and modelling the spectral energy distributions of the four 'blue quasars' recently discovered. Furthermore, we discuss the distribution of Fermi blazars in the γ-ray spectral index-γ-ray luminosity plane, and argue that 'blue quasars' objects are a minority within the blazar populations.

  10. Powerful Radio Galaxies with Simbol-X: the Nuclear Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, E.; Grandi, P.; Malaguti, G.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Bianchin, V.

    2009-05-01

    Fanaroff & Riley type II radio galaxies (FRII) are complex objects. In particular FRII Narrow Line Radio Galaxies (NLRG), optically classified as High Excitation Galaxies (HEG) show X-ray spectra very similar to their radio-quiet counterparts, the Seyfert 2 galaxies. They show 2-10 keV continua heavily obscured (NH~1023-24 cm-2) and intense FeKα lines, typical cold matter reprocessing features. Moreover recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that the soft X-ray emission of HEG and Seyfert 2 have a common origin from photoionized gas, reinforcing the idea that not only their nuclear engine but also the circumnuclear gas (at least the warm phase) are similar. On the contrary, our knowledge of NLRG HEG above 10 keV is very poor when compared to brighter Seyfert 2. As a consequence, the physical properties of the cold phase of the circumnuclear gas (possibly linked to a dusty torus) are largely unknown. Thanks to its high sensitivity up to 80 keV, Simbol-X will provide very accurate spectra and will allow a direct comparison between the NLRG and Seyfert 2 cold environments.

  11. An XMM-Newton view of the radio galaxy 3C 411

    SciTech Connect

    Bostrom, Allison; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Tombesi, Francesco

    2014-08-20

    We present the first high signal-to-noise XMM-Newton observations of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 411. After fitting various spectral models, an absorbed double power-law (PL) continuum and a blurred relativistic disk reflection model (kdblur) are found to be equally plausible descriptions of the data. While the softer PL component (Γ = 2.11) of the double PL model is entirely consistent with that found in Seyfert galaxies (and hence likely originates from a disk corona), the additional PL component is very hard (Γ = 1.05); amongst the active galactic nucleus zoo, only flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) have such hard spectra. Together with the flat radio-spectrum displayed by this source, we suggest that it should instead be classified as an FSRQ. This leads to potential discrepancies regarding the jet inclination angle, with the radio morphology suggesting a large jet inclination but the FSRQ classification suggesting small inclinations. The kdblur model predicts an inner disk radius of at most 20 r {sub g} and relativistic reflection.

  12. A Multi-Wavelength View of Radio Galaxy Hercules A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Spectacular jets powered by the gravitational energy of a super massive black hole in the core of the elliptical galaxy Hercules A illustrate the combined imaging power of two of astronomy's cutting-edge tools, the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3, and the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. To view a video of this go to: bit.ly/Ue2ypS Some two billion light-years away, the yellowish elliptical galaxy in the center of the image appears quite ordinary as seen by Hubble in visible wavelengths of light. The galaxy is roughly 1,000 times more massive than the Milky Way and harbors a 2.5-billion-solar-mass central black hole that is 1,000 times more massive than the black hole in the Milky Way. But the innocuous-looking galaxy, also known as 3C 348, has long been known as the brightest radio-emitting object in the constellation Hercules. Emitting nearly a billion times more power in radio wavelengths than our Sun, the galaxy is one of the brightest extragalactic radio sources in the entire sky. Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Baum and C. O'Dea (RIT), R. Perley and W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) To read more about this image go to: 1.usa.gov/Yu7uvX NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources as Likely Counterparts of Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources (Research Note)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    Many sources in the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue are still unidentified since they lack an optical counterpart. An important tool that can help in identifying and classifying these sources is the cross-correlation with radio catalogues, which are very sensitive and positionally accurate. Moreover, the radio properties of a source, such as the spectrum or morphology, could provide further insight into its nature. In particular, flat-spectrum radio sources at high Galactic latitudes are likely to be AGN, possibly associated to a blazar or to the compact core of a radio galaxy. Here we present a small sample of 6 sources extracted from the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue that are still unidentified or unclassified, but which are very likely associated with a bright, flat-spectrum radio object. To confirm the association and to study the source X-ray spectral parameters, we performed X-ray follow-up observations with Swift/XRT of all objects. We report in this note the overall results obtained from this search and discuss the nature of each individual INTEGRAL source. We find that 5 of the 6 radio associations are also detected in X-rays; furthermore, in 3 cases they are the only counterpart found. More specifically, IGR J06073-0024 is a flat-spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.08, IGR J14488-4008 is a newly discovered radio galaxy, while IGR J18129-0649 is an AGN of a still unknown type. The nature of two sources (IGR J07225-3810 and IGR J19386-4653) is less well defined, since in both cases we find another X-ray source in the INTEGRAL error circle; nevertheless, the flat-spectrum radio source, likely to be a radio loud AGN, remains a viable and, in fact, a more convincing association in both cases. Only for the last object (IGR J11544-7618) could we not find any convincing counterpart since the radio association is not an X-ray emitter, while the only X-ray source seen in the field is a G star and therefore unlikely to produce the persistent emission seen by INTEGRAL.

  14. Radio Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Robert J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We extend our earlier work on cluster cores with distinct radio bubbles, adding more active bubbles, i.e. those with GHz radio emission, to our sample, and also investigating ''ghost bubbles'', i.e. those without GHz radio emission. We have determined k, which is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of the electrons radiating between 10MHz and 10GHz. Constraints on the ages of the active bubbles confirm that the ratio of the energy factor, k, to the volume filling factor, f lies within the range 1 {approx}< k/f {approx}< 1000. In the assumption that there is pressure equilibrium between the radio-emitting plasma and the surrounding thermal X-ray gas, none of the radio lobes has equipartition between the relativistic particles and the magnetic field. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the data led to the conclusion that there are not enough bubbles present in the current sample to be able to determine the shape of the population. An analysis of the ghost bubbles in our sample showed that on the whole they have higher upper limits on k/f than the active bubbles, especially when compared to those in the same cluster. A study of the Brightest 55 cluster sample shows that 17, possibly 20, clusters required some form of heating as they have a short central cooling time, t{sub cool} {approx}< 3 Gyr, and a large central temperature drop, T{sub centre}/T{sub outer} < 1/2. Of these between 12 (70 per cent) and 15 (75 per cent), contain bubbles. This indicates that the duty cycle of bubbles is large in such clusters and that they can play a major role in the heating process.

  15. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  16. REVISITING SCALING RELATIONS FOR GIANT RADIO HALOS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Pratt, G. W.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-10

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R{sub 500} as P{sub 1.4}∼L{sup 2.1±0.2}{sub 500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L{sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P{sub 1.4} scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R{sub 500}, measured by Planck, as P{sub 1.4}∼Y{sup 2.05±0.28}{sub 500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that 'SZ-luminous' Y{sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup 2} clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle

  17. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R 500 as P_{1.4} \\sim L^{2.1+/- 0.2}_{500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L 500 > 5 × 1044 erg s-1) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P 1.4 scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R 500, measured by Planck, as P_{1.4}\\sim Y^{2.05+/- 0.28}_{500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y 500 > 6 × 10-5 Mpc2 clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  18. Magnetism in galaxies - Observational overview and next generation radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-06-01

    The strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields is best studied by observations of radio continuum emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation. Fields with a well-ordered spiral structure exist in many types of galaxies. Total field strengths in spiral arms and bars are 20-30 μG and dynamically important. Strong fields in central regions can drive gas inflows towards an active nucleus. The strongest regular fields (10-15 μG) are found in interarm regions, sometimes forming ``magnetic spiral arms'' between the optical arms. The typical degree of polarization is a few % in spiral arms, but high (up to 50%) in interarm regions. The detailed field structures suggest interaction with gas flows. Faraday rotation measures of the polarization vectors reveals large-scale patterns in several spiral galaxies which are regarded as signatures of large-scale (coherent) fields generated by dynamos. - Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons which can propagate further away from their origin. LOFAR (30-240 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the EVLA, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields in distant intervening galaxies and clusters, and will be used to model the overall structure and strength of the magnetic field in the Milky Way.

  19. X-ray emission associated with radio galaxies in the Perseus cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, George; Burns, Jack O.; Kowalski, Michael P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we report on new x-ray observations of the Perseus cluster made using four separate pointings of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) Positron Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). We searched for x-ray emission associated with 16 radio galaxies and detected six above 3 sigma. We made use of the PSPC spectra to determine if the x-ray emission associated with radio galaxies in Perseus is thermal or nonthermal in origin (i.e., hot gas or an active galactic nuclei (AGN)). For the head-tail radio galaxy IC 310, we find that the data are best fit by a power law model with an unusually large spectral index alpha = 2.7. This is consistent with its unresolved spatial structure. On the other hand, a second resolved x-ray source associated with another radio galaxy 2.3 Mpc from the Perseus center (V Zw 331) is best fit by a thermal model. For three sources with insufficient flux for a full spectral analysis, we calculated hardness ratios. On this basis, the x-ray emission associated with the well known head-tail source NGC 1265 is consistent with thermal radiation. The x-ray spectra of UGC 2608 and UGC 2654 probably arise from hot gas, although very steep power-law spectra (alpha greater than 3.2) are also possible. The spectrum of NGC 1275 is quite complex due to the presence of an AGN and the galaxy's location at the center of a cluster cooling flow.

  20. THE ROLE OF MERGER STAGE ON GALAXY RADIO SPECTRA IN LOCAL INFRARED-BRIGHT STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-11-01

    An investigation of the steep, high-frequency (i.e., ν ∼ 12 GHz) radio spectra among a sample of 31 local infrared-bright starburst galaxies is carried out in light of their Hubble-Space-Telescope-based merger classifications. Radio data covering as many as 10 individual bands allow for spectral indices to be measured over three frequency bins between 0.15 and 32.5 GHz. Sources having the flattest spectral indices measured at ∼2 and 4 GHz, arising from large free-free optical depths among the densest starbursts, appear to be in ongoing through post-stage mergers. The spectral indices measured at higher frequencies (i.e., ∼12 GHz) are steepest for sources associated with ongoing mergers in which their nuclei are distinct, but share a common stellar envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails. These results hold after excluding potential active galactic nuclei based on their low 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths. Consequently, the low-, mid-, and high-frequency spectral indices each appear to be sensitive to the exact merger stage. It is additionally shown that ongoing mergers, whose progenitors are still separated and share a common envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails, also exhibit excess radio emission relative to what is expected given the far-infrared/radio correlation, suggesting that there may be a significant amount of radio emission that is not associated with ongoing star formation. The combination of these observations, along with high-resolution radio morphologies, leads to a picture in which the steep high-frequency radio spectral indices and excess radio emission arise from radio continuum bridges and tidal tails that are not associated with star formation, similar to what is observed for so-called 'taffy' galaxies. This scenario may also explain the seemingly low far-infrared/radio ratios measured for many high-z submillimeter galaxies, a number of which are merger-driven starbursts.

  1. Intermittent Jet Activity in the Radio Galaxy 4C29.30?

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, M.; Konar, C.; Saikia, D.J.; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-04-02

    We present radio observations at frequencies ranging from 240 to 8460 MHz of the radio galaxy 4C29.30 (J0840+2949) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Effelsberg telescope. We report the existence of weak extended emission with an angular size of {approx} 520 arcsec (639 kpc) within which a compact edge-brightened double-lobed source with a size of 29 arcsec (36 kpc) is embedded. We determine the spectrum of the inner double from 240 to 8460 MHz and show that it has a single power-law spectrum with a spectral index is {approx} 0.8. Its spectral age is estimated to be 33 Myr. The extended diffuse emission has a steep spectrum with a spectral index of {approx} 1.3 and a break frequency 240 MHz. The spectral age is {approx}>200 Myr, suggesting that the extended diffuse emission is due to an earlier cycle of activity. We reanalyze archival x-ray data from Chandra and suggest that the x-ray emission from the hotspots consists of a mixture of nonthermal and thermal components, the latter being possibly due to gas which is shock heated by the jets from the host galaxy.

  2. Quintessence, Cosmology, and Fanaroff-Riley Type IIb Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Ruth A.; Guerra, Erick J.

    2002-10-01

    Fanaroff-Riley type IIb (FR IIb) radio galaxies provide a modified standard yardstick that allows constraints to be placed on global cosmological parameters. This modified standard yardstick is analogous to the modified standard candle provided by Type Ia supernovae. The radio galaxy and supernova methods provide a measure of the coordinate distance to high-redshift sources, and the coordinate distance is a function of global cosmological parameters. A sample of 20 FR IIb radio galaxies with redshifts between 0 and 2 are compared with the parent population of 70 radio galaxies to determine the coordinate distance to each source. The coordinate-distance determinations are used to constrain the current mean mass-energy density of quintessence ΩQ, the equation of state of the quintessence w, and the current mean mass-energy density of nonrelativistic matter Ωm zero space curvature is assumed. Radio galaxies alone indicate that the universe is currently accelerating in its expansion (with 84% confidence); most of the allowed parameter space falls within the accelerating universe region on the Ωm-w plane. This provides verification of the acceleration of the universe indicated by high-redshift supernovae and suggests that neither method is plagued by systematic errors. It is found that Ωm must be less than about 0.5 and the equation of state w of the quintessence must lie between -0.25 and -2.5 at about 90% confidence. Fits of the radio galaxy data constrain the model parameter β, which describes a relation between the beam power of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and the total energy expelled through large-scale jets. It is shown that the empirically determined model parameter is consistent with models in which the outflow results from the electromagnetic extraction of rotational energy from the central compact object. A specific relation between the strength of the magnetic field near the AGN and the spin angular momentum per unit mass of the central compact

  3. A New Radio Loudness Diagnostic for Active Galaxies: A Radio-to-Mid-Infrared Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, Marcio B.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the nuclear (high-resolution) radio emission, at 8.4GHz (3.6cm) and 1.4GHz (20cm), the [O IV) (gamma)25.89 micron, [Ne III] (gamma)l5.56 micron and [Ne II] (gamma)l2.81 micron emission lines and the black hole mass accretion rate for a sample of Seyfert galaxies. In order to characterize the radio contribution for the Seyfert nuclei we used the 8.4 GHz/[O IV] ratio, assuming that [0 IV] scales with the luminosity of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). From this we find that Seyfert 1 s (i.e. Seyfert 1.0s, 1.2s and 1.5s) and Seyfert 2s (i.e. Seyfert 1.8s, 1.9s and 2.0s) have similar radio contributions, relative to the AGN. On the other hand, sources in which the [Ne u] emission is dominated either by the AGN or star formation have statistically different radio contributions, with star formation dominated sources more 'radio loud', by a factor of approx.2.8 on average, than AGN dominated sources. We show that star formation dominated sources with relatively larger radio contribution have smaller mass accretion rates. Overall, we suggest that 8.4 GHz/[O IV], or alternatively, 1.4 GHz/[O IV] ratios, can be used to characterize the radio contribution, relative to the AGN, without the limitation of previous methods that rely on optical observables. Key words: Galaxy: stellar content - galaxies: Seyfert - infrared: galaxies

  4. FRICAT: A FIRST catalog of FR I radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capetti, A.; Massaro, F.; Baldi, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    We built a catalog of 219 FR I radio galaxies (FR Is), called FRICAT, selected from a published sample and obtained by combining observations from the NVSS, FIRST, and SDSS surveys. We included in the catalog the sources with an edge-darkened radio morphology, redshift ≤ 0.15, and extending (at the sensitivity of the FIRST images) to a radius r larger than 30 kpc from the center of the host. We also selected an additional sample (sFRICAT) of 14 smaller (10 < r < 30 kpc) FR Is, limiting to z < 0.05. The hosts of the FRICAT sources are all luminous (-21 ≳ Mr ≳ -24), red early-type galaxies with black hole masses in the range 108 ≲ MBH ≲ 3 × 109M⊙; the spectroscopic classification based on the optical emission line ratios indicates that they are all low excitation galaxies. Sources in the FRICAT are then indistinguishable from the FR Is belonging to the Third Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Sources (3C) on the basis of their optical properties. Conversely, while the 3C-FR Is show a strong positive trend between radio and [O III] emission line luminosity, these two quantities are unrelated in the FRICAT sources; at a given line luminosity, they show radio luminosities spanning about two orders of magnitude and extending to much lower ratios between radio and line power than 3C-FR Is. Our main conclusion is that the 3C-FR Is just represent the tip of the iceberg of a much larger and diverse population of FR Is.

  5. Deep HST imaging of distant weak radio and field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Gordon, J. M.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Keel, W. C.; Burkey, J. M.; Dunlop, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera (WFC) V- and I-band images of three distant weak radio galaxies with z = 0.311-2.390 and seven field galaxies with z = 0.131-0.58. The images were deconvolved with both the Lucy and multiresolution CLEAN methods, which yield a restoring Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of less than or equal to 0.2 sec, (nearly) preserve photons and signal-to-noise ratio at low spatial frequencies, and produce consistent light profiles down to our 2 sigma surface brightness sensitivity limit of V approximately 27.2 and I approximately 25.9 mag/sq arcsec. Multi-component image modeling was used to provide deconvolution-independent estimates of structural parameters for symmetric galaxies. We present 12-band (m(sub 2750) UBVRIgriJHK) photometry for a subset of the galaxies and bootstrap the unknown FOC/48 zero point at 2750 A in three independent ways (yielding m(sub 2750) = 21.34 +/- 0.09 mag for 1.0 e(-)/s). Two radio galaxies with z = 0.311 and 0.528, as well as one field galaxy with z = 0.58, have the colors and spectra of early-type galaxies, and a(exp 1/4)-like light profiles in the HST images. The two at z greater than 0.5 have little or no color gradients in V - I and are likely giant ellipticals, while the z = 0.311 radio galaxy has a dim exponential disk and is likely an S0. Six of the seven field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following a(exp 1/4) laws and outer exponential disks, both with little or no color gradients. These are (early-type) spiral galaxies with z = 0.131-0.528. About half have faint companions or bars. One shows lumpy structure, possibly a merger. The compact narrow-line galaxy 53W002 at z = 2.390 has less than or = 30% +/- 10% of its HST V and I flux in the central kiloparsec (due to its weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN)). Most of its light (V approximately equal to 23.3) occurs in a symmetric envelope with a regular a(exp 1/4)-like profile of effective

  6. Flat spectrum multicomponent radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pacholczyk, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Compact radio sources which do not exhibit currently large flux density variations, are often characterized by spectra nearly flat over a wide range of wavelengths. Cotton et al. (1980) recently reported the results of the VLBI multifrequency interferometric and total flux density observations of a typical representative of the flat spectrum class of sources, a BL Lacertae object PKS 0735+178. If 0735+178 is indeed representative of flat spectrum sources, then some mechanism causing the component production and energy loss to be balanced must be operative among this type of radio source to maintain a flat spectrum over at least certain periods of time. This effect is referred to as 'cosmic conspiracy'. It is suggested that the flatness of spectra of this class of radio sources may be related to a specific symmetry in the radio structure, namely, to a predominantly linear, one-dimensional evolution of radio radiating material, rather than spherical, three-dimensional evolution.

  7. The interplay between radio galaxies and cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, Manuela; Brüggen, Marcus

    2007-07-01

    radio luminosity function of radio galaxies associated with cluster centres is of a flattening at all luminosities LR <~ 1024 WHz-1sr-1.

  8. The two-component giant radio halo in the galaxy cluster Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, T.; Rossetti, M.; Brunetti, G.; Farnsworth, D.; Gastaldello, F.; Giacintucci, S.; Lal, D. V.; Rudnick, L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Eckert, D.; Molendi, S.; Owers, M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We report on a spectral study at radio frequencies of the giant radio halo in A 2142 (z = 0.0909), which we performed to explore its nature and origin. The optical and X-ray properties of the cluster suggest that A 2142 is not a major merger and the presence of a giant radio halo is somewhat surprising. Methods: We performed deep radio observations of A 2142 with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 608 MHz, 322 MHz, and 234 MHz and with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the 1-2 GHz band. We obtained high-quality images at all frequencies in a wide range of resolutions, from the galaxy scale, i.e. 5'', up to 60'' to image the diffuse cluster-scale emission. The radio halo is well detected at all frequencies and extends out to the most distant cold front in A 2142, about 1 Mpc away from the cluster centre. We studied the spectral index in two regions: the central part of the halo, where the X-ray emission peaks and the two brightest dominant galaxies are located; and a second region, known as the ridge (in the direction of the most distant south-eastern cold front), selected to follow the bright part of the halo and X-ray emission. We complemented our deep observations with a preliminary LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) image at 118 MHz and with the re-analysis of archival VLA data at 1.4 GHz. Results: The two components of the radio halo show different observational properties. The central brightest part has higher surface brightess and a spectrum whose steepness is similar to those of the known radio halos, i.e. α1.78 GHz118 MHz = 1.33 ± 0.08 . The ridge, which fades into the larger scale emission, is broader in size and has considerably lower surface brightess and a moderately steeper spectrum, i.e. α1.78 GHz118 MHz 1.5. We propose that the brightest part of the radio halo is powered by the central sloshing in A 2142, in a process similar to what has been suggested for mini-halos, or by secondary electrons generated by hadronic collisions in the ICM. On

  9. The X-Ray Weakness of GPS Radio Galaxies: A Volume-Limited Complete Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2005-01-01

    The XMM-Newton observations of the GPS sample was completed last summer. We are in process of finalizing the paper describing the data and the results. The main goal of the project was to determine the X-ray spectra of the GPS galaxies in comparison to regular radio galaxies. Our XMM observations show evidence that the GPS galaxies are heavily obscured with the large absorbing columns exceeding N(H)greater than le22 cm^-2. Taking into account the obscuration we determined that the intrinsic X-ray luminosities of GPS galaxies are of order le43-le44 erg/s, comparable to low luminosity radio loud quasars. The large GPS samples can confirm the result, as at this moment our evidence is based only on 7 GPS galaxies observed with good S/N/ in X-rays. The first paper summarizing the results of the XMM observation of Mkn 668 has been published Astronomy & Astrophysics. We found soft X-ray signatures of a hot plasma (kT approximately 10^7K) and a hard X-ray emission from the nucleus. The X-ray spectrum above 2.5-keV is characterized by a very flat (observed photon index, Gamma-0.5) power-law continuum, alongside with a strong Fe-K-alpha neutral iron fluorescent line (EW600-eV). The best explanation for the origin of this high energy X-ray emission is in terms of the Compton-reflection of the nuclear emission. The primary X-ray emission is obscured by a Compton-thick (N_H to 10^24 cm-2) matter which becomes transparent at higher energies. The observed above 2.5-keV X-rays are mostly due to reflection which is indicated by a strong Fe-K-alpha line. This source represented the second hard X-ray detection of the GPS galaxy ever (the first one being 1345+125; O'Dea et al. 2000). The observations of the other GPS galaxies in our sample confirmed the trend of the large obscuration present in the spectra. However, we do not have a compelling evidence for a hot gas in the nucleus. The two other GPS galaxies observed with Chandra were added to the total of 7 GPS galaxies. This GPS

  10. Discovery of a Fanaroff-Riley type 0 radio galaxy emitting at γ-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, Paola; Capetti, Alessandro; Baldi, Ranieri D.

    2016-03-01

    We present supporting evidence for the first association of a Fermi source, 3FGLJ1330.0-3818, Acero et al. (2015) with the Fanaroff-Riley type 0 (FR 0) radio galaxy Tol1326-379. FR 0s represent the majority of the local population of radio-loud active galactic nuclei but their nature is still unclear. They share the same nuclear and host properties as FR Is, but they show a large deficit of extended radio emission. Here we show that FR 0s can emit photons at very high energies. Tol1326-379 has a GeV luminosity of L>1 GeV ˜ 2 × 1042 erg s-1, typical of FR Is, but with a steeper γ-ray spectrum (Γ = 2.78 ± 0.14). This could be related to the intrinsic jet properties but also to a different viewing angle.

  11. Erratum: A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Kinney, Anne L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Antonucci, Robert

    1997-08-01

    In the paper ``A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies'' by Henrique R. Schmitt, Anne L. Kinney, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, & Robert Antonucci (ApJ, 477, 623 [1997]), there are errors in Table 1 and Figure 6, and there is a reference to a previous work that should be stated. With respect to the latter, the authors compare the position angle of small-scale radio structures in Seyfert galaxies with the position angle of their host galaxy major axis. In their analysis they find a zone of avoidance, where the small-scale radio axis avoids close alignment with the host galaxy minor axis. The authors wish to note that J. S. Ulvestad and A. S. Wilson (ApJ, 285, 439 [1984]) already observed a paucity of radio structures aligned with the host galaxy minor axis in Seyfert 2 galaxies, although on a smaller sample. Ulvestad & Wilson was referenced in their paper as Ulvestad & Wilson (1984b). In Table 1 there were errors in the references listed in the note to the table. A new version of Table 1 with correct references is given here, and the following reference entries should be added to the reference list of the original paper: Mulchaey, J. S., Wilson, A. S., & Tsvetanov, Z. I. 1996, ApJS, 102, 309; Oke, J. B., & Lauer, T. R. 1979, ApJ, 230, 360; Simkin, S. M. 1975, ApJ, 200, 567. Figure 6a was printed twice, once correctly and once incorrectly in place of Figure 6c. The correct version of Figure 6c appears below.

  12. Super-Sharp Radio "Vision" Measures Galaxy's Motion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have measured the motion across the sky of a galaxy nearly 2.4 million light-years from Earth. While scientists have been measuring the motion of galaxies directly toward or away from Earth for decades, this is the first time that the transverse motion (called proper motion by astronomers) has been measured for a galaxy that is not a satellite of our own Milky Way Galaxy. M33 Radio/Optical Image of M33 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, NOAO/AURA/NSF (Click on image for more files) An international scientific team analyzed VLBA observations made over two and a half years to detect minuscule shifts in the sky position of the spiral galaxy M33. Combined with previous measurements of the galaxy's motion toward Earth, the new data allowed the astronomers to calculate M33's movement in three dimensions for the first time. "A snail crawling on Mars would appear to be moving across the surface more than 100 times faster than the motion we measured for this galaxy," said Mark Reid, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. M33 is a satellite of the larger galaxy M31, the well-known Andromeda Galaxy that is the most distant object visible to the naked eye. Both are part of the Local Group of galaxies that includes the Milky Way. In addition to measuring the motion of M33 as a whole, the astronomers also were able to make a direct measurement of the spiral galaxy's rotation. Both measurements were made by observing the changes in position of giant clouds of molecules inside the galaxy. The water vapor in these clouds acts as a natural maser, strengthening, or amplifying, radio emission the same way that lasers amplify light emission. The natural masers acted as bright radio beacons whose movement could be tracked by the ultra-sharp radio "vision" of the VLBA. Reid and his colleagues plan to continue measuring M33's motion and also to make similar measurements of M31's motion

  13. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-03

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts.

  14. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch

  15. What are the gigahertz peaked-spectrum radio sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Stanghellini, C.

    1991-01-01

    The astrophysical implications of recent radio and optical observations of the powerful compact gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio sources are discussed. Some tentative conclusions are presented and a scenario based on the existing data is suggested. It is argued that the spectrum is due to synchrotron self-absorption, which is assumed as the basis for the present inferences from the radio spectral shape. The finding that some GPS sources have a very narrow spectral shape is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a narrow range of size scales which dominate the radio luminosity. The highly inverted LF radio spectrum is consistent with the hypothesis that the radio source is tightly confined. The conclusion that the radio polarization of these sources is systematically low is consistent either with a very tangled magnetic field or very large Faraday rotation measures. It is suggested that GPS radio sources are formed when the radio plasma is confined on the scale of the narrow-line region by an unusually dense and clumpy ISM. The existing optical spectroscopic results are also consistent with the existence of a dense and dusty nuclear ISM.

  16. Bubbles and braided jets in galaxies with compact radio nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Dahari, Oved; Jacoby, George H.; Crane, Patrick C.; Ciardullo, Robin

    1986-12-01

    Narrow-band H-alpha CCD images showing ionized gas in organized kiloparsec-scale structures in three galaxies with low-level active nuclei are presented. The edge-on spiral NGC 3079 contains an apparent loop structure which corresponds to previously reported nonthermal radio emission along the minor axis. The optical emission probably results from interaction between the ejected plasma and the ISM in the disk and halo. The S0 galaxy NGC 3998 exhibits an S-shaped structure centered on the nucleus, with no other evidence for spiral structure. In the spiral galaxy NGC 4258, the presence of continuum-free emission-line arms which coincide with the nonthermal radio arms is confirmed. The morphology of the arms suggests the presence of two double-sided jets which braid or wrap around one another and which bifurcate on both sides. It is concluded that the optical and radio emission in NGC 3079 and in NGC 4258 are related, and it is suggested that both are powered by a plasma which flows from the active nucleus and dissipates kinetic energy in the surrounding ISM.

  17. Bubbles and braided jets in galaxies with compact radio nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Dahari, Oved; Jacoby, George H.; Crane, Patrick C.; Ciardullo, Robin

    1986-01-01

    Narrow-band H-alpha CCD images showing ionized gas in organized kiloparsec-scale structures in three galaxies with low-level active nuclei are presented. The edge-on spiral NGC 3079 contains an apparent loop structure which corresponds to previously reported nonthermal radio emission along the minor axis. The optical emission probably results from interaction between the ejected plasma and the ISM in the disk and halo. The S0 galaxy NGC 3998 exhibits an S-shaped structure centered on the nucleus, with no other evidence for spiral structure. In the spiral galaxy NGC 4258, the presence of continuum-free emission-line arms which coincide with the nonthermal radio arms is confirmed. The morphology of the arms suggests the presence of two double-sided jets which braid or wrap around one another and which bifurcate on both sides. It is concluded that the optical and radio emission in NGC 3079 and in NGC 4258 are related, and it is suggested that both are powered by a plasma which flows from the active nucleus and dissipates kinetic energy in the surrounding ISM.

  18. The Galaxy Cluster Environments of Wide Angle Tail Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Wing, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Generally found in the centers of galaxy clusters, Wide Angle Tail radio sources (WATs) are defined by their characteristic jet-hotspot-lobe transition and intermediate radio power. They are typically associated with the luminous central galaxy within the cluster and often appear bent due to interaction with the hot, X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Their linear extent (r > 100 kpc) and radio luminosity make them good tracers of high redshift systems where X-ray and optical observations are more difficult. In an effort to characterize the global X-ray properties of WAT clusters, we have assembled a sample of WAT systems from the Chandra archive. We have examined the distribution of substructure, temperature, abundance, density and pressure within the ICM. We find the majority of WAT clusters display some merger signatures and many show evidence of cool/high metallicity gas within 100 kpc of the WAT host galaxy. Most notably, we observe that clusters with the highest central densities and pressures host WATs with the shortest flare radii.

  19. New insight on double-double radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Sumana

    2016-07-01

    Striking examples of episodic jet activity in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are the double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs) with two pairs of lobes emerging from the same central engine. The number of DDRGs reported so far is very limited, and it is important to identify more of these to provide a significant statistical overview of the conditions to trigger the jets and the role of jets in terms of feedback mechanisms that affect the host galaxies. Although most DDRGs were believed initially to be giant radio sources with sizes more than a Mpc, a significant number of smaller sized candidate DDRGs have also been identified in our recent study. We started GMRT observation of this sample to confirm that the sources are related to distinct epochs of nuclear activity. In addition to this radio observation we have also investigated the properties of the host galaxies and their environments to understand the triggering mechanisms for recurrent jet emission. Here, I will highlight the main results from these observations and discuss on the possible scenarios responsible for the episodic activity in different types of DDRGs .

  20. Radio Identifications of UGC Galaxies - Starbursts and Monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, J. J.; Broderick, J. J.

    1995-11-01

    Radio identifications of galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies with delta < +82 degrees were made from the Green Bank 1400 MHz sky maps. Every source having peak flux density S(P) >= 150 mJy in the approximately 12 arcmin FWHM map point-source response and position < 5 arcmin in both coordinates from the optical position of any UGC galaxy was considered a candidate identification to ensure that very extended (up to 1 Mpc) and asymmetric sources would not be missed. Maps in the literature or new 1.49 GHz VLA C-array maps made with 18 arcsec FWHM resolution were used to confirm or reject candidate identifications. The maps in this directory include both confirmed identifications and candidates rejected because of confusion or low flux density. For more information on this study, please see the following reference: Condon, J. J., and Broderick, J. J., 1988, AJ, 96, 30. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  1. NASA's Fermi Telescope Resolves Radio Galaxy Centaurus A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    NASA release April 1, 2010 Fermi's Large Area Telescope resolved high-energy gamma rays from an extended region around the active galaxy Centaurus A. The emission corresponds to million-light-year-wide radio-emitting gas thrown out by the galaxy's supersized black hole. This inset shows an optical/gamma-ray composite of the galaxy and its location on the Fermi one-year sky map. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, Capella Observatory To learn more about these images go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/news/smokestack-plumes.html NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

  2. The hydrogen line spectra of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Osterbrock, D. E.

    1985-02-01

    The results of the first detection of Ly-alpha in a narrow-line radio galaxy are reported. Nearly simultaneous optical and UV observations of 3C 192 and 3C 223 allow the measurement of both Balmer and Lyman decrements. These line ratios are approximate functions of the interstellar reddening and of a parameter which is proportional to the amount of H I collisional excitation present. The reddening of 3C 192 is slightly larger than that due to the Galaxy, although 3C 223 may have a larger value. Both galaxies have intrinsic Balmer and Lyman decrements which are significantly steeper than case B, suggesting that the gas is photoionized by a fairly hard X-ray continuum. The deduced values of L-alpha/H-beta and H-alpha/H-beta compare favorably with predictions of recent models.

  3. The hydrogen line spectra of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Osterbrock, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first detection of Ly-alpha in a narrow-line radio galaxy are reported. Nearly simultaneous optical and UV observations of 3C 192 and 3C 223 allow the measurement of both Balmer and Lyman decrements. These line ratios are approximate functions of the interstellar reddening and of a parameter which is proportional to the amount of H I collisional excitation present. The reddening of 3C 192 is slightly larger than that due to the Galaxy, although 3C 223 may have a larger value. Both galaxies have intrinsic Balmer and Lyman decrements which are significantly steeper than case B, suggesting that the gas is photoionized by a fairly hard X-ray continuum. The deduced values of L-alpha/H-beta and H-alpha/H-beta compare favorably with predictions of recent models.

  4. Identification and properties of host galaxies of RCR radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelenkova, O. P.; Soboleva, N. S.; Majorova, E. K.; Temirova, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    FIRST and NVSS radio maps are used to cross identify the radio sources of the RCR catalog, which is based on observational data obtained in several runs of the "Cold" survey, with the SDSS and DPOSS digital optical sky surveys and the 2MASS, LAS UKIDSS, and WISE infrared surveys. Digital images in various filters and the coadded gri-band SDSS images, red and infrared DPOSS images, JHK-band UKIDSS images, and JHK-band 2MASS images are analyzed for the sources with no optical candidates found in the above catalogs. Our choice of optical candidates was based on the data on the structure of the radio source, its photometry, and spectroscopy (where available). We found reliable identifications for 86% of the radio sources; possible counterparts for 8% of the sources, and failed to find any optical counterparts for 6% of the sources because their host objects proved to be fainter than the limiting magnitude of the corresponding surveys. A little over half of all the identifications proved to be galaxies; about one quarter were quasars, and the types of the remaining objects were difficult to determine because of their faintness. A relation between the luminosity and the radioloudness index was derived and used to estimate the 1.4 and 3.94 GHz luminosities for the sources with unknown redshifts. We found 3% and 60% of all the RCR radio sources to be FRI-type objects ( L ≲ 1024 W/Hz at 1.4 GHz) and powerful FRII-type galaxies ( L ≳ 1026.5 W/Hz), respectively, whereas the rest are sources including objects of the FRI, FRII, and mixed FRI-FRII types. Unlike quasars, galaxies show a trend of decreasing luminosity with decreasing flux density. Note that identification would be quite problematic without the software and resources of the virtual observatory.

  5. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  6. Early quenching of massive protocluster galaxies around z = 2.2 radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, K.; Bremer, M. N.; Stott, J. P.; Murphy, D. N. A.

    2016-10-01

    Radio galaxies are among the most massive galaxies in the high-redshift Universe and are known to often lie in protocluster environments. We have studied the fields of seven z = 2.2 radio galaxies with High Acuity Wide field K-band Imager (HAWK-I) narrow-band and broad-band imaging in order to map out their environment using Hα emitters (HAEs). The results are compared to the blank field HAE survey HiZELS. All of the radio galaxy fields are overdense in HAEs relative to a typical HiZELS field of the same area and four of the seven are richer than all except one of 65 essentially random HiZELS subfields of the same size. The star formation rates of the massive HAEs are lower than those necessary to have formed their stellar population in the preceding Gyr - indicating that these galaxies are likely to have formed the bulk of their stars at higher redshifts, and are starting to quench.

  7. Infrared imaging of MG 0414 + 0534 - The red gravitational lens systems as lensed radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, James; Luppino, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present an IR image of the gravitational lens system MG 0414 + 0534, and IR photometry of PG 1115 + 080, H1413 + 117, and Q1429 - 008. The IR of MG 0414 + 0534 shows a morphology that is similar to the radio and optical morphologies. The object is bright (K-prime = 13.7) and extremely red (I-K-prime = 5.7). MG 0414 + 0534 thus becomes the second radio-selected lens system to have very red optical IR colors. When plotted on a color-magnitude diagram of objects from a radio survey, MG 0414 + 0534 and the other very red system, MG 1131 + 0456, lie near the locus of radio galaxies. We therefore suggest that these systems are lensed high-redshift radio galaxies. In general, lensed radio galaxies should be common among lens systems selected from radio surveys, since a high proportion of radio sources are radio galaxies.

  8. Low-frequency study of two giant radio galaxies: 3C 35 and 3C 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrù, E.; Murgia, M.; Feretti, L.; Govoni, F.; Giovannini, G.; Lane, W.; Kassim, N.; Paladino, R.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Radio galaxies with a projected linear size ⪆1 Mpc are classified as giant radio sources. According to the current interpretation these are old sources which have evolved in a low-density ambient medium. Because radiative losses are negligible at low frequency, extending spectral aging studies in this frequency range will allow us to determine the zero-age electron spectrum injected and then to improve the estimate of the synchrotron age of the source. Methods: We present Very Large Array images at 74 MHz and 327 MHz of two giant radio sources: 3C 35 and 3C 223. We performed a spectral study using 74, 327, 608 and 1400 GHz images. The spectral shape is estimated in different positions along the source. Results: The radio spectrum follows a power-law in the hotspots, while in the inner region of the lobe the shape of the spectrum shows a curvature at high frequencies. This steepening agrees with synchrotron aging of the emitting relativistic electrons. In order to estimate the synchrotron age of the sources, the spectra were fitted with a synchrotron model of emission. They show that 3C 35 is an old source of 143 ± 20 Myr, while 3C 223 is a younger source of 72 ± 4 Myr.

  9. Investigating the thermal and nonthermal properties of galaxy clusters with radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, Damon Patrick

    This thesis presents my recent investigations of the tenuous intracluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters using radio observations. The ICM is composed primarily of thermal and nonthermal plasma populations, permeated by magnetic fields which influence their evolution. Radio observations provide unique probes of the properties of the ICM, allowing for estimation of particle densities, magnetic field strengths, and even yielding clues to the physical mechanisms of particle acceleration. A major theme of this dissertation is that faint diffuse radio emission may contribute a significant amount of the synchrotron luminosity in galaxy clusters, yet goes unobserved due to an underappreciated deficiency of interferometric radio telescopes. Some of the current physical models do not account for this low surface brightness synchrotron emission, which may hold the key to distinguishing between competing models of relativistic particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification in these low density environments. I first discuss the use of polarization observations to probe magnetized plasmas, exploring various methods of Faraday rotation measure determination. I demonstrate that methods such as traditional fitting of models to polarization angle only (without consideration of the fractional polarization) or the novel Rotation Measure Synthesis may yield erroneous results in the presence of complex Faraday structure. The best way to more accurately recover the true Faraday structure is by fitting models directly to the observables Q and U, using radio polarization observations of the southern lobe of the radio galaxy 3C33 as an example. Next I exhibit results from a 1.4~GHz GBT study of twelve merging galaxy clusters. After subtraction of confusion from Galactic foreground and extragalactic background radio sources, eleven of the twelve clusters exhibited a significant excess of diffuse emission over that found by previous interferometric studies. Faint large-scale radio

  10. THE RADIO PROPERTIES OF RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES ON PARSEC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Minfeng; Chen, Yongjun; Shen, Zhiqiang; Komossa, S.; Zensus, J. A.; Yuan, Weimin; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Zhou, Hongyan

    2015-11-15

    We present the detection of the compact radio structures of 14 radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 5 GHz performed in 2013. While 50% of the sources of our sample show a compact core only, the remaining 50% exhibit a core-jet structure. The measured brightness temperatures of the cores range from 10{sup 8.4} to 10{sup 11.4} K with a median value of 10{sup 10.1} K, indicating that the radio emission is from non-thermal jets, and that, likely, most sources are not strongly beamed, thus implying a low jet speed in these radio-loud NLS1 galaxies. In combination with archival data taken at multiple frequencies, we find that seven sources show flat or even inverted radio spectra, while steep spectra are revealed in the remaining seven objects. Although all of these sources are very radio-loud with R > 100, their jet properties are diverse in terms of their milliarcsecond (mas) scale (parsec scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The evidence for slow jet speeds (i.e., less relativistic jets), in combination with the low kinetic/radio power, may offer an explanation for the compact VLBA radio structure in most sources. The mildly relativistic jets in these high accretion rate systems are consistent with a scenario where jets are accelerated from the hot corona above the disk by the magnetic field and the radiation force of the accretion disk. Alternatively, a low jet bulk velocity can be explained by low spin in the Blandford–Znajek mechanism.

  11. Discovery of giant radio galaxies from NVSS: radio and infrared properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabhade, Pratik; Gaikwad, Madhuri; Bagchi, Joydeep; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Sankhyayan, Shishir; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2017-08-01

    Giant radio galaxies (GRGs) are one of the largest astrophysical sources in the Universe with an overall projected linear size of ∼0.7 Mpc or more. The last six decades of radio astronomy research has led to the detection of thousands of radio galaxies. However, only ∼300 of them can be classified as GRGs. The reasons behind their large size and rarity are unknown. We carried out a systematic search for these radio giants and found a large sample of GRGs. In this paper, we report the discovery of 25 GRGs from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey, in the red-shift range z ∼ 0.07 to 0.67. Their physical sizes range from ∼0.8 Mpc to ∼4 Mpc. Eight of these GRGs have sizes ≥2 Mpc, which is a rarity. Here, for the first time, we investigate the mid-infrared (IR) properties of the optical hosts of the GRGs and classify them securely into various active galactic nuclei types using the WISE mid-IR colours. Using radio and IR data, four of the hosts of the GRGs were observed to be radio-loud quasars that extend up to 2 Mpc in radio size. These GRGs missed detection in earlier searches possibly because of their highly diffuse nature, low surface brightness and lack of optical data. The new GRGs are a significant addition to the existing sample. They will contribute to a better understanding of the physical properties of radio giants.

  12. The radio emission from the ultraluminous far-infrared galaxy NGC 6240

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbert, Edward J. M.; Wilson, Andrew S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    We present new radio observations of the 'prototypical' ultraluminous far-infrared galaxy NGC 6240, obtained using the Very Large Array (VLA) at lambda = 20 cm in B-configuration and at lambda = 3.6 cm in A-configuration. These data, along with those from four previous VLA observations, are used to perform a comprehensive study of the radio emission from NGC 6240. Approximately 70% (approximately 3 x 10(exp 23) W/Hz) of the total radio power at 20 cm originates from the nuclear region (approximately less than 1.5 kpc), of which half is emitted by two unresolved (R approximately less than 36 pc) cores and half by a diffuse component. The radio spectrum of the nuclear emission is relatively flat (alpha approximately equals 0.6; S(sub nu) proportional to nu(exp -alpha). The supernova rate required to power the diffuse component is consistent with that predicted by the stellar evolution models of Rieke et al. (1985). If the radio emission from the two compact cores is powered by supernova remnants, then either the remnants overlap and form hot bubbles in the cores, or they are very young (approximately less than 100 yr.) Nearly all of the remaining 30% of the total radio power comes from an 'armlike' region extending westward from the nuclear region. The western arm emission has a steep spectrum (alpha approximately equals 1.0), suggestive of aging effects from synchrotron or inverse-Compton losses, and is not correlated with starlight; we suggest that it is synchrotron emission from a shell of material driven by a galactic superwind. Inverse Compton scattering of far-infrared photons in the radio sources is expected to produce an X-ray flux of approximately 2 - 6 x 10(exp -14) ergs/s/sq cm in the 2 - 10 keV band. No significant radio emission is detected from or near the possible ultramassive 'dark core'.

  13. The radio emission from the ultraluminous far-infrared galaxy NGC 6240

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbert, Edward J. M.; Wilson, Andrew S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    We present new radio observations of the 'prototypical' ultraluminous far-infrared galaxy NGC 6240, obtained using the Very Large Array (VLA) at lambda = 20 cm in B-configuration and at lambda = 3.6 cm in A-configuration. These data, along with those from four previous VLA observations, are used to perform a comprehensive study of the radio emission from NGC 6240. Approximately 70% (approximately 3 x 10(exp 23) W/Hz) of the total radio power at 20 cm originates from the nuclear region (approximately less than 1.5 kpc), of which half is emitted by two unresolved (R approximately less than 36 pc) cores and half by a diffuse component. The radio spectrum of the nuclear emission is relatively flat (alpha approximately equals 0.6; S(sub nu) proportional to nu(exp -alpha). The supernova rate required to power the diffuse component is consistent with that predicted by the stellar evolution models of Rieke et al. (1985). If the radio emission from the two compact cores is powered by supernova remnants, then either the remnants overlap and form hot bubbles in the cores, or they are very young (approximately less than 100 yr.) Nearly all of the remaining 30% of the total radio power comes from an 'armlike' region extending westward from the nuclear region. The western arm emission has a steep spectrum (alpha approximately equals 1.0), suggestive of aging effects from synchrotron or inverse-Compton losses, and is not correlated with starlight; we suggest that it is synchrotron emission from a shell of material driven by a galactic superwind. Inverse Compton scattering of far-infrared photons in the radio sources is expected to produce an X-ray flux of approximately 2 - 6 x 10(exp -14) ergs/s/sq cm in the 2 - 10 keV band. No significant radio emission is detected from or near the possible ultramassive 'dark core'.

  14. Radio continuum properties of luminous infrared galaxies. Identifying the presence of an AGN in the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardoulaki, E.; Charmandaris, V.; Murphy, E. J.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Evans, A. S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Privon, G. C.; Stierwalt, S.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are systems enshrouded in dust, which absorbs most of their optical/UV emission and radiates it again in the mid- and far-infrared. Radio observations are largely unaffected by dust obscuration, enabling us to study the central regions of LIRGs in an unbiased manner. Aims: The main goal of this project is to examine how the radio properties of local LIRGs relate to their infrared spectral characteristics. Here we present an analysis of the radio continuum properties of a subset of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which consists of 202 nearby systems (z< 0.088). Our radio sample consists of 35 systems, containing 46 individual galaxies, that were observed at both 1.49 and 8.44 GHz with the VLA with a resolution of about 1 arcsec (FWHM). The aim of the project is to use the radio imagery to probe the central kpc of these LIRGs in search of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Methods: We used the archival data at 1.49 and 8.44 GHz to create radio-spectral-index maps using the standard relation between flux density Sν and frequency ν, Sν ~ ν- α, where α is the radio spectral index. By studying the spatial variations in α, we classified the objects as radio-AGN, radio-SB, and AGN/SB (a mixture). We identified the presence of an active nucleus using the radio morphology, deviations from the radio/infrared correlation, and spatially resolved spectral index maps, and then correlated this to the usual mid-infrared ([NeV]/[NeII] and [OIV]/[NeII] line ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 μm PAH feature) and optical (BPT diagram) AGN diagnostics. Results: We find that 21 out of the 46 objects in our sample (~45%) are radio-AGN, 9 out of the 46 (~20%) are classified as starbursts (SB) based on the radio analysis, and 16 (~35%) are AGN/SB. After comparing to other AGN diagnostics we find 3 objects out of the 46 (~7%) that are identified as AGN based on the radio analysis, but are not classified as such based on

  15. Radio Continuum Mapping of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, Daniel; Hyman, Scott D.; Weiler, Kurt W.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.

    1996-05-01

    We have combined numerous, short radio continuum observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4258 (M 106) made at 20 and 6 cm with the Very Large Array (VLA) to produce deep radio maps at these frequencies. These observations were originally taken for monitoring the radio supernova SN 1981K (Weiler et al. 1986, ApJ, 310, 790; Van Dyk et al. 1992, ApJ, 396, 195). The present analysis is analogous to our recent work on NGC 6946 (Hyman et al. 1993, BAAS 25, 1322) and on NGC 4321 (Hyman et al. 1994, BAAS 26, 1498) using observations taken for monitoring SN 1980K and SN 1979C, respectively. The maps we produce for NGC 4258 are of superior sensitivity (sigma ~ lt 0.02 mJy/beam at 6 cm) and spatial resolution ( ~ 0.5" at 6 cm) to those previously published by other investigators (e. g., Turner & Ho 1994, ApJ, 421, 122; Cecil et al. 1995, ApJ, 452, 613). We present preliminary measurements and analyses of the nuclear region, the anomalous arms, and of detected thermal and nonthermal sources throughout the galaxy. We also make comparisons of our radio maps with existing data at other wavelengths and with the results of our analyses of NGC 6946 and NGC 4321.

  16. Studying Galaxy Evolution with Radio Surveys into the SKA Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Eric J.

    2014-04-01

    We are beginning to see a next generation of radio surveys aimed at addressing a number of key astrophysical questions surrounding the formation and evolution of galaxies from early times right after the Big Bang to the present-day universe. Due to the nature of interferometric radio observations, coupled with wide-field imaging and the need for high spectral and temporal resolutions, one quickly finds themselves faced with significant computational (data volume and processing) challenges. While it will likely take a full-scale SKA before we see true "exascale" problems, facilities such as, e.g., the JVLA, LOFAR, ALMA, MeerKAT, and ASKAP will be faced with petascale requirements and act as a valuable stepping stone for conceiving novel ways to handle the increasing data demands. Here I highlight some of the science questions being addressed by these next generation radio surveys, and outline the general direction for such surveys into the SKA era.

  17. A new approach to the radio-far infrared correlation for non-calorimeter galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, S.; Beck, R.

    1997-04-01

    New radio continuum data for a sample of 74 spiral galaxies supports the calorimeter model of Voelk (1989A&A...218...67V) only for steep-spectrum, thin-disk, non-interacting objects which comprise =~30% of the sample. As the spectral indices correlate neither with far infrared surface brightness nor with average (equipartition) magnetic field strength, the data disagree with the model for non-calorimeter galaxies of Helou & Bicay (1993ApJ...415...93H). We are able to explain the radio - far infrared correlation for non-calorimeter galaxies, globally and also on kiloparsec scales within galaxies, with the help of two basic relations with the average volume density of the gas as the primary factor. Firstly, there is strong evidence that the strength of the equipartition magnetic field is correlated with the volume density ρ of the (almost) neutral gas, following a power law with an exponent of m=0.48+/-0.05 for the galactic averages of our sample. Secondly, taking the thermal radio emissivity as an indicator of the average star-formation rate (SFR), we obtain a `Schmidt law' (SFR{prop.to}ρ^n^) with n=1.4+/-0.3. The FIR luminosity is linearly related to SFR. Finally, we assume equipartition between the energy densities of the magnetic field and of the cosmic rays which relates the synchrotron emissivity to the field strength. Combination of these relations leads to a radio - far infrared luminosity correlation with a power-law exponent of x=1.3+/-0.3, very close to what is observed (x=1.25+/-0.08). Forthcoming ISO satellite data can be used as a test of our approach.

  18. Radio-Mode Feedback in Massive Galaxies at Redshift 0 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Ching, John H. Y.; Johnston, Helen M.; Cannon, Russell D.; Mauch, Tom

    2010-05-01

    We have carried out a large observational study of the radio luminosities, stellar populations, and environments of massive galaxies over the redshift range 0 < z < 1. Radio jets powered by an accreting central black hole are common in massive galaxies, and there is a large class of “optically quiet AGN,” with radio emission but no optical/IR signature of black-hole accretion. The central black holes in these galaxies are probably accreting in a radiatively inefficient mode, and our results suggest that “radio-mode feedback” as described by Croton et al. is likely to occur in all masssive early-type galaxies at z < 0.8. While it appears that radio-loud AGN occur episodically in all massive early-type galaxies, we also identify a sub-population of galaxies with powerful radio sources and a prominent younger (~ 108 yr) stellar population that may have undergone recent mergers.

  19. Size dependence of the radio-luminosity-mechanical-power correlation in radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in active galactic nucleus jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of Fanaroff-Riley Type II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, (Q{sub jet}/10{sup 36} W)=1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +1.8}(L{sub 151}/10{sup 27} W Hz{sup −1}){sup 0.8}(1+z){sup 1.0}(D/kpc){sup 0.58±0.17}, where D is source size and L {sub 151} the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio-luminosity-jet-power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent in the sample. Such bias will affect the accuracy of the kinetic luminosity function derived from lobe radio luminosities and should be treated with caution.

  20. The Host Galaxy and Redshift of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, S. P.; Bassa, C. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Bower, G. C.; Law, C. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Adams, E. A. K.; Bogdanov, S.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Demorest, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Maddox, N.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Spitler, L. G.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Wharton, R. S.

    2017-01-01

    The precise localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB 121102) has provided the first unambiguous association (chance coincidence probability p ≲ 3 × 10‑4) of an FRB with an optical and persistent radio counterpart. We report on optical imaging and spectroscopy of the counterpart and find that it is an extended (0.″6–0.″8) object displaying prominent Balmer and [O iii] emission lines. Based on the spectrum and emission line ratios, we classify the counterpart as a low-metallicity, star-forming, mr‧ = 25.1 AB mag dwarf galaxy at a redshift of z = 0.19273(8), corresponding to a luminosity distance of 972 Mpc. From the angular size, the redshift, and luminosity, we estimate the host galaxy to have a diameter ≲4 kpc and a stellar mass of M* ∼ (4–7) × 107 M⊙, assuming a mass-to-light ratio between 2 to 3 M⊙ L⊙‑1. Based on the Hα flux, we estimate the star formation rate of the host to be 0.4 M⊙ yr‑1 and a substantial host dispersion measure (DM) depth ≲324 pc cm‑3. The net DM contribution of the host galaxy to FRB 121102 is likely to be lower than this value depending on geometrical factors. We show that the persistent radio source at FRB 121102’s location reported by Marcote et al. is offset from the galaxy’s center of light by ∼200 mas and the host galaxy does not show optical signatures for AGN activity. If FRB 121102 is typical of the wider FRB population and if future interferometric localizations preferentially find them in dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and prominent emission lines, they would share such a preference with long gamma-ray bursts and superluminous supernovae.

  1. Radio AGN Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    De Breuck, C.; van Breugel, W.; Rottgering, H.; Carilli, C.L.

    2001-11-13

    We present a short overview of radio surveys for AGN, including the ''complete'' flux limited surveys and ''filtered'' surveys. We also describe our ultra-steep spectrum search for the highest redshift radio galaxies, and our follow-up VLA and ATCA observations of the most distant (z = 5.19) and the most luminous z < 2 radio galaxy known.

  2. 1 Mpc giant radio galaxy IC 711 - 3 km Westerbork observations at 92 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, J.P.; Strom, R.G.

    1988-05-01

    New Westerbork obsevations at 92 cm of the galaxy IC 711 show a radio trail that extends 1 Mpc long, much farther out than previously observed at shorter wavelengths. These new observations confirm IC 711 as the longest head-tail galaxy known, and move IC 711 to the fifth rank among galaxies with the largest radio extension from an optical galaxy nucleus (after the classical double sources 3C 236, 3C 326, HB 13, and MSH 05-22). 20 references.

  3. Compton Observatory observations of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This task involved the investigation of the emission of clusters of galaxies, particularly those which contain extended radio emission, in the gamma-ray region of the spectrum. Observations were made of several clusters using the Compton Observatory EGRET instrument. For each cluster a measured flux or upper limit on the gamma-ray flux was obtained. In only one case, Abell 2199, was there a significant measured flux. This source is spatially confused with a know blazar in the field of view. The observation is consistent with all emissions being from the blazar.

  4. Shocked Molecular Hydrogen in the 3C 326 Radio Galaxy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick; Antonucci, Robert; Appleton, P. N.; Whysong, David

    2007-10-01

    The Spitzer spectrum of the giant FR II radio galaxy 3C 326 is dominated by very strong molecular hydrogen emission lines on a faint IR continuum. The H2 emission originates in the northern component of a double-galaxy system associated with 3C 326. The integrated luminosity in H2 pure rotational lines is 8.0×1041 erg s-1, which corresponds to 17% of the 8-70 μm luminosity of the galaxy. A wide range of temperatures (125-1000 K) is measured from the H2 0-0 S(0)-S(7) transitions, leading to a warm H2 mass of 1.1×109 Msolar. Low-excitation ionic forbidden emission lines are consistent with an optical LINER classification for the active nucleus, which is not luminous enough to power the observed H2 emission. The H2 could be shock heated by the radio jets, but there is no direct indication of this. More likely, the H2 is shock heated in a tidal accretion flow induced by interaction with the southern companion galaxy. The latter scenario is supported by an irregular morphology, a tidal bridge, and a possible tidal tail imaged with IRAC at 3-9 μm. Unlike ultraluminous infrared galaxies, which in some cases exhibit H2 line luminosities of comparable strength, 3C 326 shows little star formation activity (~0.1 Msolar yr-1). This may represent an important stage in galaxy evolution. Starburst activity and efficient accretion onto the central supermassive black hole may be delayed until the shock-heated H2 can kinematically settle and cool.

  5. Feeding and feedback in radio galaxies of the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Guilherme dos Santos

    2016-10-01

    We present integral field spectroscopic data covering the inner kiloparsecs of four radio galaxies of the local Universe (z<0.07), Arp 102B, Pictor A, 3C 33 and 4C +29.30, obtained with the GMOS-IFU instrument of the Gemini telescopes. We use these data to analyze the gas excitation and kinematics via two-dimensional maps. Using the flux distributions of the emission lines, we identify extended emission in ionized gas up to the edges of the observed field, which corresponds to 1.7 kpc x 2.5 kpc for Arp 102B, 2.5 kpc x 3.4 kpc for Pictor A, 4.0 kpc x 5.8 kpc for 3C 33 and 4.3 kpc x 6.2 kpc for 4C +29.30. The extended line emitting gas displays structures resembling rotating disks, spiral arms and bars. Line ratios indicate that both photons from the nuclear source and shocks originated in the interaction of the radio jet with circumnuclear gas are ionizing mechanisms of the gas. Line ratio values are typical of Seyfert galaxies for 3C 33 and 4C +29.30, while intermediate values between Seyferts and LINERs are observed in Arp 102B. Pictor A galaxy, however, shows low values of [NII]/Ha=0.15-0.25, expected for HII regions. We suggest that these values are observed due to the low gas metallicity (12+log(O/H)=8.39). Centroid velocity maps show that the gas kinematics is dominated by rotation only in Arp 102B and 3C 33. Outflows are observed in the galaxies Arp 102B, 3C 33 and 4C +29.30. We obtain mass outflow rates of 0.32-0.49 Msun per year, but the outflow kinetic power is small, ranging 0.04-0.07% of the AGN bolometric luminosity, indicating that the feedback has little impact in the host galaxies evolution. The high masses of ionized gas, ranging from 7.4E7 to 4.6E8 Msun, and the fact that these galaxies are early-type, suggest an external origin of the gas. Indeed, it is observed evidence of interaction with companion galaxies in Arp 102B, Pictor A and 4C +29.30. We suggest that the capture of mass has triggered the nuclear activity in these galaxies, with the high

  6. Alignments of radio galaxies in deep radio imaging of ELAIS N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. R.; Jagannathan, P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the distribution of radio jet position angles of radio galaxies over an area of 1 square degree in the ELAIS N1 field. ELAIS N1 was observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 612 MHz to an rms noise level of 10 μJy and angular resolution of 6 arcsec × 5 arcsec. The image contains 65 resolved radio galaxy jets. The spatial distribution reveals a prominent alignment of jet position angles along a `filament' of about 1°. We examine the possibility that the apparent alignment arises from an underlying random distribution and find that the probability of chance alignment is less than 0.1 per cent. An angular covariance analysis of the data indicates the presence of spatially coherence in position angles on scales >0 .^{circ}5. This angular scales translates to a comoving scale of >20 Mpc at a redshift of 1. The implied alignment of the spin axes of massive black holes that give rise to the radio jets suggest the presence of large-scale spatial coherence in angular momentum. Our results reinforce prior evidence for large-scale spatial alignments of quasar optical polarization position angles.

  7. UNIFICATION SCHEME OF RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS FALSIFIED BY THEIR OBSERVED SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, Ashok K.; Singh, Raj Laxmi

    2013-03-20

    In the currently popular orientation-based unified scheme, a radio galaxy appears as a quasar when its principal radio-axis happens to be oriented within a certain cone opening angle around the observer's line of sight. Due to geometrical projection, the observed sizes of quasars should therefore appear smaller than those of radio galaxies. We show that this simple, unambiguous prediction of the unified scheme is not borne out by the actually observed angular sizes of radio galaxies and quasars. Except in the original 3CR sample, based on which the unified scheme was proposed, in other much larger samples no statistically significant difference is apparent in the size distributions of radio galaxies and quasars. The population of low-excitation radio galaxies with apparently no hidden quasars inside, which might explain the observed excess number of radio galaxies at low redshifts, cannot account for the absence of any foreshortening of the sizes of quasars at large redshifts. On the other hand, from infrared and X-ray studies, there is evidence of a hidden quasar within a dusty torus in many radio galaxies, at z > 0.5. It is difficult to reconcile this with the absence of foreshortening of quasar sizes at even these redshifts, and perhaps one has to allow that the major radio axis may not have anything to do with the optical axis of the torus. Otherwise, to resolve the dichotomy of radio galaxies and quasars, a scheme quite different from the present might be required.

  8. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope Observations of Head–Tail Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Biny; Lal, Dharam V.; Pramesh Rao, A.

    2017-10-01

    We present results from a study of seven large known head–tail radio galaxies based on observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 240 and 610 MHz. These observations are used to study the radio morphologies and distribution of the spectral indices across the sources. The overall morphology of the radio tails of these sources is suggestive of random motions of the optical host around the cluster potential. The presence of multiple bends and wiggles in several head–tail sources is possibly due to the precessing radio jets. We find steepening of the spectral index along the radio tails. The prevailing equipartition magnetic field also decreases along the radio tails of these sources. These steepening trends are attributed to the synchrotron aging of plasma toward the ends of the tails. The dynamical ages of these sample sources have been estimated to be ∼108 yr, which is a factor of six more than the age estimates from the radiative losses due to synchrotron cooling.

  9. VLBI observations of a complete sample of radio galaxies. 4: The radio galaxies NGC 2484, 3C 109, and 3C 382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannini, G.; Feretti, L.; Venturi, T.; Lara, L.; Marcaide, J.; Rioja, M.; Spangler, S. R.; Wehrle, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present here new Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations of one Fanaroff and Riley (F-R) I radio galaxy (NGC 2484) and two broad-line F-R II radio galaxies (3C 109 and 3C 382). For 3C 109 new Very Large Array (VLA) maps are also shown. These sources belong to a complete sample of radio galaxies under study for a better knowledge of their structures at parsec resolution. The parsec structure of these three objects is very similar: asymmetric emission, which we interpret as the core plus a one-side jet. The parsec-scale jet is always on the same side of the main kiloparsec-scale jet. The limit on the jet to counterjet brightness ratio, the ratio of the core radio power to the total radio power and the synchrotron-self Compton model allow us to derive some constraints on the jet velocity and orientation with respect to the line of sight. From these data and from those published on two other sources of our sample, we suggest that parsec-scale jets are relativistic in both F-R I and F-R II radio galaxies and that parsec scale properties in F-R I and F-R II radio galaxies are very similar despite the large difference between these two classes of radio galaxies on the kiloparsec scale.

  10. VLBI observations of a complete sample of radio galaxies. 4: The radio galaxies NGC 2484, 3C 109, and 3C 382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannini, G.; Feretti, L.; Venturi, T.; Lara, L.; Marcaide, J.; Rioja, M.; Spangler, S. R.; Wehrle, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present here new Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations of one Fanaroff and Riley (F-R) I radio galaxy (NGC 2484) and two broad-line F-R II radio galaxies (3C 109 and 3C 382). For 3C 109 new Very Large Array (VLA) maps are also shown. These sources belong to a complete sample of radio galaxies under study for a better knowledge of their structures at parsec resolution. The parsec structure of these three objects is very similar: asymmetric emission, which we interpret as the core plus a one-side jet. The parsec-scale jet is always on the same side of the main kiloparsec-scale jet. The limit on the jet to counterjet brightness ratio, the ratio of the core radio power to the total radio power and the synchrotron-self Compton model allow us to derive some constraints on the jet velocity and orientation with respect to the line of sight. From these data and from those published on two other sources of our sample, we suggest that parsec-scale jets are relativistic in both F-R I and F-R II radio galaxies and that parsec scale properties in F-R I and F-R II radio galaxies are very similar despite the large difference between these two classes of radio galaxies on the kiloparsec scale.

  11. Radio continuum JVLA observations of the dwarf galaxy Sextans A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.; Powell, Devon; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Bomans, Dominik; Bowman, Judd D.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2017-06-01

    We present 20-cm Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations of the star-forming dwarf galaxy Sextans A. Located at the outer edge of the Local Group, with an oxygen abundance of less than one-tenth of the Solar abundance (12+log O/H = 7.49), Sextans A provides a nearby laboratory for the study of low-metallicity star formation processes. This galaxy is a weak source in the infrared, but exhibits evidence for vigorous star formation-powered outflows in ionized gas, including large-scale H-alpha shells and filaments up to a kpc in length. Sextans A has not previously been detected in radio continuum. The upgraded JVLA and WIDAR correlator provide enhanced sensitivity over previous studies. We resolve a 3.0 mJy (+/- 0.3 mJy) continuum source centered on the brightest star formation region in Sextans A. Using two relatively interference-free windows at 1.4 GHz and 1.85 GHz, we are able to measure the spectral slope of the detected emission. We estimate the non-thermal contribution and the strength of the galaxy's magnetic field. We discuss the impact of low metallicity on the reliability of the IR/radio relation.

  12. NuSTAR Observations of the Powerful Radio Galaxy Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Wik, Daniel R.; Madejski, Grzegorz; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Lanz, Lauranne; Miller, Jon M.; Saez, Cristian; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William

    2015-08-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to \\gt 70 keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law ({{Γ }}∼ 1.6-1.7) absorbed by a neutral column density of {N}{{H}}∼ 1.6× {10}23 {{cm}}-2. However, we also detect curvature in the hard (\\gt 10 keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is {E}{cut}\\gt 111 keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast (15,000-26,000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 ), high column-density ({N}W\\gt 3× {10}23 {{cm}}-2), highly ionized (ξ ∼ 2500 {erg} {cm} {{{s}}}-1) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.

  13. The gamma-ray emitting radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PKS 2004-447. II. The radio view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, R.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kadler, M.; Ojha, R.; Ros, E.; Stevens, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Carpenter, B.; Elsässer, D.; Gehrels, N.; Großberger, C.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Mannheim, K.; Markowitz, A.; Müller, C.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Trüstedt, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Wilms, J.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Γ-ray-detected radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (γ-NLS1) galaxies constitute a small but interesting sample of the γ-ray-loud AGN. The radio-loudest γ-NLS1 known, PKS 2004-447, is located in the southern hemisphere and is monitored in the radio regime by the multiwavelength monitoring programme TANAMI. Aims: We aim for the first detailed study of the radio morphology and long-term radio spectral evolution of PKS 2004-447, which are essential for understanding the diversity of the radio properties of γ-NLS1s. Methods: The TANAMI VLBI monitoring program uses the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, New Zealand, and South Africa to monitor the jets of radio-loud active galaxies in the southern hemisphere. Lower resolution radio flux density measurements at multiple radio frequencies over four years of observations were obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Results: The TANAMI VLBI image at 8.4 GHz shows an extended one-sided jet with a dominant compact VLBI core. Its brightness temperature is consistent with equipartition, but it is an order of magnitude below other γ-NLS1s with the sample value varying over two orders of magnitude. We find a compact morphology with a projected large-scale size < 11 kpc and a persistent steep radio spectrum with moderate flux-density variability. Conclusions: PKS 2004-447 appears to be a unique member of the γ-NLS1 sample. It exhibits blazar-like features, such as a flat featureless X-ray spectrum and a core-dominated, one-sided parsec-scale jet with indications for relativistic beaming. However, the data also reveal properties atypical for blazars, such as a radio spectrum and large-scale size consistent with compact-steep-spectrum (CSS) objects, which are usually associated with young radio sources. These characteristics are unique among all γ-NLS1s and extremely rare among γ-ray-loud AGN. The VLBI images shown in Figs. 3 and 4 (as FITS files) and the ATCA

  14. The Gamma-Ray Emitting Radio-Loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy PKS 2004-447 II. The Radio View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, R.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kadler, M.; Ojha, R.; Ros, E.; Stevens, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Carpenter, B.; Elsaesser, D.; Gehrels, N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Context. gamma-ray-detected radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (gamma-NLS1) galaxies constitute a small but interesting sample of the gamma-ray-loud AGN. The radio-loudest gamma-NLS1 known, PKS2004447, is located in the southern hemisphere and is monitored in the radio regime by the multiwavelength monitoring programme TANAMI. Aims. We aim for the first detailed study of the radio morphology and long-term radio spectral evolution of PKS2004447, which are essential for understanding the diversity of the radio properties of gamma-NLS1s. Methods. The TANAMI VLBI monitoring program uses the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, New Zealand, and South Africa to monitor the jets of radio-loud active galaxies in the southern hemisphere. Lower resolution radio flux density measurements at multiple radio frequencies over four years of observations were obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Results. The TANAMI VLBI image at 8.4GHz shows an extended one-sided jet with a dominant compact VLBI core. Its brightness temperature is consistent with equipartition, but it is an order of magnitude below other gamma-NLS1s with the sample value varying over two orders of magnitude. We find a compact morphology with a projected large-scale size 11 kpc and a persistent steep radio spectrum with moderate flux-density variability. Conclusions. PKS2004447 appears to be a unique member of the gamma-NLS1 sample. It exhibits blazar-like features, such as a flat featureless X-ray spectrum and a core-dominated, one-sided parsec-scale jet with indications for relativistic beaming. However, the data also reveal properties atypical for blazars, such as a radio spectrum and large-scale size consistent with compact-steep-spectrum (CSS) objects, which are usually associated with young radio sources. These characteristics are unique among all gamma-NLS1s and extremely rare among gamma-ray-loud AGN.

  15. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  16. A transient, flat spectrum radio pulsar near the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, J.; Degenaar, N.; Kerr, M.; Deller, A.; Deneva, J.; Lazarus, P.; Kramer, M.; Champion, D.; Karuppusamy, R.

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have shown possible connections between highly magnetized neutron stars ('magnetars'), whose X-ray emission is too bright to be powered by rotational energy, and ordinary radio pulsars. In addition to the magnetar SGR J1745-2900, one of the radio pulsars in the Galactic Centre (GC) region, PSR J1746-2850, had timing properties implying a large magnetic field strength and young age, as well as a flat spectrum. All characteristics are similar to those of rare, transient, radio-loud magnetars. Using several deep non-detections from the literature and two new detections, we show that this pulsar is also transient in the radio. Both the flat spectrum and large amplitude variability are inconsistent with the light curves and spectral indices of three radio pulsars with high magnetic field strengths. We further use frequent, deep archival imaging observations of the GC in the past 15 yr to rule out a possible X-ray outburst with a luminosity exceeding the rotational spin-down rate. This source, either a transient magnetar without any detected X-ray counterpart or a young, strongly magnetized radio pulsar producing magnetar-like radio emission, further blurs the line between the two categories. We discuss the implications of this object for the radio emission mechanism in magnetars and for star and compact object formation in the GC.

  17. COSMIC EMULATION: FAST PREDICTIONS FOR THE GALAXY POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Juliana; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Frontiere, Nicholas; Pope, Adrian; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Lawrence, Earl; Finkel, Hal

    2015-09-01

    The halo occupation distribution (HOD) approach has proven to be an effective method for modeling galaxy clustering and bias. In this approach, galaxies of a given type are probabilistically assigned to individual halos in N-body simulations. In this paper, we present a fast emulator for predicting the fully nonlinear galaxy–galaxy auto and galaxy–dark matter cross power spectrum and correlation function over a range of freely specifiable HOD modeling parameters. The emulator is constructed using results from 100 HOD models run on a large ΛCDM N-body simulation, with Gaussian Process interpolation applied to a PCA-based representation of the galaxy power spectrum. The total error is currently ∼1% in the auto correlations and ∼2% in the cross correlations from z = 1 to z = 0, over the considered parameter range. We use the emulator to investigate the accuracy of various analytic prescriptions for the galaxy power spectrum, parametric dependencies in the HOD model, and the behavior of galaxy bias as a function of HOD parameters. Additionally, we obtain fully nonlinear predictions for tangential shear correlations induced by galaxy–galaxy lensing from our galaxy–dark matter cross power spectrum emulator. All emulation products are publicly available at http://www.hep.anl.gov/cosmology/CosmicEmu/emu.html.

  18. Optical Properties of Radio-Selected Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, J; Laurent-Muehleisen, S A; Moran, E C; Becker, R H

    2006-01-05

    We present results from the analysis of the optical spectra of 47 radio-selected narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). These objects are a subset of the First Bright Quasar Survey (FBQS) and were initially detected at 20 cm (flux density limit {approx} 1 mJy) in the VLA FIRST Survey. We run Spearman rank correlation tests on several sets of parameters and conclude that, except for their radio properties, radio-selected NLS1 galaxies do not exhibit significant differences from traditional NLS1 galaxies. Our results are also in agreement with previous studies suggesting that NLS1 galaxies have small black hole masses that are accreting very close to the Eddington rate. We have found 16 new radio-loud NLS1 galaxies, which increases the number of known radio-loud NLS1 galaxies by a factor of {approx} 5.

  19. Radiative age mapping of the remnant radio galaxy B2 0924+30: the LOFAR perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulevski, A.; Morganti, R.; Harwood, J. J.; Barthel, P. D.; Jamrozy, M.; Brienza, M.; Brunetti, G.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Murgia, M.; White, G. J.; Croston, J. H.; Brüggen, M.

    2017-03-01

    We have observed the steep spectrum radio source B2 0924+30 using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) telescope. Hosted by a z = 0.026 elliptical galaxy, it has a relatively large angular size of 12' (corresponding to 360 kpc projected linear size) and a morphology reminiscent of a remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxy. Studying active galactic nuclei (AGN) radio remnants can give us insight into the time-scales involved into the episodic gas accretion by AGNs and their dependence on the AGN host environment. The proximity of the radio galaxy allows us to make detailed studies of its radio structure and map its spectral index and radiative age distribution. We combine LOFAR and archival images to study the spectral properties at a spatial resolution of 1'. We derive low frequency spectral index maps and use synchrotron ageing models to infer ages for different regions of the source. Thus, we are able to extend the spectral ageing studies into a hitherto unexplored frequency band, adding more robustness to our results. Our detailed spectral index mapping, while agreeing with earlier lower resolution studies, shows flattening of the spectral index towards the outer edges of the lobes. The spectral index of the lobes is α140609 ˜ -1 and gradually steepens to α140609 ˜ -1.8 moving towards the inner edges of the lobes. Using radiative ageing model fitting we show that the AGN activity ceased around 50 Myr ago. We note that the outer regions of the lobes are younger than the inner regions which is interpreted as a sign that those regions are remnant hotspots. We demonstrate the usefulness of maps of AGN radio remnants taken at low frequencies and suggest caution over the interpretation of spectral ages derived from integrated flux density measurements versus age mapping. The spectral index properties as well as the derived ages of B2 0924+30 are consistent with it being an FRII AGN radio remnant. LOFAR data are proving to be instrumental in extending our

  20. How old is the z = 3.4 radio galaxy B2 0902+34?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhardt, Peter; Dickinson, Mark

    1992-01-01

    The redshift 3.395 radio galaxy B2 0902+34 has been observed at K and in a 0.09 micron wide 2.21 micron filter which includes the redshifted forbidden O III 4959 and 5007 A emission lines. A value of m(K) = 19.9 +/- 0.3 is found in a 4 arcsec aperture, a magnitude fainter than Lilly's (1988) value, while the narrow-band image reveals that most of this flux is actually due to line emission. After correcting for forbidden O III 4959 and 5007A, a color is found which is consistent with the flat F(v) spectrum considered characteristic of a protogalaxy. Ages for the galaxy derived from stellar population models based on the limit R - K less than 3.8 are much younger than those for the I - K = 4.5 value reported by Lilly.

  1. The 2dF galaxy redshift survey: clustering properties of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, Manuela; Maddox, Steve J.; Hawkins, Ed; Peacock, John A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; de Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole A.; Jones, Bryn; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Norberg, Peder; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith; 2dFGRS Team

    2004-06-01

    The clustering properties of local, S1.4 GHz>= 1 mJy, radio sources are investigated for a sample of 820 objects drawn from the joint use of the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm (FIRST) and 2dF Galaxy Redshift surveys. To this aim, we present 271 new bJ<= 19.45 spectroscopic counterparts of FIRST radio sources to be added to those already introduced in our previous paper. The two-point correlation function for the local radio population is found to be entirely consistent with estimates obtained for the whole sample of 2dFGRS galaxies. From measurements of the redshift-space correlation function ξ(s) we derive a redshift-space clustering length s0= 10.7+0.8-0.7 Mpc, while from the projected correlation function Ξ(rT) we estimate the parameters of the real-space correlation function ξ(r) = (r/r0)-γ, r0= 6.7+0.9-1.1 Mpc and γ= 1.6 +/- 0.1, where h= 0.7 is assumed. Different results are instead obtained if we only consider sources that present signatures of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in their spectra. These objects are shown to be very strongly correlated, with r0= 10.9+1.0-1.2 Mpc and γ= 2 +/- 0.1, a steeper slope than has been claimed in other recent works. No difference is found in the clustering properties of radio-AGNs of different radio luminosity. Comparisons with models for ξ(r) show that AGN-fuelled sources reside in dark matter haloes more massive than ~1013.4 Msolar, higher than the corresponding figure for radio-quiet quasi-stellar objects. This value can be converted into a minimum black hole mass associated with radio-loud, AGN-fuelled objects of MminBH~ 109 Msolar. The above results then suggest - at least for relatively faint radio objects - the existence of a threshold black hole mass associated with the onset of significant radio activity such as that of radio-loud AGNs; however, once the activity is triggered, there appears to be no evidence for a connection between black hole mass and level of radio output.

  2. Correlation between excitation index and Eddington ratio in radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing-Fu; Cao, Xin-Wu; Chen, Liang; You, Bei

    2016-09-01

    We use a sample of 111 radio galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 to investigate their nuclear properties. The black hole masses of the sources in this sample are estimated with the velocity dispersion/luminosity of the galaxies, or the width of the broad-lines. We find that the excitation index, the relative intensity of low and high excitation lines, is correlated with the Eddington ratio for this sample. The size of the narrow-line region (NLR) was found to vary with ionizing luminosity as RNLR ∝ Lion0.25 (Liu et al. 2013). Using this empirical relation, we find that the correlation between the excitation index and the Eddington ratio can be reproduced by photoionization models. We adopt two sets of spectral energy distributions (SEDs), with or without a big blue bump in ultraviolet as the ionizing continuum, and infer that the modeled correlation between the excitation index and the Eddington ratio is insensitive to the applied SED. This means that the difference between high excitation galaxies and low excitation galaxies is not caused by the different accretion modes in these sources. Instead, it may be caused by the size of the NLR.

  3. Radio and infrared observations of (almost) one hundred non-Seyfert Markarian galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressel, Linda L.

    1987-01-01

    The 13 cm flux densities of 96 non-Seyfert Markarian galaxies were measured at Arecibo Observatory. Far infrared flux densities have been published for 78 of these galaxies in the IRAS catalog. The radio, infrared, and optical fluxes of these galaxies and of a magnitude limited sample of normal galaxies were compared to clarify the nature of the radio emission in Markarian galaxies. It was found that Markarian galaxies of a given apparent magnitude and Hubble type generally have radio fluxes several times higher that the fluxes typical of normal galaxies of the same magnitude and type. Remarkably, the ratio of radio flux to far infrared flux is nearly the same for most of these starburst galaxies and for normal spiral disks. However, the compact and peculiar Markarian galaxies consistently have about 60% more radio flux per unit infrared flux than the other Markarian galaxies and the normal spirals. It is not clear whether this difference reflects a difference in the evolution of the starbursts in these galaxies or whether there is excess radio emission of nonstellar origin.

  4. The X-Ray Core of the Low-Luminosity Radio Galaxy 3C346 and ASCA Spectroscopy to Test BL LAC/Radio Galaxy Unification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana

    2000-01-01

    the radio jets are seen at an angle to the line of sight of about 30 deg, intermediate between the radio-galaxy and quasar classes. The relatively hard ASCA response has allowed us to place an upper limit of 5.6 x 10(exp 43) ergs/ s on the 2-10 keV luminosity of any central X-ray component absorbed bN, gas which might be obscuring the broad-line emission region. Attached to this report is an almost final draft of a paper which we have prepared for submission to the Astrophysical Journal. Our combined ASCA and ROSAT results for NGC 6251 rule out our previously preferred flat-spectrum model and inverse-Compton interpretation for the source based on ROSAT data alone, but a softer X-ray spectrum and moderate absorption bring all the available data (including our early VLA HI measurements) into consistency, and we are reasonably confident that we understand the processes responsible for the X-ray emission. We have made some more sensitive HI absorption measurements which are currently being analyzed, and our plans are to publish our ASCA analysis in conjunction with the new HI results. The ASCA data for NGC 4261 have been difficult to interpret. A re-analysis of our ROSAT data with a wider range of physical parameters brings the ROSAT and ASCA results into reasonable agreement only if the emission from hot gas dominates more than suggested by our earlier work, which is itself unexpected since the radio core is bright and a large jet-related X-ray component would bring the source into agreement with results for others of its type. However, we have recently received our Chandra A01 data for this source, with the spatial resolution which allows us to separate thermal and non-thermal emission components. Our ASCA results will be re-interpreted once the analysis of our Chandra data is complete. The interpretation of the ASCA data for BL Lac object 3C 371 is ongoing, in conjunction with analysis of archival multifrequency data. Radio galaxies are complex in their X

  5. Turbulent cosmic ray reacceleration and the curved radio spectrum of the radio relic in the Sausage Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Kimura, Shigeo S.

    2016-06-01

    It has often been thought that the northern radio relic in the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 (the "Sausage" Cluster) is associated with cosmic ray (CR) electrons that are accelerated at a shock through the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. However, recent radio observations have shown that the radio spectrum is curved, which is inconsistent with the prediction of a simple DSA model. Moreover, the CR electron spectrum before being affected by radiative cooling seems to be too hard for DSA. In this study, we show that these facts are natural consequences if the electrons are reaccelerated in turbulence downstream of the shock. In this model, DSA is not the main mechanism for generating high-energy electrons. We find that the mean free path of the electrons should be much shorter than the Coulomb mean free path for efficient reacceleration. The scale of the turbulent eddies must be smaller than the width of the relic. We also predict hard X-ray spectra of inverse Compton scattering of photons.

  6. The radio core structure of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418. A young clustered starburst revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenius, E.; Conway, J. E.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Aalto, S.; Beswick, R.; Costagliola, F.; Klöckner, H.-R.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The galaxy NGC 4418 contains one of the most compact obscured nuclei within a luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) in the nearby Universe. This nucleus contains a rich molecular gas environment and an unusually high ratio of infrared-to-radio luminosity (q-factor). The compact nucleus is powered by either a compact starburst or an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Aims: The aim of this study is to constrain the nature of the nuclear region (starburst or AGN) within NGC 4418 via very-high-resolution radio imaging. Methods: Archival data from radio observations using the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN) and Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) interferometers are imaged. Sizes and flux densities are obtained by fitting Gaussian intensity distributions to the image. The average spectral index of the compact radio emission is estimated from measurements at 1.4 GHz and 5.0 GHz. Results: The nuclear structure of NGC 4418 visible with EVN and MERLIN consists of eight compact (<49 mas i.e. <8 pc) features spread within a region of 250 mas, i.e. 41 pc. We derive an inverted spectral index α ≥ 0.7 (Sν ∝ να) for the compact radio emission. Conclusions: Brightness temperatures >104.8 K indicate that these compact features cannot be HII-regions. The complex morphology and inverted spectrum of the eight detected compact features is evidence against the hypothesis that an AGN alone is powering the nucleus of NGC 4418. The compact features could be super star clusters with intense star formation, and their associated free-free absorption could then naturally explain both their inverted radio spectrum and the low radio-to-IR ratio of the nucleus. The required star formation area density is extreme, however, and close to the limit of what can be observed in a well-mixed thermal/non-thermal plasma produced by star formation, and is also close to the limit of what can be physically sustained.

  7. Interstellar matter in early-type galaxies. III - Radio emission and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, D. E. P.; Knapp, G. R.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kim, D.-W.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the IR and radio luminosity in early-type galaxies is examined using the correlation among spiral galaxies as a diagnostic of the presence of star formation. For ellipticals, the presence of long-wavelength IR emission enhances the probability that the galaxy is a radio source and is also correlated with the strength of that source. These findings are consistent with the idea that active radio nuclei are due to black holes being fueled by accretion of gas. The majority of S0s detected in both radio and far-IR have a similar ratio of IR to radio luminosity as has been found in spirals, and which is considered to be indicative of recent star formation. Sensitive radio limits for several galaxies reveal another substantial population of S0s with moderately strong IR emission unaccompanied by radio power.

  8. A new view of Jupiter's auroral radio spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Imai, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Louarn, P.; Valek, P.; Allegrini, F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Mauk, B. H.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S. M.; Adriani, A.; Bagenal, F.; Gladstone, G. R.; McComas, D. J.; Zarka, P.

    2017-07-01

    Juno's first perijove science observations were carried out on 27 August 2016. The 90° orbit inclination and 4163 km periapsis altitude provide the first opportunity to explore Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. A radio and plasma wave instrument on Juno called Waves provided a new view of Jupiter's auroral radio emissions from near 10 kHz to 30 MHz. This frequency range covers the classically named decametric, hectometric, and broadband kilometric radio emissions, and Juno observations showed much of this entire spectrum to consist of V-shaped emissions in frequency-time space with intensified vertices located very close to the electron cyclotron frequency. The proximity of the radio emissions to the cyclotron frequency along with loss cone features in the energetic electron distribution strongly suggests that Juno passed very close to, if not through, one or more of the cyclotron maser instability sources thought to be responsible for Jupiter's auroral radio emissions.

  9. Radio galaxies and the star formation history of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, P. J.; Osterman, M. A.

    Multi-wavelength observations made in the last decade strongly suggest that the universe underwent an intense phase of star-formation in the past (z > 1). This intensive activity is commonly attributed to a higher galaxy merger rate when the universe was a fraction of its present age. After briefly reviewing these evidences, we examine the role of the powerful radio sources whose comoving density is known to be a few orders of magnitude higher at z ˜2 (the so called `quasar era'). Taking into account the most recent theoretical models for the temporal evolution of the size and luminosity of a powerful double radio source, as well as advanced Lambda-CDM simulations of the cosmic web of baryonic material at different redshifts, it is argued that during the quasar era a high fraction of the volume of the web was occupied by the lobes of double radio sources. Wide-spread compression of proto-stellar clouds, triggered by the high pressure of the synchrotron plasma of the radio lobes, can thus be expected to have played a significant role in the star formation history of the universe, and also in causing a rather high level of magnitization of the galactic and intergalactic material at early epochs.

  10. Spectrum handoff algorithm with imperfect spectrum sensing incognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Bao, Xiao-min; Xie, Xian-zhong

    2016-10-01

    To guarantee the quality of service of licensed users, the unlicensed users must vacate the occupied channel by spectrum handoff if licensed users appear in the licensed spectrum. However, spectrum sensing with false alarm and missed detection may lead to more inaccuracy problems when unlicensed users perform spectrum handoff. To improve the problems mentioned before, we utilize PRP M/G/1 queuing network model to propose a spectrum handoff algorithm with error data retransmission mechanism and analyze its performance by transmission delay and extended data delivery time. In addition, we discuss the relationship between false alarm probability, extended data delivery time and user traffic load and verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Observations of the z = 4.514 radio galaxy RC J0311+0507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Thomasson, P.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Beswick, R.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.; Verkhodanov, O. V.

    2014-04-01

    RC J0311+0507 is one of the most luminous objects in the high-redshift Universe having L ≥ 3 × 1029 W Hz-1 at a 500 MHz rest frequency. A very steep radio spectrum and an indication of a Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) structure from early Very Large Array (VLA) maps suggested the presence of a supermassive black hole inside the parent galaxy. Multi-Element Radio-Linked Interferometer Network and European Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network maps (intensity and polarization) of this object at 1.7 and 5 GHz with an order of magnitude better resolution than that of the VLA are presented. Also included are further optical observations with the Russian 6-m telescope and infrared K-band observations with the United Kingdom Infra-Red Telescope, which indicate the object to be a galaxy. The new radio observations now confirm the source's structure to be that of an FR II, but with a high degree of asymmetry in the flux densities of the source components.

  12. [Galaxy spectrum subtraction of a mixed spectrum based on two class PCA eigen-spectra].

    PubMed

    Tu, Liang-Ping; Wu, Fu-Chao; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2010-06-01

    The authors present a new method called two class PCA for decomposing the mixed spectra, namely, for subtracting the host galaxy contamination from each SN spectrum. The authors improved the quality of reconstructed galaxy spectrum and computational efficiency, and these improvements were realized because we used both the PCA eigen spectra of galaxy templates library and SN templates library to model the mixed spectrum. The method includes mainly three steps described as follows. The first step is calculating two class PCA eigen spectra of galaxy templates and SN templates respectively. The second step is determining all reconstructed coefficients by the SVD matrix decomposition or orthogonal transformation. And the third step is computing a reconstructed galaxy spectrum and subtracting it from each mixed spectrum. Experiments show that this method can obtain an accurate decomposition of a mixed synthetic spectrum, and is a method with low time-consumption to get the reliable SN spectrum without galaxy contamination and can be used for spectral analysis of large amount of spectra. The time consumption using our method is much lower than that using chi2-template fitting for a spectrum.

  13. FERMI Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray Detection of the Radio Galaxy M87

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2009-11-17

    Here, we report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovery of high-energy (MeV/GeV) γ-ray emission positionally consistent with the center of the radio galaxy M87, at a source significance of over 10σ in 10 months of all-sky survey data. Following the detections of Cen A and Per A, this makes M87 the third radio galaxy seen with the LAT. The faint point-like γ-ray source has a >100 MeV flux of 2.45 (±0.63) × 10–8 photons cm–2 s–1 (photon index = 2.26 ± 0.13) with no significant variability detected within the LAT observation. This flux is comparable with the previous EGRETmore » upper limit (<2.18 × 10–8 photons cm–2 s–1, 2σ), thus there is no evidence for a significant MeV/GeV flare on decade timescales. Contemporaneous Chandra and Very Long Baseline Array data indicate low activity in the unresolved X-ray and radio core relative to previous observations, suggesting M87 is in a quiescent overall level over the first year of Fermi-LAT observations. The LAT γ-ray spectrum is modeled as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission from the electron population producing the radio-to-X-ray emission in the core. The resultant SSC spectrum extrapolates smoothly from the LAT band to the historical-minimum TeV emission. Lastly, alternative models for the core and possible contributions from the kiloparsec-scale jet in M87 are considered, and cannot be excluded.« less

  14. Steep-Spectrum Radio Emission from the Low-Mass Active Galactic Nucleus GH 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    GH 10 is a broad-lined active galactic nucleus (AGN) energized by a black hole of mass 800,000 M⊙. It was the only object detected by Greene et al. in their Very Large Array (VLA) survey of 19 low-mass AGNs discovered by Greene & Ho. New VLA imaging at 1.4, 4.9, and 8.5 GHz reveals that GH 10's emission has an extent of less than 320 pc, has an optically thin synchrotron spectrum with a spectral index α = - 0.76 +/- 0.05 (Sν propto ν+ α), is less than 11% linearly polarized, and is steady—although poorly sampled—on timescales of weeks and years. Circumnuclear star formation cannot dominate the radio emission, because the high inferred star formation rate, 18 M⊙ yr-1, is inconsistent with the rate of less than 2 M⊙ yr-1 derived from narrow Hα and [O II] λ3727 emission. Instead, the radio emission must be mainly energized by the low-mass black hole. GH 10's radio properties match those of the steep-spectrum cores of Palomar Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that, like those galaxies, the emission is outflow-driven. Because GH 10 is radiating close to its Eddington limit, it may be a local analog of the starting conditions, or seeds, for supermassive black holes. Future imaging of GH 10 at higher linear resolution thus offers an opportunity to study the relative roles of radiative versus kinetic feedback during black hole growth.

  15. When galaxies collide: understanding the broad absorption-line radio galaxy 4C +72.26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J. B.; Simpson, C.; Swinbank, A. M.; Rawlings, S.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2010-05-01

    We present a range of new observations of the `broad absorption-line radio galaxy' 4C +72.26 (z ~ 3.5), including sensitive rest-frame ultraviolet integral field spectroscopy using the Gemini/GMOS-N instrument and Subaru/CISCO K-band imaging and spectroscopy. We show that 4C +72.26 is a system of two vigorously star-forming galaxies superimposed along the line of sight separated by ~1300 +/- 200 km s-1 in velocity, with each demonstrating spectroscopically resolved absorption lines. The most active star-forming galaxy also hosts the accreting supermassive black hole which powers the extended radio source. We conclude that the star formation is unlikely to have been induced by a shock caused by the passage of the radio jet, and instead propose that a collision is a more probable trigger for the star formation. Despite the massive starburst, the ultraviolet-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution suggests that the pre-existing stellar population comprises ~1012Msolar of stellar mass, with the current burst only contributing a further ~2 per cent, suggesting that 4C +72.26 has already assembled most of its final stellar mass.

  16. An Unlikely Radio Halo in the Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Cluster RXCJ1514.9-1523

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marketvitch, M.; ZuHone, J. A.; Lee, D.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Venturi, T.; Brunetti, G.; Cassano, R.; Markevitch, M.; Athreya, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: We report the discovery of a giant radio halo in the galaxy cluster RXCJ1514,9-1523 at z=0.22 with a relatively low X-ray luminosity, L(sub X) (0.1-2.4kev) approx. 7 x 10(exp 44) ergs/s. Methods: This faint, diffuse radio source is detected with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope at 327 MHz. The source is barely detected at 1.4 GHz in a NVSS pointing that we have reanalyzed. Results: The integrated radio spectrum of the halo is quite steep, with a slope alpha = 1.6 between 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz. While giant radio halos are common in more X-ray luminous cluster mergers, there is a less than 10% probability to detect a halo in systems with L(sub X) < 8 x 10(exp 44) ergs/s. The detection of a new giant halo in this borderline luminosity regime can be particularly useful for discriminating between the competing theories for the origin of ultrarelativistic electrons in clusters. Furthermore, if our steep radio spectral index is confirmed by future deeper radio observations, this cluster would provide another example of the very rare, new class of ultra-steep spectrum radio halos, predicted by the model in which the cluster cosmic ray electrons are produced by turbulent reacceleration.

  17. Giant radio galaxies as effective probes of X-ray gas in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Malarecki, Jurek; Jones, Heath; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-08-01

    Giant radio galaxies are AGNs with relativistic jets that dynamically evolve into Mpc scale synchrotron lobes around the host elliptical. The thermal gas environment influences the jet advance and lobe formation. Since the host ellipticals are in filamentary low-density galaxy environments, the ambient gas for the Mpc-scale radio structures is likely the warm-hot X-ray gas inhabiting the intergalactic medium. We have, therefore, used large radio galaxies as probes of the distribution of hot and tenuous gas on mega-parsec scales in these relatively low density large-scale structures.For a sample of 19 giant radio galaxies we obtained radio continuum images of the synchrotron structures, and redshifts of a total of nearly 9000 galaxies in their vicinity. The 2-degree field redshift data traces the large-scale galaxy structure around the radio sources. The radio-optical data allows an estimation of the pressure, temperature and distribution of hot thermal gas associated with the large-scale structure in the vicinity of the radio AGN (Malarecki, Staveley-Smith, Saripalli, Subrahmanyan, Jones, Duffy, Rioja 2013, MNRAS 432, 200).Strong correspondence between radio galaxy lobes and galaxy distribution is observed. The data suggests that galaxies trace gas, and that radio jets and lobes of giant radio galaxies are sensitive tracers of gas on mega-parsec scales and may be used as effective probes of the difficult-to-detect IGM (Malarecki, Jones, Saripalli, Stavele-Smith, Subrahmanyan, 2015, MNRAS in press; arXiv150203954).

  18. An X-ray survey of a complete sample of 3CR radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Trinchieri, G.; Elvis, M.; Miller, L.; Longair, M.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray survey of the galaxies, 40 in all, was made with the Einstein Observatory. By comparing the distributions of X-ray luminosities, it is found that 3CR galaxies with double radio morphology (FR 2) and optical emission-line spectra tend to be the more powerful X-ray emitters, with broad-line galaxies at the top of the distribution. It is also found that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the 5 GHz radio nuclear luminosity. Through an analysis of the complete optical and radio sample with the Spearman partial rank correlation technique, it is determined that nuclear radio luminosity at 5 GHz is correlated with both total radio luminosity at 178 MHz and with galaxy optical luminosity. Other weaker correlations are found of the X-ray luminosity with the total radio luminosity at 178 MHz and the optical luminosity of the galaxy. The results are seen as underlining the importance of nuclear phenomena in radio galaxies and indicating a nuclear origin of their X-ray emission. In addition, it is found that the 3CR emission-line galaxies are similar to both Seyfert galaxies and quasars with double radio morphology in their X-ray properties, strongly reinforcing a unified picture of active nuclei.

  19. A radio continuum survey of southern E and SO galaxies at 2.7 GHz and 5.0 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, E. M.

    A radio survey has been conducted of about 250 E and SO galaxies which makes possible, since the distances of all the radio galaxies are known, a discussion of such absolute quantities as radio power and optical luminosity. Use is made of the fractional luminosity function defined by Hummel (1981). The results of the present study indicate that, unlike the case of spiral galaxies, the galaxy environment appears to have little influence on the formation of radio sources in elliptical and SO galaxies, and there is no evidence for excess radio emission from paired galaxies.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J. M.; Nyland, K. E-mail: knyland@nrao.edu

    2012-12-01

    The early-type galaxy NGC 3115, at a distance of 10.2 Mpc, hosts the nearest billion-solar-mass black hole. Wong et al. recently inferred a substantial Bondi accretion rate near the black hole. Bondi-like accretion is thought to fuel outflows, which can be traced through their radio emission. This paper reports the discovery of a radio nucleus in NGC 3115, with a diameter less than 0.''17 (8.4 pc), a luminosity at 8.5 GHz of 3.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, and a flat spectrum ({alpha} = -0.23 {+-} 0.20, S{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). The radio source coincides with the galaxy's photocenter and candidate X-ray nucleus. The emission is radio loud, suggesting the presence of an outflow on scales less than 10 pc. On such scales, the Bondi accretion could be impeded by heating due to disruption of the outflow.

  1. A multi-frequency study of the SZE in giant radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Marchegiani, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Radio galaxy (RG) lobes contain relativistic electrons embedded in a tangled magnetic field that produce, in addition to low-frequency synchrotron radio emission, inverse-Compton scattering (ICS) of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. This produces a relativistic, non-thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Aims: We study the spectral and spatial properties of the non-thermal SZE in a sample of radio galaxies and make predictions for their detectability in both the negative and the positive part of the SZE, with space experiments like Planck, OLIMPO, and Herschel-SPIRE. These cover a wide range of frequencies, from radio to sub-mm. Methods: We model the SZE in a general formalism that is equivalent to the relativistic covariant one and describe the electron population contained in the lobes of the radio galaxies with parameters derived from their radio observations, namely, flux, spectral index, and spatial extension. We further constrain the electron spectrum and the magnetic field of the RG lobes using X-ray, gamma-ray, and microwave archival observations. Results: We determine the main spectral features of the SZE in RG lobes, namely, the minimum, the crossover, and the maximum of the SZE. We show that these typical spectral features fall in the frequency ranges probed by the available space experiments. We provide the most reliable predictions for the amplitude and spectral shape of the SZE in a sample of selected RGs with extended lobes. In three of these objects, we also derive an estimate of the magnetic field in the lobe at the ~μG level by combining radio (synchrotron) observations and X-ray (ICS) observations. These data, together with the WMAP upper limits, set constraints on the minimum momentum of the electrons residing in the RG lobes and allow realistic predictions for the visibility of their SZE to be derived with Planck, OLIMPO, and Herschel-SPIRE. Conclusions: We show that the SZE from several RG lobes can be observed with mm

  2. A plethora of diffuse steep spectrum radio sources in Abell 2034 revealed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, T. W.; Luckin, J.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Intema, H. T.; Owers, M. S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Heald, G. H.; Hoang, D. N.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Bonafede, A.; Chyży, K. T.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intracluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5 Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.

  3. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - I. Morphology, magnetic field strength and energetics.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Jeremy J; Croston, Judith H; Intema, Huib T; Stewart, Adam J; Ineson, Judith; Hardcastle, Martin J; Godfrey, Leith; Best, Philip; Brienza, Marisa; Heesen, Volker; Mahony, Elizabeth K; Morganti, Raffaella; Murgia, Matteo; Orrú, Emanuela; Röttgering, Huub; Shulevski, Aleksandar; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Due to their steep spectra, low-frequency observations of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies potentially provide key insights in to the morphology, energetics and spectrum of these powerful radio sources. However, limitations imposed by the previous generation of radio interferometers at metre wavelengths have meant that this region of parameter space remains largely unexplored. In this paper, the first in a series examining FR IIs at low frequencies, we use LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) observations between 50 and 160 MHz, along with complementary archival radio and X-ray data, to explore the properties of two FR II sources, 3C 452 and 3C 223. We find that the morphology of 3C 452 is that of a standard FR II rather than of a double-double radio galaxy as had previously been suggested, with no remnant emission being observed beyond the active lobes. We find that the low-frequency integrated spectra of both sources are much steeper than expected based on traditional assumptions and, using synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting, show that the total energy content of the lobes is greater than previous estimates by a factor of around 5 for 3C 452 and 2 for 3C 223. We go on to discuss possible causes of these steeper-than-expected spectra and provide revised estimates of the internal pressures and magnetic field strengths for the intrinsically steep case. We find that the ratio between the equipartition magnetic field strengths and those derived through synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting remains consistent with previous findings and show that the observed departure from equipartition may in some cases provide a solution to the spectral versus dynamical age disparity.

  4. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - I. Morphology, magnetic field strength and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Croston, Judith H.; Intema, Huib T.; Stewart, Adam J.; Ineson, Judith; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Godfrey, Leith; Best, Philip; Brienza, Marisa; Heesen, Volker; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Morganti, Raffaella; Murgia, Matteo; Orrú, Emanuela; Röttgering, Huub; Shulevski, Aleksandar; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Due to their steep spectra, low-frequency observations of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies potentially provide key insights in to the morphology, energetics and spectrum of these powerful radio sources. However, limitations imposed by the previous generation of radio interferometers at metre wavelengths have meant that this region of parameter space remains largely unexplored. In this paper, the first in a series examining FR IIs at low frequencies, we use LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) observations between 50 and 160 MHz, along with complementary archival radio and X-ray data, to explore the properties of two FR II sources, 3C 452 and 3C 223. We find that the morphology of 3C 452 is that of a standard FR II rather than of a double-double radio galaxy as had previously been suggested, with no remnant emission being observed beyond the active lobes. We find that the low-frequency integrated spectra of both sources are much steeper than expected based on traditional assumptions and, using synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting, show that the total energy content of the lobes is greater than previous estimates by a factor of around 5 for 3C 452 and 2 for 3C 223. We go on to discuss possible causes of these steeper-than-expected spectra and provide revised estimates of the internal pressures and magnetic field strengths for the intrinsically steep case. We find that the ratio between the equipartition magnetic field strengths and those derived through synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting remains consistent with previous findings and show that the observed departure from equipartition may in some cases provide a solution to the spectral versus dynamical age disparity.

  5. TURBULENCE AND RADIO MINI-HALOS IN THE SLOSHING CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Giacintucci, S.

    2013-01-10

    A number of relaxed, cool-core galaxy clusters exhibit diffuse, steep-spectrum radio sources in their central regions, known as radio mini-halos. It has been proposed that the relativistic electrons responsible for the emission have been reaccelerated by turbulence generated by the sloshing of the cool core gas. We present a high-resolution MHD simulation of gas sloshing in a galaxy cluster coupled with subgrid simulations of relativistic electron acceleration to test this hypothesis. Our simulation shows that the sloshing motions generate turbulence on the order of {delta}v {approx} 50-200 km s{sup -1} on spatial scales of {approx}50-100 kpc and below in the cool core region within the envelope of the sloshing cold fronts, whereas outside the cold fronts, there is negligible turbulence. This turbulence is potentially strong enough to reaccelerate relativistic electron seeds (with initial {gamma} {approx} 100-500) to {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 4} via damping of magnetosonic waves and non-resonant compression. The seed electrons could remain in the cluster from, e.g., past active galactic nucleus activity. In combination with the magnetic field amplification in the core, these electrons then produce diffuse radio synchrotron emission that is coincident with the region bounded by the sloshing cold fronts, as indeed observed in X-rays and the radio. The result holds for different initial spatial distributions of pre-existing relativistic electrons. The power and the steep spectral index ({alpha} Almost-Equal-To 1-2) of the resulting radio emission are consistent with observations of mini-halos, though the theoretical uncertainties of the acceleration mechanisms are high. We also produce simulated maps of inverse-Compton hard X-ray emission from the same population of relativistic electrons.

  6. The Warped Nuclear Disk of Radio Galaxy 3C 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Floyd, D. J. E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Baum, S. A.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. B.; Miley, G. K.; Capetti, A.; Madrid, J. P.; Perlman, E.

    2005-12-01

    Among radio galaxies containing nuclear dust disks, the bipolar jet axis is generally expected to be perpendicular to the disk major axis. However, the FR I radio source 3C 449, possessing a nearly parallel jet/disk orientation on the sky, is an extreme example of a system that does not conform to this expectation. We examine the 600 pc dusty disk in this galaxy with images from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that a colormap of the disk exhibits a twist in its isocolor contours (isochromes). We model the colormap by integrating galactic starlight through an absorptive disk, and find that the anomalous twist in the isochromes can be reproduced in the model with a vertically thin, warped disk. The model predicts that the disk is nearly perpendicular to the jet axis within 100 pc of the nucleus. We discuss physical mechanisms capable of causing such a warp. We show that a torque on the disk arising from a possible binary black hole in the AGN or radiation pressure from the AGN causes precession on a timescale that is too long to generate such a warp. However, we estimate that the pressure in the X-ray emitting interstellar medium is large enough to perturb the disk. The warped disk in 3C 449 may be a new manifestation of feedback from an active galactic nucleus.

  7. ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MERCURY ( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), PERIODIC VARIATIONS, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES...EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SOURCES), GALAXIES, BLACKBODY RADIATION, BRIGHTNESS, TEMPERATURE, MARS( PLANET ), JUPITER( PLANET ), SATURN( PLANET

  8. The Cluster Environment of a Triple-Double Episodic Radio Spiral Galaxy BCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Jimmy

    2012-10-01

    SDSS J140948.85-030232.5 (also referred to as or Speca) is unique in that it is the only known galaxy that is both a spiral radio galaxy and harbors three distinct pairs of radio relic lobes indicative of episodic radio outbursts. Furthermore, it is the brightest cluster galaxy of a cluster despite being a spiral. We propose a short XMM-Newton snapshot observation of the environment of Speca to determine the X-ray flux of the previously unobserved host cluster as a prelude to deeper X-ray observations to investigate the radio relic lobes interaction with the hot intracluster medium of the cluster.

  9. The multifrequency parsec-scale structure of PKS 2254-367 (IC 1459): a luminosity-dependent break in morphology for the precursors of radio galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Edwards, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    We present the first multifrequency very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) images of PKS 2254-367, a gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio source hosted by the nearby galaxy IC 1459 (D = 20.5 Mpc). PKS 2254-367 and the radio source in NGC 1052 (PKS 0238-084; D = 17.2 Mpc) are the two closest GPS radio sources to us, far closer than the next closest example, PKS 1718-649 (D = 59 Mpc). As such, IC 1459 and NGC 1052 offer opportunities to study the details of the parsec-scale radio sources as well as the environments that the radio sources inhabit, across the electromagnetic spectrum. Given that some models for the origin and evolution of GPS radio sources require a strong connection between the radio source morphology and the gaseous nuclear environment, such opportunities for detailed study are important. Our VLBI images of PKS 2254-367 show that the previously identified similarities between IC 1459 and NGC 1052 continue on to the parsec-scale. Both compact radio sources appear to have symmetric jets of approximately the same luminosity, much lower than typically noted in compact double GPS sources. Similarities between PKS 2254-367 and NGC 1052, and differences with respect to other GPS galaxies, lead us to speculate that a sub-class of GPS radio sources, with low luminosity and with jet-dominated morphologies, exists and would be largely absent from radio source surveys with ˜1 Jy flux density cut-offs. We suggest that this possible low-luminosity, jet-dominated population of GPS sources could be an analogue of the Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxies, with the higher luminosity lobe-dominated GPS sources being the analogue of the FR II radio galaxies.

  10. LOFAR VLBI studies at 55 MHz of 4C 43.15, a z = 2.4 radio galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Leah K.; Deller, Adam T.; Röttgering, Huub; Miley, George; Varenius, Eskil; Shimwell, Timothy W.; Moldón, Javier; Jackson, Neal; Morganti, Raffaella; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Oonk, J. B. R.

    2016-09-01

    The correlation between radio spectral index and redshift has been exploited to discover high-redshift radio galaxies, but its underlying cause is unclear. It is crucial to characterize the particle acceleration and loss mechanisms in high-redshift radio galaxies to understand why their radio spectral indices are steeper than their local counterparts. Low-frequency information on scales of ˜1 arcsec are necessary to determine the internal spectral index variation. In this paper we present the first spatially resolved studies at frequencies below 100 MHz of the z = 2.4 radio galaxy 4C 43.15 which was selected based on its ultrasteep spectral index (α < -1; Sν ˜ να) between 365 MHz and 1.4 GHz. Using the International Low Frequency Array Low Band Antenna we achieve subarcsecond imaging resolution at 55 MHz with very long baseline interferometry techniques. Our study reveals low-frequency radio emission extended along the jet axis, which connects the two lobes. The integrated spectral index for frequencies <500 MHz is -0.83. The lobes have integrated spectral indices of -1.31 ± 0.03 and -1.75 ± 0.01 for frequencies ≥1.4 GHz, implying a break frequency between 500 MHz and 1.4 GHz. These spectral properties are similar to those of local radio galaxies. We conclude that the initially measured ultrasteep spectral index is due to a combination of the steepening spectrum at high frequencies with a break at intermediate frequencies.

  11. Radio galaxies in ZFOURGE/NMBS: no difference in the properties of massive galaxies with and without radio-AGN out to z = 2.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, G. A.; Spitler, L. R.; Norris, R. P.; Cowley, M. J.; Papovich, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Quadri, R. F.; Straatman, C. M. S.; Allen, R.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Labbe, I.; Nanayakkara, T.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tran, K.-V.

    2016-01-01

    In order to reproduce the high-mass end of the galaxy mass distribution, some process must be responsible for the suppression of star formation in the most massive of galaxies. Commonly active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked to fulfil this role, but the exact means by which they do so is still the topic of much debate, with studies finding evidence for both the suppression and enhancement of star formation in AGN hosts. Using the ZFOURGE (FourStar Galaxy Evolution) and NMBS (Newfirm Medium Band Survey) galaxy surveys, we investigate the host galaxy properties of a mass-limited (M ≥ 1010.5 M⊙), high-luminosity (L1.4 > 1024 W Hz-1) sample of radio-loud AGN to a redshift of z = 2.25. In contrast to low-redshift studies, which associate radio-AGN activity with quiescent hosts, we find that the majority of z > 1.5 radio-AGN are hosted by star-forming galaxies. Indeed, the stellar populations of radio-AGN are found to evolve with redshift in a manner that is consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy population. Interestingly, we find that the radio-AGN fraction is constant across a redshift range of 0.25 ≤ z < 2.25, perhaps indicating that the radio-AGN duty cycle has little dependence on redshift or galaxy type. We do however see a strong relation between the radio-AGN fraction and stellar mass, with radio-AGN becoming rare below ˜1010.5 M⊙ or a halo mass of 1012 M⊙. This halo-mass threshold is in good agreement with simulations that initiate radio-AGN feedback at this mass limit. Despite this, we find that radio-AGN host star formation rates are consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy sample, suggesting that while radio-AGN are in the right place to suppress star formation in massive galaxies they are not necessarily responsible for doing so.

  12. The Host Galaxy and the Extended Emission-Line Region of the Radio Galaxy 3C 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Stockton, Alan

    2008-04-01

    We present extensive ground-based spectroscopy and HST imaging of 3C 79, an FR II radio galaxy associated with a luminous extended emission-line region (EELR). Surface brightness modeling of an emission-line-free HST R-band image reveals that the host galaxy is a massive elliptical with a compact companion 0.8'' away and 4 mag fainter. The host galaxy spectrum is best described by an intermediate-age (1.3 Gyr) stellar population (4% by mass), superimposed on a 10 Gyr old population and a power law (αλ = - 1.8); the stellar populations are consistent with supersolar metallicities, with the best fit given by the 2.5 Z⊙ models. We derive a dynamical mass of 4 × 1011 M⊙ within the effective radius from the velocity dispersion. The EELR spectra clearly indicate that the EELR is photoionized by the hidden central engine. Photoionization modeling shows evidence that the gas metallicity in both the EELR and the nuclear narrow-line region is mildly subsolar (0.3-0.7 Z⊙), significantly lower than the supersolar metallicities deduced from typical active galactic nuclei in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The more luminous filaments in the EELR exhibit a velocity field consistent with a common disk rotation. Fainter clouds, however, show high approaching velocities that are uncoupled from this apparent disk rotation. The striking similarities between this EELR and the EELRs around steep-spectrum radio-loud quasars provide further evidence for the orientation-dependent unification schemes. The metal-poor gas is almost certainly not native to the massive host galaxy. We suggest that the close companion galaxy could be the tidally stripped bulge of a late-type galaxy that is merging with the host galaxy. The interstellar medium of such a galaxy is probably the source for the low-metallicity gas in 3C 79. Based in part on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative

  13. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Shabala, S. S.

    2013-04-10

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  14. Tracing low-mass galaxy clusters using radio relics: the discovery of Abell 3527-bis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.; Intema, H. T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; van Weeren, R.; Bonafede, A.; Greiner, J.; Cassano, R.; Brüggen, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters undergo mergers that can generate extended radio sources called radio relics. Radio relics are the consequence of merger-induced shocks that propagate in the intra cluster medium (ICM). Aims: In this paper we analyse the radio, optical and X-ray data from a candidate galaxy cluster that has been selected from the radio emission coming from a candidate radio relic detected in NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Our aim is to clarify the nature of this source and prove that under certain conditions radio emission from radio relics can be used to trace relatively low-mass galaxy clusters. Methods: We observed the candidate galaxy cluster with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at three different frequencies. These datasets have been analysed together with archival data from ROSAT in the X-ray and with archival data from the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) telescope in four different optical bands. Results: We confirm the presence of a 1 Mpc long radio relic located in the outskirts of a previously unknown galaxy cluster. We confirm the presence of the galaxy cluster through dedicated optical observations and using archival X-ray data. Due to its proximity and similar redshift to a known Abell cluster, we named it Abell 3527-bis. The galaxy cluster is amongst the least massive clusters known to host a radio relic. Conclusions: We showed that radio relics can be effectively used to trace a subset of relatively low-mass galaxy clusters that might have gone undetected in X-ray or Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys. This technique might be used in future deep, low-frequency surveys such as those carried on by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), the Upgraded GMRT (uGMRT) and, ultimately, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  15. Fermi monitoring of radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-02-01

    We present detailed analysis of the γ-ray flux variability and spectral properties of the five radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL-NLSy1) galaxies, detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, namely 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, PMN J0948+0022, PKS 1502+036, and PKS 2004−447. The first three sources show significant flux variations, including the rapid variability of a few hours by 1H 0323+342. The average γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 shows deviation from a simple power-law (PL) behavior, whereas the PL model gives a better fit for the other three sources. The spectra of 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, and PMN J0948+0022, which are in low, flaring, and moderately active states, respectively, show significant curvature. Such curvature in the γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 could be due to the emission region located inside the broad line region (BLR) where the primary mechanism of the γ-ray emission is inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of BLR photons occurring in the Klein–Nishina regime. The γ-ray emission of SBS 0846+513 is explained by IC scattering of dusty torus photons, which puts the emission region outside the BLR and thus under the Thomson regime. Therefore, the observed curvature of SBS 0846+513 could be intrinsic to the particle energy distribution. The presence of curvature in the γ-ray spectrum and flux variability amplitudes of some of the RL-NLSy1 galaxies suggests that these sources could be akin to low/moderate jet power flat spectrum radio quasars.

  16. Protoclusters with evolved populations around radio galaxies at z ~ 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, Masaru; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Ichi; Yamada, Toru; Bower, Richard

    2006-09-01

    We report the discovery of protocluster candidates around high-redshift radio galaxies at z ~ 2.5 on the basis of clear statistical excess of colour-selected galaxies around them seen in the deep near-infrared imaging data obtained with CISCO on the Subaru Telescope. We have observed six targets, all at similar redshifts at z ~ 2.5, and our data reach J = 23.5, H = 22.6 and K = 21.8 (5σ) and cover a 1.6 × 1.6 arcmin2 field centred on each radio galaxy. We apply colour cuts in JHK bands in order to exclusively search for galaxies located at high redshifts, z > 2. Over the magnitude range of 19.5 < K < 21.5, we see a significant excess of red galaxies with J - K > 2.3 by a factor of 2 around the combined radio galaxies fields compared to those found in the general field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S). The excess of galaxies around the radio galaxies fields becomes more than a factor of 3 around 19.5 < K < 20.5 when the two-colour cuts are applied with JHK bands. Such overdensity of the colour-selected galaxies suggests that those fields tend to host high-density regions at high redshifts, although there seems to be the variety of the density of the colour-selected galaxies in each field. In particular, two radio galaxies fields out of the six observed fields show very strong density excess and these are likely to be protoclusters associated with the radio galaxies which would evolve into rich clusters of galaxies dominated by old passively evolving galaxies.

  17. Methods for Bayesian power spectrum inference with galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2013-12-10

    We derive and implement a full Bayesian large scale structure inference method aiming at precision recovery of the cosmological power spectrum from galaxy redshift surveys. Our approach improves upon previous Bayesian methods by performing a joint inference of the three-dimensional density field, the cosmological power spectrum, luminosity dependent galaxy biases, and corresponding normalizations. We account for all joint and correlated uncertainties between all inferred quantities. Classes of galaxies with different biases are treated as separate subsamples. This method therefore also allows the combined analysis of more than one galaxy survey. In particular, it solves the problem of inferring the power spectrum from galaxy surveys with non-trivial survey geometries by exploring the joint posterior distribution with efficient implementations of multiple block Markov chain and Hybrid Monte Carlo methods. Our Markov sampler achieves high statistical efficiency in low signal-to-noise regimes by using a deterministic reversible jump algorithm. This approach reduces the correlation length of the sampler by several orders of magnitude, turning the otherwise numerically unfeasible problem of joint parameter exploration into a numerically manageable task. We test our method on an artificial mock galaxy survey, emulating characteristic features of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, such as its survey geometry and luminosity-dependent biases. These tests demonstrate the numerical feasibility of our large scale Bayesian inference frame work when the parameter space has millions of dimensions. This method reveals and correctly treats the anti-correlation between bias amplitudes and power spectrum, which are not taken into account in current approaches to power spectrum estimation, a 20% effect across large ranges in k space. In addition, this method results in constrained realizations of density fields obtained without assuming the power spectrum or bias parameters

  18. A computational study of radio relics in galaxy cluster mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Dane Patrick

    Radio relics are extended regions of synchrotron radio emission that have been found in the outskirts of a few dozen galaxy clusters. Relics are often associated with clusters undergoing merger activity. They are not associated optically with a particular member of the cluster and are thought to arise from relativistic electron populations in the intra-cluster medium. The radio phoenix model, where shockwaves from merger activity re-energize a fossil radio plasma through adiabatic compression of the plasma, is one possible method of relic formation. This thesis uses gravitational N-body + SPH simulations with added synchrotron physics to present the largest computational study of radio relics in the radio phoenix model to date, totaling over 50,000 CPU-hours of computation and 4.7 TB of data. I have created a simulation data set of cluster mergers, with 25 different combinations of cluster mass, impact parameter, kinetic energies, cluster concentrations, and cluster-subcluster mass ratios. Using these simulations, I will discuss how high mass ratio collisions of 7:1 (cluster:subcluster mass) are most effective at reviving emission and creating a relic. I also show how this model predicts that clusters with total masses on the order of 6.25 x 10. 14 solar masses are most efficient at creating relics. By varyingthe magnetic pressure in the simulations, I demonstrate how relic formation is relatively insensitive to a wide range of magnetic field strengths. I also examine the great steepening of the spectral index of relics at even moderate (z ~ 0.4) redshifts predicted by the simulations, with the implications for future low-frequency telescope arrays. Finally, I present specific merger simulations for the clusters Abell 85 and 2443. The relic emission in Abell 85 is shown to be well predicted by the radio phoenix model, while the possible merger of Abell 2443 with its subcluster ZwCl 2224.2+1651 is shown to be unlikely as the cause of the relic in that system.

  19. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES AROUND RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Worpel, Hauke; Brown, Michael J. I.; Jones, D. Heath; Floyd, David J. E.; Beutler, Florian

    2013-07-20

    We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by increasing the rate at which gas accretes toward the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors, and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the Six Degree Field Galaxy Survey. We find tentative evidence that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r < 160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggesting that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is neither a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years.

  20. Optical and radio astrometry of the galaxy associated with FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Beswick, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Keane, E. F.; Bhandari, S.; Johnston, S.; Totani, T.; Tominaga, N.; Yasuda, N.; Stappers, B. W.; Barr, E. D.; Kramer, M.; Possenti, A.

    2016-11-01

    A fading radio source, coincident in time and position with the fast radio burst FRB 150418, has been associated with the galaxy WISE J071634.59-190039.2. Subsequent observations of this galaxy have revealed that it contains a persistent, but variable, radio source. We present e-Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network, Very Long Baseline Array, and Australia Telescope Compact Array radio observations and Subaru optical observations of WISE J071634.59-190039.2 and find that the persistent radio source is unresolved and must be compact (<0.01 kpc), and that its location is consistent with the optical centre of the galaxy. We conclude that it is likely that WISE J071634.59-190039.2 contains a weak radio active galactic nucleus.

  1. Gamma-ray Bursts: Radio Afterglow and Host Galaxy Study with The FAST Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. B.; Huang, Y. F.; Kong, S. W.; Zhang, Z. B.; Li, D.; Luo, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    For four types of GRBs, namely high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, we calculated their radio afterglow light curves. Meanwhile, considering contributions from host galaxies in radio bands, we statistically investigated the effect of hosts on radio afterglows. It is found that a tight anti-correlation exists between the ratio of radio flux (RRF) of host galaxy to the total radio afterglow peak flux and the observed frequency. Using this method, the host flux densities of those bursts without host measurements can be estimated at low or medium frequencies. We predicted that almost all types of radio afterglows, except that of low-luminosity GRBs, can be observed by FAST up to z = 15 or even more. FAST is expected to significantly expand the samples of GRB radio afterglows and host galaxies.

  2. Relics in galaxy clusters at high radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierdorf, M.; Beck, R.; Hoeft, M.; Klein, U.; van Weeren, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We investigated the magnetic properties of radio relics located at the peripheries of galaxy clusters at high radio frequencies, where the emission is expected to be free of Faraday depolarization. The degree of polarization is a measure of the magnetic field compression and, hence, the Mach number. Polarization observations can also be used to confirm relic candidates. Methods: We observed three radio relics in galaxy clusters and one radio relic candidate at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz in total emission and linearly polarized emission with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. In addition, we observed one radio relic candidate in X-rays with the Chandra telescope. We derived maps of polarization angle, polarization degree, and Faraday rotation measures. Results: The radio spectra of the integrated emission below 8.35 GHz can be well fitted by single power laws for all four relics. The flat spectra (spectral indices of 0.9 and 1.0) for the so-called Sausage relic in cluster CIZA J2242+53 and the so-called Toothbrush relic in cluster 1RXS 06+42 indicate that models describing the origin of relics have to include effects beyond the assumptions of diffuse shock acceleration. The spectra of the radio relics in ZwCl 0008+52 and in Abell 1612 are steep, as expected from weak shocks (Mach number ≈2.4). Polarization observations of radio relics offer a method of measuring the strength and geometry of the shock front. We find polarization degrees of more than 50% in the two prominent Mpc-sized radio relics, the Sausage and the Toothbrush, which are among the highest percentages of linear polarization detected in any extragalactic radio source to date. This is remarkable because the large beam size of the Effelsberg single-dish telescope corresponds to linear extensions of about 300 kpc at 8.35 GHz at the distances of the relics. The high degree of polarization indicates that the magnetic field vectors are almost perfectly aligned along the relic structure, as expected for shock

  3. STScI-PRC95-30 HUBBLE SEES DETAILED NEW STRUCTURES IN THREE RADIO GALAXIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images, combined with radio maps produced by the Very Large Array Radio Interferometer (blue contour lines), show surprisingly varied and intricate structures of gas and stars that suggest the mechanisms powering radio galaxies are more complex than thought previously. The bizarre, never before seen detail may be a combination of light from massive star forming regions, small satellite dwarf galaxies, and bow shocks caused by jets of hot gas blasted out of the galaxies' cores by suspected black holes. [LEFT] - 3C265. Hubble resolves numerous bright star clusters or dwarf 'satellite' galaxies surrounding a bright central compact structure. The line corresponds to the axis of the galaxy's radio emissions, which unlike other radio galaxies, is in a different direction from the optical region. The star forming regions might result from a collision between galaxies. The jet that produces the radio emissions might have further intensified star formation. [CENTER] - 3C324. A number of small interacting components are distributed roughly along the radio axis in this source. Comparison of the Hubble image with that from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope suggests that the central regions of this galaxy are obscured by a large dust lane. [RIGHT] - 3C368. One of the best studied radio galaxies, this image is composed of a very smooth cigar-shaped emission region closely aligned with the radio axis, upon which is superimposed a string of bright knots that might be stars or dust. This suggests that a jet of high speed gas, presumably ejected from a black hole at the core of the galaxy, might be triggering star formation along its path. Credit: M. Longair (Cambridge University, England), NASA, and NRAO

  4. Sardinia Radio Telescope observations of Abell 194. The intra-cluster magnetic field power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Vacca, V.; Loi, F.; Girardi, M.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Feretti, L.; Paladino, R.; Carretti, E.; Concu, R.; Melis, A.; Poppi, S.; Valente, G.; Bernardi, G.; Bonafede, A.; Boschin, W.; Brienza, M.; Clarke, T. E.; Colafrancesco, S.; de Gasperin, F.; Eckert, D.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Gregorini, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Junklewitz, H.; Orrù, E.; Parma, P.; Perley, R.; Rossetti, M.; B Taylor, G.; Vazza, F.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We study the intra-cluster magnetic field in the poor galaxy cluster Abell 194 by complementing radio data, at different frequencies, with data in the optical and X-ray bands. Methods: We analyzed new total intensity and polarization observations of Abell 194 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). We used the SRT data in combination with archival Very Large Array observations to derive both the spectral aging and rotation measure (RM) images of the radio galaxies 3C 40A and 3C 40B embedded in Abell 194. To obtain new additional insights into the cluster structure, we investigated the redshifts of 1893 galaxies, resulting in a sample of 143 fiducial cluster members. We analyzed the available ROSAT and Chandra observations to measure the electron density profile of the galaxy cluster. Results: The optical analysis indicates that Abell 194 does not show a major and recent cluster merger, but rather agrees with a scenario of accretion of small groups, mainly along the NE-SW direction. Under the minimum energy assumption, the lifetimes of synchrotron electrons in 3C 40 B measured from the spectral break are found to be 157 ± 11 Myr. The break frequency image and the electron density profile inferred from the X-ray emission are used in combination with the RM data to constrain the intra-cluster magnetic field power spectrum. By assuming a Kolmogorov power-law power spectrum with a minimum scale of fluctuations of Λmin = 1 kpc, we find that the RM data in Abell 194 are well described by a magnetic field with a maximum scale of fluctuations of Λmax = (64 ± 24) kpc. We find a central magnetic field strength of ⟨ B0 ⟩ = (1.5 ± 0.2) μG, which is the lowest ever measured so far in galaxy clusters based on Faraday rotation analysis. Further out, the field decreases with the radius following the gas density to the power of η = 1.1 ± 0.2. Comparing Abell 194 with a small sample of galaxy clusters, there is a hint of a trend between central electron

  5. The power spectrum of galaxies in the nearby universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Da Costa, L. Nicolaci; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.; Park, Changbom

    1994-01-01

    We compute the power spectrum of galaxy density fluctuations in a recently completed Southern Sky Redshift Survey of optically selected galaxies (SSRS2). The amplitude and shape of the SSRS2 power spectrum are consistent with results of the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey of the northern hemisphere (CfA2), including the abrupt change of slope on a scale of 30-50/h Mpc; these results are reproducible for independent volumes of space, and variations are consistent with the errors estimated from mock surveys. Taken together, the SSRS2 and the CfA2 form a complete sample of 14,383 galaxies which covers one-third of the sky. The power spectrum of this larger sample continues to rise on scales up to approximately 200/h Mpc, with weak evidence for flattening on the largest scales. The SSRS2 + CfA2 power spectrum and the power spectrum constraints implied by COBE are well matched by an Omega(h) is approximately 0.2, Omega + lambda(sub 0) = 1 cold dark matter model with minimal biasing of optically selected galaxies.

  6. The peculiar radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Sahayanathan, S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Anjum, Ayesha; Pandey, S. B.

    2014-07-10

    We present a multiwavelength study of the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLSy1) 1H 0323+342, detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Multiband light curves show many orphan X-ray and optical flares having no corresponding γ-ray counterparts. Such anomalous variability behavior can be due to different locations of the emission region from the central source. During a large flare, a γ-ray flux doubling timescale as small as ∼3 hr is noticed. We built spectral energy distributions (SEDs) during different activity states and modeled them using a one-zone leptonic model. The shape of the optical/UV component of the SEDs is dominated by accretion disk emission in all the activity states. In the X-ray band, significant thermal emission from the hot corona is inferred during quiescent and first flaring states; however, during subsequent flares, the nonthermal jet component dominates. The γ-ray emission in all the states can be well explained by inverse-Compton scattering of accretion disk photons reprocessed by the broad-line region. The source showed violent intra-night optical variability, coinciding with one of the high γ-ray activity states. An analysis of the overall X-ray spectrum fitted with an absorbed power-law plus relativistic reflection component hints at the presence of an Fe Kα line and returns a high black hole spin value of a = 0.96 ± 0.14. We argue that 1H 0323+342 possesses dual characteristics, akin to both flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and radio-quiet NLSy1 galaxies, though at a low jet power regime compared to powerful FSRQs.

  7. The column density distribution of hard X-ray radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Landi, R.; Bazzano, A.; Dallacasa, D.; La Franca, F.; Malizia, A.; Venturi, T.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/Imager on Board the Integral Satellite (IBIS) and Swift/The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) AGN catalogues (˜7-10 per cent of the total AGN population). The 64 radio galaxies have a typical FR II radio morphology and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities (from 1042 to 1046 erg s-1) and high Eddington ratios (log LBol/LEdd typically larger than ˜0.01). The observed fraction of absorbed AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2) is around 40 per cent among the total sample, and ˜75 per cent among type 2 AGN. The majority of obscured AGN are narrow-line objects, while unobscured AGN are broad-line objects, obeying to the zeroth-order predictions of unified models. A significant anti-correlation between the radio core dominance parameter and the X-ray column density is found. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is ˜2-3 per cent, in comparison with the 5-7 per cent found in radio-quiet hard X-ray selected AGN. We have estimated the absorption and Compton thick fractions in a hard X-ray sample containing both radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies and therefore affected by the same selection biases. No statistical significant difference was found in the absorption properties of radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies sample. In particular, the Compton thick objects are likely missing in both samples and the fraction of obscured radio galaxies appears to decrease with luminosity as observed in hard X-ray non-radio galaxies.

  8. Compact Steep Spectrum 3CR radio sources - VLBI observations at 18 CM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, C.; Fanti, R.; Parma, P.; Schilizzi, R. T.; van Breugel, W. J. M.

    1985-02-01

    Results of a program to investigate the kiloparsec-sized radio structure of a representative sample of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources from the 3CR catalog (Jenkins et al., 1977) are presented. Ten objects (3C49,67, 119, 237, 241, 268.3, 287, 303.1, 343, 343.1) have been mapped at 18 cm with a resolution of about 30 marcsec using the European VLBI Network. In some cases the VLBI data have been supplemented by MERLIN observations at the same wavelength to enhance sensitivity to large-scale structure. The overall sizes of the CSS sources range from about 0.1 to 1 or 2 arcsec, corresponding to linear sizes of the order of 1 to 10 kpc. The morphological classification ranges from double to core-jet to complex; CSS quasars are generally core-jets or complex, while CSS radio galaxies are doubles, although not necessarily simple doubles.

  9. Pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR 0 radio-galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, that was unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys. The key questions are related to the origin of their radio-emission and to its connection with the properties of their hosts. We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources, a small but representative subsample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or only slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with the one exception of a hybrid FR I/FR II source extended over ~40 kpc. Thanks to either the new high-resolution maps or to the radio spectra, we isolated the radio core component in most of them. We split the sample into two groups. Four sources have low black hole (BH) masses (mostly ~107 M⊙) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission, and are associated with radio-quiet (RQ) AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud (RL) AGN, which are located in red massive (~1011 M⊙) early-type galaxies, have high BH masses (≳108 M⊙), and are spectroscopically classified as low excitation galaxies (LEG). These are all characteristics typical of FR I radio galaxies. They also lie on the correlation between radio core power and [O III] line luminosity defined by FR Is. However, they are more core-dominated (by a factor of ~30) than FR Is and show a deficit of extended radio emission. We dub these sources "FR 0" to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission, which is their single distinguishing feature with respect to FR Is. The differences in radio properties between FR 0s and FR Is might be ascribed to an evolutionary effect, with the FR 0 sources undergoing rapid intermittency that prevents the growth of large-scale structures. However, this contrasts with the scenario in which low-luminosity radio-galaxies are fed by continuous accretion of gas from

  10. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes ofmore » neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.« less

  11. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.

  12. Spectroscopy of emission-line nebulae in powerful radio galaxies - Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, S. A.; Heckman, T. M.; van Breugel, W.

    1992-04-01

    Long-slit optical spectra of the emission-line nebulae associated with 21 low-redshift (less than 0.2) radio galaxies are analyzed. Nebulae are classified kinematically into three types: rotators, calm nonrotators, and violent nonrotators; these types are characterized. It is proposed that the rotators have dynamically young disks of gas recently acquired by the radio galaxy in an interaction or merger with a gas-rich galaxy. This is consistent with the data on the morphologies, colors, and stellar dynamics of radio galaxies with strong emission lines. It is inferred from the association of the large-scale gas kinematics with the radio and optical properties of an active galaxy that the angular momentum of the gas which fuels the AGN may be an important parameter in the determinant of how activity is manifest in an AGN.

  13. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.

  14. A survey of spectrum prediction methods in cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianwei; Li, Yanling

    2017-04-01

    Spectrum prediction technology is an effective way to solve the problems of processing latency, spectrum access, spectrum collision and energy consumption in cognitive radio networks. Spectral prediction technology is divided into three categories according to its nature, namely, spectral prediction method based on regression analysis, spectrum prediction method based on Markov model and spectrum prediction method based on machine learning. By analyzing and comparing the three kinds of prediction models, the author hopes to provide some reference for the later researchers. In this paper, the development situation, practical application and existent problems of three kinds of forecasting models are analyzed and summarized. On this basis, this paper discusses the development trend of the next step.

  15. Radio continuum and far-infrared observations of low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeppe, G.; Brinks, E.; Klein, U.; Giovanardi, C.; Altschuler, D. R.; Price, R. M.; Deeg, H. -J.

    1994-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum and Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) far-infrared (FIR) observations of 16 low luminosity galaxies of mostly low surface brightness. All galaxies had previously claimed single dish radio continuum detections. However, at the frequencies of our observations (1.49 and 8.48 GHz), we find significant radio emission for two objects only. We show that the other previously claimed detections are due to confusion with physically unrelated background sources. This implies a low radio continuum detection rate for these galaxies. Re-reduced IRAS scans yield significant far-infrared flux densities in at least one IRAS band for 6 of the 16 galaxies. These, together with the FIR and radio continuum upper limits, are consistent with the well established radio/FIR relation, where most of our galaxies populate the low-luminosity end. From the radio continuum and FIR flux densities and their upper limits we estimate the current star formation rates and demonstrate that the galaxies are currently passive in forming stars, in agreement with previous optical investigations. There is an indication that the galaxies were forming stars more intensively averaged over their lifetime than they are presently.

  16. Interim radio spectrum surveillance station. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Radio frequency interference at NASA's deep space stations has become a serious problem. A radio spectrum surveillance capability at these stations is needed to determine the sources of interference so that preventative measures can be taken. The first phase of a program to develop this capability was the development of a low-cost surveillance station now in operation at the Goldstone Space Communication Complex near Barstow, California. This interim surveillance station is described and findings from the use of this equipment are presented.

  17. Radio Loudness of AGNs: Host Galaxy Morphology and the Spin Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Sikora, M.; Lasota, J.-P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate how the total radio luminosity of AGN-powered radio sources depends on their accretion luminosity and the central black hole mass. We find that AGNs form two distinct and well separated sequences on the radio-loudness -- Eddington-ratio plane. We argue that these sequences mark the real upper bounds of radio-loudness of two distinct populations of AGNs: those hosted respectively by elliptical and disk galaxies. Both sequences show the same dependence of the radio-loudness on the Eddington ratio (an increase with decreasing Eddington ratio), which suggests that another parameter in addition to the accretion rate must play a role in determining the jet production efficiency in active galactic nuclei, and that this parameter is related to properties of the host galaxy. The revealed host-related radio dichotomy breaks down at high accretion rates where the dominant fraction of luminous quasars hosted by elliptical galaxies is radio quiet. We argue that the huge difference between the radio-loudness reachable by AGNs in disc and elliptical galaxies can be explained by the scenario according to which the spin of a black hole determines the outflows power, and central black holes can reach large spins only in early type galaxies (following major mergers), and not (in a statistical sense) in spiral galaxies.

  18. Contemporaneous observations of the radio galaxy NGC 1275 from radio to very high energy γ -rays

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadamek, A.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Kataoka, J.; Rekola, R.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-03-27

    The radio galaxy NGC 1275, recently identified as a very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) γ-ray emitter by MAGIC, is one of the few non-blazar active galactic nuclei detected in the VHE regime. The purpose of this work is to better understand the origin of the γ-ray emission and locate it within the galaxy. We studied contemporaneous multifrequency observations of NGC 1275 and modeled the overall spectral energy distribution. We analyzed unpublished MAGIC observations carried out between October 2009 and February 2010, and the previously published observations taken between August 2010 and February 2011. Here, we studied the multiband variability and correlations by analyzing data of Fermi-LAT in the 100 MeV–100 GeV energy band, as well as Chandra (X-ray), KVA (optical), and MOJAVE (radio) data taken during the same period. Using customized Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to early MAGIC stereoscopic data, we detect NGC 1275 also in the earlier MAGIC campaign. The flux level and energy spectra are similar to the results of the second campaign. The monthly light curve above 100 GeV shows a hint of variability at the 3.6σ level. In the Fermi-LAT band, both flux and spectral shape variabilities are reported. Furthermore, the optical light curve is also variable and shows a clear correlation with the γ-ray flux above 100 MeV. In radio, three compact components are resolved in the innermost part of the jet. One of these components shows a similar trend as the Fermi-LAT and KVA light curves. The γ-ray spectra measured simultaneously with MAGIC and Fermi-LAT from 100 MeV to 650 GeV can be well fitted either by a log-parabola or by a power-law with a subexponential cutoff for the two observation campaigns. A single-zone synchrotron-self-Compton model, with an electron spectrum following a power-law with an exponential cutoff, can explain the broadband spectral energy distribution and the multifrequency behavior of the source. But, this model suggests an untypical

  19. Discovery of a Giant Radio Halo in a New Planck Galaxy Cluster PLCKG171.9-40.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Kale, Ruta; Wik, Daniel R.; Venturi, Tiziana; Markevitch, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a giant radio halo in a new, hot, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster recently found by Planck, PLCKG171.9-40.7. The radio halo was found using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz, and in the 1.4 GHz data from a NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey pointing that we have reanalyzed. The diffuse radio emission is coincident with the cluster X-ray emission, has an extent of approx.1 Mpc and a radio power of approx. 5×10(exp 24)W/Hz at 1.4 GHz. Its integrated radio spectrum has a slope of alpha approx. = 1.8 between 235 MHz and 1.4 GHz, steeper than that of a typical giant halo. The analysis of the archival XMMNewton X-ray data shows that the cluster is hot (approx. 10 keV) and disturbed, consistent with X-ray selected clusters hosting radio halos. This is the first giant radio halo discovered in one of the new clusters found by Planck.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A GIANT RADIO HALO IN A NEW PLANCK GALAXY CLUSTER PLCKG171.9-40.7

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, Simona; Kale, Ruta; Venturi, Tiziana; Wik, Daniel R.; Markevitch, Maxim

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a giant radio halo in a new, hot, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster recently found by Planck, PLCKG171.9-40.7. The radio halo was found using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz, and in the 1.4 GHz data from an NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey pointing that we have reanalyzed. The diffuse radio emission is coincident with the cluster X-ray emission, and has an extent of {approx}1 Mpc and a radio power of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1} at 1.4 GHz. Its integrated radio spectrum has a slope of {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 1.8 between 235 MHz and 1.4 GHz, steeper than that of a typical giant halo. The analysis of the archival XMM-Newton X-ray data shows that the cluster is hot ({approx}10 keV) and disturbed, consistent with X-ray-selected clusters hosting radio halos. This is the first giant radio halo discovered in one of the new clusters found by Planck.

  1. Radio Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extra-galactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5 arcmin of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (+4.2 to -3.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5 arcmin). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are in turn a factor of 3.3 (+4.1 -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of al[ja = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S varies as upsilon(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  2. Radio Sources toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extragalactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of millijansky source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 noncluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5' of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (sup +4.3)(sub -2.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5'). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are, in turn, a factor of 3.3 (sup +4.1) (sub -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the noncluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute the spectral indices of millijansky sources in the cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of alpha = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S proportional to nu(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  3. Physical Conditions in Faint Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyul'Bashev, S. A.

    2001-06-01

    Weak, compact radio sources (˜100 mJy peak flux, L˜1 10 pc) with their spectral peaks at about a gigahertz are studied, based on the complete sample of 46 radio sources of Snellen, drawn from high-sensitivity surveys, including the low-frequency Westerbork catalog. The physical parameters have been estimated for 14 sources: the magnetic field (H ⊥), the number density of relativistic particles (n e), the energy of the magnetic field , and the energy of relativistic particles (E e). Ten sources have & $E_{H_ bot } ≪ E_e ; , three have approximate equipartition of the energies & (E_{H_ bot } ˜ E_e ) ; , and only one has & E_{H_ bot } ≫ E_e ; . The mean magnetic fields in quasars (10-3 G) and galaxies (10-2 G) have been estimated. The magnetic field appears to be related to the sizes of compact features as & H ˜ 1/sqrt L $ ; .

  4. A CHANDRA SNAPSHOT SURVEY FOR 3C RADIO GALAXIES WITH REDSHIFTS BETWEEN 0.3 AND 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Tremblay, G. R.; Liuzzo, E.; Bonafede, A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper contains an analysis of short Chandra observations of 19 3C sources with redshifts between 0.3 and 0.5 not previously observed in the X-rays. This sample is part of a project to obtain Chandra data for all of the extragalactic sources in the 3C catalog. Nuclear X-ray intensities as well as any X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots, hotspots, or lobes have been measured in three energy bands: soft, medium, and hard. Standard X-ray spectral analysis for the four brightest nuclei has also been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in the current sample with the exception of 3C 435A. There is one compact steep spectrum source while all the others are FR II radio galaxies. X-ray emission from two galaxy clusters (3C 19 and 3C 320), from six hotspots in four radio galaxies (3C 16, 3C 19, 3C 268.2, 3C 313), and extended X-ray emission on kiloparsec scales in 3C 187 and 3C 313, has been detected.

  5. Radio Point Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Bonamente, M.; Dawson, K.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.

    2006-01-01

    Extra-galactic point sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio point sources toward galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy point source fluxes from 90 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We also compute counts towards clusters as a function of luminosity in three redshift bins out to z = 1.0 and see no clear evidence for evolution with redshift. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz. The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.76 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.55 and 0.95, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of brighter field point sources measured by other surveys.

  6. Herschel-ATLAS: far-infrared properties of radio-selected galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.; Virdee, J. S.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Dunne, L.; Rawlings, S.; Stevens, J. A.; Christopher, N. M.; Heywood, I.; Mauch, T.; Rigopoulou, D.; Verma, A.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S. M.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hill, D. T.; Hughes, D.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jones, D. H.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Norberg, P.; Pohlen, M.; Prescott, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Sharp, R.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van Kampen, E.

    2010-11-01

    We use the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) science demonstration data to investigate the star formation properties of radio-selected galaxies in the GAMA-9h field as a function of radio luminosity and redshift. Radio selection at the lowest radio luminosities, as expected, selects mostly starburst galaxies. At higher radio luminosities, where the population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), we find that some individual objects are associated with high far-infrared luminosities. However, the far-infrared properties of the radio-loud population are statistically indistinguishable from those of a comparison population of radio-quiet galaxies matched in redshift and K-band absolute magnitude. There is thus no evidence that the host galaxies of these largely low-luminosity (Fanaroff-Riley class I), and presumably low-excitation, AGN, as a population, have particularly unusual star formation histories. Models in which the AGN activity in higher luminosity, high-excitation radio galaxies is triggered by major mergers would predict a luminosity-dependent effect that is not seen in our data (which only span a limited range in radio luminosity) but which may well be detectable with the full Herschel-ATLAS data set. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. E-mail: m.j.hardcastle@herts.ac.uk

  7. A large anisotropy in the sky distribution of 3CRR quasars and other radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2015-06-01

    We report the presence of large anisotropies in the sky distributions of powerful extended quasars as well as some other sub-classes of radio galaxies in the 3CRR survey, the most reliable and most intensively studied complete sample of strong steep-spectrum radio sources. The anisotropies lie about a plane passing through the equinoxes and the north celestial pole. Out of a total of 48 quasars in the sample, 33 of them lie in one half of the observed sky and the remaining 15 in the other half. The probability that in a random distribution of 3CRR quasars in the sky, statistical fluctuations could give rise to an asymmetry in observed numbers up to this level is only ˜1 %. Also only about 1/4th of Fanaroff-Riley 1 (FR1) type of radio galaxies lie in the first half of the observed sky and the remainder in the second half. If we include all the observed asymmetries in the sky distributions of quasars and radio galaxies in the 3CRR sample, the probability of their occurrence by a chance combination reduces to ˜2×10-5. Two pertinent but disturbing questions that could be raised here are—firstly why should there be such large anisotropies present in the sky distribution of some of the strongest and most distant discrete sources, implying inhomogeneities in the universe at very large scales (covering a fraction of the universe)? Secondly why should such anisotropies lie about a great circle decided purely by the orientation of earth's rotation axis and/or the axis of its revolution around the sun? It seems yet more curious when we consider the other anisotropies, e.g., an alignment of the four normals to the quadrupole and octopole planes in the CMBR with the cosmological dipole and the equinoxes. Then there is the other recently reported large dipole anisotropy in the NVSS radio source distribution differing in magnitude from the CMBR dipole by a factor of four, and therefore not explained as due to the peculiar motion of the Solar system, yet aligned with the CMBR

  8. On the Relationship between a Giant Radio Galaxy MSH 05-22 and the Ambient Large-Scale Galaxy Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Safouris, Vicky; Hunstead, Richard W.

    2008-04-01

    We present a comparison of the properties of a giant radio galaxy and the ambient intergalactic medium, whose properties are inferred from the large-scale distribution in galaxies. The double lobes of the radio galaxy MSH 05-22 are giant—1.8 Mpc projected linear size—and interact with the environment outside the interstellar medium and coronal halo associated with the host galaxy. The radio lobes appear to be relicts, and the double structure is asymmetric. We have examined the large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution surrounding the radio source. The host galaxy of MSH 05-22 is associated with a small group that lies close to the boundary of sheetlike and filamentary density enhancements, and adjacent to a void. Assuming that the galaxies trace gas, the asymmetries in the radio morphology in this case study appear related to the anisotropy in the medium. However, the observed overdensities and structure formation models for the heating of the intergalactic medium (IGM) suggest a density-temperature product for the IGM environment that is an order of magnitude below that expected from the properties of the radio source. The discordance suggests that even sources like MSH 05-22, which are observed in the relatively low-density IGM environment associated with the filamentary large-scale structure and have multiple signatures of being relicts, may be overpressured and evolving toward an equilibrium relaxed state with the ambient IGM. Alternately, it is speculated that astrophysical feedback originating in galaxy overdensities observed 1-2 Mpc to the north and northeast of MSH 05-22 might be the mechanism for the heating of the ambient IGM gas.

  9. Radio continuum of galaxies with H2O megamaser disks: 33 GHz VLA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, F.; Henkel, C.; Brunthaler, A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Menten, K. M.; Braatz, J. A.; Greene, J. E.; Reid, M. J.; Condon, J. J.; Lo, K. Y.; Kuo, C. Y.; Litzinger, E.; Kadler, M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Galaxies with H2O megamaser disks are active galaxies in whose edge-on accretion disks 22 GHz H2O maser emission has been detected. Because their geometry is known, they provide a unique view into the properties of active galactic nuclei. Aims: The goal of this work is to investigate the nuclear environment of galaxies with H2O maser disks and to relate the maser and host galaxy properties to those of the radio continuum emission of the galaxy. Methods: The 33 GHz (9 mm) radio continuum properties of 24 galaxies with reported 22 GHz H2O maser emission from their disks are studied in the context of the multiwavelength view of these sources. The 29-37 GHz Ka-band observations are made with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array in B, CnB, or BnA configurations, achieving a resolution of 0.2-0.5 arcsec. Hard X-ray data from the Swift/BAT survey and 22 μm infrared data from WISE, 22 GHz H2O maser data and 1.4 GHz data from NVSS and FIRST surveys are also included in the analysis. Results: Eighty-seven percent (21 out of 24) galaxies in our sample show 33 GHz radio continuum emission at levels of 4.5-240σ. Five sources show extended emission (deconvolved source size larger than 2.5 times the major axis of the beam), including one source with two main components and one with three main components. The remaining detected 16 sources (and also some of the above-mentioned targets) exhibit compact cores within the sensitivity limits. Little evidence is found for extended jets (>300 pc) in most sources. Either they do not exist, or our chosen frequency of 33 GHz is too high for a detection of these supposedly steep spectrum features. In NGC 4388, we find an extended jet-like feature that appears to be oriented perpendicular to the H2O megamaser disk. NGC 2273 is another candidate whose radio continuum source might be elongated perpendicular to the maser disk. Smaller 100-300 pc sized jets might also be present, as is suggested by the beam-deconvolved morphology of our

  10. Radio Sources in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei. I. VLA Detections of Compact, Flat-Spectrum Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Neil M.; Falcke, Heino; Wilson, Andrew S.; Ho, Luis C.

    2000-10-01

    We report a high-resolution (0.2"), 15 GHz survey of a sample of 48 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with the Very Large Array.5 Compact radio emission has been detected above a flux density of 1.1 mJy in 57% (17 of 30) of low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) nuclei and low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies. The 2 cm radio power is significantly correlated with the emission-line ([O I] λ6300) luminosity. Using radio fluxes at other frequencies from the literature, we find that at least 15 of the 18 detected radio cores have a flat to inverted spectrum (α>=-0.3, Sν~να). While the present observations are consistent with the radio emission originating in star-forming regions (the brightness temperatures are >=102.5-4.5 K), higher resolution radio observations of 10 of the detected sources, reported in an accompanying paper, show that the cores are very compact (<~1 pc), of high brightness temperature (Tb>~108 K), and probably synchrotron self-absorbed, ruling out a starburst origin. Thus, our results suggest that at least 50% of low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies and LINERs in the sample are accretion powered, with the radio emission presumably coming from jets or advection-dominated accretion flows. We have detected only 1 of 18 ``transition'' (i.e., LINER+H II) nuclei observed, indicating that their radio cores are significantly weaker than those of ``pure'' LINERs. Compact 2 cm radio cores are found in both type 1 (i.e., with broad Hα) and type 2 (without broad Hα) nuclei. There is weak evidence, limited in significance by small numbers, that low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with compact radio cores exhibit radio ejecta preferentially aligned along the rotation axis of the galaxy disk. If this result were confirmed by a larger sample, it would lend support to the idea that the misalignment of accretion disks with the galaxy stellar disk in more luminous Seyfert galaxies is a result of radiation-pressure-induced warping of their accretion

  11. Black Hole Demographics in and Nuclear Properties of Nearby Low Luminosity Radio Galaxies; Connections to Radio Activity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, S. A.; Kleijn, G. A. Verdoes; Xu, C.; ODea, C. P.; deZeeuw, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    We combine the results of an HST STIS and WFPC study of a complete sample of 21 nearby UGC low luminosity radio galaxies with the results of a radio VLA and VLBA study of the same sample. We examine the relationship between the stellar and gaseous properties of the galaxies on tens to hundreds of parsec scale with the properties of the radio jets on the same scale. From the VLA and VLBA data we constrain the physics of the outflowing radio plasma from the tens of parsecs to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. From the WFPC2 H alpha and dust images and the STIS kinematics of the near nuclear gas we obtain constraints on the orientation of near nuclear disks of gas and measures of the nuclear stellar, continuum point source, and line emission fluxes. Under the statistically supported assumption that the radio jet issues perpendicular to the disk, we use the orientation of the optical (large scale accretion?) disks to constrain the three-dimensional orientation of the radio ejection. From HST/STIS spectroscopy of the near-nuclear emission line gas we obtain measures/limits on the black hole masses. We examine correlations between the VLBA and VLA-scale radio emission, the nuclear line emission, and the nuclear optical and radio continuum emission. Though our sample is relatively small, it is uniquely well defined, spans a narrow range in redshift and we have a consistent set of high resolution data with which to carefully examine these relationships. We use the combined radio and optical data to: 1) Constrain the orientation, physics, and bulk outflow speed of the radio plasma; 2) Put limits on the mass accretion rate and study the relationship between black hole mass, radio luminosity, and near nuclear gaseous content; 3) Provide insight into the relationship between BL Lac objects and low luminosity radio galaxies.

  12. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  13. High–frequency cluster radio galaxies: Luminosity functions and implications for SZE–selected cluster samples

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, Nikhel; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; ...

    2017-01-15

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the meta-catalogue of X-ray-detected clusters of galaxies (MCXC; < z > = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multifrequency catalogue of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which ismore » negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogues. We find that the high-frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass–observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 per cent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. As a result, allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 per cent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.« less

  14. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 percent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  15. High-frequency cluster radio galaxies: luminosity functions and implications for SZE-selected cluster samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-05-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the meta-catalogue of X-ray-detected clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multifrequency catalogue of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogues. We find that the high-frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 per cent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 per cent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  16. The H I column density power spectrum of six nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Prasun; Bharadwaj, Somnath

    2013-11-01

    We propose a method to determine the power spectrum of H I column density fluctuations using radio-interferometric observations of 21-cm emission from the interstellar medium of galaxies. We have used this to estimate the power spectra of six nearly face-on nearby spiral galaxies. Earlier work has shown that these power spectra are well fitted by power laws with slopes around -1.6 across length-scales ˜1 to ˜10 kpc, the amplitude however was undetermined. In this work, we have determined the amplitude of the H I column density power spectrum. We find that the H I column density NHI expressed in units of 1020 cm-2 has mean square fluctuations in the range ˜0.03 to ˜20. The amplitude of the power spectrum is found to be tightly correlated with the H I mass fraction of the galaxies. The physical process responsible for these scale-invariant fluctuations is, however, at present not known.

  17. THE MID-INFRARED ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Galametz, Audrey; Stern, Daniel; De Breuck, Carlos; Vernet, Joeel; Hatch, Nina; Mayo, Jack; Miley, George; Rettura, Alessandro; Seymour, Nick; Adam Stanford, S.

    2012-04-20

    Taking advantage of the impressive sensitivity of Spitzer to detect massive galaxies at high redshift, we study the mid-infrared environments of powerful, high-redshift radio galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3. Galaxy cluster member candidates were isolated using a single Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared color criterion, [3.6]-[4.5] > -0.1 (AB), in the fields of 48 radio galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3. Using a counts-in-cell analysis, we identify a field as overdense when 15 or more red IRAC sources are found within 1' (i.e., 0.5 Mpc at 1.2 < z < 3) of the radio galaxy to the 5{sigma} flux density limits of our IRAC data (f{sub 4.5} = 13.4 {mu}Jy). We find that radio galaxies lie preferentially in medium to dense regions, with 73% of the targeted fields denser than average. Our (shallow) 120 s data permit the rediscovery of previously known clusters and protoclusters associated with radio galaxies as well as the discovery of new promising galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.2.

  18. Threshold optimization of cooperative spectrum sensing in cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Jia, Min; Tan, Xuezhi

    2013-01-01

    We consider the threshold optimization problem of cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio (CR) and investigate the threshold optimization algorithm for both single-channel and multichannel cooperative spectrum sensing. In order to obtain the optimal threshold for single-channel cooperative spectrum sensing, we deploy the fusion rules AND Logic, OR Logic, and K-OUT-N Logic. Moreover, an iterative optimization algorithm is proposed to obtain optimal CRs in cooperative spectrum sensing and their optimal thresholds. In multichannel cooperative spectrum sensing, two threshold optimization methods—namely nonrestrained multichannel threshold optimization (NRMTO) and restrained multichannel threshold optimization (RMTO)—have been proposed in order to decrease the total error detection probability of all the subchannels. The simulation results show that in single-channel cooperative spectrum sensing the proposed algorithm outperforms traditional cooperative spectrum sensing with the uniform threshold if the SNR is different, while decreasing the detection performance slightly if the SNR is identical. The results also indicate that the NRMTO can achieve the minimal total error detection probability of multichannel cooperative spectrum sensing, while the RMTO can guarantee the detection performance of each subchannel but with a higher total error detection probability.

  19. TELECOMMUNICATIONS: History and Current Issues Related to Radio Spectrum Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    recognized in 1922 with the formation of the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee ( IRAC ), comprised of representatives from the federal agencies...that use the most spectrum.8 IRAC , whose existence and actions were affirmed by the President in 1927, has continued to advise whoever has been...management of federal government users was delegated to NTIA, an agency of the Department of Commerce.10 IRAC assists NTIA in assigning

  20. NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio-galaxy Cygnus A

    DOE PAGES

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; ...

    2015-07-29

    Here, we present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out tomore » $$\\gt 70$$ keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law ($${\\rm{\\Gamma }}\\sim 1.6-1.7$$) absorbed by a neutral column density of $${N}_{{\\rm{H}}}\\sim 1.6\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$$. However, we also detect curvature in the hard ($$\\gt 10$$ keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is $${E}_{\\mathrm{cut}}\\gt 111$$ keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast ($$15,000-26,000\\;\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\;$$), high column-density ($${N}_{W}\\gt 3\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$$), highly ionized ($$\\xi \\sim 2500\\;\\mathrm{erg}\\;\\mathrm{cm}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.« less

  1. NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio-galaxy Cygnus A

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Wik, Daniel R.; Madejski, Grzegorz; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Lanz, Lauranne; Miller, Jon M.; Saez, Cristian; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William

    2015-07-29

    Here, we present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to $\\gt 70$ keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law (${\\rm{\\Gamma }}\\sim 1.6-1.7$) absorbed by a neutral column density of ${N}_{{\\rm{H}}}\\sim 1.6\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$. However, we also detect curvature in the hard ($\\gt 10$ keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is ${E}_{\\mathrm{cut}}\\gt 111$ keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast ($15,000-26,000\\;\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\;$), high column-density (${N}_{W}\\gt 3\\times {10}^{23}\\;\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$), highly ionized ($\\xi \\sim 2500\\;\\mathrm{erg}\\;\\mathrm{cm}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.

  2. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mabasher, Bahram; Brudgesm Terrry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 (mu)Jy per 4.4" beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22 (equivalent to M(sub r) = -13 for cluster member galaxies). Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are restricted to radio luminosities between about 10(exp 21) and 10(exp 22) W/Hz, an interesting result given that star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions below about 10(exp 23) W/Hz. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (Mr less than or equals -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high (> approx. 3x10(exp 22) W/Hz) and low (< approx. 10(exp 21) W/Hz) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically-bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3x10(exp 19) W/Hz. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M(sub r) approx. equals -14) dwarf ellipticals hosting strong radio AGN.

  3. TURBULENT COSMIC-RAY REACCELERATION AT RADIO RELICS AND HALOS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Yamazaki, Ryo; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-12-20

    Radio relics are synchrotron emission found on the periphery of galaxy clusters. From the position and the morphology, it is often believed that the relics are generated by cosmic-ray (CR) electrons accelerated at shocks through a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. However, some radio relics have harder spectra than the prediction of the standard DSA model. One example is observed in the cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214, which is often called the “Toothbrush Cluster.” Interestingly, the position of the relic is shifted from that of a possible shock. In this study, we show that these discrepancies in the spectrum and the position can be solved if turbulent (re)acceleration is very effective behind the shock. This means that for some relics turbulent reacceleration may be the main mechanism to produce high-energy electrons, contrary to the common belief that it is the DSA. Moreover, we show that for efficient reacceleration, the effective mean free path of the electrons has to be much smaller than their Coulomb mean free path. We also study the merging cluster 1E 0657−56, or the “Bullet Cluster,” in which a radio relic has not been found at the position of the prominent shock ahead of the bullet. We indicate that a possible relic at the shock is obscured by the observed large radio halo that is generated by strong turbulence behind the shock. We propose a simple explanation of the morphological differences of radio emission among the Toothbrush, the Bullet, and the Sausage (CIZA J2242.8+5301) Clusters.

  4. Turbulent Cosmic-Ray Reacceleration at Radio Relics and Halos in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Yamazaki, Ryo; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Radio relics are synchrotron emission found on the periphery of galaxy clusters. From the position and the morphology, it is often believed that the relics are generated by cosmic-ray (CR) electrons accelerated at shocks through a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. However, some radio relics have harder spectra than the prediction of the standard DSA model. One example is observed in the cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214, which is often called the “Toothbrush Cluster.” Interestingly, the position of the relic is shifted from that of a possible shock. In this study, we show that these discrepancies in the spectrum and the position can be solved if turbulent (re)acceleration is very effective behind the shock. This means that for some relics turbulent reacceleration may be the main mechanism to produce high-energy electrons, contrary to the common belief that it is the DSA. Moreover, we show that for efficient reacceleration, the effective mean free path of the electrons has to be much smaller than their Coulomb mean free path. We also study the merging cluster 1E 0657-56, or the “Bullet Cluster,” in which a radio relic has not been found at the position of the prominent shock ahead of the bullet. We indicate that a possible relic at the shock is obscured by the observed large radio halo that is generated by strong turbulence behind the shock. We propose a simple explanation of the morphological differences of radio emission among the Toothbrush, the Bullet, and the Sausage (CIZA J2242.8+5301) Clusters.

  5. Sardinia Radio Telescope wide-band spectral-polarimetric observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Govoni, F.; Carretti, E.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Trois, A.; Loi, F.; Vacca, V.; Tarchi, A.; Castangia, P.; Possenti, A.; Bocchinu, A.; Burgay, M.; Casu, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pisanu, T.; Poddighe, A.; Poppi, S.; D'Amico, N.; Bachetti, M.; Corongiu, A.; Egron, E.; Iacolina, N.; Ladu, A.; Marongiu, P.; Migoni, C.; Perrodin, D.; Pilia, M.; Valente, G.; Vargiu, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present new observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in the frequency range 6000-7200 MHz, with the aim to image the large-angular-scale emission at high-frequency of the radio sources located in this cluster of galaxies. The data were acquired using the recently commissioned ROACH2-based backend to produce full-Stokes image cubes of an area of 1°×1° centred on the radio source 3C 129. We modelled and deconvolved the telescope beam pattern from the data. We also measured the instrumental polarization beam patterns to correct the polarization images for off-axis instrumental polarization. Total intensity images at an angular resolution of 2.9 arcmin were obtained for the tailed radio galaxy 3C 129 and for 13 more sources in the field, including 3C 129.1 at the galaxy cluster centre. These data were used, in combination with literature data at lower frequencies, to derive the variation of the synchrotron spectrum of 3C 129 along the tail of the radio source. If the magnetic field is at the equipartition value, we showed that the lifetimes of radiating electrons result in a radiative age for 3C 129 of tsyn ≃ 267 ± 26 Myr. Assuming a linear projected length of 488 kpc for the tail, we deduced that 3C 129 is moving supersonically with a Mach number of M = vgal/cs = 1.47. Linearly polarized emission was clearly detected for both 3C 129 and 3C 129.1. The linear polarization measured for 3C 129 reaches levels as high as 70 per cent in the faintest region of the source where the magnetic field is aligned with the direction of the tail.

  6. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.

  7. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes,more » radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.« less

  8. THE SCALING RELATIONS AND THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE FOR RADIO HALOS AND RELICS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters is known to be related to cluster mass and cluster dynamical state. We collect the observed fluxes of radio halos, relics, and mini-halos for a sample of galaxy clusters from the literature, and calculate their radio powers. We then obtain the values of cluster mass or mass proxies from previous observations, and also obtain the various dynamical parameters of these galaxy clusters from optical and X-ray data. The radio powers of relics, halos, and mini-halos are correlated with the cluster masses or mass proxies, as found by previous authors, while the correlations concerning giant radio halos are in general the strongest. We found that the inclusion of dynamical parameters as the third dimension can significantly reduce the data scatter for the scaling relations, especially for radio halos. We therefore conclude that the substructures in X-ray images of galaxy clusters and the irregular distributions of optical brightness of member galaxies can be used to quantitatively characterize the shock waves and turbulence in the intracluster medium responsible for re-accelerating particles to generate the observed diffuse radio emission. The power of radio halos and relics is correlated with cluster mass proxies and dynamical parameters in the form of a fundamental plane.

  9. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.

  10. A CO-rich merger shaping a powerful and hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z = 2: the Dragonfly Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Mao, M. Y.; Stroe, A.; Pentericci, L.; Villar-Martín, M.; Norris, R. P.; Miley, G.; De Breuck, C.; van Moorsel, G. A.; Lehnert, M. D.; Carilli, C. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Seymour, N.; Sadler, E. M.; Ekers, R. D.; Drouart, G.; Feain, I.; Colina, L.; Stevens, J.; Holt, J.

    2015-07-01

    In the low-redshift Universe, the most powerful radio sources are often associated with gas-rich galaxy mergers or interactions. We here present evidence for an advanced, gas-rich (`wet') merger associated with a powerful radio galaxy at a redshift of z ˜ 2. This radio galaxy, MRC 0152-209, is the most infrared-luminous high-redshift radio galaxy known in the Southern hemisphere. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we obtained high-resolution CO(1-0) data of cold molecular gas, which we complement with Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging and William Herschel Telescope long-slit spectroscopy. We find that, while roughly MH2 ˜ 2 × 1010 M⊙ of molecular gas coincides with the central host galaxy, another MH2 ˜ 3 × 1010 M⊙ is spread across a total extent of ˜60 kpc. Most of this widespread CO(1-0) appears to follow prominent tidal features visible in the rest-frame near-UV HST/WFPC2 imaging. Lyα emission shows an excess over He II, but a deficiency over LIR, which is likely the result of photoionization by enhanced but very obscured star formation that was triggered by the merger. In terms of feedback, the radio source is aligned with widespread CO(1-0) emission, which suggests that there is a physical link between the propagating radio jets and the presence of cold molecular gas on scales of the galaxy's halo. Its optical appearance, combined with the transformational stage at which we witness the evolution of MRC 0152-209, leads us to adopt the name `Dragonfly Galaxy'.

  11. Emergence of double-peaked emission lines in the broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Eracleous, Michael

    1994-09-01

    A new optical spectrum of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) Pictor A reveals a prominent double-peaked component of the Balmer lines which does not appear in any historical spectra of this object. Carried out with the hope of obtaining exactly such a result, this observation is a key to the interpretation of double-peaked emitters. If bolsters our previous conclusion that there is a set of additional properties which are associated with the rare class of double-peaked emitters, namely F-R II radio morphology, strong low-ionization forbidden lines, weak UV continuum, and flat far-infrared spectrum. Furthermore, the low-velocity, 'ordinary' broad Balmer lines in Pictor A remained relatively unchanged as the new twin peaks appeared, which justifies the practice of applying models that fit only the double peaks and not the low-velocity components that are often present in spectra of this type. We discuss the relative merits of accretion-disk models and other models for double-peaked emission lines in the light of this new observation.

  12. Emergence of double-peaked emission lines in the broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Eracleous, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A new optical spectrum of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) Pictor A reveals a prominent double-peaked component of the Balmer lines which does not appear in any historical spectra of this object. Carried out with the hope of obtaining exactly such a result, this observation is a key to the interpretation of double-peaked emitters. If bolsters our previous conclusion that there is a set of additional properties which are associated with the rare class of double-peaked emitters, namely F-R II radio morphology, strong low-ionization forbidden lines, weak UV continuum, and flat far-infrared spectrum. Furthermore, the low-velocity, 'ordinary' broad Balmer lines in Pictor A remained relatively unchanged as the new twin peaks appeared, which justifies the practice of applying models that fit only the double peaks and not the low-velocity components that are often present in spectra of this type. We discuss the relative merits of accretion-disk models and other models for double-peaked emission lines in the light of this new observation.

  13. Spectrum from Faint Galaxy IRAS F00183-7111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has detected the building blocks of life in the distant universe, albeit in a violent milieu. Training its powerful infrared eye on a faint object located at a distance of 3.2 billion light-years, Spitzer has observed the presence of water and organic molecules in the galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. With an active galactic nucleus, this is one of the most luminous galaxies in the universe, rivaling the energy output of a quasar. Because it is heavily obscured by dust (see visible-light image in the inset), most of its luminosity is radiated at infrared wavelengths.

    The infrared spectrograph instrument onboard Spitzer breaks light into its constituent colors, much as a prism does for visible light. The image shows a low-resolution spectrum of the galaxy obtained by the spectrograph at wavelengths between 4 and 20 microns. Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial object's unique blend of light. Characteristic patterns, or fingerprints, within the spectra allow astronomers to identify the object's chemical composition and to determine such physical properties as temperature and density.

    The broad depression in the center of the spectrum denotes the presence of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand) in the galaxy. An emission peak within the bottom of the trough is the chemical signature for molecular hydrogen. The hydrocarbons (orange) are organic molecules comprised of carbon and hydrogen, two of the most common elements on Earth. Since it has taken more than three billion years for the light from the galaxy to reach Earth, it is intriguing to note the presence of organics in a distant galaxy at a time when life is thought to have started forming on our home planet.

    Additional features in the spectrum reveal the presence of water ice (blue), carbon dioxide ice (green) and carbon monoxide (purple) in both gas and solid forms. The magenta peak corresponds to singly ionized neon gas, a spectral line often used by

  14. Unifying X-ray winds in radio galaxies with Chandra HETG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    X-ray winds are routinely observed in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies. They can be classified as warm absorbers (WAs), with v~100-1,000km/s, and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), with v>10,000km/s. In stark contrast, the lack of sensitive enough observations allowed the detection of WAs or UFOs only in very few radio galaxies. Therefore, we propose to observe a small sample of three radio galaxies with the Chandra HETG - 3C111 for 150ks, 3C390.3 for 150ks and 3C120 for 200ks - to detect and study in detail their WAs. We will quantify the importance of mechanical feedback from winds in radio galaxies and compare them to the radio jet power. We will also test whether WAs and UFOs can be unified in a single, multi-phase and multi-scale outflow, as recently reported for Seyferts.

  15. THE UBIQUITOUS RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael J. I.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Floyd, David J. E.; Mould, Jeremy R.

    2011-04-20

    We have measured the radio continuum emission of 396 early-type galaxies brighter than K = 9, using 1.4 GHz imagery from the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey, Green Bank 300 ft Telescope, and 64 m Parkes Radio Telescope. For M{sub K} < -24 early-type galaxies, the distribution of radio powers at fixed absolute magnitude spans four orders of magnitude and the median radio power is proportional to K-band luminosity to the power 2.78 {+-} 0.16. The measured flux densities of M{sub K} < -25.5 early-type galaxies are greater than zero in all cases. It is thus highly likely that the most massive galaxies always host an active galactic nucleus or have recently undergone star formation.

  16. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR YOUNG RADIO GALAXIES IS TRIGGERED BY ACCRETION DISK INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qingwen

    2009-08-20

    Bolometric luminosities and black hole (BH) masses are estimated by various methods for a sample of young radio galaxies with known ages. We find that the ages are positively correlated with the bolometric luminosities in these young radio galaxies. This positive correlation is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the radiation pressure instability of accretion disks in Czerny et al. The ages of young radio galaxies are also found to be consistent with the theoretical durations of outbursts in BH mass and accretion rate (in Eddington unit) plane, where the outbursts are assumed to be triggered by the radiation pressure instabilities. Our results provide observational evidence for the radiation pressure instability, which causes limit-cycle behavior, as a physical mechanism that may be responsible for these short-lived young radio galaxies.

  17. Kinematic signatures of AGN feedback in moderately powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 observed with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, C.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P.; Bryant, J. J.; Hunstead, R.; Dicken, D.; Johnston, H.

    2016-02-01

    Most successful galaxy formation scenarios now postulate that the intense star formation in massive, high-redshift galaxies during their major growth period was truncated when powerful AGNs launched galaxy-wide outflows of gas that removed large parts of the interstellar medium. SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the most powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 show clear signatures of such winds, but are too rare to be good representatives of a generic phase in the evolution of all massive galaxies at high redshift. Here we present SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical emission-line gas in 12 radio galaxies at redshifts ~2. Our sample spans a range in radio power that is intermediate between the most powerful radio galaxies with known wind signatures at these redshifts and vigorous starburst galaxies, and are about two orders of magnitude more common than the most powerful radio galaxies. Thus, if AGN feedback is a generic phase of massive galaxy evolution for reasonable values of the AGN duty cycle, these are just the sources where AGN feedback should be most important. Our sources show a diverse set of gas kinematics ranging from regular velocity gradients with amplitudes of Δv = 200-400 km s-1 consistent with rotating disks to very irregular kinematics with multiple velocity jumps of a few 100 km s-1. Line widths are generally high, typically around FWHM = 800 km s-1, more similar to the more powerful high-z radio galaxies than mass-selected samples of massive high-z galaxies without bright AGNs, and consistent with the velocity range expected from recent hydrodynamic models. A broad Hα line in one target implies a black hole mass of a few 109 M⊙. Velocity offsets of putative satellite galaxies near a few targets suggest dynamical masses of a few 1011 M⊙ for our sources, akin to the most powerful high-z radio galaxies. Ionized gas masses are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than in the most powerful radio galaxies, and the extinction in the gas is

  18. Discovery of a suspected giant radio galaxy with the KAT-7 array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Mhlahlo, N.; Jarrett, T.; Oozeer, N.; Marchegiani, P.

    2016-02-01

    We detect a new suspected giant radio galaxy (GRG) discovered by KAT-7. The GRG core is identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer source J013313.50-130330.5, an extragalactic source based on its infrared colours and consistent with a misaligned active galactic nuclei-type spectrum at z ≈ 0.3. The multi-ν spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object associated with the GRG core shows a synchrotron peak at ν ≈ 1014 Hz consistent with the SED of a radio galaxy blazar-like core. The angular size of the lobes are ˜4 arcmin for the NW lobe and ˜1.2 arcmin for the SE lobe, corresponding to projected linear distances of ˜1078 kpc and ˜324 kpc, respectively. The best-fitting parameters for the SED of the GRG core and the value of jet boosting parameter δ = 2, indicate that the GRG jet has maximum inclination θ ≈ 30 deg with respect to the line of sight, a value obtained for δ = Γ, while the minimum value of θ is not constrained due to the degeneracy existing with the value of Lorentz factor Γ. Given the photometric redshift z ≈ 0.3, this GRG shows a core luminosity of P1.4 GHz ≈ 5.52 × 1024 W Hz-1, and a luminosity P1.4 GHz ≈ 1.29 × 1025 W Hz-1 for the NW lobe and P1.4 GHz ≈ 0.46 × 1025 W Hz-1 for the SE lobe, consistent with the typical GRG luminosities. The radio lobes show a fractional linear polarization ≈9 per cent consistent with typical values found in other GRG lobes.

  19. Obscured Star-Formation in Merging Galaxies: High Resolution Radio Imaging of a Time-Ordered Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new, deep, high resolution 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of a time-ordered sequence of seven large galaxy mergers. The radio observations are able to detect star-forming re- gions that are completely obscured at optical wavelengths. In all systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse ra- dio emission, with limiting luminosities of approx. 1-5 x 10(exp l8) W Hz or approx. 1-5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Many of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active starforming regions but not with specific optical or W emission sources. Several of the compact radio sources are coincident with Ultra-luminous X-ray objects (ULX's). In most systems, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find that the fraction of compact radio cources with nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they ae dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) decreases with merger age, while the fraction of sources with nonimally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants) increases. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the numbers of young massive stars, associated ionized gas masses, we estimate supernova rates and required star-formation rates, We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems and from other determinations of star-formation rates. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. Metal enriched gaseous halos around distant radio galaxies: Clues to feedback in galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; van Breugel, W; de Vries, W; Dopita, A; Dey, A; Miley, G; Rottgering, H; Venemans, B; Stanford, S A; Lacy, M; Spinrad, H; Dawson, S; Stern, D; Bunker, A

    2006-08-01

    We present the results of an optical and near-IR spectroscopic study of giant nebular emission line halos associated with three z > 3 radio galaxies, 4C 41.17, 4C 60.07 and B2 0902+34. Previous deep narrow band Ly{alpha} imaging had revealed complex morphologies with sizes up to 100 kpc, possibly connected to outflows and AGN feedback from the central regions. The outer regions of these halos show quiet kinematics with typical velocity dispersions of a few hundred km s{sup -1}, and velocity shears that can mostly be interpreted as being due to rotation. The inner regions show shocked cocoons of gas closely associated with the radio lobes. These display disturbed kinematics and have expansion velocities and/or velocity dispersions >1000 km s{sup -1}. The core region is chemically evolved, and we also find spectroscopic evidence for the ejection of enriched material in 4C 41.17 up to a distance of {approx} 60 kpc along the radio-axis. The dynamical structures traced in the Ly{alpha} line are, in most cases, closely echoed in the Carbon and Oxygen lines. This shows that the Ly{alpha} line is produced in a highly clumped medium of small filling factor, and can therefore be used as a tracer of the dynamics of HzRGs. We conclude that these HzRGs are undergoing a final jet-induced phase of star formation with ejection of most of their interstellar medium before becoming 'red and dead' Elliptical galaxies.

  1. Imaging the host galaxies of high-redshift radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, James D.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew, D.; Elias, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We present new deep K-band and optical images of four radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 1 and six radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 2.5, as well as optical images only of six more at z approximately = 2.5. We have examined the images carefully for evidence of extended 'fuzz' from any putative QSO host galaxy. None of the z approximately = 2.5 QSOs shows any extended emission, and only two of the z approximately = 1 QSOs show marginal evidence for extended emission. Our 3 sigma detection limits in the K images, m(sub K) approximately = 21 for an isolated source, would correspond approximately to an unevolved L(sup star) elliptical galaxy at z = 2.5 or 2-3 mag fainter than an L(sup star) elliptical at z = 1, although our limits on host galaxy light are weaker than this due to the difficulty of separating galaxy light from QSO light. We simulate simple models of disk and elliptical host galaxies, and find that the marginal emission around the two z approximately = 1 QSOs can be explained by disks or bulges that are approximately 1-2 mag brighter than an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy in one case and approximately 1.5-2.5 mag brighter than L(sub star) in the other. For two other z approximately = 1 QSOs, we have only upper limits (L approximately = L(sup star)). The hosts of the high-redshift sample must be no brighter than about 3 mag above an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy, and are at least 1 magnitude fainter than the hosts of radio-loud QSOs at the same redshift. If the easily detected K-band light surrounding a previous sample of otherwise similar but radio-loud QSOs is starlight, then it must evolve on timescales of greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 8) yr (e.g., Chambers & Charlot 1990); therefore our non-detection of host galaxy fuzz around radio-quiet QSOs supports the view that high-redshift radio-quiet and radio-loud QSOs inhabit different host objects, rather than being single types of objects that turn their radio emission on and off over

  2. A representative survey of the dynamics and energetics of FRII radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-01-01

    We report the first large, systematic study of the dynamics and energetics of a representative sample of FRII radio galaxies with well-characterized group/cluster environments. We used X-ray inverse-Compton and radio synchrotron measurements to determine the internal radio-lobe conditions, and these were compared with external pressures acting on the lobes, determined from measurements of the thermal X-ray emission of the group/cluster. Consistent with previous work, we found that FRII radio lobes are typically electron-dominated by a small factor relative to equipartition, and are over-pressured relative to the external medium in their outer parts. These results suggest that there is typically no energetically significant proton population in the lobes of FRII radio galaxies (unlike for FRIs), and so for this population, inverse-Compton modelling provides an accurate way of measuring total energy content and estimating jet power. We estimated the distribution of Mach numbers for the population of expanding radio lobes, finding that at least half of the radio galaxies are currently driving strong shocks into their group/cluster environments. Finally, we determined a jet power-radio luminosity relation for FRII radio galaxies based on our estimates of lobe internal energy and Mach number. The slope and normalisation of this relation are consistent with theoretical expectations, given the departure from equipartition and environmental distribution for our sample.

  3. Archaeology of active galaxies across the electromagnetic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Raffaella

    2017-09-01

    Analytical and numerical galaxy-formation models indicate that active galactic nuclei (AGNs) likely play a prominent role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. However, quantifying this effect requires knowledge of how the nuclear activity proceeds throughout the life of a galaxy, whether it alternates with periods of quiescence and, if so, on what timescales these cycles occur. This topic has attracted growing interest, but making progress remains a challenging task. For optical and radio AGNs, a variety of techniques are used to perform a kind of `archaeology' that traces the signatures of past nuclear activity. Here we summarize recent findings regarding the lifecycle of an AGN from optical and radio observations. The limited picture we have so far suggests that these cycles can range from long periods of 107-108 yr to shorter periods of 104-105 yr, even reaching extreme events on timescales of just a few years. Together with simulations, observational results regarding the multiple cycles of AGN activity help to create a complete picture of the AGN lifecycle.

  4. Radio continuum and H I emission from the spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.

    The statistical method used by Hummel (1981) to derive the radioluminosity functions of galaxies is applied to the H I data obtained on a sample of 101 spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster. The analysis permits a quantitative demonstration of H I deficiency among the Virgo spiral galaxies without invoking the deficiency parameter. In addition, evidence is presented that Virgo spiral galaxies might show a correlation between H I content and radio continuum luminosity, which is more marked among the unperturbed sample. The results are discussed from the viewpoint of stellar and galaxy evolution and its relation with the intergalactic environment.

  5. RADIO GALAXY FEEDBACK IN X-RAY-SELECTED GROUPS FROM COSMOS: THE EFFECT ON THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Giodini, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Boehringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Smolcic, V.; Massey, R.; BIrzan, L.; Zamorani, G.; Oklopcic, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Thompson, D.

    2010-05-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-active galactic nuclei located inside X-ray-detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intragroup medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  6. Gamma-Ray Emission from the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Robert C.; Kadler, M.; Tueller, Jack

    2008-01-01

    The broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been suggested as the counterpart of the y-ray source 3EG J0416+3650. While 3C 111 meets most of the criteria for a high-probability identification, like a bright flat-spectrum radio core and a blazar-like broadband SED, in the Third EGRET Catalog, the large positional offset of about 1.5' put 3C 111 outside the 99% probability region for 3EG J0416+3650, making this association questionable. We present a re-analysis of all available archival data for 3C 111 from the EGRET archives, resulting in detection of variable hard-spectrum high-energy gamma-ray emission above 1000 MeV from a position close to the nominal position of 3C 111, in three separate viewing periods (VPs), at a 3sigma level in each. A second variable hard-spectrum source is present nearby. At >100 MeV, one variable soft-spectrum source seems to account for most of the EGRET-detected emission of 3EG J0416+3650. A follow-up Swift UVOT/XRT observation reveals one moderately bright X-ray source in the error box of 3EG J0416+3650, but because of the large EGRET position uncertainty, it is not certain that the X-ray and gamma-ray sources are associated. Another Swift observation near the second (unidentified) hard gamma-ray source detected no X-ray source nearby.

  7. The nature of the 3CR radio galaxies at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Philip; Longair, Malcolm

    We present evidence that the 3CR radio galaxies at redshift z ~ 1 are already very massive, highly dynamically evolved galaxies, which lie at the heart of (proto-)cluster environments. Since nearby 3CR double radio sources are generally found in more isolated surroundings, the galactic environments of these galaxies must change dramatically with redshift. Therefore, the original `uniform population, closed box' interpretation of the infrared K-magnitude vs redshift relationship no longer appears valid. We propose a new interpretation: the powerful radio galaxies selected at high and low redshift have different evolutionary histories, but must contain a similar mass of stars, a few times 1011M ⊙, and so conspire to produce the `passively evolving' K-z relation observed. We discuss this model in the context of the current understanding of powerful radio sources and, in light of this new model, we compare the K-z relation of the 3CR galaxies with those derived for lower power radio galaxies and for brightest cluster galaxies.

  8. Far-UV Emission Properties of FR1 Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Stocke, John T.; France, Kevin; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Perlman, Eric

    2016-11-01

    The power mechanism and accretion geometry for low-power FR 1 radio galaxies are poorly understood in comparison to those for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs. In this paper, we use the diagnostic power of the Lyα recombination line observed using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to investigate the accretion flows in three well-known, nearby FR 1s: M87, NGC 4696, and Hydra A. The Lyα emission line’s luminosity, velocity structure, and the limited knowledge of its spatial extent provided by COS are used to assess conditions within a few parsecs of the supermassive black hole in these radio-mode active galactic nuclei. We observe strong Lyα emission in all three objects with total luminosity similar to that seen in BL Lacertae objects. M87 shows a complicated emission-line profile in Lyα, which varies spatially across the COS aperture and possibly temporally over several epochs of observation. In both NGC 4696 and M87, the Lyα luminosities ˜1040 erg s-1 are closely consistent with the observed strength of the ionizing continuum in Case B recombination theory and with the assumption of a near-unity covering factor. It is possible that the Lyα-emitting clouds are ionized largely by beamed radiation associated with the jets. Long-slit UV spectroscopy can be used to test this hypothesis. Hydra A and the several BL Lac objects studied in this and previous papers have Lyα luminosities larger than M87 but their extrapolated, nonthermal continua are so luminous that they overpredict the observed strength of Lyα, a clear indicator of relativistic beaming in our direction. Given their substantial space density (˜4 × 10-3 Mpc-3), the unbeamed Lyman continuum radiation of FR 1s may make a substantial minority contribution (˜10%) to the local UV background if all FR 1s are similar to M87 in ionizing flux level.

  9. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M.; Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Pursimo, T.; Jauncey, David L.; Maslennikov, K.

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  10. Using Data Mining to Find Bent-Double Radio Galaxies in the FIRST Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath,C; Cantu-Paz,E; Fodor,I; Tang,N A

    2001-06-22

    In this paper, the authors describe the use of data mining techniques to search for radio-emitting galaxies with a bent-double morphology. In the past, astronomers from the FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) survey identified these galaxies through visual inspection. This was not only subjective but also tedious as the on-going survey now covers 8000 square degrees, with each square degree containing about 90 galaxies. In this paper, they describe how data mining can be used to automate the identification of these galaxies. They discuss the challenges faced in defining meaningful features that represent the shape of a galaxy and their experiences with ensembles of decision trees for the classification of bent-double galaxies.

  11. Measuring the VIPERS galaxy power spectrum at z∼1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Stefano; Bel, Julien; Granett, Ben; Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey [VIPERS, Guzzo et al. 2014] is using the VIMOS spectrograph at the ESO VLT to measure redshifts for ~ 100,000 galaxies with IAB < 22.5 and 0.5 < z < 1.2, over an area of 24 deg2 (split over the W1 and W4 fields of CFHTLS). VIPERS currently provides, at such redshifts, the best compromise between volume, number of galaxies and dense spatial sampling. We present here the first estimate of the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution, P(k), at redshifts z ~ 0.75 and z ~ 1, obtained from the ~ 55,000 redshifts of the PDR-1 data release. We discuss first constraints on cosmological quantities, as the matter density and the baryonic fraction, obtained for the first time at an epoch when the Universe was about half its current age.

  12. The First IRS Spectrum of a Lyman Break Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siana, Brian; Colbert, James; Frayer, David; Teplitz, Harry

    2006-05-01

    A significant portion of the star-formation in the high redshift universe resides in the ultraviolet-luminous Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). Although they are UV bright, the bulk of their luminosities are emitted in the far-infrared (FIR). Unlike the population of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs), LBGs are typically too faint in the MIR to for Spitzer spectroscopy. We propose deep IRS spectroscopy of the lensed Lyman-Break Galaxy (LBG) MS1512-cB58. The factor of ~30 magnification provides the only opportunity to obtain a MIR spectrum of a typical (L*) LBG. We will measure the strength of the PAH features, allowing a comparison with Lbol as measured from longer wavelength photometry. We will also fit the shape of the warm dust (VSG) continuum and compare it to expectations from the IRAC-to-MIPS70 SED.

  13. Confirmation of a Radio-Selected Galaxy Overdensity at z=1.11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Daniel; Holden, Brad; Stanford, S. A.; Spinard, Hyron

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of a galaxy overdensity at z = 1.11 associated with the z = 1.110 high-redshift radio galaxy MG1 J04426+0202 (hereafter MG 0442+0202). The group, Cl 0442+0202, was found in a near-infrared survey of z > 1 radio galaxies undertaken to identify spatially coincident regions with a high density of objects red in I-K' color, typical of z > 1 elliptical galaxies. Spectroscopic observations from the Keck I telescope reveal five galaxies within 35" of MG 0442+0202 at 1.10 < z < 1.11. These member galaxies have broadband colors and optical spectra consistent with passively evolving elliptical galaxies formed at high redshift. Archival ROSAT observations reveal a 3 (sigma) detection of soft X-ray emission coincident with Cl 0442+0202 at a level 5 times greater than expected for the radio galaxy. These data suggest a rich galaxy cluster and inspired a 45 ks Chandra X-Ray Observatory observation. As expected, the radio galaxy is unresolved by Chandra but is responsible for approximately half the observed X-ray flux. The remaining ROSAT flux is resolved into four point sources within 15' of the radio galaxy, corresponding to a surface density 2 orders of magnitude higher than average for X-ray sources at these flux levels [S(0.5-2 keV) > 5 x 10(exp -16) ergs cm (exp -2) s(exp -1)]. One of these point sources is identified with a radio-quiet type II quasar at z = 1.863, akin to sources recently reported in deep Chandra surveys. The limit on an extended hot intracluster medium in the Chandra data is S(1-6 keV) < 1.9 x 10-15 ergs cm (exp -2) s(exp -1) (3 (sigma), 30" radius aperture). Though the X-ray observations do not confirm the existence of a massive bound cluster at z > 1, the success of the optical/near-infrared targeting of early-type systems near the radio galaxy validates searches using radio galaxies as beacons for high-redshift large-scale structure. We interpret Cl 0442+0202 as a massive cluster in the process of formation.

  14. Spectroscopic Confirmation of A Radio-Selected Galaxy Overdensity at z = 1.11

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, S; Stern, D; Holden, B; Spinrad, H

    2004-02-26

    We report the discovery of a galaxy overdensity at z = 1.11 associated with the z = 1.110 high-redshift radio galaxy MG 0442+0202. The group, CL 0442+0202, was found in a near-infrared survey of z > 1 radio galaxies undertaken to identify spatially-coincident regions with a high density of objects red in I - K' color, typical of z > 1 elliptical galaxies. Spectroscopic observations from the Keck I telescope reveal five galaxies within 35'' of MG 0442+0202 at 1.10 < z < 1.11. These member galaxies have broad-band colors and optical spectra consistent with passively-evolving elliptical galaxies formed at high redshift. Archival ROSAT observations reveal a 3{sigma} detection of soft X-ray emission coincident with CL 0442+0202 at a level five times greater than expected for the radio galaxy. These data are suggestive of a rich galaxy cluster and inspired a 45 ks Chandra X-Ray Observatory observation. As expected, the radio galaxy is unresolved to Chandra, but is responsible for approximately half of the observed X-ray flux. The remaining ROSAT flux is resolved into four point sources within 15'' of the radio galaxy, corresponding to a surface density two orders of magnitude higher than average for X-ray sources at these flux levels (S{sub 0.5-2keV} > 5x10{sup -16} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}). One of these point sources is identified with a radio-quiet, type II quasar at z = 1.863, akin to sources recently reported in deep Chandra surveys. The limit on an extended hot intracluster medium in the Chandra data is S{sub 1-6keV} < 1.9 x 10{sup -15} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (3{sigma}, 30'' radius aperture). Though the X-ray observations do not confirm the existence of a massive, bound cluster at z > 1, the success of the optical/near-infrared targeting of early-type systems near the radio galaxy validates searches using radio galaxies as beacons for high-redshift large-scale structure. We interpret CL 0442+0202 to be a massive cluster in the process of formation.

  15. Soft γ-ray selected radio galaxies: favouring giant size discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Malizia, A.; Dallacasa, D.; Panessa, F.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the recent INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT surveys we have extracted a sample of 64 confirmed plus three candidate radio galaxies selected in the soft gamma-ray band. The sample covers all optical classes and is dominated by objects showing a Fanaroff-Riley type II radio morphology; a large fraction (70 per cent) of the sample is made of `radiative mode' or high-excitation radio galaxies. We measured the source size on images from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at twenty-cm and the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey images and have compared our findings with data in the literature obtaining a good match. We surprisingly found that the soft gamma-ray selection favours the detection of large size radio galaxies: 60 per cent of objects in the sample have size greater than 0.4 Mpc while around 22 per cent reach dimension above 0.7 Mpc at which point they are classified as giant radio galaxies (GRGs), the largest and most energetic single entities in the Universe. Their fraction among soft gamma-ray selected radio galaxies is significantly larger than typically found in radio surveys, where only a few per cent of objects (1-6 per cent) are GRGs. This may partly be due to observational biases affecting radio surveys more than soft gamma-ray surveys, thus disfavouring the detection of GRGs at lower frequencies. The main reasons and/or conditions leading to the formation of these large radio structures are still unclear with many parameters such as high jet power, long activity time and surrounding environment all playing a role; the first two may be linked to the type of active galactic nucleus discussed in this work and partly explain the high fraction of GRGs found in the present sample. Our result suggests that high energy surveys may be a more efficient way than radio surveys to find these peculiar objects.

  16. The nuclear properties and extended morphologies of powerful radio galaxies: the roles of host galaxy and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Best, P. N.

    2017-04-01

    Powerful radio Galaxies exist as either compact or extended sources, with the extended sources traditionally classified by their radio morphologies as Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I and II sources. FRI/FRII and compact radio galaxies have also been classified by their optical spectra into two different types: high excitation (HERG; quasar-mode) and low excitation (LERG; jet-mode). We present a catalogue of visual morphologies for a complete sample of >1000 1.4-GHz-selected extended radio sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We study the environment and host galaxy properties of FRI/FRII and compact sources, classified into HERG/LERG types, in order to separate and distinguish the factors that drive the radio morphological variations from those responsible for the spectral properties. Comparing FRI LERGs with FRII LERGs at fixed stellar mass and radio luminosity, we show that FRIs typically reside in richer environments and are hosted by smaller galaxies with higher mass surface density; this is consistent with extrinsic effects of jet disruption driving the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) dichotomy. Using matched samples of HERGs and LERGs, we show that HERG host galaxies are more frequently star forming, with more evidence for disc-like structure than LERGs, in accordance with currently favoured models of fundamentally different fuelling mechanisms. Comparing FRI/FRII LERGs with compact LERGs, we find the primary difference is that compact objects typically harbour less massive black holes. This suggests that lower mass black holes may be less efficient at launching stable radio jets, or do so for shorter times. Finally, we investigate rarer sub-classes: wide-angle-tailed, head-tail, FR-hybrid and double-double sources.

  17. The nuclear properties and extended morphologies of powerful radio galaxies: the roles of host galaxy and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Best, P. N.

    2017-01-01

    Powerful radio galaxies exist as either compact or extended sources, with the extended sources traditionally classified by their radio morphologies as Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I and II sources. FRI/II and compact radio galaxies have also been classified by their optical spectra into two different types: high excitation (HERG; quasar-mode) and low excitation (LERG; jet-mode). We present a catalogue of visual morphologies for a complete sample of >1000 1.4-GHz-selected extended radio sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We study the environment and host galaxy properties of FRI/II and compact sources, classified into HERG/LERG types, in order to separate and distinguish the factors that drive the radio morphological variations from those responsible for the spectral properties. Comparing FRI LERGs with FRII LERGs at fixed stellar mass and radio luminosity, we show that FRIs typically reside in richer environments and are hosted by smaller galaxies with higher mass surface density; this is consistent with extrinsic effects of jet disruption driving the FR dichotomy. Using matched samples of HERGs and LERGs, we show that HERG host galaxies are more frequently star-forming, with more evidence for disk-like structure than LERGs, in accordance with currently-favoured models of fundamentally different fuelling mechanisms. Comparing FRI/II LERGs with compact LERGs, we find the primary difference is that compact objects typically harbour less massive black holes. This suggests that lower-mass black holes may be less efficient at launching stable radio jets, or do so for shorter times. Finally, we investigate rarer sub-classes: wide-angle tail, head-tail, FR-hybrid and double-double sources.

  18. Probing the gas content of radio galaxies through H I absorption stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2014-09-01

    Using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we carried out shallow H i absorption observations of a flux-selected (S1.4 GHz > 50 mJy) sample of 93 radio active galactic nuclei (AGN), which have available SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) redshifts between 0.02 < z < 0.23. Our main goal is to study the gas properties of radio sources down to S1.4 GHz flux densities not systematically explored before using, for the first time, stacking of absorption spectra of extragalactic H i. Despite the shallow observations, we obtained a direct detection rate of ~29%, comparable with deeper studies of radio galaxies. Furthermore, detections are found at every S1.4 GHz flux level, showing that H i absorption detections are not biased toward brighter sources. The stacked profiles of detections and non-detections reveal a clear dichotomy in the presence of H i, with the 27 detections showing an average peak τ = 0.02 corresponding to N(H i) ~(7.4 ± 0.2) × 1018 (Tspin/cf) cm-2, while the 66 non-detections remain undetected upon stacking with a peak optical depth upper limit τ < 0.002 corresponding to N(H i) < (2.26 ± 0.06) × 1017 (Tspin/cf) cm-2 (using a FWHM of 62 kms-1, derived from the mean width of the detections). Separating the sample into compact and extended radio sources increases the detection rate, optical depth, and FWHM for the compact sample. The dichotomy for the stacked profiles of detections and non-detections still holds between these two groups of objects. We argue that orientation effects connected to a disk-like distribution of the H i can be partly responsible for the dichotomy that we see in our sample. However, orientation effects alone cannot explain all the observational results, and some of our galaxies must be genuinely depleted of cold gas. A fraction of the compact sources in the sample are confirmed by previous studies as likely young radio sources (compact steep spectrum and gigahertz peaked spectrum sources). These show an even higher

  19. Optical identifications of flat-spectrum radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J.J.; Condon, M.A.; Broderick, J.J.; Davis, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of radio sources with S> or =0.3 Jy at 1400 MHz, +24/sup 0/ or =+0.5 are usually in empty fields. The lower limits that can be assigned to the radio-optical spectral indices ..cap alpha../sub RO/ of these sources are significantly higher than the median ..cap alpha../sub RO/ of the sources with flat high-frequency spectra, so the optical characteristics of the two classes of radio source are intrinsically different. The radio and optical fluxes of flat-spectrum QSO's appear to be correlated, at least when averaged over 10/sup 2/--10/sup 3/ yr.

  20. Low Power Compact Radio Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, G.; Taylor, G.B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NRAO, Socorro

    2005-06-30

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution multi-frequency (8 and 22 GHz) VLA images of five low power compact (LPC) radio sources, and phase referenced VLBA images at 1.6 GHz of their nuclear regions. At the VLA resolution we resolve the structure and identify component positions and flux densities. The phase referenced VLBA data at 1.6 GHz reveals flat-spectrum, compact cores (down to a few milliJansky) in four of the five sources. The absolute astrometry provided by the phase referencing allows us to identify the center of activity on the VLA images. Moreover, these data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. On the basis of the arcsecond scale structures and of the nuclear properties, we rule out the presence of strong relativistic effects in our LPCs, which must be intrinsically small (deprojected linear sizes {approx}< 10 kpc). Fits of continuous injection models reveal break frequencies in the GHz domain, and ages in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} yrs. In LPCs, the outermost edge may be advancing more slowly than in more powerful sources or could even be stationary; some LPCs might also have ceased their activity. In general, the properties of LPCs can be related to a number of reasons, including, but not limited to: youth, frustration, low kinematic power jets, and short-lived activity in the radio.

  1. HST/ACS observations of Lyman-break galaxies and Lyα emitters associated with radio galaxies at z>4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overzier, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    Distant radio galaxies may pinpoint overdense regions in the early universe. We have collected data with HST/ACS towards several overdensities of Lyα emitters associated with radio galaxies discovered by Venemans et al. Using the Lyman break selection technique we find statistical evidence for additional galaxies associated with the radio galaxies TN J1338-1942 at z=4.1 and TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. In the case of TN J1338-1942, the angular distribution of candidate Lyman break galaxies is highly filamentary across the ˜12 arcmin2 field, with more than half of the objects clustered in a 4.4 arcmin2 region that includes the radio galaxy. Both fields appear to be significantly richer in Lyman break galaxies than the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, suggesting that the radio galaxies are embedded in galaxy groups or (forming) clusters. The Lyman break galaxies have mild to moderate star formation rates and relatively blue UV continuum colours. Except for their high equivalent width Lyα, the properties of spectroscopically confirmed Lyα emitters associated with these radio galaxies are consistent with those of normal Lyman break galaxies at relatively low luminosities. The two radio galaxies have some intriguing properties: TN J1338-1942 is extremely bright in the rest-frame UV, and has a highly disturbed morphology presumed to arise from interactions between the jet and the surrounding medium, and a starburst-driven superwind. The UV star formation rate and (projected) size of TN J0924-2201 are typical of relatively faint Lyman break galaxies at z˜3-5. Yet it is a luminous, radio-loud AGN, suggesting the presence of a supermassive black hole that may have acquired its mass before the host galaxy produced the bulk of its stars.

  2. The neutral dust and gas in the radio galaxy 3C 305

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, N.; Beswick, R.; Pedlar, A.; Cole, G.; Leahy, J. P.; Holloway, A. J.; Sparks, W. B.; Axon, D.

    3C305 is a nearby radio galaxy which shows strong warping of the stellar disk and a dust lane running almost parallel to the jet axis. We present and discuss HST and radio studies of the dust and gas which strongly constrain the geometry of this system, and explore the line ionization mechanism (photoionization/ jet-induced shocks) using emission line diagnostic ratios.

  3. The multifrequency spectrum of the starburst galaxy NGC 2782

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, A. L.; Bregman, J. N.; Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.; Cohen, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear region of NGC 2782 has been observed at radio, millimeter, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray frequencies to understand the ionization source that gives rise to the narrow emission lines. The continuum is probably caused by a normal galactic population plus considerable numbers of young stars and warm dust. In the ultraviolet and optical spectra, which are powerful diagnostics, no strong lines are detected in the 1200 A-3200 A region aside from L-alpha, and the optical emission lines cover only a narrow ionization range. The line and continuum properties suggest that NGC 2782 is a starburst galaxy, in which young stars photoionize the surrounding gas.

  4. CMB lensing power spectrum biases from galaxies and clusters using high-angular resolution temperature maps

    SciTech Connect

    Van Engelen, A.; Sehgal, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Holder, G. P.; Zahn, O.; Nagai, D.

    2014-05-01

    The lensing power spectrum from cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps will be measured with unprecedented precision with upcoming experiments, including upgrades to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the South Pole Telescope. Achieving significant improvements in cosmological parameter constraints, such as percent level errors on σ{sub 8} and an uncertainty on the total neutrino mass of ∼50 meV, requires percent level measurements of the CMB lensing power. This necessitates tight control of systematic biases. We study several types of biases to the temperature-based lensing reconstruction signal from foreground sources such as radio and infrared galaxies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters. These foregrounds bias the CMB lensing signal due to their non-Gaussian nature. Using simulations as well as some analytical models we find that these sources can substantially impact the measured signal if left untreated. However, these biases can be brought to the percent level if one masks galaxies with fluxes at 150 GHz above 1 mJy and galaxy clusters with masses above M {sub vir} = 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}. To achieve such percent level bias, we find that only modes up to a maximum multipole of l {sub max} ∼ 2500 should be included in the lensing reconstruction. We also discuss ways to minimize additional bias induced by such aggressive foreground masking by, for example, exploring a two-step masking and in-painting algorithm.

  5. CMB Lensing Power Spectrum Biases from Galaxies and Clusters Using High-angular Resolution Temperature Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sehgal, N.; Holder, G. P.; Zahn, O.; Nagai, D.

    2014-05-01

    The lensing power spectrum from cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps will be measured with unprecedented precision with upcoming experiments, including upgrades to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the South Pole Telescope. Achieving significant improvements in cosmological parameter constraints, such as percent level errors on σ8 and an uncertainty on the total neutrino mass of ~50 meV, requires percent level measurements of the CMB lensing power. This necessitates tight control of systematic biases. We study several types of biases to the temperature-based lensing reconstruction signal from foreground sources such as radio and infrared galaxies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters. These foregrounds bias the CMB lensing signal due to their non-Gaussian nature. Using simulations as well as some analytical models we find that these sources can substantially impact the measured signal if left untreated. However, these biases can be brought to the percent level if one masks galaxies with fluxes at 150 GHz above 1 mJy and galaxy clusters with masses above M vir = 1014 M ⊙. To achieve such percent level bias, we find that only modes up to a maximum multipole of l max ~ 2500 should be included in the lensing reconstruction. We also discuss ways to minimize additional bias induced by such aggressive foreground masking by, for example, exploring a two-step masking and in-painting algorithm.

  6. Modeling and Classifying X-Shaped Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Julian; Sobczak, Robert; Wiita, Paul

    2012-03-01

    While there are several explanations for the formation of the apparently modest subset of radio galaxies that display an X-shaped morphology (XRGs), an important but often overlooked aspect of observing XRGs is the classification uncertainties arising from projection effects. These XRGs have hot-spots in one set of primary lobes, as is typical for powerful RGs, but also have a greatly offset pair of secondary lobes that lack hot-spots. To determine the likelihood of a true XRG appearing non-X-shaped, we developed a computer algorithm to model fiducial XRGs and then rotated the models by random angles so as to develop probabilities that observations would lead to classification errors due to projection effects. We show that XRGs may be misclassified as showing Z-shaped, winged, standard double, and double-double morphologies. A ``perfect'' XRG, that is, one with perpendicular, equal-sized primary and secondary lobes, may appear as having a different morphology ˜20% of the time. Thus many true XRG sources can be misclassified, significantly affecting the number that are known to exist. The double-double RGs are very rare and usually are interpreted as manifestations of restarted jet activity; however, a substantial fraction of them may really be XRGs viewed at special angles.

  7. Radio continuum and far-infrared emission of spiral galaxies: Implications of correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, T. N.; Iyengar, K. V. K.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present a study extending the correlation seen between radio continuum and far-infrared emissions from spiral galaxies to a lower frequency of 408 MHz and also as a function of radio spectral index. The tight correlation seen between the two luminosities is then used to constrain several parameters governing the emissions such as the changes in star formation rate and mass function, frequency of supernovae that are parents of the interstellar electrons and factors governing synchrotron radio emission.

  8. The γ-ray emission region in the Fanaroff-Riley II radio galaxy 3C 111

    SciTech Connect

    Grandi, P.; Torresi, E.; Stanghellini, C.

    2012-04-30

    The broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111, characterized by a Fanaroff-Riley II (FRII) radio morphology, is one of the sources of the misaligned active galactic nucleus sample, consisting of radio galaxies and steep spectrum radio quasars, recently detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). In this analysis of the 24 month γ-ray light curve shows that 3C 111 was only occasionally detected at high energies. It was bright at the end of 2008 and faint, below the Fermi-LAT sensitivity threshold, for the rest of the time. A multifrequency campaign of 3C 111, ongoing in the same period, revealed an increase of the millimeter, optical, and X-ray fluxes in 2008 September-November, interpreted by Chatterjee et al. as due to the passage of a superluminal knot through the jet core. Furthermore, the temporal coincidence of the millimeter-optical-X-ray outburst with the GeV activity suggests a cospatiality of the events, allowing, for the first time, the localization of the γ-ray dissipative zone in an FRII jet. Here, we argue that the GeV photons of 3C 111 are produced in a compact region confined within 0.1 pc and at a distance of about 0.3 pc from the black hole.

  9. The γ-ray emission region in the Fanaroff-Riley II radio galaxy 3C 111

    DOE PAGES

    Grandi, P.; Torresi, E.; Stanghellini, C.

    2012-04-30

    The broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111, characterized by a Fanaroff-Riley II (FRII) radio morphology, is one of the sources of the misaligned active galactic nucleus sample, consisting of radio galaxies and steep spectrum radio quasars, recently detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). In this analysis of the 24 month γ-ray light curve shows that 3C 111 was only occasionally detected at high energies. It was bright at the end of 2008 and faint, below the Fermi-LAT sensitivity threshold, for the rest of the time. A multifrequency campaign of 3C 111, ongoing in the same period, revealed an increasemore » of the millimeter, optical, and X-ray fluxes in 2008 September-November, interpreted by Chatterjee et al. as due to the passage of a superluminal knot through the jet core. Furthermore, the temporal coincidence of the millimeter-optical-X-ray outburst with the GeV activity suggests a cospatiality of the events, allowing, for the first time, the localization of the γ-ray dissipative zone in an FRII jet. Here, we argue that the GeV photons of 3C 111 are produced in a compact region confined within 0.1 pc and at a distance of about 0.3 pc from the black hole.« less

  10. NuSTAR Reveals the Comptonizing Corona of the Broad-line Radio Galaxy 3C 382

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Bollenbacher, J. M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Baloković, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Lohfink, A. M.; Marinucci, A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-10-01

    Broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are active galactic nuclei that produce powerful, large-scale radio jets, but appear as Seyfert 1 galaxies in their optical spectra. In the X-ray band, BLRGs also appear like Seyfert galaxies, but with flatter spectra and weaker reflection features. One explanation for these properties is that the X-ray continuum is diluted by emission from the jet. Here, we present two NuSTAR observations of the BLRG 3C 382 that show clear evidence that the continuum of this source is dominated by thermal Comptonization, as in Seyfert 1 galaxies. The two observations were separated by over a year and found 3C 382 in different states separated by a factor of 1.7 in flux. The lower flux spectrum has a photon-index of Γ =1.68+0.03-0.02, while the photon-index of the higher flux spectrum is Γ =1.78+0.02-0.03. Thermal and anisotropic Comptonization models provide an excellent fit to both spectra and show that the coronal plasma cooled from kTe = 330 ± 30 keV in the low flux data to 231+50-88 keV in the high flux observation. This cooling behavior is typical of Comptonizing corona in Seyfert galaxies and is distinct from the variations observed in jet-dominated sources. In the high flux observation, simultaneous Swift data are leveraged to obtain a broadband spectral energy distribution and indicates that the corona intercepts ~10% of the optical and ultraviolet emitting accretion disk. 3C 382 exhibits very weak reflection features, with no detectable relativistic Fe Kα line, that may be best explained by an outflowing corona combined with an ionized inner accretion disk.

  11. NuSTAR reveals the Comptonizing corona of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 382

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Bollenbacher, J. M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Baloković, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Walton, D. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Lohfink, A. M.; Marinucci, A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Zhang, W. W.; Stern, D.

    2014-10-10

    Broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are active galactic nuclei that produce powerful, large-scale radio jets, but appear as Seyfert 1 galaxies in their optical spectra. In the X-ray band, BLRGs also appear like Seyfert galaxies, but with flatter spectra and weaker reflection features. One explanation for these properties is that the X-ray continuum is diluted by emission from the jet. Here, we present two NuSTAR observations of the BLRG 3C 382 that show clear evidence that the continuum of this source is dominated by thermal Comptonization, as in Seyfert 1 galaxies. The two observations were separated by over a year and found 3C 382 in different states separated by a factor of 1.7 in flux. The lower flux spectrum has a photon-index of Γ=1.68{sub −0.02}{sup +0.03}, while the photon-index of the higher flux spectrum is Γ=1.78{sub −0.03}{sup +0.02}. Thermal and anisotropic Comptonization models provide an excellent fit to both spectra and show that the coronal plasma cooled from kT{sub e} = 330 ± 30 keV in the low flux data to 231{sub −88}{sup +50} keV in the high flux observation. This cooling behavior is typical of Comptonizing corona in Seyfert galaxies and is distinct from the variations observed in jet-dominated sources. In the high flux observation, simultaneous Swift data are leveraged to obtain a broadband spectral energy distribution and indicates that the corona intercepts ∼10% of the optical and ultraviolet emitting accretion disk. 3C 382 exhibits very weak reflection features, with no detectable relativistic Fe Kα line, that may be best explained by an outflowing corona combined with an ionized inner accretion disk.

  12. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  13. Sub-mJy radio sources - A population of starburst galaxies at intermediate redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.

    1987-01-01

    Optical-infrared observations are used to show that the sub-mJy sources, discovered in deep radio surveys and responsible for the upturn in the radio source counts at sub-mJy levels, represent a population of star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts and with Mv between about -23 and -20. The very high frequency of line-emission, the very large incidence of galaxy mergers and interactions associated with these sub-mJy sources, and the good agreement between the sub-mJy radio source counts and the counts of starburst galaxies from deep IRAS surveys imply that these star-forming galaxies are in fact undergoing starbursts.

  14. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  15. Large Scale Outflow from a Radio Loud AGN in Merging Galaxies at Redshift 2.48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6×1011 M⊙ and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the AGN producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass-metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At >~ 50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio jet-driven outflow.

  16. Flat-spectrum radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or relativistic neutrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanoni, Peter M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The intensity spectrum of the core of radio-loud AGN varies smoothly from 10 exp 8.5 to 10 to the 16th Hz, and is flat between 10 to the 9th and 10 to the 10th Hz, implying that a single emission mechanism is responsible. It is proposed here that energy is transported from the central source by relativistic neutrons which travel freely over a large volume and decay into relativistic protons. The protons produce secondary electrons which generate the observed radiation. The photon spectra thus produced are largely model-independent and flat.

  17. Monitoring the Remarkable Radio Spectral-Line/Continuum Outburst in Galaxy NGC 660

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Christopher J.; Ghosh, Tapasi; Minchin, Robert F.; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    A radio continuum and spectral-line outburst in galaxy NGC660 was serendipitously discovered by us at Arecibo in 2007/8. From Feb. 2013, roughly bi-monthly Arecibo spectral-line and continuum monitoring of this remarkable event has been performed, with 28 observing epochs completed to Auguast 2016. Variability of the continuum spectrum, and of the detailed OH emission/absorption spectra at 4660, 4750, and 4765 MHz have been followed over this period. The rapid changes seen in the molecular emission from the nuclear region of this galaxy are unprecedented. To delineate the physical model of this complicated starburst system further, we have supplemented this Arecibo monitoring by two epochs of milliarcsecond-resolution HSA line and continuum imaging, (with Arecibo in this VLBI array). The VLBI images reveal jet structure consistent with a recent nuclear outburst. The OH features show association with the outburst hotspots. Both the continuum and OH maser intensities have been steadily declining since peaking at mid-2011.

  18. Observational constraints on bending the wide-angle tailed radio galaxy 1919+479

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. O.; Gregory, S. A.; Odea, C. P.; Balonek, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    A wide range of new observations of the wide-angle tailed radio galaxy 1919+479 and its environs are presented. Multifrequency and multiconfiguration VLA observations are described, ranging in resolution from 0.7 arcsec to 40 arcsec. Distributions of source structures at different scale sizes, spectral indices, and polarizations are presented. Wide-field photographic and CCD imaging data are presented along with a review of the measured galaxy redshifts in the field. A newly reprocessed Einstein IPC X-ray image of the cluster is shown, and the X-ray emission's relationship to the radio morphology is described. The radio, optical, and X-ray data are used to constrain the cD galaxy dynamics and models for bending the radio structure. In particular, the possible role of jet collisions with clouds in the intracluster medium is considered. The applicability of cloud collision models to wide-angle tails in general is considered.

  19. Soft Gamma-ray selected radio galaxies: favouring giant size discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, Loredana

    2016-07-01

    Using the recent INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT surveys we have extracted a sample of radio galaxies selected in the soft gamma-ray band. The sample consists of known and candidate radio galaxies. The sample extraction criteria will be presented and its general properties outlined. In particular we provide strong evidence that this soft gamma-ray selection favours the discovery of large size radio objects, otherwise known as Giant Radio Galaxies or GRG. The main reasons and/or conditions leading to the formation of these sources are still unclear and this result suggests that they maybe related to exceptional internal properties of the source central engine, like a high jet power or a long activity time. Broad band analysis of new GRG, discovered during this work, will also be presented.

  20. Observational Studies of the Angular Structure of the Radio Galaxy 3C 234 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megn, A. V.; Braude, S. Ya.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Sharykin, N. K.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Bulatsen, V. G.

    2003-12-01

    An analysis of the angular structure of the radio galaxy 3C 234 at decameter wavelengths based on data obtained on the URAN-1 and URAN-2 interferometers is presented. Four of the five model components that describe the radio-brightness distribution at centimeter wavelengths are observed at decameter wavelengths: two compact components and two neighboring extended components. The fifth, undetected, component is the most extended, and encompasses the central region of the radio source, including the nucleus of the galaxy. Self-absorption is detected in the compact components, whose angular sizes are determined to be 0.27±0.03″ (northeast component) and 0.55±0.05″ (southwest component), in agreement with direct measurements at centimeter wavelengths. Most of the decameter emission of the radio galaxy is associated with its extended components.

  1. Classifying bent radio galaxies from a mixture of point-like/extended images with Machine Learning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, David; Oozeer, Nadeem; Somanah, Radhakrishna

    2017-05-01

    The hypothesis that bent radio sources are supposed to be found in rich, massive galaxy clusters and the avalibility of huge amount of data from radio surveys have fueled our motivation to use Machine Learning (ML) to identify bent radio sources and as such use them as tracers for galaxy clusters. The shapelet analysis allowed us to decompose radio images into 256 features that could be fed into the ML algorithm. Additionally, ideas from the field of neuro-psychology helped us to consider training the machine to identify bent galaxies at different orientations. From our analysis, we found that the Random Forest algorithm was the most effective with an accuracy rate of 92% for a classification of point and extended sources as well as an accuracy of 80% for bent and unbent classification.

  2. Fresh Activity in Old Systems: Radio AGNs in Fossil Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley M.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Hartwick, Victoria L.

    2012-08-01

    We present the first systematic 1.4 GHz Very Large Array radio continuum survey of fossil galaxy group candidates. These are virialized systems believed to have assembled over a gigayear in the past through the merging of galaxy group members into a single, isolated, massive elliptical galaxy and featuring an extended hot X-ray halo. We use new photometric and spectroscopic data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to determine that three of the candidates are clearly not fossil groups. Of the remaining 30 candidates, 67% contain a radio-loud (L 1.4 GHz > 1023 W Hz-1) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the center of their dominant elliptical galaxy. We find a weak correlation between the radio luminosity of the AGN and the X-ray luminosity of the halo suggesting that the AGN contributes to energy deposition into the intragroup medium. We only find a correlation between the radio and optical luminosity of the central elliptical galaxy when we include X-ray-selected, elliptically dominated non-fossil groups, indicating a weak relationship between AGN strength and the mass assembly history of the groups. The dominant elliptical galaxy of fossil groups is on average roughly an order of magnitude more luminous than normal group elliptical galaxies in optical, X-ray, and radio luminosities and our findings are consistent with previous results that the radio-loud fraction in elliptical galaxies is linked to the stellar mass of a population. The current level of activity in fossil groups suggests that AGN fueling continues long after the last major merger. We discuss several possibilities for fueling the AGN at the present epoch.

  3. An X-Ray, Optical, and Radio Search for Supernova Remnants in the Nearby Sculptor Group Sd Galaxy NGC 7793

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Duric, Nebojsa; Lacey, Christina K.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Magnor, Marcus A.; Mendelowitz, Caylin

    2002-02-01

    This paper is the second in a series devoted to examining the multiwavelength properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) located in nearby galaxies. We consider here the resident SNRs in the nearby Sculptor group Sd galaxy NGC 7793. Using our own Very Large Array (VLA) radio observations at 6 and 20 cm, as well as archived ROSAT X-ray data, previously published optical results, and our own Hα image, we have searched for X-ray and radio counterparts to previously known optically identified SNRs and for new previously unidentified SNRs at these two wavelength regimes. Consistent with our prior results for NGC 300, only a tiny minority of the optically identified SNRs have been found at another wavelength. The most noteworthy source in our study is N7793-S26, which is the only SNR in this galaxy that is detected at all three wavelengths (X-ray, optical, and radio). It features a long (~450 pc) filamentary morphology that is clearly seen in both the optical and the radio images. N7793-S26's radio luminosity exceeds that of the Galactic SNR Cas A, and based on equipartition calculations we determine that an energy of at least 1052 ergs is required to maintain this source. Such a result argues for the source being created by multiple supernova explosions rather than by a single supernova event. A second optically identified SNR, N7793-S11, has detectable radio emission but no detectable X-ray emission. A radio-selected sample of candidate SNRs has also been prepared by searching for coincidences between nonthermal radio sources and regions of Hα emission in this galaxy. This search has produced five new candidate radio SNRs to be added to the 28 SNRs that have already been detected by optical methods. A complementary search for new candidate X-ray SNRs has also been conducted by searching for soft-spectrum sources (kT<1 keV) that are coincident with regions of Hα emission. That search has yielded a candidate X-ray SNR that is coincident with one (and possibly two) of the

  4. 1-20 micron infrared photometry of 3CR radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Willner, S. P.; Fabbiano, G.; Carleton, N. P.; Lawrence, A.; Ward, M.

    1984-05-01

    Seven emission-line radio galaxies in the wavelength range from 1 to 20 microns were observed in February 1983. Three broad emission-line galaxies (BLRGs 3C 109, 3C 234, and 3C 445), and four narrow emission-line radio galaxies (NLRGs 3C 98, 3C 198, 3C 223, and 3C 293) were found. The BLRGs showed strong infrared fluxes beyond 3.5 microns, with steep infrared slopes similar to optical slopes. In a comparison with earlier observational data it was found that two of the BLRGs are variable in the JHK filter range without a change of slope. The NLRGs showed strong excess at 10 microns and normal elliptical galaxy colors at JHK and L. Simple predictions based on type-2 Seyfert galaxies show that strong infrared excesses are absent.

  5. 1-20 micron infrared photometry of 3CR radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Willner, S. P.; Fabbiano, G.; Carleton, N. P.; Lawrence, A.; Ward, M.

    1984-01-01

    Seven emission-line radio galaxies in the wavelength range from 1 to 20 microns were observed in February 1983. Three broad emission-line galaxies (BLRGs 3C 109, 3C 234, and 3C 445), and four narrow emission-line radio galaxies (NLRGs 3C 98, 3C 198, 3C 223, and 3C 293) were found. The BLRGs showed strong infrared fluxes beyond 3.5 microns, with steep infrared slopes similar to optical slopes. In a comparison with earlier observational data it was found that two of the BLRGs are variable in the JHK filter range without a change of slope. The NLRGs showed strong excess at 10 microns and normal elliptical galaxy colors at JHK and L. Simple predictions based on type-2 Seyfert galaxies show that strong infrared excesses are absent.

  6. Gas kinematics in powerful radio galaxies at z 2: Energy supply from star formation, AGN, and radio jets⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Drouart, G.; De Breuck, C.; Best, P.; Seymour, N.; Vernet, J.

    2017-04-01

    We compare the kinetic energy and momentum injection rates from intense star formation, bolometric AGN radiation, and radio jets with the kinetic energy and momentum observed in the warm ionized gas in 24 powerful radio galaxies at z 2. These galaxies are among our best candidates for being massive galaxies near the end of their active formation period, when intense star formation, quasar activity, and powerful radio jets all co-exist. All galaxies have VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical line emission, showing extended emission-line regions with large velocity offsets (up to 1500 km s-1) and line widths (typically 800-1000 km s-1) consistent with very turbulent, often outflowing gas. As part of the HeRGÉ sample, they also have FIR estimates of the star formation and quasar activity obtained with Herschel/PACS and SPIRE, which enables us to measure the relative energy and momentum release from each of the three main sources of feedback in massive, star-forming AGN host galaxies during their most rapid formation phase. We find that star formation falls short by factors 10-1000 of providing the energy and momentum necessary to power the observed gas kinematics. The obscured quasars in the nuclei of these galaxies provide enough energy and momentum in about half of the sample, however, only if both are transferred to the gas relatively efficiently. We compare with theoretical and observational constraints on the efficiency of the energy and momentum transfer from jet and AGN radiation, which favors the radio jets as main drivers of the gas kinematics. Based on observations carried out with the Very Large Telescope of ESO under Program IDs 079.A-0617, 084.A-0324, 085.A-0897, and 090.A-0614.Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  7. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - II. Spectral ageing and source dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Morganti, Raffaella; Croston, Judith H.; Brüggen, Marcus; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Shulevski, Aleksander; White, Glenn J.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the second in a series investigating Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies at low frequencies, we use LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations between 117 and 456 MHz, in addition to archival data, to determine the dynamics and energetics of two radio galaxies, 3C 452 and 3C 223, by fitting spectral ageing models on small spatial scales. We provide improved measurements for the physical extent of the two sources, including a previously unknown low surface brightness extension to the northern lobe of 3C 223, and revised energetics based on these values. We find spectral ages of 77.05^{+9.22}_{-8.74} and 84.96^{+15.02}_{-13.83} Myr for 3C 452 and 3C 223, respectively, suggesting a characteristic advance speed for the lobes of around 1 per cent of the speed of light. For 3C 452, we show that, even for a magnetic field strength not assumed to be in equipartition, a disparity of a factor of approximately 2 exists between the spectral age and that determined from a dynamical standpoint. We confirm that the injection index of both sources (as derived from the lobe emission) remains steeper than classically assumed values, even when considered on well-resolved scales at low frequencies. However, we find an unexpected sharp discontinuity between the spectrum of the hotspots and the surrounding lobe emission. We suggest that this discrepancy is a result of the absorption of hotspot emission and/or non-homogeneous and additional acceleration mechanisms; as such, hotspots should not be used in the determination of the underlying initial electron energy distribution.

  8. SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 at VLBI: a compact radio galaxy in a narrow-line Seyfert 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccianiga, A.; Dallacasa, D.; Antón, S.; Ballo, L.; Berton, M.; Mack, K.-H.; Paulino-Afonso, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations, carried out with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN), of SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3, a radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) characterized by a steep radio spectrum. The source, compact at Very Large Array resolution, is resolved on the milliarcsec scale, showing a central region plus two extended structures. The relatively high brightness temperature of all components (5 × 106-1.3 × 108 K) supports the hypothesis that the radio emission is non-thermal and likely produced by a relativistic jet and/or small radio lobes. The observed radio morphology, the lack of a significant core, and the presence of a low frequency (230 MHz) spectral turnover are reminiscent of the Compact Steep-Spectrum (CSS) sources. However, the linear size of the source (˜0.5 kpc) measured from the EVN map is lower than the value predicted using the turnover/size relation valid for CSS sources (˜6 kpc). This discrepancy can be explained by an additional component not detected in our observations, accounting for about a quarter of the total source flux density, combined to projection effects. The low core dominance of the source (CD < 0.29) confirms that SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 is not a blazar, i.e. the relativistic jet is not pointing towards the observer. This supports the idea that SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 may belong to the `parent population' of flat-spectrum RL NLS1 and favours the hypothesis of a direct link between RL NLS1 and compact, possibly young, radio galaxies.

  9. Rapidly growing black holes and host galaxies in the distant Universe from the Herschel Radio Galaxy Evolution Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouart, G.; De Breuck, C.; Vernet, J.; Seymour, N.; Lehnert, M.; Barthel, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Ibar, E.; Galametz, A.; Haas, M.; Hatch, N.; Mullaney, J. R.; Nesvadba, N.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stern, D.; Wylezalek, D.

    2014-06-01

    We present results from a comprehensive survey of 70 radio galaxies at redshifts 1 galaxies in our sample are continuously covered across 3.6-870 μm. The total 8-1000 μm restframe infrared luminosities of these radio galaxies are such that almost all of them are either ultra-(LtotIR 1012 L⊙) or hyper-luminous (LtotIR 1013 L⊙) infrared galaxies. We fit the infrared SEDs with a set of empirical templates which represent dust heated by a variety of starbursts (SB) and by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We find that the SEDs of radio galaxies require the dust to be heated by both AGN and SB, but the luminosities of these two components are not strongly correlated. Assuming empirical relations and simple physical assumptions, we calculate the star formation rate (SFR), the black hole mass accretion rate (ṀBH), and the black hole mass (MBH) for each radio galaxy. We find that the host galaxies and their black holes are growing extremely rapidly, having SFR ≈ 100-5000 M⊙ yr-1 and ṀBH ≈ 1-100 M⊙ yr-1. The mean specific SFRs (sSFR) of radio galaxies at z> 2.5 are higher than the sSFR of typical star forming galaxies over the same redshift range, but are similar or perhaps lower than the galaxy population for radio galaxies at z< 2.5. By comparing the sSFR and the specific ṀBH (sṀBH), we conclude that black holes in radio loud AGN are already, or soon will be, overly massive compared to their host galaxies in terms of expectations from the local MBH-MGal relation. In order to catch up with the black hole, the galaxies require about an order of magnitude more time to grow in mass at the observed SFRs compared to the time the black hole is actively accreting

  10. Optical spectroscopy of the radio-loud nuclei of spiral galaxies: Starbursts or monsters

    SciTech Connect

    Heckman, T.M.; Van Breugel, W.; Miley, G.K.; Butcher, H.R.

    1983-08-01

    We present optical spectroscopic data pertaining to the physical state, kinematics, and spatial extent of the emission-line gas near the radio-loud nuclei of spiral galaxies. These data are combined with published optical, radio, and infrared data to evaluate the suggestions by Condon et al. (1982) that the nuclear radio emission in this class of galaxy is produced by multiple supernova remnants generated as a consequence of a nuclear starburst. As a whole, the radio-loud nuclei have stronger emission lines than radio-quiet nuclei of galaxies of similar Hubble/de Vaucouleurs type. This emission-line gas is generally at least as spatially extended as the radio continuum emission. However, we find that only about 1/3 of the spiral galaxies examined have optical spectroscopic properties consistent with those of ''extranuclear starbursts'' (i.e., giant H II regions). The majority of the nuclei seem to require a form of energy input to the ionized gas which is ''harder'' than the Lyman continuum radiation of OB stars, as their emission-line spectra are of the Seyfert or Liner variety. The nuclei with H II region spectra are distinct from the nuclei with Seyfert spectra in terms of radio morphology and radio spectral index, and tend to occur in spiral galaxies of much later Hubble type than do the Seyfert or Liner nuclei (Sc vs Sa). Moreover, the most luminous nuclear radio sources in our sample (PMHz> or =10/sup 22/ Watts Hz/sup -1/ Sr/sup -1/) are not associated with H II region nuclei. We summarize evidence that the putative nuclear starbursts must differ significantly from extranuclear starbursts.

  11. The Trivariate / Radio Optical X-Ray / Luminosity Function CD Galaxies - Part Two - the Fuelling of Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Bijleveld, W.

    1983-09-01

    In order to the test the hypothesis that radio sources in elliptical galaxies are fuelled by a fraction of accreted X-ray gas, a sample of 81 cD galaxies in clusters and 23 cD galaxies in poor groups is studied. Various subsamples have been defined (reviewed in Table t) according to the origin of the cD galaxy classification (optically, radio or X-ray selected). A catalogue is presented, listing the measured optical, radio and X-ray luminosities from various origins, but all transformed to a uniform and homogeneous system: optical Mv (38 kpc metric diameter), radio P1.4 (1.4 GHz monochromatic total radio power) and Lx (1 Mpc metric diameter 0.5-3.0 keV X-ray band). The three luminosity parameters are investigated for cross- correlations by studying power-power plots and by analysing how the integral radio luminosity function, expressed in fractions of radio detections (F(> P1.4)), depend on Mv and Lx. All three parameters are found to correlate with each other. F(> P1.4) increases with both increasing Lx and brighter Mv and Lx also increases with brighter Mv. The determinations of the different regression relations are internally consistent. The empirical conclusions from the analysis are: (i) The mean Mv of poor group cDs is 0.m4 fainter than the mean Mv of cluster cDs. (ii) The bivariate radio luminosity functions of both samples confirm, both in shape and in their dependence on Mv, those of normal and giant ellipticals. (iii) cD galaxies have an increasing probability to contain a central (≲ 28 kpc) radio source when the X-ray luminosity of their halo (˜1 Mpc diameter) increases. 50 ± 9% of Lx ≧ 1044 erg s-1 cDs have a central radio source with P1.4 ≧ 1024WHz-1, while 12+l2-5% of Lx < 1043 ergs-1 cDs have a radio source of that power. This important conclusion is summarised in Fig. 5. (iv) Comparing rich cluster cDs and poor group cDs a relation between Mv and Lx is found. This relation holds among the rich cluster cDs as well. The physical origins of

  12. Novel Spectrum Sensing Algorithms for OFDM Cognitive Radio Networks.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenguo; Wu, Zhilu; Yin, Zhendong; Cheng, Qingqing

    2015-06-15

    Spectrum sensing technology plays an increasingly important role in cognitive radio networks. Consequently, several spectrum sensing algorithms have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we present a new spectrum sensing algorithm "Differential Characteristics-Based OFDM (DC-OFDM)" for detecting OFDM signal on account of differential characteristics. We put the primary value on channel gain θ around zero to detect the presence of primary user. Furthermore, utilizing the same method of differential operation, we improve two traditional OFDM sensing algorithms (cyclic prefix and pilot tones detecting algorithms), and propose a "Differential Characteristics-Based Cyclic Prefix (DC-CP)" detector and a "Differential Characteristics-Based Pilot Tones (DC-PT)" detector, respectively. DC-CP detector is based on auto-correlation vector to sense the spectrum, while the DC-PT detector takes the frequency-domain cross-correlation of PT as the test statistic to detect the primary user. Moreover, the distributions of the test statistics of the three proposed methods have been derived. Simulation results illustrate that all of the three proposed methods can achieve good performance under low signal to noise ratio (SNR) with the presence of timing delay. Specifically, the DC-OFDM detector gets the best performance among the presented detectors. Moreover, both of the DC-CP and DC-PT detector achieve significant improvements compared with their corresponding original detectors.

  13. Novel Spectrum Sensing Algorithms for OFDM Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhenguo; Wu, Zhilu; Yin, Zhendong; Cheng, Qingqing

    2015-01-01

    Spectrum sensing technology plays an increasingly important role in cognitive radio networks. Consequently, several spectrum sensing algorithms have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we present a new spectrum sensing algorithm “Differential Characteristics-Based OFDM (DC-OFDM)” for detecting OFDM signal on account of differential characteristics. We put the primary value on channel gain θ around zero to detect the presence of primary user. Furthermore, utilizing the same method of differential operation, we improve two traditional OFDM sensing algorithms (cyclic prefix and pilot tones detecting algorithms), and propose a “Differential Characteristics-Based Cyclic Prefix (DC-CP)” detector and a “Differential Characteristics-Based Pilot Tones (DC-PT)” detector, respectively. DC-CP detector is based on auto-correlation vector to sense the spectrum, while the DC-PT detector takes the frequency-domain cross-correlation of PT as the test statistic to detect the primary user. Moreover, the distributions of the test statistics of the three proposed methods have been derived. Simulation results illustrate that all of the three proposed methods can achieve good performance under low signal to noise ratio (SNR) with the presence of timing delay. Specifically, the DC-OFDM detector gets the best performance among the presented detectors. Moreover, both of the DC-CP and DC-PT detector achieve significant improvements compared with their corresponding original detectors. PMID:26083226

  14. The nuclear region of low luminosity flat radio spectrum sources. II. Emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Serote Roos, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marchã's et al. (\\cite{March96}) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. The fact that we observe a LINER-type spectrum in LL FRS sources supports the idea that some of these objects could be undergoing an ADAF phase; in addition, such a low ionization emission-line spectrum is in agreement with the black hole mass values and sub-Eddington accretion rates published for some FRS sources. Based on observations collected at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mt. Hopkins. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  15. X-ray And Radio Plasma Interactions In Clusters Of Galaxies: A194 And A2634

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudaverdi, Murat; Ercan, E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the analysis results from XMM-Newton data of two clusters of galaxies, which was also known to as strong radio emitters; A194 and A2634. A194 is a nearby (z=0.018) linear cluster in NE-SW direction. The cluster is very faint in X-rays with an average ICM temperature of 2.7 keV. A194 has strong radio lobes hosted by N541 and N547. Temperature map indicates an interesting result of ICM & radio-lobe interactions; the hot X-ray plasma coincides with the rim of radio-lobes, as it was heated. A2634 (z=0.0314) is also has a strong radio emission from its cD galaxy. ICM plasma has an average temperature of 3 keV. The temperature variations of A2634 associate with the radio-jets. The northern part of the cluster is significantly hot (4.5 keV) around the boundaries of radio-jets and very low in metal abundance (<0.1 solar). The analysis results of two-clusters are studied to understand radio and X-ray interactions within ICM. We report that (1) the radio-jets may push ICM and create X-ray cavities (2) radio-rims increases the temperature of ICM by shock-heating.

  16. Star formation in nearby early-type galaxies: the radio continuum perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Wrobel, Joan M.; Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Alatalo, Katherine; Morganti, Raffaella; Duc, Pierre-Alain; de Zeeuw, P. T.; McDermid, Richard M.; Crocker, Alison F.; Oosterloo, Tom

    2017-01-01

    We present a 1.4 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) study of a sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS3D survey. The radio morphologies of these ETGs at a resolution of θFWHM ≈ 5 arcsec include sources that are compact on sub-kpc scales, resolved structures similar to those seen in star-forming spiral galaxies, and kpc-scale radio jets/lobes associated with active nuclei. We compare the radio, CO, and infrared (IR) properties of these ETGs. The most CO-rich ETGs have radio luminosities consistent with extrapolations from H2 mass derived star-formation rates from studies of late-type galaxies. These ETGs also follow the radio-IR correlation. However, ETGs with lower molecular gas masses tend to have less radio emission relative to their CO and IR emission compared to spirals. The fraction of galaxies in our sample with high IR-radio ratios is much higher than in previous studies, and cannot be explained by a systematic underestimation of the radio luminosity due to the presence extended, low-surface-brightness emission that was resolved out in our VLA observations. We find that the high IR-radio ratios tend to occur at low IR luminosities, but are not associated with low dynamical mass or metallicity. Thus, we have identified a population of ETGs that have a genuine shortfall of radio emission relative to both their IR and CO emission. A number of mechanisms may cause this deficiency, including a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function, weak magnetic fields, a higher prevalence of environmental effects compared to spirals, and enhanced cosmic ray losses.

  17. Jet-CO alignments in the environments high-z radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emonts, Bjorn

    2017-03-01

    In the outskirts of massive high-redshift radio galaxies, powerful radio-jets often interact with ambient warm Lyα-emitting gas. We present the discovery of luminous reservoirs of cold molecular gas in these environments, based on CO(1-0) observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The CO-emission is aligned with the radio jets, and found tens of kpc outside the host galaxy. These molecular gas reservoirs have CO luminosities in the range of those found in submm-galaxies (L'CO ~ 4-9 × 1010 K km/s pc2), but they lack any near-infrared counterpart in deep Spitzer imaging. These results suggest that jet-triggered feedback takes place in the circum-galactic environment of high-z radio galaxies. We prefer the interpretation that the CO-emitting gas is formed when the propagating jets enrich, shock and cool pre-existing dusty halo gas. We further argue that sensitive low-surface-brightness CO observations, using radio interferometers in very compact array-configurations, are essential to study the role of the cold molecular medium in the outskirts of massive high-z galaxies.

  18. A search for extended radio emission from selected compact galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiel-Wroczyński, B.; Urbanik, M.; Soida, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Studies on compact galaxy groups have led to the conclusion that a plenitude of phenomena take place in between galaxies that form them. However, radio data on these objects are extremely scarce and not much is known concerning the existence and role of the magnetic field in intergalactic space. Aims: We aim to study a small sample of galaxy groups that look promising as possible sources of intergalactic magnetic fields; for example data from radio surveys suggest that most of the radio emission is due to extended, diffuse structures in and out of the galaxies. Methods: We used the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope at 4.85 GHz and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) data at 1.40 GHz. After subtraction of compact sources we analysed the maps searching for diffuse, intergalactic radio emission. Spectral index and magnetic field properties were derived. Results: Intergalactic magnetic fields exist in groups HCG 15 and HCG 60, whereas there are no signs of them in HCG 68. There are also hints of an intergalactic bridge in HCG 44 at 4.85 GHz. Conclusions: Intergalactic magnetic fields exist in galaxy groups and their energy density may be comparable to the thermal (X-ray) density, suggesting an important role of the magnetic field in the intra-group medium, wherever it is detected.

  19. Star Formation in Edge-on Galaxies and its Relation to Radio Continuum Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos J.; Mora Partiarroyo, Silvia Carolina; Schmidt, Philip; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Irwin, Judith; Wang, Daniel; Rand, Richard J.; Stein, Yelena; CHANG-ES

    2017-01-01

    We study the radio continuum emission in edge-on galaxies from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies -- an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), with a particular focus on the question of the correlation of radio synchroton halos with the star formation rate distribution across the galaxy disks. To determine the star formation rates we analyze the application of various SFR calibration methods, in particular those involving Hα and 24 μm emission for the galaxies in the sample. We test consistency of the published SFR calibrations by predicting thermal radio continuum maps that are compared with the observed radio data and with the derived spectral index maps, both before and after removal of the predicted thermal maps. In addition to published calibrations of the SFR from Hα and 24 μm data, we explore different mixtures of Hα and 24 μm maps that may be more applicable in the case of an edge-on galaxy perspective. We also discuss the correlation between the luminosity, morphology, and spectral indices of radio synchrotron halos with the distribution of SF in the galactic disks, and explore the connection with extra-planar diffuse ionized gas obtained from sensitive Hα images with the ARC 3.5m telescope for the entire sample. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No 1650681 and AST - 1615594.

  20. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  1. The dynamics and excitation of circumnuclear disks in radio-active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brown, Michael; Jannuzi, Buell; McGregor, Peter; Floyd, David; Jones, Heath; Ferrarese, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Powerful radio-active galaxies may harbor a heavily obscured Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), where the black hole is hidden by an optically and geometrically thick dust "torus". Near-IR spectroscopy with Adaptive Optics (AO) has shown that the ratio of atomic to molecular hydrogen varies greatly across the nuclear regions, thus allowing one to set limits of the size of the torus. AO IFU observations with Gemini and Keck will enable a study of a complete sample of early-type galaxies harboring radio AGNs, resulting in a complete picture of the kinematics and distribution of the gas around the nucleus, and trace the 2-D structure of the torus in these galaxies. The time is right to survey a complete sample of nearby radio-active galaxies to (1) characterize the dynamics of these circumnuclear disks as a function of galaxy mass and (2) outline the ecology of the gas flows that support them. %First we must see which of Brown et al's %complete sample of nearby radiogalaxies have emission As a first step, we need to determine which of our selected sample of 23 nearby radio-active galaxies have emission lines in J & H and are thus amenable to NIR IFU observations. This we propose to do with FLAMINGOS. To survey our sample for suitable objects for the Keck/Gemini follow-up will require approximately 22 nights distributed evenly over the next four observing semesters.%It will take 11 nights in 11B & 12B and

  2. SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY GROUPS AND THEIR PERTURBING DISK GALAXIES: AN X-RAY, OPTICAL, AND RADIO CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Di Gesu, Laura; Ghizzardi, Simona; Rossetti, Mariachiara; Giacintucci, Simona; Girardi, Marisa; Roediger, Elke; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Buote, David A.; Humphrey, Philip J.; Eckert, Dominique; Ettori, Stefano; Mathews, William G.

    2013-06-10

    We present a combined X-ray, optical, and radio analysis of the galaxy group IC 1860 using the currently available Chandra and XMM data, multi-object spectroscopy data from the literature, and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data. The Chandra and XMM imaging and spectroscopy reveal two surface brightness discontinuities at 45 and 76 kpc shown to be consistent with a pair of cold fr