Science.gov

Sample records for speed controller parameters

  1. Robust output feedback cruise control for high-speed train movement with uncertain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu-Kai; Yang, Li-Xing; Li, Ke-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the robust output feedback cruise control for high-speed train movement with uncertain parameters is investigated. The dynamic of a high-speed train is modeled by a cascade of cars connected by flexible couplers, which is subject to rolling mechanical resistance, aerodynamic drag and wind gust. Based on Lyapunov’s stability theory, the sufficient condition for the existence of the robust output feedback cruise control law is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), under which the high-speed train tracks the desired speed, the relative spring displacement between the two neighboring cars is stable at the equilibrium state, and meanwhile a small prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level is guaranteed. One numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No.2014JBM150).

  2. The application of PID parameter self-tuning fuzzy controller in the constant-power speed control system of heading machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jun; Hou, Jian; Shen, Dong

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the control system of PID parameter self-tuning fuzzy controller. For cutting the coal of different hardness, adopt fuzzy techniques, automatically adjust the feed speed of operating mechanism, and maintain the control of operating mechanism of heading machine with constant power.

  3. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  4. Shaft speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Simple mechanism controls rotation of heavy-duty shaft by mechanical comparison with rotation of small, precise, stepper motor. Mechanism can be used to limit winding and unwinding speeds of large spools and reels and to control speed of other rotating shafts. Setup incorporates reference shaft geared down from stepper motor and feedback shaft geared up from shaft to be controlled. Feedback and reference shafts are coupled with brake assembly inside stationary cylinder. When work shaft speeds up, brakes are activated automatically to slow it down.

  5. A wind-tunnel investigation of parameters affecting helicopter directional control at low speeds in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Young, W. H., Jr.; Mantay, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to measure the performance of several helicopter tail-rotor/fin configurations with regard to directional control problems encountered at low speeds in ground effect. Tests were conducted at wind azimuths of 0 deg to 360 deg in increments of 30 deg and 60 deg and at wind speeds from 0 to 35 knots. The results indicate that at certain combinations of wind speed and wind azimuth, large increases in adverse fin force require correspondingly large increases in the tail-rotor thrust, collective pitch, and power required to maintain yaw trim. Changing the tail-rotor direction of rotation to top blade aft for either a pusher tail rotor (tail-rotor wake blowing away from fin) or a tractor tail rotor (tail-rotor wake blowing against fin) will alleviate this problem. For a pusher tail rotor at 180 deg wind azimuth, increases in the fin/tail-rotor gap were not found to have any significant influence on the overall vehicle directional control capability. Changing the tail rotor to a higher position was found to improve tail-rotor performance for a fin-off configuration at a wind azimuth of 180 deg. A V-tail configuration with a pusher tail rotor with top blade aft direction of rotation was found to be the best configuration with regard to overall directional control capability.

  6. Shelter Index and a simple wind speed parameter to characterize vegetation control of sand transport threshold and Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nield, J. M.; Nickling, W. G.; Furtak-Cole, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in many dryland environments from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (SI=distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height) and particle threshold expressed as the ratio of wind speed measured at 0.45 times the mean plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m when saltation commences, and saltation flux. The results are used to evaluate SI as a parameter to characterize the influence of vegetation on local winds and sediment transport conditions. Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in two vegetation communities: mature streets of mesquite covered nebkhas and incipient nebkhas dominated by low mesquite plants. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each 10° wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning. SI can show the susceptibility to wind erosion at different time scales, i.e., event, seasonal, or annual, but in a supply-limited system it can fail to define actual flux amounts due to a lack of knowledge of the distribution of sediment across the surface of interest with respect to the patterns of SI.

  7. Variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Younger, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This report details a new design for a variable speed controller which can be used to operate lunar machinery without the astronaut using his or her upper body. In order to demonstrate the design, a treadle for an industrial sewing machine was redesigned to be used by a standing operator. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from sit down to stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with a sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator along with the ergonomics involved. Included with the design analysis are suggestions for possible uses for the speed controller in other applications.

  8. Engine speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, K.

    1983-02-01

    An idle control system for an automobile internal combustion engine includes an idle control unit for controlling the operation of an electromagnetically operated actuator. While the engine has a combustible mixture intake passage leading to the engine and a throttle valve operatively positioned inside the mixture intake passage for controlling the flow of a combustible air-fuel mixture towards the engine, the actuator is utilized to adjust either the effective cross sectional area of a bypass air passage leading from the air source to the mixture intake passage at a position downstream of the throttle valve or the opening of the throttle valve, to control the engine speed during idling to a predetermined value.

  9. Testing Shelter Index and a Simple Wind Speed Parameter to Characterize Vegetation Control of Sand Transport Threshold and Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; Nield, Joanna; Nickling, William; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2013-04-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in the Chihuahuan Desert surrounding Las Cruces NM from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. One important aspect of research is to develop a relationship between a descriptor of the surface roughness that can be used to provide an indication of how susceptible the sediment transport system is to activation by wind. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height), as originally proposed by Okin (2008), and particle threshold expressed as a ratio of wind measured at 0.45 times the plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m, and saltation flux (g cm-2 s-1). Saltation flux was measured using sediment traps positioned 15 cm above the surface and nearby optical gate sensors (Wenglor® model YH03PCT8)measuring saltation activity also placed at a height of 15 cm. The results are used to evaluate shelter index as a parameter to characterize the local winds as influenced by the vegetation and sediment transport conditions (threshold and transport). Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in three vegetation communities: mature mesquite covered nebkha dunes, incipient nebkha dunes dominated by low mesquite plants, and a mature creosote bush area. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each approximately 10 degree wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning.

  10. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  11. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  12. Determination of combustion parameters using engine crankshaft speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taglialatela, F.; Lavorgna, M.; Mancaruso, E.; Vaglieco, B. M.

    2013-07-01

    Electronic engine controls based on real time diagnosis of combustion process can significantly help in complying with the stricter and stricter regulations on pollutants emissions and fuel consumption. The most important parameter for the evaluation of combustion quality in internal combustion engines is the in-cylinder pressure, but its direct measurement is very expensive and involves an intrusive approach to the cylinder. Previous researches demonstrated the direct relationship existing between in-cylinder pressure and engine crankshaft speed and several authors tried to reconstruct the pressure cycle on the basis of the engine speed signal. In this paper we propose the use of a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network to model the relationship between the engine crankshaft speed and some parameters derived from the in-cylinder pressure cycle. This allows to have a non-intrusive estimation of cylinder pressure and a real time evaluation of combustion quality. The structure of the model and the training procedure is outlined in the paper. A possible combustion controller using the information extracted from the crankshaft speed information is also proposed. The application of the neural network model is demonstrated on a single-cylinder spark ignition engine tested in a wide range of speeds and loads. Results confirm that a good estimation of some combustion pressure parameters can be obtained by means of a suitable processing of crankshaft speed signal.

  13. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  14. Automatic speed control of highway traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingman, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Vehicle control system monitors all vehicles in its range, and automatically slows down speeding vehicles by activating governor in vehicle. System determines only maximum speed; speeds below maximum are controlled by vehicle operator. Loss of transmitted signal or activation of emergency over-ride will open fuel line and return control to operator.

  15. Diesel engine torsional vibration control coupling with speed control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yibin; Li, Wanyou; Yu, Shuwen; Han, Xiao; Yuan, Yunbo; Wang, Zhipeng; Ma, Xiuzhen

    2017-09-01

    The coupling problems between shafting torsional vibration and speed control system of diesel engine are very common. Neglecting the coupling problems sometimes lead to serious oscillation and vibration during the operation of engines. For example, during the propulsion shafting operation of a diesel engine, the oscillation of engine speed and the severe vibration of gear box occur which cause the engine is unable to operate. To find the cause of the malfunctions, a simulation model coupling the speed control system with the torsional vibration of deformable shafting is proposed and investigated. In the coupling model, the shafting is simplified to be a deformable one which consists of several inertias and shaft sections and with characteristics of torsional vibration. The results of instantaneous rotation speed from this proposed model agree with the test results very well and are successful in reflecting the real oscillation state of the engine operation. Furthermore, using the proposed model, the speed control parameters can be tuned up to predict the diesel engine a stable and safe running. The results from the tests on the diesel engine with a set of tuned control parameters are consistent with the simulation results very well.

  16. Wheel speed management control system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodzeit, Neil E. (Inventor); Linder, David M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spacecraft attitude control system uses at least four reaction wheels. In order to minimize reaction wheel speed and therefore power, a wheel speed management system is provided. The management system monitors the wheel speeds and generates a wheel speed error vector. The error vector is integrated, and the error vector and its integral are combined to form a correction vector. The correction vector is summed with the attitude control torque command signals for driving the reaction wheels.

  17. Turbine speed control system based on a fuzzy-PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei; Yu, Hai-Yan

    2008-12-01

    The flexibility demand of marine nuclear power plant is very high, the multiple parameters of the marine nuclear power plant with the once-through steam generator are strongly coupled, and the normal PID control of the turbine speed can’t meet the control demand. This paper introduces a turbine speed Fuzzy-PID controller to coordinately control the steam pressure and thus realize the demand for quick tracking and steady state control over the turbine speed by using the Fuzzy control’s quick dynamic response and PID control’s steady state performance. The simulation shows the improvement of the response time and steady state performance of the control system.

  18. Nonlinear engine model for idle speed control

    SciTech Connect

    Livshiz, M.; Sanvido, D.J.; Stiles, S.D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a nonlinear model of an engine used for the design of idle speed control and prediction in a broad range of idle speeds and operational conditions. Idle speed control systems make use of both spark advance and the idle air actuator to control engine speed for improved response relative to variations in the target idle speed due to load disturbances. The control system at idle can be presented by a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) nonlinear model. Information of nonlinearities helps to improve performance of the system over the whole range of engine speeds. A proposed simple nonlinear model of the engine at idle was applied for design of optimal controllers and predictors for improved steady state, load rejection and transition from and to idle. This paper describes vehicle results of engine speed prediction based on the described model.

  19. Low speed phaselock speed control system. [for brushless dc motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulcher, R. W.; Sudey, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A motor speed control system for an electronically commutated brushless dc motor is provided which includes a phaselock loop with bidirectional torque control for locking the frequency output of a high density encoder, responsive to actual speed conditions, to a reference frequency signal, corresponding to the desired speed. The system includes a phase comparator, which produces an output in accordance with the difference in phase between the reference and encoder frequency signals, and an integrator-digital-to-analog converter unit, which converts the comparator output into an analog error signal voltage. Compensation circuitry, including a biasing means, is provided to convert the analog error signal voltage to a bidirectional error signal voltage which is utilized by an absolute value amplifier, rotational decoder, power amplifier-commutators, and an arrangement of commutation circuitry.

  20. Scan speed control for tapping mode SPM

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase the imaging speed of a scanning probe microscope in tapping mode, we propose to use a dynamic controller on 'parachuting' regions. Furthermore, we propose to use variable scan speed on 'upward step' regions, with the speed determined by the error signal of the closed-loop control. We offer line traces obtained on a calibration grating with 25-nm step height, using both standard scanning and our scanning method, as experimental evidence. PMID:22333220

  1. Relationships between stroke parameters and critical swimming speed in a sprint interval training set.

    PubMed

    Barden, John M; Kell, Robert T

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between stroke parameters and critical swimming speed (which is defined as the speed that can theoretically be maintained without exhaustion). Stroke parameters (stroke rate and length) and velocity were recorded for each 25-m length during a controlled sprint interval training set in which participants swam one of the four competitive strokes at a range of intensities below, at, and above critical speed. Eleven participants (8 females, 3 males; age 17.9 +/- 0.9 years) completed a progressive (descending) set of 8 x 100 m repetitions in a 25-m pool according to target times that ranged in intensity from 65% to 100% of the swimmer's best time (the intensity for each repetition increased by 5% throughout the set). The data showed that participants reached critical speed on the fourth repetition and that substantial and unpredictable changes in stroke parameters occurred once critical speed had been reached. Specifically, post-critical speed stroke rate and stroke length were significantly (P < 0.01) greater and less, respectively, than the pre-critical speed values, and these changes occurred in an abrupt and non-linear manner. Overall, the findings suggest that critical speed represents a transition point between two different sets of stroke parameter relationships--one for low-intensity aerobic swimming and one for high-intensity anaerobic swimming.

  2. Speed control for a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolli, Kaylan C.; Mallikarjun, Sreeram; Kola, Krishnamohan; Hall, Ernest L.

    1997-09-01

    Automated guided vehicles (AGVs) have many potential applications in manufacturing, medicine, space and defense. The purpose of this paper is to describe exploratory research on the design of a speed control for a modular autonomous mobile robot controller. The speed control of the traction motor is essential for safe operation of a mobile robot. The challenges of autonomous operation of a vehicle require safe, runaway and collision free operation. A mobile robot test-bed has been constructed using a golf cart base. The computer controlled speed control has been implemented and works with guidance provided by vision system and obstacle avoidance using ultrasonic sensors systems. A 486 computer through a 3- axis motion controller supervises the speed control. The traction motor is controlled via the computer by an EV-1 speed control. Testing of the system was done both in the lab and on an outside course with positive results. This design is a prototype and suggestions for improvements are also given. The autonomous speed controller is applicable for any computer controlled electric drive mobile vehicle.

  3. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  4. Automatic contour welder incorporates speed control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Speed control system maintains the welding torch of an automatic welder at a substantially constant speed. The system is particularly useful when welding contoured or unusually shaped surfaces, which cause the distance from the work surface to the weld carriage to vary in a random manner.

  5. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  6. Speed control with end cushion for high speed air cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Wayne W.; Solbrig, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A high speed air cylinder in which the longitudinal movement of the piston within the air cylinder tube is controlled by pressurizing the air cylinder tube on the accelerating side of the piston and releasing pressure at a controlled rate on the decelerating side of the piston. The invention also includes a method for determining the pressure required on both the accelerating and decelerating sides of the piston to move the piston with a given load through a predetermined distance at the desired velocity, bringing the piston to rest safely without piston bounce at the end of its complete stroke.

  7. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  8. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  9. Speed control system for a windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, C.E.

    1981-06-23

    A speed control system for a windmill having blades which can be feathered for altering speed and with the blades under the control of a mechanism which includes a piston assembly and a fluid governor associated therewith. Spring means are used to feather the blades against the force of the piston assembly which is interconnected with the blades, and the speed of blade rotation actually creates the fluid pressure acting on the piston assembly and a governor is associated with the piston assembly for controlling the position of the piston and thus controlling the feathering of the blades, all according to the speed of rotation of the windmill blades. The windmill can be used for generating electric power, and fail-safe mechanisms are employed for protecting in the event of a windmill blade breakage.

  10. Control of airplanes at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R Mckinnon

    1923-01-01

    Loss of control over the orientation of an airplane as the incidence approaches and enters the region of stalled flight is a prolific cause of serious accidents. This report discusses methods of landing at slow speeds approaching stall.

  11. Helicopter low-speed yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C. (Inventor); Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor); Crowell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system for improving yaw control at low speeds consists of one strake placed on the upper portion of the fuselage facing the retreating rotor blade and another strake placed on the lower portion of the fuselage facing the advancing rotor blade. These strakes spoil the airflow on the helicopter tail boom during hover, low speed flight, and right or left sidewards flight so that less side thrust is required from the tail rotor.

  12. Speed control system for an access gate

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-03-20

    An access control apparatus for an access gate. The access gate typically has a rotator that is configured to rotate around a rotator axis at a first variable speed in a forward direction. The access control apparatus may include a transmission that typically has an input element that is operatively connected to the rotator. The input element is generally configured to rotate at an input speed that is proportional to the first variable speed. The transmission typically also has an output element that has an output speed that is higher than the input speed. The input element and the output element may rotate around a common transmission axis. A retardation mechanism may be employed. The retardation mechanism is typically configured to rotate around a retardation mechanism axis. Generally the retardation mechanism is operatively connected to the output element of the transmission and is configured to retard motion of the access gate in the forward direction when the first variable speed is above a control-limit speed. In many embodiments the transmission axis and the retardation mechanism axis are substantially co-axial. Some embodiments include a freewheel/catch mechanism that has an input connection that is operatively connected to the rotator. The input connection may be configured to engage an output connection when the rotator is rotated at the first variable speed in a forward direction and configured for substantially unrestricted rotation when the rotator is rotated in a reverse direction opposite the forward direction. The input element of the transmission is typically operatively connected to the output connection of the freewheel/catch mechanism.

  13. Miniature, Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilski, Steve; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Miniature Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope (MVS-CMG) was designed for small satellites (mass from less than 1 kg up to 500 kg). Currently available CMGs are too large and heavy, and available miniature CMGs do not provide sufficient control authority for use on practical satellites. This primarily results from the need to greatly increase the speed of rotation of the flywheel in order to reduce the flywheel size and mass. This goal was achieved by making use of a proprietary, space-qualified, high-speed (100,000 rpm) motor technology to spin the flywheel at a speed ten times faster than other known miniature CMGs under development. NASA is supporting innovations in propulsion, power, and guidance and navigation systems for low-cost small spacecraft. One of the key enabling technologies is attitude control mechanisms. CMGs are particularly attractive for spacecraft attitude control since they can achieve higher torques with lower mass and power than reaction wheels, and they provide continuous torque capability that enables precision pointing (in contrast to on-off thruster control). The aim of this work was to develop a miniature, variable-speed CMG that is sized for use on small satellites. To achieve improved agility, these spacecraft must be able to slew at high rate, which requires attitude control actuators that can apply torques on the order of 5 N-m. The MVS-CMG is specifically designed to achieve a high-torque output with a minimum flywheel and system mass. The flywheel can be run over a wide range of speeds, which is important to help reduce/eliminate potential gimbal lock, and can be used to optimize the operational envelope of the CMG.

  14. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b) If...

  15. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b) If...

  16. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b) If...

  17. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b) If...

  18. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b) If...

  19. Regulating vacuum pump speed with feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Ludington, D.C.; Aneshansley, D.J.; Pellerin, R.; Guo, F.

    1992-01-01

    Considerable energy is wasted by the vacuum pump/motor on dairy farms. The output capacity (m{sup 3}/min or cfm) of the vacuum pump always exceeds the capacity needed to milk cows and wash pipelines. Vacuum pumps run at full speed and load regardless of actual need for air. Excess air is admitted through a controller. Energy can be saved from electrical demand reduced by regulating vacuum pump speed according to air based on air usage. An adjustable speed drive (ASD) on the motor and controlled based upon air usage, can reduce the energy used by the vacuum pump. However, the ASD unit tested could not maintain vacuum levels within generally accepted guidelines when air usage changed. Adding a high vacuum reserve and a dual vacuum controller between the vacuum pump and the milking pipeline brought vacuum stability within guidelines. The ASD/dual vacuum system can reduce energy consumption and demand by at least 50 percent during milking and provide better vacuum stability than conventional systems. Tests were not run during washing cycles. Using 1990 costs and only the energy saved during milking, the simple payback on investment in new equipment for a 5 hp motor, speed controller and vacuum regulator would be about 5 years.

  20. Innovation Analysis Approach to Design Parameters of High Speed Train Carriage and Their Intrinsic Complexity Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shou-Ne; Wang, Ming-Meng; Hu, Guang-Zhong; Yang, Guang-Wu

    2017-09-01

    In view of the problem that it's difficult to accurately grasp the influence range and transmission path of the vehicle top design requirements on the underlying design parameters. Applying directed-weighted complex network to product parameter model is an important method that can clarify the relationships between product parameters and establish the top-down design of a product. The relationships of the product parameters of each node are calculated via a simple path searching algorithm, and the main design parameters are extracted by analysis and comparison. A uniform definition of the index formula for out-in degree can be provided based on the analysis of out-in-degree width and depth and control strength of train carriage body parameters. Vehicle gauge, axle load, crosswind and other parameters with higher values of the out-degree index are the most important boundary conditions; the most considerable performance indices are the parameters that have higher values of the out-in-degree index including torsional stiffness, maximum testing speed, service life of the vehicle, and so on; the main design parameters contain train carriage body weight, train weight per extended metre, train height and other parameters with higher values of the in-degree index. The network not only provides theoretical guidance for exploring the relationship of design parameters, but also further enriches the application of forward design method to high-speed trains.

  1. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground, is...

  7. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground, is...

  8. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground, is...

  9. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground, is...

  10. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground, is...

  11. A robust composite nonlinear control scheme for servomotor speed regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanwei; Cheng, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    A parameterised design of robust composite nonlinear controller is proposed for typical second-order servo systems subject to unknown constant disturbance and control input saturation. The control law consists of a linear feedback part for achieving fast response, a nonlinear feedback part for suppressing the overshoot, and a disturbance-compensation mechanism for erasing the steady-state error. An extended state observer is adopted to estimate the unknown disturbance. The closed-loop stability is analysed theoretically. The control scheme is applied to the speed regulation of permanent magnet synchronous motor, and numerical simulations are carried out. The results confirm that the proposed control scheme can achieve fast, smooth, and accurate speed regulation, and has a certain degree of robustness with respect to the amplitude of disturbances and the perturbations of system parameters.

  12. 14 CFR 25.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 25.1149... Accessories § 25.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) There must be a separate propeller speed and... synchronization of all propellers. (d) The propeller speed and pitch controls must be to the right of, and at...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 25.1149... Accessories § 25.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) There must be a separate propeller speed and... synchronization of all propellers. (d) The propeller speed and pitch controls must be to the right of, and at...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 25.1149... Accessories § 25.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) There must be a separate propeller speed and... synchronization of all propellers. (d) The propeller speed and pitch controls must be to the right of, and at...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 25.1149... Accessories § 25.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) There must be a separate propeller speed and... synchronization of all propellers. (d) The propeller speed and pitch controls must be to the right of, and at...

  16. Wind turbine speed control by automatic yawing

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenemser, K.H.; Swift, A.H.P.

    1983-05-01

    A yaw dynamics analysis was developed for a two-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine with passive cyclic pitch variation achieved by letting the blade pair freely oscillate about a common axis with which the blades formed a small prelag angle. This type of rotor was found capable of high yaw rates without imposing vibratory hub moments and without producing noticeable flapping amplitudes. Experiments were conducted with a tail vane stabilized 7.6-m-diam wind rotor driving a three-phase alternator tuned and loaded to produce a rotor torque proportional to the square of the rotor speed. Two yaw control systems which replaced the usual blade feathering controls were investigated: an active yaw control system using a hydraulic rotor speed governor, and a passive system responding to a combination of rotor thrust and torque. During strong gusts both systems limited rotor speed quite accurately. The passive system appeared to be more promising because of its greater reliability and because of the greater ease of adapting it to larger size wind turbines.

  17. Planktonic foraminifera: factors controlling sinking speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kozo; Be, Allan W. H.

    1984-12-01

    Sinking speeds of 330 specimens belonging to 10 extant species of planktonic foraminifera were determined in a sinking column device filled with 3°C seawater. The sinking speed is governed primarily by shell weight and presence/absence of spines. For example, preserved planktonic specimens of Orbulina universa, whose shell weight ranged from 2 to 21 μg, sank 122 to 583 m day -1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.92 on log-log scale. Progressive shell thickening during foraminiferal growth accounts for some of the higher sinking speeds. In addition, shells from sediment on the average sink about three times faster than shells (of equivalent size and species) of planktonic foraminifera collected in near-surface waters. These high values are in part due to the shells often being encrusted with clay and nannoplankton remains. In contrast, the sinking speeds of the spinose species are approximately 3-fold slower than those of the non-spinose species. Based on data from plankton tows, most planktonic foraminifera > 150 μm reach the mean ocean depth of 3800 m in 3 to 12 days depending upon shell weight and presence or absence of spines. Estimated Reynolds numbers range from 0.05 to 24.85 and most exceed a value of 0.5 which is an upper for limit Stokes' Law range, suggesting that foraminifera are out of Stokes' sinking range. The Reynolds number and drag coefficients are negatively well correlated, indicating that drag is one of the important controlling factors in the sinking regime. The presence of spines is significant in increasing drag, decreasing the Reynolds number, and hence reducing the sinking speed.

  18. Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    A Controlled Speed Accessory Drive System was examined in an effort to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars. Concept feasibility and the performance of a typical system during actual road driving conditions were demonstrated. The CSAD system is described as a mechanical device which limits engine accessory speeds, thereby reducing parasitic horsepower losses and improving overall vehicle fuel economy. Fuel consumption data were compiled for fleets of GSA vehicles. Various motor pool locations were selected, each representing different climatic conditions. On the basis of a total accumulated fleet usage of nearly three million miles, an overall fuel economy improvement of 6 percent to 7 percent was demonstrated. Coincident chassis dynamometer tests were accomplished on selected vehicles to establish the effect of different accessory drive systems on exhaust emissions, and to evaluate the magnitude of the mileage benefits which could be derived.

  19. 14 CFR 23.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 23.1149... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) If there are propeller speed or pitch controls, they must be grouped and arranged to allow— (1) Separate control of each...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 23.1149... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) If there are propeller speed or pitch controls, they must be grouped and arranged to allow— (1) Separate control of each...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 23.1149... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) If there are propeller speed or pitch controls, they must be grouped and arranged to allow— (1) Separate control of each...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 23.1149... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) If there are propeller speed or pitch controls, they must be grouped and arranged to allow— (1) Separate control of each...

  3. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow speed...

  4. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow speed...

  5. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow speed...

  6. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow speed...

  7. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow speed...

  8. Effect of periodic inflow on speed-controlled shuttle bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamic behavior of a shuttle bus controlled the speed when passengers come periodically at the origin. We propose the nonlinear-map model for the dynamics of the speed-controlled bus with the periodic inflow. The bus schedule is closely connected to the motion. The motion of the speed-controlled bus is affected by the periodic inflow. The motion of the shuttle bus depends highly on both speed control and periodic inflow. The shuttle bus displays the periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions by varying both periodic inflow and speed control. We clarify the dependence of the bus motion on both speed control and periodic inflow.

  9. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  10. Speed control of automotive diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outbib, Rachid; Graton, Guillaume; Dovifaaz, Xavier; Younes, Rafic

    2014-04-01

    This paper deals with Diesel engine control. More precisely, a model-based approach is considered to stabilise engine speed around a defined value. The model taken into account is nonlinear and contains explicitly the expression of fuel conversion efficiency. In general in the literature, this experimentally obtained quantity is modelled with either a polynomial or an exponential form (see for instance Younes, R. (1993). Elaboration d'un modèle de connaissance du moteur diesel avec turbocompresseur à géométrie variable en vue de l'optimisation de ses émissions. Ecole Centrale de Lyon; Omran, R., Younes, R., Champoussin, J., & Outbib, R. (2011). New indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) model for predicting crankshaft movement. Energy Conversion and Management, 52, 3376-3382). This paper focuses on engine speed feedback stabilisation when fuel conversion efficiency is modelled with an exponential form, which is more suitable for automative applications. Simulation results are proposed to highlight the closed-loop control performances.

  11. 14 CFR 25.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 25.1149... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) There must be a separate propeller speed...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 23.1513 Section 23.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC, determined under § 23.149, must...

  13. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en route...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 23.1513 Section 23.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC, determined under § 23.149, must...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.1513 Section 25.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC determined under § 25.149 must be...

  16. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en route...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 23.1513 Section 23.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC, determined under § 23.149, must...

  18. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en route...

  19. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en route...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.1513 Section 25.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC determined under § 25.149 must be...

  1. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en route...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.1513 Section 25.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC determined under § 25.149 must be...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 23.1513 Section 23.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC, determined under § 23.149, must...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.1513 Section 25.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC determined under § 25.149 must be...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.1513 Section 25.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC determined under § 25.149 must be...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 23.1513 Section 23.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC, determined under § 23.149, must...

  7. Robust adaptive cruise control of high speed trains.

    PubMed

    Faieghi, Mohammadreza; Jalali, Aliakbar; Mashhadi, Seyed Kamal-e-ddin Mousavi

    2014-03-01

    The cruise control problem of high speed trains in the presence of unknown parameters and external disturbances is considered. In particular a Lyapunov-based robust adaptive controller is presented to achieve asymptotic tracking and disturbance rejection. The system under consideration is nonlinear, MIMO and non-minimum phase. To deal with the limitations arising from the unstable zero-dynamics we do an output redefinition such that the zero-dynamics with respect to new outputs becomes stable. Rigorous stability analyses are presented which establish the boundedness of all the internal states and simultaneously asymptotic stability of the tracking error dynamics. The results are presented for two common configurations of high speed trains, i.e. the DD and PPD designs, based on the multi-body model and are verified by several numerical simulations.

  8. High Speed Genetic Lips Detection by Dynamic Search Domain Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Takuya; Wakasa, Yuji; Tanaka, Kanya; Karungaru, Stephen; Fukumi, Minoru

    In this paper, high-speed size and orientation invariant lips detection of a talking person in an active scene using template matching and genetic algorithms is proposed. As part of the objectives, we also try to acquire numerical parameters to represent the lips. The information is very important for many applications, where high performance is required, such as audio-visual speech recognition, speaker identification systems, robot perception and personal mobile devices interfaces. The difficulty in lips detection is mainly due to deformations and geometric changes of the lips during speech and the active scene by free camera motion. In order to enhance the performance in speed and accuracy, initially, the performance is improved on a single still image, that is, the base of video processing. Our proposed system is based on template matching using genetic algorithms (GA). Only one template is prepared per experiment. The template is the closed mouth of a subject, because the application is for personal devices. In our previous study, the main problem was trade-off between search accuracy and search speed. To overcome this problem, we use two methods: scaling window and dynamic search domain control (SD-Control). We therefore focus on the population size of the GA, because it has a direct effect on search accuracy and speed. The effectiveness of the proposed system is demonstrated by performing computer simulations. We achieved a lips detection accuracy of 91.33% at an average processing time of 33.70 milliseconds per frame.

  9. Speed control system design and experimentation for interior PMSM drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Dang, Dong; Thi-Thuy Vu, Nga; Choi, Han Ho; Jung, Jin-Woo

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a robust speed-control strategy using a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives. The sufficient conditions of linear matrix inequalities, which can guarantee the existence of the fuzzy controller gains, are derived from a common quadratic Lyapunov function. Moreover, the maximum torque per ampere control is incorporated to improve the torque production in the constant torque region and the efficiency of the IPMSM drive. The global stability of an observer-based control system is analytically proven. Simulations and experiments are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach through a prototype IPMSM drive system. Consequently, the proposed fuzzy control methodology can achieve less steady-state error and less sensitivity than the conventional feedback linearisation control method under motor parameter variations and external disturbances.

  10. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-01

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  11. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-10

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  12. Study on self-tuning pole assignment speed control of an ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingzhuo; Bo, Liu; Yu, Zhang

    2011-10-01

    Ultrasonic motors have a heavy nonlinearity, which varies with driving conditions. The nonlinearity is a problem as an accurate motion actuator for industrial applications and it is important to eliminate the nonlinearity in order to improve the control performance. In general, complicated control strategies are used to deal with the nonlinearity of ultrasonic motors. This paper proposes a new speed control scheme for ultrasonic motors to overcome the nonlinearity employing a simplified self-tuning control. The speed control model which can reflect the main nonlinear characteristics is obtained using a system identification method based on the step response. Then, a pole assignment speed controller is designed. To avoid the influence of the motor's nonlinearity on the speed control performance, a control parameters' on-line self-tuning strategy utilizing the gain of the model is designed. The proposed control strategy is realized using a DSP circuit, and experiments prove the validity of the proposed speed control scheme.

  13. Vehicular enginee idel speed and cruise control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, A.A.; Sokalski, R.G.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a vehicular cruise and engine idling speed control system. This system consists of: 1.) An actuator adapted for engagement to a vehicular engine throttle that in a first engaged condition is operable upon receipt of a first control signal to move the throttle to regulate the vehicle speed. In a second engaged condition the engine throttle is operable upon receipt of a second control signal to regulate engine idling speed independent of the vehicle speed, 2.) A controller which responds to a sensed vehicle speed and an operator selected vehicle speed to provide the first and second control signal from at least one sensed engine operating condition upon establishment of the second engaged condition, 3.) An operator control for establishment of the first and second engaged conditions, 4.) A sensor throttle, actuated by the operator, is functionally effective for switching the controller output from the second control signal to the first control signal and causes the actuator to position the throttle at an advanced engine idle speed pick-up position, 5.) A device for differentiating between the operator selected vehicle speed throttle position and the regulated engine idle speed pick-up throttle position, 6.) A mechanism for insuring that the engine speed decreases in a uniform manner from the engine idle speed pick-up throttle position to the regulated engine idle speed throttle position.

  14. Vibration suppression of speed-controlled robots with nonlinear control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscariol, Paolo; Gasparetto, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a simple nonlinear control strategy for the simultaneous position tracking and vibration damping of robots is presented. The control is developed for devices actuated by speed-controlled servo drives. The conditions for the asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system are derived by ensuring its passivity. The capability of achieving improved trajectory tracking and vibration suppression is shown through experimental tests conducted on a three-axis Cartesian robot. The control is aimed to be compatible with most industrial applications given the simplicity of implementation, the reduced computational requirements, and the use of joint position as the only measured signal.

  15. Influence of vehicle parameters on critical hunting speed based on Ruzicka model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Dabin; Li, Li; Jin, Xuesong; Xiao, Xinbiao; Ding, Junjun

    2012-05-01

    While introducing foreign advanced technology and cooperating with Chinese famous research institutes, the high-speed vehicles are designed and take the major task of passenger transport in China. In high-speed vehicle, the characteristic of shock absorber is an important parameter which determines overall behavior of the vehicle. The most existing researches neglect the influence of the series stiffness of the shock absorber on the vehicle dynamic behavior and have one-sided views on the equivalent conicity of wheel tread. In this paper, a high speed passenger vehicle in China is modeled to investigate the effect of the parameters taking series hydraulic shock absorber stiffness into consideration on Ruzicka model. Using the vehicle dynamic model, the effect of main suspension parameters on critical speed is studied. In order to verify the reasonableness of shock absorber parameter settings, vibration isolation characteristics are calculated and the relationship between suspension parameters and the vehicle critical hunting speed is studied. To study the influence of equivalent conicity on vehicle dynamic behavior, a series of wheel treads with different conicities are set and the vehicle critical hunting speeds with different wheel treads are calculated. The discipline between the equivalent conicity of wheel tread and critical speed are obtained in vehicle nonlinear system. The research results show that the critical speed of vehicle much depends on wheelset positioning stiffness and anti-hunting motion damper, and the series stiffness produces notable effect on the vehicle dynamic behavior. The critical speed has a peak value with the equivalent conicity increasing, which is different from the traditional opinion in which the critical speed will decrease with the conicity increasing. The relationship between critical speed and conicity of wheel tread is effected by the suspension parameters of the vehicle. The study results obtained offer a method and useful

  16. Sequential control by speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    The speed drive for ac motor is widely used in the industrial field to allow direct control for the speed and torque without any feedback from the motor shaft. By using the ABB ACS800 speed drive unit, the speed and torque can be controlled using sequential control method. Sequential control is one of the application control method provided in the ABB ACS800 Drive, where a set of events or action performed in a particular order one after the other to control the speed and torque of the ac motor. It was claimed that sequential control method is using the preset seven constant speeds being provided in ABB ACS800 drive to control the speed and torque in a continuous and sequential manner. The characteristics and features of controlling the speed and torque using sequential control method can be investigated by observing the graphs and curves plotted which are obtained from the practical result. Sequential control can run either in the Direct Torque Control (DTC) or Scalar motor control mode. By using sequential control method, the ABB ACS800 drive can be programmed to run the motor automatically according to the time setting of the seven preset constant speeds. Besides, the intention of this project is to generate a new form of the experimental set up.

  17. Scalar control on speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of ABB ACS800 variable speed drive operating under Scalar Control mode, and eventually develop a set of experimental procedures for undergraduate laboratory purposes. Scalar Control is the most widespread form of ac drive, for its low cost and simplicity especially implemented in the open loop mode. Scalar control is achieved by controlling the stator voltage and frequency, thus maintaining the motor's air-gap flux at a constant value. To illustrate the control method, the ac drive is configured according to the wiring diagram in the firmware manual that the drive control location can be both local and external. The drive is selected to operate under Factory application macro, whereby either ordinary speed control applications or constant speeds applications may be used. Under ordinary speed control, frequency reference signals are provided to the drive through the analogue input AI1. The drive will operate at the given frequency reference value throughout the operation regardless of any changes in the load. The torque speed curve moves along the speed axis with no changes to the shape as the supply frequencies changes. On the other hand, the drive allows three preset constant speed through digital inputs DI5 and DI6. The drive operate at a constant speed value over a time period, and only switch from one constant speed to another constant speed by triggering the two input switches. Scalar control is most suitable for applications not required high precision, such as blowers, fans and pumps.

  18. Cellular Automaton Models of Highway Traffic Flow Considering Lane-Control and Speed-Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong-Sheng; Li, Wen-Jun; Zeng, Jun-Wei; Wang, Min; Du, Jia-Wei; Guang, Xiao-Ping

    2011-10-01

    As two kinds of management modes of highway traffic control, lane-control, and speed-control produce different effect under different conditions. In this paper, traffic flow cellular automaton models for four-lane highway system with two opposing directions under the above two modes are established considering car and truck mixed running. Through computer numerical simulating, the fundamental diagrams with different parameters are obtained, and after the analysis of density-flux diagrams, the variation discipline of flux with traffic density under different control models is gained. The results indicate that, compared with lane-control, utilization ratio of road can be further improved with speed-control when the truck number increases. The research result is of great significance for reasonable providing theoretical guidance for highway traffic control.

  19. Stochastic control system parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The parameter identification problem of general discrete time, nonlinear, multiple input/multiple output dynamic systems with Gaussian white distributed measurement errors is considered. The knowledge of the system parameterization was assumed to be known. Concepts of local parameter identifiability and local constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability were established. A set of sufficient conditions for the existence of a region of parameter identifiability was derived. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic was provided for finding the regions of parameter identifiability. If the vector of the true parameters is locally constrained maximum likelihood (CML) identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the constrained maximum likelihood estimation sequence will converge to the vector of true parameters.

  20. Steering Law Controlling the Constant Speeds of Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KOYASAKO, Y.; TAKAHASHI, M.

    2016-09-01

    To enable the agile control of satellites, using control moment gyros (CMGs) has become increasingly necessary because of their ability to generate large amounts of torque. However, CMGs have a singularity problem whereby the torque by the CMGs degenerates from three dimensions to two dimensions, affecting spacecraft attitude control performance. This study proposes a new steering control law for CMGs by controlling the constant speed of a CMG. The proposed method enables agile attitude changes, according to the required task, by managing the total angular momentum of the CMGs by considering the distance to external singularities. In the proposed method, the total angular momentum is biased in a specific direction and the angular momentum envelope is extended. The design method can increase the net angular momentum of CMGs which can be exchanged with the satellite. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  1. 14 CFR 23.1149 - Propeller speed and pitch controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch controls. 23.1149... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1149 Propeller speed and pitch controls. (a) If there are...

  2. Digital phase-locked-loop speed sensor for accuracy improvement in analog speed controls. [feedback control and integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital speed control that can be combined with a proportional analog controller is described. The stability and transient response of the analog controller were retained and combined with the long-term accuracy of a crystal-controlled integral controller. A relatively simple circuit was developed by using phase-locked-loop techniques and total error storage. The integral digital controller will maintain speed control accuracy equal to that of the crystal reference oscillator.

  3. Improvement of speed control performance using PID type neurocontroller in an electric vehicle system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, S.; Omatu, S.; Higasa, H.

    1994-12-31

    In order to develop an efficient driving system for electric vehicle (EV), a testing system using motors has been built to simulate the driving performance of EVs. In the testing system, the PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) controller is used to control rotating speed of motor when the EV drives. In this paper, in order to improve the performance of speed control, a neural network is applied to tuning parameters of PID controller. It is shown, through experiments that a neural network can reduce output error effectively while the PID controller parameters are being tuned online. 6 refs.

  4. Stability Analysis of an Adaptive Torque Controller for Variable Speed Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K. E.; Pao, L. Y.; Balas, M. J.; Kulkarni, V.; Fingersh, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    Variable speed wind turbines are designed to follow wind speed variations in low winds in order to maximize aerodynamic efficiency. Unfortunately, uncertainty in the aerodynamic parameters may lead to sub-optimal power capture in variable speed turbines. Adaptive generator torque control is one method of eliminating this sub-optimality; however, before adaptive control can become widely used in the wind industry, it must be proven to be safe. This paper analyzes the stability of an adaptive torque control law and the gain adaptation law in use on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center.

  5. A Sequential Shifting Algorithm for Variable Rotor Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Edwards, Jason M.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    A proof of concept of a continuously variable rotor speed control methodology for rotorcraft is described. Variable rotor speed is desirable for several reasons including improved maneuverability, agility, and noise reduction. However, it has been difficult to implement because turboshaft engines are designed to operate within a narrow speed band, and a reliable drive train that can provide continuous power over a wide speed range does not exist. The new methodology proposed here is a sequential shifting control for twin-engine rotorcraft that coordinates the disengagement and engagement of the two turboshaft engines in such a way that the rotor speed may vary over a wide range, but the engines remain within their prescribed speed bands and provide continuous torque to the rotor; two multi-speed gearboxes facilitate the wide rotor speed variation. The shifting process begins when one engine slows down and disengages from the transmission by way of a standard freewheeling clutch mechanism; the other engine continues to apply torque to the rotor. Once one engine disengages, its gear shifts, the multi-speed gearbox output shaft speed resynchronizes and it re-engages. This process is then repeated with the other engine. By tailoring the sequential shifting, the rotor may perform large, rapid speed changes smoothly, as demonstrated in several examples. The emphasis of this effort is on the coordination and control aspects for proof of concept. The engines, rotor, and transmission are all simplified linear models, integrated to capture the basic dynamics of the problem.

  6. Engine control system having speed-based timing

    DOEpatents

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2012-02-14

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator. The controller is configured to receive a signal indicative of engine speed and compare the engine speed signal with a desired engine speed. The controller is also configured to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve to control an amount of air/fuel mixture delivered to the cylinder based on the comparison.

  7. A novel robust speed controller scheme for PMBLDC motor.

    PubMed

    Thirusakthimurugan, P; Dananjayan, P

    2007-10-01

    The design of speed and position controllers for permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PMBLDC) drive remains as an open problem in the field of motor drives. A precise speed control of PMBLDC motor is complex due to nonlinear coupling between winding currents and rotor speed. In addition, the nonlinearity present in the developed torque due to magnetic saturation of the rotor further complicates this issue. This paper presents a novel control scheme to the conventional PMBLDC motor drive, which aims at improving the robustness by complete decoupling of the design besides minimizing the mutual influence among the speed and current control loops. The interesting feature of this robust control scheme is its suitability for both static and dynamic aspects. The effectiveness of the proposed robust speed control scheme is verified through simulations.

  8. Sensitivity of maximum sprinting speed to characteristic parameters of the muscle force-velocity relationship.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ross H; Umberger, Brian R; Caldwell, Graham E

    2012-05-11

    An accumulation of evidence suggests that the force-velocity relationship (FVR) of skeletal muscle plays a major role in limiting maximum human sprinting speed. However, most of the theories on this limiting role have been non-specific as to how the FVR limits speed. The FVR is characterized by three parameters that each have a different effect on its shape, and could thus limit sprinting speed in different ways: the maximum shortening velocity V(max), the shape parameter A(R), and the eccentric plateau C(ecc). In this study, we sought to determine how specifically the FVR limits sprinting speed using forward dynamics simulations of human locomotion to examine the sensitivity of maximum speed to these three FVR parameters. Simulations were generated by optimizing the model's muscle excitations to maximize the average horizontal speed. The simulation's speed, temporal stride parameters, joint angles, GRF, and muscle activity in general compared well to data from human subjects sprinting at maximum effort. Simulations were then repeated with incremental and isolated adjustments in V(max), A(R), and C(ecc) across a physiological range. The range of speeds (5.22-6.91 m s⁻¹) was most sensitive when V(max) was varied, but the fastest speed of 7.17 m s⁻¹ was attained when A(R) was set to its maximum value, which corresponded to all muscles having entirely fast-twitch fibers. This result was explained by the muscle shortening velocities, which tended to be moderate and within the range where A(R) had its greatest effect on the shape of the FVR. Speed was less sensitive to adjustments in C(ecc), with a range of 6.23-6.70 m s⁻¹. Increases in speed with parameter changes were due to increases in stride length more so than stride frequency. The results suggest that the shape parameter A(R), which primarily determines the amount of muscle force that can be produced at moderate shortening velocities, plays a major role in limiting the maximum sprinting speed. Analysis

  9. Variable current speed controller for eddy current motors

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, H.L.; Bailey, J.M.; Casstevens, J.M.; Dixon, J.H.; Griffith, B.O.; Igou, R.E.

    1982-03-12

    A speed control system for eddy current motors is provided in which the current to the motor from a constant frequency power source is varied by comparing the actual motor speed signal with a setpoint speed signal to control the motor speed according to the selected setpoint speed. A three-phase variable voltage autotransformer is provided for controlling the voltage from a three-phase power supply. A corresponding plurality of current control resistors is provided in series with each phase of the autotransformer output connected to inputs of a three-phase motor. Each resistor is connected in parallel with a set of normally closed contacts of plurality of relays which are operated by control logic. A logic circuit compares the selected speed with the actual motor speed obtained from a digital tachometer monitoring the motor spindle speed and operated the relays to add or substract resistance equally in each phase of the motor input to vary the motor current to control the motor at the selected speed.

  10. Gravitational search algorithm based tuning of a PI speed controller for an induction motor drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Ali, Jamal; Hannan, M. A.; Mohamed, Azah

    2016-03-01

    Proportional-integral (PI)-controller is very useful for controlling speed and mechanical load variables for the three-phase induction motor (TIM) operation. However, the conventional PI-controller has a very exhaustive trial and error procedure for obtaining it is parameters. In this paper, PI speed controller has been improved in it is design technique to suite TIM by utilizing a gravitational search algorithm (GSA) optimization technique. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the speed response has been used as an objective function. An optimal GSA based PI speed controller (GSA-PI) objective function is also employed to tune and minimize the MAE for developing the performance of the TIM in terms of changes speed and mechanical load. This experiment use space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) technique to create pulse width modulation for switching devices for three phase bridge inverter. Results obtained from the GSA-PI speed controller are compared with those obtained through particle swarm optimization (PSO) to validate the developed controller. Then it has been proved that the robustness of the GSA-PI speed controller is far better than that of the1 PSO controller in all tested cases in terms of damping capability and transient response under different mechanical loads and speeds.

  11. Speed control of a small turbine using electrical loading.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small wind turbines with permanent magnet alternators (PMA) seldom have active speed control systems. The turbines rely on passive mechanisms such as furling and/or blade flutter to control the rotational speed. These passive methods cause high mechanical stresses and undesirable noise. One metho...

  12. Gait parameters database for young children: The influences of age and walking speed.

    PubMed

    Van Hamme, A; El Habachi, A; Samson, W; Dumas, R; Chèze, L; Dohin, B

    2015-07-01

    Reference databases are mandatory in orthopaedics because they enable the detection of gait abnormalities in patients. Such databases rarely include data on children under seven years of age. In young children, gait is principally influenced by age and walking speed. The influence of the age-speed interaction has not been well established. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to propose normative values for biomechanical gait parameters in children taking into account age, walking speed, and the age-speed interaction. Gait analyses were performed on 106 healthy children over a large age range (between one and seven years of age) during gait trials at a self-selected speed. From these gait cycles, biomechanical parameters, such as the joint angles and joint power of the lower limbs, were computed. Specific peak values and the times of occurrence of each biomechanical gait parameter were identified. Linear regressions are proposed for studying the influence of age, walking speed and the age-speed interaction. Most of the regressions achieved good accuracy in fitting the curve peaks and times of occurrence, and the normal reference targets of biomechanical parameters could be deduced from these regressions. The biomechanical gait parameters of a pathological case were plotted against the normal reference targets to illustrate the relevance of the proposed targeting method. The normal reference targets for biomechanical gait parameters based on age-speed regressions in a large database might help clinicians detect gait abnormalities in children from one to seven years of age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementation of Temperature Sequential Controller on Variable Speed Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Z. X.; Barsoum, N. N.

    2008-10-01

    There are many pump and motor installations with quite extensive speed variation, such as Sago conveyor, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and water pumping system. A common solution for these applications is to run several fixed speed motors in parallel, with flow control accomplish by turning the motors on and off. This type of control method causes high in-rush current, and adds a risk of damage caused by pressure transients. This paper explains the design and implementation of a temperature speed control system for use in industrial and commercial sectors. Advanced temperature speed control can be achieved by using ABB ACS800 variable speed drive-direct torque sequential control macro, programmable logic controller and temperature transmitter. The principle of direct torque sequential control macro (DTC-SC) is based on the control of torque and flux utilizing the stator flux field orientation over seven preset constant speed. As a result of continuous comparison of ambient temperature to the references temperatures; electromagnetic torque response is particularly fast to the motor state and it is able maintain constant speeds. Experimental tests have been carried out by using ABB ACS800-U1-0003-2, to validate the effectiveness and dynamic respond of ABB ACS800 against temperature variation, loads, and mechanical shocks.

  14. Influences of aerodynamic loads on hunting stability of high-speed railway vehicles and parameter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Han; Lai, Jiang; Sheng, Hong-Zhi

    2014-12-01

    The influences of steady aerodynamic loads on hunting stability of high-speed railway vehicles were investigated in this study. A mechanism is suggested to explain the change of hunting behavior due to actions of aerodynamic loads: the aerodynamic loads can change the position of vehicle system (consequently the contact relations), the wheel/rail normal contact forces, the gravitational restoring forces/moments and the creep forces/moments. A mathematical model for hunting stability incorporating such influences was developed. A computer program capable of incorporating the effects of aerodynamic loads based on the model was written, and the critical speeds were calculated using this program. The dependences of linear and nonlinear critical speeds on suspension parameters considering aerodynamic loads were analyzed by using the orthogonal test method, the results were also compared with the situations without aerodynamic loads. It is shown that the most dominant factors affecting linear and nonlinear critical speeds are different whether the aerodynamic loads considered or not. The damping of yaw damper is the most dominant influencing factor for linear critical speeds, while the damping of lateral damper is most dominant for nonlinear ones. When the influences of aerodynamic loads are considered, the linear critical speeds decrease with the rise of crosswind velocity, whereas it is not the case for the nonlinear critical speeds. The variation trends of critical speeds with suspension parameters can be significantly changed by aerodynamic loads. Combined actions of aerodynamic loads and suspension parameters also affect the critical speeds. The effects of such joint action are more obvious for nonlinear critical speeds.

  15. Pitch-controlled variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    2000-03-01

    Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the early development of wind energy, the majority of wind turbines were operated at constant speed. Recently, the number of variable-speed wind turbines installed in wind farms has increased and more wind turbine manufacturers are making variable-speed wind turbines. This paper covers the operation of variable-speed wind turbines with pitch control. The system the authors considered is controlled to generate maximum energy while minimizing loads. The maximization of energy was only carried out on a static basis and only drive train loads were considered as a constraint. In medium wind speeds, the generator and power converter control the wind turbine to capture maximum energy from the wind. In the high wind speed region, the wind turbine is controlled to maintain the aerodynamic power produced by the wind turbine. Two methods to adjust the aerodynamic power were investigated: pitch control and generator load control, both of which are employed to control the operation of the wind turbine. The analysis and simulation shows that the wind turbine can be operated at its optimum energy capture while minimizing the load on the wind turbine for a wide range of wind speeds.

  16. Spacecraft Pointing Control Using a Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Katsuhiko; Takatsuka, Naoki; Shima, Takeya

    The objective of this study is to align a certain axis of a spacecraft in an arbitrary direction by using a variable-speed single-gimbal CMG. Because the total angular momentum of the spacecraft is conserved in inertial space, the final attitude of the spacecraft is restricted, and it is possible to achieve pointing control of the axis that is orthogonal to the gimbal axis. Using new parameters to express pointing errors, we have proposed a simple pointing control law that can be used to align the pointing axis in an arbitrary direction in inertial space. The validity of the proposed control law is verified by numerical simulations.

  17. Parameter Identification of Steam Turbine Speed Governing System Using an Improved Gravitational Search Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing-liang; Deng, Tong-tian; Wang, Jia-sheng

    2017-05-01

    Since most of the traditional parameter identification methods used in the steam turbine speed governing system (STSGS) have the shortages of great work load, poor fitness and long period by hand, a novel improved gravitational search algorithm (VGSA) method, whose gravitational parameter can be dynamically adjusted according to the current fitness and search space will keep being more and more narrow during the iteration process, is proposed in this paper based on an improved gravitational search algorithm (IGSA). The performance of this new method was identified through the comparisons of the steam turbine speed governing system identification results with IGSA using the measured data from a 600MW and a 300MW thermal power unit. The results show that the new method VGSA has the features of higher precision and higher speed during the identification process, and it brings a new scheme for steam turbine speed governing system identification.

  18. Redundant speed control for brushless Hall effect motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A speed control system for a brushless Hall effect device equipped direct current (D.C.) motor is described. Separate windings of the motor are powered by separate speed responsive power sources. A change in speed, upward or downward, because of the failure of a component of one of the power sources results in a corrective signal being generated in the other power source to supply an appropriate power level and polarity to one winding to cause the motor to be corrected in speed.

  19. Road and engine speed governor with power demand control

    SciTech Connect

    Sturdy, H.D.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a speed limiting governor for use with an engine having a throttle movable between an open throttle position and a close throttle position for regulating the flow of fuel to the engine. The governor is of the type comprising an overriding throttle closing means, and engine speed signal generating means for producing a signal corresponding to engine speed, a load speed signal generating means for producing a signal corresponding to load speed, actuating means including a reversible motor coupled with the overriding throttle closing means and being responsive to motor control signals for energizing the motor in the close throttle direction or in the open throttle direction, logic means responsive to the engine speed signal and the load speed signal for producing motor control signals for moving the overriding means between a wide open throttle position and a close throttle position and to intermediate positions including a reference position. The logic means is responsive to the speed signals for moving the overriding means in the close throttle direction to the reference position when the engine speed reaches a first preset value, and means responsive to engine power demand for energizing the motor to move the overriding means from the reference position toward the open throttle position.

  20. Using Simulation Speeds to Differentiate Controller Interface Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna; Pope, Alan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated two concepts: (1) whether speeding a human-in-the-loop simulation (or the subject's "world") scales time stress in such a way as to cause primary task performance to reveal workload differences between experimental conditions and (2) whether using natural hand motions to control the attitude of an aircraft makes controlling the aircraft easier and more intuitive. This was accomplished by having pilots and non-pilots make altitude and heading changes using three different control inceptors at three simulation speeds. Results indicate that simulation speed does affect workload and controllability. The bank and pitch angle error was affected by simulation speed but not by a simulation speed by controller type interaction; this may have been due to the relatively easy flying task. Results also indicate that pilots could control the bank and pitch angle of an aircraft about equally as well with the glove as with the sidestick. Non-pilots approached the pilots ability to control the bank and pitch angle of an aircraft using the positional glove - where the hand angle is directly proportional to the commanded aircraft angle. Therefore, (1) changing the simulation speed lends itself to objectively indexing a subject s workload and may also aid in differentiating among interface concepts based upon performance if the task being studied is sufficiently challenging and (2) using natural body movements to mimic the movement of an airplane for attitude control is feasible.

  1. Hardware Evolution of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the design of analog speed controllers for DC motors on aerospace systems. The presentation includes an overview of controller evolution, evolvable controller configuration, an emphasis on proportion integral (PI) controllers, schematic diagrams, and experimental results.

  2. Hardware Evolution of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the design of analog speed controllers for DC motors on aerospace systems. The presentation includes an overview of controller evolution, evolvable controller configuration, an emphasis on proportion integral (PI) controllers, schematic diagrams, and experimental results.

  3. Active surge control for variable speed axial compressors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu; Yang, Chunjie; Wu, Ping; Song, Zhihuan

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses active surge control in variable speed axial compressors. A compression system equipped with a variable area throttle is investigated. Based on a given compressor model, a fuzzy logic controller is designed for surge control and a proportional speed controller is used for speed control. The fuzzy controller uses measurements of the change of pressure rise as well as the change of mass flow to determine the throttle opening. The presented approach does not require the knowledge of system equilibrium or the surge line. Numerical simulations show promising results. The proposed fuzzy logic controller performs better than a backstepping controller and is capable to suppress surge at different operating points. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Type-1 and Type-2 Fuzzy Logic and Sliding-Mode Based Speed Control of Direct Torque and Flux Control Induction Motor Drives - A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Tejavathu; Panda, A. K.; Kumar, S. Shiva

    2013-08-01

    In this research study, the performance of direct torque and flux control induction motor drive (IMD) is presented using five different speed control techniques. The performance of IMD mainly depends on the design of speed controller. The PI speed controller requires precise mathematical model, continuous and appropriate gain values. Therefore, adaptive control based speed controller is desirable to achieve high-performance drive. The sliding-mode speed controller (SMSC) is developed to achieve continuous control of motor speed and torque. Furthermore, the type-1 fuzzy logic speed controller (T1FLSC), type-1 fuzzy SMSC and a new type-2 fuzzy logic speed controller are designed to obtain high performance, dynamic tracking behaviour, speed accuracy and also robustness to parameter variations. The performance of each control technique has been tested for its robustness to parameter uncertainties and load disturbances. The detailed comparison of different control schemes are carried out in a MATALB/Simulink environment at different speed operating conditions, such as, forward and reversal motoring under no-load, load and sudden change in speed.

  5. Control technology development. [distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic control design approaches were developed for distributed parameter systems. A hardware flexible beam facility was constructed to demonstrate and verify the theoretical control concepts. Efforts were made in the area of model order estimation for control systems with uncertain or time varying parameters.

  6. A high speed data acquisition and processing system for real time data analysis and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferron, J. R.

    1992-11-01

    A high speed data acquisition system which is closely coupled with a high speed digital processor is described. Data acquisition at a rate of 40 million 14 bit data values per second is possible simultaneously with data processing at a rate of 80 million floating point operations per second. This is achieved by coupling a commercially available VME format single board computer based on the Intel i860 microprocessor with a custom designed first-in, first-out memory circuit that transfers data at high speed to the processor board memory. Parallel processing to achieve increased computation speed is easily implemented because the data can be transferred simultaneously to multiple processor boards. Possible applications include high speed process control and real time data reduction. A specific example is described in which this hardware is used to implement a feedback control system for 18 parameters which uses 100 input signals and achieves a 100 μs cycle time.

  7. Follow the leader: visual control of speed in pedestrian following.

    PubMed

    Rio, Kevin W; Rhea, Christopher K; Warren, William H

    2014-02-07

    When people walk together in groups or crowds they must coordinate their walking speed and direction with their neighbors. This paper investigates how a pedestrian visually controls speed when following a leader on a straight path (one-dimensional following). To model the behavioral dynamics of following, participants in Experiment 1 walked behind a confederate who randomly increased or decreased his walking speed. The data were used to test six models of speed control that used the leader's speed, distance, or combinations of both to regulate the follower's acceleration. To test the optical information used to control speed, participants in Experiment 2 walked behind a virtual moving pole, whose visual angle and binocular disparity were independently manipulated. The results indicate the followers match the speed of the leader, and do so using a visual control law that primarily nulls the leader's optical expansion (change in visual angle), with little influence of change in disparity. This finding has direct applications to understanding the coordination among neighbors in human crowds.

  8. Follow the leader: Visual control of speed in pedestrian following

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Kevin W.; Rhea, Christopher K.; Warren, William H.

    2014-01-01

    When people walk together in groups or crowds they must coordinate their walking speed and direction with their neighbors. This paper investigates how a pedestrian visually controls speed when following a leader on a straight path (one-dimensional following). To model the behavioral dynamics of following, participants in Experiment 1 walked behind a confederate who randomly increased or decreased his walking speed. The data were used to test six models of speed control that used the leader's speed, distance, or combinations of both to regulate the follower's acceleration. To test the optical information used to control speed, participants in Experiment 2 walked behind a virtual moving pole, whose visual angle and binocular disparity were independently manipulated. The results indicate the followers match the speed of the leader, and do so using a visual control law that primarily nulls the leader's optical expansion (change in visual angle), with little influence of change in disparity. This finding has direct applications to understanding the coordination among neighbors in human crowds. PMID:24511143

  9. Telemetry Speeds Forest-Fire Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Cherbonneaux, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Airborne system rapidly delivers hard copy to firefighters. Sensors in airplane send data to ground station for image processing. Imagery immediately transferred to U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) maps by photo interpreter. Maps transmitted by telecopies directly to fire-control camps. Receipt by fire camp less than 10 minutes. Information aids in decisions involving deployment of firefighters and equipment, flood control, monitoring oilspills, observing thermal currents, and pollutions monitoring.

  10. Telemetry Speeds Forest-Fire Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Cherbonneaux, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Airborne system rapidly delivers hard copy to firefighters. Sensors in airplane send data to ground station for image processing. Imagery immediately transferred to U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) maps by photo interpreter. Maps transmitted by telecopies directly to fire-control camps. Receipt by fire camp less than 10 minutes. Information aids in decisions involving deployment of firefighters and equipment, flood control, monitoring oilspills, observing thermal currents, and pollutions monitoring.

  11. Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Sensitivity of Objective Parameters towards Recording Frame Rate

    PubMed Central

    Kunduk, Melda; Döllinger, Michael; Alexiou, Christoph; Dubrovskiy, Denis; Semmler, Marion; Seger, Anja; Bohr, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The current use of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy in clinic settings involves subjective visual assessment of vocal fold vibratory characteristics. However, objective quantification of vocal fold vibrations for evidence-based diagnosis and therapy is desired, and objective parameters assessing laryngeal dynamics have therefore been suggested. This study investigated the sensitivity of the objective parameters and their dependence on recording frame rate. A total of 300 endoscopic high-speed videos with recording frame rates between 1000 and 15 000 fps were analyzed for a vocally healthy female subject during sustained phonation. Twenty parameters, representing laryngeal dynamics, were computed. Four different parameter characteristics were found: parameters showing no change with increasing frame rate; parameters changing up to a certain frame rate, but then remaining constant; parameters remaining constant within a particular range of recording frame rates; and parameters changing with nearly every frame rate. The results suggest that (1) parameter values are influenced by recording frame rates and different parameters have varying sensitivities to recording frame rate; (2) normative values should be determined based on recording frame rates; and (3) the typically used recording frame rate of 4000 fps seems to be too low to distinguish accurately certain characteristics of the human phonation process in detail. PMID:27990428

  12. The effects of head movement and walking speed on gait parameters in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Sunkarat, Somporn; Khamsaen, Khanamporn; Meeyan, Kitti; Treleaven, Julia

    2014-04-01

    It has been documented that neck pain can influence sensorimotor function. However, little is known about the effects of head movement and walking speed on gait characteristics in patients with neck pain. The aim of this study was to determine gait characteristics of patients with neck pain during walking with different head movements and gait speeds as compared to a control group without neck pain. Twenty women aged between 18 and 59 years with chronic neck pain (>3 months) and 20 healthy controls of similar age, weight and height were recruited into the study. Participants with neck pain completed the Neck Disability Index and Visual Analogue Pain Scale. The experiment consisted of two walking sessions. The first session included walking with head straight, head up-down, and head turns from side to side. The second session included walking at comfortable and maximum speeds. Each trial was performed twice. Gait parameters measured using GAITRite walkway system were step length, stride length, step time, stride time, step width, cadence and gait speed. Patients with chronic neck pain demonstrated a narrower step width, a shorter step length and a slower gait speed during walking with the head movements and at maximum speed compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). Maximum gait speed was moderately correlated with pain intensity and disability (p < 0.01). The results suggest that patients with chronic neck pain have gait disturbances. This supports the notion that assessment of gait should be addressed in patients with persistent neck pain.

  13. An Automatic Speed Control for Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1928-01-01

    Described here is an automatic control that has been used in several forms in wind tunnels at the Washington Navy Yard. The form now in use with the 8-foot tunnel at the Navy Yard is considered here. Details of the design and operation of the automatic control system are given. Leads from a Pitot tube are joined to an inverted cup manometer located above a rheostat. When the sliding weight of this instrument is set to a given notch, say for 40 m.p.h, the beam tip vibrates between two electric contacts that feed the little motor. Thus, when the wind is too strong or too weak, the motor automatically throws the rheostat slide forward and backward. If it failed to function well, the operator would notice the effect on his meniscus, and would operate the hand control by merely pressing the switch.

  14. Fuzzy logic enhanced speed control of an indirect field-oriented induction machine drive

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, B.; Xu, L.; Tang, Y.

    1997-09-01

    Field orientation control (FOC) of induction machines has permitted fast transient response by decoupled torque and flux control. However, field orientation detuning caused by parameter variations is a major difficulty for indirect FOC methods. Traditional probability density function (PID) controllers have trouble meeting a wide range of speed tracking performance even when proper field orientation is achieved. PID controller performance is severely degraded when detuning occurs. This paper presents a fuzzy logic design approach that can meet the speed tracking requirements even when detuning occurs. Computer simulations and experimental results obtained via a general-purpose digital signal processor (DSP) system are presented.

  15. Optoelectronic measurement for parameters of high-speed flying objects based on laser screen and photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Donge; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Ji; Xiao, Kai-jia; Wang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The impacting or penetrating power of high-speed flying object can be evaluated by its mass and velocity, so the velocity and the mass are two key parameters. Here we present an optoelectronic measurement method for parameters of high-speed flying objects based on parallel laser screen and photodiode array. The system consists of two thin laser screens with parallel each other and certain distance, orthogonal two dimensional photodiode arrays, data acquisition module, control module and data transmission processing module. When the object flies through the thin screen, the incident light of some photodiodes at the corresponding position is blocked and the output states of the corresponding photodiodes are changed. The flying position, which can be used to correct the distance error, velocity and the overall dimension of the object are determined by high-speed sampling and storing all the output states of photodiode array at any sampling moment when the object flying through the thin screens. We employed a line-shaped laser diode and a Fresnel lens with long-focal-length and aberration-free to generate parallel laser screen. The high-speed large-amount parallel data sampling module is comprised of four FPGA-based boards with built-in FIFO buffer memory, and the control module is constructed by one FPGA board and a FLASH memory. Functions simulation and experiment results of the FPGA-based data acquisition storage and the LabVIEW-based data processing indicate that the method and the design are feasible.

  16. Parameter sensitivities affecting the flutter speed of a MW-sized blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, Donald Wayne, Jr.

    2005-08-01

    With the current trend toward larger and larger horizontal axis wind turbines, classical flutter is becoming a more critical issue. Recent studies have indicated that for a single blade turning in still air the flutter speed for a modern 35 m blade occurs at approximately twice its operating speed (2 per rev), whereas for smaller blades (5-9 m), both modern and early designs, the flutter speeds are in the range of 3.5-6 per rev. Scaling studies demonstrate that the per rev flutter speed should not change with scale. Thus, design requirements that change with increasing blade size are producing the concurrent reduction in per rev flutter speeds. In comparison with an early small blade design (5 m blade), flutter computations indicate that the non rotating modes which combine to create the flutter mode change as the blade becomes larger (i.e., for the larger blade the second flapwise mode, as opposed to the first flapwise mode for the smaller blade, combines with the first torsional mode to produce the flutter mode). For the more modern smaller blade design (9 m blade), results show that the non rotating modes that couple are similar to those of the larger blade. For the wings of fixed-wing aircraft, it is common knowledge that judicious selection of certain design parameters can increase the airspeed associated with the onset of flutter. Two parameters, the chordwise location of the center of mass and the ratio of the flapwise natural frequency to the torsional natural frequency, are especially significant. In this paper studies are performed to determine the sensitivity of the per rev flutter speed to these parameters for a 35 m wind turbine blade. Additional studies are performed to determine which structural characteristics of the blade are most significant in explaining the previously mentioned per rev flutter speed differences. As a point of interest, flutter results are also reported for two recently designed 9 m twist/coupled blades.

  17. Parameter sensitivities affecting the flutter speed of a MW-sized blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, Donald Wayne, Jr.

    2004-10-01

    With the current trend toward larger and larger horizontal axis wind turbines, classical flutter is becoming a more critical issue. Recent studies have indicated that for a single blade turning in still air the flutter speed for a modern 35 m blade occurs at approximately twice its operating speed (2 per rev), whereas for smaller blades (5-9 m), both modern and early designs, the flutter speeds are in the range of 3.5-6 per rev. Scaling studies demonstrate that the per rev flutter speed should not change with scale. Thus, design requirements that change with increasing blade size are producing the concurrent reduction in per rev flutter speeds. In comparison with an early small blade design (5 m blade), flutter computations indicate that the non rotating modes which combine to create the flutter mode change as the blade becomes larger (i.e., for the larger blade the second flapwise mode, as opposed to the first flapwise mode for the smaller blade, combines with the first torsional mode to produce the flutter mode). For the more modern smaller blade design (9 m blade), results show that the non rotating modes that couple are similar to those of the larger blade. For the wings of fixed-wing aircraft, it is common knowledge that judicious selection of certain design parameters can increase the airspeed associated with the onset of flutter. Two parameters, the chordwise location of the center of mass and the ratio of the flapwise natural frequency to the torsional natural frequency, are especially significant. In this paper studies are performed to determine the sensitivity of the per rev flutter speed to these parameters for a 35 m wind turbine blade. Additional studies are performed to determine which structural characteristics of the blade are most significant in explaining the previously mentioned per rev flutter speed differences. As a point of interest, flutter results are also reported for two recently designed 9 m twist/coupled blades.

  18. The impact of ocean sound speed variability on the uncertainty of geoacoustic parameter estimates.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-Min; Chapman, N Ross

    2009-05-01

    This paper investigates the influence of water column variability on the estimates of geoacoustic model parameters obtained from matched field inversions. The acoustic data were collected on the New Jersey continental shelf during shallow water experiments in August 2006. The oceanographic variability was evident when the data were recorded. To quantify the uncertainties of the geoacoustic parameter estimates in this environment, Bayesian matched field geoacoustic inversion was applied to multi-tonal continuous wave data. The spatially and temporally varying water column sound speed is parametrized in terms of empirical orthogonal functions and included in the inversion. Its impact on the geometric and geoacoustic parameter estimates is then analyzed by the inter-parameter correlations. Two different approaches were used to obtain information about the variation of the water sound speed. One used only the profiles collected along the experimental track during the experiment, and the other also included observations collected over a larger area. The geoacoustic estimates from both the large and small sample sets are consistent. However, due to the diversity of the oceanic sound speed, more empirical orthogonal functions are needed in the inversion when more sound speed profile samples are used.

  19. Automatic Welding System Using Speed Controllable Autonomous Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewon; Suto, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Junya; Kim, Jongcheol; Suga, Yasuo

    A prototype of autonomous mobile robot with two vision sensors for automatic welding of steel plates was constructed. The robot can move straight, steer and turn around the robot center by controlling the driving speed of the two wheels respectively. At the tip of the movable arm, two CCD cameras are fixed. A local camera observes the welding line near the welding torch and another wide camera observes relatively wide area in front of the welding part. The robot controls the traveling speed in accordance with the shape of the welding line. In the case of straight welding line, the speed of the robot is accelerated and the welding efficiency is improved. However, if the robot finds a corner of welding line, the speed is decelerated in order to realize the precise seam tracking and stable welding. Therefore, the robot can realize precise and high speed seam-tracking by controlling the travel speed. The effectiveness of the control system is confirmed by welding experiments.

  20. Hardware Evolution of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA). The performance of these evolved controllers is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller.

  1. Hardware Evolution of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA). The performance of these evolved controllers is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller.

  2. Microprocessor Control of Low Speed VSTOL Flight.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-08

    sec u Control vector V Total velocity, ft/sec v y -axis velocity, ft/sec -10- LIST OF SYMBOLS (Cont.) Variables Description w z-axis velocity, ft/sec...X Aerodynamic force along the x-axis x Axial position, ft x State vector Y Aerodynamic force along the y -axis y Lateral position, ft Z Aerodynamic...force along the z-axis z Vertical position, ft Variables (Greek) Angle of attack, deg Sideslip angle, deg A Disturbance quantity Y Vertical flight path

  3. Control structures for high speed processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, G. K.; Mankin, R.; Owsley, P. A.; Kim, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A special processor was designed to function as a Reed Solomon decoder with throughput data rate in the Mhz range. This data rate is significantly greater than is possible with conventional digital architectures. To achieve this rate, the processor design includes sequential, pipelined, distributed, and parallel processing. The processor was designed using a high level language register transfer language. The RTL can be used to describe how the different processes are implemented by the hardware. One problem of special interest was the development of dependent processes which are analogous to software subroutines. For greater flexibility, the RTL control structure was implemented in ROM. The special purpose hardware required approximately 1000 SSI and MSI components. The data rate throughput is 2.5 megabits/second. This data rate is achieved through the use of pipelined and distributed processing. This data rate can be compared with 800 kilobits/second in a recently proposed very large scale integration design of a Reed Solomon encoder.

  4. An Adaptive Speed Control System for Micro Electro Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Aligiri, E.; Tan, P. C.; Zarepour, H.

    2009-11-01

    The integration of the state-of-the-art monitoring and adaptive control technologies can substantially improve the performance of EDM process. This paper reports the development of an adaptive speed control system for micro EDM which demands a higher level of accuracy. Monitoring of the machining state is conducted during the machining process so that the conditions are analysed continuously. Various schemes for the machining state are used for decision making. For instance, upon recognition of abnormal discharges, the developed adaptive speed control system would adjust the electrode feeding speed in an attempt to correct the machining state. Experimental verification shows that the proposed system can improve the machining time by more than 50%. In addition, a more accurate machined feature can be produced as compared to traditional EDM servo control systems.

  5. Hardware structures of hydronic systems for speed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avram, M.; Spânu, A.; Bucşan, C.; Besnea, D.

    2016-08-01

    Most hydraulic actuating systems use constant flow pumps, for economic reasons. The resistive method is then used to control the speed of the actuated load. In the case of high performance systems the flow area is modified using analogical or numeric electric commands applied to proportional flow control devices. In the first part of the paper some hardware structures of hydronic actuating systems used for speed control are presented, and in the second part two experimental models of such systems are presented. Some aspects regarding the output improvement of such a system are also considered.

  6. Flare-Control Effectiveness at Hypersonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontis, Konstantinos

    The effects of flare control on the aerodynamic characteristics, performance, and stability of a cylindrical body under laminar and turbulent boundary layer conditions have been studied experimentally and computationally. The experimental study has been carried out in a hypersonic gun tunnel at a Mach number of 8.2 and a Reynolds number of 158,100, based on the cylinder diameter, at flare angles 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees and at pitch angles of -12 to 12 deg for the 10 deg flare case only. The surface flow was studied using the oil-dot technique. Some information regarding the shock layer was obtained from schlieren pictures. The effects of turbulence on onset of separation were also deduced from pressure measurements over the cylinder and the flare. The forces were measured with a three-component balance equipped with semiconductor strain gauges. The effects of centre of gravity (CG) location on the aerodynamic characteristics and in particular on the CMαwere examined. The results under turbulent conditions and zero-incidence were compared with numerical simulations performed using a 3-D time-marching Navier-Stokes code. The magnitude of the separated region, the minimum flare angle required to induce separation, and the effects of small-scale separation are detailed.

  7. Control strategy for a variable-speed wind energy conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, A.; Veillette, D.; Rajagopalan, V.

    1979-01-01

    A control concept for a variable-speed wind energy conversion system is proposed, for which a self-exited asynchronous cage generator is used along with a system of thyristor converters. The control loops are the following: (1) regulation of the entrainment speed as function of available mechanical energy by acting on the resistance couple of the asynchronous generator; (2) control of electric power delivered to the asynchronous machine, functioning as a motor, for start-up of the vertical axis wind converter; and (3) limitation of the slip value, and by consequence, of the induction currents in the presence of sudden variations of input parameters.

  8. [Functional parameters and their association with gait speed in Chilean community-dwelling older adults].

    PubMed

    Rybertt, Christopher; Cuevas, Silvia; Winkler, Ximena; Lavados, Pamela; Martínez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Gait speed is a test to measure functional capacity in older adults. Nevertheless, the factors influencing this variable are not well described in South American populations. To determine the relationship between usual and maximal walking speed and functional parameters among Chilean community-dwelling older adults. An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study including 69 older adults was conducted. The usual and maximal gait speeds were associated with body composition (body mass index), upper limbs muscle strength (arm curl-ups), lower limbs muscle strength (30 seconds sit-to-stand test), global function (Barthel index), ankle flexibility (range of motion), dynamic balance (timed Up & Go test) and aerobic capacity (2 minutes walking test). The ankle flexibility, lower limbs strength and aerobic capacity influenced the maximal speed (R2 =0.65; p <0.001), while the usual speed was influenced by upper limbs and lower limbs strength and by the aerobic capacity (R2 = 0.51; p <0.001). The usual and maximal gait speeds are mostly influenced by the lower limbs muscle strength plus aerobic capacity.

  9. High-Speed Computer-Controlled Switch-Matrix System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E.; Cory, B.; Ho, P.; Hoffman, M.

    1985-01-01

    High-speed computer-controlled switch-matrix system developed for communication satellites. Satellite system controlled by onboard computer and all message-routing functions between uplink and downlink beams handled by newly developed switch-matrix system. Message requires only 2-microsecond interconnect period, repeated every millisecond.

  10. High-Speed Computer-Controlled Switch-Matrix System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E.; Cory, B.; Ho, P.; Hoffman, M.

    1985-01-01

    High-speed computer-controlled switch-matrix system developed for communication satellites. Satellite system controlled by onboard computer and all message-routing functions between uplink and downlink beams handled by newly developed switch-matrix system. Message requires only 2-microsecond interconnect period, repeated every millisecond.

  11. Selective Use of Optical Variables to Control Forward Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Awe, Cynthia A.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Previous work on the perception and control of simulated vehicle speed has examined the contributions of optical flow rate (angular visual speed) and texture, or edge rate (frequency of passing terrain objects or markings) on the perception and control of forward speed. However, these studies have not examined the ability to selectively use edge rate or flow rate. The two studies reported here show that subjects found it very difficult to arbitrarily direct attention to one or the other of these variables; but that the ability to selectively use these variables is linked to the visual contextual information about the relative validity (linkage with speed) of the two variables. The selectivity also resulted in different velocity adaptation levels for events in which flow rate and edge rate specified forward speed. Finally, the role of visual context in directing attention was further buttressed by the finding that the incorrect perception of changes in ground texture density tended to be coupled with incorrect perceptions of changes in forward speed.

  12. Speed limit and ramp meter control for traffic flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatin, Paola; Göttlich, Simone; Kolb, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The control of traffic flow can be related to different applications. In this work, a method to manage variable speed limits combined with coordinated ramp metering within the framework of the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) network model is introduced. Following a 'first-discretize-then-optimize' approach, the first order optimality system is derived and the switch of speeds at certain fixed points in time is explained, together with the boundary control for the ramp metering. Sequential quadratic programming methods are used to solve the control problem numerically. For application purposes, experimental setups are presented wherein variable speed limits are used as a traffic guidance system to avoid traffic jams on highway interchanges and on-ramps.

  13. Systematic Controller Design Methodology for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Balas, M. J.

    2002-02-01

    Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three operational regions. This paper provides a guide for controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship between the two opposing metrics is easily visualized.

  14. Neural control and modulation of swimming speed in the larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Severi, Kristen E; Portugues, Ruben; Marques, João C; O'Malley, Donald M; Orger, Michael B; Engert, Florian

    2014-08-06

    Vertebrate locomotion at different speeds is driven by descending excitatory connections to central pattern generators in the spinal cord. To investigate how these inputs determine locomotor kinematics, we used whole-field visual motion to drive zebrafish to swim at different speeds. Larvae match the stimulus speed by utilizing more locomotor events, or modifying kinematic parameters such as the duration and speed of swimming bouts, the tail-beat frequency, and the choice of gait. We used laser ablations, electrical stimulation, and activity recordings in descending neurons of the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) to dissect their contribution to controlling forward movement. We found that the activity of single identified neurons within the nMLF is correlated with locomotor kinematics, and modulates both the duration and oscillation frequency of tail movements. By identifying the contribution of individual supraspinal circuit elements to locomotion kinematics, we build a better understanding of how the brain controls movement.

  15. Neural control and modulation of swimming speed in the larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marques, João C.; O'Malley, Donald M.; Orger, Michael B.; Engert, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vertebrate locomotion at different speeds is driven by descending excitatory connections to central pattern generators in the spinal cord. To investigate how these inputs determine locomotor kinematics, we used whole-field visual motion to drive zebrafish to swim at different speeds. Larvae match the stimulus speed by utilizing more locomotor events, or modifying kinematic parameters such as the duration and speed of swimming bouts, the tail-beat frequency, and choice of gait. We used laser ablations, electrical stimulation, and activity recordings in descending neurons of the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) to dissect their contribution to controlling forward movement. We found that the activity of single identified neurons within the nMLF is correlated with locomotor kinematics, and modulates both the duration and oscillation frequency of tail movements. By identifying the contribution of individual supraspinal circuit elements to locomotion kinematics we build a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. PMID:25066084

  16. Control algorithms for effective operation of variable-speed wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report describes a computer code, called ASYM and provides results from its application in simulating the control of the 34-m Test Bed vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) in Bushland, Texas. The code synthesizes dynamic wind speeds on a second-by-second basis in the time domain. The wind speeds conform to a predetermined spectral content governed by the hourly average wind speed that prevails at each hour of the simulation. The hourly average values are selected in a probabilistic sense through the application of Markov chains, but their cumulative frequency of occurrence conforms to a Rayleigh distribution that is governed by the mean annual wind speed of the site selected. The simulated wind speeds then drive a series of control algorithms that enable the code to predict key operational parameters such as number of annual starts and stops, annual energy production, and annual fatigue damage at a critically stressed joint on the wind turbine. This report also presents results from the application of ASYM that pertain to low wind speed cut-in and cut-out conditions and controlled operation near critical speed ranges that excite structural vibrations that can lead to accelerated fatigue damage.

  17. Adaptive speed/position control of induction motor based on SPR approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hou-Tsan

    2014-11-01

    A sensorless speed/position tracking control scheme for induction motors is proposed subject to unknown load torque via adaptive strictly positive real (SPR) approach design. A special nonlinear coordinate transform is first provided to reform the dynamical model of the induction motor. The information on rotor fluxes can thus be derived from the dynamical model to decide on the proportion of input voltage in the d-q frame under the constraint of the maximum power transfer property of induction motors. Based on the SPR approach, the speed and position control objectives can be achieved. The proposed control scheme is to provide the speed/position control of induction motors while lacking the knowledge of some mechanical system parameters, such as the motor inertia, motor damping coefficient, and the unknown payload. The adaptive control technique is thus involved in the field oriented control scheme to deal with the unknown parameters. The thorough proof is derived to guarantee the stability of the speed and position of control systems of induction motors. Besides, numerical simulation and experimental results are also provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  18. Parameters and controlling of plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, O.

    1981-01-01

    The parameters involved in plasma polymerization reactions are examined and the use of these parameters in the control of plasma reactions is dicussed. The variables associated with the reaction chamber, electrical discharge form, frequency and electrical source for the development of plasma, and monitoring techniques are addressed.

  19. Adaptive Torque Control of Variable Speed Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K. E.

    2004-08-01

    The primary focus of this work is a new adaptive controller that is designed to resemble the standard non-adaptive controller used by the wind industry for variable speed wind turbines below rated power. This adaptive controller uses a simple, highly intuitive gain adaptation law designed to seek out the optimal gain for maximizing the turbine's energy capture. It is designed to work even in real, time-varying winds.

  20. Linear Parameter Varying Control for Actuator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A robust linear parameter varying (LPV) control synthesis is carried out for an HiMAT vehicle subject to loss of control effectiveness. The scheduling parameter is selected to be a function of the estimates of the control effectiveness factors. The estimates are provided on-line by a two-stage Kalman estimator. The inherent conservatism of the LPV design is reducing through the use of a scaling factor on the uncertainty block that represents the estimation errors of the effectiveness factors. Simulations of the controlled system with the on-line estimator show that a superior fault-tolerance can be achieved.

  1. Neural rotational speed control for wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundarain, M.; Alberdi, M.; Garrido, A. J.; Garrido, I.

    2011-02-01

    Among the benefits arising from an increasing use of renewable energy are: enhanced security of energy supply, stimulation of economic growth, job creation and protection of the environment. In this context, this study analyses the performance of an oscillating water column device for wave energy conversion in function of the stalling behaviour in Wells turbines, one of the most widely used turbines in wave energy plants. For this purpose, a model of neural rotational speed control system is presented, simulated and implemented. This scheme is employed to appropriately adapt the speed of the doubly-fed induction generator coupled to the turbine according to the pressure drop entry, so as to avoid the undesired stalling behaviour. It is demonstrated that the proposed neural rotational speed control design adequately matches the desired relationship between the slip of the doubly-fed induction generator and the pressure drop input, improving the power generated by the turbine generator module.

  2. The Speed of Light and the Hubble parameter: The Mass-Boom Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

    2008-05-29

    We prove here that Newton's universal gravitation and momentum conservation laws together reproduce Weinberg's relation. It is shown that the Hubble parameter H must be built in this relation, or equivalently the age of the Universe t. Using a wave-to-particle interaction technique we then prove that the speed of light c decreases with cosmological time, and that c is proportional to the Hubble parameter H. We see the expansion of the Universe as a local effect due to the LAB value of the speed of light co taken as constant. We present a generalized red shift law and find a predicted acceleration for photons that agrees well with the result from Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration. We finally present a cosmological model coherent with the above results that we call the Mass-Boom. It has a linear increase of mass m with time as a result of the speed of light c linear decrease with time, and the conservation of momentum mc. We obtain the baryonic mass parameter equal to the curvature parameter, {omega}{sub m} {omega}{sub k}, so that the model is of the type of the Einstein static, closed, finite, spherical, unlimited, with zero cosmological constant. This model is the cosmological view as seen by photons, neutrinos, tachyons etc. in contrast with the local view, the LAB reference. Neither dark matter nor dark energy is required by this model. With an initial constant speed of light during a short time we get inflation (an exponential expansion). This converts, during the inflation time, the Planck's fluctuation length of 10{sup -33} cm to the present size of the Universe (about 10{sup 28} cm, constant from then on). Thereafter the Mass-Boom takes care to bring the initial values of the Universe (about 10{sup 15} gr) to the value at the present time of about 10{sup 55} gr.

  3. Direct Torque Control of a Small Wind Turbine with a Sliding-Mode Speed Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lal Senanayaka, Jagath; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper. the method of direct torque control in the presence of a sliding-mode speed controller is proposed for a small wind turbine being used in water heating applications. This concept and control system design can be expanded to grid connected or off-grid applications. Direct torque control of electrical machines has shown several advantages including very fast dynamics torque control over field-oriented control. Moreover. the torque and flux controllers in the direct torque control algorithms are based on hvsteretic controllers which are nonlinear. In the presence of a sliding-mode speed control. a nonlinear control system can be constructed which is matched for AC/DC conversion of the converter that gives fast responses with low overshoots. The main control objectives of the proposed small wind turbine can be maximum power point tracking and soft-stall power control. This small wind turbine consists of permanent magnet synchronous generator and external wind speed. and rotor speed measurements are not required for the system. However. a sensor is needed to detect the rated wind speed overpass events to activate proper speed references for the wind turbine. Based on the low-cost design requirement of small wind turbines. an available wind speed sensor can be modified. or a new sensor can be designed to get the required measurement. The simulation results will be provided to illustrate the excellent performance of the closed-loop control system in entire wind speed range (4-25 m/s).

  4. The Parameter Identification Method of Blade Asynchronous Vibration under Sweep Speed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, L.; Liu, H.; Zang, C.; Wang, D.; Hu, W.; Wang, L.

    2016-09-01

    The non-contact blade tip timing (BTT) measurement, with the advantage of measuring all the disk blades, has obtained widespread applications in industries. The measured data is under-sampled. Generally asynchronous vibrations will appear with the rotating speed sweeping under the excitation of the flow field, which can create a great increase of the blade vibration amplitude that is potentially harmful to the operation reliability of the turbine. In this paper, the investigation on the parameter identification method of blade asynchronous vibration under variable speed excitations was deeply explored. A novel method of parameter identification has been developed, based on the two sensors data interpolation in order to increase the frequency that can be identified. The spectral analysis with all phases Fast Fourier Transform (apFFT) was performed to extract the accuracy amplitude and phase of the blade. The order tracking calculation was carried out based on the minimum angle error. A mathematical model with four blades was developed to simulate the BTT testing data which can produce the simulation of speed sweep asynchronous vibration signal of the four blades. The correctness and accuracy of the algorithm was verified with the parameters identification of blade asynchronous vibration using the simulation model.

  5. Controlled Speed Accessory Drive Program: Programmatic environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-14

    This document is a programmatic environmental assessment of the Department of Energy's Controlled Speed Accessory Drive (CSAD) program and alternatives. Its purpose is to evaluate CSAD alternatives to assure that environmental priorities are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process, and to facilitate the choice of preferable options. This document accords with both the letter and the spirit of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements as interpreted and standardized by the Council on Environmental Quality. The major conclusions reached in this assessment are as follows: (1) controlled speed accessory drive bolted onto existing automobile designs may not provide adequate engine cooling when operated at high ambient temperatures or under heavy loading; (2) when the CSAD is adopted for production, the emissions effect of controlled speed accessory drive will not be a problem. Auto emissions are already controlled by existing regulations, and automobiles with a CSAD must meet the same emission standards as non-CSAD vehicles; (3) the nature of the impact is such that significant expansion of the market will not affect it. The one adverse environmental concern, the engine cooling problem, will probably be remedied by proper optimization of automobiles for controlled speed accessory drive, or, until the problem can be alleviated, it will delay commercialization of the drive. No safety hazard will be introduced to the American roadways. In addition, no adverse environmental concerns directly related to the Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program are anticipated. Therefore, it is recommended that a finding of no significant impact be prepared.

  6. High-speed train control based on multiple-model adaptive control with second-level adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yonghua; Zhang, Zhenlin

    2014-05-01

    Speed uplift has become the leading trend for the development of current railway traffic. Ideally, under the high-speed transportation infrastructure, trains run at specified positions with designated speeds at appointed times. In view of the faster adaptation ability of multiple-model adaptive control with second-level adaptation (MMAC-SLA), we propose one type of MMAC-SLA for a class of nonlinear systems such as cascaded vehicles. By using an input decomposition technique, the corresponding stability proof is solved for the proposed MMAC-SLA, which synthesises the control signals from the weighted multiple models. The control strategy is utilised to challenge the position and speed tracking of high-speed trains with uncertain parameters. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed MMAC-SLA can achieve small tracking errors with moderate in-train forces incurred under the control of flattening input signals with practical enforceability. This study also provides a new idea for the control of in-train forces by tracking the positions and speeds of cars while considering power constraints.

  7. Regulating vacuum pump speed with feedback control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ludington, D.C.; Aneshansley, D.J.; Pellerin, R.; Guo, F.

    1992-01-01

    Considerable energy is wasted by the vacuum pump/motor on dairy farms. The output capacity (m{sup 3}/min or cfm) of the vacuum pump always exceeds the capacity needed to milk cows and wash pipelines. Vacuum pumps run at full speed and load regardless of actual need for air. Excess air is admitted through a controller. Energy can be saved from electrical demand reduced by regulating vacuum pump speed according to air based on air usage. An adjustable speed drive (ASD) on the motor and controlled based upon air usage, can reduce the energy used by the vacuum pump. However, the ASD unit tested could not maintain vacuum levels within generally accepted guidelines when air usage changed. Adding a high vacuum reserve and a dual vacuum controller between the vacuum pump and the milking pipeline brought vacuum stability within guidelines. The ASD/dual vacuum system can reduce energy consumption and demand by at least 50 percent during milking and provide better vacuum stability than conventional systems. Tests were not run during washing cycles. Using 1990 costs and only the energy saved during milking, the simple payback on investment in new equipment for a 5 hp motor, speed controller and vacuum regulator would be about 5 years.

  8. 6. GOVERNOR AND SPEED CONTROL MECHANISMS TANK, AT LEFT AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GOVERNOR AND SPEED CONTROL MECHANISMS TANK, AT LEFT AN ACCUMULATOR TANK WHICH STORE AIR PRESSURE TO OPEN GATES AND GET GENERATOR STARTED. LARGE TANK AT RIGHT IS THE MAIN GUARD VALVE FOR THE GENERATOR - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Haiwee Power Plant, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Integration simulation method concerning speed control of ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, R.; Yue, B.; Matsunaga, N.; Ishizuka, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the configuration of control system of the ultrasonic motor (USM) from finite element method (FEM) model by applying the nonlinear model order reduction (MOR) is proposed. First, the USM and the FEM model is introduced. Second, FEM model order reduction method is described. Third, the result of comparing the computing time and accuracy of the FEM model and reduced order model is shown. Finaly, nominal model for control is derived by system identification from reduced order model. Nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) is applied to the nominal model, and speed is controlled. the controller effect is comfirmed by applying the proposed reduced order model.

  10. Multivariable Techniques for High-Speed Research Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the activities and findings conducted under contract with NASA Langley Research Center. Subject matter is the investigation of suitable multivariable flight control design methodologies and solutions for large, flexible high-speed vehicles. Specifically, methodologies are to address the inner control loops used for stabilization and augmentation of a highly coupled airframe system possibly involving rigid-body motion, structural vibrations, unsteady aerodynamics, and actuator dynamics. Design and analysis techniques considered in this body of work are both conventional-based and contemporary-based, and the vehicle of interest is the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Major findings include: (1) control architectures based on aft tail only are not well suited for highly flexible, high-speed vehicles, (2) theoretical underpinnings of the Wykes structural mode control logic is based on several assumptions concerning vehicle dynamic characteristics, and if not satisfied, the control logic can break down leading to mode destabilization, (3) two-loop control architectures that utilize small forward vanes with the aft tail provide highly attractive and feasible solutions to the longitudinal axis control challenges, and (4) closed-loop simulation sizing analyses indicate the baseline vane model utilized in this report is most likely oversized for normal loading conditions.

  11. Sensorless speed control of PMSM via adaptive interconnected observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzat, Marwa; de Leon, Jesus; Glumineau, Alain

    2011-11-01

    In this article, a robust sensorless speed observer-controller scheme for a surface permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is proposed. First-of-all, following preliminary results in the framework of the induction motor that is less sensible to the position estimation error, an adaptive high gain interconnected observer is designed. It is only supplied by the electrical measurement: the motor currents and voltages. This observer estimates the rotor speed and position, the stator resistance and the load torque. A nonlinear backstepping controller is developed. The above observer is associated with this controller and the complete scheme practical stability proof is given. The overall system is tested by simulation in the framework of an industrial benchmark with a trajectory that particularly checks the motor unobservability condition. Some robustness tests have been carried out. The controller-observer scheme shows good performances in spite of the uncertainties and the unknown load torque.

  12. Implementation of motor speed control using PID control in programmable logic controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, R. E.; Azmi, N. A.; Ahmad, M. A.; Ghazali, M. R.; Zawawi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents the implementation of motor speed control using Proportional Integral Derrivative (PID) controller using Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). Proportional Integral Derrivative (PID) controller is the technique used to actively control the speed of the motor. An AC motor is used in the research together with the PLC, encoder and Proface touch screen. The model of the PLC that has been used in this project is OMRON CJIG-CPU42P where this PLC has a build in loop control that can be made the ladder diagram quite simple using function block in CX-process tools. A complete experimental analysis of the technique in terms of system response is presented. Comparative assessment of the impact of Proportional, Integral and Derivative in the controller on the system performance is presented and discussed.

  13. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current motor

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is generated by a novel vernier-logic circuit which is drift-free and highly sensitive to small speed changes. The phase error is also computed by digital logic, with adjustable sensitivity around a 0 mid-scale value. The drift error signal, generated by long-term counting of the phase error, is used to compensate for any slow changes in the average friction drag on the motor. An auxillary drift-byte status sensor prevents any disruptive overflow or underflow of the drift-error counter. An adjustable clocked-delay unit is inserted between the controller and the source of the reference pulse train to permit phase alignment of the rotor to any desired offset angle. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of read-only memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  14. Quadrupedal galloping control for a wide range of speed via vertical impulse scaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Won; Kim, Sangbae

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents a bio-inspired quadruped controller that allows variable-speed galloping. The controller design is inspired by observations from biological runners. Quadrupedal animals increase the vertical impulse that is generated by ground reaction forces at each stride as running speed increases and the duration of each stance phase reduces, whereas the swing phase stays relatively constant. Inspired by this observation, the presented controller estimates the required vertical impulse at each stride by applying the linear momentum conservation principle in the vertical direction and prescribes the ground reaction forces at each stride. The design process begins with deriving a planar model from the MIT Cheetah 2 robot. A baseline periodic limit cycle is obtained by optimizing ground reaction force profiles and the temporal gait pattern (timing and duration of gait phases). To stabilize the optimized limit cycle, the obtained limit cycle is converted to a state feedback controller by representing the obtained ground reaction force profiles as functions of the state variable, which is monotonically increasing throughout the gait, adding impedance control around the height and pitch trajectories of the obtained limit cycle and introducing a finite state machine and a pattern stabilizer to enforce the optimized gait pattern. The controller that achieves a stable 3 m s(-1) gallop successfully adapts the speed change by scaling the vertical ground reaction force to match the momentum lost by gravity and adding a simple speed controller that controls horizontal speed. Without requiring additional gait optimization processes, the controller achieves galloping at speeds ranging from 3 m s(-1) to 14.9 m s(-1) while respecting the torque limit of the motor used in the MIT Cheetah 2 robot. The robustness of the controller is verified by demonstrating stable running during various disturbances, including 1.49 m step down and 0.18 m step up, as well as random ground

  15. Magnetic Bearing Controller Improvements for High Speed Flywheel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control system for a high-speed flywheel system is described. The flywheel utilizes a five axis active magnetic bearing system, using eddy current sensors for position feedback to the bearing controller. Magnetic bearing controller features designed to improve flywheel operation and testing are described. Operational improvements include feed forward control to compensate for rotor imbalance, moving notch filtering to compensate for synchronous and harmonic rotational noise, and fixed notching to prevent rotor bending mode excitation. Testing improvements include adding safe gain, bearing current hold, bearing current zero, and excitation input features. Performance and testing improvements provided by these features are measured and discussed.

  16. Averaged controllability of parameter dependent conservative semigroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohéac, Jérôme; Zuazua, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    We consider the problem of averaged controllability for parameter depending (either in a discrete or continuous fashion) control systems, the aim being to find a control, independent of the unknown parameters, so that the average of the states is controlled. We do it in the context of conservative models, both in an abstract setting and also analysing the specific examples of the wave and Schrödinger equations. Our first result is of perturbative nature. Assuming the averaging probability measure to be a small parameter-dependent perturbation (in a sense that we make precise) of an atomic measure given by a Dirac mass corresponding to a specific realisation of the system, we show that the averaged controllability property is achieved whenever the system corresponding to the support of the Dirac is controllable. Similar tools can be employed to obtain averaged versions of the so-called Ingham inequalities. Particular attention is devoted to the 1d wave equation in which the time-periodicity of solutions can be exploited to obtain more precise results, provided the parameters involved satisfy Diophantine conditions ensuring the lack of resonances.

  17. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R.

    2012-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed. PMID:25685398

  18. Scale Control and Quality Management of Printed Image Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselskaya, O. A.; Kolesnikov, V. L.; Solov'eva, T. V.; Nagornova, I. V.; Babluyk, E. B.; Trapeznikova, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    The article provides a comparison of the main valuation techniques for a regulated parameter of printability of the offset paper by current standards GOST 24356 and ISO 3783: 2006. The results of development and implementation of a complex test scale for management and control the quality of printed production are represented. The estimation scale is introduced. It includes normalized parameters of print optical density, print uniformity, picking out speed, the value of dot gain, print contrast with the added criteria of minimizing microtexts, a paper slip, resolution threshold and effusing ability of paper surface. The results of analysis allow directionally form surface properties of the substrate to facilitate achieving the required quality of the printed image parameters, i. e. optical density of a print at a predetermined level not less than 1.3, the print uniformity with minimal deviation of dot gain about the order of 10 per cents.

  19. Quantum parameter estimation with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Haidong

    2017-07-01

    A pivotal task in quantum metrology, and quantum parameter estimation in general, is to design schemes that achieve the highest precision with the given resources. Standard models of quantum metrology usually assume that the dynamics is fixed and that the highest precision is achieved by preparing the optimal probe states and performing optimal measurements. However, in many practical experimental settings, additional controls are usually available to alter the dynamics. Here we propose to use optimal control methods for further improvement of the precision limit of quantum parameter estimation. We show that, by exploring the additional degree of freedom offered by the controls, a higher-precision limit can be achieved. In particular, we show that the precision limit under the controlled schemes can go beyond the constraints put by the coherent time, which is in contrast with the standard scheme where the precision limit is always bounded by the coherent time.

  20. Research on speed control of secondary regulation lifting system of parking equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Faye

    2005-12-01

    Hydrostatic transmission with secondary regulation is a new kind of hydrostatic transmission that can regenerate inertial and gravitational energy of load. On the basis of an in-depth analysis of the working principles and energy-saving mechanisms of the parking equipment lifting systems with, secondary regulating technology, this paper proposes a method of regenerating a lifting system's inertial energy by controlling rotational speed and reclaiming the gravitational energy by use of a constant rotational speed. Considering large changes of the parameters of lifting systems and then non-linearity, a fuzzy control was adopted to control the lifting system, and a mathematical model of the system was established. By simulation and experiment of the lifting system, the conclusion was reached a lifting system's braking achieved by controlling rotational speed is reliable and stable at a definite speed. It also permits changing the efficiency of recovery by changing the rotational speed. The design power of the lifting system can be chosen in terms of the system's average power, so the system's power can be reduced and energy savings achieved.

  1. An alternative speed control for industrial sewing machines.

    PubMed

    Curry, Z D; Leamon, T B

    1993-08-01

    Occupations which normally involve a fixed workstation and can be effectively operated from a sitting position would appear to be highly compatible with the lack of mobility of paraplegics. However, owing to the traditional operational-control configuration of many machines which require use of the lower limbs, employment for paraplegics is limited in these occupations. A speed-control mechanism suitable for use by paraplegics was designed and compared with the traditional treadle speed control used on industrial sewing machines. This control was operated by chest movement displacing a lever in contact with the subject in the region of the sternum. Subjects for this study were twenty non-handicapped individuals primarily without any previous sewing experience. Data were collected by questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and performance on sewing tasks. There was no significant difference between the two control devices in accuracy and task-completion time. The chest-control device required significantly fewer machine stops during task performance. The chest-control device produced less overall postural stress than the traditional treadle control. Overall preference for the two control devices was divided equally among the subjects. The chest-control device will enable many of those unable to use their lower limbs to operate any one of a series of stitching-related machines by providing access to, and control of, the machine. The control device appears to provide the potential for both the handicapped and non-handicapped to achieve performance equal to that achieved by the latter group with conventional treadle controls. It is suggested that the alternative control could be used not only with industrial sewing machines, but also with other machines that require a fixed workstation and can be operated from a sitting position.

  2. Changing Throwing Pattern: Instruction and Control Parameter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of instruction and scaling up a control parameter (velocity of throw) on changes in throwing pattern. Sixty adult female throwers (ages 20-26 years) were randomly placed into one of four practice conditions: (a) scale up on velocity with no instruction, (b) maintain constant velocity with no…

  3. Changing Throwing Pattern: Instruction and Control Parameter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of instruction and scaling up a control parameter (velocity of throw) on changes in throwing pattern. Sixty adult female throwers (ages 20-26 years) were randomly placed into one of four practice conditions: (a) scale up on velocity with no instruction, (b) maintain constant velocity with no…

  4. Effect of Different Training Methods on Stride Parameters in Speed Maintenance Phase of 100m Sprint Runningmel.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Emel; Hindistan, Ibrahim Ethem; Ozkaya, Yasar Gul

    2017-04-27

    This study examined the effects of two different training methods relevant to sloping surface on stride parameters in speed maintenance phase of 100 m sprint running. Twenty recreationally active students were assigned into one of three groups: combined training (Com), horizontal training (H), and control (C) group. Com group performed uphill and downhill training on a sloping surface with an angle of 4°, while H group trained on a horizontal surface, 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Speed maintenance and deceleration phases were divided into distances with 10m intervals, and running time (t), running velocity (RV), step frequency (SF) and step length (SL) were measured at pre-, and post-exercise period. After 8-weeks of training program, t was shortened by 3.97% in Com group, and 2.37% in H group. RV also increased for totally 100m of running distance by 4,13% and 2,35% in Com, and H groups, respectively. At the speed maintenance phase, although t and maximal RV (RVmax) found to be statistically unaltered during overall phase, t was found to be decreased, and RVmax was preceded by 10m in distance in both training groups. SL was increased at 60-70m, and SF was decreased at 70-80m in H group. SL was increased with concomitant decrease in SF at 80-90m in Com group. Both training groups were maintained the RVmax with a great percentage at the speed maintenance phase. In conclusion, although both training methods resulted an increase in running time and RV, Com training method was more prominently effective method in improving RV, and this improvement was originated from the positive changes in SL during the speed maintaining phase.

  5. Miniaturized High Speed Controls for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and Test)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    pRESSURE TRANSDUCER TEST DATA 109 4. TT2 TDMPZRATRE SENSOR For the range of inlet temperature variation of interest (-650 F to +135 0 F) the thermistor ...2. Radiation Pyrometer 79 3. Compressor Discharge Pressure Sensors 102 4. Compressor Inlet Temperature Sensor 110 5. NI, N2 and Pump Speed Sensors ...closed loop acceleration control (developed). 2. A radiation pyrometer-type turbine blade temperature sensor for use in turbine blade temperature

  6. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  7. Speed Control of General Purpose Engine with Electronic Governor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawut, Umerujan; Tohti, Gheyret; Takigawa, Buso; Tsuji, Teruo

    This paper presents a general purpose engine speed control system with an electronic governor in order to improve the current system with a mechanical governor which shows unstable characteristics by change of mecanical friction or A/F ratio (Air/Fuel ratio). For the control system above, there are problems that the feedback signal is only a crank angle because of cost and the controlled object is a general purpose engine which is strongly nonlinear. In order to overcome these problems, the system model is shown for the dynamic estimation of the amount of air flow and the robust controller is designed. That is, the proposed system includes the robust sliding-mode controller by the feedback signal of only a crank angle where Genetic Algorithm is applied for the controller design. The simulation and the experiments by MATLAB/Simulink are performed to show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  8. Effect of the modulation of optic flow speed on gait parameters in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyungwon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of modulation of the optic flow speed on gait parameters in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. [Methods] We examined 10 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. The children underwent gait analysis under 3 different conditions of optic flow speed: slow, normal, and fast optic flow speed. The children walked across the walkway of a GAITRite system, while watching a virtual reality screen, and walking velocity, cadence, stride length, step length, single support time, and double support time were recorded. [Results] Compared with the other applied flow speed conditions, the fast optic flow speed (2 times the normal speed) significantly increased walking velocity, cadence, normalized step length, base of support, and single support cycle of both the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs. Moreover, compared with the other applied flow speed conditions, the slow optic flow speed (0.25 times the normal speed) yielded a significantly decreased walking velocity, cadence, normalized step length, base of support, and single support cycle for both the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs. [Conclusion] The gait parameters of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy are altered by modulation of the optic flow speed. Thus, we believe that gait training involving modulation of the optic flow speed is feasible and suitable for resolving abnormal gait patterns in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

  9. Advanced rotorcraft control using parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters is presented. The algorithm is part of a design algorithm for an optimal linear dynamic output feedback controller that minimizes a finite time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of a accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm has been included in a control design package for optimal robust low order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm has been demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  10. Effects of water-current speed on hematological, biochemical and immune parameters in juvenile tinfoil barb, Barbonymus schwanenfeldii (Bleeker, 1854)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiming; Song, Bolan; Lin, Xiaotao; Xu, Zhongneng

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effect of water-current speed on hematological, biochemical and immune parameters in juvenile tinfoil barb ( Barbonymus schwanenfeldii). Blood samples were taken on days 1, 23 and 45 from control fish and from two training groups maintained at current speeds of 0.06 bl/s (body length per second), 0.66 bl/s, and 1.92 bl/s, respectively. Significantly increased red-blood-cell counts and hematocrit were observed in the post-training groups on days 23 and 45. Significantly increased hemoglobin concentrations were also observed in the 1.92 bl/s group on days 23 and 45. In contrast, values of mean corpuscular volume were significantly lower in the 1.92 bl/s group than in the other groups on day 45. Nitroblue-tetrazolium-positive cells and lysozyme and superoxidase dismutase activities in the plasma increased significantly with increasing training intensity on days 23 and 45. Antibacterial activities were significantly increased in the trained groups compared with the control group on day 23; significantly elevated alkaline phosphatase activity was observed in the 1.92 bl/s groups on day 45. Therefore, training intensities of 0.66 and 1.92 bl/s enhanced the blood oxygen-carrying capability and plasma immune parameters of juvenile tinfoil barbs.

  11. The nature of functional variability in plantar pressure during a range of controlled walking speeds

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Crompton, Robin H.; Savage, Russell; Bates, Karl T.

    2016-01-01

    During walking, variability in step parameters allows the body to adapt to changes in substrate or unexpected perturbations that may occur as the feet interface with the environment. Despite a rich literature describing biomechanical variability in step parameters, there are as yet no studies that consider variability at the body–environment interface. Here, we used pedobarographic statistical parametric mapping (pSPM) and two standard measures of variability, mean square error (m.s.e.) and the coefficient of variation (CV), to assess the magnitude and spatial variability in plantar pressure across a range of controlled walking speeds. Results by reduced major axis, and pSPM regression, revealed no consistent linear relationship between m.s.e. and speed or m.s.e. and Froude number. A positive linear relationship, however, was found between CV and walking speed and CV and Froude number. The spatial distribution of variability was highly disparate when assessed by m.s.e. and CV: relatively high variability was consistently confined to the medial and lateral forefoot when measured by m.s.e., while the forefoot and heel show high variability when measured by CV. In absolute terms, variability by CV was universally low (less than 2.5%). From these results, we determined that variability as assessed by m.s.e. is independent of speed, but dependent on speed when assessed by CV. PMID:27853618

  12. Relative importance of parameters affecting wind speed prediction using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, M. A.; Khatibi, R.; Hosseini, B.; Bilgili, M.

    2013-10-01

    In traditional artificial neural networks (ANN) models, the relative importance of the individual meteorological input variables is often overlooked. A case study is presented in this paper to model monthly wind speed values using meteorological data (air pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation), where the study also includes an estimate of the relative importance of these variables. Recorded monthly mean data are available at a gauging site in Tabriz, Azerbaijan, Iran, for the period from 2000 to 2005, gauged in the city at the outskirt of alluvial funneling mountains with an established microclimatic conditions and a diurnal wind regime. This provides a sufficiently severe test for the ANN model with a good predictive capability of 1 year of lead time but without any direct approach to refer the predicted results to local microclimatic conditions. A method is used in this paper to calculate the relative importance of each meteorological input parameters affecting wind speed, showing that air pressure and precipitation are the most and least influential parameters with approximate values of 40 and 10 %, respectively. This gained knowledge corresponds to the local knowledge of the microclimatic and geomorphologic conditions surrounding Tabriz.

  13. Adaptive estimation of nonlinear parameters of a nonholonomic spherical robot using a modified fuzzy-based speed gradient algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roozegar, Mehdi; Mahjoob, Mohammad J.; Ayati, Moosa

    2017-05-01

    This paper deals with adaptive estimation of the unknown parameters and states of a pendulum-driven spherical robot (PDSR), which is a nonlinear in parameters (NLP) chaotic system with parametric uncertainties. Firstly, the mathematical model of the robot is deduced by applying the Newton-Euler methodology for a system of rigid bodies. Then, based on the speed gradient (SG) algorithm, the states and unknown parameters of the robot are estimated online for different step length gains and initial conditions. The estimated parameters are updated adaptively according to the error between estimated and true state values. Since the errors of the estimated states and parameters as well as the convergence rates depend significantly on the value of step length gain, this gain should be chosen optimally. Hence, a heuristic fuzzy logic controller is employed to adjust the gain adaptively. Simulation results indicate that the proposed approach is highly encouraging for identification of this NLP chaotic system even if the initial conditions change and the uncertainties increase; therefore, it is reliable to be implemented on a real robot.

  14. Controlling the Temperature and Speed of the Phase Transition of VO2 Microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Joonseok; Kim, Howon; Chen, Xian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Park, Changwoo; Ju, Honglyoul

    2015-12-29

    Here, we investigated the control of two important parameters of vanadium dioxide (VO2 ) microcrystals, the phase transition temperature and speed, by varying microcrystal width. By using the reflectivity change between insulating and metallic phases, phase transition temperature is measured by optical microscopy. As the width of square cylinder-shaped microcrystals decreases from ~70 to ~1 μm, the phase transition temperature (67 °C for bulk) varied as much as 26.1 °C (19.7 °C) during heating (cooling). In addition, the propagation speed of phase boundary in the microcrystal, i.e., phase transition speed, is monitored at the onset of phase transition by using the high-speed resistance measurement. The phase transition speed increases from 4.6 × 10 2 to 1.7 × 10 4 μm/s as the width decreases from ~50 to ~2 μm. While the statistical description for a heterogeneous nucleation process explains the size dependence on phase transition temperature of VO2 , the increase of effective thermal exchange process is responsible for the enhancement of phase transition speed of small VO 2 microcrystals. These findings not only enhance the understanding of VO 2 intrinsic properties but also contribute to the development of innovative electronic devices.

  15. Controlling the Temperature and Speed of the Phase Transition of VO2 Microcrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Joonseok; Kim, Howon; Chen, Xian; ...

    2015-12-29

    Here, we investigated the control of two important parameters of vanadium dioxide (VO2 ) microcrystals, the phase transition temperature and speed, by varying microcrystal width. By using the reflectivity change between insulating and metallic phases, phase transition temperature is measured by optical microscopy. As the width of square cylinder-shaped microcrystals decreases from ~70 to ~1 μm, the phase transition temperature (67 °C for bulk) varied as much as 26.1 °C (19.7 °C) during heating (cooling). In addition, the propagation speed of phase boundary in the microcrystal, i.e., phase transition speed, is monitored at the onset of phase transition by usingmore » the high-speed resistance measurement. The phase transition speed increases from 4.6 × 10 2 to 1.7 × 10 4 μm/s as the width decreases from ~50 to ~2 μm. While the statistical description for a heterogeneous nucleation process explains the size dependence on phase transition temperature of VO2 , the increase of effective thermal exchange process is responsible for the enhancement of phase transition speed of small VO 2 microcrystals. These findings not only enhance the understanding of VO 2 intrinsic properties but also contribute to the development of innovative electronic devices.« less

  16. Design and control of a novel two-speed Uninterrupted Mechanical Transmission for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shengnan; Song, Jian; Song, Haijun; Tai, Yuzhuo; Li, Fei; Sinh Nguyen, Truong

    2016-06-01

    Conventional all-electric vehicles (EV) adopt single-speed transmission due to its low cost and simple construction. However, with the adoption of this type of driveline system, development of EV technology leads to the growing performance requirements of drive motor. Introducing a multi-speed or two-speed transmission to EV offers the possibility of efficiency improvement of the whole powertrain. This paper presents an innovative two-speed Uninterrupted Mechanical Transmission (UMT), which consists of an epicyclic gearing system, a centrifugal clutch and a brake band, allowing the seamless shifting between two gears. Besides, driver's intention is recognized by the control system which is based on fuzzy logic controller (FLC), utilizing the signals of vehicle velocity and accelerator pedal position. The novel UMT shows better dynamic and comfort performance in compare with the optimized AMT with the same gear ratios. Comparison between the control strategy with recognition of driver intention and the conventional two-parameter gear shifting strategy is presented. And the simulation and analysis of the middle layer of optimal gearshift control algorithm is detailed. The results indicate that the UMT adopting FLC and optimal control method provides a significant improvement of energy efficiency, dynamic performance and shifting comfort for EV.

  17. Speed isn’t everything: Complex processing speed measures mask individual differences and developmental changes in executive control

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Nicholas J.; Blackwell, Katharine A.; Munakata, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    The rate at which people process information appears to influence many aspects of cognition across the lifespan. However, many commonly accepted measures of “processing speed” may require goal maintenance, manipulation of information in working memory, and decision-making, blurring the distinction between processing speed and executive control and resulting in overestimation of processing-speed contributions to cognition. This concern may apply particularly to studies of developmental change, as even seemingly simple processing speed measures may require executive processes to keep children and older adults on task. We report two new studies and a re-analysis of a published study, testing predictions about how different processing speed measures influence conclusions about executive control across the life span. We find that the choice of processing speed measure affects the relationship observed between processing speed and executive control, in a manner that changes with age, and that choice of processing speed measure affects conclusions about development and the relationship among executive control measures. Implications for understanding processing speed, executive control, and their development are discussed. PMID:23432836

  18. The hippocampus participates in the control of locomotion speed.

    PubMed

    López Ruiz, J R; Osuna Carrasco, L P; López Valenzuela, C L; Franco Rodríguez, N E; de la Torre Valdovinos, B; Jiménez Estrada, I; Dueñas Jiménez, J M; Dueñas Jiménez, S H

    2015-12-17

    The hippocampus role in sensory-motor integration remains unclear. In these experiments we study its function in the locomotor control. To establish the connection between the hippocampus and the locomotor system, electrical stimulation in the CA1 region was applied and EMG recordings were obtained. We also evaluated the hindlimbs and forelimbs kinematic patterns in rats with a penetrating injury (PI) in the hippocampus as well as in a cortex-injured group (CI), which served as control. After the PI, tamoxifen a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that has been described as a neuroprotector and antiinflammatory drug, or vehicle was administered. Electrical stimulation in the hippocampus produces muscle contractions in the contralateral triceps, when 6 Hz or 8 Hz pulse trains were applied. The penetrating injury in the hippocampus reduced the EMG amplitude after the electrical stimulation. At 7 DPI (days post-injury) we observed an increase in the strides speed in all four limbs of the non-treated group, decreasing the correlation percentage of the studied joints. After 15 DPI the strides speed in the non-treated returned to normal. These changes did not occur in the tamoxifen group nor in cortex-injured group. After 30 days, the nontreated group presented a reduction in the number of pyramidal cell layer neurons at the injury site, in comparison to the tam-treated group. The loss of neurons, may cause the interruption of the trisynaptic circuit and changes in the locomotion speed. Tamoxifen preserves the pyramidal neurons after the injury, probably resulting in the strides speed recovery. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality control parameters for Tamra (copper) Bhasma

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, Chandrashekhar Yuvaraj; Prajapati, Pradeepkumar; Patgiri, Biswajyoti; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Metallic Bhasmas are highly valued and have their own importance in Ayurvedic formulations. To testify the Bhasmas various parameters have been told in Rasashastra classics. Tamra Bhasma (TB) with its different properties is used in the treatment of various diseases is quiet famous among the Ayurvedic physicians (Vaidyas). Objectives: The present study was carried out to set up the quality control parameters for the TB by making the use of classical tests along with advanced analytical tools. Settings and Design: Copper wire taken for the preparation of Bhasma was first analyzed for its copper content and then subjected to Shodhana, Marana and Amrutikarana procedures as per the classical references. Final product complied with all the classical parameters like Rekhapurnatwa, Varitaratwa etc. Materials and Methods: After complying with these tests TB was analyzed by advanced analytical techniques like particle size distribution (PSD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and inductive coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Results: PSD analysis of TB showed volumetric mean diameter of 28.70 μm, 50% of the material was below 18.40 μm size. Particle size less than 2μm were seen in SEM. 56.24 wt % of copper and 23.06 wt % of sulphur was found in ICP-AES. Heavy metals like cadmium, selenium were not detected while others like arsenic, lead and mercury were present in traces. Conclusions: These observations could be specified as the quality control parameters conforming to all the classical tests under the Bhasma Pariksha. PMID:23661863

  20. Quality control parameters for Tamra (copper) Bhasma.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Chandrashekhar Yuvaraj; Prajapati, Pradeepkumar; Patgiri, Biswajyoti; Shukla, Vinay J

    2012-04-01

    Metallic Bhasmas are highly valued and have their own importance in Ayurvedic formulations. To testify the Bhasmas various parameters have been told in Rasashastra classics. Tamra Bhasma (TB) with its different properties is used in the treatment of various diseases is quiet famous among the Ayurvedic physicians (Vaidyas). The present study was carried out to set up the quality control parameters for the TB by making the use of classical tests along with advanced analytical tools. Copper wire taken for the preparation of Bhasma was first analyzed for its copper content and then subjected to Shodhana, Marana and Amrutikarana procedures as per the classical references. Final product complied with all the classical parameters like Rekhapurnatwa, Varitaratwa etc. After complying with these tests TB was analyzed by advanced analytical techniques like particle size distribution (PSD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and inductive coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). PSD analysis of TB showed volumetric mean diameter of 28.70 μm, 50% of the material was below 18.40 μm size. Particle size less than 2μm were seen in SEM. 56.24 wt % of copper and 23.06 wt % of sulphur was found in ICP-AES. Heavy metals like cadmium, selenium were not detected while others like arsenic, lead and mercury were present in traces. These observations could be specified as the quality control parameters conforming to all the classical tests under the Bhasma Pariksha.

  1. Speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors using ring coupling control and adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Le-Bao; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Sheng-Zhou; Yang, Qing-Quan

    2015-09-01

    A new control approach for speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors is developed, by incorporating an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) technique into a ring coupling synchronization control structure. This control approach can stabilize speed tracking of each motor and synchronize its motion with other motors' motion so that speed tracking errors and synchronization errors converge to zero. Moreover, an adaptive law is exploited to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort and attenuate chattering. Performance comparisons with parallel control, relative coupling control and conventional PI control are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  2. Linear parameter varying representations for nonlinear control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Lance Huntington

    Linear parameter varying (LPV) systems are investigated as a framework for gain-scheduled control design and optimal hybrid control. An LPV system is defined as a linear system whose dynamics depend upon an a priori unknown but measurable exogenous parameter. A gain-scheduled autopilot design is presented for a bank-to-turn (BTT) missile. The method is novel in that the gain-scheduled design does not involve linearizations about operating points. Instead, the missile dynamics are brought to LPV form via a state transformation. This idea is applied to the design of a coupled longitudinal/lateral BTT missile autopilot. The pitch and yaw/roll dynamics are separately transformed to LPV form, where the cross axis states are treated as "exogenous" parameters. These are actually endogenous variables, so such a plant is called "quasi-LPV." Once in quasi-LPV form, a family of robust controllers using mu synthesis is designed for both the pitch and yaw/roll channels, using angle-of-attack and roll rate as the scheduling variables. The closed-loop time response is simulated using the original nonlinear model and also using perturbed aerodynamic coefficients. Modeling and control of engine idle speed is investigated using LPV methods. It is shown how generalized discrete nonlinear systems may be transformed into quasi-LPV form. A discrete nonlinear engine model is developed and expressed in quasi-LPV form with engine speed as the scheduling variable. An example control design is presented using linear quadratic methods. Simulations are shown comparing the LPV based controller performance to that using PID control. LPV representations are also shown to provide a setting for hybrid systems. A hybrid system is characterized by control inputs consisting of both analog signals and discrete actions. A solution is derived for the optimal control of hybrid systems with generalized cost functions. This is shown to be computationally intensive, so a suboptimal strategy is proposed that

  3. Unmanned air vehicle flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge plasma at high wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Yong; Wang, WanBo; Wang, XunNian; Li, HuaXing

    2014-06-01

    The present paper described an experimental investigation of separation control of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) at high wind speeds. The plasma actuator was based on Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) and operated in a steady manner. The flow over a wing of UAV was performed with smoke flow visualization in the ϕ0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the flow structure over the wing so that the locations of plasma actuators could be optimized. A full model of the UAV was experimentally investigated in the ϕ3.2 m low speed wind tunnel using a six-component internal strain gauge balance. The effects of the key parameters, including the locations of the plasma actuators, the applied voltage amplitude and the operating frequency, were obtained. The whole test model was made of aluminium and acted as a cathode of the actuator. The results showed that the plasma acting on the surface of UAV could obviously suppress the boundary layer separation and reduce the model vibration at the high wind speeds. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of the UAV was increased by 2.5% and the lift/drag ratio was increased by about 80% at the wind speed of 100 m/s. The control mechanism of the plasma actuator at the test configuration was also analyzed.

  4. Pattern of a confined chemical garden controlled by injection speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagatsuma, Shu; Higashi, Takuro; Sumino, Yutaka; Achiwa, Ayumi

    2017-05-01

    Pattern of confined chemical garden was controlled by the speed of injected fluid, and their mechanism is discussed. A confined chemical garden system was constructed where an aqueous solution of cobalt chloride was injected into a cell filled with sodium silicate solution. The reaction of these two solutions resulted in the formation of precipitation. The viscosities of the prepared aqueous solutions were set to be similar in order to rule out the possibility of Saffman-Taylor instability. The injection front showed three distinctive patterns: algaes, shells, and filaments, which were dependent on injection speed. The injection pressure and the spatio-temporal pattern of the injected fluid were measured, and a significant increase in the injection pressure was observed when the filament pattern appeared, which indicated the existence of thin lubrication layer between the precipitation and the substrate. The filament pattern was further analyzed quantitatively, and the number of active filaments was determined to be proportional to the injection speed. A mathematical model was constructed that considered both the viscous effect from the thin lubrication layer and the Laplace pressure. This model successfully reproduced the characteristic filament dynamics.

  5. Inertial speed control coupling for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitaguchi, S.S.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine having a gas generator section for producing a flow of high energy gases and a free power turbine section driven by the gases for rotatably driving an engine load, a speed control device, comprising: an epicyclic gear assembly having a first gear, a second gear, an annular array of differential gears meshed between the first and second gears, and a cage supporting the differential gears for rotation about their individual axes and for orbital motion about the rotational axes; the first gear is connected to and rotatably driven by the free power turbine section; one of the second gear and cage is connected to and rotatably driven by the gas generator section; the other of the second gear and cage includes an inertial mass and is cooperatively driven by one of the second gear and cage and by first gear at a substantially constant speed during steady-state engine operation. The inertial mass has a rotational inertia substantially greater than the rotational inertia of the free power turbine section to couple the free power turbine section to the gas generator section. This temporarily resists rotational speed change of the free power turbine section during a transient load condition.

  6. Behavioural system identification of visual flight speed control in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rohrseitz, Nicola; Fry, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural control in many animals involves complex mechanisms with intricate sensory-motor feedback loops. Modelling allows functional aspects to be captured without relying on a description of the underlying complex, and often unknown, mechanisms. A wide range of engineering techniques are available for modelling, but their ability to describe time-continuous processes is rarely exploited to describe sensory-motor control mechanisms in biological systems. We performed a system identification of visual flight speed control in the fruitfly Drosophila, based on an extensive dataset of open-loop responses previously measured under free flight conditions. We identified a second-order under-damped control model with just six free parameters that well describes both the transient and steady-state characteristics of the open-loop data. We then used the identified control model to predict flight speed responses after a visual perturbation under closed-loop conditions and validated the model with behavioural measurements performed in free-flying flies under the same closed-loop conditions. Our system identification of the fruitfly's flight speed response uncovers the high-level control strategy of a fundamental flight control reflex without depending on assumptions about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The results are relevant for future investigations of the underlying neuromotor processing mechanisms, as well as for the design of biomimetic robots, such as micro-air vehicles. PMID:20525744

  7. Behavioural system identification of visual flight speed control in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rohrseitz, Nicola; Fry, Steven N

    2011-02-06

    Behavioural control in many animals involves complex mechanisms with intricate sensory-motor feedback loops. Modelling allows functional aspects to be captured without relying on a description of the underlying complex, and often unknown, mechanisms. A wide range of engineering techniques are available for modelling, but their ability to describe time-continuous processes is rarely exploited to describe sensory-motor control mechanisms in biological systems. We performed a system identification of visual flight speed control in the fruitfly Drosophila, based on an extensive dataset of open-loop responses previously measured under free flight conditions. We identified a second-order under-damped control model with just six free parameters that well describes both the transient and steady-state characteristics of the open-loop data. We then used the identified control model to predict flight speed responses after a visual perturbation under closed-loop conditions and validated the model with behavioural measurements performed in free-flying flies under the same closed-loop conditions. Our system identification of the fruitfly's flight speed response uncovers the high-level control strategy of a fundamental flight control reflex without depending on assumptions about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The results are relevant for future investigations of the underlying neuromotor processing mechanisms, as well as for the design of biomimetic robots, such as micro-air vehicles.

  8. Passive control of rotorcraft high-speed impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulc, O.; Doerffer, P.; Tejero, F.

    2016-10-01

    A strong, normal shock wave, terminating a local supersonic area located at the tip of a helicopter blade, not only limits the aerodynamic performance, but also constitutes an origin of the High-Speed Impulsive (HSI) noise. The application of a passive control device (a shallow cavity covered by a perforated plate) just beneath the interaction region weakens the compression level, thus reducing the main source of the HSI noise. The numerical investigation based on the URANS approach and Bohning/Doerffer (BD) transpiration law (SPARC code) confirms a large potential of the new method. Two exemplary implementations, adapted to model helicopter rotors tested at NASA Ames facility in transonic conditions: Caradonna-Tung (lifting, transonic hover) and Caradonna-Laub-Tung (non-lifting, high-speed forward flight), demonstrate the possible gains in terms of the reduction of acoustic pressure fluctuations in the near-field of the blade tip. The CFD results are validated against the experimental data obtained for the reference configurations (no control), while the analysis of the passive control arrangement is based on a purely numerical research. The normal shock wave is effectively eliminated by the wall ventilation exerting a positive impact on the generated level of the HSI noise.

  9. Speeding up adiabatic passage by adding Lyapunov control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Du; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2017-09-01

    We propose a scheme to speed up adiabatic passage by using Lyapunov control theory. This is a good choice to solve the problem that may emerge in Berry's transitionless quantum driving [M. V. Berry, J. Phys. A 42, 365303 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/36/365303]. That is, the extra couplings in the counterdiabatic driving Hamiltonian can be avoided by choosing the available control Hamiltonian in an actual physical system. As examples, we shorten the evolution time of adiabatic population transfer in a three-level system and the entanglement generation in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system. Moreover, the occupation of an intermediate state can be sharply suppressed by properly choosing the control Hamiltonian in the three-level system. The scheme can also be generalized to a complex system where the exact expressions of adiabatic eigenstates are difficult to obtain.

  10. PC based speed control of dc motor using fuzzy logic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, S.K.; Kanphade, R.D.; Lavekar, K.P.

    1998-07-01

    The dc motor is extensively used as constant speed drive in textile mills, paper mills, printing press, etc.. If the load and supply voltage are time varying, the speed will be changed. Since last few decades the conventional PID controllers are used to maintain the constant speed by controlling the duty ratio of Chopper. Generally, four quadrant chopper is used for regenerative braking and reverse motoring operation. Fuzzy Logic is newly introduced in control system. Fuzzy Control is based on Fuzzy Logic, a logical system which is too much closer in spirit to human thinking and natural language. The Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) provides a linguistic control strategy based on knowledge base of the system. Firstly, the machine is started very smoothly from zero to reference speed in the proposed scheme by increasing the duty ratio. Then change and rate of change of speed (dN, dN/dt), change and rate of change input voltage (dV, dV/dt) and load current are input to FLC. The new value of duty ratio is determined from the Fuzzy rule base and defuzzification method. The chopper will be 'ON' according to new duty ratio to maintain the constant speed. The dynamic and steady state performance of the proposed system is better than conventional control system. In this paper mathematical simulation and experimental implementation are carried out to investigate the drive performance.

  11. Numerical dissipation control in high order shock-capturing schemes for LES of low speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, D. V.; Yee, H. C.; Wray, A. A.; Sjögreen, B.; Kritsuk, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The Yee & Sjögreen adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order scheme (High Order Filter Methods for Wide Range of Compressible Flow Speeds, ICOSAHOM 09, 2009) is further improved for DNS and LES of shock-free turbulence and low speed turbulence with shocklets. There are vastly different requirements in the minimization of numerical dissipation for accurate turbulence simulations of different compressible flow types and flow speeds. Traditionally, the method of choice for shock-free turbulence and low speed turbulence are by spectral, high order central or high order compact schemes with high order linear filters. With a proper control of a local flow sensor, appropriate amount of numerical dissipation in high order shock-capturing schemes can have spectral-like accuracy for compressible low speed turbulent flows. The development of the method includes an adaptive flow sensor with automatic selection on the amount of numerical dissipation needed at each flow location for more accurate DNS and LES simulations with less tuning of parameters for flows with a wide range of flow speed regime during the time-accurate evolution, e.g., time varying random forcing. An automatic selection of the different flow sensors catered to the different flow types is constructed. A Mach curve and high-frequency oscillation indicators are used to reduce the tuning of parameters in controlling the amount of shock-capturing numerical dissipation to be employed for shock-free turbulence, low speed turbulence and turbulence with strong shocks. In Kotov et al. (High Order Numerical Methods for LES of Turbulent Flows with Shocks, ICCFD8, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, July 14-18, 2014) the LES of a turbulent flow with a strong shock by the Yee & Sjögreen scheme indicated a good agreement with the filtered DNS data. A work in progress for the application of the adaptive flow sensor for compressible turbulence with time-varying random forcing is forthcoming. The present study examines the

  12. Wind Speed Preview Measurement and Estimation for Feedforward Control of Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simley, Eric J.

    Wind turbines typically rely on feedback controllers to maximize power capture in below-rated conditions and regulate rotor speed during above-rated operation. However, measurements of the approaching wind provided by Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) can be used as part of a preview-based, or feedforward, control system in order to improve rotor speed regulation and reduce structural loads. But the effectiveness of preview-based control depends on how accurately lidar can measure the wind that will interact with the turbine. In this thesis, lidar measurement error is determined using a statistical frequency-domain wind field model including wind evolution, or the change in turbulent wind speeds between the time they are measured and when they reach the turbine. Parameters of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 5-MW reference turbine model are used to determine measurement error for a hub-mounted circularly-scanning lidar scenario, based on commercially-available technology, designed to estimate rotor effective uniform and shear wind speed components. By combining the wind field model, lidar model, and turbine parameters, the optimal lidar scan radius and preview distance that yield the minimum mean square measurement error, as well as the resulting minimum achievable error, are found for a variety of wind conditions. With optimized scan scenarios, it is found that relatively low measurement error can be achieved, but the attainable measurement error largely depends on the wind conditions. In addition, the impact of the induction zone, the region upstream of the turbine where the approaching wind speeds are reduced, as well as turbine yaw error on measurement quality is analyzed. In order to minimize the mean square measurement error, an optimal measurement prefilter is employed, which depends on statistics of the correlation between the preview measurements and the wind that interacts with the turbine. However, because the wind speeds encountered by

  13. Method and system for controlling a rotational speed of a rotor of a turbogenerator

    DOEpatents

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2008-12-30

    A system and method controls a rotational speed of a rotor or shaft of a turbogenerator in accordance with a present voltage level on a direct current bus. A lower threshold and a higher threshold are established for a speed of a rotor or shaft of a turbogenerator. A speed sensor determines speed data or a speed signal for the rotor or shaft associated with a turbogenerator. A voltage regulator adjusts a voltage level associated with a direct current bus within a target voltage range if the speed data or speed signal indicates that the speed is above the higher threshold or below the lower threshold.

  14. Low-Speed Active Flow Control Laboratory Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    The future of aviation propulsion systems is increasingly focused on the application of control technologies to significantly enhance the performance of a new generation of air vehicles. Active flow control refers to a set of technologies that manipulate the flow of air and combustion gases deep within the confines of an engine to dynamically alter its performance during flight. By employing active flow control, designers can create engines that are significantly lighter, are more fuel efficient, and produce lower emissions. In addition, the operating range of an engine can be extended, yielding safer transportation systems. The realization of these future propulsion systems requires the collaborative development of many base technologies to achieve intelligent, embedded control at the engine locations where it will be most effective. NASA Glenn Research Center s Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch has developed a state-of-the-art low-speed Active Flow Control Laboratory in which emerging technologies can be integrated and explored in a flexible, low-cost environment. The facility allows the most promising developments to be prescreened and optimized before being tested on higher fidelity platforms, thereby reducing the cost of experimentation and improving research effectiveness.

  15. Climate Control of Photosynthetic Parameters across Biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Yi, C.

    2011-12-01

    Meteorological tower networks measure net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2, which is a balance between ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP). For understanding the mechanistic response of CO2 exchange to climate factors at process-level, it's necessary to separate NEE into its two components. A light-response analysis model (Ruimy, et al., 1995) has proved to be an efficient tool for this purpose. Principal light-response parameters-apparent quantum yield (α), photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) are important for modeling of CO2 exchange from regional scale to global domains using remote sensing. A major challenge lies in understanding how those parameters vary across biomes under different climatic conditions. So far, few large-sample studies have been conducted on this purpose. In our study, we partition seasonal NEE into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration of 247 unique fluxnet sites, which represents over 900 site-years. Our results indicate that: (1) apparent quantum yield (α) of deciduous broadleaf forests and mixed forests is sensitive to seasonal temperature; (2) photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) of deciduous forests and evergreen broadleaf forests is controlled by Bowen Ratio; and (3) Ecosystem respiration of evergreen needle forests and mixed forests is controlled by temperature, while evergreen broadleaf forests controlled by Bowen Ratio. Our results also demonstrate that some relationships between photosynthetic parameters and climate controls are latitude dependent. Ecosystem respiration of croplands and deciduous broadleaf forests in high latitudes shows better temperature correlations than that in low latitudes; apparent quantum yield (α) of evergreen needle forests only display temperature control in latitudes above 40N. On biome-scale average, the magnitudes of photosynthetic capacity are categorized into two groups: (1) with high value (from 31.96 to 37.13 umol m-2s-1) of croplands

  16. Real-time control of sound diffusion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leider, Colby

    2003-04-01

    Much electronic and computer music relies extensively on real-time diffusion of electronic sound in surround loudspeaker configurations. The most common method of sound diffusion in practice today is to use standard sound-reinforcement mixers whereby each fader controls the playback volume of a corresponding loudspeaker in a concert hall. Using the mixer this way, however, presents problems when one attempts to create sound trajectories, because complex, precise, and repeatable control of the individual faders is required. To address these interface issues, two different handheld controllers were created for real-time sound diffusion. The first controller is equipped accelerometers, force-sensing resistors, and joysticks and maps using input into diffusion parameters. The second controller mimics the operation of a standard mixer but allows more rapid movement of fader positions by replacing each fader with a bend sensor. To test the validity of each controller, twenty undergraduate music engineering students were asked to repeatedly perform various diffusion tasks (such as moving a monaural sound in a circle around the audience) using a standard mixer and each of the controllers. The accuracy and speed of their performances were tracked. The study concludes with lessons learned from the statistics gathered. [Research supported by the University of Miami.

  17. Parameter study and optimization for piezoelectric energy harvester for TPMS considering speed variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghi Eshghi, Amin; Lee, Soobum; Lee, Hanmin; Kim, Young-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we perform design parameter study and design optimization for a piezoelectric energy harvester considering vehicle speed variation. Initially, a FEM model using ANSYS is developed to appraise the performance of a piezoelectric harvester in a rotating tire. The energy harvester proposed here uses the vertical deformation at contact patch area from the car weight and centrifugal acceleration. This harvester is composed of a beam which is clamped at both ends and a piezoelectric material is attached on the top of that. The piezoelectric material possesses the 31 mode of transduction in which the direction of applied field is perpendicular to that of the electric field. To optimize the harvester performance, we would change the geometrical parameters of the harvester to obtain the maximum power. One of the main challenges in the design process is obtaining the required power while considering the constraints for harvester weight and volume. These two concerns are addressed in this paper. Since the final goal of this study is the development of an energy harvester with a wireless sensor system installed in a real car, the real time data for varied velocity of a vehicle are taken into account for power measurements. This study concludes that the proposed design is applicable to wireless tire sensor systems.

  18. Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed.

    PubMed

    Ijmker, Trienke; Houdijk, Han; Lamoth, Claudine J C; Beek, Peter J; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2013-09-03

    Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present study, we applied this method to test two hypotheses: (1) the effect of external stabilization on energy cost depends on the stiffness of the stabilizing springs, and (2) the energy cost for balance control, and consequently the effect of external stabilization on energy cost, depends on walking speed. Fourteen healthy young adults walked on a motor driven treadmill without stabilization and with stabilization with four different spring stiffnesses (between 760 and 1820 Nm(-1)) at three walking speeds (70%, 100%, and 130% of preferred speed). Energy cost was calculated from breath-by-breath oxygen consumption. Gait parameters (mean and variability of step width and stride length, and variability of trunk accelerations) were calculated from kinematic data. On average external stabilization led to a decrease in energy cost of 6% (p<0.005) as well as a decrease in step width (24%; p<0.001), step width variability (41%; p<0.001) and variability of medio-lateral trunk acceleration (12.5%; p<0.005). Increasing stabilizer stiffness increased the effects on both energy cost and medio-lateral gait parameters up to a stiffness of 1260 Nm(-1). Contrary to expectations, the effect of stabilization was independent of walking speed (p=0.111). These results show that active lateral stabilization during walking involves an energetic cost, which is independent of walking speed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stall inception and the prospects for active control in four high-speed compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Day, I.J.; Breuer, T.; Escuret, J.; Cherrett, M.; Wilson, A.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a European collaborative project, four high-speed compressors were tested to investigate the generic features of stall inception in aero-engine type compressors. Tests were run over the full speed range to identify the design and operating parameters that influence the stalling process. A study of data analysis techniques was also conducted in the hope of establishing early warning of stall. The work presented here is intended to relate the physical happenings in the compressor to the signals that would be received by an active stall control system. The measurements show a surprising range of stall-related disturbances and suggest that spike-type stall inception is a feature of low-speed operation while modal activity is clearest in the midspeed range. High-frequency disturbances were detected at both ends of the speed range and nonrotating stall, a new phenomenon, was detected in three out of the four compressors. The variety of the stalling patterns, and the ineffectiveness of the stall warning procedures, suggests that the ultimate goal of a flightworthy active control system remains some way off.

  20. What controls the speed of rip currents? Comparing field observations, numerical simulations, and a parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.; Warner, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Wave breaking on alongshore non-uniform beaches can drive rip currents near bathymetric depressions. Understanding the controls on the speed of these offshore-directed flows is important for improving predictions of beach hazards, the transport of pollutants and larvae, and morphological evolution. To investigate the response of nearshore flows to non-uniform bathymetry, five channels (on average 30-m wide and 2-m deep) were dredged across the surf zone on the Outer Banks of NC at different times using the propellers of a landing craft, and the subsequent evolution of waves, currents, and morphology was observed for a range of incident wave conditions. In addition, flows are simulated with the COAWST modeling system for the observed incident waves and rip channel bathymetry, and for an extended range of wave conditions and rip channel geometries. A parameter for the maximum offshore-directed flow speed in the surf zone is derived using depth-averaged momentum balances and continuity. The most important terms controlling the offshore-directed flow (rip current) speed are the incident wave height and angle, the water depths in the channel and on the sandbar crest or the terrace through which the channel is incised, and the ratio of wave height to water depth at breaking. The parameter accounts for several wave-breaking regimes, and includes the effect of the suppression of cross-shore flows by the inertia of breaking-wave driven alongshore currents. The parameter has skill predicting the observed and simulated offshore-directed flow speed. Supported by ASDR&E, NDSEG, ONR, and NSF.

  1. A new procedure of modal parameter estimation for high-speed digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huňady, Róbert; Hagara, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with the use of 3D digital image correlation in determining modal parameters of mechanical systems. It is a non-contact optical method, which for the measurement of full-field spatial displacements and strains of bodies uses precise digital cameras with high image resolution. Most often this method is utilized for testing of components or determination of material properties of various specimens. In the case of using high-speed cameras for measurement, the correlation system is capable of capturing various dynamic behaviors, including vibration. This enables the potential use of the mentioned method in experimental modal analysis. For that purpose, the authors proposed a measuring chain for the correlation system Q-450 and developed a software application called DICMAN 3D, which allows the direct use of this system in the area of modal testing. The created application provides the post-processing of measured data and the estimation of modal parameters. It has its own graphical user interface, in which several algorithms for the determination of natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping of particular modes of vibration are implemented. The paper describes the basic principle of the new estimation procedure which is crucial in the light of post-processing. Since the FRF matrix resulting from the measurement is usually relatively large, the estimation of modal parameters directly from the FRF matrix may be time-consuming and may occupy a large part of computer memory. The procedure implemented in DICMAN 3D provides a significant reduction in memory requirements and computational time while achieving a high accuracy of modal parameters. Its computational efficiency is particularly evident when the FRF matrix consists of thousands of measurement DOFs. The functionality of the created software application is presented on a practical example in which the modal parameters of a composite plate excited by an impact hammer were determined. For the

  2. Low-Speed Stability-and-Control and Ground-Effects Measurements on the Industry Reference High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Yaros, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a national effort to develop an economically feasible High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), a single configuration has been accepted as the testing baseline by the organizations working in the High Speed Research (HSR) program. The configuration is based on a design developed by the Boeing Company and is referred to as the Reference H (Ref H). The data contained in this report are low-speed stability-and-control and ground-effect measurements obtained on a 0.06 scale model of the Ref H in a subsonic tunnel.

  3. Control Parameter Description of Eukaryotic Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Amselem, Gabriel; Bae, Albert; Theves, Mathias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis of eukaryotic cells depends both on the average concentration of the chemoattractant and on the steepness of its gradient. For the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we test quantitatively the prediction by Ueda and Shibata [ Biophys. J. 93 11 (2007)] that the efficacy of chemotaxis depends on a single control parameter only, namely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), determined by the stochastic fluctuations of (i) the binding of the chemoattractant molecule to the transmembrane receptor and (ii) the intracellular activation of the effector of the signaling cascade. For SNR 1, the theory captures the experimental findings well, while for larger SNR noise sources further downstream in the signaling pathway need to be taken into account. Supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft SFB 937 and Max Planck Society.

  4. Control Parameter Description of Eukaryotic Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amselem, Gabriel; Theves, Matthias; Bae, Albert; Beta, Carsten; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-09-01

    The chemotaxis of eukaryotic cells depends both on the average concentration of the chemoattractant and on the steepness of its gradient. For the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we test quantitatively the prediction by Ueda and Shibata [Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-3495 93, 11 (2007)10.1529/biophysj.106.100263] that the efficacy of chemotaxis depends on a single control parameter only, namely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), determined by the stochastic fluctuations of (i) the binding of the chemoattractant molecule to the transmembrane receptor and (ii) the intracellular activation of the effector of the signaling cascade. For SNR ≲1, the theory captures the experimental findings well, while for larger SNR noise sources further downstream in the signaling pathway need to be taken into account.

  5. High speed rotorcraft propulsion concepts to control power/speed characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettner, J. L.; Hawkins, J. M.; Blandford, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Recent NASA sponsored rotorcraft airframer studies have demonstrated the desire for constant power over a wide range of output speed for turboshaft propulsion systems. This study interrogated several different concepts aimed at maintaining constant power over a speed variation from 100-50 percent with minimum increase in fuel consumption. The baseline engine was an advanced technology 8000 shp, fixed turbine geometry, turboshaft engine. The concepts investigated included variable geometry turbines, variable geometry compressors, power transfer from the HP to LP shafts, counterrotating power turbine with a combiner gearbox, and variable speed transmission integrated with the baseline turboshaft engine. The concept that best satisfies the program objectives with superior engine performance and with the least technical risk is the baseline (fixed geometry turbines) turboshaft engine integrated with the variable speed transmission.

  6. Influence of speed variation and age on ground reaction forces and stride parameters of children's normal gait.

    PubMed

    Diop, M; Rahmani, A; Belli, A; Gautheron, V; Geyssant, A; Cottalorda, J

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of both age and speed on ground reaction forces and temporal parameters during normal gait in children. Fifteen children aged 4-6 years (group 1), 16 aged 6-8 years (group 2), and 16 aged 8-10 years (group 3) walked at 2.7 km/h, 3.6 km/h, and 4.5 km/h on a treadmill. For each child thirty successive steps were recorded. The influence of speed and age on normalized gait parameters was examined with two-way analysis of variance. The first vertical peak force (Fz1) and all the antero-posterior forces of group 1 were higher than those of the other groups for the three speeds. The minimum vertical force (Fz2), the second vertical peak force (Fz3), and the duration of stride and stance were significantly higher in groups 2 and 3. For all the groups, Fz1 and all the antero-posterior forces increased with the speed while Fz2, stride, stance, and double-stance duration decreased. Fz3 was not influenced by speed variation. The results of this study show that age and walking speed influence ground reaction forces and stride time parameters in 4- to 10-year-old children.

  7. High-speed tracking control of piezoelectric actuators using an ellipse-based hysteresis model.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guoying; Zhu, Limin

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, an ellipse-based mathematic model is developed to characterize the rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the proposed model, an expanded input space is constructed to describe the multivalued hysteresis function H[u](t) by a multiple input single output (MISO) mapping Gamma:R(2)-->R. Subsequently, the inverse MISO mapping Gamma(-1)(H[u](t),H[u](t);u(t)) is proposed for real-time hysteresis compensation. In controller design, a hybrid control strategy combining a model-based feedforward controller and a proportional integral differential (PID) feedback loop is used for high-accuracy and high-speed tracking control of piezoelectric actuators. The real-time feedforward controller is developed to cancel the rate-dependent hysteresis based on the inverse hysteresis model, while the PID controller is used to compensate for the creep, modeling errors, and parameter uncertainties. Finally, experiments with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted and the experimental results are compared. The experimental results show that the hysteresis compensation in the feedforward path can reduce the hysteresis-caused error by up to 88% and the tracking performance of the hybrid controller is greatly improved in high-speed tracking control applications, e.g., the root-mean-square tracking error is reduced to only 0.34% of the displacement range under the input frequency of 100 Hz.

  8. Motor cortical control of movement speed with implications for brain-machine interface control

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Matthew D.; Yu, Byron M.; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Motor cortex plays a substantial role in driving movement, yet the details underlying this control remain unresolved. We analyzed the extent to which movement-related information could be extracted from single-trial motor cortical activity recorded while monkeys performed center-out reaching. Using information theoretic techniques, we found that single units carry relatively little speed-related information compared with direction-related information. This result is not mitigated at the population level: simultaneously recorded population activity predicted speed with significantly lower accuracy relative to direction predictions. Furthermore, a unit-dropping analysis revealed that speed accuracy would likely remain lower than direction accuracy, even given larger populations. These results suggest that the instantaneous details of single-trial movement speed are difficult to extract using commonly assumed coding schemes. This apparent paucity of speed information takes particular importance in the context of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), which rely on extracting kinematic information from motor cortex. Previous studies have highlighted subjects' difficulties in holding a BMI cursor stable at targets. These studies, along with our finding of relatively little speed information in motor cortex, inspired a speed-dampening Kalman filter (SDKF) that automatically slows the cursor upon detecting changes in decoded movement direction. Effectively, SDKF enhances speed control by using prevalent directional signals, rather than requiring speed to be directly decoded from neural activity. SDKF improved success rates by a factor of 1.7 relative to a standard Kalman filter in a closed-loop BMI task requiring stable stops at targets. BMI systems enabling stable stops will be more effective and user-friendly when translated into clinical applications. PMID:24717350

  9. Cooperative multiagent congestion control for high-speed networks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kao-Shing; Tan, Shun-Wen; Hsiao, Ming-Chang; Wu, Cheng-Shong

    2005-04-01

    An adaptive multiagent reinforcement learning method for solving congestion control problems on dynamic high-speed networks is presented. Traditional reactive congestion control selects a source rate in terms of the queue length restricted to a predefined threshold. However, the determination of congestion threshold and sending rate is difficult and inaccurate due to the propagation delay and the dynamic nature of the networks. A simple and robust cooperative multiagent congestion controller (CMCC), which consists of two subsystems: a long-term policy evaluator, expectation-return predictor and a short-term rate selector composed of action-value evaluator and stochastic action selector elements has been proposed to solve the problem. After receiving cooperative reinforcement signals generated by a cooperative fuzzy reward evaluator using game theory, CMCC takes the best action to regulate source flow with the features of high throughput and low packet loss rate. By means of learning procedures, CMCC can learn to take correct actions adaptively under time-varying environments. Simulation results showed that the proposed approach can promote the system utilization and decrease packet losses simultaneously.

  10. FASTBUS Readout Controller card for high speed data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, S. Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Areti, V.H.; Foster, G.W.; Joshi, U.; Treptow, K. )

    1991-10-01

    This article describes a FASTBUS Readout Controller (FRC) for high speed data acquisition in FASTBUS based systems. The controller has two main interfaces: to FASTBUS and to a Readout Port. The FASTBUS interface performs FASTBUS master and slave operations at a maximum transfer rate exceeding 40 MBytes/s. The Readout Port can be adapted for a variety of protocols. Currently, it will be interfaced to a VME bus based processor with a VSB port. The on-board LR33000 embedded processor controls the readout, executing a list of operations download into its memory. It scans the FASTBUS modules and stores the data in a triple port DRAM (TPDRAM), through one of the Serial Access Memory (SAM) ports of the (TPDRAM). Later, it transfers this data to the readout port using the other SAM. The FRC also supports serial communication via RS232 and Ethernet interfaces. This device is intended for use in the data acquisition system at the Collider Detector at Fermilab. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  11. 30 CFR 57.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 57... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment.... Operating speeds shall be consistent with conditions of roadways, tracks, grades, clearance, visibility, and...

  12. 30 CFR 56.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 56... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment.... Operating speeds shall be consistent with conditions of roadways, tracks, grades, clearance, visibility, and...

  13. 30 CFR 56.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 56... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment.... Operating speeds shall be consistent with conditions of roadways, tracks, grades, clearance, visibility, and...

  14. 30 CFR 57.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 57... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment.... Operating speeds shall be consistent with conditions of roadways, tracks, grades, clearance, visibility, and...

  15. Coronal Holes and Solar Wind High-Speed Streams: I. Forecasting the Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2007-02-01

    We analyze the relationship between the coronal hole (CH) area/position and physical characteristics of the associated corotating high-speed stream (HSS) in the solar wind at 1 AU. For the analysis we utilize the data in the period DOY 25 125 of 2005, characterized by a very low coronal mass ejection (CME) activity. Distinct correlations between the daily averaged CH parameters and the solar wind characteristics are found, which allows us to forecast the solar wind velocity v, proton temperature T, proton density n, and magnetic field strength B, several days in advance in periods of low CME activity. The forecast is based on monitoring fractional areas A, covered by CHs in the meridional slices embracing the central meridian distance ranges [-40°,-20°], [-10°,10°], and [20°,40°]. On average, the peaks in the daily values of n, B, T, and v appear delayed by 1, 2, 3, and 4 days, respectively, after the area A attains its maximum in the central-meridian slice. The peak values of the solar wind parameters are correlated to the peak values of A, which provides also forecasting of the peak values of n, B, T, and v. The most accurate prediction can be obtained for the solar wind velocity, for which the average relative difference between the calculated and the observed peak values amounts to overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈10 %. The forecast reliability is somewhat lower in the case of T, B, and n ( overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈20 , 30, and 40%, respectively). The space weather implications are discussed, including the perspectives for advancing the real-time calculation of the Sun Earth transit times of coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks, by including more realistic real-time estimates of the solar wind characteristics.

  16. Speed tracking control of pneumatic motor servo systems using observation-based adaptive dynamic sliding-mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Syuan-Yi; Gong, Sheng-Sian

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to develop an adaptive high-precision control system for controlling the speed of a vane-type air motor (VAM) pneumatic servo system. In practice, the rotor speed of a VAM depends on the input mass air flow, which can be controlled by the effective orifice area (EOA) of an electronic throttle valve (ETV). As the control variable of a second-order pneumatic system is the integral of the EOA, an observation-based adaptive dynamic sliding-mode control (ADSMC) system is proposed to derive the differential of the control variable, namely, the EOA control signal. In the ADSMC system, a proportional-integral-derivative fuzzy neural network (PIDFNN) observer is used to achieve an ideal dynamic sliding-mode control (DSMC), and a supervisor compensator is designed to eliminate the approximation error. As a result, the ADSMC incorporates the robustness of a DSMC and the online learning ability of a PIDFNN. To ensure the convergence of the tracking error, a Lyapunov-based analytical method is employed to obtain the adaptive algorithms required to tune the control parameters of the online ADSMC system. Finally, our experimental results demonstrate the precision and robustness of the ADSMC system for highly nonlinear and time-varying VAM pneumatic servo systems.

  17. High speed e-beam writing for large area photonic nanostructures — a choice of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kezheng; Li, Juntao; Reardon, Christopher; Schuster, Christian S.; Wang, Yue; Triggs, Graham J.; Damnik, Niklas; Müenchenberger, Jana; Wang, Xuehua; Martins, Emiliano R.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2016-09-01

    Photonic nanostructures are used for many optical systems and applications. However, some high-end applications require the use of electron-beam lithography (EBL) to generate such nanostructures. An important technological bottleneck is the exposure time of the EBL systems, which can exceed 24 hours per 1 cm2. Here, we have developed a method based on a target function to systematically increase the writing speed of EBL. As an example, we use as the target function the fidelity of the Fourier Transform spectra of nanostructures that are designed for thin film light trapping applications, and optimize the full parameter space of the lithography process. Finally, we are able to reduce the exposure time by a factor of 5.5 without loss of photonic performance. We show that the performances of the fastest written structures are identical to the original ones within experimental error. As the target function can be varied according to different purposes, the method is also applicable to guided mode resonant grating and many other areas. These findings contribute to the advancement of EBL and point towards making the technology more attractive for commercial applications.

  18. High speed e-beam writing for large area photonic nanostructures — a choice of parameters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kezheng; Li, Juntao; Reardon, Christopher; Schuster, Christian S.; Wang, Yue; Triggs, Graham J.; Damnik, Niklas; Müenchenberger, Jana; Wang, Xuehua; Martins, Emiliano R.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Photonic nanostructures are used for many optical systems and applications. However, some high-end applications require the use of electron-beam lithography (EBL) to generate such nanostructures. An important technological bottleneck is the exposure time of the EBL systems, which can exceed 24 hours per 1 cm2. Here, we have developed a method based on a target function to systematically increase the writing speed of EBL. As an example, we use as the target function the fidelity of the Fourier Transform spectra of nanostructures that are designed for thin film light trapping applications, and optimize the full parameter space of the lithography process. Finally, we are able to reduce the exposure time by a factor of 5.5 without loss of photonic performance. We show that the performances of the fastest written structures are identical to the original ones within experimental error. As the target function can be varied according to different purposes, the method is also applicable to guided mode resonant grating and many other areas. These findings contribute to the advancement of EBL and point towards making the technology more attractive for commercial applications. PMID:27633902

  19. Effect of speed manipulation on the control of aperture closure during reach-to-grasp movements.

    PubMed

    Rand, Miya K; Squire, Linda M; Stelmach, George E

    2006-09-01

    This study investigates coordination between hand transport and grasp movement components by examining a hypothesis that the hand location, relative to the object, in which aperture closure is initiated remains relatively constant under a wide range of transport speed. Subjects made reach-to-grasp movements to a dowel under four speed conditions: slow, comfortable, fast but comfortable, and maximum (i.e., as fast as possible). The distance traveled by the wrist after aperture reached its maximum (aperture closure distance) increased with an increase of transport speed across the speed conditions. This finding rejected the hypothesis and suggests that the speed of hand transport is taken into account in aperture closure initiation. Within each speed condition, however, the closure distance exhibited relatively small variability across trials, even though the total distance traveled by the wrist during the entire transport movement varied from trial to trial. The observed stability in aperture closure distance across trials implies that the hand distance to the object plays an important role in the control law governing the initiation of aperture closure. Further analysis showed that the aperture closure distance depended on the amplitude of peak aperture as well as hand velocity and acceleration. To clarify the form of the above control law, we analyzed four different mathematical models, in which a decision to initiate grasp closure is made as soon as a specific movement parameter (wrist distance to target or transport time) crosses a threshold that is either a constant value or a function of the above-mentioned other movement-related parameters. Statistical analysis performed across all movement conditions revealed that the control law model (according to which grasp initiation is made when hand distance to target becomes less than a certain linear function of aperture amplitude, hand velocity, and hand acceleration) produced significantly smaller residual errors

  20. Effect of speed manipulation on the control of aperture closure during reach-to-grasp movements

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Linda M.; Stelmach, George E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates coordination between hand transport and grasp movement components by examining a hypothesis that the hand location, relative to the object, in which aperture closure is initiated remains relatively constant under a wide range of transport speed. Subjects made reach-to-grasp movements to a dowel under four speed conditions: slow, comfortable, fast but comfortable, and maximum (i.e., as fast as possible). The distance traveled by the wrist after aperture reached its maximum (aperture closure distance) increased with an increase of transport speed across the speed conditions. This finding rejected the hypothesis and suggests that the speed of hand transport is taken into account in aperture closure initiation. Within each speed condition, however, the closure distance exhibited relatively small variability across trials, even though the total distance traveled by the wrist during the entire transport movement varied from trial to trial. The observed stability in aperture closure distance across trials implies that the hand distance to the object plays an important role in the control law governing the initiation of aperture closure. Further analysis showed that the aperture closure distance depended on the amplitude of peak aperture as well as hand velocity and acceleration. To clarify the form of the above control law, we analyzed four different mathematical models, in which a decision to initiate grasp closure is made as soon as a specific movement parameter (wrist distance to target or transport time) crosses a threshold that is either a constant value or a function of the above-mentioned other movement-related parameters. Statistical analysis performed across all movement conditions revealed that the control law model (according to which grasp initiation is made when hand distance to target becomes less than a certain linear function of aperture amplitude, hand velocity, and hand acceleration) produced significantly smaller residual errors

  1. Asymmetry of short-term control of spatio-temporal gait parameters during treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowska, Klaudia; Latka, Miroslaw; West, Bruce J.

    2017-01-01

    Optimization of energy cost determines average values of spatio-temporal gait parameters such as step duration, step length or step speed. However, during walking, humans need to adapt these parameters at every step to respond to exogenous and/or endogenic perturbations. While some neurological mechanisms that trigger these responses are known, our understanding of the fundamental principles governing step-by-step adaptation remains elusive. We determined the gait parameters of 20 healthy subjects with right-foot preference during treadmill walking at speeds of 1.1, 1.4 and 1.7 m/s. We found that when the value of the gait parameter was conspicuously greater (smaller) than the mean value, it was either followed immediately by a smaller (greater) value of the contralateral leg (interleg control), or the deviation from the mean value decreased during the next movement of ipsilateral leg (intraleg control). The selection of step duration and the selection of step length during such transient control events were performed in unique ways. We quantified the symmetry of short-term control of gait parameters and observed the significant dominance of the right leg in short-term control of all three parameters at higher speeds (1.4 and 1.7 m/s). PMID:28287168

  2. Asymmetry of short-term control of spatio-temporal gait parameters during treadmill walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowska, Klaudia; Latka, Miroslaw; West, Bruce J.

    2017-03-01

    Optimization of energy cost determines average values of spatio-temporal gait parameters such as step duration, step length or step speed. However, during walking, humans need to adapt these parameters at every step to respond to exogenous and/or endogenic perturbations. While some neurological mechanisms that trigger these responses are known, our understanding of the fundamental principles governing step-by-step adaptation remains elusive. We determined the gait parameters of 20 healthy subjects with right-foot preference during treadmill walking at speeds of 1.1, 1.4 and 1.7 m/s. We found that when the value of the gait parameter was conspicuously greater (smaller) than the mean value, it was either followed immediately by a smaller (greater) value of the contralateral leg (interleg control), or the deviation from the mean value decreased during the next movement of ipsilateral leg (intraleg control). The selection of step duration and the selection of step length during such transient control events were performed in unique ways. We quantified the symmetry of short-term control of gait parameters and observed the significant dominance of the right leg in short-term control of all three parameters at higher speeds (1.4 and 1.7 m/s).

  3. An Anaylsis of Control Requirements and Control Parameters for Direct-Coupled Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novik, David; Otto, Edward W.

    1947-01-01

    Requirements of an automatic engine control, as affected by engine characteristics, have been analyzed for a direct-coupled turbojet engine. Control parameters for various conditions of engine operation are discussed. A hypothetical engine control is presented to illustrate the use of these parameters. An adjustable speed governor was found to offer a desirable method of over-all engine control. The selection of a minimum value of fuel flow was found to offer a means of preventing unstable burner operation during steady-state operation. Until satisfactory high-temperature-measuring devices are developed, air-fuel ratio is considered to be a satisfactory acceleration-control parameter for the attainment of the maximum acceleration rates consistent with safe turbine temperatures. No danger of unstable burner operation exists during acceleration if a temperature-limiting acceleration control is assumed to be effective. Deceleration was found to be accompanied by the possibility of burner blow-out even if a minimum fuel-flow control that prevents burner blow-out during steady-state operation is assumed to be effective. Burner blow-out during deceleration may be eliminated by varying the value of minimum fuel flow as a function of compressor-discharge pressure, but in no case should the fuel flow be allowed to fall below the value required for steady-state burner operation.

  4. Gait parameter control timing with dynamic manual contact or visual cues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peter; Werner, William

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the timing of gait parameter changes (stride length, peak toe velocity, and double-, single-support, and complete step duration) to control gait speed. Eleven healthy participants adjusted their gait speed on a treadmill to maintain a constant distance between them and a fore-aft oscillating cue (a place on a conveyor belt surface). The experimental design balanced conditions of cue modality (vision: eyes-open; manual contact: eyes-closed while touching the cue); treadmill speed (0.2, 0.4, 0.85, and 1.3 m/s); and cue motion (none, ±10 cm at 0.09, 0.11, and 0.18 Hz). Correlation analyses revealed a number of temporal relationships between gait parameters and cue speed. The results suggest that neural control ranged from feedforward to feedback. Specifically, step length preceded cue velocity during double-support duration suggesting anticipatory control. Peak toe velocity nearly coincided with its most-correlated cue velocity during single-support duration. The toe-off concluding step and double-support durations followed their most-correlated cue velocity, suggesting feedback control. Cue-tracking accuracy and cue velocity correlations with timing parameters were higher with the manual contact cue than visual cue. The cue/gait timing relationships generalized across cue modalities, albeit with greater delays of step-cycle events relative to manual contact cue velocity. We conclude that individual kinematic parameters of gait are controlled to achieve a desired velocity at different specific times during the gait cycle. The overall timing pattern of instantaneous cue velocities associated with different gait parameters is conserved across cues that afford different performance accuracies. This timing pattern may be temporally shifted to optimize control. Different cue/gait parameter latencies in our nonadaptation paradigm provide general-case evidence of the independent control of gait parameters previously demonstrated in gait adaptation paradigms

  5. Effects of speed-control measures on the safety of unsignalized midblock street crossings in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Ye, Zhirui; Wang, Xinyi; Li, Wenting

    2017-10-03

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different speed-control measures on the safety of unsignalized midblock street crossings. In China, it is quite difficult to obtain traffic crash and conflict data for pedestrians using such crossings, mainly due to the lack of traffic data management and organizational issues. In light of this, the proposed method did not rely on such data, but considered vehicle speed, which is a leading contributing factor of pedestrian safety at mid blocks. To evaluate the speed reduction effects at different locations, the research team utilized the following methods in this study: (1) testing speed differences-on the basis of the collected data, statistical analysis is conducted to test the speed differences between upstream and crosswalk, upstream and downstream, and downstream and crosswalk; and (2) mean distribution deviation-this value is calculated by taking the difference in cumulative speed distributions for the two different samples just mentioned. In order to better understand the variation of speed reduction effects at different distances from speed-control facilities, data were collected from six types of speed-control measures with a visual range of 60 m. The results showed that speed humps, transverse rumble strips, and speed bumps were effective in reducing vehicle speeds. Among them speed humps performed the best, with reductions of 21.1% and 20.0% from upstream location (25.01 km/h) and downstream location (24.66 km/h) to pedestrian crosswalk (19.73 km/h), respectively. By contrast, the speed reduction effects were minimal for stop and yield signs, flashing yellow lights, and crossings without treatment. Consequently, in order to reduce vehicle speeds and improve pedestrian safety at mid blocks, several speed-control measures such as speed humps, speed bumps, and transverse rumble strips are recommended to be deployed in the vicinity of pedestrian crosswalks.

  6. Excitations for Rapidly Estimating Flight-Control Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Tim; Smith, Mark; Morelli, Gene

    2006-01-01

    A flight test on an F-15 airplane was performed to evaluate the utility of prescribed simultaneous independent surface excitations (PreSISE) for real-time estimation of flight-control parameters, including stability and control derivatives. The ability to extract these derivatives in nearly real time is needed to support flight demonstration of intelligent flight-control system (IFCS) concepts under development at NASA, in academia, and in industry. Traditionally, flight maneuvers have been designed and executed to obtain estimates of stability and control derivatives by use of a post-flight analysis technique. For an IFCS, it is required to be able to modify control laws in real time for an aircraft that has been damaged in flight (because of combat, weather, or a system failure). The flight test included PreSISE maneuvers, during which all desired control surfaces are excited simultaneously, but at different frequencies, resulting in aircraft motions about all coordinate axes. The objectives of the test were to obtain data for post-flight analysis and to perform the analysis to determine: 1) The accuracy of derivatives estimated by use of PreSISE, 2) The required durations of PreSISE inputs, and 3) The minimum required magnitudes of PreSISE inputs. The PreSISE inputs in the flight test consisted of stacked sine-wave excitations at various frequencies, including symmetric and differential excitations of canard and stabilator control surfaces and excitations of aileron and rudder control surfaces of a highly modified F-15 airplane. Small, medium, and large excitations were tested in 15-second maneuvers at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. Typical excitations are shown in Figure 1. Flight-test data were analyzed by use of pEst, which is an industry-standard output-error technique developed by Dryden Flight Research Center. Data were also analyzed by use of Fourier-transform regression (FTR), which was developed for onboard, real-time estimation of the

  7. Gait parameter adjustments for walking on a treadmill at preferred, slower, and faster speeds in older adults with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Beth A; Kubo, Masayoshi; Ulrich, Beverly D

    2012-01-01

    The combined effects of ligamentous laxity, hypotonia, and decrements associated with aging lead to stability-enhancing foot placement adaptations during routine overground walking at a younger age in adults with Down syndrome (DS) compared to their peers with typical development (TD). Our purpose here was to examine real-time adaptations in older adults with DS by testing their responses to walking on a treadmill at their preferred speed and at speeds slower and faster than preferred. We found that older adults with DS were able to adapt their gait to slower and faster than preferred treadmill speeds; however, they maintained their stability-enhancing foot placements at all speeds compared to their peers with TD. All adults adapted their gait patterns similarly in response to faster and slower than preferred treadmill-walking speeds. They increased stride frequency and stride length, maintained step width, and decreased percent stance as treadmill speed increased. Older adults with DS, however, adjusted their stride frequencies significantly less than their peers with TD. Our results show that older adults with DS have the capacity to adapt their gait parameters in response to different walking speeds while also supporting the need for intervention to increase gait stability.

  8. An exploration of the influence of diagonal dissociation and moderate changes in speed on locomotor parameters in trotting horses

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, John E.A.; Clayton, Hilary M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although the trot is described as a diagonal gait, contacts of the diagonal pairs of hooves are not usually perfectly synchronized. Although subtle, the timing dissociation between contacts of each diagonal pair could have consequences on gait dynamics and provide insight into the functional strategies employed. This study explores the mechanical effects of different diagonal dissociation patterns when speed was matched between individuals and how these effects link to moderate, natural changes in trotting speed. We anticipate that hind-first diagonal dissociation at contact increases with speed, diagonal dissociation at contact can reduce collision-based energy losses and predominant dissociation patterns will be evident within individuals. Methods. The study was performed in two parts: in the first 17 horses performed speed-matched trotting trials and in the second, five horses each performed 10 trotting trials that represented a range of individually preferred speeds. Standard motion capture provided kinematic data that were synchronized with ground reaction force (GRF) data from a series of force plates. The data were analyzed further to determine temporal, speed, GRF, postural, mass distribution, moment, and collision dynamics parameters. Results. Fore-first, synchronous, and hind-first dissociations were found in horses trotting at (3.3 m/s ± 10%). In these speed-matched trials, mean centre of pressure (COP) cranio-caudal location differed significantly between the three dissociation categories. The COP moved systematically and significantly (P = .001) from being more caudally located in hind-first dissociation (mean location = 0.41 ± 0.04) through synchronous (0.36 ± 0.02) to a more cranial location in fore-first dissociation (0.32 ± 0.02). Dissociation patterns were found to influence function, posture, and balance parameters. Over a moderate speed range, peak vertical forelimb GRF had a strong relationship with dissociation time (R = .594

  9. Possible causes of the discrepancy between the predicted and observed parameters of high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugay, Yu. S.; Veselovsky, I. S.; Slemzin, V. A.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Rodkin, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    We have considered the possible causes of discrepancies between the predicted and observed at 1 AU parameters of the recurrent solar wind (SW) streams in the maximum of the 24th solar cycle. These discrepancies have been observed in both the SW velocity profile and the SW stream arrival time, as well as in the absence of the expected high-speed SW stream. The degree of discrepancy depends on the model used for the SW prediction; however, in some cases, different prediction methods provide a similar discrepancy with the observed SW parameters at 1 AU. For several cases, we show that the probable cause of the discrepancies can be a deflection of the high-speed SW stream from the radial direction due to the interaction with the transient SW streams at certain configuration of the magnetic fields of high-speed and transient SW sources in the solar corona.

  10. Controlling speed and direction during interception: an affordance-based approach.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Julien; Fajen, Brett R; Montagne, Gilles

    2010-04-01

    The coordination of direction and speed of self-motion when intercepting a target moving parallel to the ground plane was examined. Subjects viewed a computer-generated environment comprised of a textured ground plane and a moving target. Turning rate was controlled using a steering wheel and speed was controlled using a foot pedal. It was hypothesized that these two degrees of freedom would be coordinated such that the speed required to intercept the target (i.e., the ideal speed) would be maintained below the subject's maximum possible speed. As predicted, subjects turned toward the target when ideal speed was less than maximum speed and ahead of the target when ideal speed was greater than maximum speed. When behavior was compared across groups with different maximum speed capabilities, it was found that the ratio of ideal to maximum speed was invariant across groups at critical points of both steering and speed adjustments. Finally, subjects rapidly recalibrated to a sudden increase or decrease in maximum speed. The results suggest that actors coordinate steering and speed during interception in a way that takes into account the limits on their action capabilities. Discussion focuses on the role of calibration and the implications of the present findings for existing models of visually guided interception.

  11. Robust/optimal temperature profile control of a high-speed aerospace vehicle using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek; Padhi, Radhakant; Balakrishnan, S N

    2007-07-01

    An approximate dynamic programming (ADP)-based suboptimal neurocontroller to obtain desired temperature for a high-speed aerospace vehicle is synthesized in this paper. A 1-D distributed parameter model of a fin is developed from basic thermal physics principles. "Snapshot" solutions of the dynamics are generated with a simple dynamic inversion-based feedback controller. Empirical basis functions are designed using the "proper orthogonal decomposition" (POD) technique and the snapshot solutions. A low-order nonlinear lumped parameter system to characterize the infinite dimensional system is obtained by carrying out a Galerkin projection. An ADP-based neurocontroller with a dual heuristic programming (DHP) formulation is obtained with a single-network-adaptive-critic (SNAC) controller for this approximate nonlinear model. Actual control in the original domain is calculated with the same POD basis functions through a reverse mapping. Further contribution of this paper includes development of an online robust neurocontroller to account for unmodeled dynamics and parametric uncertainties inherent in such a complex dynamic system. A neural network (NN) weight update rule that guarantees boundedness of the weights and relaxes the need for persistence of excitation (PE) condition is presented. Simulation studies show that in a fairly extensive but compact domain, any desired temperature profile can be achieved starting from any initial temperature profile. Therefore, the ADP and NN-based controllers appear to have the potential to become controller synthesis tools for nonlinear distributed parameter systems.

  12. Planning Robot-Control Parameters With Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative-reasoning planning algorithm helps to determine quantitative parameters controlling motion of robot. Algorithm regarded as performing search in multidimensional space of control parameters from starting point to goal region in which desired result of robotic manipulation achieved. Makes use of directed graph representing qualitative physical equations describing task, and interacts, at each sampling period, with history of quantitative control parameters and sensory data, to narrow search for reliable values of quantitative control parameters.

  13. Planning Robot-Control Parameters With Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative-reasoning planning algorithm helps to determine quantitative parameters controlling motion of robot. Algorithm regarded as performing search in multidimensional space of control parameters from starting point to goal region in which desired result of robotic manipulation achieved. Makes use of directed graph representing qualitative physical equations describing task, and interacts, at each sampling period, with history of quantitative control parameters and sensory data, to narrow search for reliable values of quantitative control parameters.

  14. Digital phase-locked loop speed control for a brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, M. G.

    1985-06-01

    Speed control of d.c. motors by phase-locked loops (PLL) is becoming increasingly popular. Primary interest has been in employing PLL for constant speed control. This thesis investigates the theory and techniques of digital PLL to speed control of a brushless d.c. motor with a variable speed of operation. Addition of logic controlled count enable/disable to a synchronous up/down counter, used as a phase-frequency detector, is shown to improve the performance of previously proposed PLL control schemes.

  15. A new method for speed control of a DC motor using magnetorheological clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-03-01

    In this research, a new method to control speed of DC motor using magnetorheological (MR) clutch is proposed and realized. Firstly, the strategy of a DC motor speed control using MR clutch is proposed. The MR clutch configuration is then proposed and analyzed based on Bingham-plastic rheological model of MR fluid. An optimal designed of the MR clutch is then studied to find out the optimal geometric dimensions of the clutch that can transform a required torque with minimum mass. A prototype of the optimized MR clutch is then manufactured and its performance characteristics are experimentally investigated. A DC motor speed control system featuring the optimized MR clutch is designed and manufactured. A PID controller is then designed to control the output speed of the system. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed DC motor speed control system, experimental results of the system such as speed tracking performance are obtained and presented with discussions.

  16. Type-2 fuzzy logic control based MRAS speed estimator for speed sensorless direct torque and flux control of an induction motor drive.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Tejavathu; Kumar Panda, Anup; Shiva Kumar, S

    2015-07-01

    In this research study, a model reference adaptive system (MRAS) speed estimator for speed sensorless direct torque and flux control (DTFC) of an induction motor drive (IMD) using two adaptation mechanism schemes are proposed to replace the conventional proportional integral controller (PIC). The first adaptation mechanism scheme is based on Type-1 fuzzy logic controller (T1FLC), which is used to achieve high performance sensorless drive in both transient as well as steady state conditions. However, the Type-1 fuzzy sets are certain and unable to work effectively when higher degree of uncertainties presents in the system which can be caused by sudden change in speed or different load disturbances, process noise etc. Therefore, a new Type-2 fuzzy logic controller (T2FLC) based adaptation mechanism scheme is proposed to better handle the higher degree of uncertainties and improves the performance and also robust to various load torque and sudden change in speed conditions, respectively. The detailed performances of various adaptation mechanism schemes are carried out in a MATLAB/Simulink environment with a speed sensor and speed sensorless modes of operation when an IMD is operating under different operating conditions, such as, no-load, load and sudden change in speed, respectively. To validate the different control approaches, the system also implemented on real-time system and adequate results are reported for its validation.

  17. Ride performance of a high speed rail vehicle using controlled semi active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Anil

    2017-05-01

    The rail-wheel interaction in a rail vehicle running at high speed results in large amplitude vibration of carbody that deteriorates the ride comfort of travellers. The role of suspension system is crucial to provide an acceptable level of ride performance. In this context, an existing rail vehicle is modelled in vertical, pitch and roll motions of carbody and bogies. Additionally, nonlinear stiffness and damping parameters of passive suspension system are defined based on experimental data. In the secondary vertical suspension system, a magneto-rheological (MR) damper is included to improve the ride quality and comfort. The parameters of MR damper depend on the current, amplitude and frequency of excitations. At different running speeds, three semi-active suspension strategies with MR damper are analysed for periodic track irregularity and the resulting performance indices are juxtaposed with the nonlinear passive suspension system. The disturbance rejection and force tracking damper controller algorithms are applied to control the desired force of MR damper. This study reveals that the vertical vibrations of a vehicle can be reduced significantly by using the proposed semi-active suspension strategies. Moreover, it naturally results in improved ride quality and passenger’s comfort in comparison to the existing passive system.

  18. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Determination of the Effect of Experimental Parameters on Vehicle Agent Speed Relative to Vehicle Intruder

    PubMed Central

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Banjanovic-Mehmedovic, Lejla; Bosankic, Ivan; Kasapovic, Suad; Abdul Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Bin

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems rely on understanding, predicting and affecting the interactions between vehicles. The goal of this paper is to choose a small subset from the larger set so that the resulting regression model is simple, yet have good predictive ability for Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. The method of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) was applied to the data resulting from these measurements. The ANFIS process for variable selection was implemented in order to detect the predominant variables affecting the prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. This process includes several ways to discover a subset of the total set of recorded parameters, showing good predictive capability. The ANFIS network was used to perform a variable search. Then, it was used to determine how 9 parameters (Intruder Front sensors active (boolean), Intruder Rear sensors active (boolean), Agent Front sensors active (boolean), Agent Rear sensors active (boolean), RSSI signal intensity/strength (integer), Elapsed time (in seconds), Distance between Agent and Intruder (m), Angle of Agent relative to Intruder (angle between vehicles °), Altitude difference between Agent and Intruder (m)) influence prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. The results indicated that distance between Vehicle agent and Vehicle intruder (m) and angle of Vehicle agent relative to Vehicle Intruder (angle between vehicles °) is the most influential parameters to Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. PMID:27219539

  19. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Determination of the Effect of Experimental Parameters on Vehicle Agent Speed Relative to Vehicle Intruder.

    PubMed

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Banjanovic-Mehmedovic, Lejla; Bosankic, Ivan; Kasapovic, Suad; Abdul Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Bin

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems rely on understanding, predicting and affecting the interactions between vehicles. The goal of this paper is to choose a small subset from the larger set so that the resulting regression model is simple, yet have good predictive ability for Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. The method of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) was applied to the data resulting from these measurements. The ANFIS process for variable selection was implemented in order to detect the predominant variables affecting the prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. This process includes several ways to discover a subset of the total set of recorded parameters, showing good predictive capability. The ANFIS network was used to perform a variable search. Then, it was used to determine how 9 parameters (Intruder Front sensors active (boolean), Intruder Rear sensors active (boolean), Agent Front sensors active (boolean), Agent Rear sensors active (boolean), RSSI signal intensity/strength (integer), Elapsed time (in seconds), Distance between Agent and Intruder (m), Angle of Agent relative to Intruder (angle between vehicles °), Altitude difference between Agent and Intruder (m)) influence prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. The results indicated that distance between Vehicle agent and Vehicle intruder (m) and angle of Vehicle agent relative to Vehicle Intruder (angle between vehicles °) is the most influential parameters to Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder.

  20. Analysis and control of high-speed wheeled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velenis, Efstathios

    In this work we reproduce driving techniques to mimic expert race drivers and obtain the open-loop control signals that may be used by auto-pilot agents driving autonomous ground wheeled vehicles. Race drivers operate their vehicles at the limits of the acceleration envelope. An accurate characterization of the acceleration capacity of the vehicle is required. Understanding and reproduction of such complex maneuvers also require a physics-based mathematical description of the vehicle dynamics. While most of the modeling issues of ground-vehicles/automobiles are already well established in the literature, lack of understanding of the physics associated with friction generation results in ad-hoc approaches to tire friction modeling. In this work we revisit this aspect of the overall vehicle modeling and develop a tire friction model that provides physical interpretation of the tire forces. The new model is free of those singularities at low vehicle speed and wheel angular rate that are inherent in the widely used empirical static models. In addition, the dynamic nature of the tire model proposed herein allows the study of dynamic effects such as transients and hysteresis. The trajectory-planning problem for an autonomous ground wheeled vehicle is formulated in an optimal control framework aiming to minimize the time of travel and maximize the use of the available acceleration capacity. The first approach to solve the optimal control problem is using numerical techniques. Numerical optimization allows incorporation of a vehicle model of high fidelity and generates realistic solutions. Such an optimization scheme provides an ideal platform to study the limit operation of the vehicle, which would not be possible via straightforward simulation. In this work we emphasize the importance of online applicability of the proposed methodologies. This underlines the need for optimal solutions that require little computational cost and are able to incorporate real, unpredictable

  1. The selective use of functional optical variables in the control of forward speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Awe, Cynthia A.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work on the perception and control of simulated vehicle speed has examined the contributions of optical flow rate (angular visual speed) and texture, or edge rate (frequency of passing terrain objects or markings) on the perception and control of forward speed. However, these studies have not examined the ability to selectively use edge rate or flow rate. The two studies presented here show that this ability is far greater for pilots than non-pilots, as would be expected since pilots must control vehicular speed over a variety of altitudes where flow rates change independently of forward speed. These studies also show that this ability to selectively use these variables is linked to the visual contextual information about the relative validity (linkage with speed) of the two variables. Subjective judgment data also indicated that awareness of altitude and ground texture density did not mediate ground speed awareness.

  2. Control of a High Speed Flywheel System for Energy Storage in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Jansen, Ralph; Dever, Timothy; Santiago, Walter

    2004-01-01

    A novel control algorithm for the charge and discharge modes of operation of a flywheel energy storage system for space applications is presented. The motor control portion of the algorithm uses sensorless field oriented control with position and speed estimates determined from a signal injection technique at low speeds and a back EMF technique at higher speeds. The charge and discharge portion of the algorithm use command feed-forward and disturbance decoupling, respectively, to achieve fast response with low gains. Simulation and experimental results are presented demonstrating the successful operation of the flywheel control up to the rated speed of 60,000 rpm.

  3. 30 CFR 57.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. Operators of self-propelled mobile equipment shall maintain control of the equipment while it is in motion... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment....

  4. 30 CFR 56.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. Operators of self-propelled mobile equipment shall maintain control of the equipment while it is in motion... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment....

  5. 30 CFR 56.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 56... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. Operators of self-propelled mobile equipment shall maintain control of the equipment while it is in...

  6. 30 CFR 57.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 57... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. Operators of self-propelled mobile equipment shall maintain control of the equipment while it is in...

  7. 30 CFR 57.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. Operators of self-propelled mobile equipment shall maintain control of the equipment while it is in motion... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 57...

  8. 30 CFR 56.9101 - Operating speeds and control of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. Operators of self-propelled mobile equipment shall maintain control of the equipment while it is in motion... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating speeds and control of equipment. 56...

  9. Measurement of whole-body vibration exposure from speed control humps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshid, E.; Alkalby, F.; Kamal, H.

    2007-07-01

    The main objective of speed control humps is to introduce shocks and high vibration levels when a car passes over them if its speed is higher than the allowable limit. Hump geometry is a major factor in altering the level of these shocks and specifying the speed limit. However, there is no study of the relationship between whole body vibration due to passing over a speed control hump and lower back pain or occupational diseases. In this study, an experimental investigation is conducted to evaluate health risks associated with different geometry speed control humps. Vibration levels and shocks are measured by a seat pad accelerometer placed under the driver's seat to evaluate hazard risks on the human body's lower back. The assessment is based on two standard methods of measuring whole body vibration: the British standard BS 6841 and the new ISO/DIS standard 2631-5. These methods are used to assess the effects of vehicle type, passenger location in the vehicle, vehicle speed, and speed control hump geometry. It was found that circular speed control humps currently installed on many public roads should be modified in order to eliminate hazards. Two newly designed speed humps were proved to be less hazardous than circular speed control humps.

  10. Study of defuzzification methods of fuzzy logic controller for speed control of a DC motor

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.H.; Saraf, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    A typical Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) has the following components: fuzzification, knowledge base, decision making and defuzzification. Various defuzzification techniques have been proposed in the literature. The efficacy of a FLC depends very much on the defuzzification process. This is so because the overall performance of the system under control is determined by the controlling signal (the defuzzified output of the FLC) the system receives. The aim of this paper is to evaluate qualitatively the performance of the different defuzzification techniques as applied to speed control of a DC motor.

  11. Speed cameras, section control, and kangaroo jumps-a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Høye, Alena

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted of the effects of speed cameras and section control (point-to-point speed cameras) on crashes. 63 effect estimates from 15 speed camera studies and five effect estimates from four section control studies were included in the analysis. Speed cameras were found to reduce total crash numbers by about 20%. The effect declines with increasing distance from the camera location. Fatal crashes were found to be reduced by 51%, this result may however be affected by regression to the mean (RTM). Section control was found to have a greater crash reducing effect than speed cameras (-30% for total crash numbers and -56% for KSI crashes). There is no indication that these results (except the one for the effect of speed cameras on fatal crashes) are affected by regression to the mean, publication bias or outlier bias. The results indicate that kangaroo driving (braking and accelerating) occurs, but no adverse effects on speed or crashes were found. Crash migration, i.e., an increase of crash numbers on other roads due to rerouting of traffic, may occur in some cases at speed cameras, but the results do not indicate that such effects are common. Both speed cameras and section control were found to achieve considerable speed reductions and the crash effects that were found in meta-analysis are of a similar size or greater than one might expect based on the effects on speed.

  12. T-S fuzzy model predictive speed control of electrical vehicles.

    PubMed

    Khooban, Mohammad Hassan; Vafamand, Navid; Niknam, Taher

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel nonlinear model predictive controller (MPC) in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The proposed MPC is based on Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy model, a non-parallel distributed compensation (non-PDC) fuzzy controller and a non-quadratic Lyapunov function (NQLF). Utilizing the non-PDC controller together with the Lyapunov theorem guarantees the stabilization issue of this MPC. In this approach, at each sampling time a quadratic cost function with an infinite prediction and control horizon is minimized such that constraints on the control input Euclidean norm are satisfied. To show the merits of the proposed approach, a nonlinear electric vehicle (EV) system with parameter uncertainty is considered as a case study. Indeed, the main goal of this study is to force the speed of EV to track a desired value. The experimental data, a new European driving cycle (NEDC), is used in order to examine the performance of the proposed controller. First, the equivalent TS model of the original nonlinear system is derived. After that, in order to evaluate the proficiency of the proposed controller, the achieved results of the proposed approach are compared with those of the conventional MPC controller and the optimal Fuzzy PI controller (OFPI), which are the latest research on the problem in hand.

  13. Linear parameter varying control design for rotating systems supported by journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida Gonçalves Siqueira, Adriano; Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Norrick, Nicklas; Lucchesi Cavalca, Kátia; Fiori de Castro, Helio; Bauer, Jens; Dohnal, Fadi

    2012-05-01

    Linear parameter varying (LPV) control is a model-based control technique that takes into account time-varying parameters of the plant. In the case of rotating systems supported by lubricated bearings, the dynamic characteristics of the bearings change in time as a function of the rotating speed. Hence, LPV control can tackle the problem of run-up and run-down operational conditions when dynamic characteristics of the rotating system change significantly in time due to the bearings and high vibration levels occur. In this work, the LPV control design for a flexible shaft supported by plain journal bearings is presented. The model used in the LPV control design is updated from unbalance response experimental results and dynamic coefficients for the entire range of rotating speeds are obtained by numerical optimization. Experimental implementation of the designed LPV control resulted in strong reduction of vibration amplitudes when crossing the critical speed, without affecting system behavior in sub- or super-critical speeds.

  14. Adaptive two-degree-of-freedom PI for speed control of permanent magnet synchronous motor based on fractional order GPC.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wenjun; Tang, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Shiqi; Xie, Yuanlong; Song, Bao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive two-degree-of-freedom (2Dof) proportional-integral (PI) controller is proposed for the speed control of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM). Firstly, an enhanced just-in-time learning technique consisting of two novel searching engines is presented to identify the model of the speed control system in a real-time manner. Secondly, a general formula is given to predict the future speed reference which is unavailable at the interval of two bus-communication cycles. Thirdly, the fractional order generalized predictive control (FOGPC) is introduced to improve the control performance of the servo drive system. Based on the identified model parameters and predicted speed reference, the optimal control law of FOGPC is derived. Finally, the designed 2Dof PI controller is auto-tuned by matching with the optimal control law. Simulations and real-time experimental results on the servo drive system of PMSM are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  15. Novel Observer Scheme of Fuzzy-MRAS Sensorless Speed Control of Induction Motor Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, S.; Zerikat, M.; Mechernene, A.; Benharir, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach Fuzzy-MRAS conception for robust accurate tracking of induction motor drive operating in a high-performance drives environment. Of the different methods for sensorless control of induction motor drive the model reference adaptive system (MRAS) finds lot of attention due to its good performance. The analysis of the sensorless vector control system using MRAS is presented and the resistance parameters variations and speed observer using new Fuzzy Self-Tuning adaptive IP Controller is proposed. In fact, fuzzy logic is reminiscent of human thinking processes and natural language enabling decisions to be made based on vague information. The present approach helps to achieve a good dynamic response, disturbance rejection and low to plant parameter variations of the induction motor. In order to verify the performances of the proposed observer and control algorithms and to test behaviour of the controlled system, numerical simulation is achieved. Simulation results are presented and discussed to shown the validity and the performance of the proposed observer.

  16. Effects of Control Parameters on a Robot Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, K. J.; Weeks, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    Gains and weighting factors in vision-based controller evaluated. Report describes study of trajectory control in vision-based robotic welder. Covers evaluation of user-programmable parameters that dictate control response to perceived error in tracking weld seam.

  17. Speed And Power Control Of An Engine By Modulation Of The Load Torque

    DOEpatents

    Ziph, Benjamin; Strodtman, Scott; Rose, Thomas K

    1999-01-26

    A system and method of speed and power control for an engine in which speed and power of the engine is controlled by modulation of the load torque. The load torque is manipulated in order to cause engine speed, and hence power to be changed. To accomplish such control, the load torque undergoes a temporary excursion in the opposite direction of the desired speed and power change. The engine and the driven equipment will accelerate or decelerate accordingly as the load torque is decreased or increased, relative to the essentially fixed or constant engine torque. As the engine accelerates or decelerates, its power increases or decreases in proportion.

  18. High-speed current dq PI controller for vector controlled PMSM drive.

    PubMed

    Marufuzzaman, Mohammad; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era.

  19. High-Speed Current dq PI Controller for Vector Controlled PMSM Drive

    PubMed Central

    Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era. PMID:24574913

  20. Benefits of variable rotor speed in integrated helicopter/engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Takanori; Rock, Stephen M.

    1993-01-01

    Current helicopter flight and propulsion controls are typically designed with the assumption that rotor speed will be held to a constant setpoint. A new flight and propulsion control system using a continuously variable rotor speed command is proposed to improve the maneuverability and agility of helicopter systems. In this new approach, the flight control system generates an optimal variable rotor speed command in addition to conventional control commands in a framework of integrated flight/propulsion control. The benefits (i.e. improved maneuverability and agility) of varying rotor speed during transient maneuvers are demonstrated using a bob-up maneuver as an example. In particular, two types of benefits are identified in different maneuver conditions. One comes from a thrust augmentation, while the other comes from an exchange of rotational and translational energy. In the example, a simple linear dynamic hover model is used with an optimal control design method to generate the optimal rotor speed command.

  1. Concurrently adjusting interrelated control parameters to achieve optimal engine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Methods and systems for real-time engine control optimization are provided. A value of an engine performance variable is determined, a value of a first operating condition and a value of a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected, and initial values for a first engine control parameter and a second engine control parameter are determined based on the detected first operating condition and the detected second operating condition. The initial values for the first engine control parameter and the second engine control parameter are adjusted based on the determined value of the engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. In order to cause the engine performance variable to approach the target engine performance variable, adjusting the initial value for the first engine control parameter necessitates a corresponding adjustment of the initial value for the second engine control parameter.

  2. The Speed of Increasing milk Feeds: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jane; Berrington, Janet; Bowler, Ursula; Boyle, Elaine; Dorling, Jon; Embleton, Nicholas; Juszczak, Edmund; Leaf, Alison; Linsell, Louise; Johnson, Samantha; McCormick, Kenny; McGuire, William; Roberts, Tracy; Stenson, Ben

    2017-01-28

    In the UK, 1-2% of infants are born very preterm (<32 weeks of gestation) or have very low birth weight (<1500 g). Very preterm infants are initially unable to be fed nutritional volumes of milk and therefore require intravenous nutrition. Milk feeding strategies influence several long and short term health outcomes including growth, survival, infection (associated with intravenous nutrition) and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC); with both infection and NEC being key predictive factors of long term disability. Currently there is no consistent strategy for feeding preterm infants across the UK. The SIFT trial will test two speeds of increasing milk feeds with the primary aim of determining effects on survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental disability at 24 months of age, corrected for prematurity. The trial will also examine many secondary outcomes including infection, NEC, time taken to reach full feeds and growth. Two thousand eight hundred very preterm or very low birth weight infants will be recruited from approximately 30 hospitals across the UK to a randomised controlled trial. Infants with severe congenital anomaly or no realistic chance of survival will be excluded. Infants will be randomly allocated to either a faster (30 ml/kg/day) or slower (18 ml/kg/day) rate of increase in milk feeds. Data will be collected during the neonatal hospital stay on weight, infection rates, episodes of NEC, length of stay and time to reach full milk feeds. Long term health outcomes comprising vision, hearing, motor and cognitive impairment will be assessed at 24 months of age (corrected for prematurity) using a parent report questionnaire. Extensive searches have found no active or proposed studies investigating the rate of increasing milk feeds. The results of this trial will have importance for optimising incremental milk feeding for very preterm and/or very low birth weight infants. No additional resources will be required to implement an optimal

  3. Feedback Control Analysis Using Parameter Plane Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    compensation of linear control systems. General equations have been derived for the cases of feedback, cascade, and combination feedback-cascade...Bode and root-locus analyses, the program provides the capability to investigate ř% the entire gamut of linear control system architecture. A basis

  4. Analytical design of a parasitic-loading digital speed controller for a 400-hertz turbine driven alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, B. D.; Ryan, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A design for a solid-state parasitic speed controller using digital logic was analyzed. Parasitic speed controllers are used in space power electrical generating systems to control the speed of turbine-driven alternators within specified limits. The analysis included the performance characteristics of the speed controller and the generation of timing functions. The speed controller using digital logic applies step loads to the alternator. The step loads conduct for a full half wave starting at either zero or 180 electrical degrees.

  5. Parameter Optimization During Forging Process of a Novel High-Speed-Steel Cold Work Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Ligang; Sun, Yanliang; Li, Qiang; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The forging of high-speed-steel (HSS) roll has always been a technical problem in manufacturing industry. In this study, the forging process of a novel HSS cold work roll was simulated by deform-3D on the basis of rigid-viscoplastic finite element model. The effect of heating temperature and forging speed on temperature and stress fields during forging process was simulated too. The results show that during forging process, the temperature of the contact region with anvils increases. The stress of the forging region increases and distributes un-uniformly, while that of the non-forging region is almost zero. With increasing forging time, Z load on anvil increases gradually. With increasing heating temperature or decreasing forging speed, the temperature of the whole billet increases, while the stress and Z load on anvil decrease. In order to ensure the high efficiency and safety of the forging process, the heating temperature and the forging speed are chosen as 1160 °C and 16.667 mm/s, respectively.

  6. Guidance and Control Design for High-Speed Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldthorpe, S. H.; Dangaran, R. D.; Dwyer, J. P.; McBee, L. S.; Norman, R. M.; Shannon, J. H.; Summers, L. G.

    1996-01-01

    A ROTO architecture, braking and steering control law and display designs for a research high speed Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO) system applicable to transport class aircraft are described herein. Minimum surface friction and FMS database requirements are also documented. The control law designs were developed with the aid of a non-real time simulation program incorporating airframe and gear dynamics as well as steering and braking guidance algorithms. An attainable objective of this ROTO system, as seen from the results of this study, is to assure that the studied aircraft can land with runway occupancy times less then 53 seconds. Runway occupancy time is measured from the time the aircraft crosses the runway threshold until its wing tip clears the near side of the runway. Turnoff ground speeds of 70 knots onto 30 degree exits are allowed with dry and wet surface conditions. Simulation time history and statistical data are documented herein. Parameters which were treated as variables in the simulation study include aircraft touchdown weight/speed/location, aircraft CG, runway friction, sensor noise and winds. After further design and development of the ROTO control system beyond the system developed earlier, aft CG MD-11 aircraft no longer require auto-asymmetric braking (steering) and fly-by-wire nose gear steering. However, the auto ROTO nose gear hysteresis must be less than 2 degrees. The 2 sigma dispersion certified for MD-11 CATIIIB is acceptable. Using this longitudinal dispersion, three ROTO exits are recommended at 3300, 4950 and 6750 feet past the runway threshold. The 3300 foot exit is required for MD-81 class aircraft. Designs documented in this report are valid for the assumptions/models used in this simulation. It is believed that the results will apply to the general class of transport aircraft; however further effort is required to validate this assumption for the general case.

  7. Optimal V/f control of super high-speed PMSM and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Chunyuan; Ren, Shuangyan; Yan, Shijie; Man, Yongkui; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2006-11-01

    Due to the features such as high efficiency, small volume and high power density, super high-speed permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) are becoming attractive in many fields such as high-speed micro-turbine generators, centrifugal compressors and pumps. V/f control is flexible and easy to be realized, moreover, voltage utilization ratio of SVPWM modulation is high, so the plan combined with V/f control and SVPWM modulation can be adopted for PMSM. The effects of the stator resistance and the dead-time on the control are generally neglected in traditional V/f control, which leads to that the low-speed performance is poor and the system is not stable at high speed. Based on considering the effects of stator resistance and dead-time, an optimal V/f control of the super high-speed PMSM is presented. Combined with the optimal V/f control and SVPWM modulation, soft starting and operating experiments for PMSM generator (105Kw, 61000rpm) are successfully implemented in the designed system of super high-speed gas micro-turbine based on DSP 320F2407A. The experiment results shows that this optimal V/f control is virtual and feasible for super high-speed PMSM. The proposed scheme provided dynamic stability and high performance of the super high-speed PMSM with an open-loop control.

  8. Measuring the Speed of Newborn Object Recognition in Controlled Visual Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Justin N.; Wood, Samantha M. W.

    2017-01-01

    How long does it take for a newborn to recognize an object? Adults can recognize objects rapidly, but measuring object recognition speed in newborns has not previously been possible. Here we introduce an automated controlled-rearing method for measuring the speed of newborn object recognition in controlled visual worlds. We raised newborn chicks…

  9. Tuning of fault tolerant control design parameters.

    PubMed

    DeLima, Pedro G; Yen, Gary G

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two major contributions in the field of fault tolerant control. First, it gathers points of concern typical to most fault tolerant control applications and translates the chosen performance metrics into a set of six practical design specifications. Second, it proposes initialization and tuning procedures through which a particular fault tolerant control architecture not only can be set to comply with the required specifications, but also can be tuned online to compensate for a total of twelve properties, such as the noise rejection levels for fault detection and diagnosis signals. The proposed design is realized over a powerful architecture that combines the flexibility of adaptive critic designs with the long term memory and learning capabilities of a supervisor. This paper presents a practical design procedure to facilitate the applications of a fundamentally sound fault tolerant control architecture in real-world problems.

  10. Association between reading speed, cycloplegic refractive error, and oculomotor function in reading disabled children versus controls.

    PubMed

    Quaid, Patrick; Simpson, Trefford

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one in ten students aged 6 to 16 in Ontario (Canada) school boards have an individual education plan (IEP) in place due to various learning disabilities, many of which are specific to reading difficulties. The relationship between reading (specifically objectively determined reading speed and eye movement data), refractive error, and binocular vision related clinical measurements remain elusive. One hundred patients were examined in this study (50 IEP and 50 controls, age range 6 to 16 years). IEP patients were referred by three local school boards, with controls being recruited from the routine clinic population (non-IEP patients in the same age group). A comprehensive eye examination was performed on all subjects, in addition to a full binocular vision work-up and cycloplegic refraction. In addition to the cycloplegic refractive error, the following binocular vision related data was also acquired: vergence facility, vergence amplitudes, accommodative facility, accommodative amplitudes, near point of convergence, stereopsis, and a standardized symptom scoring scale. Both the IEP and control groups were also examined using the Visagraph III system, which permits recording of the following reading parameters objectively: (i) reading speed, both raw values and values compared to grade normative data, and (ii) the number of eye movements made per 100 words read. Comprehension was assessed via a questionnaire administered at the end of the reading task, with each subject requiring 80% or greater comprehension. The IEP group had significantly greater hyperopia compared to the control group on cycloplegic examination. Vergence facility was significantly correlated to (i) reading speed, (ii) number of eye movements made when reading, and (iii) a standardized symptom scoring system. Vergence facility was also significantly reduced in the IEP group versus controls. Significant differences in several other binocular vision related scores were also found. This

  11. Variable Gain Type Internal Model Control-PID Speed Control for Ultrasonic Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kanya; Yoshimura, Yoshie; Wakasa, Yuji; Akashi, Takuya

    Ultrasonic motors (USM) causes serious characteristic changes during operation. It is difficult for the conventional internal model control (IMC) proportional integral differential (PID) control to compensate such characteristic changes of the plant. To solve these problems, we propose a method of variable gain type IMC-PID control. In the proposed method, plant parameters are identified on line and these estimated parameters are used for adjusting three gains of PID. Then the proposed method makes it possible to compensate characteristic changes of the plant. The effectiveness of the proposed control method have been confirmed by experiments using the existing ultrasonic motors servo system.

  12. High Speed and High Spatial Density Parameter Measurement Using Fiber Optic Sensing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Allen R. Jr. (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Inventor); Hamory, Philip J (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an improved fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) having the ability to provide both high spatial resolution and high frequency strain measurements. The inventive hybrid FOSS fiber combines sensors from high acquisition speed and low spatial resolution Wavelength-Division Multiplexing (WDM) systems and from low acquisition speed and high spatial resolution Optical Frequency Domain Reflection (OFDR) systems. Two unique light sources utilizing different wavelengths are coupled with the hybrid FOSS fiber to generate reflected data from both the WDM sensors and OFDR sensors operating on a single fiber optic cable without incurring interference from one another. The two data sets are then de-multiplexed for analysis, optionally with conventionally-available WDM and OFDR system analyzers.

  13. Universal Parameter Measurement and Sensorless Vector Control of Induction and Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shu; Ara, Takahiro

    Recently, induction motors (IMs) and permanent-magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) have been used in various industrial drive systems. The features of the hardware device used for controlling the adjustable-speed drive in these motors are almost identical. Despite this, different techniques are generally used for parameter measurement and speed-sensorless control of these motors. If the same technique can be used for parameter measurement and sensorless control, a highly versatile adjustable-speed-drive system can be realized. In this paper, the authors describe a new universal sensorless control technique for both IMs and PMSMs (including salient pole and nonsalient pole machines). A mathematical model applicable for IMs and PMSMs is discussed. Using this model, the authors derive the proposed universal sensorless vector control algorithm on the basis of estimation of the stator flux linkage vector. All the electrical motor parameters are determined by a unified test procedure. The proposed method is implemented on three test machines. The actual driving test results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  14. Anti-Windup Algorithm with Priority to Proportinal Control Output of Speed PI Controller for Position Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazawa, Masaki; Yamada, Takahiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Katsura, Seiichiro

    A robust servo system is important for performance improvement of motion control system in several industry applications. Generally, a high speed positioning servo system consists of robust control systems with integrator, such as PI controller. The industrial servo system always has the limitation for the capacity of actuator and power amplifier. An ordinary industrial position servo system often has the saturation of motor current and motor speed. It is difficult for the high speed positioning servo system to keep the robust position control against the saturation of motor current and motor speed. Because, an ordinary position servo system has the complicated control structure with many control loops. Hence, it sometimes has the large overshoot and the oscillated response by the limitation of motor current and motor speed. In order to overcome this problem, this paper proposes a new robust high speed positioning servo system considering the saturation of torque current and motor speed. The experimental results show that the proposed robust high speed positioning servo system the quick and stable position response for the saturation of motor current and motor speed.

  15. Wind tunnel experiments to prove a hydraulic passive torque control concept for variable speed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diepeveen, N. F. B.; Jarquin-Laguna, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the results are presented of experiments to prove an innovative concept for passive torque control of variable speed wind turbines using fluid power technology. It is demonstrated that by correctly configuring the hydraulic drive train, the wind turbine rotor operates at or near maximum aerodynamic efficiency for below rated wind speeds. The experiments with a small horizontal-axis wind turbine rotor, coupled to a hydraulic circuit, were conducted at the Open Jet Facility of the Delft University of Technology. In theory, the placement of a nozzle at the end of the hydraulic circuit causes the pressure and hence the rotor torque to increase quadratically with flow speed and hence rotation speed. The rotor torque is limited by a pressure relief valve. Results from the experiments proved the functionality of this passive speed control concept. By selecting the correct nozzle outlet area the rotor operates at or near the optimum tip speed ratio.

  16. Multiple Model Parameter Adaptive Control for In-Flight Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    dynamics of an aircraft. The plant is control- lable by a proportional-plus-integral ( PI ) control law. This section describes two methods of calculating...adaptive model-following PI control law [20-24]. The control law bases its control gains upon the parameters of a linear difference equation model which

  17. The Control Anticipation Parameter for Augmented Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-15

    time delay - sec Te2 - Pitch rate numerator time constant - sec-i V - Freestream velocity - ft/sec Z~ eZw - Normal force stability derivative due to...reference (f)) SHORT PERIOD CHARACTERISTICS CONTROL - 18.5 g/RAD "la 50 g/RAD SYSTEM V 1d 250 KT Vind350 KT CHARACTERISTICS t/;ir d - 1.25 SECI 1/t-,p

  18. Control of low-speed turbulent separated flow using jet vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, G. V.; Lin, J. C.; Howard, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    A parametric study has been performed with jet vortex generators to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation associated with low-speed turbulent flow over a two-dimensional rearward-facing ramp. Results indicate that flow-separation control can be accomplished, with the level of control achieved being a function of jet speed, jet orientation (with respect to the free-stream direction, and jet location (distance from the separation region in the free-stream direction). Compared to slot blowing, jet vortex generators can provide an equivalent level of flow control over a larger spanwise region (for constant jet flow area and speed).

  19. Encoderless Model Predictive Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators in Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahem, Mohamed; Hackl, Christoph; Kennel, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an encoderless finite-control-set model predictive control (FCS-MPC) strategy for doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs) based on variable-speed wind turbine systems (WTSs) is proposed. According to the FCS-MPC concept, the discrete states of the power converter are taken into account and the future converter performance is predicted for each sampling period. Subsequently, the voltage vector that minimizes a predefined cost function is selected to be applied in the next sampling instant. Furthermore, a model reference adaptive system (MRAS) observer is used to estimate the rotor speed and position of the DFIG. Estimation and control performance of the proposed encoderless control method are validated by simulation results for all operation conditions. Moreover, the performance of the MRAS observer is tested under variations of the DFIG parameters.

  20. Maneuver and vibration control of flexible manipulators using variable-speed control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Quan; Zhang, Jingrui

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the variable-speed control moment gyros (VS-CMGs) are adopted as actuators for vibration suppression of space flexible manipulators. They are directly mounted on the flexible links of the manipulator. Such system can be viewed as a flexible multibody system in chain topology actuated by both joint motors and VS-CMGs. We first develop a general approach for establishing the system equations of motion through Kane's method. Then, two controllers are designed for trajectory tracking and vibration suppression: one is an inverse dynamics control, whereas the other is based on the singular perturbation method. The proposed two control strategies are applied to a free-flying platform with a flexible manipulator. Sample numerical results show that the VS-CMGs can significantly suppress the induced vibration of the flexible links during the large angle maneuver.

  1. Attitude Control for an Aero-Vehicle Using Vector Thrusting and Variable Speed Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Lim, K. B.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization of passively unstable thrust-levitated vehicles can require significant control inputs. Although thrust vectoring is a straightforward choice for realizing these inputs, this may lead to difficulties discussed in the paper. This paper examines supplementing thrust vectoring with Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs). The paper describes how to allocate VSCMGs and the vectored thrust mechanism for attitude stabilization in frequency domain and also shows trade-off between vectored thrust and VSCMGs. Using an H2 control synthesis methodology in LMI optimization, a feedback control law is designed for a thrust-levitated research vehicle and is simulated with the full nonlinear model. It is demonstrated that VSCMGs can reduce the use of vectored thrust variation for stabilizing the hovering platform in the presence of strong wind gusts.

  2. Attitude control of a rigid spacecraft with one variable-speed control moment gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Hai-Chao; Jin, Lei; Xu, Shi-Jie

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear controllability and attitude stabilization are studied for the underactuated nonholonomic dynamics of a rigid spacecraft with one variable-speed control moment gyro (VSCMG), which supplies only two internal torques. Nonlinear controllability theory is used to show that the dynamics are locally controllable from the equilibrium point and thus can be asymptotically stabilized to the equilibrium point via time-invariant piecewise continuous feedback laws or time-periodic continuous feedback laws. Specifically, when the total angular momentum of the spacecraft-VSCMG system is zero, any orientation can be a controllable equilibrium attitude. In this case, the attitude stabilization problem is addressed by designing a kinematic stabilizing law, which is implemented through a nonlinear proportional and derivative controller, using the generalized dynamic inverse (GDI) method. The steady-state instability inherent in the GDI controller is elegantly avoided by appropriately choosing control gains. In order to obtain the command gimbal rate and wheel acceleration from control torques, a simple steering logic is constructed to accommodate the requirements of attitude stabilization and singularity avoidance of the VSCMG. Illustrative numerical examples verify the efficacy of the proposed control strategy.

  3. Development of methodology for controlling the parameters of TP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, K. V.; Petrovich, S. V.; Simonova, L. A.; Yusupov, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    This article describes TP control step of the intelligent system for predicting the properties of CGI, which includes three parts: the selection of parameters for comparison, the comparison with the simulation results, the change of the current TP. The list of parameters under which control in the production is carried out has been determined, the adjustment algorithm of TP is designed.

  4. Computational methods for the control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Cliff, E. M.; Powers, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Finite dimensional approximation schemes that work well for distributed parameter systems are often not suitable for the analysis and implementation of feedback control systems. The relationship between approximation schemes for distributed parameter systems and their application to optimal control problems is discussed. A numerical example is given.

  5. Quenching a quantum critical state by the order parameter: Dynamical quantum phase transitions and quantum speed limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyl, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Quantum critical states exhibit strong quantum fluctuations and are therefore highly susceptible to perturbations. In this Rapid Communication we study the dynamical stability against a sudden coupling to these strong fluctuations by quenching the order parameter of the underlying transition. Such a quench can generate superextensive energy fluctuations. This leads to a dynamical quantum phase transition (DQPT) with nonanalytic real-time behavior in the resulting decay of the initial state. By establishing a general connection between DQPTs and quantum speed limits, this allows us to obtain a quantum speed limit with unconventional system-size dependence. These findings are illustrated for the one-dimensional and the infinitely connected transverse-field Ising model. The main concepts, however, are general and can be applied also to other critical states. An outlook is given on the implications of superextensive energy fluctuations on potential restricted thermalization despite nonintegrability.

  6. Application of MCSFilter to estimate stiction control valve parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Andreia; Fernandes, Florbela P.; Santos, Lino O.; Romanenko, Andrey

    2017-07-01

    The mitigation of the stiction phenomena in control valves is of paramount importance for efficient industrial plant operation. Mathematical models of sticky valves are typically discontinuous and highly nonlinear. A derivative-free optimization method is applied in the context of parameter estimation in order to determine the stiction parameters of a control valve. The method successfully determines the correct parameter set and compares favorably with a previous case study of this problem that used smooth function.

  7. Load speed regulation in compliant mechanical transmission systems using feedback and feedforward control actions.

    PubMed

    Raul, P R; Dwivedula, R V; Pagilla, P R

    2016-07-01

    The problem of controlling the load speed of a mechanical transmission system consisting of a belt-pulley and gear-pair is considered. The system is modeled as two inertia (motor and load) connected by a compliant transmission. If the transmission is assumed to be rigid, then using either the motor or load speed feedback provides the same result. However, with transmission compliance, due to belts or long shafts, the stability characteristics and performance of the closed-loop system are quite different when either motor or load speed feedback is employed. We investigate motor and load speed feedback schemes by utilizing the singular perturbation method. We propose and discuss a control scheme that utilizes both motor and load speed feedback, and design an adaptive feedforward action to reject load torque disturbances. The control algorithms are implemented on an experimental platform that is typically used in roll-to-roll manufacturing and results are shown and discussed.

  8. Biocybernetic Control of Vigilance Task Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Frederick G.

    2000-01-01

    that tracking involves a continuous, though low level, motor response. Since it is not clear how such activity might affect performance of the adaptive automation system, it was thought to be important to evaluate how the system functioned when there was minimal motor output by the subjects. The current study used the closed-loop system, developed at NASA-Langley Research Center, to control the state of awareness of subjects while they performed a vigilance task. Several experiments were conducted to examine the use of EEG feedback to control a target dimension used in the task. Changes in a subject's arousal, as defined by specific EEG indexes, produced stimulus changes known to affect task performance. In addition, different electrode sites, compared to previous research, were sampled to determine the optimum configuration with regard to the following criteria: (1) task performance and (2) EEG index.

  9. The speed control of DC motor under the load condition using PI and PID controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapsiz, Muhammed Reşit; Kahveci, Hakan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, it was aimed to compare PI (Proportional-Integral) and PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) controllers for speed control of Permanent Magnet Direct Current (PMDC) motor under both load and without load. For this purpose, firstly, the mathematical model was obtained from the dynamic equations of the PMDC motor and the obtained mathematical model was transferred to the simulation environment and modeled using Matlab/SIMULINK. Following the modeling process, PI and PID controller structures were formed, respectively. Secondly, after these structures were formed, the PMDC motor was run without any controller. Then, the control of the PMDC motor with no load was provided by using PI and PID controllers. Finally, the PMDC motor were loaded under the constant load (TL = 3 N.m.) for each condition and selected time period (t = 3 s). The obtained result for each control operations was comparatively given by observing effects of loading process on systems. When the obtained results were evaluated for each condition, it was observed that PID controller have the best performance with respect to PI controller.

  10. Measuring Ability, Speed, or Both? Challenges, Psychometric Solutions, and What Can Be Gained From Experimental Control

    PubMed Central

    Goldhammer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The main challenge of ability tests relates to the difficulty of items, whereas speed tests demand that test takers complete very easy items quickly. This article proposes a conceptual framework to represent how performance depends on both between-person differences in speed and ability and the speed-ability compromise within persons. Related measurement challenges and psychometric models that have been proposed to deal with the challenges are discussed. It is argued that addressing individual differences in the speed-ability trade-off requires the control of item response times. In this way, response behavior can be captured exclusively with the response variable remedying problems in traditional measurement approaches. PMID:26807063

  11. Using heat to control the sample spinning speed in MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Mihaliuk, Eugene; Gullion, Terry

    2011-10-01

    A new approach using temperature to control the spinning speed of a sample rotor in magic-angle spinning NMR is presented. Instead of an electro-mechanical valve that regulates the flow of drive gas to control the spinning speed in traditional MAS NMR systems, we use a small heater wire located directly in the stator. The sample spinning speed is controlled very accurately with a surprisingly low heating power of 1 W. Results on a benchtop unit demonstrate the capability of the system.

  12. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives.

  13. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives. PMID:26959240

  14. Integrated High-Speed Torque Control System for a Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Askew, R. Scott (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A control system for achieving high-speed torque for a joint of a robot includes a printed circuit board assembly (PCBA) having a collocated joint processor and high-speed communication bus. The PCBA may also include a power inverter module (PIM) and local sensor conditioning electronics (SCE) for processing sensor data from one or more motor position sensors. Torque control of a motor of the joint is provided via the PCBA as a high-speed torque loop. Each joint processor may be embedded within or collocated with the robotic joint being controlled. Collocation of the joint processor, PIM, and high-speed bus may increase noise immunity of the control system, and the localized processing of sensor data from the joint motor at the joint level may minimize bus cabling to and from each control node. The joint processor may include a field programmable gate array (FPGA).

  15. Decentralized Control of an Unidirectional Air Traffic Flow with Flight Speed Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Takeichi, Noboru

    A decentralized control of an air traffic flow is discussed. This study aims to clarify a fundamental strategy for an unidirectional air traffic flow control considering the flight speed distribution. It is assumed that the decentralized control is made based on airborne surveillance systems. The separation control between aircraft is made by turning, and 4 types of route composition are compared; the optimum route only, the optimum route with permissible range, the optimum route with subroutes determined by relative speed of each aircraft, and the optimum route with subroutes defined according to the optimum speed of each aircraft. Through numerical simulations, it is clarified that the route composition with a permissible range makes the air traffic flow safer and more efficient. It is also shown that the route design with multiple subroutes corresponding to speed ranges and the aircraft control using route intent information can considerably improve the safety and workload of the air traffic flow.

  16. Estimator Based Controller for High Speed Flywheel Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2002-01-01

    A flywheel system and its operator interface are described. Measurements of magnetic bearing negative stiffness are performed. Two digital magnetic bearing control algorithms (PD and estimator based) are defined and their implementations are described. Tuning of each controller is discussed. Comparison of the two controllers' stability, damping noise, and operating current are described. Results describing the superiority of the estimator-based controller are presented and discussed.

  17. Control of the SCOLE configuration using distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    A continuum model for the SCOLE configuration has been derived using transfer matrices. Controller designs for distributed parameter systems have been analyzed. Pole-assignment controller design is considered easy to implement but stability is not guaranteed. An explicit transfer function of dynamic controllers has been obtained and no model reduction is required before the controller is realized. One specific LQG controller for continuum models had been derived, but other optimal controllers for more general performances need to be studied.

  18. Control of the SCOLE configuration using distributed parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1994-06-01

    A continuum model for the SCOLE configuration has been derived using transfer matrices. Controller designs for distributed parameter systems have been analyzed. Pole-assignment controller design is considered easy to implement but stability is not guaranteed. An explicit transfer function of dynamic controllers has been obtained and no model reduction is required before the controller is realized. One specific LQG controller for continuum models had been derived, but other optimal controllers for more general performances need to be studied.

  19. Scale-Free Correlations, Influential Neighbours and Speed Control in Flocks of Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.; Hildenbrandt, Hanno

    2015-02-01

    Coordination of birds in large flocks is amazing, especially, since individual birds only interact with a few neighbors (the so-called `influential neighbours'). Yet, empirical data show that fluctuations of velocity and speed of different birds are correlated beyond the influential neighbours and are correlated over a larger distance in a larger flock. This correlation between the correlation length of velocity or speed and flock size was found to be linear, called a scale-free correlation. It depends on the way individuals interact in the flock, for instance, on the number of influential neighbours and speed control. It is unknown however, how exactly the number of influential neighbours affects this scale-free correlation. Recent empirical data show that different degrees of control of speed affect the scale-free correlation for speed fluctuations. Theoretically, based on statistical mechanics, it is predicted that at very high speed control, the correlation is no longer scale-free but saturates at a certain correlation length and this hampers coordination in flocks. We study these issues in a model, called StarDisplay, because its behavioural rules are biologically inspired and many of its flocking patterns resemble empirical data. Our results show that the correlation length of fluctuations of velocity as well as speed correlate with flock size in a scale-free manner. A higher number of influential neighbours causes a diminishing increase of the slope of the scale-free correlation with velocity, resulting thus in flocks that coordinate more uniformly. Similar to recent empirical data higher speed control reduces the correlation length of speed fluctuations in our model. As predicted theoretically, at very high speed control the model generates a non-scale free correlation, and although there are still flocks, they are in the process of disintegrating.

  20. High-speed Lissajous-scan atomic force microscopy: Scan pattern planning and control design issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaei, A.; Yong, Yuen K.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of triangular or sawtooth waveforms is a major difficulty for achieving high-speed operation in many scanning applications such as scanning probe microscopy. Such non-smooth waveforms contain high order harmonics of the scan frequency that can excite mechanical resonant modes of the positioning system, limiting the scan range and bandwidth. Hence, fast raster scanning often leads to image distortion. This paper proposes analysis and design methodologies for a nonlinear and smooth closed curve, known as Lissajous pattern, which allows much faster operations compared to the ordinary scan patterns. A simple closed-form measure is formulated for the image resolution of the Lissajous pattern. This enables us to systematically determine the scan parameters. Using internal model controllers (IMC), this non-raster scan method is implemented on a commercial atomic force microscope driven by a low resonance frequency positioning stage. To reduce the tracking errors due to actuator nonlinearities, higher order harmonic oscillators are included in the IMC controllers. This results in significant improvement compared to the traditional IMC method. It is shown that the proposed IMC controller achieves much better tracking performances compared to integral controllers when the noise rejection performances is a concern.

  1. High-speed Lissajous-scan atomic force microscopy: scan pattern planning and control design issues.

    PubMed

    Bazaei, A; Yong, Yuen K; Moheimani, S O Reza

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of triangular or sawtooth waveforms is a major difficulty for achieving high-speed operation in many scanning applications such as scanning probe microscopy. Such non-smooth waveforms contain high order harmonics of the scan frequency that can excite mechanical resonant modes of the positioning system, limiting the scan range and bandwidth. Hence, fast raster scanning often leads to image distortion. This paper proposes analysis and design methodologies for a nonlinear and smooth closed curve, known as Lissajous pattern, which allows much faster operations compared to the ordinary scan patterns. A simple closed-form measure is formulated for the image resolution of the Lissajous pattern. This enables us to systematically determine the scan parameters. Using internal model controllers (IMC), this non-raster scan method is implemented on a commercial atomic force microscope driven by a low resonance frequency positioning stage. To reduce the tracking errors due to actuator nonlinearities, higher order harmonic oscillators are included in the IMC controllers. This results in significant improvement compared to the traditional IMC method. It is shown that the proposed IMC controller achieves much better tracking performances compared to integral controllers when the noise rejection performances is a concern.

  2. A new ball launching system with controlled flight parameters for catching experiments.

    PubMed

    d'Avella, A; Cesqui, B; Portone, A; Lacquaniti, F

    2011-03-30

    Systematic investigations of sensorimotor control of interceptive actions in naturalistic conditions, such as catching or hitting a ball moving in three-dimensional space, requires precise control of the projectile flight parameters and of the associated visual stimuli. Such control is challenging when air drag cannot be neglected because the mapping of launch parameters into flight parameters cannot be computed analytically. We designed, calibrated, and experimentally validated an actuated launching apparatus that can control the average spatial position and flight duration of a ball at a given distance from a fixed launch location. The apparatus was constructed by mounting a ball launching machine with adjustable delivery speed on an actuated structure capable of changing the spatial orientation of the launch axis while projecting balls through a hole in a screen hiding the apparatus. The calibration procedure relied on tracking the balls with a motion capture system and on approximating the mapping of launch parameters into flight parameters by means of polynomials functions. Polynomials were also used to estimate the variability of the flight parameters. The coefficients of these polynomials were obtained using the launch and flight parameters of 660 launches with 65 different initial conditions. The relative accuracy and precision of the apparatus were larger than 98% for flight times and larger than 96% for ball heights at a distance of 6m from the screen. Such novel apparatus, by reliably and automatically controlling desired ball flight characteristics without neglecting air drag, allows for a systematic investigation of naturalistic interceptive tasks.

  3. Positive correlation between drowsiness and prefrontal activation during a simulated speed-control driving task.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao

    2014-11-12

    The present study aimed to examine the relationship between drowsiness and prefrontal activation during simulated driving tasks using a wireless portable near-infrared spectroscopy device. Participants drove from start to goal along default routes with either intentional control of their driving speed (speed-control group) or not (speed-free group). Drowsiness level was assessed using a five-item Likert-type questionnaire. The behavioral data indicated longer driving time in the speed-control group than in the speed-free group, whereas no difference in the number of errors was found between the two groups. Importantly, the speed-control group showed a significant positive correlation between the drowsiness score and left prefrontal activation, whereas the speed-free group did not. The results suggest that drowsy individuals may show increased prefrontal activation as compensatory efforts to maintain the desired level of performance in tasks that require deliberate control of behaviors. Furthermore, the present study shows that near-infrared spectroscopy may provide us with a possibility to examine the state of drowsiness during daily-life operations.

  4. Linear Parameter Varying Control Synthesis for Actuator Failure, Based on Estimated Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The design of a linear parameter varying (LPV) controller for an aircraft at actuator failure cases is presented. The controller synthesis for actuator failure cases is formulated into linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimizations based on an estimated failure parameter with pre-defined estimation error bounds. The inherent conservatism of an LPV control synthesis methodology is reduced using a scaling factor on the uncertainty block which represents estimated parameter uncertainties. The fault parameter is estimated using the two-stage Kalman filter. The simulation results of the designed LPV controller for a HiMXT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle with the on-line estimator show that the desired performance and robustness objectives are achieved for actuator failure cases.

  5. Fuzzy logic based intelligent control of a variable speed cage machine wind generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, M.G.; Bose, B.K.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a variable speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used for efficiency optimization and performance enhancement control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which pumps power to a utility grid or can supply to an autonomous system. The generation system has fuzzy logic control with vector control in the inner loops. A fuzzy controller tracks the generator speed with the wind velocity to extract the maximum power. A second fuzzy controller programs the machine flux for light load efficiency improvement, and a third fuzzy controller gives robust speed control against wind gust and turbine oscillatory torque. The complete control system has been developed, analyzed, and validated by simulation study. Performances have then been evaluated in detail.

  6. Functional integration of vertical flight path and speed control using energy principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized automatic flight control system was developed which integrates all longitudinal flight path and speed control functions previously provided by a pitch autopilot and autothrottle. In this design, a net thrust command is computed based on total energy demand arising from both flight path and speed targets. The elevator command is computed based on the energy distribution error between flight path and speed. The engine control is configured to produce the commanded net thrust. The design incorporates control strategies and hierarchy to deal systematically and effectively with all aircraft operational requirements, control nonlinearities, and performance limits. Consistent decoupled maneuver control is achieved for all modes and flight conditions without outer loop gain schedules, control law submodes, or control function duplication.

  7. Parameter optimization in AQM controller design to support TCP traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Oliver W.

    2004-09-01

    TCP congestion control mechanism has been widely investigated and deployed on Internet in preventing congestion collapse. We would like to employ modern control theory to specify quantitatively the control performance of the TCP communication system. In this paper, we make use of a commonly used performance index called the Integral of the Square of the Error (ISE), which is a quantitative measure to gauge the performance of a control system. By applying the ISE performance index into the Proportional-plus-Integral controller based on Pole Placement (PI_PP controller) for active queue management (AQM) in IP routers, we can further tune the parameters for the controller to achieve an optimum control minimizing control errors. We have analyzed the dynamic model of the TCP congestion control under this ISE, and used OPNET simulation tool to verify the derived optimized parameters of the controllers.

  8. A high-speed GaAs MESFET optical controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Bhasin, K. B.; Richard, M.; Bendett, M.; Gustafson, G.

    1989-01-01

    Optical interconnects are being considered for control signal distribution in phased array antennas. A packaged hybrid GaAs optical controller with a 1:16 demultiplexed output that is suitable for this application is described. The controller, which was fabricated using enhancement/depletion mode MESFET technology, operates at demultiplexer-limited input data rates up to 305 Mb/s and requires less than 200 microW optical input power.

  9. A high-speed GaAs MESFET optical controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Bhasin, K. B.; Richard, M.; Bendett, M.; Gustafson, G.

    1989-01-01

    Optical interconnects are being considered for control signal distribution in phased array antennas. A packaged hybrid GaAs optical controller with a 1:16 demultiplexed output that is suitable for this application is described. The controller, which was fabricated using enhancement/depletion mode MESFET technology, operates at demultiplexer-limited input data rates up to 305 Mb/s and requires less than 200 microW optical input power.

  10. Stability and Speed Control of a Series-Wound DC Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshun, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A speed control for a series-wound DC motor is proposed. It is shown that steady-state rotation is stabile and robust. Stability is analyzed using a quadratic Lyapunov function. Its explicit expression is derived

  11. Evaluation of Urban Local-Scale Aerodynamic Parameters: Implications for the Vertical Profile of Wind Speed and for Source Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Christoph W.; Grimmond, Sue; Barlow, Janet; Gatey, David; Kotthaus, Simone; Lindberg, Fredrik; Halios, Christos H.

    2017-08-01

    Nine methods to determine local-scale aerodynamic roughness length (z0) and zero-plane displacement (zd) are compared at three sites (within 60 m of each other) in London, UK. Methods include three anemometric (single-level high frequency observations), six morphometric (surface geometry) and one reference-based approach (look-up tables). A footprint model is used with the morphometric methods in an iterative procedure. The results are insensitive to the initial zd and z0 estimates. Across the three sites, zd varies between 5 and 45 m depending upon the method used. Morphometric methods that incorporate roughness-element height variability agree better with anemometric methods, indicating zd is consistently greater than the local mean building height. Depending upon method and wind direction, z0 varies between 0.1 and 5 m with morphometric z0 consistently being 2-3 m larger than the anemometric z0. No morphometric method consistently resembles the anemometric methods. Wind-speed profiles observed with Doppler lidar provide additional data with which to assess the methods. Locally determined roughness parameters are used to extrapolate wind-speed profiles to a height roughly 200 m above the canopy. Wind-speed profiles extrapolated based on morphometric methods that account for roughness-element height variability are most similar to observations. The extent of the modelled source area for measurements varies by up to a factor of three, depending upon the morphometric method used to determine zd and z0.

  12. Choosing the appropriate forecasting model for predictive parameter control.

    PubMed

    Aleti, Aldeida; Moser, Irene; Meedeniya, Indika; Grunske, Lars

    2014-01-01

    All commonly used stochastic optimisation algorithms have to be parameterised to perform effectively. Adaptive parameter control (APC) is an effective method used for this purpose. APC repeatedly adjusts parameter values during the optimisation process for optimal algorithm performance. The assignment of parameter values for a given iteration is based on previously measured performance. In recent research, time series prediction has been proposed as a method of projecting the probabilities to use for parameter value selection. In this work, we examine the suitability of a variety of prediction methods for the projection of future parameter performance based on previous data. All considered prediction methods have assumptions the time series data has to conform to for the prediction method to provide accurate projections. Looking specifically at parameters of evolutionary algorithms (EAs), we find that all standard EA parameters with the exception of population size conform largely to the assumptions made by the considered prediction methods. Evaluating the performance of these prediction methods, we find that linear regression provides the best results by a very small and statistically insignificant margin. Regardless of the prediction method, predictive parameter control outperforms state of the art parameter control methods when the performance data adheres to the assumptions made by the prediction method. When a parameter's performance data does not adhere to the assumptions made by the forecasting method, the use of prediction does not have a notable adverse impact on the algorithm's performance.

  13. An interdisciplinary school project using a Nintendo Wii controller for measuring car speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Nils Kristian; Mitchell, James Robert

    2013-03-01

    This work examines the feasibility of employing a Nintendo Wii game controller for measuring car speed in an interdisciplinary school project. It discusses the physical characteristics of the controller and of vehicle headlights. It suggests how an experiment may be linked to topics in mathematics, statistics, physics and computer science. An algorithm for calculating speed from repeated recordings of car headlights is provided. Finally the results of repeated experiments with an approaching car are provided.

  14. The effect of speed-accuracy strategy on response interference control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wylie, S A; van den Wildenberg, W P M; Ridderinkhof, K R; Bashore, T R; Powell, V D; Manning, C A; Wooten, G F

    2009-07-01

    Studies that used conflict paradigms such as the Eriksen Flanker task show that many individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) have pronounced difficulty resolving the conflict that arises from the simultaneous activation of mutually exclusive responses. This finding fits well with contemporary views that postulate a key role for the basal ganglia in action selection. The present experiment aims to specify the cognitive processes that underlie action selection deficits among PD patients in the context of variations in speed-accuracy strategy. PD patients (n=28) and healthy controls (n=17) performed an arrow version of the flanker task under task instructions that either emphasized speed or accuracy of responses. Reaction time (RT) and accuracy rates decreased with speed compared to accuracy instructions, although to a lesser extent for the PD group. Differences in flanker interference effects among PD and healthy controls depended on speed-accuracy strategy. Compared to the healthy controls, PD patients showed larger flanker interference effects under speed stress. RT distribution analyses suggested that PD patients have greater difficulty suppressing incorrect response activation when pressing for speed. These initial findings point to an important interaction between strategic and computational aspects of interference control in accounting for cognitive impairments of PD. The results are also compatible with recent brain imaging studies that demonstrate basal ganglia activity to co-vary with speed-accuracy adjustments.

  15. Reward prospect rapidly speeds up response inhibition via reactive control.

    PubMed

    Boehler, Carsten N; Schevernels, Hanne; Hopf, Jens-Max; Stoppel, Christian M; Krebs, Ruth M

    2014-06-01

    Response inhibition is an important cognitive-control function that allows for already-initiated or habitual behavioral responses to be promptly withheld when needed. A typical paradigm to study this function is the stop-signal task. From this task, the stop-signal response time (SSRT) can be derived, which indexes how rapidly an already-initiated response can be canceled. Typically, SSRTs range around 200 ms, identifying response inhibition as a particularly rapid cognitive-control process. Even so, it has recently been shown that SSRTs can be further accelerated if successful response inhibition is rewarded. Since this earlier study effectively ruled out differential preparatory (proactive) control adjustments, the reward benefits likely relied on boosted reactive control. Yet, given how rapidly such control processes would need to be enhanced, alternative explanations circumventing reactive control are important to consider. We addressed this question with an fMRI study by gauging the overlap of the brain networks associated with reward-related and response-inhibition-related processes in a reward-modulated stop-signal task. In line with the view that reactive control can indeed be boosted swiftly by reward availability, we found that the activity in key brain areas related to response inhibition was enhanced for reward-related stop trials. Furthermore, we observed that this beneficial reward effect was triggered by enhanced connectivity between task-unspecific (reward-related) and task-specific (inhibition-related) areas in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present data hence suggest that reward information can be translated very rapidly into behavioral benefits (here, within ~200 ms) through enhanced reactive control, underscoring the immediate responsiveness of such control processes to reward availability in general.

  16. A New Type Hi-Speed BLDC Control System Base on Indirect Current Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. P.; Wang, Y. C.; Zhang, F. G.; Jin, S.

    2017-05-01

    High speed BLDC has the characteristic as larger air gap smaller armature inductance, traditional PWM modulation will produce a great number of high frequency current harmonics which led problem like large torque ripple and serious motor heat. In the meantime traditional PWM modulation use the diode rectifier which cause harmonic pollution in electric power net. To solve the problem above, proposes a new motor controller topology. Using the IGBT device to replace the diode on frequency converter rectifier side, apply the power factor correction technology, reduce the pollution on the grid. Using busbar current modulation on the inverter, driving bridge-arm use 3-phase 6-state open as driving Mode, realize the control on a 10000r/min,10kw BLDC. The results of Simulation on matlab show the topological structure as proposed can effectively improve the network side power factor and reduce the motor armature winding harmonic and motor torque ripple.

  17. Orbit control of a stratospheric satellite with parameter uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Huo, Wei

    2016-12-01

    When a stratospheric satellite travels by prevailing winds in the stratosphere, its cross-track displacement needs to be controlled to keep a constant latitude orbital flight. To design the orbit control system, a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) model of the satellite is established based on the second Lagrangian formulation, it is proven that the input/output feedback linearization theory cannot be directly implemented for the orbit control with this model, thus three subsystem models are deduced from the 6-DOF model to develop a sequential nonlinear control strategy. The control strategy includes an adaptive controller for the balloon-tether subsystem with uncertain balloon parameters, a PD controller based on feedback linearization for the tether-sail subsystem, and a sliding mode controller for the sail-rudder subsystem with uncertain sail parameters. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is robust to uncertainties and satisfies high precision requirements for the orbit flight of the satellite.

  18. Power Maximization Control of Variable Speed Wind Generation System Using Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Shigeo; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoji

    This paper proposes the sensorless output power maximization control of the wind generation system. A permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) is used as a variable speed generator in the proposed system. The generator torque is suitably controlled according to the generator speed and thus the power from a wind turbine settles down on the maximum power point by the proposed MPPT control method, where the information of wind velocity is not required. Moreover, the maximum available generated power is obtained by the optimum current vector control. The current vector of PMSG is optimally controlled according to the generator speed and the required torque in order to minimize the losses of PMSG considering the voltage and current constraints. The proposed wind power generation system can be achieved without mechanical sensors such as a wind velocity detector and a position sensor. Several experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  19. Maximum Output Power Control System of Variable-Speed Small Wind Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Yoko; Kajiwara, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposes a maximum output power control system of variable-speed small wind generators. Paying attention to an optimum rotational speed of a single phase AC wind generator which can obtain maximum output power according to natural wind speed, the proposed method adjusts the rotational speed of the single phase AC generator to the optimum rotational speed. Since this adjustment is realized on line so that it can be adapted for variable-speed wind, a generated power brake links directly with the single phase AC generator, and the rotational speed of the single phase AC generator is adjusted by controlling the current that flows the FET (Field-Effect Transistor) device as the generated power brake. In order to reduce heat loss of the FET device, the PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) controller is introduced. Moreover, the experimental system of the proposed method is constituted and the experiment is performed. Finally, the validity and the practicality of the proposed method are confirmed by experimental results.

  20. Hi-speed versatile serial crate controller for CAMAC

    SciTech Connect

    Horelick, D.

    1984-10-01

    A serial crate controller, primarily for use in the SLC CAMAC control system, has been designed, and has been in use for about 2 years. The design supports a party line approach, with up to 16 crates on a single twisted pair for data transfers, plus another pair for prompt L response. The bit rate is 5 megabits/s, and complete transaction times of about 10 ..mu..s are achieved for 16-bit data transfers over cables up to 1000 feet long. One of the primary objects of the design was simplicity - there are approximately 60 chips in the two-board unit.

  1. An RFID-based intelligent vehicle speed controller using active traffic signals.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Joshué; Seco, Fernando; Milanés, Vicente; Jiménez, Antonio; Díaz, Julio C; de Pedro, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    These days, mass-produced vehicles benefit from research on Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). One prime example of ITS is vehicle Cruise Control (CC), which allows it to maintain a pre-defined reference speed, to economize on fuel or energy consumption, to avoid speeding fines, or to focus all of the driver's attention on the steering of the vehicle. However, achieving efficient Cruise Control is not easy in roads or urban streets where sudden changes of the speed limit can happen, due to the presence of unexpected obstacles or maintenance work, causing, in inattentive drivers, traffic accidents. In this communication we present a new Infrastructure to Vehicles (I2V) communication and control system for intelligent speed control, which is based upon Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for identification of traffic signals on the road, and high accuracy vehicle speed measurement with a Hall effect-based sensor. A fuzzy logic controller, based on sensor fusion of the information provided by the I2V infrastructure, allows the efficient adaptation of the speed of the vehicle to the circumstances of the road. The performance of the system is checked empirically, with promising results.

  2. An RFID-Based Intelligent Vehicle Speed Controller Using Active Traffic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Joshué; Seco, Fernando; Milanés, Vicente; Jiménez, Antonio; Díaz, Julio C.; de Pedro, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    These days, mass-produced vehicles benefit from research on Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). One prime example of ITS is vehicle Cruise Control (CC), which allows it to maintain a pre-defined reference speed, to economize on fuel or energy consumption, to avoid speeding fines, or to focus all of the driver’s attention on the steering of the vehicle. However, achieving efficient Cruise Control is not easy in roads or urban streets where sudden changes of the speed limit can happen, due to the presence of unexpected obstacles or maintenance work, causing, in inattentive drivers, traffic accidents. In this communication we present a new Infrastructure to Vehicles (I2V) communication and control system for intelligent speed control, which is based upon Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for identification of traffic signals on the road, and high accuracy vehicle speed measurement with a Hall effect-based sensor. A fuzzy logic controller, based on sensor fusion of the information provided by the I2V infrastructure, allows the efficient adaptation of the speed of the vehicle to the circumstances of the road. The performance of the system is checked empirically, with promising results. PMID:22219692

  3. Regardless-of-Speed Superconducting LSM Controlled-Repulsive MAGLEV Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Egashira, Tatsuya; Hirai, Ryuichi

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes a new repulsive Maglev vehicle which a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) can levitate and propel simultaneously, independently of the vehicle speeds. The combined levitation and propulsion control is carried out by controlling mechanical-load angle and armature-current. Dynamic simulations show successful operations with good ride-quality by using a compact control method proposed here.

  4. Solid state circuit controls direction, speed, and braking of dc motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F.

    1966-01-01

    Full-wave bridge rectifier circuit controls the direction, speed, and braking of a dc motor. Gating in the circuit of Silicon Controlled Rectifiers /SCRS/ controls output polarity and braking is provided by an SCR that is gated to short circuit the reverse voltage generated by reversal of motor rotation.

  5. CW laser strategies for simultaneous, multi-parameter measurements in high-speed gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Rosa, M. D.; Philippe, L. C.; Arroyo, M. P.; Hanson, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Strategies utilizing continuous wave (CW) lasers are considered which are capable of simultaneously measuring the flow parameters of velocity, temperature, and pressure at sampling rates exceeding 3 kHz. Velocity is determined from the Doppler shift of the spectral profile, temperature is extracted from intensity ratios of multiple lines, and pressure is measured from either the collision of broadening or the magnitude of absorption. Distinctions between strategies concern the specifics of probe spacies (NO, OH, O2, and H2O) in terms of nominal probe wavelength, equipment, and detection scheme. CW lasers were applied to path-integrated absorption measurements of transient shock-tube flows and spatially resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements of underexpanded jets.

  6. Direct Evidence for Vision-based Control of Flight Speed in Budgerigars.

    PubMed

    Schiffner, Ingo; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2015-06-05

    We have investigated whether, and, if so, how birds use vision to regulate the speed of their flight. Budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus, were filmed in 3-D using high-speed video cameras as they flew along a 25 m tunnel in which stationary or moving vertically oriented black and white stripes were projected on the side walls. We found that the birds increased their flight speed when the stripes were moved in the birds' flight direction, but decreased it only marginally when the stripes were moved in the opposite direction. The results provide the first direct evidence that Budgerigars use cues based on optic flow, to regulate their flight speed. However, unlike the situation in flying insects, it appears that the control of flight speed in Budgerigars is direction-specific. It does not rely solely on cues derived from optic flow, but may also be determined by energy constraints.

  7. Direct Evidence for Vision-based Control of Flight Speed in Budgerigars

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Ingo; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated whether, and, if so, how birds use vision to regulate the speed of their flight. Budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus, were filmed in 3-D using high-speed video cameras as they flew along a 25 m tunnel in which stationary or moving vertically oriented black and white stripes were projected on the side walls. We found that the birds increased their flight speed when the stripes were moved in the birds’ flight direction, but decreased it only marginally when the stripes were moved in the opposite direction. The results provide the first direct evidence that Budgerigars use cues based on optic flow, to regulate their flight speed. However, unlike the situation in flying insects, it appears that the control of flight speed in Budgerigars is direction-specific. It does not rely solely on cues derived from optic flow, but may also be determined by energy constraints. PMID:26046799

  8. Control of Groundwater Remediation Process as Distributed Parameter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, M.; Kovács, T.; Hulkó, G.

    2014-12-01

    Pollution of groundwater requires the implementation of appropriate solutions which can be deployed for several years. The case of local groundwater contamination and its subsequent spread may result in contamination of drinking water sources or other disasters. This publication aims to design and demonstrate control of pumping wells for a model task of groundwater remediation. The task consists of appropriately spaced soil with input parameters, pumping wells and control system. Model of controlled system is made in the program MODFLOW using the finitedifference method as distributed parameter system. Control problem is solved by DPS Blockset for MATLAB & Simulink.

  9. Design of permanent magnet synchronous motor speed control system based on SVPWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo

    2017-04-01

    The control system is designed to realize TMS320F28335 based on the permanent magnet synchronous motor speed control system, and put it to quoting all electric of injection molding machine. The system of the control method used SVPWM, through the sampling motor current and rotating transformer position information, realize speed, current double closed loop control. Through the TMS320F28335 hardware floating-point processing core, realize the application for permanent magnet synchronous motor in the floating point arithmetic, to replace the past fixed-point algorithm, and improve the efficiency of the code.

  10. Adaptive pitch control for variable speed wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kathryn E [Boulder, CO; Fingersh, Lee Jay [Westminster, CO

    2012-05-08

    An adaptive method for adjusting blade pitch angle, and controllers implementing such a method, for achieving higher power coefficients. Average power coefficients are determined for first and second periods of operation for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is larger than for the first, a pitch increment, which may be generated based on the power coefficients, is added (or the sign is retained) to the nominal pitch angle value for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is less than for the first, the pitch increment is subtracted (or the sign is changed). A control signal is generated based on the adapted pitch angle value and sent to blade pitch actuators that act to change the pitch angle of the wind turbine to the new or modified pitch angle setting, and this process is iteratively performed.

  11. Wall temperature control of low-speed body drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of thermal means to control drag under turbulent boundary layer conditions is examined. Numerical calculations are presented for both skin friction and (unseparated) pressure drag for turbulent boundary-layer flows over a fuselage-like body with wall heat transfer. In addition, thermal control of separation on a bluff body is investigated. It is shown that a total drag reduction of up to 20 percent can be achieved for wall heating with a wall-to-total-freestream temperature ratio of 2. For streamlined slender bodies, partial wall heating of the forebody can produce almost the same order of total drag reduction as the full body heating case. For bluff bodies, the separation delay from partial wall cooling of the afterbody is approximately the same as for the fully cooled body.

  12. The research of automatic speed control algorithm based on Green CBTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying; Xiong, Hui; Wang, Xiaoliang; Wu, Youyou; Zhang, Chuanqi

    2017-06-01

    Automatic speed control algorithm is one of the core technologies of train operation control system. It’s a typical multi-objective optimization control algorithm, which achieve the train speed control for timing, comfort, energy-saving and precise parking. At present, the train speed automatic control technology is widely used in metro and inter-city railways. It has been found that the automatic speed control technology can effectively reduce the driver’s intensity, and improve the operation quality. However, the current used algorithm is poor at energy-saving, even not as good as manual driving. In order to solve the problem of energy-saving, this paper proposes an automatic speed control algorithm based on Green CBTC system. Based on the Green CBTC system, the algorithm can adjust the operation status of the train to improve the efficient using rate of regenerative braking feedback energy while ensuring the timing, comfort and precise parking targets. Due to the reason, the energy-using of Green CBTC system is lower than traditional CBTC system. The simulation results show that the algorithm based on Green CBTC system can effectively reduce the energy-using due to the improvement of the using rate of regenerative braking feedback energy.

  13. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-05-27

    Control schemes for powered ankle-foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle-tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle-foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs.

  14. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F.; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle–foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle–tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle–foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs. PMID:21502131

  15. Distributed parameter modeling for the control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The use of FEMs of spacecraft structural dynamics is a common practice, but it has a number of shortcomings. Distributed-parameter models offer an alternative, but present both advantages and difficulties. First, the model order does not have to be reduced prior to the inclusion of control system dynamics. This advantage eliminates the risk involved with model 'order reduction'. Second, distributed parameter models inherently involve fewer parameters, thereby enabling more accurate parameter estimation using experimental data. Third, it is possible to include the damping in the basic model, thereby increasing the accuracy of the structural damping. The difficulty in generating distributed parameter models of complex spacecraft configurations has been greatly alleviated by the use of PDEMOD, BUNVIS-RG, or DISTEL. PDEMOD is being developed for simultaneously modeling structural dynamics and control system dynamics.

  16. High speed imaging for material parameters calibration at high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, M.; Fardmoshiri, M.; Mancini, E.; Rossi, M.; Cortese, L.

    2016-05-01

    To describe the material behaviour at high strain rates dynamic experimental tests are necessary, and appropriate constitutive models are to be calibrated accordingly. A way to achieve this is through an inverse procedure, based on the minimization of an error function calculated as the difference between experimental and numerical data coming from Finite Element analysis. This approach, widely used in the literature, has a heavy computational cost associated with the minimization process that requires, for each variation of the material model parameters, the execution of FE calculations. In this work, a faster but yet effective calibration procedure is studied Experimental tests were performed on an aluminium alloy AA6061-T6, by means of a direct tension-compression Split Hopkinson bar. A fast camera with a resolution of 192 × 128 pixels and capable of a sample rate of 100,000 fps captured images of the deformation process undergone by the samples during the tests. The profile of the sample obtained after the image binarization and processing, was postprocessed to derive the deformation history; afterwards it was possible to calculate the true stress and strain, and carry out the inverse calibration by analytical computations. The results of this method were compared with the ones coming from the Finite Element approach.

  17. Sensitivity of turbine-height wind speeds to parameters in planetary boundary-layer and surface-layer schemes in the weather research and forecasting model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po -Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-21

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor–Yamada–Nakanishi–Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. Lastly, the relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  18. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  19. Sensitivity of turbine-height wind speeds to parameters in planetary boundary-layer and surface-layer schemes in the weather research and forecasting model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po -Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-21

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor–Yamada–Nakanishi–Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. Lastly, the relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  20. Sensitivity of turbine-height wind speeds to parameters in planetary boundary-layer and surface-layer schemes in the weather research and forecasting model

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; ...

    2016-07-21

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor–Yamada–Nakanishi–Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. Themore » parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. Lastly, the relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.« less

  1. Research on the low speed stability control technology of fly-cutting machine for KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Ji, Fang; Chen, Hua

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, The problem about stability in low speed of the air bearing stage driven by a linear motor was investigated to satisfy the ultra-precision fly-cutting of KDP crystals. First of all, the modal of the servo system with the permanent magnet synchronous linear motor was analyzed. In the system of the low speed linear motor driver, the main interferences came from cutting force f Load , the friction of chain and cable f n , the ripple thrust f ripp , and motor friction f fric . Secondly, the factors about low speed stability were analyzed: the key to improve the system's stability is to control the interference forces; Another important issue is to develop an advanced control strategy. Thirdly, some optimization experiments about low speed stability were developed as follows: the influence of feedback element, the influence of Power converter, speed optimization of damping feed-forward control, speed optimization of Spindle vibration, speed optimization based on disturbance observer. Finally the experimental results: the lowest speed of the stage can reach 0.2 mm/min; the error of the speed is less than 0.06mm/min when running between 1mm/min and 10 mm/min. The cutting experiment of KDP with the size of 330mm × 330mm × 10mm, was proceeded on the Fly-cutting machine by the feeding velocity of 1mm/min. The results about the surface roughness show that the value of Rq is 3.3nm and the value of Ra is 2.6nm.

  2. Shape control of distributed parameter reflectors using sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Fukashi; Washington, Gregory N.; Utkin, Vadim

    2001-08-01

    Sliding mode control has become one of the most powerful control methods for variable structure systems, a set of continuous systems with an appropriate switching logic. Its robustness properties and order reduction capability have made sliding mode control one of the most efficient tools for relatively higher order nonlinear plants operating under uncertain conditions. Piezo-electric materials possess the property of creating a charge when subjected to a mechanical strain, and of generating a strain when subjected to an electric field. Piezo-electric actuators are known to have a hysteresis due to the thermal motion and Coulomb interaction of Weiss domains. Because of the thermal effect the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators is reproducible only with some uncertainty in experiments. The robustness of sliding mode control under uncertain conditions has an advantage in handling the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators. In this research sliding mode control is used to control the shape of one- and two-dimensionally curved adaptive reflectors with piezo-electric actuators. Four discrete linear actuators for the one-dimensionally curved reflector and eight actuators for the two-dimensionally curved reflector are assumed.

  3. Symmetric stereographic orientation parameters applied to constrained spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southward, Charles M.; Ellis, Joshua R.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2007-09-01

    The full kinematic properties of a minimal set of rigid body attitude coordinates called Symmetric Stereographic Orientation Parameters (SSOPs) are developed. These coordinates result from a stereographic projection of the Euler parameter constraint hypersphere onto a three-dimensional hyper-plane. As discussed in previous work [5], this family contains the well-known classical and modified Rodrigues parameters. Considering general SSOP projection points, transformations to the Euler parameters and the direction cosine matrix are discussed. The set of three SSOP coordinates have the unique feature that the associated singularity can be placed at a desired principal rotation angle by adjusting the projection point. In contrast to the Rodrigues parameters, the SSOP coordinates do not represent a unique orientation. The impact of this non-uniqueness on the constrained spacecraft attitude control problem is discussed. An attitude feedback control law in terms of SSOPs will inherently avoid reaching this singular attitude description, and thus constrain the attitude error response to be within a well-defined cone. Lyapunov's direct method is used to illustrate how a SSOP-based control law can be derived to drive the spacecraft attitude away from the singularity and towards a desired orientation. This control law generalizes the previously developed classical and modified Rodrigues parameter-based attitude control laws for general stereographic projection points.

  4. Parameter testing for lattice filter based adaptive modal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Williams, J. P.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    For Large Space Structures (LSS), an adaptive control system is highly desirable. The present investigation is concerned with an 'indirect' adaptive control scheme wherein the system order, mode shapes, and modal amplitudes are estimated on-line using an identification scheme based on recursive, least-squares, lattice filters. Using the identified model parameters, a modal control law based on a pole-placement scheme with the objective of vibration suppression is employed. A method is presented for closed loop adaptive control of a flexible free-free beam. The adaptive control scheme consists of a two stage identification scheme working in series and a modal pole placement control scheme. The main conclusion from the current study is that the identified parameters cannot be directly used for controller design purposes.

  5. Parameter testing for lattice filter based adaptive modal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Williams, J. P.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    For Large Space Structures (LSS), an adaptive control system is highly desirable. The present investigation is concerned with an 'indirect' adaptive control scheme wherein the system order, mode shapes, and modal amplitudes are estimated on-line using an identification scheme based on recursive, least-squares, lattice filters. Using the identified model parameters, a modal control law based on a pole-placement scheme with the objective of vibration suppression is employed. A method is presented for closed loop adaptive control of a flexible free-free beam. The adaptive control scheme consists of a two stage identification scheme working in series and a modal pole placement control scheme. The main conclusion from the current study is that the identified parameters cannot be directly used for controller design purposes.

  6. Gear ratio optimization and shift control of 2-speed I-AMT in electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bingzhao; Liang, Qiong; Xiang, Yu; Guo, Lulu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Connecting a 2-speed transmission with the drive motor improves the dynamic and economic performance of electric passenger vehicles. A novel 2-speed I-AMT (Inverse Automated Manual Transmission) is studied, and the dry clutch is located at the rear of the transmission so that the traction interruption of traditional AMT can be cancelled. After the gear ratios are optimized using Dynamic Programming, gear shift control is addressed, and smooth shift process without torque hole is achieved through feed-forward and feed-back control of the clutch and the motor. Finally the proposed electric vehicle (EV) is compared with an EV with fixed-ratio gear box, and it is shown that the 2-speed AMT with a rear-mounted dry clutch has much better performance in terms of acceleration time, maximum speed and energy economy. The effect of clutch friction loss during shifting on the energy efficiency of the whole driving range is analyzed as well.

  7. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  8. Controlling flexible robot arms using a high speed dynamics process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor); Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Described here is a robot controller for a flexible manipulator arm having plural bodies connected at respective movable hinges, and flexible in plural deformation modes. It is operated by computing articulated body qualities for each of the bodies from the respective modal spatial influence vectors, obtaining specified body forces for each of the bodies, and computing modal deformation accelerations of the nodes and hinge accelerations of the hinges from the specified body forces, from the articulated body quantities and from the modal spatial influence vectors. In one embodiment of the invention, the controller further operates by comparing the accelerations thus computed to desired manipulator motion to determine a motion discrepancy, and correcting the specified body forces so as to reduce the motion discrepancy. The manipulator bodies and hinges are characterized by respective vectors of deformation and hinge configuration variables. Computing modal deformation accelerations and hinge accelerations is carried out for each of the bodies, beginning with the outermost body by computing a residual body force from a residual body force of a previous body, computing a resultant hinge acceleration from the body force, and then, for each one of the bodies beginning with the innermost body, computing a modal body acceleration from a modal body acceleration of a previous body, computing a modal deformation acceleration and hinge acceleration from the resulting hinge acceleration and from the modal body acceleration.

  9. Controlling Flexible Robot Arms Using High Speed Dynamics Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A robot manipulator controller for a flexible manipulator arm having plural bodies connected at respective movable hinges and flexible in plural deformation modes corresponding to respective modal spatial influence vectors relating deformations of plural spaced nodes of respective bodies to the plural deformation modes, operates by computing articulated body quantities for each of the bodies from respective modal spatial influence vectors, obtaining specified body forces for each of the bodies, and computing modal deformation accelerations of the nodes and hinge accelerations of the hinges from the specified body forces, from the articulated body quantities and from the modal spatial influence vectors. In one embodiment of the invention, the controller further operates by comparing the accelerations thus computed to desired manipulator motion to determine a motion discrepancy, and correcting the specified body forces so as to reduce the motion discrepancy. The manipulator bodies and hinges are characterized by respective vectors of deformation and hinge configuration variables, and computing modal deformation accelerations and hinge accelerations is carried out for each one of the bodies beginning with the outermost body by computing a residual body force from a residual body force of a previous body and from the vector of deformation and hinge configuration variables, computing a resultant hinge acceleration from the body force, the residual body force and the articulated hinge inertia, and revising the residual body force modal body acceleration.

  10. Controlling Compressor Vane Flow Vectoring Angles at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Matthew; Rempfer, Dietmar; Williams, David; Acharya, Mukund

    2003-11-01

    The ability to control flow separation angles from compressor inlet guide vanes with a Coanda-type actuator is demonstrated using both wind tunnel experiments and finite element simulations. Vectoring angles up to 40 degrees from the uncontrolled baseline state were measured with helium schlieren visualization at transonic Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.6, and with airfoil chord Reynolds numbers ranging from 89,000 to 710,000. The magnitude of the vectoring angle is shown to depend upon the geometry of the trailing edge, and actuator slot size, and the momentum flux coefficient. Under certain conditions the blowing has no effect on the vectoring angle indicating that the Coanda effect is not present. DNS simulations with the finite element method investigated the effects of geometry changes and external flow. Continuous control of the vectoring angle is demonstrated, which has important implications for application to rotating machinery. The technique is shown to reduce the stall flow coefficient by 15 percent in an axial flow compressor.

  11. Increasing speed to improve arm movement and standing postural control in Parkinson's disease patients when catching virtual moving balls.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuei-Jung; Hwang, Wen-Juh; Wu, Ching-yi; Fang, Jing-Jing; Leong, Iat-Fai; Ma, Hui-Ing

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that moving targets help Parkinson's disease (PD) patients improve their arm movement while sitting. We examined whether increasing the speed of a moving ball would also improve standing postural control in PD patients during a virtual reality (VR) ball-catching task. Twenty-one PD patients and 21 controls bilaterally reached to catch slow-moving and then fast-moving virtual balls while standing. A projection-based VR system connected to a motion-tracking system and a force platform was used. Dependent measures included the kinematics of arm movement (movement time, peak velocity), duration of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA), and center of pressure (COP) movement (movement time, maximum amplitude, and average velocity). When catching a fast ball, both PD and control groups made arm movements with shorter movement time and higher peak velocity, longer APA, as well as COP movements with shorter movement time and smaller amplitude than when catching a slow ball. The change in performance from slow- to fast-ball conditions was not different between the PD and control groups. The results suggest that raising the speed of virtual moving targets should increase the speed of arm and COP movements for PD patients. Therapists, however, should also be aware that a fast virtual moving target causes the patient to confine the COP excursion to a smaller amplitude. Future research should examine the effect of other task parameters (e.g., target distance, direction) on COP movement and examine the long-term effect of VR training.

  12. A Taguchi approach on optimal process control parameters for HDPE pipe extrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, R. Umamaheswara; Rao, P. Srinivasa

    2016-12-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes find versatile applicability for transportation of water, sewage and slurry from one place to another. Hence, these pipes undergo tremendous pressure by the fluid carried. The present work entails the optimization of the withstanding pressure of the HDPE pipes using Taguchi technique. The traditional heuristic methodology stresses on a trial and error approach and relies heavily upon the accumulated experience of the process engineers for determining the optimal process control parameters. This results in setting up of less-than-optimal values. Hence, there arouse a necessity to determine optimal process control parameters for the pipe extrusion process, which can ensure robust pipe quality and process reliability. In the proposed optimization strategy, the design of experiments (DoE) are conducted wherein different control parameter combinations are analyzed by considering multiple setting levels of each control parameter. The concept of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ratio) is applied and ultimately optimum values of process control parameters are obtained as: pushing zone temperature of 166 °C, Dimmer speed at 08 rpm, and Die head temperature to be 192 °C. Confirmation experimental run is also conducted to verify the analysis and research result and values proved to be in synchronization with the main experimental findings and the withstanding pressure showed a significant improvement from 0.60 to 1.004 Mpa.

  13. A summary of laser and microwave flow control in high-speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, D.

    2013-06-01

    Laser and microwave discharge in air has emerged as an effective method for flow control in high-speed flows. Computational and experimental research has demonstrated its capability for significant drag reduction and mitigation of adverse interactions in high-speed flows. The paper presents a summary of key computational and experimental studies performed at Rutgers University in collaboration with the Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Moscow, Russia) and St. Petersburg State University (St. Petersburg, Russia).

  14. An MPC Algorithm with Combined Speed and Steering Control for Obstacle Avoidance in Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-24

    the simultaneous optimization of speed and steering without a priori knowledge about the obstacles. Obstacles are detected using a planar LIDAR ...large-size autonomous ground vehicles that perceive the environment only through a planar LIDAR sensor [18], [19]. The algorithm can navigate an AGV...that simultaneously optimizes both the longitudinal speed and steering control commands in an AGV that relies only on a planar LIDAR sensor to detect

  15. Passive Separation Control on a Body at Transonic Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layukallo, Thombi; Hayashi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    The present paper proposes a new approach to control flow separation around a body. Flow separation is controlled by inserting simple tabs inside the separated region to suppress the reverse flow action. This is expected to increase the pressure in the base region of the body, thus reducing drag. Moreover, flow instability is also expected to decrease because of change in the wake profile. The cases considered in the present investigation are flows around a circular cylinder at M=0.6 and 0.73. Tabs having lengths of 10% and 20% of the cylinder diameter were used. The results show that the base pressure of the cylinder can be increased when these tabs are inserted inside the separated region. The smallest drag on the cylinder/tab body was achieved when the two pairs of tabs were installed on both sides of the cylinder at angles of ±120° and ±140°, measured from the front stagnation point of the cylinder. Compared to the plain cylinder, drag was reduced by 32% at M=0.6 and by 18% at M=0.73. Schlieren photography reveals that the vortex formation length is increased when the tabs are installed. Moreover, the tabs greatly suppress the level of pressure fluctuations on the cylinder surface. This can be attributed to change in the wake profile that is associated with drag reduction. Furthermore, the frequency of the Karman vortex street is also increased. The analysis of the results was assisted by numerical calculations based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES). From these results, five significant effects of the tabs were identified: restriction of the reverse flow action, trapping of vorticity in the region upstream of the tabs, suppression of the shear layers’ movement, more rapid vortex roll-up downstream of the body, and reduced strength of the downstream vortices.

  16. Adaptive PD Tracking Control of Gimbal on Satellite Based on Parameter Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Min; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Bai, Jun-Qing; Wang, Hao-Yu

    As key component of pointing and tracking mission of satellite, gimbal with two or more degree of freedom is usually mounted on the satellite in order to fulfill certain space mission, such as optical communication between satellites, target recognition, antenna with certain pointing direction and so on. In these missions, gimbal is mostly used to point to and track a space target or a given track. However, for most control method, because of their constant feedback parameter, the gimbal still track target with constant speed when the target is in high-speed or the satellite mounted with gimbal is suddenly undertaken shock. In fact, the gimbal could track target with different speed to improve pointing accuracy under particular circumstance. In order to solve the problem, an algorithm to revise feedback parameter is designed to be different functions of pointing angle error of gimbal. At last a simulation is carried out to verify the improvement of joint angle error using this algorithm under particular circumstance. The results proved that the joint angle error is efficiently decreased with feedback parameter revision.

  17. Speed-accuracy tradeoff by a control signal with balanced excitation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chung-Chuan; Wang, Cheng-Te

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of flexible behavior is the brain's ability to dynamically adjust speed and accuracy in decision-making. Recent studies suggested that such adjustments modulate not only the decision threshold, but also the rate of evidence accumulation. However, the underlying neuronal-level mechanism of the rate change remains unclear. In this work, using a spiking neural network model of perceptual decision, we demonstrate that speed and accuracy of a decision process can be effectively adjusted by manipulating a top-down control signal with balanced excitation and inhibition [balanced synaptic input (BSI)]. Our model predicts that emphasizing accuracy over speed leads to reduced rate of ramping activity and reduced baseline activity of decision neurons, which have been observed recently at the level of single neurons recorded from behaving monkeys in speed-accuracy tradeoff tasks. Moreover, we found that an increased inhibitory component of BSI skews the decision time distribution and produces a pronounced exponential tail, which is commonly observed in human studies. Our findings suggest that BSI can serve as a top-down control mechanism to rapidly and parametrically trade between speed and accuracy, and such a cognitive control signal presents both when the subjects emphasize accuracy or speed in perceptual decisions. PMID:25995354

  18. Control of a flexible, surface-piercing hydrofoil for high-speed, small-scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, hydrofoils have become ubiquitous in the design of high performance surface vehicles such as sailboats. They have proven particularly useful at small scales: while the speed of displacement-hull sailboats of length L is limited by their hull speed √{ gL } , due to wave making resistance, such limitations do not apply to hydrofoil crafts and sailboats. Such crafts of length O(1 - 10 m) are capable of reaching speeds in excess of 45 kts, often far faster than the wind. Besides, in the quest for super-maneuverability, actuated hydrofoils enable the efficient generation and control of large forces. With the intent to ultimately enable the design of small-scale, high-speed, and super-maneuverable surface vehicles, we investigate the problem of controlling the lift force generated by a flexible, surface-piercing hydrofoil traveling at high speed through a random wave field. We design a test platform composed of a rudder-like vertical foil, which is actuated in pitch, and instrumented with velocity, force, and immersion sensors. We present a feedback linearization controller, designed to operate over a wide range of velocities and sea states. Validation experiments are carried out on-the-field at speeds ranging from 3 to 10+m/s.

  19. A New Turbo-shaft Engine Control Law during Variable Rotor Speed Transient Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Miao, Lizhen; Zhang, Haibo; Huang, Jinquan

    2015-12-01

    A closed-loop control law employing compressor guided vanes is firstly investigated to solve unacceptable fuel flow dynamic change in single fuel control for turbo-shaft engine here, especially for rotorcraft in variable rotor speed process. Based on an Augmented Linear Quadratic Regulator (ALQR) algorithm, a dual-input, single-output robust control scheme is proposed for a turbo-shaft engine, involving not only the closed loop adjustment of fuel flow but also that of compressor guided vanes. Furthermore, compared to single fuel control, some digital simulation cases using this new scheme about variable rotor speed have been implemented on the basis of an integrated system of helicopter and engine model. The results depict that the command tracking performance to the free turbine rotor speed can be asymptotically realized. Moreover, the fuel flow transient process has been significantly improved, and the fuel consumption has been dramatically cut down by more than 2% while keeping the helicopter level fight unchanged.

  20. The influence of mass parameters and gear ratio on the speed and energy expenditure of a cyclist.

    PubMed

    Stępniewski, Andrzej A; Grudziński, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The wavelength of moment of active forces (driving forces) for a full cycle while pedaling with platform pedals was determined. There was defined the value of moment of passive forces, depending on drag, rolling resistance and grade of surface. Kinematic motion parameters were determined from the equation of motion of the machine, which was solved numerically. In numerical example, there were determined and compared the temporal courses of bicycle speed for possible gear ratios for the two different waveforms of the driving torque--the determined, the time-varying and the constant ones. There were compared extreme values of active and passive forces, the kinetic energy of the bike and work expended by the rider at a specified time.

  1. Speed Control Law for Precision Terminal Area In-Trail Self Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a speed control law for precision in-trail airborne self-spacing during final approach. This control law was designed to provide an operationally viable means to obtain a desired runway threshold crossing time or minimum distance, one aircraft relative to another. The control law compensates for dissimilar final approach speeds between aircraft pairs and provides guidance for a stable final approach. This algorithm has been extensively tested in Monte Carlo simulation and has been evaluated in piloted simulation, with preliminary results indicating acceptability from operational and workload standpoints.

  2. Low speed hybrid generalized predictive control of a gasoline-propelled car.

    PubMed

    Romero, M; de Madrid, A P; Mañoso, C; Milanés, V

    2015-07-01

    Low-speed driving in traffic jams causes significant pollution and wasted time for commuters. Additionally, from the passengers׳ standpoint, this is an uncomfortable, stressful and tedious scene that is suitable to be automated. The highly nonlinear dynamics of car engines at low-speed turn its automation in a complex problem that still remains as unsolved. Considering the hybrid nature of the vehicle longitudinal control at low-speed, constantly switching between throttle and brake pedal actions, hybrid control is a good candidate to solve this problem. This work presents the analytical formulation of a hybrid predictive controller for automated low-speed driving. It takes advantage of valuable characteristics supplied by predictive control strategies both for compensating un-modeled dynamics and for keeping passengers security and comfort analytically by means of the treatment of constraints. The proposed controller was implemented in a gas-propelled vehicle to experimentally validate the adopted solution. To this end, different scenarios were analyzed varying road layouts and vehicle speeds within a private test track. The production vehicle is a commercial Citroën C3 Pluriel which has been modified to automatically act over its throttle and brake pedals.

  3. Identification and robust control of linear parameter-varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lawton Hubert

    This dissertation deals with linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems: linear dynamic systems that depend on time-varying parameters. These systems appear in gain scheduling problems, and much recent research has been devoted to their prospective usefulness for systematic gain scheduling. We primarily focus on robust control of uncertain LPV systems and identification of LPV systems that are modelable as linear-fractional transformations (LFTs). Using parameter-dependent quadratic Lyapunov functions, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and scaled small-gain arguments, we define notions of stability and induced-{cal L}sb2 performance for uncertain LPV systems whose parameters and rates of parameter variation satisfy given bounds. The performance criterion involves integral quadratic constraints and implies naturally parameter-dependent induced-{cal L}sb2 norm bounds. We formulate and solve an {cal H}sb{infty}-like control problem for an LPV plant with measurable parameters and an "Output/State Feedback" structure: the feedback outputs include some noiselessly measured states. Necessary and sufficient solvability conditions reduce to LMIs that can be solved approximately using finite-dimensional convex programming. Reduced-order LPV controllers are constructed from the LMI solutions. A D-K iteration-like procedure provides robustness to structured, time-varying, parametric uncertainty. The design method is applied to a motivating example: flight control for the F-16 VISTA throughout its subsonic flight envelope. Parameter-dependent weights and {cal H}sb{infty} design principles describe the performance objectives. Closed-loop responses exhibited by nonlinear simulations indicate satisfactory flying qualities. Identification of linear-fractional LPV systems is treated using maximum-likelihood parameter estimation. Computing the gradient and Hessian of a maximum-likelihood cost function reduces to simulating one LPV filter per identified parameter. We use nonlinear

  4. Linear, Parameter-Varying Control of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Chicunque, Claudia Patricia

    Modern aircraft designers are adopting light-weight, high-aspect ratio flexible wings to improve performance and reduce operation costs. A technical challenge associated with these designs is that the large deformations in flight of the wings lead to adverse interactions between the aircraft aerodynamic forces and structural forces. These adverse interactions produce excessive vibrations that can degrade flying qualities and may result in severe structural damages or catastrophic failure. This dissertation is focused on the application of multivariable robust control techniques for suppression of these adverse interactions in flexible aircraft. Here, the aircraft coupled nonlinear equations of motion are represented in the linear, parameter-varying framework. These equations account for the coupled aerodynamics, rigid body dynamics, and deformable body dynamics of the aircraft. Unfortunately, the inclusion of this coupled dynamics results in high-order models that increase the computational complexity of linear, parameter-varying control techniques. This dissertation addresses three key technologies for linear, parameter-varying control of flexible aircraft: (i) linear, parameter-varying model reduction; (ii) selection of actuators and sensors for vibration suppression; and (iii) design of linear, parameter-varying controllers for vibration suppression. All of these three technologies are applied to an experimental research platform located at the University of Minnesota. The objective of this dissertation is to provide to the flight control community with a set of design methodologies to safely exploit the benefits of light-weight flexible aircraft.

  5. Speeding the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions for cancer control and prevention.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer; Jilcott-Pitts, Stephanie; Myers, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing menu of evidence-based interventions to prevent and control cancer, such interventions continue to be underused in practice. This commentary describes interactive approaches to speeding the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions and illustrates these approaches using examples from obesity prevention and tobacco control.

  6. A generic DSP-based real-time simulator with application to hydrogenerator speed controller development. [Digital Signal Processor

    SciTech Connect

    Throckmorton, P.J.; Wozniak, L. . Dept. of General Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the features and evaluation of a digital signal processor/personal computer-based simulator which allows the simultaneous simulation of two linear systems in real time. A desire to gain the ability to evaluate hydrogenerator governors (speed controllers) in forms completely equivalent to that which could be used to control actual hydrogenerators is the primary motivation for this work. The simulator is designed so that one linear system nay be conceptualized as an error controller while the second system may be thought of as a plant under control. The simulator is specialized in that it allows direct entry of the hydrogenerator system parameter values of one of two linearized hydrogenerating system plant models. An option to enter the gains of a generic PID controller also exists. This PID controller may be utilized to simulate a governor for a hydrogenerator, thus allowing the real-time simulation of a closed-loop speed-controlled hydrogenerating system. Simulation accuracy is established by comparing computed results to those computed by an accepted standard'' software package. An IBM-compatible personal computer and a modified Texas Instruments TMS320C30 digital signal processor evaluation module are the primary hardware used.

  7. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  8. Speed synchronization control for integrated automotive motor-transmission powertrain system with random delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Hui; Fang, Zongde

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a robust speed synchronization controller design for an integrated motor-transmission powertrain system in which the driving motor and multi-gearbox are directly coupled. As the controller area network (CAN) is commonly used in the vehicle powertrain system, the possible network-induced random delays in both feedback and forward channel are considered and modeled by using two Markov chains in the controller design process. For the application perspective, the control law adopted here is a generalized proportional-integral (PI) control. By employing the system-augmentation technique, a delay-free stochastic closed-loop system is obtained and the generalized PI controller design problem is converted to a static output feedback (SOF) controller design problem. Since there are external disturbances involved in the closed-loop system, the energy-to-peak performance is considered to guarantee the robustness of the controller. And the controlled output is chosen as the speed synchronization error. To further improve the transient response of the closed-loop system, the pole placement is also employed in the energy-to-peak performance based speed synchronization control. The mode-dependent control gains are obtained by using an iterative linear matrix inequality (LMI) algorithm. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  9. Multiobjective insensitive design of airplane control systems with uncertain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Giesy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A multiobjective computer-aided design algorithm has been developed which minimizes the sensitivity of the design objectives to uncertainties in system parameters. The more important uncertain parameters are described by a gaussian random vector with known covariance matrix, and a vector sensitivity objective function is defined as the probabilities that the design objectives will violate specified requirements constraints. Control system parameters are found which minimize the sensitivity vector in a Pareto-optimal sense, using constrained minimization algorithms. Example results are shown for lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) design for three Shuttle flight conditions.

  10. Control design for a class of nonlinear parameter varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiushan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Stabilisation for a class of one-sided Lipschitz nonlinear parameter varying systems is dealt with in this paper. First, the nonlinear parameter varying system is represented as a subsystem of a differential inclusion. Sufficient conditions for exponential stabilisation for the differential inclusion are given by solving linear matrix inequalities. Then a continuous control law is designed to stabilise the differential inclusion. It leads to stabilising the nonlinear parameter varying system. Finally, a simulation example is presented to show the validity and advantages of the proposed method.

  11. Parameter Transient Behavior Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine (Technical Monitor); Shin, Jong-Yeob

    2003-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. This paper illustrates analysis of a FTC system based on estimated fault parameter transient behavior which may include false fault detections during a short time interval. Using Lyapunov function analysis, the upper bound of an induced-L2 norm of the FTC system performance is calculated as a function of a fault detection time and the exponential decay rate of the Lyapunov function.

  12. Gas Bearing Control for Safe Operation in Critical Speed Regions - Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Lukas R. S.; Niemann, Hans H.; Galeazzi, Roberto; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2015-11-01

    Gas bearings are popular for their high speed capabilities, low friction and clean operation, but require low clearances and suffer from poor damping properties. The poor damping properties cause high disturbance amplification near the natural frequencies. These become critical when the rotation speed coincides with a natural frequency. In these regions, even low mass unbalances can cause rub and damage the machine. To prevent rubbing, the variation of the rotation speed of machines supported by gas bearings has to be carefully conducted during run-ups and run-downs, by acceleration and deceleration patterns and avoidance of operation near the critical speeds, which is a limiting factor during operation, specially during run-downs. An approach for reducing the vibrations is by feedback controlled lubrication. This paper addresses the challenge of reducing vibrations in rotating machines supported by gas bearings to extend their operating range. Using H∞-design methods, active lubrication techniques are proposed to enhance the damping, which in turn reduces the vibrations to a desired safe level. The control design is validated experimentally on a laboratory test rig, and shown to allow safe shaft rotation speeds up to, in and above the two first critical speeds, which significantly extends the operating range.

  13. Parameters optimization and control in precision laser scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiu'e.; Li, Yongda; Li, Yongzheng

    2005-01-01

    The positional precision of laser scribing and laser marking in precision metrological tools, such as scale plate and scale dial, is of the order of μm. The control of scribing must be very accurate. The laser beam parameters, focal length of the lens, and the position of the focal spot must be carefully selected and accurately controlled. The workpiece must also be accurately and repeatedly positioned. Any deviation from the required parameters would seriously affect the product quality. This paper studied an Nd:YAG laser scribing system specially designed for scribing of extremely high precision dial scale used in petroleum drilling machine. The relevant parameters were carefully selected and optimized. CAD, CAM, NC and automatic control technology were employed in the system. The integration of optics, mechanics, electronics and computer ensured high precision laser scribing.

  14. Joint Access Control Based on Access Ratio and Resource Utilization for High-Speed Railway Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuzhe; Ai, Bo

    2015-05-01

    The fast development of high-speed rails makes people's life more and more convenient. However, provisioning of quality of service of multimedia applications for users on the high-speed train is a critical task for wireless communications. Therefore, new solutions are desirable to be found to address this kind of problem. Current researches mainly focus on providing seamless broadband wireless access for high-speed mobile terminals. In this paper, an algorithm to calculate the optimal resource reservation fraction of handovers is proposed. A joint access control scheme for high-speed railway communication handover scenario is proposed. Metrics of access ratio and resource utilization ratio are considered jointly in the analysis and the performance evaluation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm and the scheme improve quality of service compared with other conventional schemes.

  15. Design and analysis issues of integrated control systems for high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, Craig A.; Feather, John B.; Dykman, John R.; Page, Mark A.; Hodgkinson, John

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify, rank, and define development plans for the critical guidance and control design and analysis issues as related to economically viable and environmentally acceptable high-speed civil transport. The issues were identified in a multistep process. First, pertinent literature on supersonic cruise aircraft was reviewed, and experts were consulted to establish the fundamental characteristics and problems inherent to supersonic cruise aircraft. Next, the advanced technologies and strategies being pursued for the high-speed civil transport were considered to determine any additional unique control problems the transport may have. Finally, existing technologies and methods were examined to determine their capabilities for the design and analysis of high-speed civil transport control systems and to identify the shortcomings and issues. Three priority levels - mandatory, highly beneficial, and desirable - were established. Within each of these levels, the issues were further ranked. Technology development plans for each issue were defined. Each plan contains a task breakdown and schedule.

  16. Analysis, design, and control of a novel optically commutated adjustable-speed motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Wyatt S.; Risch, Ivan; Zhang, Yuandao; Garverick, Steven; Inerfield, Michael

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes the analysis, design and control of a novel, single-phase motor with a unique behavior resulting from the use of rotating power electronics mounted to the motor armature. Coils on the armature are selectively shorted by power MOSFET's which rotate with the armature, and torque is produced by interaction between currents induced in the shorted coils and the magnetic field produced by a stationary field coil. Control is limited to the timing of which armature coils are to be shorted as a function of armature speed and angle, it is possible to modulate torque production and obtain torque or speed control using only single-phase ac power and without the use of brushes or permanent magnets. An electro-mechanical model for this type of motor is presented and validated with respect to experimentation. The results show promise for achieving low- cost, adjustable-speed drives using this novel method of rotating electronics, optical communications, and computed commutation.

  17. High-speed SPGD wavefront controller for an adaptive optics system without wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caixia; Li, Xinyang; Li, Mei; Ye, Jongwei; Chen, Bo

    2010-10-01

    A non-conventional adaptive optics system based on direct system performance metric optimization is illustrated. The system does not require wave-front sensor which is difficult to work under the poor condition such as beam cleanup for the anomalous light beam. The system comprises a high speed wavefront controller based on Stochastic Parallel Gradient Descent (SPGD) Algorithm, a deformable mirror, a tip/tilt mirror and a far-field system performance metric sensor. The architecture of the wave-front controller is based on a combination of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and floating-point Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The Zernike coefficient information is applied to improve the iteration speed. The experimental results show that the beam cleanup system based on SPGD keep a high iteration speed. The controller can compensate the wavefront aberration and tilt excursion effectively.

  18. Improved speed control system for an 87,000 HP wind tunnel drive

    SciTech Connect

    Becks, E.A.; Blumenthal, P.Z.; Bencic, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the design, installation, and integrated systems tests for a new drive motor speed control system which was part of a recent rehab project for the NASA Lewis 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The tunnel drive consists of three mechanically-coupled 29,000 HP wound rotor induction motors driving an axial flow compressor. Liquid rheostats are used to vary the impedance of the rotor circuits, thus varying the speed of the drive system. The new design utilizes a distributed digital control system with a dual touch screen CRT operator console to provide alarm monitoring, logging, and trending. The liquid rheostats are driven by brush-type servomotor systems with magnetostrictive linear displacement transducers used for position feedback. The new system achieved all goals for speed variations with load, motor load balance, and control of total power.

  19. Systematic approach for PID controller design for pitch-regulated, variable-speed wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.M.; Balas, M.J.

    1997-11-01

    Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Improved Speed Control System for the 87,000 HP Wind Tunnel Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becks, Edward A.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Blumenthal, Philip Z.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, installation, and integrated systems tests for a new drive motor speed control system which was part of a recent rehab project for the NASA Lewis 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The tunnel drive consists of three mechanically-coupled 29,000 HP wound rotor induction motors driving an axial flow compressor. Liquid rheostats are used to vary the impedance of the rotor circuits, thus varying the speed of the drive system. The new design utilizes a distributed digital control system with a dual touch screen CRT operator console to provide alarm monitoring, logging, and trending. The liquid rheostats are driven by brushtype servomotor systems with magnetostrictive linear displacement transducers used for position feedback. The new system achieved all goals for speed variations with load, motor load balance, and control of total power.

  1. Driver's behavioral adaptation to adaptive cruise control (ACC): the case of speed and time headway.

    PubMed

    Bianchi Piccinini, Giulio Francesco; Rodrigues, Carlos Manuel; Leitão, Miguel; Simões, Anabela

    2014-06-01

    The Adaptive Cruise Control is an Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) that allows maintaining given headway and speed, according to settings pre-defined by the users. Despite the potential benefits associated to the utilization of ACC, previous studies warned against negative behavioral adaptations that might occur while driving with the system activated. Unfortunately, up to now, there are no unanimous results about the effects induced by the usage of ACC on speed and time headway to the vehicle in front. Also, few studies were performed including actual users of ACC among the subjects. This research aimed to investigate the effect of the experience gained with ACC on speed and time headway for a group of users of the system. In addition, it explored the impact of ACC usage on speed and time headway for ACC users and regular drivers. A matched sample driving simulator study was planned as a two-way (2×2) repeated measures mixed design, with the experience with ACC as between-subjects factor and the driving condition (with ACC and manually) as within-subjects factor. The results show that the usage of ACC brought a small but not significant reduction of speed and, especially, the maintenance of safer time headways, being the latter result greater for ACC users, probably as a consequence of their experience in using the system. The usage of ACC did not cause any negative behavioral adaptations to the system regarding speed and time headway. Based on this research work, the Adaptive Cruise Control showed the potential to improve road safety for what concerns the speed and the time headway maintained by the drivers. The speed of the surrounding traffic and the minimum time headway settable through the ACC seem to have an important effect on the road safety improvement achievable with the system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Total energy control system autopilot design with constrained parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Uy-Loi; Voth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the application of a multivariable control design method (SANDY) based on constrained parameter optimization to the design of a multiloop aircraft flight control system. Specifically, the design method is applied to the direct synthesis of a multiloop AFCS inner-loop feedback control system based on total energy control system (TECS) principles. The design procedure offers a structured approach for the determination of a set of stabilizing controller design gains that meet design specifications in closed-loop stability, command tracking performance, disturbance rejection, and limits on control activities. The approach can be extended to a broader class of multiloop flight control systems. Direct tradeoffs between many real design goals are rendered systematic by proper formulation of the design objectives and constraints. Satisfactory designs are usually obtained in few iterations. Performance characteristics of the optimized TECS design have been improved, particularly in the areas of closed-loop damping and control activity in the presence of turbulence.

  3. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Control of the radiation parameters of a copper vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, Yu P.; Yudin, Nikolai A.

    2003-09-01

    The possibility of controlling the pulse shape and duration and the beam divergence of a copper vapour laser operating in the mode of double pump pulses, when the first pulse excites lasing in the active medium and the second amplifies it. It is shown that a change in the delay of the second pump pulse relative to the laser pulse initiated by the first pump pulse allows an efficient control of the laser-radiation characteristics. In this case, the coefficient of laser-radiation conversion into a beam with a diffraction-limited divergence may reach ~80 %.

  4. Design development of steering and speed control for an intelligent mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolli, Kaylan C.; Kola, Krishnamohan; Hall, Ernest L.

    1998-10-01

    Exploratory research on the design of a modular autonomous mobile robot controller for steering and speed control is described. The high level control of the robot incorporates a fuzzy logic approach. Steering and speed control are achieved using a three-axis Galil motion controller. The steering mechanism and the speed control involve the parallel control of the robot's two front wheels based on decisions made by the upper level fuzzy logic to guide the robot in a desired direction to follow a specific path and avoid obstacles in that path. The steering motors are Electrocraft brush DC motor. The BDC amplifiers are run in the current loop mode. The overall control is supervised by a personal computer through the multi-axis controller. The system has been simulated on Matlab and Simulink and optimal values for the digital gains were achieved for desired control. Testing of these systems has been done in a laboratory setting as well as on an outside track with positive results.

  5. Direct Adaptive Control of Utility-Scale Wind Turbine for Speed Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.; Wright, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    The accurate modeling of wind turbines is an extremely challenging problem due to the tremendous complexity of the machines and the turbulent and unpredictable conditions in which they operate. Adaptive control techniques are well suited to nonlinear applications, such as wind turbines, which are difficult to accurately model and which have effects from poorly known operating environments. In this paper, we extended the direct model reference adaptive control (DMRAC) approach to track a reference point and to reject persistent disturbances. This approach was then used to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller was to regulate generator speed in Region 3 and to reject step disturbances. The control objective was accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. The turbine simulation models the controls advanced research turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine that has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. This novel application of adaptive control was compared in simulations with a classical proportional integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the PI pitch controller.

  6. Induction motor speed drive improvement using fuzzy IP-self-tuning controller. A real time implementation.

    PubMed

    Lokriti, Abdesslam; Salhi, Issam; Doubabi, Said; Zidani, Youssef

    2013-05-01

    An IP-self-tuning controller tuned by a fuzzy adjustor, is proposed to improve induction machine speed control. The interest of such controller is the possibility to adjust only one gain, instead of two gains for the case of the PI-self-tuning controllers commonly used in the literature. This paper presents simulation and experimental results. These latter were obtained by practical implementation on a DSPace 1104 board of three different speed controllers (the classical IP, the fuzzy-like-PI and the IP-self-tuning), for a 1.5KW induction machine. The paper presents different tests used to compare the performances of the proposed controller to the two others in terms of computation time, tracking performances and disturbances rejection. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Impact of Back Squat and Leg-Press Exercises on Maximal Strength and Speed-Strength Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Klaus; Hartmann, Hagen; Sander, Andre; Mickel, Christoph; Szilvas, Elena; Keiner, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Strength training-induced increases in speed strength seem indisputable. For trainers and athletes, the most efficient exercise selection in the phase of preparation is of interest. Therefore, this study determined how the selection of training exercise influences the development of speed strength and maximal strength during an 8-week training intervention. Seventy-eight students participated in this study (39 in the training group and 39 as controls). Both groups were divided into 2 subgroups. The first training group (squat training group [SQ]) completed an 8-week strength training protocol using the parallel squat. The second training group (leg-press training group [LP]) used the same training protocol using the leg press (45° leg press). The control group was divided in 2 subgroups as controls for the SQ or the LP. Two-factorial analyses of variance were performed using a repeated measures model for all group comparisons and comparisons between pretest and posttest results. The SQ exhibited a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in jump performance in squat jump (SJ, 12.4%) and countermovement jump (CMJ, 12.0%). Whereas, the changes in the LP did not reach statistical significance and amounted to improvements in SJ of 3.5% and CMJ 0.5%. The differences between groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05). There are also indications that the squat exercise is more effective to increase drop jump performance. Therefore, the squat exercise increased the performance in SJ, CMJ, and reactive strength index more effectively compared with the leg-press in a short-term intervention. Consequently, if the strength training aims at improving jump performance, the squat should be preferred because of the better transfer effects.

  8. Speed Isn't Everything: Complex Processing Speed Measures Mask Individual Differences and Developmental Changes in Executive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepeda, Nicholas J.; Blackwell, Katharine A.; Munakata, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    The rate at which people process information appears to influence many aspects of cognition across the lifespan. However, many commonly accepted measures of "processing speed" may require goal maintenance, manipulation of information in working memory, and decision-making, blurring the distinction between processing speed and executive…

  9. Speed Isn't Everything: Complex Processing Speed Measures Mask Individual Differences and Developmental Changes in Executive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepeda, Nicholas J.; Blackwell, Katharine A.; Munakata, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    The rate at which people process information appears to influence many aspects of cognition across the lifespan. However, many commonly accepted measures of "processing speed" may require goal maintenance, manipulation of information in working memory, and decision-making, blurring the distinction between processing speed and executive…

  10. [Predictors of Average Speed in Orienteering: The Number of Controls is Crucial].

    PubMed

    Gasser, B A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in average speed in the three competition forms orienteering sprint, long distance and hunt start, and to identify reasons for speed differences. In contrast to classic running disciplines, average speed increased with longer distances, which is probably due to technical requirements or the number of controls, which decreased proportionally with longer distances. These analyses emphasise the importance of map-reading in the area of controls since these parts of the races seem to bear a great deal of potential to optimize running times, thereby enabling runners to achieve their maximum performance levels. Based on these findings, the principal of focusing training on one distance due to biological constraints is less important in orienteering than it is in running disciplines. However, if runners do choose to focus on a certain speed, e. g. in the case of elite runners, analogous to 5-km runs, the training of sprints or half-marathons for the classic distance should be structured and organised. Runners prioritising sprint should therefore focus on lactate tolerance or speed work in training whereas runners prioritising classic distance should put emphasis on basic endurance and threshold training. To sum up, this study highlights the relevance of cognitive-technical skills in the control area of races. These elements should constantly be trained by orienteers, independently of physical constraints, in order for them to realise their full potential in races.

  11. Determination of the Critical Parameters for Remote Microscope Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, R. C.; Herbach, B. A.; Johnston, J. C.; Bethea, M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to determine the capabilities of Telescience as applied to Microgravity Materials Science the need for a remotely controlled microscope was recognized. For this purpose we equipped a microscope with an X-Y-Z positioning device and motors on the zoom and focus controls. Computer control of these devices allowed remote operation. A standard TV camera was mounted to the computer controlled video board which could compress the image in resolution and grey scale. The operator control console was programmed to display three still video pictures as well as provide command access. A standard data transfer network was used to transmit the video data files and the command interaction was via a high speed phone modem. This system, with the microscope in the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at LeRC and the control at RPI, was used to determine the accuracy of setting, time required to achieve setting and the operator ease factor. It was found that the focus setting could be established well within the resolution limit of the TV system and that each motion took about 50 seconds and approximately 12 minutes was required to reach ?best? focus. These times could be reduced significantly with operator experience. The operators were provided with ancillary equipment which provided assistance in making the necessary decisions and they reported satisfaction with the control.

  12. Critical Stability and Control Issues in High-Speed Aerodynamics for the HSCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Douglas L.; Princen, Norman H.; Harris, Oran C.

    1999-01-01

    The stability and control issues in high speed aerodynamics of most significance for the development of a viable HSCT are identified, and the status of the Ref. H configuration with respect to these issues is discussed. The interdependence between aerodynamic requirements and assumptions about airplane system functions such as Envelope Protection and Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control is highlighted. The conclusions presented draw on results from the Ref. H Assessment and Alternate Control Concepts Assessment performed under Configuration Aerodynamics Subtask 5 during 1995.

  13. On Using Exponential Parameter Estimators with an Adaptive Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical adaptive controllers are restricted to using a specific update law to generate parameter estimates. This paper investigates the possibility of using any exponential parameter estimator with an adaptive controller such that the system tracks a desired trajectory. The goal is to provide flexibility in choosing any update law suitable for a given application. The development relies on a previously developed concept of controller/update law modularity in the adaptive control literature, and the use of a converse Lyapunov-like theorem. Stability analysis is presented to derive gain conditions under which this is possible, and inferences are made about the tracking error performance. The development is based on a class of Euler-Lagrange systems that are used to model various engineering systems including space robots and manipulators.

  14. Feedback/feedforward control of hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuators for high-speed scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfang; Shan, Jinjun; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the control system design for a piezoelectric actuator (PEA) for a high-speed trajectory scanning application. First nonlinear hysteresis is compensated for by using the Maxwell resistive capacitor model. Then the linear dynamics of the hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuator are identified. A proportional plus integral (PI) controller is designed based on the linear system, enhanced by feedforward hysteresis compensation. It is found that the feedback controller does not always improve tracking accuracy. When the input frequency exceeds a certain value, feedforward control only may result in better control performance. Experiments are conducted, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  15. H-Infinity-Optimal Control for Distributed Parameter Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    F. Callier and C.A. Desoer , "An Algebra of Transfer Functions for Distributed Linear Time-Invariant Systems," IEEE Trans. Circuits Syst., Sept. 1978...neeuey and -f by blog* nu"bM) This report describes progress in the development and application of H-infinity-optimal control theory to distributed...parameter systems. This research is intended to develop both theory and algorithms capable of providing realistic control systems for physical plants which

  16. High-speed reference-beam-angle control technique for holographic memory drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ken-ichiro; Ogata, Takeshi; Hosaka, Makoto; Fujita, Koji; Okuyama, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    We developed a holographic memory drive for next-generation optical memory. In this study, we present the key technology for achieving a high-speed transfer rate for reproduction, that is, a high-speed control technique for the reference beam angle. In reproduction in a holographic memory drive, there is the issue that the optimum reference beam angle during reproduction varies owing to distortion of the medium. The distortion is caused by, for example, temperature variation, beam irradiation, and moisture absorption. Therefore, a reference-beam-angle control technique to position the reference beam at the optimum angle is crucial. We developed a new optical system that generates an angle-error-signal to detect the optimum reference beam angle. To achieve the high-speed control technique using the new optical system, we developed a new control technique called adaptive final-state control (AFSC) that adds a second control input to the first one derived from conventional final-state control (FSC) at the time of angle-error-signal detection. We established an actual experimental system employing AFSC to achieve moving control between each page (Page Seek) within 300 µs. In sequential multiple Page Seeks, we were able to realize positioning to the optimum angles of the reference beam that maximize the diffracted beam intensity. We expect that applying the new control technique to the holographic memory drive will enable a giga-bit/s-class transfer rate.

  17. Modeling and Development of a Magnetic Bearing Controller for a High Speed Flywheel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Brown, Gerald V.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling effort used to develop an improved type of magnetic bearing controller, called a modal controller, for use on high speed flywheel systems. The controller design is based on models of the flywheel system, is designed to directly control the natural dynamics of the spinning rotor, and is generic enough to be readily adapted to future flywheel systems. Modeling and development are described for two key controller subsystems: the modal controller subsystem, which allows direct control over the rotor rigid body modes, and the bending mode compensation subsystem, which tracks, and prevents interference from, the rotor bending modes during flywheel operation. Integration of modeling results into the final controller is described and data taken on the NASA Glenn D1 flywheel module during high speed operation are presented and discussed. The improved modal controller described in this paper has been successfully developed and implemented and has been used for regular hands-free operation of the D1 flywheel module up to its maximum operating speed of 60,000 RPM.

  18. A novel level set model with automated initialization and controlling parameters for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyi; Jiang, Mingyan; Bai, Peirui; Yang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a level set model without the need of generating initial contour and setting controlling parameters manually is proposed for medical image segmentation. The contribution of this paper is mainly manifested in three points. First, we propose a novel adaptive mean shift clustering method based on global image information to guide the evolution of level set. By simple threshold processing, the results of mean shift clustering can automatically and speedily generate an initial contour of level set evolution. Second, we devise several new functions to estimate the controlling parameters of the level set evolution based on the clustering results and image characteristics. Third, the reaction diffusion method is adopted to supersede the distance regularization term of RSF-level set model, which can improve the accuracy and speed of segmentation effectively with less manual intervention. Experimental results demonstrate the performance and efficiency of the proposed model for medical image segmentation.

  19. A rate adaptive control method for Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Wan, Jiahuan; Hu, Xiaodong; Xu, Linyan; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-08-01

    A simple rate adaptive control method is proposed to improve the imaging speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in the paper. Conventionally, the probe implemented on the AFM scans the sample surface at a constant rate, resulting in low time efficiency. Numerous attempts have been made to realize high-speed AFMs, while little efforts are put into changing the constant-rate scanning. Here we report a rate adaptive control method based on variable-rate scanning. The method automatically sets the imaging speed for the x scanner through the analysis of the tracking errors in the z direction at each scanning point, thus improving the dynamic tracking performance of the z scanner. The development and functioning of the rate adaptive method are demonstrated, as well as how the approach significantly achieves faster scans and a higher resolution AFM imaging.

  20. Genetic Algorithm Optimizes Q-LAW Control Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; von Allmen, Paul; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Terrile, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a multi-objective, genetic algorithm designed to optimize Lyapunov feedback control law (Q-law) parameters in order to efficiently find Pareto-optimal solutions for low-thrust trajectories for electronic propulsion systems. These would be propellant-optimal solutions for a given flight time, or flight time optimal solutions for a given propellant requirement. The approximate solutions are used as good initial solutions for high-fidelity optimization tools. When the good initial solutions are used, the high-fidelity optimization tools quickly converge to a locally optimal solution near the initial solution. Q-law control parameters are represented as real-valued genes in the genetic algorithm. The performances of the Q-law control parameters are evaluated in the multi-objective space (flight time vs. propellant mass) and sorted by the non-dominated sorting method that assigns a better fitness value to the solutions that are dominated by a fewer number of other solutions. With the ranking result, the genetic algorithm encourages the solutions with higher fitness values to participate in the reproduction process, improving the solutions in the evolution process. The population of solutions converges to the Pareto front that is permitted within the Q-law control parameter space.

  1. Hovering control scheme to elliptical orbit via frozen parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Zhao, Shuge; Zhang, Yao; Zhai, Guang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the hovering control operation of a target in an elliptical orbit based on frozen parameter. The relative dynamics of spacecraft in eccentric orbits can be described as linear time-varying systems with periodic parameters. Those periodic parameters are the orbital radius, angular velocity and angular acceleration. The time-varying characteristics of these periodic parameters were analyzed via a performance index which is obtained analytically with small fixed time interval. Then, the frozen time interval was obtained with a fixed performance index using a numerical method. A series of constant coefficient linear systems are then obtained to represent the periodic linear system, namely the relative motion dynamics. In the frozen time interval, the hovering control scheme was designed based on a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). Numerical simulations showed that the hovering control performance is good, except the vicinity near the apogee and perigee, both of which exhibit a relative large performance index. Decreasing the performance index from 0.01 to 0.001 reduces the position errors from 5 m to 0.5 m during steady state. It is shown that this approach can save propellant and eliminate chatter during the convergence compared to Control Lyapunov Functions (CLF) approach.

  2. Robust control of speed and temperature in a power plant gas turbine.

    PubMed

    Najimi, Ebrahim; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an H(∞) robust controller has been designed for an identified model of MONTAZER GHAEM power plant gas turbine (GE9001E). In design phase, a linear model (ARX model) which is obtained using real data has been applied. Since the turbine has been used in a combined cycle power plant, its speed and also the exhaust gas temperature should be adjusted simultaneously by controlling fuel signals and compressor inlet guide vane (IGV) position. Considering the limitations on the system inputs, the aim of the control is to maintain the turbine speed and the exhaust gas temperature within desired interval under uncertainties and load demand disturbances. Simulation results of applying the proposed robust controller on the nonlinear model of the system (NARX model), fairly fulfilled the predefined aims. Simulations also show the improvement in the performance compared to MPC and PID controllers for the same conditions. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-linear backstepping control of five-phase IM drive at low speed conditions-experimental implementation.

    PubMed

    Echeikh, Hamdi; Trabelsi, Ramzi; Iqbal, Atif; Bianchi, Nicola; Mimouni, Mohamed Fouizi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper non-linear backstepping control (BSC) is employed for high performance five-phase induction motor drive for low speed operation. The traditional control approaches such as direct torque control and indirect rotor field oriented control introduces stability problem at low speed. The proposed BSC is shown to offer stable operation in the sense of Lyapunov and high dynamics at low speed. Experimental results are provided to present the proprieties of the proposed approach at low speed in terms of stability, torque ripple, desired control performance, achievable dynamics and complexity of implementation etc. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Classical and modern control design of a speed-hold system for a STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blight, J. D.; Gangsaas, D.

    1981-01-01

    A speed-hold system for an experimental short takeoff and landing jet airplane has been designed using both classical root-locus and modern optimal control synthesis techniques. The purpose of the speed-hold system is to maintain airspeed during final approach in the presence of wind shears, gusts, engine failures, and pilot control inputs. Designs were based on using airspeed as a single measurement and two symmetrically deployed upper surface blown flaps as a single control. An optimal control law feeding back all the states and the integral of airspeed through constant gains provided superior performance in terms of speed tracking and control surface activity. However, when a constant-gain Kalman filter was inserted to estimate the states using only the measurement of airspeed, the performance of the optimal control law was reduced to the same as that of a much simpler classical proportional-path plus integral-path control law. To improve the performance of the optimal control law, additional measurements would be required.

  5. On-line physical parameter identification and adaptive control of a launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brian Scott

    Physical parameter identification is useful in many applications, especially in aerospace where much analysis goes into developing accurate physical system models for control. A number of off-line physical parameter identification methods exist; however, the choice of on-line methods is more limited. On-line identification methods are required for adaptive control. New on-line physical parameter identification methods are developed in this work as motivated by the problem of launch vehicle adaptive control. Launch vehicles vary from launch to launch due to differences in payloads and fuel loading. Based on the known variations, launch vehicle control laws are reanalyzed and modified if necessary; this process is expensive and adds to recurring launch vehicle costs. This reanalysis is performed despite the fact that changes in the launch vehicle are relatively minor. A trustworthy adaptive control system could eliminate this expensive redesign cycle. An adaptive control system could also provide better performance than a controller redesigned off-line. However, adaptive control is still considered too risky to use with unstable systems, primarily due to limitations in the identification methods currently available for use in adaptive control. This problem is addressed with the development of new identification algorithms. A philosophy of identification is described which uses physical parameters for identification. A technique is developed to convert existing on-line methods to a form capable of identifying physical parameters. New methods include physical parameter versions of normalized least mean squares (NLMS), research least squares (RLS), extended least squares (ELS), recursive maximum likelihood (RML), and the extended Kalman filter (EKF). Compared to transfer function identification, physical parameter identification reduces the order of the problem and speeds up convergence. Compared to the extended Kalman filter, the new methods have a faster iteration

  6. Application of drive circuit based on L298N in direct current motor speed control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liuliu; Wang, Fang; Han, Sen; Li, Yuchen; Sun, Hao; Lu, Qingjie; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quanzhao

    2016-10-01

    In the experiment of researching the nanometer laser interferometer, our design of laser interferometer circuit system is up to the wireless communication technique of the 802.15.4 IEEE standard, and we use the RF TI provided by Basic to receive the data on speed control system software. The system's hardware is connected with control module and the DC motor. However, in the experiment, we found that single chip microcomputer control module is very difficult to drive the DC motor directly. The reason is that the DC motor's starting and braking current is larger than the causing current of the single chip microcomputer control module. In order to solve this problem, we add a driving module that control board can transmit PWM wave signal through I/O port to drive the DC motor, the driving circuit board can come true the function of the DC motor's positive and reversal rotation and speed adjustment. In many various driving module, the L298N module's integrated level is higher compared with other driver module. The L298N model is easy to control, it not only can control the DC motor, but also achieve motor speed control by modulating PWM wave that the control panel output. It also has the over-current protection function, when the motor lock, the L298N model can protect circuit and motor. So we use the driver module based on L298N to drive the DC motor. It is concluded that the L298N driver circuit module plays a very important role in the process of driving the DC motor in the DC motor speed control system.

  7. Development of a super high speed motor-generator and controller

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Do-Kwan Ahn, Min-Hyuk; Joo, Dae-Suk; Woo, Byung-Chul; Koo, Dae-Hyun

    2014-05-07

    To develop a super high speed motor-generator, it is essential to deal with magnetic analysis, dynamic analysis, and experimental evaluation of the heart of the MTG (Microturbine Generator) system, the motor-generator. An amorphous core is applied to a stator core for reduction of iron loss at high speed, and the motor-generator is analyzed with considerations focused on magnetic losses and the statistical optimum design. The performance of the amorphous core is validated by the analysis and experiment by back-to-back tests considering the AC load. Rotor dynamics is performed for dynamic stability at high speed using transient analysis orbit diagrams and compared with the experimental results. The simulation results of the generator are compared with the experiment. Also a super high speed controller of the MTG system is developed using a sensorless algorithm, power stack, gate driver, digital signal processing, analog circuit, and radiation heat design. Based on these results, a high speed motor-generator and controller are successfully developed.

  8. Design of Life Extending Controls Using Nonlinear Parameter Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conceptual development of a life extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel and oxidizer turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. This design approach makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of a rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using nonlinear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure.

  9. Optimal control for a Formula One car with variable parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perantoni, Giacomo; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2014-05-01

    The minimum-lap-time optimal control problem for a Formula One race car is solved using direct transcription and nonlinear programming. Features of this work include significantly reduced full-lap solution times and the simultaneous optimisation of the driven line, the driver controls and multiple car set-up parameters. It is shown that significant reductions in the driven lap time can be obtained from track-specific set-up parameter optimisation. Reduced computing times are achieved using a combination of a track description based on curvilinear coordinates, analytical derivatives and model non-dimensionalisation. The curvature of the track centre line is found by solving an auxiliary optimal control problem that negates the difficulties associated with integration drift and trajectory closure.

  10. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of the successful application of fuzzy logic to enhance the performance and control of a variable-speed wind generation system. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to either a double-sided pulse-width modulation converte...

  11. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a variable-speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used to optimize efficiency and enhance performance control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which either pump...

  12. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of the successful application of fuzzy logic to enhance the performance and control of a variable-speed wind generation system. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to either a double-sided pulse-width modulation converte...

  13. Variable-frequency inverter controls torque, speed, and braking in ac induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Dc to ac inverter provides optimum frequency and voltage to ac induction motor, in response to different motor-load and speed requirements. Inverter varies slip frequency of motor in proportion to required torque. Inverter protects motor from high current surges, controls negative slip to apply braking, and returns energy stored in momentum of load to dc power source.

  14. A control approach to high-speed probe-based nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Zou, Qingze; Lin, Zhiqun

    2009-04-29

    In this paper, an inversion-based feedforward control approach for achieving high-speed, large-range probe-based nanofabrication is proposed. Probe-based nanofabrication has attracted great interest recently. This technique, however, is still limited by its low throughput, due to the challenges in compensating for the existing adverse effects. These adverse effects include the nonlinear hysteresis as well as the vibrational dynamics of piezoactuators used to position the probe in 3D axes, and the dynamic coupling in multi-axis motion during high-speed nanofabrication. The main contribution of this paper is the utilization of the recently developed model-less inversion-based iterative control technique to overcome these challenges in scanning probe microscope-based nanofabrication. By using this advanced control technique, precision position control of the probe can be achieved during high-speed, large-range multi-axis nanofabrication. The proposed approach is demonstrated in experiments by implementing it to fabricate large-size ( approximately 50 microm) pentagram patterns via mechanical scratching on a gold-coated silicon sample surface at high speed ( approximately 4.5 mm s(-1)).

  15. A control approach to high-speed probe-based nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Zou, Qingze; Lin, Zhiqun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, an inversion-based feedforward control approach for achieving high-speed, large-range probe-based nanofabrication is proposed. Probe-based nanofabrication has attracted great interest recently. This technique, however, is still limited by its low throughput, due to the challenges in compensating for the existing adverse effects. These adverse effects include the nonlinear hysteresis as well as the vibrational dynamics of piezoactuators used to position the probe in 3D axes, and the dynamic coupling in multi-axis motion during high-speed nanofabrication. The main contribution of this paper is the utilization of the recently developed model-less inversion-based iterative control technique to overcome these challenges in scanning probe microscope-based nanofabrication. By using this advanced control technique, precision position control of the probe can be achieved during high-speed, large-range multi-axis nanofabrication. The proposed approach is demonstrated in experiments by implementing it to fabricate large-size (~50 µm) pentagram patterns via mechanical scratching on a gold-coated silicon sample surface at high speed (~4.5 mm s-1).

  16. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a variable-speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used to optimize efficiency and enhance performance control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which either pump...

  17. Control over parameters of photonic nanojets of dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. E.; Panina, E. K.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the results of theoretical investigation of the parameters of photonic nanojets formed near the shadow surface of micron-sized dielectric spheres irradiated by a laser radiation. The longitudinal and transversal dimensions of the photonic nanojet and its peak intensity also are calculated as the functions of particle size, index of absorption, and optical contrast of the particulate material. The photonic nano-flux was simulated numerically in composite particles made of a core and a shell with different refractive indices and variable shell thickness. Some practical conclusions are drawn concerning the possible ways to gain the control over the nanojet parameters in micron-sized spherical particles.

  18. Parameter Estimation for Sensorless Controlled Induction Motors using Nonlinear Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozuki, Takashi; Kawabata, Yoshitaka; Sugimoto, Sueo

    In this paper, we consider parameter estimation of the state variables and unknown parameters of Induction Motors (IMs) using nonlinear filters. Simultaneous estimation is the most general method for sensorless controlled IMs, and at present, by the advance of computer processors, nonlinear filters have been applied to various occasions, so we describe the method for applying nonlinear filters to Induction Motors model, and consider its estimate performance by simulations. Simulation results showed that nonlinear filters have more accuracy estimate performance than the adaptive observer, and the excellent noise immunity.

  19. Dimming-discrete-multi-tone (DMT) for simultaneous color control and high speed visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2014-04-07

    Visible light communication (VLC) using LEDs has attracted significant attention recently for the future secure, license-free and electromagnetic-interference (EMI)-free optical wireless communication. Dimming technique in LED lamp is advantageous for energy efficiency. Color control can be performed in the red-green-blue (RGB) LEDs by using dimming technique. It is highly desirable to employ dimming technique to provide simultaneous color and dimming control and high speed VLC. Here, we proposed and demonstrated a LED dimming control using dimming-discrete-multi-tone (DMT) modulation. High speed DMT-based VLC with simultaneous color and dimming control is demonstrated for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Demonstration and analyses for several modulation conditions and transmission distances are performed, for instance, demonstrating the data rate of 103.5 Mb/s (using RGB LED) with fast Fourier transform (FFT) size of 512.

  20. Inverse optimal control for speed-varying path following of marine vessels with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Haixiang; Yu, Wenzhao; Feng, Hui; Han, Xin

    2017-06-01

    A controller which is locally optimal near the origin and globally inverse optimal for the nonlinear system is proposed for path following of over actuated marine crafts with actuator dynamics. The motivation is the existence of undesired signals sent to the actuators, which can result in bad behavior in path following. To attenuate the oscillation of the control signal and obtain smooth thrust outputs, the actuator dynamics are added into the ship maneuvering model. Instead of modifying the Line-of-Sight (LOS) guidance law, this proposed controller can easily adjust the vessel speed to minimize the large cross-track error caused by the high vessel speed when it is turning. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of this proposed controller.

  1. High speed reaction wheels for satellite attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P.; Rodriguez, E.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of spacecraft attitude control and energy storage (ACES) functions in common hardware, to synergistically maintain three-axis attitude control while supplying electrical power during earth orbital eclipses, allows the generation of control torques by high rotating speed wheels that react against the spacecraft structure via a high efficiency bidirectional energy conversion motor/generator. An ACES system encompasses a minimum of four wheels, controlling power and the three torque vectors. Attention is given to the realization of such a system with composite flywheel rotors that yield high energy density, magnetic suspension technology yielding low losses at high rotational speeds, and an ironless armature permanent magnet motor/generator yielding high energy conversion efficiency.

  2. High speed reaction wheels for satellite attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P.; Rodriguez, E.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of spacecraft attitude control and energy storage (ACES) functions in common hardware, to synergistically maintain three-axis attitude control while supplying electrical power during earth orbital eclipses, allows the generation of control torques by high rotating speed wheels that react against the spacecraft structure via a high efficiency bidirectional energy conversion motor/generator. An ACES system encompasses a minimum of four wheels, controlling power and the three torque vectors. Attention is given to the realization of such a system with composite flywheel rotors that yield high energy density, magnetic suspension technology yielding low losses at high rotational speeds, and an ironless armature permanent magnet motor/generator yielding high energy conversion efficiency.

  3. Neuro-fuzzy speed control of traveling-wave type ultrasonic motor drive using frequency and phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Chi; Yu, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) control system for a traveling-wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM) driven by a dual mode modulation non-resonant driving circuit. First, the motor configuration and the proposed driving circuit of a TWUSM are introduced. To drive a TWUSM effectively, a novel driving circuit, that simultaneously employs both the driving frequency and phase modulation control scheme, is proposed to provide two-phase balance voltage for a TWUSM. Since the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the TWUSM are highly nonlinear and time-varying, a FNN control system is therefore investigated to achieve high-precision speed control. The proposed FNN control system incorporates neuro-fuzzy control and the driving frequency and phase modulation to solve the problem of nonlinearities and variations. The proposed control system is digitally implemented by a low-cost digital signal processor based microcontroller, hence reducing the system hardware size and cost. The effectiveness of the proposed driving circuit and control system is verified with hardware experiments under the occurrence of uncertainties. In addition, the advantages of the proposed control scheme are indicated in comparison with a conventional proportional-integral control system.

  4. Extended Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor Through Dual Mode Inverter Control

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J.S.

    2000-06-23

    The trapezoidal back electromotive force (emf) brushless direct current (dc) motor (BDCM) with surface-mounted magnets has high-power density and efficiency especially when rare-earth magnet materials are used. Traction applications, such as electric vehicles, could benefit significantly from the use of such motors. Unfortunately, a practical means for driving the motor over a constant power speed ratio (CPSR) of 5:1 or more has not yet been developed. A key feature of these motors is that they have low internal inductance. The phase advance method is effective in controlling the motor power over such a speed range, but the current at high speed may be several times greater than that required at the base speed. The increase in current during high-speed operation is due to the low motor inductance and the action of the bypass diodes of the inverter. The use of such a control would require increased current rating of the inverter semiconductors and additional cooling for the inverter, where the conduction losses increase proportionally with current, and especially for the motor, where the losses increase with the square of the current. The high current problems of phase advance can be mitigated by adding series inductance; however, this reduces power density, requires significant increase in supply voltage, and leaves the CPSR performance of the system highly sensitive to variations in the available voltage. A new inverter topology and control scheme has been developed that can drive low-inductance BDCMs over the CPSR that would be required in electric vehicle applications. This new controller is called the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC). It is shown that the BDCM has an infinite CPSR when it is driven by the DMIC.

  5. Speed and Torque Control Strategies for Loss Reduction of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argent, Michael; McDonald, Alasdair; Leithead, Bill; Giles, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    This paper builds on the work into modelling the generator losses for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines from their intrinsic torque cycling to investigate the effects of aerodynamic inefficiencies caused by the varying rotational speed resulting from different torque control strategies to the cyclic torque. This is achieved by modelling the wake that builds up from the rotation of the VAWT rotor to investigate how the wake responds to a changing rotor speed and how this in turn affects the torque produced by the blades as well as the corresponding change in generator losses and any changes to the energy extracted by the wind turbine rotor.

  6. Invited review article: high-speed flexure-guided nanopositioning: mechanical design and control issues.

    PubMed

    Yong, Y K; Moheimani, S O R; Kenton, B J; Leang, K K

    2012-12-01

    Recent interest in high-speed scanning probe microscopy for high-throughput applications including video-rate atomic force microscopy and probe-based nanofabrication has sparked attention on the development of high-bandwidth flexure-guided nanopositioning systems (nanopositioners). Such nanopositioners are designed to move samples with sub-nanometer resolution with positioning bandwidth in the kilohertz range. State-of-the-art designs incorporate uniquely designed flexure mechanisms driven by compact and stiff piezoelectric actuators. This paper surveys key advances in mechanical design and control of dynamic effects and nonlinearities, in the context of high-speed nanopositioning. Future challenges and research topics are also discussed.

  7. Vision-Based Steering Control, Speed Assistance and Localization for Inner-City Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Mendez, Miguel Angel; Sanchez-Lopez, Jose Luis; Jimenez, Felipe; Campoy, Pascual; Sajadi-Alamdari, Seyed Amin; Voos, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous route following with road vehicles has gained popularity in the last few decades. In order to provide highly automated driver assistance systems, different types and combinations of sensors have been presented in the literature. However, most of these approaches apply quite sophisticated and expensive sensors, and hence, the development of a cost-efficient solution still remains a challenging problem. This work proposes the use of a single monocular camera sensor for an automatic steering control, speed assistance for the driver and localization of the vehicle on a road. Herein, we assume that the vehicle is mainly traveling along a predefined path, such as in public transport. A computer vision approach is presented to detect a line painted on the road, which defines the path to follow. Visual markers with a special design painted on the road provide information to localize the vehicle and to assist in its speed control. Furthermore, a vision-based control system, which keeps the vehicle on the predefined path under inner-city speed constraints, is also presented. Real driving tests with a commercial car on a closed circuit finally prove the applicability of the derived approach. In these tests, the car reached a maximum speed of 48 km/h and successfully traveled a distance of 7 km without the intervention of a human driver and any interruption. PMID:26978365

  8. Newly-Developed Adaptive Noise Absorption Control Technology for High Speed Fan Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Koh, Masaharu; Ozaki, Shunichi; Yokochi, Makoto; Sato, Takuo

    The paper describes about a newly-developed adaptive noise absorption control (AAC) technology I for fan noise reduction and about proof test results of the technology. The AAC technology adaptively controls the reactance part of acoustic impedance of duct liners with mobile reflective plates and large acoustic chambers, absorbs fan tones and broadband noise together, and achieves larger overall fan noise reduction over a wide fan speed range. For actual proof of the technology, adaptive duct liner I was made on trial basis and was examined. The test result clarifies that the duct liner I could reduce fan noise larger than O.A. SPL 10dB (A) at max fan speed of 6000rpm, including reduction of low frequency noise and fundamental BPF tone and harmonics of 18dB at maximum. In response to fan speed change, the reflective plate movement control could achieve the large peak frequency shift and peak level increase in the acoustic absorption spectra, and could reduce fan noise larger than O.A. SPL 9dB (A) over the fan speed range from 1000 to 6000rpm.

  9. Control of a high-speed, brushless dc motor driven through a cycloconverter line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, J. J.; Reesor, D. B.; Weimer, J. A.

    Feasibility and concept of designing a high-speed, permanent magnet, brushless dc motor aircraft fuel pump drive using a cycloconverter link is examined. Analytical methods are developed to model the behavior of a three-phase permanent magnetic machine when operated as a self-synchronous motor supplied from a polyphase, variable voltage, variable frequency source through a midpoint cycloconverter link under circulating current free mode of control. A hybrid combination of sinusoidal and dc steady-state analysis methods is utilized to obtain a suitable equivalent circuit of the motor. Study of the motor model is made to establish the nature of the no load MMF angle as a function of current to give a minimum value while assuring proper thyristor commutation. Then, a closed loop control system with an outer loop on speed and an inner loop on current is postulated wherein a proportional plus integral controller is placed in the forward path to assure minimum speed error. A numerical study of performance is presented for speed runup and rundown conditions.

  10. Vision-Based Steering Control, Speed Assistance and Localization for Inner-City Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Mendez, Miguel Angel; Sanchez-Lopez, Jose Luis; Jimenez, Felipe; Campoy, Pascual; Sajadi-Alamdari, Seyed Amin; Voos, Holger

    2016-03-11

    Autonomous route following with road vehicles has gained popularity in the last few decades. In order to provide highly automated driver assistance systems, different types and combinations of sensors have been presented in the literature. However, most of these approaches apply quite sophisticated and expensive sensors, and hence, the development of a cost-efficient solution still remains a challenging problem. This work proposes the use of a single monocular camera sensor for an automatic steering control, speed assistance for the driver and localization of the vehicle on a road. Herein, we assume that the vehicle is mainly traveling along a predefined path, such as in public transport. A computer vision approach is presented to detect a line painted on the road, which defines the path to follow. Visual markers with a special design painted on the road provide information to localize the vehicle and to assist in its speed control. Furthermore, a vision-based control system, which keeps the vehicle on the predefined path under inner-city speed constraints, is also presented. Real driving tests with a commercial car on a closed circuit finally prove the applicability of the derived approach. In these tests, the car reached a maximum speed of 48 km/h and successfully traveled a distance of 7 km without the intervention of a human driver and any interruption.

  11. Novel control scheme for a high-speed metrological scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorbringer-Dorozhovets, N.; Hausotte, T.; Manske, E.; Shen, J. C.; Jäger, G.

    2011-09-01

    Some time ago, an interferometer-based metrological scanning probe microscope (SPM) was developed at the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of the Ilmenau University of Technology, Germany. The specialty of this SPM is the combined deflection detection system that comprises an interferometer and a beam deflection. Due to this system it is possible to simultaneously measure the displacement, bending and torsion of the probe (cantilever). The SPM is integrated into a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine (NPM machine) and allows measurements with a resolution of 0.1 nm over a range of 25 mm × 25 mm × 5 mm. Excellent results were achieved for measurements of calibrated step height and lateral standards and these results are comparable to the calibration values from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) (Dorozhovets N et al 2007 Proc. SPIE 6616 661624-1-7). The disadvantage was a low attainable scanning speed and accordingly large expenditure of time. Control dynamics and scanning speed are limited because of the high masses of the stage and corner mirror of the machine. For the vertical axis an additional high-speed piezoelectric drive is integrated in the SPM in order to increase the measuring dynamics. The movement of the piezoelectric drive is controlled and traceable measured by the interferometer. Hence, nonlinearity and hysteresis in the actuator do not affect the measurement. The outcome of this is an improvement of the bending control of the cantilever and much higher scan speeds of up to 200 µm s-1.

  12. Optimal vibration control of curved beams using distributed parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushou; Jin, Dongping; Wen, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The design of linear quadratic optimal controller using spectral factorization method is studied for vibration suppression of curved beam structures modeled as distributed parameter models. The equations of motion for active control of the in-plane vibration of a curved beam are developed firstly considering its shear deformation and rotary inertia, and then the state space model of the curved beam is established directly using the partial differential equations of motion. The functional gains for the distributed parameter model of curved beam are calculated by extending the spectral factorization method. Moreover, the response of the closed-loop control system is derived explicitly in frequency domain. Finally, the suppression of the vibration at the free end of a cantilevered curved beam by point control moment is studied through numerical case studies, in which the benefit of the presented method is shown by comparison with a constant gain velocity feedback control law, and the performance of the presented method on avoidance of control spillover is demonstrated.

  13. Cognitive control and word recognition speed influence the Stroop effect in bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiming; Fan, Xiaoyue; Liu, Cong; Cai, Zhenguang G

    2016-04-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to be less susceptible to Stroop interference in their first language than monolinguals, though the cause is currently being debated. In two experiments, we explored how cognitive control and word recognition contribute to the Stroop effect by contrasting cognitive control (via a Simon arrow task), word recognition speed (via a Chinese/English word recognition task) and Stroop susceptibility (via a verbal Stroop task) between proficient and non-proficient Chinese-English bilinguals. Compared to non-proficient bilinguals, proficient bilinguals showed better cognitive control at inhibiting irrelevant information, and they were slower at recognising Chinese words but quicker at recognising English words. Critically, we also showed that proficient bilinguals showed a smaller Stroop effect than non-proficient bilinguals in Chinese but a comparable Stroop effect as non-proficient bilinguals in English. The results cannot be accounted for by cognitive control or word recognition speed alone; instead, they are best accommodated by assuming that cognitive control and word recognition speed jointly determine the Stroop effect. Thus, we conclude that enhanced cognitive control and delayed word recognition combine to reduce Stroop effect in bilinguals as compared to monolinguals. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  14. Identification and speed control of ultrasonic motors based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Lee, H. P.; Lin, W. Z.; Lim, S. P.; Lee, K. H.; Shi, X. H.

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasonic motor (USM) is a newly developed motor that has many excellent performances, useful features and extensive applications. The operational characteristics of the USM are affected by many factors. Strongly nonlinear characteristics could be caused by the increase of temperature, the changes of load, driving frequency and voltage and many other factors. Therefore, it is difficult to perform effective control on USMs using traditional control methods based on mathematical models of systems. Recently, artificial intelligent methods based on neural networks have become the main approaches to perform USM control. However, the existing neural-network-based methods for USM control have some shortcomings, such as complex network structures, slower convergent speeds and lower convergent precision, as well as no theoretical guarantee on the convergence of control. Furthermore, it is difficult to obtain accurate control input for the USM by using a speed controller with a single control variable. In this paper, a bimodal controller is designed where both the driving frequency and amplitude of the applied voltage are used as control inputs. A novel input-output recurrent neural network (IORNN) identifier is constructed to dynamically identify the input-output relation of the ultrasonic motors. To guarantee convergence and for faster learning, the adaptive learning rates are derived using discrete-type Lyapunov stability analysis. Numerical results show that the proposed IORNN identifier can approximate the nonlinear input-output mapping of ultrasonic motors quite well. Compared with the existing method, the control precision can be increased by about three times and the convergence time can be decreased by about two times when the proposed method is employed. Good effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is also obtained for various reference speeds.

  15. VMAT linear accelerator commissioning and quality assurance: dose control and gantry speed tests.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Greer, Peter B

    2016-05-01

    In VMAT treatment delivery the ability of the linear accelerator (linac) to accurately control dose versus gantry angle is critical to delivering the plan correctly. A new VMAT test delivery was developed to specifically test the dose versus gantry angle with the full range of allowed gantry speeds and dose rates. The gantry-mounted IBA MatriXX with attached inclinometer was used in movie mode to measure the instantaneous relative dose versus gantry angle during the plan every 0.54 s. The results were compared to the expected relative dose at each gantry angle calculated from the plan. The same dataset was also used to compare the instantaneous gantry speeds throughout the delivery compared to the expected gantry speeds from the plan. Measurements performed across four linacs generally show agreement between measurement and plan to within 1.5% in the constant dose rate regions and dose rate modulation within 0.1 s of the plan. Instantaneous gantry speed was measured to be within 0.11∘/s of the plan (1 SD). An error in one linac was detected in that the nominal gantry speed was incorrectly calibrated. This test provides a practical method to quality-assure critical aspects of VMAT delivery including dose versus gantry angle and gantry speed control. The method can be performed with any detector that can acquire time-resolved dosimetric information that can be synchronized with a measurement of gantry angle. The test fulfils several of the aims of the recent Netherlands Commission on Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) Report 24, which provides recommendations for comprehensive VMAT quality assurance. PACS number(s): 87.55.Qr.

  16. VMAT linear accelerator commissioning and quality assurance: dose control and gantry speed tests.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Greer, Peter B

    2016-05-08

    In VMAT treatment delivery the ability of the linear accelerator (linac) to accurately control dose versus gantry angle is critical to delivering the plan correctly. A new VMAT test delivery was developed to specifically test the dose versus gantry angle with the full range of allowed gantry speeds and dose rates. The gantry-mounted IBA MatriXX with attached inclinometer was used in movie mode to measure the instantaneous relative dose versus gantry angle during the plan every 0.54 s. The results were compared to the expected relative dose at each gantry angle calculated from the plan. The same dataset was also used to compare the instantaneous gan-try speeds throughout the delivery compared to the expected gantry speeds from the plan. Measurements performed across four linacs generally show agreement between measurement and plan to within 1.5% in the constant dose rate regions and dose rate modulation within 0.1 s of the plan. Instantaneous gantry speed was measured to be within 0.11°/s of the plan (1 SD). An error in one linac was detected in that the nominal gantry speed was incorrectly calibrated. This test provides a practical method to quality-assure critical aspects of VMAT delivery including dose versus gantry angle and gantry speed control. The method can be performed with any detector that can acquire time-resolved dosimetric information that can be synchronized with a measurement of gantry angle. The test fulfils several of the aims of the recent Netherlands Commission on Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) Report 24, which provides recommendations for comprehensive VMAT quality assurance.

  17. Performance comparison of control schemes for variable-speed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottasso, C. L.; Croce, A.; Savini, B.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the performance of different control schemes when applied to the regulation problem of a variable-speed representative wind turbine. In particular, we formulate and compare a wind-scheduled PID, a LQR controller and a novel adaptive non-linear model predictive controller, equipped with observers of the tower states and wind. The simulations include gusts and turbulent winds of varying intensity in nominal as well as off-design operating conditions. The experiments highlight the possible advantages of model-based non-linear control strategies.

  18. Control of complex dynamics and chaos in distributed parameter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarti, S.; Marek, M.; Ray, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses a methodology for controlling complex dynamics and chaos in distributed parameter systems. The reaction-diffusion system with Brusselator kinetics, where the torus-doubling or quasi-periodic (two characteristic incommensurate frequencies) route to chaos exists in a defined range of parameter values, is used as an example. Poincare maps are used for characterization of quasi-periodic and chaotic attractors. The dominant modes or topos, which are inherent properties of the system, are identified by means of the Singular Value Decomposition. Tested modal feedback control schemas based on identified dominant spatial modes confirm the possibility of stabilization of simple quasi-periodic trajectories in the complex quasi-periodic or chaotic spatiotemporal patterns.

  19. Parameter estimation for a nonlinear control-oriented tokamak profile evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geelen, P.; Felici, F.; Merle, A.; Sauter, O.

    2015-12-01

    A control-oriented tokamak profile evolution model is crucial for the development and testing of control schemes for a fusion plasma. The RAPTOR (RApid Plasma Transport simulatOR) code was developed with this aim in mind (Felici 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 083052). The performance of the control system strongly depends on the quality of the control-oriented model predictions. In RAPTOR a semi-empirical transport model is used, instead of a first-principles physics model, to describe the electron heat diffusivity {χ\\text{e}} in view of computational speed. The structure of the empirical model is given by the physics knowledge, and only some unknown physics of {χ\\text{e}} , which is more complicated and less well understood, is captured in its model parameters. Additionally, time-averaged sawtooth behavior is modeled by an ad hoc addition to the neoclassical conductivity {σ\\parallel} and electron heat diffusivity. As a result, RAPTOR contains parameters that need to be estimated for a tokamak plasma to make reliable predictions. In this paper a generic parameter estimation method, based on the nonlinear least-squares theory, was developed to estimate these model parameters. For the TCV tokamak, interpretative transport simulations that used measured {{T}\\text{e}} profiles were performed and it was shown that the developed method is capable of finding the model parameters such that RAPTOR’s predictions agree within ten percent with the simulated q profile and twenty percent with the measured {{T}\\text{e}} profile. The newly developed model-parameter estimation procedure now results in a better description of a fusion plasma and allows for a less ad hoc and more automated method to implement RAPTOR on a variety of tokamaks.

  20. Controlling the parameters of wet lateral oxidation for VCSEL fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaziat, Majid; Reed, David; Kor, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Physical parameters that need to be controlled during the wet oxidation of VCSEL mesas are numerous and include: temperature uniformity, vapor flow pattern, epitaxial thickness and composition uniformity, diffusion through adjacent layers, oxidation onset delay, etch skirt, and wafer surface prep. We report the results of our studies on some of these factors including vapor flow patterns, and oxidation front monitoring. The results are being used for the optimization of our commercial system for wet lateral oxidation.

  1. [Dynamic control of the atmospheric parameters of spacecraft].

    PubMed

    Breslav, I S; Salazkin, V N

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of experimental data a mathematical model of relationships between physiological parameters, oxygen content in the atmosphere and exercises has been developed. Using the model, it has been demonstrated that circulation and respiration reactions to exercises can be optimized by increasing the partial pressure of oxygen as related to the exercise level. A probable law of the dynamic and physiologically optimal control of the oxygen content in the space cabin atmosphere has been advanced. In cases of an uncontrolled decrease of PO2 the oxygen supply of crewmembers can be optimized by the dynamic control of the ambient CO2 content.

  2. Robust parameter design for automatically controlled systems and nanostructure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Tirthankar

    2007-12-01

    This research focuses on developing comprehensive frameworks for developing robust parameter design methodology for dynamic systems with automatic control and for synthesis of nanostructures. In many automatically controlled dynamic processes, the optimal feedback control law depends on the parameter design solution and vice versa and therefore an integrated approach is necessary. A parameter design methodology in the presence of feedback control is developed for processes of long duration under the assumption that experimental noise factors are uncorrelated over time. Systems that follow a pure-gain dynamic model are considered and the best proportional-integral and minimum mean squared error control strategies are developed by using robust parameter design. The proposed method is illustrated using a simulated example and a case study in a urea packing plant. This idea is also extended to cases with on-line noise factors. The possibility of integrating feedforward control with a minimum mean squared error feedback control scheme is explored. To meet the needs of large scale synthesis of nanostructures, it is critical to systematically find experimental conditions under which the desired nanostructures are synthesized reproducibly, at large quantity and with controlled morphology. The first part of the research in this area focuses on modeling and optimization of existing experimental data. Through a rigorous statistical analysis of experimental data, models linking the probabilities of obtaining specific morphologies to the process variables are developed. A new iterative algorithm for fitting a Multinomial GLM is proposed and used. The optimum process conditions, which maximize the above probabilities and make the synthesis process less sensitive to variations of process variables around set values, are derived from the fitted models using Monte-Carlo simulations. The second part of the research deals with development of an experimental design methodology, tailor

  3. Three-parameter tunable Tilt-Integral-Derivative (TID) controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A feedback control system compensator of the PID type is provided, wherein the proportional component of the compensator is replaced with a tilted component having a transfer function s to the power of -1/n. The resulting transfer function of the entire compensator more closely approximates an optimal transfer function, thereby achieving improved feedback controller. Further, as compared to conventional PID compensators, the TID compensator allows for simpler tuning, better disturbance rejection ratio, and smaller effects of plant parameter variations on closed loop response.

  4. Variable speed wind turbine control by discrete-time sliding mode approach.

    PubMed

    Torchani, Borhen; Sellami, Anis; Garcia, Germain

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new design variable speed wind turbine control by discrete-time sliding mode approach. This methodology is designed for linear saturated system. The saturation constraint is reported on inputs vector. To this end, the back stepping design procedure is followed to construct a suitable sliding manifold that guarantees the attainment of a stabilization control objective. It is well known that the mechanisms are investigated in term of the most proposed assumptions to deal with the damping, shaft stiffness and inertia effect of the gear. The objectives are to synthesize robust controllers that maximize the energy extracted from wind, while reducing mechanical loads and rotor speed tracking combined with an electromagnetic torque. Simulation results of the proposed scheme are presented.

  5. Study on variation in ship's forward speed under regular waves depending on rudder controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Soon-Dong; Kang, Donghoon; Lee, JongHyun; Lee, Seung Jae; Jung, Kwang Hyo

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to compare and analyze the advanced speed of ships with different rudder controller in wavy condition by using a simulation. The commercial simulation tool named AQWA is used to develop the simulation of ship which has 3 degree of freedom. The nonlinear hydrodynamic force acting on hull, the propeller thrust and the rudder force are calculated by the additional subroutine which interlock with the commercial simulation tool, and the regular wave is used as the source of the external force for the simulation. Rudder rotational velocity and autopilot coefficients vary to make the different rudder controller. An advanced speed of ships depending on the rudder controller is analyzed after the autopilot simulations.

  6. Modelling and control algorithms of the cross conveyors line with multiengine variable speed drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremushkina, M. S.; Baburin, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with the actual problem of developing the control algorithm that meets the technical requirements of the mine belt conveyors, and enables energy and resource savings taking into account a random sort of traffic. The most effective method of solution of these tasks is the construction of control systems with the use of variable speed drives for asynchronous motors. The authors designed the mathematical model of the system ‘variable speed multiengine drive – conveyor – control system of conveyors’ that takes into account the dynamic processes occurring in the elements of the transport system, provides an assessment of the energy efficiency of application the developed algorithms, which allows one to reduce the dynamic overload in the belt to 15-20%.

  7. Tuning RED parameters in satellite networks using control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Mukundan; Durresi, Arjan; Chellappan, Sriram; Ozbay, Hitay; Jain, Raj

    2003-08-01

    Congestion in the Internet results in wasted bandwidth and also stands in the way of guaranteeing QoS. The effect of congestion is multiplied many fold in Satellite networks, where the resources are very expensive. Thus congestion control has a special significance in the performance of Satellite networks. In today's Internet, congestion control is implemented mostly using some form of the de facto standard, RED. But tuning of parameters in RED has been a major problem throughout. Achieving high throughput with corresponding low delays is the main goal in parameter setting. It is also desired to keep the oscillations in the queue low to reduce jitter, so that the QoS guarantees can be improved. In this paper, we use a previously linearized fluid flow model of TCP-RED to study the performance and stability of the Queue in the router. We use classical control tools like Tracking Error minimization and Delay Margin to study the performance, stability of the system. We use the above-mentioned tools to provide guidelines for setting the parameters in RED, such that the throughput, delay and jitter of the system are optimized. Thus we provide guidelines for optimizing satellite IP networks. We apply our results exclusively for optimizing the performance of satellite networks, where the effects of congestion are much pronounced and need for optimization is much important. We use ns simulator to validate our results to support our analysis.

  8. Distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feitian; Lagor, Francis D; Yeo, Derrick; Washington, Patrick; Paley, Derek A

    2015-10-23

    Flexibility plays an important role in fish behavior by enabling high maneuverability for predator avoidance and swimming in turbulent flow. This paper presents a novel flexible fish robot equipped with distributed pressure sensors for flow sensing. The body of the robot is molded from soft, hyperelastic material, which provides flexibility. Its Joukowski-foil shape is conducive to modeling the fluid analytically. A quasi-steady potential-flow model is adopted for real-time flow estimation, whereas a discrete-time vortex-shedding flow model is used for higher-fidelity simulation. The dynamics for the flexible fish robot yield a reduced model for one-dimensional swimming. A recursive Bayesian filter assimilates pressure measurements to estimate flow speed, angle of attack, and foil camber. The closed-loop speed-control strategy combines an inverse-mapping feedforward controller based on an average model derived for periodic actuation of angle-of-attack and a proportional-integral feedback controller utilizing the estimated flow information. Simulation and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the estimation and control strategy. The paper provides a systematic approach to distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot by regulating the flapping amplitude.

  9. Effect of Travel Speed on the Visual Control of Steering Toward a Goal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongrong; Niehorster, Diederick C; Li, Li

    2017-08-17

    Previous studies have proposed that people can use visual cues such as the instantaneous direction (i.e., heading) or future path trajectory of travel specified by optic flow or target visual direction in egocentric space to steer or walk toward a goal. In the current study, we examined what visual cues people use to guide their goal-oriented locomotion and whether their reliance on such visual cues changes as travel speed increases. We presented participants with optic flow displays that simulated their self-motion toward a target at various travel speeds under two viewing conditions in which we made target egocentric direction available or unavailable for steering. We found that for both viewing conditions, participants did not steer along a curved path toward the target such that the actual and the required path curvature to reach the target would converge when approaching the target. At higher travel speeds, participants showed a faster and larger reduction in target-heading angle and more accurate and precise steady-state control of aligning their heading specified by optic flow with the target. These findings support the claim that people use heading and target egocentric direction but not path for goal-oriented locomotion control, and their reliance on heading increases at higher travel speeds. The increased reliance on heading for goal-oriented locomotion control could be due to an increased reliability in perceiving heading from optic flow as the magnitude of flow increases with travel speed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Age-related decline in cognitive control: the role of fluid intelligence and processing speed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect on cognitive control efficiency is still unclear. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence and processing speed on the selective age-related decline in proactive control. Eighty young and 80 healthy older adults were included in this study. The participants were submitted to a working memory recognition paradigm, assessing proactive and reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. Results Repeated measures ANOVAs and hierarchical linear regressions indicated that the ability to appropriately use cognitive control processes during aging seems to be at least partially affected by the amount of available cognitive resources (assessed by fluid intelligence and processing speed abilities). Conclusions This study highlights the potential role of cognitive resources on the selective age-related decline in proactive control, suggesting the importance of a more exhaustive approach considering the confounding variables during cognitive control assessment. PMID:24401034

  11. Variable-Speed Induction Motor Drives for Aircraft Environmental Control Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Hansen, I. G.; Schreiner, K. E.; Roth, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    New, more-efficient designs for aircraft jet engines are not capable of supplying the large quantities of bleed air necessary to provide pressurization and air conditioning for the environmental control systems (ECS) of the next generation of large passenger aircraft. System analysis and engineering have determined that electrically-driven ECS can help to maintain the improved fuel efficiencies; and electronic controllers and induction motors are now being developed in a NASA/NPD SBIR Program to drive both types of ECS compressors. Previous variable-speed induction motor/controller system developments and publications have primarily focused on field-oriented control, with large transient reserve power, for maximum acceleration and optimum response in actuator and robotics systems. The application area addressed herein is characterized by slowly-changing inputs and outputs, small reserve power capability for acceleration, and optimization for maximum efficiency. This paper therefore focuses on the differences between this case and the optimum response case, and shows the development of this new motor/controller approach. It starts with the creation of a new set of controller requirements. In response to those requirements, new control algorithms are being developed and implemented in an embedded computer, which is integrated into the motor controller closed loop. Buffered logic outputs are used to drive the power switches in a resonant-technology, power processor/motor-controller, at switching/resonant frequencies high enough to support efficient high-frequency induction motor operation at speeds up to 50,000-RPA

  12. Age-related decline in cognitive control: the role of fluid intelligence and processing speed.

    PubMed

    Manard, Marine; Carabin, Delphine; Jaspar, Mathieu; Collette, Fabienne

    2014-01-08

    Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect on cognitive control efficiency is still unclear. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence and processing speed on the selective age-related decline in proactive control. Eighty young and 80 healthy older adults were included in this study. The participants were submitted to a working memory recognition paradigm, assessing proactive and reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. Repeated measures ANOVAs and hierarchical linear regressions indicated that the ability to appropriately use cognitive control processes during aging seems to be at least partially affected by the amount of available cognitive resources (assessed by fluid intelligence and processing speed abilities). This study highlights the potential role of cognitive resources on the selective age-related decline in proactive control, suggesting the importance of a more exhaustive approach considering the confounding variables during cognitive control assessment.

  13. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Jacopo; Osella, Matteo; Kennard, Andrew S.; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2017-03-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different models were used to propose specific mechanisms, but the links between them are poorly explored. The lack of comparative studies makes it difficult to appreciate how well any particular mechanism is supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with simple physical analogues. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or interdivision time), we show how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well as the constant added size mechanism recently found to capture several aspects of the cell division behavior of different bacteria. As we show by analytical estimates and numerical simulations, the available data are described precisely by the first-order approximation of this expansion, i.e., by a "linear response" regime for the correction of size fluctuations. Hence, a single dimensionless parameter defines the strength and action of the division control against cell-to-cell variability (quantified by a single "noise" parameter). However, the same strength of linear response may emerge from several mechanisms, which are distinguished only by higher-order terms in the perturbative expansion. Our analytical estimate of the sample size needed to distinguish between second-order effects shows that this value is close to but larger than the values of the current datasets. These results provide a unified framework for future studies and clarify the relevant parameters at play in the control of

  14. Estimation of Saxophone Control Parameters by Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-i; Smyth, Tamara; Lipton, Zachary C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an approach to jointly estimating the tone hole configuration (fingering) and reed model parameters of a saxophone is presented. The problem isn't one of merely estimating pitch as one applied fingering can be used to produce several different pitches by bugling or overblowing. Nor can a fingering be estimated solely by the spectral envelope of the produced sound (as it might for estimation of vocal tract shape in speech) since one fingering can produce markedly different spectral envelopes depending on the player's embouchure and control of the reed. The problem is therefore addressed by jointly estimating both the reed (source) parameters and the fingering (filter) of a saxophone model using convex optimization and 1) a bank of filter frequency responses derived from measurement of the saxophone configured with all possible fingerings and 2) sample recordings of notes produced using all possible fingerings, played with different overblowing, dynamics and timbre. The saxophone model couples one of several possible frequency response pairs (corresponding to the applied fingering), and a quasi-static reed model generating input pressure at the mouthpiece, with control parameters being blowing pressure and reed stiffness. Applied fingering and reed parameters are estimated for a given recording by formalizing a minimization problem, where the cost function is the error between the recording and the synthesized sound produced by the model having incremental parameter values for blowing pressure and reed stiffness. The minimization problem is nonlinear and not differentiable and is made solvable using convex optimization. The performance of the fingering identification is evaluated with better accuracy than previous reported value. PMID:27754493

  15. Constant speed control of four-stroke micro internal combustion swing engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dedong; Lei, Yong; Zhu, Honghai; Ni, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands on safety, emission and fuel consumption require more accurate control models of micro internal combustion swing engine (MICSE). The objective of this paper is to investigate the constant speed control models of four-stroke MICSE. The operation principle of the four-stroke MICSE is presented based on the description of MICSE prototype. A two-level Petri net based hybrid model is proposed to model the four-stroke MICSE engine cycle. The Petri net subsystem at the upper level controls and synchronizes the four Petri net subsystems at the lower level. The continuous sub-models, including breathing dynamics of intake manifold, thermodynamics of the chamber and dynamics of the torque generation, are investigated and integrated with the discrete model in MATLAB Simulink. Through the comparison of experimental data and simulated DC voltage output, it is demonstrated that the hybrid model is valid for the four-stroke MICSE system. A nonlinear model is obtained from the cycle average data via the regression method, and it is linearized around a given nominal equilibrium point for the controller design. The feedback controller of the spark timing and valve duration timing is designed with a sequential loop closing design approach. The simulation of the sequential loop closure control design applied to the hybrid model is implemented in MATLAB. The simulation results show that the system is able to reach its desired operating point within 0.2 s, and the designed controller shows good MICSE engine performance with a constant speed. This paper presents the constant speed control models of four-stroke MICSE and carries out the simulation tests, the models and the simulation results can be used for further study on the precision control of four-stroke MICSE.

  16. The development of a control system for a small high speed steam microturbine generator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, A.; Nichol, P.; Saunders, M.; Frisby, B.

    2015-08-01

    Steam is a widely used energy source. In many situations steam is generated at high pressures and then reduced in pressure through control valves before reaching point of use. An opportunity was identified to convert some of the energy at the point of pressure reduction into electricity. To take advantage of a market identified for small scale systems, a microturbine generator was designed based on a small high speed turbo machine. This machine was packaged with the necessary control valves and systems to allow connection of the machine to the grid. Traditional machines vary the speed of the generator to match the grid frequency. This was not possible due to the high speed of this machine. The characteristics of the rotating unit had to be understood to allow a control that allowed export of energy at the right frequency to the grid under the widest possible range of steam conditions. A further goal of the control system was to maximise the efficiency of generation under all conditions. A further complication was to provide adequate protection for the rotating unit in the event of the loss of connection to the grid. The system to meet these challenges is outlined with the solutions employed and tested for this application.

  17. SMA actuators for vibration control and experimental determination of model parameters dependent on ambient airflow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.

    2016-05-01

    This article demonstrates the practical applicability of a method of modelling shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators. For this study, a pair of SMA wires was installed in an antagonistic manner to form an actuator, and a linear differential equation that describes the behaviour of the actuator’s generated force relative to its input voltage was derived for the limited range below the austenite onset temperature. In this range, hysteresis need not be considered, and the proposed SMA actuator can therefore be practically applied in linear control systems, which is significant because large deformations accompanied by hysteresis do not necessarily occur in most vibration control cases. When specific values of the parameters used in the differential equation were identified experimentally, it became clear that one of the parameters was dependent on ambient airflow velocity. The values of this dependent parameter were obtained using an additional SMA wire as a sensor. In these experiments, while the airflow distribution around the SMA wires was varied by changing the rotational speed of the fans in the wind tunnels, an input voltage was conveyed to the SMA actuator circuit, and the generated force was measured. In this way, the parameter dependent on airflow velocity was estimated in real time, and it was validated that the calculated force was consistent with the measured one.

  18. Method and apparatus for selectively controlling the speed of an engine

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roy Inge

    2001-02-27

    A control assembly 12 for use within a vehicle 10 having an engine 14 and which selectively controls the speed of the engine 14 in order to increase fuel efficiency and to effect relatively smooth starting and stopping of the engine. Particularly, in one embodiment, control assembly 12 cooperatively operates with a starter/alternator assembly 20 and is adapted for use with hybrid vehicles employing a start/stop powertrain assembly, wherein fuel efficiency is increased by selectively stopping engine operation when the vehicle has stopped.

  19. Neural-network-based speed controller for induction motors using inverse dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Hassanein S.; Mohamed, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are excellent tools for controller design. ANNs have many advantages compared to traditional control methods. These advantages include simple architecture, training and generalization and distortion insensitivity to nonlinear approximations and nonexact input data. Induction motors have many excellent features, such as simple and rugged construction, high reliability, high robustness, low cost, minimum maintenance, high efficiency, and good self-starting capabilities. In this paper, we propose a neural-network-based inverse model for speed controllers for induction motors. Simulation results show that the ANNs have a high tracing capability.

  20. Flow speed within the Antarctic ice sheet and its controls inferred from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthern, Robert J.; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Williams, C. Rosie

    2015-07-01

    Accurate dynamical models of the Antarctic ice sheet with carefully specified initial conditions and well-calibrated rheological parameters are needed to forecast global sea level. By adapting an inverse method previously used in electric impedance tomography, we infer present-day flow speeds within the ice sheet. This inversion uses satellite observations of surface velocity, snow accumulation rate, and rate of change of surface elevation to estimate the basal drag coefficient and an ice stiffness parameter that influences viscosity. We represent interior ice motion using a vertically integrated approximation to incompressible Stokes flow. This model represents vertical shearing within the ice and membrane stresses caused by horizontal stretching and shearing. Combining observations and model, we recover marked geographical variations in the basal drag coefficient. Relative changes in basal shear stress are smaller. No simple sliding law adequately represents basal shear stress as a function of sliding speed. Low basal shear stress predominates in central East Antarctica, where thick insulating ice allows liquid water at the base to lubricate sliding. Higher shear stress occurs in coastal East Antarctica, where a frozen bed is more likely. Examining Thwaites glacier in more detail shows that the slowest sliding often coincides with elevated basal topography. Differences between our results and a similar adjoint-based inversion suggest that inversion or regularization methods can influence recovered parameters for slow sliding and finer scales; on broader scales we recover a similar pattern of low basal drag underneath major ice streams and extensive regions in East Antarctica that move by basal sliding.

  1. Computing an operating parameter of a unified power flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G; Robinett, III, Rush D

    2015-01-06

    A Unified Power Flow Controller described herein comprises a sensor that outputs at least one sensed condition, a processor that receives the at least one sensed condition, a memory that comprises control logic that is executable by the processor; and power electronics that comprise power storage, wherein the processor causes the power electronics to selectively cause the power storage to act as one of a power generator or a load based at least in part upon the at least one sensed condition output by the sensor and the control logic, and wherein at least one operating parameter of the power electronics is designed to facilitate maximal transmittal of electrical power generated at a variable power generation system to a grid system while meeting power constraints set forth by the electrical power grid.

  2. A flexible active and reactive power control strategy for a variable speed constant frequency generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Xu, L.

    1995-07-01

    Variable-speed constant-frequency generating systems are used in wind power, hydro power, aerospace, and naval power generations to enhance efficiency and reduce friction. In these applications, an attractive candidate is the slip power recovery system comprising of doubly excited induction machine or doubly excited brushless reluctance machine and PWM converters with a dc link. In this paper, a flexible active and reactive power control strategy is developed, such that the optimal torque-speed profile of the turbine can be followed and overall reactive power can be controlled, while the machine copper losses have been minimized. At the same time, harmonics injected into the power network has also been minimized. In this manner, the system can function as both a high-efficient power generator and a flexible reactive power compensator.

  3. High-speed atomic force microscopy and peak force tapping control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuiqing; Mininni, Lars; Hu, Yan; Erina, Natalia; Kindt, Johannes; Su, Chanmin

    2012-03-01

    ITRS Roadmap requires defect size measurement below 10 nanometers and challenging classifications for both blank and patterned wafers and masks. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of providing metrology measurement in 3D at sub-nanometer accuracy but has long suffered from drawbacks in throughput and limitation of slow topography imaging without chemical information. This presentation focus on two disruptive technology developments, namely high speed AFM and quantitative nanomechanical mapping, which enables high throughput measurement with capability of identifying components through concurrent physical property imaging. The high speed AFM technology has allowed the imaging speed increase by 10-100 times without loss of the data quality. Such improvement enables the speed of defect review on a wafer to increase from a few defects per hour to nearly 100 defects an hour, approaching the requirements of ITRS Roadmap. Another technology development, Peak Force Tapping, substantially simplified the close loop system response, leading to self-optimization of most challenging samples groups to generate expert quality data. More importantly, AFM also simultaneously provides a series of mechanical property maps with a nanometer spatial resolution during defect review. These nanomechanical maps (including elastic modulus, hardness, and surface adhesion) provide complementary information for elemental analysis, differentiate defect materials by their physical properties, and assist defect classification beyond topographic measurements. This paper will explain the key enabling technologies, namely high speed tip-scanning AFM using innovative flexure design and control algorithm. Another critical element is AFM control using Peak Force Tapping, in which the instantaneous tip-sample interaction force is measured and used to derive a full suite of physical properties at each imaging pixel. We will provide examples of defect review data on different wafers and media disks

  4. How do treadmill speed and terrain visibility influence neuromuscular control of guinea fowl locomotion?

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Joanne C.; Rankin, Jeffery W.; Daley, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Locomotor control mechanisms must flexibly adapt to both anticipated and unexpected terrain changes to maintain movement and avoid a fall. Recent studies revealed that ground birds alter movement in advance of overground obstacles, but not treadmill obstacles, suggesting context-dependent shifts in the use of anticipatory control. We hypothesized that differences between overground and treadmill obstacle negotiation relate to differences in visual sensory information, which influence the ability to execute anticipatory manoeuvres. We explored two possible explanations: (1) previous treadmill obstacles may have been visually imperceptible, as they were low contrast to the tread, and (2) treadmill obstacles are visible for a shorter time compared with runway obstacles, limiting time available for visuomotor adjustments. To investigate these factors, we measured electromyographic activity in eight hindlimb muscles of the guinea fowl (Numida meleagris, N=6) during treadmill locomotion at two speeds (0.7 and 1.3 m s−1) and three terrain conditions at each speed: (i) level, (ii) repeated 5 cm low-contrast obstacles (<10% contrast, black/black), and (iii) repeated 5 cm high-contrast obstacles (>90% contrast, black/white). We hypothesized that anticipatory changes in muscle activity would be higher for (1) high-contrast obstacles and (2) the slower treadmill speed, when obstacle viewing time is longer. We found that treadmill speed significantly influenced obstacle negotiation strategy, but obstacle contrast did not. At the slower speed, we observed earlier and larger anticipatory increases in muscle activity and shifts in kinematic timing. We discuss possible visuomotor explanations for the observed context-dependent use of anticipatory strategies. PMID:26254324

  5. Macroscopic control parameter for avalanche models for bursty transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Rowlands, G.; Watkins, N. W.

    2009-01-15

    Similarity analysis is used to identify the control parameter R{sub A} for the subset of avalanching systems that can exhibit self-organized criticality (SOC). This parameter expresses the ratio of driving to dissipation. The transition to SOC, when the number of excited degrees of freedom is maximal, is found to occur when R{sub A}{yields}0. This is in the opposite sense to (Kolmogorov) turbulence, thus identifying a deep distinction between turbulence and SOC and suggesting an observable property that could distinguish them. A corollary of this similarity analysis is that SOC phenomenology, that is, power law scaling of avalanches, can persist for finite R{sub A} with the same R{sub A}{yields}0 exponent if the system supports a sufficiently large range of lengthscales, necessary for SOC to be a candidate for physical (R{sub A} finite) systems.

  6. Mechanisms for Control of Boundary-Layer Turbulence Across the Speed Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Boundary - Layer Turbulence across the Speed Regimes AFOSR GRANT FA9550-08-1-0093 SECTION 1 Summary Information R. Bowersox...knowledge to demonstrate localized control of boundary layer turbulence using small, O(1/10th) of the boundary layer thickness, surface elements. The...number boundary layer . This goal was accomplished. Through our simulations, we predicted a peak reduction of 20%. Experimentally , we observed 25%

  7. Active Flow Control for High-Speed Weapon Release from a Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    and supersonic microjets . Each of these control devices offers unique attributes for high-speed weapon release and was the subject of considerable...successfully used in a variety of tests for noise suppression of free and impinging jets and for weapons bay acoustic suppression at transonic...final HIFEX actuator is the supersonic microjet , a device developed at Florida A&M/Florida State University and described by [3]. Small (0.016-inch

  8. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"—the time derivative of the driving field phase—matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient.

  9. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"-the time derivative of the driving field phase-matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient.

  10. A Novel Micro-cantilever Based Angular Speed Sensor Controlled Piezoelectrically and Tuned by Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah-Mohammadi-Azar, A.; Shabani, R.; Rezazadeh, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a novel sensor is proposed to measure rotational shafts speed. The sensor is composed of a micro-cantilever, with a piezoelectric actuator layer on the upper surface and a sensor layer on the lower surface. The sensor is attached to the shaft while the deflection of the micro-cantilever, due to centrifugal force of the rotating shaft, is actively controlled. Therefore the sensor deflection is suppressed and the controller output or the piezoelectric actuating voltage is employed to measure the angular speed of the shaft (Force balance technique). The micro-cantilever is symmetrically located between two electrodes giving it a wider operating range and also increasing its sensitivity. Imposing different electrostatic bias voltages alters the equivalent stiffness of the structure and consequently affects the micro-beam deflections and the controller outputs. Simulation results reveal that for lower velocities the resolution increases by increasing the bias voltages. It is shown that decreasing the micro-beam length increases the measurable velocity range and conversely decreasing the electrodes gap decreases the maximum measurable speed.

  11. Stingray: high-speed control of small UGVs in urban terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Brian; Massey, Kent

    2009-05-01

    For the TARDEC-funded Stingray Project, iRobot Corporation and Chatten Associates are developing technologies that will allow small UGVs to operate at tactically useful speeds. In previous work, we integrated a Chatten Head-Aimed Remote Viewer (HARV) with an iRobot Warrior UGV, and used the HARV to drive the Warrior, as well as a small, high-speed, gas-powered UGV surrogate. In this paper, we describe our continuing work implementing semiautonomous driver-assist behaviors to help an operator control a small UGV at high speeds. We have implemented an IMU-based heading control behavior that enables tracked vehicles to maintain accurate heading control even over rough terrain. We are also developing a low-latency, low-bandwidth, high-quality digital video protocol to support immersive visual telepresence. Our experiments show that a video compression codec using the H.264 algorithm can produce several times better resolution than a Motion JPEG video stream, while utilizing the same limited bandwidth, and the same low latency. With further enhancements, our H.264 codec will provide an order of magnitude greater quality, while retaining a low latency comparable to Motion JPEG, and operating within the same bandwidth.

  12. Application of Fuzzy-Logic Controller and Neural Networks Controller in Gas Turbine Speed Control and Overheating Control and Surge Control on Transient Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torghabeh, A. A.; Tousi, A. M.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents Fuzzy Logic and Neural Networks approach to Gas Turbine Fuel schedules. Modeling of non-linear system using feed forward artificial Neural Networks using data generated by a simulated gas turbine program is introduced. Two artificial Neural Networks are used , depicting the non-linear relationship between gas generator speed and fuel flow, and turbine inlet temperature and fuel flow respectively . Off-line fast simulations are used for engine controller design for turbojet engine based on repeated simulation. The Mamdani and Sugeno models are used to expression the Fuzzy system . The linguistic Fuzzy rules and membership functions are presents and a Fuzzy controller will be proposed to provide an Open-Loop control for the gas turbine engine during acceleration and deceleration . MATLAB Simulink was used to apply the Fuzzy Logic and Neural Networks analysis. Both systems were able to approximate functions characterizing the acceleration and deceleration schedules . Surge and Flame-out avoidance during acceleration and deceleration phases are then checked . Turbine Inlet Temperature also checked and controls by Neural Networks controller. This Fuzzy Logic and Neural Network Controllers output results are validated and evaluated by GSP software . The validation results are used to evaluate the generalization ability of these artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic controllers.

  13. Study on the stability of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W. C.; Yang, J. D.; Chen, J. P.; Teng, Y.

    2014-03-01

    According to the fact that the effects of penstock, unit and governor on stability of water level fluctuation for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber are neglected in previous researches, in this paper, Thoma assumption is broken through, the complete mathematical model of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber is established, and the comprehensive transfer function and linear homogeneous differential equation that characterize the dynamic characteristics of system are derived. The stability domain that characterizes the good or bad of stability quantitatively is drawn by using the stability conditions. The effects of the fluid inertia in water diversion system, the air cushion surge chamber parameters, hydraulic turbine characteristics, generator characteristics, and regulation modes of governor on the stability of waterpower-speed control system are analyzed through stability domain. The main conclusions are as follows: The fluid inertia in water diversion system and hydraulic turbine characteristics have unfavorable effects on the system while generator characteristics have favorable effect. The stability keeps getting better with the increase of chamber height and basal area and the decrease of air pressure and air polytropic exponent. The stability of power regulation mode is obviously better than that of frequency regulation mode.

  14. Investigation of critical parameters controlling the efficiency of associative ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Padellec, A.; Launoy, T.; Dochain, A.; Urbain, X.

    2017-05-01

    This paper compiles our merged-beam experimental findings for the associative ionization (AI) process from charged reactants, with the aim of guiding future investigations with e.g. the double electrostatic ion storage ring DESIREE in Stockholm. A reinvestigation of the isotopic effect in H-(D-) + He+ collisions is presented, along with a review of {{{H}}}3+ and NO+ production by AI involving ion pairs or excited neutrals, and put in perspective with the mutual neutralization and radiative association reactions. Critical parameters are identified and evaluated for their systematic role in controlling the magnitude of the cross section: isotopic substitution, exothermicity, electronic state density, and spin statistics.

  15. A single session of open kinetic chain movements emphasizing speed improves speed of movement and modifies postural control in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gray, Vicki L; Ivanova, Tanya D; Garland, S Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been given to training speed of movement, even though functional activities require quick submaximal contractions. Closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercises are considered more functional; however, the best method for training speed is not known. A single bout of open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises emphasizing speed was performed to determine whether movement velocity and muscle activation would improve in a single session and whether the improvements transfer to a physiological balance task. Eleven participants <1 year post-stroke performed an arm raise task before and after a single session of fast OKC exercises. Surface electromyography (EMG) from soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior (TA), biceps femoris (BF) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, peak velocity and average power were recorded during the OKC exercises. EMG from SOL, TA, BF and RF and center of pressure (COP) velocity were measured during arm raise task. At the end of the OKC exercises, velocity, power and TA, BF and RF EMG area increased. The arm acceleration and BF EMG area increased significantly during the arm raise. The improvements observed at the end of the OKC exercises transferred to the arm raise task. The improvements in balance were comparable to those previously seen after CKC exercises.

  16. Measuring of high current channel parameters in high pressure gas by combined using of magnetic probe and high speed streak photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomaz, A. A.; Pinchuk, M. E.; Budin, A. V.; Leks, A. G.; Leont'ev, V. V.; Pozubenkov, A. A.; Kurakina, N. K.

    2016-11-01

    Experimental results for discharge in hydrogen with current amplitude up to 1 MA, current rise rate of ∼ 1010 A/s, and at initial pressure up to 30 MPa are presented. A series of channel contractions was observed at a current rise stage. Estimation of plasma channel parameters was made for equilibrium state at the channel diameter oscillations. The speed of the discharge channel contraction was determined by the specially developed magnetic- probe technique. Comparison of these magnetic probe measurements with high-speed optical photostreaks was carried out.

  17. Transient and steady state performance analysis of power flow control in a DFIG variable speed wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwosu, Cajethan M.; Oti, Stephen E.; Ogbuka, Cosmas U.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents transient and steady state performance analysis of power flow control in a 5.0 kW Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) Variable Speed Wind Turbine (VSWT) under sub synchronous speed, super synchronous speed and synchronous speed modes of operation. Stator flux orientation is used for the control of the rotor-side converter (RSC) and DFIG whereas the grid (or stator) voltage orientation is the preferred choice for the control of the grid-side converter (GSC). In each of the three speeds modes, power is always supplied to the grid through the stator of the DFIG. The magnitude of net power (stator power plus rotor power) is less than stator power during the sub synchronous speed mode; it is greater than stator power during the super synchronous speed mode while it is equal to the stator power during the synchronous speed mode. In synchronous speed mode, the rotor power is zero indicating that power is neither supplied to the grid from the rotor nor supplied to the rotor from the grid; here the magnitude of net power is equal to stator power. The simulation results thus obtained in a MATLAB/SIMULINK environment laid credence to the controllability of power flow reversal in a DFIG-VSWT through back-to-back power electronic converter.

  18. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters.

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  19. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator with Controllable Pulse Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10–310 μs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1–56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation by up to 82% and 57%, and decreases coil heating by up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3,000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications, and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency. PMID:21540487

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.