Science.gov

Sample records for spent treated wood

  1. Spent CCA treated wood from residential decks can be a resource for reuse and recycling

    Treesearch

    Robert L Smith; Philip A. Araman; David Bailey; Matthew F. Winn

    2005-01-01

    The volume of CCA treated wood being disposed of in landfills is growing at an alarming rate. In order to reduce the demand on landfills and timber harvest, more environmentally responsible alternatives for spent CCA treated wood have to be addressed. The objective of this study was to determine feasible products that can be produced from CCA treated wood....

  2. Method to recover and reuse chromated copper arsenate wood preservative from spent treated wood

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi, Feroz Kabir M.; Cooper, Paul A. . E-mail: p.cooper@utoronto.ca

    2006-07-01

    The volume of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood products coming out of service is expected to increase dramatically during the next decade. There is a need for an alternative waste management approach to landfilling. This paper investigates the variables affecting extraction of CCA components from wood particles and the potential to oxidize and reuse the recovered chemicals. Most of the CCA components could be extracted by 10% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 50 deg. C in 6 h with an average extraction efficiency of 95% for Cr, 94% for Cu and 98% for As. The extract containing Cr{sup III}, Cu{sup II} and As{sup V} could be oxidized in several stages by aqueous 2.5% w/w H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in less than 2 h to a condition where it was compatible with CCA treating solutions and could be reused for treating new wood. When the recovered extract was mixed with fresh CCA solution in different ratios, the mixed CCA-C solutions had similar solution stability as freshly prepared CCA-C solution and treated wood had similar leaching properties as wood treated with fresh solution.

  3. Method to recover and reuse chromated copper arsenate wood preservative from spent treated wood.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Feroz Kabir M; Cooper, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    The volume of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood products coming out of service is expected to increase dramatically during the next decade. There is a need for an alternative waste management approach to landfilling. This paper investigates the variables affecting extraction of CCA components from wood particles and the potential to oxidize and reuse the recovered chemicals. Most of the CCA components could be extracted by 10% H2O2 at 50 degrees C in 6 h with an average extraction efficiency of 95% for Cr, 94% for Cu and 98% for As. The extract containing Cr(III), Cu(II) and As(V) could be oxidized in several stages by aqueous 2.5% w/w H2O2 in less than 2 h to a condition where it was compatible with CCA treating solutions and could be reused for treating new wood. When the recovered extract was mixed with fresh CCA solution in different ratios, the mixed CCA-C solutions had similar solution stability as freshly prepared CCA-C solution and treated wood had similar leaching properties as wood treated with fresh solution.

  4. Mechanical and chemical properties of CCA-treated lumber removed from spent residential decks

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Smith; David Bailey; Philip A. Araman

    2007-01-01

    The amount of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)- treated wood being removed from spent residential decks is increasing at a tremendous rate. While most spent CCA-treated wood is being disposed in landfills, further useful and environmentally beneficial alternatives have to be met. If the volume of CCA-treated wood reaching landfills continues to rise, stricter disposal...

  5. The reuse of treated wood

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Smith; David Bailey; Delton R. Alderman; Philip A. Araman

    2006-01-01

    The primary goals of this book chapter are to identify barriers to the reuse of treated lumber, to describe the physical properties of spent chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated lumber coming from residential decks and to identify potential products and markets that can use spent treated lumber. The primary focus will be on CCA-treated lumber because it has been the...

  6. Bond quality of phenol-based adhesives containing liquefied creosote-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2009-01-01

    Liquefaction of spent creosote-treated wood was studied to determine the technological practicability of its application in converting treated wood waste into resin adhesives. A total of 144 plywood panels were fabricated with experimental variables included 2 phenol to wood (P/W) ratios in liquefaction, 6 resin formulations (3 formaldehyde/liquefied wood (F/...

  7. Fungicidal value of wood tar from pyrolysis of treated wood.

    PubMed

    Mazela, Bartłomiej

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the paper was to estimate the fungicidal value of wood tar extracted as a product of pyrolysis of wood previously treated with either creosote oil or CCB-type salt preservative. The effectiveness of wood treated with one of these two wood tar residuals was compared to the effectiveness of wood treated with virgin creosote oil (type WEI-B) and an untreated control. Wood was impregnated with alcohol solutions of the two extracted preservatives or virgin creosote oil and then subjected to the Coniophora puteana, Poria placenta and Coriolus versicolor fungi. The fungicidal values of the investigated preservatives were determined with the use of the short agar-block method and the aging test according to the standard EN 84. It was found that wood tar extracted by pyrolysis of old creosote-treated wood and then used to treat wood may have potential as a preservative for wood protection or as a component of preservatives.

  8. Bioprocessing preservative-treated waste wood

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang; Les. Ferge

    2000-01-01

    Disposal of preservative-treated waste wood is a growing problem worldwide. Bioprocessing the treated wood offers one approach to waste management under certain conditions. One goal is to use wood decay fungi to reduce the volume of waste with an easily managed system in a cost-effective manner. Wood decay fungi were obtained from culture collections in the Mycology...

  9. Research update for the treated wood reusing program at the Calhoun Research Station

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Leslie Groom; W. Allen Nipper

    2009-01-01

    The reusability of decommissioned treated wood is primarily dependent on residual preservative retention and residual strength of the wood after service. Therefore, determining the residual preservative retention, bonding performance, and residual strength of spent treated wood can provide vital information to further recycling efforts. This report summarizes the...

  10. Reusing remediated CCA-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2003-01-01

    Options for recycling and reusing chromated-copper-arsenate- (CCA) treated material include dimensional lumber and round wood size reduction, composites, and remediation. Size reduction by remilling, shaving, or resawing CCA-treated wood reduces the volume of landfilled waste material and provides many options for reusing used treated wood. Manufacturing composite...

  11. Bioremediation of treated wood with fungi

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2006-01-01

    The authors have developed technologies for fungal bioremediation of waste wood treated with oilborne or metal-based preservatives. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood-decay fungi, obtained through strain selection to obtain preservative-tolerant fungi. This waste management approach provides a product with reduced wood volume and the...

  12. Recycling of treated wood poles

    SciTech Connect

    Fansham, P.

    1995-11-01

    There are approximately 150 million utilities poles in service in North America. Of the 3 million poles removed from service each year, many poles still contain a sound and structurally intact core and only the outer layer has deteriorated. Since most of the old poles are treated with either pentachlorophenol or creosote there are limited disposal options available to pole users. The practice of giving old poles away to farmers or other interested parties in falling into disfavour since this practice does not absolve the utility of the environmental liability associated with the treated wood. TWT has commercialised a thermolysis (Pyrolysis) based process capable of removing oil based preservatives from treated wood. The patented process involves: the shaving of the weathered pole exterior; the rapid distillation of oil based preservatives in an oxygen depleted environment; condensation of the vapours; and separation of liquids. TWT has constructed a 30,000 pole per year facility east of Calgary and has provided recycled poles for the construction of two power lines now in use by TransAlta Utilities Corporation, Canada`s largest investor owned electric utility. TWT has tested two thermolysis (Pyrolysis) technologies and has determined that contact thermolysis using a heated auger design performed better and with less plugging than a fast fluid bed reactor. The fluid bed reactor is prone to coke formation and contamination of the oil by fine char particles. Residual PCP concentration in the shavings was reduced from 9500 ppm to 10 ppm. Leachate testing on the char yielded a PCP concentration of 1.43 ppm in the Leachate, well below the EPA standard maximum of 100 ppm.

  13. Corrosion of Fasteners in Wood Treated with Newer Wood Preservatives

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This document compiles recent research findings related to corrosion of metals in preservative treated wood into a single report on corrosion of metals in wood. The research was conducted as part of the Research, Technology and Education portion of the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation (NHCBP) Program administered by the Federal Highway Administration. The...

  14. Cleaning Up Contaminated Wood-Treating Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    treating sites throughout the United States. OTA found that there are many Superfund wood-treatment sites located in this country that are very...hazardous waste cleanup at wood- pany Superfund site, in Texarkana, Texas. The treating sites throughout the country. OTA has 25-acre site, a former...could be applied to mental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund site other sites in the future. OTA has not recom- in 1986 (27). Wood products had been

  15. Bioremediation of treated wood with bacteria

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews prior research in the field of bacterial bioremediation for wood treated with oilborne and inorganic preservatives. Current state of the art is summarized along with potential benefits and pitfalls of a pilot-scale bioremediation process for CCA-treated waste wood.

  16. Use of treated woods in roof assembly.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    On February 12, 2002, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a voluntary decision by industry to move consumer use of treated lumber products away from a variety of pressure-treated wood that contains Arsenate (As) by December 31, 2003, in favor of new alternative wood preservatives. It is the purpose of this report to outline legislative efforts to ban the use of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood for residential roofing in the State of Oregon. At the time that the legislation was introduced, it was coincidental that the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) recommended that CCA-treated wood should not be used in residential roofing. A summary of the report is included in this review. Finally, we discuss some of the potentially harmful environmental hazards of wood preservatives on the environment. In addition to the toxicity of pressure-treated wood on our environment, we point out that wood as well as pressure-treated wood assemblies are highly flammable. Consequently, we recommend the use of residential roofing systems that have Class A fire protection for the homeowner. Because residential roof fires remain a life-threatening danger to residential homeowners in the United States, we describe a national fire prevention program for reducing residential roof fires by use of an Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) and National Fire Protection Association Class A fire-rated roof system.

  17. Finishability of CCA pressure-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Alan Ross; Richard Carlson; William Feist; Steven Bussjaeger

    2000-01-01

    Thus, a need arose for the development of surface finishes for CCA-treated wood that could address the special requirements of this substrate and provide protection against the ravages of water, sunlight, mildew, and other aspects of weathering and wear. Initially, this need was not addressed, most wood preserving companies had little expertise in surface finishes and...

  18. Leaching behaviour of wood treated with creosote.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Matuschek, G; Lenoir, D; Kettrup, A

    2001-01-01

    The results of a laboratory investigation on the leaching behaviour of wood treated with creosote and of untreated wood are reported. A special leaching test derived from the German standard method DEV S4 test (DIN 38414) has been developed. Samples were leached in deionized water, in a solution buffered at pH 4.7 and in a solution of humic substances. The organic fraction of the leachate was extracted using liquid-liquid extraction. The extracts were analysed qualitatively with GC/MSD and quantified with GC/FID. The results were compared with those of Soxhlet-extracts from creosote-treated wood.

  19. Pesticides released from burning treated wood

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon; H.B. Clements; P.B. Bush; D.G. Neary; J.W. Taylor

    1985-01-01

    Abstract. Demands for firewood are high and rising, and pesticide-treated trees are often an obvious source. Wood treated with five herbicides (2,4-D, picloram, hexazinone, dicamba, and dichloroprop) and two insecticides (lindane and chlorpyrifos) were burned under controlled combustion conditions in a horizontal tube furnace to simulate the wide...

  20. Liquefaction of CCA-treated wood and elimination of metals from the solvent by precipitation

    Treesearch

    Lianzhen Lin; Chung-Yun Hse

    2005-01-01

    Spent chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was liquefied in polyethylene glycol 400/glycerin (2:1 w/w). Sulfuric acid (95-98%) and ferrous salts (FeSO4•7H2O or FeCl2•4H2O) were used as catalysts and additives, respectively. The resulting liquefied CCA-treated wood was...

  1. Electrochemical corrosion testing of fasteners in extracts of treated wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone

    2008-01-01

    A recent change in wood preservatives has highlighted the need for a rapid, quantitative test to measure the corrosion rates of metals in contact with treated wood that could be used to evaluate new fasteners or new wood preservatives. A new method was developed where polarisation resistance tests were conducted on fasteners exposed to a water extract of wood treated...

  2. PRESERVATIVE LEACHING FROM WEATHERED CCA-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of discarded CCA-treated wood in landfills raises concerns with respect to leaching of preservative compounds. When unweathered CCA-treated wood is leached using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), arsenic concentrations exceed the toxicity characteris...

  3. Poisoned Playgrounds: Arsenic in "Pressure-Treated" Wood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Renee; Walker, Bill

    This study of 180 pressure-treated wood samples shows that treated wood is a much greater source of arsenic exposure for children than arsenic-contaminated drinking water. The report determines that an average 5-year-old, playing less than 2 weeks on a chromated-copper-arsenate-treated (CCA) wood play set would exceed the lifetime cancer risk…

  4. Extraction of chromium, copper, and arsenic from CCA-treated wood by using wood vinegar.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Ahn, Byoung Jun; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, wood vinegar was used to extract chromium, copper, and arsenic from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. The extraction efficiency for CCA elements was evaluated using various concentrations of wood vinegar, extraction temperatures, and extraction periods. The extraction efficiency for CCA elements increased with increasing the concentration of wood vinegar and the extraction conditions, resulting in maximal removal rate of copper (95.7%), followed by arsenic (92.7%) and chromium (86.3%). Since wood vinegar afforded high levels of copper extraction, its use was extended to copper-based preservative-treated wood, wherein significant extraction of copper up to 97.6% and 95.7% was obtained from alkaline copper quats (ACQ)- and copper azole (CuAz)-treated sawdust, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the application of wood vinegar for the extraction of metal elements from CCA-treated wood.

  5. Integrated system for treating soil contaminated with wood treating wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Acheson, C.M.; Brenner, R.C.; Khodadoust, A.P.

    1995-10-01

    Approximately 20% of the hazardous waste sites undergoing bioremediation are contaminated with wood treating wastes, primarily compounds such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), creosote, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other hydrocarbons. A process that combines soil washing with sequential anaerobic and aerobic biotreatment is being integrated to remediate soil contaminated with these wood treating wastes. By extracting the target compound from the soil, soil washing facilitates degradation by mobilizing the target compound and expanding the range of feasible remediation technologies. Additional flexibility is possible since soil washing can be conducted in an in-situ or ex-situ format. In this process, the wash solution is initially bioremediated in an anaerobic environment. Mineralization of the target compound is completed aerobically. Based on preliminary results, the integrated process could meet the target cleanup level for PCP in approximately 45% of the bioremediation sites. Process development began by independently evaluating soil washing and target compound degradation. PCP contaminated soils were the initial focus, but this work is currently being extended to include soils contaminated with both PCP and PAHs. In addition, based on promising results from the soil washing and degradation evaluations, these individual unit operations are being integrated to form a complete process to remediate soils contaminated with wood treating wastes. This complete process incorporates soil washing, soil wash solution recycling, and biodegradation of the target compounds and is outlined.

  6. The challenge of bonding treated wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    Wood products are quite durable if exposure to moisture is minimized; however, most uses of wood involve considerable exposure to moisture. To preserve the wood, chemicals are used to minimize moisture pickup, to prevent insect attack, and/or to resist microbial growth. The chemicals used as preservatives can interfere with adhesive bonds to wood. Given the many...

  7. Properties of particleboard made from recycled CCA-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; S. Nami. Kartal; James. Muehl

    2000-01-01

    Recovery of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood for reuse has been the focus of several international research groups due to the imminent disposal problem created when large quantities of CCA-treated wood ultimately come out of service. Bioleaching with Bacillus licheniformis CC01 and oxalic acid extraction are two methods known to remove significant...

  8. Variability in evaluating environmental impacts of treated wood.

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Paul Cooper; Patricia K. Lebow

    2004-01-01

    Preservative-treated wood contains components that may be toxic to non-target organisms if released into the environment in sufficient quantities. Numerous studies have been conducted to determine the rate of preservative release from treated wood and/or the extent of their subsequent accumulation in the environment. These studies have produced a wide range of results...

  9. Variability in evaluating environmental impacts of treated wood.

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Paul Cooper; Patricia. Lebow

    2004-01-01

    Preservative treated wood contains components that may be toxic to non-target organisms if released into the environment in sufficient quantities. Numerous studies have been conducted to determine the rate of preservative release from treated wood and/or the extent of their subsequent accumulation in the environment. These studies have produced a wide range of results...

  10. LEACHING OF CCA-TREATED WOOD: IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity character...

  11. Scaled-up remediation of CCA-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; William R. Kenealy

    2004-01-01

    Bioremediation is a novel approach to recycling waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA). Remediating CCA-treated waste wood diverts this fiber source from our landfills and provides tangible secondary products from the cleaned fiber. On a laboratory scale, this method, which utilizes oxalic acid extraction and bioleaching with a metal- tolerant...

  12. LEACHING OF CCA-TREATED WOOD: IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity character...

  13. Recycling of decommissioned CCA-treated wood into value-added enigineered wood products

    Treesearch

    Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2003-01-01

    Chromatcd copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has been most widely used in North America since the 1970's for many exterior application such as decks, fences, playground equipment, utility poles, and others. A large volume of CCA-treated wood is currently coming out of service. Traditional disposal methods such as landfilling and incineration are not without...

  14. Outdoor weathering of sol-gel-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Mandla A Tshabalala; Ryan Libert; Nancy Ross Sutherland

    2009-01-01

    Outdoor weathering of wood specimens treated with sol-gel formulations based on methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS), hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMOS), and ferric-zirconia-titania (Fe-Zr-Ti) sol was evaluated. The sol-gel process allowed deposition of a thin film of hybrid inorganic-organic networks (gel) in the wood cell wall that resulted in improved outdoor weathering...

  15. Creosote movement from treated wood immersed in fresh water

    Treesearch

    Sung-Mo Kang; Jeffrey J. Morrell; John Simonsen; Stan Lebow

    2005-01-01

    Creosote has a long history of successful use as a wood preservative, but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in this preservative have raised environmental concerns, particularly when creosote-treated wood is used in aquatic environments. A number of models have been developed to predict the risk of creosote use in aquatic environments, but one limitation of these models...

  16. Marine exposure of preservative-treated small wood panels

    Treesearch

    B. R. Johnson; D. I. Gutzmer

    1984-01-01

    Small wood panels treated with many different chemicals have been exposed to limnorian and teredine marine borers in the sea at Key West, Florida. These preservatives and treatments include creosotes with and without modification, waterborne salts, salt-creosote dual treatments, chemical modifications of wood, and modified polymers. In spite of the accelerated nature...

  17. Factors affecting sodium hypochlorite extraction of CCA from treated wood.

    PubMed

    Gezer, E D; Cooper, P A

    2009-12-01

    Significant amounts of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood products, such as utility poles and residential construction wood, remain in service. There is increasing public concern about environmental contamination from CCA-treated wood when it is removed from service for reuse or recycling, placed in landfills or burned in commercial incinerators. In this paper, we investigated the effects of time, temperature and sodium hypochlorite concentration on chromium oxidation and extraction of chromated copper arsenate from CCA-treated wood (Type C) removed from service. Of the conditions evaluated, reaction of milled wood with sodium hypochlorite for one hour at room temperature followed by heating at 75 degrees C for two hours gave the highest extraction efficiency. An average of 95% Cr, 99% Cu and 96% As could be removed from CCA-treated, milled wood by this process. Most of the extracted chromium was oxidized to the hexavalent state and could therefore be recycled in a CCA treating solution. Sodium hypochlorite extracting solutions could be reused several times to extract CCA components from additional treated wood samples.

  18. Evaluating spent CCA residential decks for second-life products

    Treesearch

    Robert Smith; David Bailey; Phil Araman

    2003-01-01

    The amount of CCA treated wood being removed from spent residential decks is increasing at a tremendous rate. While most spent CCA treated wood is being disposed in landfills, further useful and environmentally beneficial alternatives have to be met. This research estimated the percentage of recoverable lumber from spent CCA decks that can be recycled into other usable...

  19. Mechanism of corrosion in treated wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, Samuel L.

    2009-12-01

    The voluntary withdrawal of chromated copper arsenate for use in residential construction (December 31, 2003) has led to increased use of newer wood preservatives such as alkaline copper quaternary, copper azole, and micronized copper systems. One difficulty in designing for corrosion performance with new preservative systems is the amount of time it takes to obtain results, previous exposure tests have taken up to 20 years. Standardized methods for measuring corrosion in wood use high temperature, high humidity environments and it is unclear how to extrapolate these corrosion rates to realistic conditions. This dissertation explores the mechanism of corrosion of metals in contact with wood and discusses the practical implications of these results for developing a rapid test method. Specifically, this dissertation presents a rapid test method developed by the author with correlation to long-term exposure tests for certain combinations of metals and preservatives. The new method was evaluated for steel and galvanized steel on six different wood treatments. The data suggest that the corrosion mechanism involves the reduction of cupric ions from the preservative and that the migration of the cupric ions through wood is not the rate determining step.

  20. Management practices for used treated wood. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K.V.

    1995-06-01

    Pentachlorophenol, creosote, and other chemicals are used to preserve poles, crossarms, and railroad ties for the electric, telecommunications, and railroad industries. Each year, millions of pieces of treated wood are retired. This report provides information on current and potential options for management of used treated wood. Researchers conducted a literature search to acquire information on preservatives and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure data. They conducted a telephone survey of selected state agencies, landfill and incinerator/cogeneration operations, and utilities to obtain information on costs, availability of landfill disposal options, and restrictions associated with land disposal of treated wood. Simulations to evaluate the effects of landfill disposal on groundwater using EPRI`s MYGRT{trademark} analytical transport model were conducted. Current utility and railroad industry management practices for treated wood include primary reuse, disposal in nonhazardous landfills, and cogeneration. The most likely future options are increased cogeneration, with continued reuse and disposal in landfills.

  1. Exposure test of fasteners in preservative-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2006-01-01

    This study examined nails and screws exposed to ACQ-treated wood for up to 12 months in a controlled environment. The environment (27ºC, 100% relative humidity) was chosen so that comparisons could be made with previous exposure tests run using CCA-treated wood in the same environment. Five types of fasteners (common 8d nail, hot-dipped galvanized 8d nail, 4d aluminum...

  2. Estimating preservative release from treated wood exposed to precipitation

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Patricia Lebow; Daniel Foster

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated leaching methods are needed to better estimate emissions from treated wood used above ground or above water. In this study, we evaluated leaching methods using continuous immersion, dip immersion, and simulated rainfall approaches. Copper and/or boron emissions were measured for specimens treated with either chromated copper arsenate Type C (CCA-C) or a...

  3. Exposure to wood dust and heavy metals in workers using CCA pressure-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Decker, Paul; Cohen, Beverly; Butala, John H; Gordon, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Chemical pesticide treatment enables relatively nonresistant woods to be used in outdoor construction projects. The most prevalent procedure used to protect these woods is pressure treatment with chromium, copper, and arsenic (CCA). This pilot study examined the airborne concentration and particle size distribution of wood particles, chromium, copper, and arsenic at both outdoor (measured over the whole work day) and indoor (measured during the performance of specific tasks) work sites. At the outdoor residential deck construction sites, the arithmetic mean total dust concentration, measured using personal filter cassette samplers, was 0.57 mg/m3. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (da) of the outdoor wood dust was greater than 20 microm. Indoor wood dust concentrations were significantly greater than those measured outdoor and were job category-dependent. The highest mean breathing zone dust concentration, 49.0 mg/m3, was measured at the indoor sanding operation. Personal impactor sampling demonstrated that the mean total airborne concentration of arsenic, but not chromium or copper, was consistently above recommended occupational exposure levels at the indoor work site, and occasionally at the outdoor work sites. At the indoor sanding operation, the mean total chromium, copper, and arsenic concentrations were 345, 170, and 342 microg/m3, respectively. Thus, significant exposure to airborne heavy metals can occur as a result of indoor and outdoor exposure to CCA pressure-treated wood dust. Therefore, current standards for wood dust may not adequately protect workers from the heavy metals commonly used in CCA pressure-treated wood.

  4. Oxygen index evaluation of fire-retardant-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of using the oxygen index test (ASTM D 2863-76) to obtain an indication of the relative flammability of fire-retardant- treated wood products was investigated. The oxygen index is the minimum percentage oxygen that is required to maintain flaming combustion of a specimen under specified laboratory conditions. Within the plastics industry, the test is...

  5. Marine Exposure of Preservative-Treated Small Wood Panels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    part by NFEC. FPL contact B. R. Johnson. 2 R = Removed when destroyed by Limnoria ( L ), teredines (T). Table 3.3.- Ammoniacal copper arsenate (AWPA P-5...ReeachSmall Wood Panels Paper FPL 399 April 1981 LA. A.) ~ *ll .4 -, 3 j󈧗 .hfed 1 .s’~.Ddn’ree9 * 1’Z .9\\XS~rQ * A- ;~C~:I I .- ~’ V ~ LUI~ L ~U~W...United States( L - Department of IM rnAgriculture Marine Exposure of Forest Service Forest PreservativeTreated Products RSmall Wood Panels. Paper9 = FPL

  6. ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE CCA (CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE) ON TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns have been raised regarding the safety of young children contacting arsenic and chromium residues while playing on and around Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) treated wood playground structures and decks. Although CCA registrants voluntarily canceled treated wood for re...

  7. 76 FR 13616 - Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Picayune Wood Treating Site located in Picayune, Pearl River County, Mississippi for publication. DATES...

  8. ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE CCA (CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE) ON TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns have been raised regarding the safety of young children contacting arsenic and chromium residues while playing on and around Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) treated wood playground structures and decks. Although CCA registrants voluntarily canceled treated wood for re...

  9. Modelling inorganic biocide emission from treated wood in water.

    PubMed

    Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a chemical model for explaining the leaching behaviour of inorganic biocides from treated wood. The standard leaching test XP CEN/TS14429 was applied to a commercial construction material made of treated Pinus sylvestris (Copper Boron Azole preservative). The experimental results were used for developing a chemical model under PHREEQC(®) (a geochemical software, with LLNL, MINTEQ data bases) by considering the released species detected in the eluates: main biocides Cu and B, other trace biocides (Cr and Zn), other elements like Ca, K, Cl, SO(4)(-2), dissolved organic matter (DOC). The model is based on chemical phenomena at liquid/solid interfaces (complexation, ion exchange and hydrolysis) and is satisfactory for the leaching behaviour representation. The simulation results confronted with the experiments confirmed the hypotheses of: (1) biocide fixation by surface complexation reactions with wood specific sites (carboxyl and phenol for Cu, Zn, Cr(III), aliphatic hydroxyl for B, ion exchange to a lesser extent) and (2) biocide mobilisation by extractives (DOC) coming from the wood. The maximum of Cu, Cr(III) and Zn fixation occurred at neutral pH (including the natural pH of wood), while B fixation was favoured at alkaline pH.

  10. Common questions and concerns from government users of industrial treated wood products

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; James Wacker

    2011-01-01

    Because pressure-treated wood is perceived as economical and relatively easy to install, federal, state and local government agencies sometimes utilize treated wood for industrial-type applications. When these agencies have questions or concerns about treated wood they may make inquiries to the US Forest Products Laboratory. These inquiries provide an indication of...

  11. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  12. Role of construction debris in release of copper, chromium, and arsenic from treated wood structures

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Steven A. Halverson; Jeffrey J. Morrell; John. Simonsen

    Recent research on the release of wood preservatives from treated wood used in sensitive environments has not considered the potential contribution from construction residues. This study sought to develop leaching rate data for small construction debris and compare those to the release rate from treated wood itself. Western hemlock boards were pressure treated with...

  13. Marine Exposure of Preservative-Treated Small Wood Panels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    borer Limnoria tripunctata L . is prevalent. This organism readily attacks creosote-treated wood. Because of observations that metallic salts deter L ... L . tripunctata and teredine borers are abundant. Since then, as promising new or candidate preservatives have appeared, we have installed additional...harbors have active populations of L . tripunctata and f-redines; the Trumbo Annex area has somewhat more teredine and less Limnoria activity than did the

  14. Corrosion of metals in treated wood examined by synchrotron based xanes and XFM

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Joseph E. Jakes; Grant T. Kirker; Leandro Passarini; Barry Lai

    2016-01-01

    Copper based waterborne wood preservatives are frequently used to extend the service life of wood products used in outdoor environments. While these copper based treatments protect the wood from fungal decay and insect attack, they increase the corrosion of metals embedded or in contact with the treated wood. Over the past ten years, several studies have looked at the...

  15. Nanotechnologies for the restoration of alum-treated archaeological wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriulo, Fabrizio; Braovac, Susan; Kutzke, Hartmut; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The project Saving Oseberg is funded by the Norwegian State with the aim to preserve the Viking Age wooden objects from the Oseberg burial mound. They were excavated in 1904 near Tønsberg, Norway, and many have been treated in the past with alum salts (KAl(SO4)2·12H2O). Alum was widely used during the early 1900s as a treatment for archaeological wood to prevent shrinkage and impart strength. In the 1990s, conservators observed an alarming condition of the objects. Initial investigations showed that the alum treatment has initiated a slow but ongoing deterioration process, attacking the wood for over 100 years. Today, the artefacts are highly acidic and have significantly reduced mechanical strength. In the last decade, the use of non-aqueous alkaline nanoparticle dispersions has provided successful results for the protection of cellulose-based materials. Alum-treated archaeological wood samples from Oseberg, with a pH ≤ 2, have been treated with alkaline nanoparticle dispersions, and the effects of the treatment have been evaluated by thermal analysis (TG-DTG), infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) analyses. In this contribution, the preliminary results will be presented.

  16. Characterization of the surface and the interphase of PVC-copper amine-treated wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haihong; Kamdem, D. Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Contact angles and surface energy of wood, as well as interfacial shear strength between wood and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were investigated and used to monitor the modifications generated on the surfaces of wood treated with a copper ethanolamine solution. An increase in surface energy of wood after treatments promotes wetting of PVC on wood surfaces. Improved interfacial shear strength between treated wood and PVC matrix can be attributed to the formation of a stronger wood-PVC interphase. This suggests that treatment may be used to improve the adhesion between wood surface and PVC in the formulation of wood fiber composites to yield products with enhanced mechanical properties and better biological and physical performance against decay and insect destroying wood.

  17. CCA retention and its effects on the bonding performance of decommissioned treated wood: a preliminary study

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Mark Gibson; Chung Y. Hse

    2009-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) continues to be widely used as a wood preservative for industrial uses in the U.S. Disposal of treated wood is a potential long-term environmental liability. Current practices for disposing of decommissioned preservative-treated wood include landfilling and incineration, which are increasingly impractical due to environmental...

  18. Adhesive bonding of wood treated with ACQ and copper azole preservatives

    Treesearch

    Linda F. Lorenz; Charles Frihart

    2006-01-01

    Treated wood has generally been more difficult to bond than untreated wood for a variety of reasons. Alkaline copper quat (ACQ) and copper azole (CA-B), the most prominent substitutes for chromated copper arsenate (CCA), are difficult to bond consistently. Using a phenol-resorcinol- formaldehyde (PRF) adhesive formulated for bonding to CCA-treated wood, we examined the...

  19. Preservative-treated wood and alternative products in the Forest Service

    Treesearch

    James (Scott) Groenier; Stan Lebow

    2006-01-01

    When treated wood is used in field settings, the possibility of environmental contamination raises concerns. There is increasing pressure to be environmentally friendly and to reduce, restrict, or eliminate the use of wood preservatives because of the concern that toxic constituents may leach from the treated wood. This report will provide an overview of preservative...

  20. Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Timothy; Tolaymat, Thabet; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Dubey, Brajesh; Stook, Kristin; Wadanambi, Lakmini

    2004-10-18

    Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), extraction procedure toxicity method (EPTOX), waste extraction test (WET), multiple extraction procedure (MEP), and modifications of these procedures which utilized actual MSW landfill leachates, a construction and demolition (C and D) debris leachate, and a concrete enhanced leachate. Additional experiments were conducted to assess factors affecting leaching, such as particle size, pH, and leaching contact time. Results from the regulatory leaching tests provided similar results with the exception of the WET, which extracted greater quantities of metals. Experiments conducted using actual MSW leachate, C and D debris leachate, and concrete enhanced leachate provided results that were within the same order of magnitude as results obtained from TCLP, SPLP, and EPTOX. Eleven of 13 samples of CCA-treated dimensional lumber exceeded the US EPA's toxicity characteristic (TC) threshold for arsenic (5 mg/L). If un-weathered arsenic-treated wood were not otherwise excluded from the definition of hazardous waste, it frequently would require management as such. When extracted with simulated rainwater (SPLP), 9 of the 13 samples leached arsenic at concentrations above 5 mg/L. Metal leachability tended to increase with decreasing particle size and at pH extremes. All three metals leached above the drinking water standards thus possibly posing a potential risk to groundwater. Arsenic is a major concern from a disposal point of view with respect to ground water quality.

  1. Amount of leachant and water absorption levels of wood treated with borates and water repellents.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ergun; Sonmez, Abdullah; Colak, Mehmet; Toker, Hilmi

    2006-12-01

    Wood protection efficacy of borates against biological agents, flame retardancy, and suitability to the environment is well known. Since borates can be applied to timber as water based solutions, they are preferred economically as well. Even though they are highly mobile in wood, boron compounds are widely used in timber preservation. Borates migrate in liquid and increase the hygroscopicity of wood in damp conditions. This study deals with the physical restriction of water access in wood by impregnating water repellent agents into wood to limit amount of leachant and water absorption levels of wood after boron treatment. Borates were incorporated with polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) their bulking effect in wood was considered. Results indicated that the amount of leachates from wood treated with borates in PEG-400 was remarkably higher compared to those of wood treated with the aqueous solutions of borates. Water absorption (WA) levels of wood treated with aqueous solutions of borates were higher than those of their treated samples with the solutions in PEG-400. Secondary treatments of wood with the water repellent (WR) chemicals following borate impregnation reduced the leaching of chemicals from wood in water and also WA of the specimens were less than those of the wood treated with only borates from aqueous and PEG solutions. Styrene (St) was the most effective monomer among the other agents used in terms of immobility effect on borates and WA.

  2. Application of a CCA-treated wood waste decontamination process to other copper-based preservative-treated wood after disposal.

    PubMed

    Janin, Amélie; Coudert, Lucie; Riche, Pauline; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Blais, Jean-François

    2011-02-28

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was widely used until 2004 for residential and industrial applications. Since 2004, CCA was replaced by alternative copper preservatives such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ), for residential applications due to health concerns. Treated wood waste disposal is becoming an issue. Previous studies identified a chemical process for decontaminating CCA-treated wood waste based on sulfuric acid leaching. The potential application of this process to wood treated with the copper-based preservatives (alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ)) is investigated here. Three consecutive leaching steps with 0.1 M sulfuric acid at 75°C for 2 h were successful for all the types of treated wood and achieved more than 98% copper solubilisation. The different acidic leachates produced were successively treated by coagulation using ferric chloride and precipitation (pH=7) using sodium hydroxide. Between 94 and 99% of copper in leachates could be recovered by electrodeposition after 90 min using 2 A electrical current. Thus, the process previously developed for CCA-treated wood waste decontamination could be efficiently applied for CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-treated wood.

  3. Wood preservatives and pressure-treated wood: considerations for historic-preservation projects

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Anthony; Stan T. Lebow

    2015-01-01

    Wood, an abundant resource throughout most of the world, has been used as a building material for thousands of years. Many historic buildings have been built primarily of wood, and masonry and stone buildings generally have wood elements, both structural and architectural. As a biological material, wood is both remarkably complex and yet quite durable if well...

  4. Removal of lead from aqueous solutions with a treated spent bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Mana, Mohamed; Ouali, Mohand Said; Lindheimer, Marc; Menorval, Louis Charles de

    2008-11-30

    A spent bleaching earth from an edible oil refinery has been treated by impregnation with a normal sodium hydroxide solution followed by mild thermal treatment (100 degrees C). The obtained material (TSBE) was washed, dried and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, SEM, BET and thermal analysis. The clay structure was not apparently affected by the treatment and the impregnated organic matter was quantitatively removed. We have investigated the sorption of lead on this material, the spent bleaching earth (SBE) and the virgin bleaching earth (VBE). The kinetic results fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model and the Weber & Morris, intraparticle diffusion model. The pH had effect on the sorption efficiency. The sorption isotherms followed the Langmuir model for various sorbent concentrations with good values of determination coefficient. A comparison between the results obtained with this material and those of the literature highlighted a good removal capacity of the treated spent bleaching earth at low cost.

  5. Environmental impact of preservative-treated wood in a wetland boardwalk.

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia K. Lebow; Daniel O. Foster; Kenneth M. Brooks

    Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and industry partners are cooperating in a study of the leaching and environmental effects of a wetland boardwalk. The construction project is considered bworst casec because the site has high rainfall and large volumes of treated wood were used. Separate boardwalk test sections were constructed using untreated wood or wood...

  6. Documenting the Durability and Service Life of Pressure-treated Wood

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Patricia Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of service life are increasingly used to compare life cycle costs of building materials. Because of a lack of published data for treated wood, some users assume a relatively low service life for wood in comparison to alternative materials. Such bias against durable wood products may cause alternative materials to appear more economical. This paper discusses...

  7. Ash from the combustion of treated wood: Characteristics and management options

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrs, J.E.; Donovan, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    Continued research and development of environmentally-acceptable and cost-effective end uses for wood ash is having a significant affect on the ability to use wood waste for fuel. This is particularly true for ash resulting from treated wood combustion. Concerns about the contents of ash from wood containing paint, stain, preservatives, or other chemicals is one of the largest regulatory barriers to its use as fuel. This paper presents preliminary results from a study sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority on ash characteristics and end uses, including environmental characteristics of low-strength concrete materials made with treated wood ash.

  8. Subterranean Termite Resistance of Polystyrene-Treated Wood from Three Tropical Wood Species

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Yusuf Sudo; Massijaya, Muh Yusram; Arinana, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the resistance of three Indonesian wood species to termite attack. Samples from sengon (Falcataria moluccana), mangium (Acacia mangium), and pine (Pinus merkusii) were treated with polystyrene at loading levels of 26.0%, 8.6%, and 7.7%, respectively. Treated and untreated samples were exposed to environmental conditions in the field for 3 months. Untreated specimens of sengon, mangium, and pine had resistance ratings of 3.0, 4.6, and 2.4, respectively, based on a 10-point scale from 0 (no resistance) to 10 (complete or near-complete resistance). Corresponding resistance values of 7.8, 7.2, and 8.2 were determined for specimens treated with polystyrene. Overall weight loss values of 50.3%, 23.3%, and 66.4% were found for untreated sengon, mangium, and pine samples, respectively; for treated samples, the values were 7.6%, 14.4%, and 5.1%, respectively. Based on the findings in this study, overall resistance to termite attack was higher for treated samples compared to untreated samples. PMID:27455331

  9. Subterranean Termite Resistance of Polystyrene-Treated Wood from Three Tropical Wood Species.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yusuf Sudo; Massijaya, Muh Yusram; Arinana, A

    2016-07-21

    The objective of this work was to investigate the resistance of three Indonesian wood species to termite attack. Samples from sengon (Falcataria moluccana), mangium (Acacia mangium), and pine (Pinus merkusii) were treated with polystyrene at loading levels of 26.0%, 8.6%, and 7.7%, respectively. Treated and untreated samples were exposed to environmental conditions in the field for 3 months. Untreated specimens of sengon, mangium, and pine had resistance ratings of 3.0, 4.6, and 2.4, respectively, based on a 10-point scale from 0 (no resistance) to 10 (complete or near-complete resistance). Corresponding resistance values of 7.8, 7.2, and 8.2 were determined for specimens treated with polystyrene. Overall weight loss values of 50.3%, 23.3%, and 66.4% were found for untreated sengon, mangium, and pine samples, respectively; for treated samples, the values were 7.6%, 14.4%, and 5.1%, respectively. Based on the findings in this study, overall resistance to termite attack was higher for treated samples compared to untreated samples.

  10. Evaluation of the accessibility of CCA metals in liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge for recovery and reuse

    Treesearch

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    CCA-treated wood was liquefied with polyethylene glycol/glycerin and sulfuric acid. The heavy metals were precipitated by Ca(OH)2 from liquefied CCA-treated wood. The original CCA-treated wood and precipitated wood sludge were fractionated by a modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. The purpose of the BCR...

  11. FIELD-SCALE LEACHING OF ARSENIC, CHROMIUM AND COPPER FROM WEATHERED TREATED WOOD

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, A. Rasem; Hu, Ligang; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Fieber, Lynne; Cai, Yong; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2010-01-01

    Earlier studies documented the loss of wood preservatives from new wood. The objective of this study was to evaluate losses from weathered treated wood under field conditions by collecting rainfall leachate from 5 different wood types, all with a surface area of 0.21 m2. Wood samples included weathered chromate copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood at low (2.7 kg/m3), medium (4.8 kg/m3) and high (35.4 kg/m3) retention levels, new alkaline copper quat (ACQ) treated wood (1.1 kg/m3 as CuO) and new untreated wood. Arsenic was found to leach at a higher rate (100 mg in 1 year for low retention) than chromium and copper (<40 mg) in all CCA treated wood samples. Copper leached at the highest rate from the ACQ sample (670 mg). Overall results suggest that metals’ leaching is a continuous process driven by rainfall, and that the mechanism of release from the wood matrix changes as wood weathers. PMID:20053493

  12. Increased PCDD/F formation in the bottom ash from fires of CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Tame, N W; Dlugogorski, B Z; Kennedy, E M

    2003-03-01

    Bottom ash that was the result of the combustion of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood under controlled fire conditions showed an increase of several orders of magnitude in the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), compared to that of untreated timber. Wood that has been pressure treated with CCA contains copper (II), which is known to catalyse the so-called de novo formation of PCDD/Fs. Comparable levels of PCDD/Fs would be expected in residual ash from burning CCA-treated wood in backyard fires, stoves and wood heaters, as a consequence of similar combustion conditions.

  13. In vitro bioavailability of heavy metals in pressure-treated wood dust.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Terry; Spanier, Jonathan; Butala, John H; Li, Ping; Rossman, Toby G

    2002-05-01

    Pressure treatment with chromium, copper, and arsenic (CCA) is the most prevalent method for protecting wood used in outdoor construction projects. Although these metals are tightly bound to the wood fibers and are not released under most conditions of use, we examined the bioavailability of metals in CCA pressure-treated wood dust in vitro. Cytotoxicity and metallothionein (MT) mRNA expression were examined in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells incubated with respirable-size wood dust generated by sanding CCA-treated and untreated (control) Southern yellow pine. In colony survival studies, increased cytotoxicity (p < 0.05) occurred in V79 cells treated with CCA wood dust (351 +/- 77 microg/ml, mean +/- SE) compared with control wood dust (883 +/- 91 microg/ml). Increased cytotoxicity with CCA wood dust also occurred in an arsenic resistant subline of V79 cells, thus suggesting that arsenic was not responsible for the increased cytotoxicity. Metallothionein mRNA was significantly increased after 48 h of treatment with CCA wood dust compared with control wood dust. Incubation of CCA wood dust in cell culture media resulted in the transfer of copper, but not chromium or arsenic, into the media. Moreover, the treatment of cells with this filtered extract resulted in significantly increased metallothionein mRNA, suggesting that bioavailable copper is responsible for inducing metallothionein mRNA in V79 cells. Thus, these bioassays suggest that metals become bioavailable during in vitro culture of phagocytic V79 cells with CCA wood dust.

  14. Reuse of spent granular activated carbon for organic micro-pollutant removal from treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingyi; Shang, Ran; Heijman, Bas; Rietveld, Luuk

    2015-09-01

    Spent granular activated carbons (sGACs) for drinking water treatments were reused via pulverizing as low-cost adsorbents for micro-pollutant adsorption from a secondary treated wastewater effluent. The changes of physicochemical characteristics of the spent carbons in relation to the fresh carbons were determined and were correlated to the molecular properties of the respective GAC influents (i.e. a surface water and a groundwater). Pore size distribution analysis showed that the carbon pore volume decreased over a wider size range due to preloading by surface water, which contains a broader molecular weight distribution of organic matter in contrast to the groundwater. However, there was still considerable capacity available on the pulverized sGACs for atrazine adsorption in demineralized water and secondary effluent, and this was particularly the case for the groundwater spent GAC. However, as compared to the fresh counterparts, the decreased surface area and the induced surface acidic groups on the pulverized sGACs contributed both to the lower uptake and the more impeded adsorption kinetic of atrazine in the demineralized water. Nonetheless, the pulverized sGACs, especially the one preloaded by surface water, was less susceptible to adsorption competition in the secondary effluent, due to its negatively charged surface which can repulse the accessibility of the co-present organic matter. This suggests the reusability of the drinking water spent GACs for micro-pollutant adsorption in the treated wastewater.

  15. Chemical remediation of wood treated with micronised, nano or soluble copper preservatives

    Treesearch

    Saip Nami Kartal; Evren Terzi; Bessie Woodward; Carol A. Clausen; Stan T. Lebow

    2013-01-01

    The potential for extraction of copper from wood treated with micronised, nano or soluble forms of copper has been evaluated in view of chemical remediation. In focus were EDTA, oxalic acid, bioxalate, and D-gluconic acid for extraction of Cu from treated wood. Bioxalate extractions for 24 h resulted in Cu removal over 95% for all tested...

  16. Technical Note: Comparison of accelerated methods for evaluating leaching from preservative-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia K. Lebow; Kolby C. Hirth

    2017-01-01

    Current standardized methods are not well-suited for estimating in-service preservative leaching from treated wood products. This study compared several alternative leaching methods to a commonly used standard method, and to leaching under natural exposure conditions. Small blocks or lumber specimens were pressure treated with a wood preservative containing borax and...

  17. Selection, production, procurement, and use of preservative treated wood : supplementing federal specification TT-W-571

    Treesearch

    Lee R. Gjovik; Roy H. Baechler

    1977-01-01

    This report has been prepared to supplement Federal Specification TT-W-571 “Wood Preservation: Treating Practices.” developed for the General Services Administration by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, the Specification is used by Federal agencies, State agencies, and private users in procuring preservative-treated wood....

  18. Guide for Materials Selection and Design for Metals Used in Contact with Copper-Treated Wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This design guide summarizes recent research on the corrosion of metals in treated wood, presents design strategies to minimize corrosion of metals in contact with treated wood, and is targeted toward engineers, architects, builders, and homeowners. The guide is organized as a “question and answer” document. While the questions are arranged in a logical order, each...

  19. Leaching of flakeboard produced from recycled CCA-treated wood into deionized water

    Treesearch

    W. Li; T.F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2004-01-01

    The disposal of preservative-treated wood is becoming a larger issue for the forest products industry due to increasing public concern and scrutiny as well as costs associated with traditional disposal, i.e., landfilling. Recycling of preservative-treated wood has great potential. In this study, flakeboard was produced from decommissioned guardrail posts that had been...

  20. Long-Term Durability of Pressure-Treated Wood in a Severe Test Site

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Grant Kirker; Patricia Lebow

    2013-01-01

    Improved estimates of the long-term durability of treated wood products are needed to guide choices about construction materials and allow estimates of design life. This report summarizes the long-term decay and insect resistance of treated wood post and lumber specimens placed in ground contact at a test site of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  1. Physical and mechanical properties of flakeboard produced from recycled CCA-treated wood

    Treesearch

    W. Li; T.F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2004-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has been most widely used in North America since the 1970s for many exterior applications such as decks, fences, playground equipment, utility poles, and others. A large volume of CCA-treated wood is currently coming out of service. Traditional disposal methods such as landfilling and incineration are not without adverse...

  2. An analysis of the physical properties of recovered CCA-treated wood from residential decks

    Treesearch

    David Bailey; Robert L. Smith; Philip A. Araman

    2004-01-01

    A large volume of CCA-treated wood removed from residential decks is disposed of in landfills every year, and better environmentally conscious alternatives are needed. Recycling CCA-treated wood from the decks could be a feasible alternative, but there is a lack of knowledge regarding the physical properties of the material. This research analyzed the chemical and...

  3. Long-term soil accumulation of chromium, copper, and arsenic adjacent to preservative-treated wood.

    Treesearch

    S. Lebow; D. Foster; J. Evans

    2004-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has been used extensively in outdoor applications. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and CCA producers recently reached an agreement to limit future use of CCA for some types of applications. One area of concern is the long-term accumulation of leached CCA in soil adjacent to treated wood structures. Interpreting...

  4. Isolating metal-tolerant bacteria capable of removing copper, chromium, and arsenic from treated wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2000-01-01

    Bioremediation of chromated copper arsenate-treated waste wood with one or more metal-tolerant bacteria is a potential method of naturally releasing metals from treated wood fibre. Sampling eight environments with elevated levels of copper, chromium, and arsenic resulted in the isolation of 28 bacteria with the capability of releasing one or more of the components from...

  5. Taiwan refineries adopt wet-air oxidation to treat spent caustic liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, C.E. )

    1994-03-01

    Wet-air oxidation technology is enabling a petrochemical company in Taiwan to increase production while protecting the environment. This 30-year-old technology has found a new niche at three refineries owned and operated by Chinese Petroleum Corporation to treat spent caustic liquor derived from ethylene production and other sources. Wet-air oxidation destroys sulfides, mercaptans, phenols and other difficult-to-treat pollutants, or converts them to biodegradable constituents. Such highly colored, odorous liquors are not amenable to biological treatment; however, effluent from wet-air oxidation at CPC is water-clear and treated easily by the company's biological wastewater treatment system.

  6. Influence of impregnation method on metal retention of CCB-treated wood in slow pyrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Kinata, Silao Espérance; Loubar, Khaled; Bouslamti, Amine; Belloncle, Christophe; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-09-30

    In the present work, the effects of copper, chromium and boron on the pyrolysis of wood and their distribution in the pyrolysis products were investigated. For this, the wood has been impregnated with chromium-copper-boron (CCB). In addition, to describe the effects of impregnation method, vacuum-pressure and dipping methods were also conducted. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results show that an increase in the final residue and decrease in degradation temperature on both methods of treated wood compared to untreated wood. Then, slow pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a laboratory reactor. The mass balance of pyrolysis products is confirmed by TGA. Furthermore, the concentration of metals in the final residue is measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The results show that the final residue contains more than 45% of the initial amount of metal present in the treated wood. The phenomenon is more pronounced with vacuum-pressure treated wood. The heating values of pyrolysis products were analyzed. The heating value of charcoal obtained from treated and untreated wood is approximately same. But the heating value of tar from untreated wood is higher than the heating value of the tar from treated wood.

  7. Impact of surface water conditions on preservative leaching and aquatic toxicity from treated wood products.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Bittont, Gabriel

    2007-05-15

    New alternative wood preservatives contain higher levels of copper (Cu) which can promote aquatic toxicity in natural water systems. Earlier work focused on evaluating toxicity using laboratory generated leaching solutions. In this study, the impact on preservative leaching and aquatic toxicity from treated wood products was evaluated using natural surface waters including waters from two rivers, three lakes, two wetlands, and one seawater, in addition to synthetic moderate hard water and deionized water. Blocks of wood treated with Cu based alternatives such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper boron azole (CBA), along with chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, were leached under quiescent conditions, and total Cu, labile Cu, and heavy metal toxicity were measured. Results show that ACQ- and CBA-treated wood leach approximately 10 and 20 times more total Cu relative to CCA-treated wood and that the presence of organic and inorganic ligands in natural waters lowered the labile fraction of Cu relative to that from laboratory generated leaching solutions. Aquatic toxicity was found to correlate with the labile Cu fraction, and hence, the aquatic toxicity of the treated wood leachates was lower in natural waters in comparison to laboratory leaching solutions. The results of the present study suggest that studies designed to evaluate the impacts of treated wood should therefore consider the role of complexation in reducing the labile Cu fraction and its potential role in decreasing toxicity.

  8. Utilization of anaerobically treated distillery spent wash for production of cellulases under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bhavik K; Mohana, Sarayu; Jog, Rahul; Divecha, Jyoti; Madamwar, Datta

    2010-10-01

    Pollution caused by distillery spent wash on one hand has stimulated the need to develop new technologies to treat the waste and on the other, forced us to reevaluate the efficient utilization of its nutritive potential for production of various high value compounds. In this study, anaerobically treated distillery spent wash was used for the production of cellulases by Aspergillus ellipticus under solid-state fermentation using wheat straw as a substrate. The interactions between distillery effluent concentration, initial pH, moisture content and inoculum size were investigated and modeled using response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD). Under optimized conditions, filter paper activity, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-1,4-glucanase activities were found to be 13.38, 26.68 and 130.92 U/g of substrate respectively. Characterization of endo-beta-1,4-glucanase and beta-glucosidase was done after partial purification by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by desalting. The partially purified endo-beta-1,4-glucanase and beta-glucosidase showed maximum activity at 60 degrees C. Saccharification studies performed with different lignocellulosic substrates showed that wheat bran was most susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. The study suggests that anaerobically treated distillery spent wash can be used as a viable nutrient source for cellulase production under solid-state fermentation by A. ellipticus.

  9. Ash from the combustion of treated wood: Characteristics and management options

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrs, J.E.; Donovan, C.T.

    1995-11-01

    Continued research and development of environmentally-acceptable and cost-effective end uses for wood ash is having a significant affect on the ability to use wood and wood waste as fuel. This is particularly true for ash resulting from treated wood combustion. Concerns about the contents of ash from wood containing paint, stain, preservatives, or other chemicals is one of the largest regulatory barriers to its use as fuel. This paper: (1) explains the types of {open_quotes}clean, untreated{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}treated{close_quotes} wood that are likely to produce ash that can be beneficially used; (2) presents preliminary results from a study sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) on ash characteristics and end uses. The study sampled and analyzed ash generated during test burns of five treated wood wastes at an 18 MW wood-fired power plant; and (3) describes existing and potential end uses for untreated and treated wood ash.

  10. Bioremediation and degradation of CCA-treated wood waste.

    Treesearch

    Barbara L Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Bioprocessing CCA wood waste is an efficient and economical alternative to depositing the waste in landfills, especially if landfill restrictions on CCA waste are imposed nation wide. We have developed bioremediation and degradation technologies for microbial processing of CCA waste. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood decay fungi,...

  11. REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE ON MANAGING RISKS AT WOOD TREATING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 700 sites in the United States have been identified where wood preserving operations have been conducted. The most common types of wood preservatives found at these sites are creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and copper chromated arsenate (CCA). When properly used and dis...

  12. REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE ON MANAGING RISKS AT WOOD TREATING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 700 sites in the United States have been identified where wood preserving operations have been conducted. The most common types of wood preservatives found at these sites are creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and copper chromated arsenate (CCA). When properly used and dis...

  13. Comparative study on liquefaction of creosote and chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood and untreated southern pine wood: effects of acid catalyst content, liquefaction time, temperature, and phenol to wood ratio

    Treesearch

    Hui Pan; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Creosote- and chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste and untreated southern pine wood were liquefied with phenol and sulfuric acid. The effects of sulfuric acid content, liquefaction time, liquefaction temperature, and phenol to wood ratio on liquefaction rate (i.e., wood residue content) were investigated and analyzed by analysis of variance (...

  14. Quantities of arsenic-treated wood in demolition debris generated by Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Brajesh; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Townsendt, Timothy G

    2007-03-01

    The disaster debris from Hurricane Katrina is one of the largest in terms of volume and economic loss in American history. One of the major components of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures such as electrical poles, fences, decks, and homes a considerable amount of treated wood and consequently arsenic will be disposed as disaster debris. In this study an effort was made to estimate the quantity of arsenic disposed through demolition debris generated in the Louisiana and Mississippi area through Hurricane Katrina. Of the 72 million cubic meters of disaster debris generated, roughly 12 million cubic meters were in the form of construction and demolition wood resulting in an estimated 1740 metric tons of arsenic disposed. Management of disaster debris should consider the relatively large quantities of arsenic associated with pressure-treated wood.

  15. Quantities of Arsenic-Treated Wood in Demolition Debris Generated by Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Brajesh; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    The disaster debris from Hurricane Katrina is one of the largest in terms of volume and economic loss in American history. One of the major components of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures such as electrical poles, fences, decks, and homes a considerable amount of treated wood and consequently arsenic will be disposed as disaster debris. In this study an effort was made to estimate the quantity of arsenic disposed through demolition debris generated in the Louisiana and Mississippi area through Hurricane Katrina. Of the 72 million cubic meters of disaster debris generated, roughly 12 million cubic meters were in the form of construction and demolition wood resulting in an estimated 1740 metric tons of arsenic disposed. Management of disaster debris should consider the relatively large quantities of arsenic associated with pressure-treated wood. PMID:17396637

  16. Implication of chromium speciation on disposal of discarded CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinkun; Dubey, Brajesh; Jang, Yong-Chul; Townsend, Timothy; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2006-02-06

    The wood preservative chromated copper arsenate (CCA) contains hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and the conversion of Cr(VI) to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] drives fixation of the treatment chemicals to the wood fibers. Since the toxicity of Cr depends on its valence state, an assessment of the Cr species occurring in CCA-treated wood, as well as leachates and ashes from CCA-treated wood, is helpful when assessing implications for disposal. In this study, both new and weathered wood samples of CCA-treated wood and their ashes were evaluated for total Cr and Cr(VI) within the solid matrices and within leachates. Results show that for both new and weathered CCA-treated wood, Cr(VI) occurred in the range of 0.7-4% of the total Cr. Greater Cr leaching occurred at the pH extremes, with Cr(VI) only measured under alkaline pH values (pH > 9.0). Total chromium concentrations from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) leachates from CCA-treated wood were consistently less than 3mg/L with Cr(VI) below detection limits. The results suggest that leaching of Cr(VI) from discarded CCA-treated wood should not be a concern in most landfill environments. One exception would be disposal in landfills with alkaline leachate; Cr(VI) was observed to leach from CCA-treated wood in the presence of alkaline leachate from crushed concrete. When CCA-treated wood is combusted, chromium becomes concentrated in the ash. Cr(VI) in ash from the combustion of CCA-treated wood was found between 4 and 7% of the total chromium. In ash from the combustion of wood recovered from construction and demolition (C&D) debris (which contained some CCA-treated wood), Cr(VI) accounted for as much as 43% of the total Cr. Nearly, all of the Cr in SPLP leachates produced from the ash was in the Cr(VI) form. The degree of Cr(VI) leaching from the ash was highly dependent upon the alkalinity of the ash, with higher ash leachate pH resulting in greater concentrations of Cr(VI).

  17. Removal of basic dyes from aqueous solutions with a treated spent bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Mana, Mohamed; Ouali, Mohand-Said; de Menorval, L C

    2007-03-01

    A spent bleaching earth from an edible oil refinery was treated by impregnation with a normal sodium hydroxide solution followed by mild thermal treatment (100 degrees C). The obtained material (TSBE) was washed, dried, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, SEM, BET, and thermal analysis. The clay structure was not apparently affected by the treatment and the impregnated organic matter was quantitatively removed. We have investigated the comparative sorption of safranine and methylene blue on this material, the spent bleaching earth (SBE), and the virgin bleaching earth (VBE). The kinetic results fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Weber and Morris intraparticle diffusion model. The pH had no effect on the sorption efficiency. The sorption isotherms followed the Langmuir model for various sorbent concentrations with good values of the determination coefficient. A linear relationship was found between the calculated maximum removal capacity and the solid/solution ratio. A comparison between the results obtained with this material and those of the literature highlighted the low cost and the good removal capacity of treated spent bleaching earth.

  18. Treated wood preservatives linked to aquatic damage, human illness, and death--a societal problem.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    On February 12, 2002, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a voluntary decision by industry to move consumer use of treated lumber products away from a variety of pressure-treated wood that contains arsenate (As) by December 31, 2003, in favor of new alternative wood preservatives. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is a chemical mixture consisting of three pesticidal compounds (As, chromium, and copper) registered for wood preservative uses. CCA is injected into wood by a process that uses high pressure to saturate wood products with the chemical. Only people who have received the proper safety training should use CCA to treat wood products. Around the home, CCA-treated wood is commonly used for decks, walkways, fences, gazebos, boat docks, and playground equipment. Other common uses of CCA-treated wood include highway noise barriers, sign posts, utility posts, and retaining walls. As of January 1, 2004, the EPA is no longer allowing CCA products to be used to treat wood intended for any of these residential uses. This decision will facilitate the voluntary transition to new alternative wood preservatives that do not contain As in both the manufacturing and retail sectors. To its credit, the EPA has developed consumer safety information sheets, hanging signs, end signs, and bin stickers that provide comprehensive information about the dangers of CCA-treated wood, use-site, and handling precautions. The EPA has not concluded that CCA-treated wood poses any unreasonable risk to the public or the environment. Nevertheless, As is a known human carcinogen and, thus, the EPA believes that any reduction in the levels of potential exposure to As is desirable. The toxicologic manifestations have been primarily related to the effects of As exposure from drinking water sources and include the following: acute poisoning incidents, cardiovascular effects, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Understanding the biomethylation of As is central to elucidating its action

  19. Effect of precipitation pattern on leaching of preservative from treated wood and implications for accelerated testing

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop improved accelerated test methods for evaluating the leaching of wood preservatives from treated wood exposed to precipitation. In this study the effects of rate of rainfall and length of intervals between rainfall events on leaching was evaluated by exposing specimens to varying patterns of simulated rainfall under controlled laboratory...

  20. Evaluation of pressure treated wood impact on landfill waste decomposition using a methane yield assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwidong; Townsend, Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Research was conducted to investigate the potential impact of CCA-treated wood and other arsenic-free Cu-based preservative-treated wood on microorganisms, involved in the anaerobic decomposition of waste in landfills. Wood preservatives used included alkaline copper quat (ACQ), copper citrate (CC), copper boron azole (CBA), copper dimethyldithiocarbamate (CDDC), and chromated copper arsenate (CCA). The biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay was used to estimate the possible impacts. The methane yields of mixtures of preservative-treated wood or untreated wood with cellulose (group 1) and these wood samples only (group 2) were determined. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) test found that there were no significant differences among methane yields results in either group 1 or group 2, at the 0.05 level of significance. The results indicate that under the conditions tested, none of the treated wood products evaluated were toxic to the methane-producing organisms. At the end of the assays, test bottle contents were analyzed for Cu, Cr, and As. When the fraction of each metal in the solution (relative to original metal in the wood, leachability %) was examined, As was present at the great extent. The leachability of As was in the range from 15.1% to 21.7% while relatively low leachability (1.7-7.6%) of Cu was observed.

  1. Understanding decay resistance, dimensional stability and strength changes in heat treated and acetylated wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; Rebecca E. Ibach; James McSweeny; Thomas Nilsson

    2009-01-01

    Reductions in hygroscopicity, increased dimensional stability and decay resistance of heat-treated wood depend on decomposition of a large portion of the hemicelluloses in the wood cell wall. In theory, these hemicelluloses are converted to small organic molecules, water and volatile furan-type intermediates that can polymerize in the cell wall. Reductions in...

  2. Chapter 14: Evaluating the Leaching of Biocides from Preservative-Treated Wood Products

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Leaching of biocides is an important consideration in the long term durability and any potential for environmental impact of treated wood products. This chapter discusses factors affecting biocide leaching, as well as methods of evaluating rate and quantity of biocide released. The extent of leaching is a function of preservative formulation, treatment methods, wood...

  3. Effect of simulated rainfall and weathering on release of preservative elements from CCA treated wood

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; R. Sam Williams; Patricia Lebow

    2003-01-01

    The release of arsenic from wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) can be decreased by application of wood finishes, but little is known about the types of finishes that are best suited for this purpose. This study evaluated the effects of finish water repellent content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the release of arsenic, copper, and chromium...

  4. Guide for minimizing the effect of preservative-treated wood on sensitive environments

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Michael Tippie

    2001-01-01

    Preservative-treated wood is often used for construction of highway and foot bridges, wetland boardwalks, and other structures in or over water or sensitive environments. In these applications it is important that release of preservative from the wood into the environment is minimized. This publication addresses this concern by describing the various types of pressure-...

  5. Statistical analysis of influence of soil source on leaching of arsenic and copper from CCA-C treated wood

    Treesearch

    Patricia Lebow; Richard Ziobro; Linda Sites; Tor Schultz; David Pettry; Darrel Nicholas; Stan Lebow; Pascal Kamdem; Roger Fox; Douglas Crawford

    2006-01-01

    Leaching of wood preservatives affects the long-term efficacy and environmental impact of treated wood. Soil properties and wood characteristicscan affectleaching of woad preservatives, but these effects are not well understood. This paper reports a statistical analysis of the effects of soil and wood properties on leaching of arsenic (As) and copper (Cu) from southern...

  6. Synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence microscopy confirms copper in the corrosion products of metals in contact with treated wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Joseph E. Jakes; Grant T. Kirker; David Vine; Stefan Vogt

    2017-01-01

    Copper based waterborne wood preservatives are frequently used to extend the service life of wood products when subjected to frequent moisture exposure. While these copper based treatments protect the wood from fungal decay and insect attack, they increase the corrosion of metals embedded or in contact with the treated wood. Previous research has shown the most...

  7. RELATIVE LEACHING AND AQUATIC TOXICITY OF PRESSURE-TREATED WOOD PRODUCTS USING BATCH LEACHING TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of southern yellow pine dimensional lumber, each treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-hour batch leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), coppe...

  8. RELATIVE LEACHING AND AQUATIC TOXICITY OF PRESSURE-TREATED WOOD PRODUCTS USING BATCH LEACHING TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of southern yellow pine dimensional lumber, each treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-hour batch leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), coppe...

  9. Use of small volume cups in XRF analysis of treated wood retention

    Treesearch

    Rene Stelzer; Adam Taylor; Patricia Lebow

    2017-01-01

    Efforts are underway in the United States to improve the conformance of commercially-treated wood with the applicable retention standards. As part of an effort to devise a practical method for on-site assessment of within-charge retention variation, we investigated whether small-volume x-ray fluorescence (XRF) sample cups could be used with treated wood. A range of cup...

  10. Wood ash to treat sewage sludge for agricultural use

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.K.

    1993-12-31

    About 90% of the three million tons of wood ash generated in the United States from wood burning facilities is being landfilled. Many landfills are initiated tipping fees and/or restrictions on the disposal of special wastes such as ash. The purpose of this work was to evaluate (1) the feasibility of using wood ash to stabilize sewage sludge and (2) the fertilizer and liming value of the sludge/ash mixture on plant response and soil pH. Research showed that wood ash, when mixed with sludge, will produce a pH above 12.0, which meets US EPA criteria for pathogen reduction for land application on non-direct food chain crops. Different ratios of wood ash to sludge mixtures were tested and the 1:1 ratio (by weight) was found to be optimal. Five replications of wood ash from four sources were tested for moisture content, pH and fertilizer nutrients. The pH of the ash/sludge mixture (1:1) on day one ranged from 12.4 to 13.2. In most cases the pH remained the same over a 21 day test or only dropped 0.1 to 0.3 units. Analyses of the mixtures showed that heavy metal concentrations (As, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Se, Zn) were low. The 1:1 ash/sludge mixture had a calcium carbonate equivalency of 17%. Green house pot studies using tall fescue grass were loadings of 300 to 750 pounds per acre of TKN-N than for 500 lb/acre of 10-10-10 commercial fertilizer. Plant tissue analysis showed N, P, K, Ca, and Mg levels to be within the sufficiency range for tall fescue.

  11. Effect of UV exposure on the surface chemistry of wood veneers treated with ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patachia, Silvia; Croitoru, Catalin; Friedrich, Christian

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of four types of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) on the chemical alteration of the surface of wood veneers exposed to 254 nm UV irradiation have been studied by using image analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and surface energy calculation. The wood treated with ionic liquids showed better stability to UV light, as demonstrated by the low lignin, carbonyl index and cellulose crystallinity index variation, as well as very small color modification of the surface with the increase of the UV exposure period, by comparing to non-treated wood. The results show that the tested ionic liquids could be effective as UV stabilizers.

  12. Release of copper-amended particles from micronized copper-pressure-treated wood during mechanical abrasion.

    PubMed

    Civardi, Chiara; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Cordula; Mucchino, Claudio; Wichser, Adrian; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-11-28

    We investigated the particles released due to abrasion of wood surfaces pressure-treated with micronized copper azole (MCA) wood preservative and we gathered preliminary data on its in vitro cytotoxicity for lung cells. The data were compared with particles released after abrasion of untreated, water (0% MCA)-pressure-treated, chromated copper (CC)-pressure-treated wood, and varnished wood. Size, morphology, and composition of the released particles were analyzed. Our results indicate that the abrasion of MCA-pressure-treated wood does not cause an additional release of nanoparticles from the unreacted copper (Cu) carbonate nanoparticles from of the MCA formulation. However, a small amount of released Cu was detected in the nanosized fraction of wood dust, which could penetrate the deep lungs. The acute cytotoxicity studies were performed on a human lung epithelial cell line and human macrophages derived from a monocytic cell line. These cell types are likely to encounter the released wood particles after inhalation. Our findings indicate that under the experimental conditions chosen, MCA does not pose a specific additional nano-risk, i.e. there is no additional release of nanoparticles and no specific nano-toxicity for lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

  13. Extraction of hexavalent chromium from chromated copper arsenate treated wood under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Suzana; Cooper, Paul A

    2008-05-15

    Information on chromium (Cr) oxidation states is essential for the assessment of environmental and health risks associated with the overall life-cycle of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood products because of differences in toxicity between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium compounds. Hypothetical Cr(VI) fixation products were investigated in CCA type C treated sawdust of aspen and red pine during or following preservative fixation by extraction with Cr(VI)-specific extractants. Cr(VI) was found only in alkaline extracts of treated wood. A major source of Cr(VI) was method-induced oxidation of fixed Cr(III) during alkaline extraction, as confirmed by demonstrated oxidation of Cr(III) from CrCl3 treated wood. Oxidation of nontoxic and immobile Cr(III) to toxic and mobile Cr(VI) was facilitated by the presence of wood at pH > 8.5. Thermodynamic equilibrium between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) is affected by pH, temperature, rates of dissolution of CrIII) compounds, and oxygen availability. Results of this study recommend against alkaline extraction protocols for determination of Cr(VI) in treated wood. This Cr oxidation mechanism can act as a previously unrecognized route for generation of hazardous Cr(VI) if CCA treated wood is exposed to alkaline conditions during its production, use, or waste management.

  14. Factors affecting chelating extraction of Cr, Cu, and As from CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Chih; Wang, Ya-Nang; Chen, Pin-Jui; Ko, Chun-Han

    2013-06-15

    The disposal of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated waste wood is becoming a serious problem in many countries due to potential leaching of hazardous elements from in-service use in the environment or disposal of solutions after remediation; therefore, it is necessary to develop proper remediation techniques. The effects of concentration, extraction period, temperature, and sequential extraction on the extraction of Cr, Cu, and As from CCA-treated wood using [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) were studied. Mobility of metal in the samples was evaluated by using a sequential extraction scheme that could give the information needed to explain different extraction efficiencies for different metals. Results of long-term leaching tests of CCA-treated wood before and after EDDS extraction were used to evaluate Cr, Cu, and As leachability. Kinetic experiments showed that 6 h was the optimum extraction time for all metals and CCA-treated wood. Experimental results showed that EDDS is a very effective chelating agent for the extraction of Cr, Cu, and As from CCA-treated wood. Increased temperature significantly enhanced the extraction efficiency of CCA metals, especially Cr and As. The much better extractability of Cu compared to Cr and As by chelating agents can be attributed to the presence of larger weakly bound fractions. The CCA-treated woods after EDDS extraction have met the EPA's TCLP regulatory limit and could be classified as a non-hazardous waste according to identification standard of hazardous wastes.

  15. Liquefaction of the Used Creosote-Treated Wood in the Presence of Phenol and Its Application to Phenolic Resin

    Treesearch

    Nubuo Shiraishi; Chung-Yun Hse

    2000-01-01

    A limited initial study was made to evaluate liquefaction of creosote-treated southern pine wood sawdust with liquefaction of birch wood powder as a control. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using creosote-treated southern pine wood as a raw material for the-formulation-of-phenol-based resin adhesives. The liquefaction was conducted in the presence of...

  16. Leachability of boron from wood treated with natural and semi-synthetic polymers and calcium precipitating agent

    Treesearch

    S. N. Kartal; F. Green

    2003-01-01

    Several fixation systems to limit or decrease boron leachability from treated wood have been developed. Some attempts have relied on limiting of water penetration of treated wood using water repellents, monomer and polymer systems. On the other hand, non-toxic polymers such as proteins were tried to reduce amount of boron leached from wood (Thevenon et al. 1997, 1998...

  17. The marine hard substrate community as an assay for toxicity of CCA-treated wood

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, J.S.; Weis, P. |

    1994-12-31

    Panels of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) pressure-treated wood and control (untreated) wood were placed into an estuary and examined after one month for settlement of organisms. The community on the CCA wood exhibited greatly reduced species richness, biomass, and diversity. When the community was removed and the boards replaced into the estuary, the epibiota settling during the following month showed a smaller difference between the CCA panels and the control wood. After removal of the community and immersion of the wood for a third month, there were no statistically significant differences in the community that formed on the two materials. However, qualitative differences were still visible, particularly in the growth of the alga Enteromorpha and the bryozoan Conopeum. Differences in algal and bryozoan cover persisted after a year of submersion. Bioaccumulation of the metals in the epibiota on the CCA wood generally declined over time, but remained far above control levels, however. The decreased toxicity of the CCA wood with repeated trials is probably related to decreased rate of leaching, as observed earlier in laboratory experiments, and suggests that the treated wood would have reduced environmental impact if it were soaked out on site at the treatment facility before being marketed for use in the aquatic environment.

  18. Fungal biodegradation of CCA-treated wood and removal of its metal components.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Min-Ji; Imamura, Yuji; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, 5 isolates of brown-rot fungi were used for fungal bioprocessing (FB) of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood wastes: Antrodia vaillantii SEL8501, Fomitopsis palustris TYP0507 and TYP6137, and Crustoderma sp. KUC8065 and KUC8611. The isolates showed notable capacity for the degradation of treated wood and removal of CCA components via the American Wood Protection Association soil block test. Among them, Crustoderma sp. KUC8611 effectively decayed the treated wood, causing a mass loss of up to 60%. F. palustris caused extensive leaching of CrO(3) of up to 79% and As(2)O(5) of up to 87%, but only moderate leaching of CuO of up to 50%. This high capacity for removal of CrO(3) and As(2)O(5) showed a strong logarithmic relationship with the amount of oxalic acid produced in the decayed wood. The majority of metals removed from treated wood during the decay process were deposited in the soil and feeder strip. Further investigation will be required to establish the capability of selected fungi for FB of full-sized lumber treated with CCA.

  19. Aureobasidium melanogenum: a native of dark biofinishes on oil treated wood.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Elke J; Houbraken, Jos A M P; Meijer, Martin; Adan, Olaf C G; Samson, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The genus Aureobasidium, which is known as a wood staining mould, has been detected on oil treated woods in the specific stain formation called biofinish. This biofinish is used to develop a new protective, self-healing and decorative biotreatment for wood. In order to understand and control biofinish formation on oil treated wood, the occurrence of different Aureobasidium species on various wood surfaces was studied. Phenotypic variability within Aureobasidium strains presented limitations of morphological identification of Aureobasidium species. PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing of ITS and RPB2 were used to identify the culturable Aureobasidium species composition in mould stained wood surfaces with and without a biofinish. The analysed isolates showed that several Aureobasidium species were present and that Aureobasidium melanogenum was predominantly detected, regardless of the presence of a biofinish and the type of substrate. A. melanogenum was detected on wood samples exposed in the Netherlands, Cameroon, South Africa, Australia and Norway. ITS-specific PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of DNA extracted from biofinish samples confirmed results of the culturing based method: A. melanogenum is predominant within the Aureobasidium population of biofinishes on pine sapwood treated with raw linseed oil and the outdoor placement in the Netherlands.

  20. Arsenic Speciation of Solvent-Extracted Leachate from New and Weathered CCA-Treated Wood

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, BERNINE I.; SOLO - GABRIELE, HELENA M.; DUBEY, BRAJESH K.; TOWNSEND, TIMOTHY G.; CAI, YONG

    2009-01-01

    For the past 60 yr, chromate-copper-arsenate (CCA) has been used to pressure-treat millions of cubic meters of wood in the United States for the construction of many outdoor structures. Leaching of arsenic from these structures is a possible health concern as there exists the potential for soil and groundwater contamination. While previous studies have focused on total arsenic concentrations leaching from CCA-treated wood, information pertaining to the speciation of arsenic leached is limited. Since arsenic toxicity is dependent upon speciation, the objective of this study was to identify and quantify arsenic species leaching from new and weathered CCA-treated wood and CCA-treated wood ash. Solvent-extraction experiments were carried out by subjecting the treated wood and the ash to solvents of varying pH values, solvents defined in the EPA’s Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), rainwater, deionized water, and seawater. The generated leachates were analyzed for inorganic As(III) and As(V) and the organoarsenic species, monomethylarsonic acid (MMAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by hydride generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC–HG-AFS). Only the inorganic species were detected in any of the wood leachates; no organoarsenic species were found. Inorganic As(V) was the major detectable species leaching from both new and weathered wood. The weathered wood leached relatively more overall arsenic and was attributed to increased inorganic As(III) leaching. The greater presence of As(III) in the weathered wood samples as compared to the new wood samples may be due to natural chemical and biological transformations during the weathering process. CCA-treated wood ash leached more arsenic than unburned wood using the SPLP and TCLP, and ash samples leached more inorganic As(III) than the unburned counterparts. Increased leaching was due

  1. Evaluating landfill disposal of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood and potential effects on groundwater: evidence from Florida.

    PubMed

    Saxe, Jennifer K; Wannamaker, Eric J; Conklin, Scott W; Shupe, Todd F; Beck, Barbara D

    2007-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has been used for more than 50 years. Recent attention has been focused on appropriate disposal of CCA-treated wood when its service life ends. Groups in the US and Europe concerned with the possibility of arsenic migration to groundwater from disposed CCA-treated wood have proposed that consumers be required to dispose of the wood as a hazardous waste, in the most protective of landfills. We examined available data for evidence of arsenic migration from unlined construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills in Florida, where CCA-treated wood is disposed. Florida was chosen because soil, groundwater, landfill design, weather, and levels of CCA-treated wood use make the state a uniquely sensitive indicator for observing arsenic migration from CCA-treated wood disposal sites, should it occur. We developed and quality-checked a CCA-treated wood disposal model to estimate the amount of wood and associated arsenic disposed. By 2000, an estimated 13 million kg of arsenic in CCA-treated wood was disposed in Florida; however, groundwater monitoring data do not indicate that arsenic is migrating from unlined C&D landfills. Our results provide evidence that highly stringent regulation of CCA-treated wood disposal, such as treatment as a hazardous waste, is unnecessary.

  2. A spectrocolorimetric and chemical study on color modification of heat-treated wood during artificial weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the wood surface color modifications of three North American species (jack pine, aspen, and birch) heat-treated under different temperatures was studied by spectrocolorimetric colormeter (datacolor, CHECK TM). Data was analyzed using the reflectance spectra (400-700 nm) as well as the CIE-L*a*b* system and ΔE. Kubelka-Munk (K-M) spectra of samples were recorded as a function of artificial weathering time to obtain the absorption maxima of the chromophore woods formed during artificial weathering. The results were compared with those of the respective untreated (Kiln-dried) species. Analysis of chemical components shows that the lignin percent of jack pine, aspen, and birch increased after heat treatment (28.66-35.9%, 20.27-26.41%, and 19.04-22.71% respectively) which might be due to smaller influence of heat treatment on lignin content than hemicelluloses. This improves the resistance of heat-treated wood to photo-degradation. This is also supported by the smaller change observed in K-M spectra and total color parameters in CIE-L*a*b* system of heat-treated wood samples compared to those of untreated wood when weathered for72 h. However, the lignin percent of heat-treated woods reduce to maximum 2.5% after artificial weathering of 1512 h. This suggests that the weathering degrades most lignin matrix; consequently, both the colors of heat-treated woods and untreated woods are lighter and very similar after a long period of artificial weathering.

  3. [Characterization of Wood Surface Treated with Electroless Copper Plating by Near Infrared Spectroscopy Technology].

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Zhang, Mao-mao; Zhao, Guang-jie; Yang, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Wood electromagnetic shielding material, which was made by treating wood with electroless plating, not only keep the superior characteristics of wood, but also improve the conductivity, thermal conductivity and electromagnetic shielding properties of wood. The emergence of this material opens the way to the value-added exploitation of wood and widens the processing and application field for the electromagnetic shielding material. In order to explore the feasibility of using NIR technology to investigate the properties of wood electromagnetic shielding material, this study analysis the samples before and after copper plated process by the NIR spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA). The results showed that (1) there exist significant differences between samples before and after copper plated process both on the spectral shape and absorption, and the great differences can also be seen in the samples with different treat time, especially for the samples with 5 min treat time; (2) after PCA analysis, six clusters from the samples before and after copper plated process were separately distributed in the score plot, and the properties of untreated wood and sensitized wood were similar, and the properties of samples for 25 and 40 min treat time were also similar in order that these samples were close to each other, all of which might suggest that the NIR spectroscopy reflected major feature information about material treatment; (3) After comparing the PCA performance between NIR and visible spectral region, it could be found that the classification performance of samples before and after copper plated process based on the NIR region were better than that based on the visible region, and the information of color on the surface of samples were preferably reflected in the visible region, which could indicate that there are more information about samples' surface characters using the visible spectroscopy coupled with NIR spectroscopy and it is feasible to

  4. Fractionation of heavy metals in liquefied chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood sludge using a modified BCR-sequential extraction procedure

    Treesearch

    Hui Pan; Chung-Yun Hse; Robert Gambrell; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was liquefied with polyethylene glycol/glycerin and sulfuric acid. After liquefaction, most CCA metals (98% As, 92% Cr, and 83% Cu) were removed from liquefied CCA-treated wood by precipitation with calcium hydroxide. The original CCA-treated wood and liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge were fractionated by a modified...

  5. Microbial Studies of Biofouling of Treated and Untreated Wood Pilings in the Marine Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    271:452-455. Austin, B., D.A. Allen, A. Zachary, M.R. Belas and R.R. Colwell. 1979. Ecology and taxonomy of bacteria attaching to wood surfaces in a...Austin, B., D.A. Allen, A. Zachary, M.R. Belas and R.R. Colwell. 1979. Ecology and taxonomy of bacteria attaching to wood surfaces in a tropical... Ecology Studies of Biofouling of Treated and Untreated Wood Pilings in the Marine Environment by R.R. Colwell .i Department of Microbiology University of

  6. Uncertainties in corrosion rate measurements of fasteners exposed to treated wood at 100% relative humidity

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect that uncertainties in measurements of time, weight, and surface area have on the determination of the corrosion rate of metal fasteners in contact with wood. Three different types of nails were driven into alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ)-treated wood and exposed to 26.7°C (80°C) at 100 % relative humidity environment for up to 1 year....

  7. Process for treating spent catalyst including antimony halides from chlorofluorocarbon production

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcevic, V.; McGahan, J.F.

    1988-06-14

    A process for treating spent catalyst from chlorofluorocarbon production is described wherein the catalyst includes antimony halides and undergoes hydrolysis in an aqueous medium to produce insoluble antimony compounds and fluoride ions. The process comprises hydrolyzing the catalyst in an aqueous solution of ferric chloride having a sufficient concentration of ferric ions to complex substantially all of the fluoride ions produced upon hydrolysis of the catalyst, neutralizing the reaction mass present following hydrolysis of the catalyst and complexing of the fluoride ions by contacting the reaction mass with an aqueous suspension of a compound selected from the class consisting of calcium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide, and separating the insoluble antimony compounds from the neutralized reaction mass.

  8. Biodegradation and decolourization of anaerobically treated distillery spent wash by a novel bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Desai, Chirayu; Madamwar, Datta

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate microorganisms capable of decolourizing and degrading anaerobically treated distillery spent wash. A bacterial consortium DMC comprising of three bacterial cultures was selected on the basis of rapid effluent decolourization and degradation, which exhibited 67 +/- 2% decolourization within 24 h and 51 +/- 2% chemical oxygen demand reduction within 72 h when incubated at 37 degrees C under static condition in effluent supplemented with 0.5% glucose, 0.1% KH(2)PO(4), 0.05% KCl and 0.05% MgSO(4) x 7H(2)O. Addition of organic or inorganic nitrogen sources did not support decolourization. The cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Stenotrophomonas maltophila and Proteus mirabilis by the 16S rDNA analysis.

  9. Properties of structural panels fabricated from bioremediated CCA-treated wood: pilot scale

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; James H. Muehl; Andrzej M. Krzysik

    2006-01-01

    Particleboard and flakeboard panels were fabricated from remediated CCA-treated southern yellow pine. Treated wood, flaked or comminuted into particles, was remediated in 12-kg batches using oxalic acid extraction, followed by bioleaching with the metal-tolerant bacterium Bacillus licheniformis. Remediation resulted in removal of 80 percent Cu, 71 percent Cr, and 89...

  10. Utilization of treated conifer wood chips by Pleurotus (Fr.) P. Karst. species for cultivating mushrooms

    Treesearch

    Suki C. Croan

    2003-01-01

    Mushroom-producing white-rot basidiomycetes can grow rapidly and produce heavy mycelial growth on treated conifer wastes with extractive-degrading fungi. This study evaluates the treatment of scaled-up conifer wood chips with Ophiostoma piliferum (Cartapip 97). Treated conifer chips were used as substrates for cultivating mushroom-producing basidiomycetes of various...

  11. Fifty-Year Durability Evaluation of Posts Treated with Industrial Wood Preservatives

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Grant T. Kirker; Rachel Arango

    2015-01-01

    Long-term durability data are needed to improve service life estimates for treated wood products used as critical structural supports in industrial applications. This article reports the durability of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) posts pressure treated with ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA), chromated copper arsenate (CCA), creosote, or...

  12. Accelerated weathering of fire-retardant-treated wood for fire testing

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2009-01-01

    Fire-retardant-treated products for exterior applications must be subjected to actual or accelerated weathering prior to fire testing. For fire-retardant-treated wood, the two accelerated weathering methods have been Method A and B of ASTM D 2898. The rain test is Method A of ASTM D 2898. Method B includes exposures to ultraviolet (UV) sunlamps in addition to water...

  13. Effect of coating systems on the vaporization of pentachlorophenol from treated wood

    Treesearch

    L. L. Ingram; G. D. McGinnis; P. M. Pope; W. C. Feist

    1983-01-01

    Specimens of southern pine treated with pentachlorophenol (penta) in mineral spirits (dip treatment), penta in P9 type A oil and penta in methylene chloride (pressure treatments) were used to evaluate the efficacy of different types of coatings in suppressing the vaporization of penta from treated wood. The clear film-forming coatings, such as polyurethane and alkyds,...

  14. Leaching characteristics of CCA-treated wood waste: a UK study.

    PubMed

    Mercer, T G; Frostick, L E

    2012-06-15

    CCA-treated wood is expected to increase in the UK waste stream over the next 20-50 years. The potential pollution from this waste has been evaluated through two leaching studies, one based upon batch leaching tests and another based upon a series of lysimeter tests. The aim of the studies was to characterise the behaviour of arsenic (As), chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) from this wood when applied to soil as a mulch. Results demonstrate that all three elements leach from CCA waste wood, occasionally in concentrations exceeding regulatory thresholds by two to three orders of magnitude. In the lysimeter study, wood mulch monofills and wood mulch in combination with soil were used to monitor the leaching of As, Cr and Cu. Peak concentrations for As, Cr and Cu were 1885 μg/l, 1243 μg/l and 1261 μg/l, respectively. Freshly treated wood leached 11, 23 and 33 times more Cu, Cr and As, respectively than weathered wood. The toxic and mobile species of arsenic (As III, As V) were detected. Leaching in the CCA wood monofill was influenced by rainfall, with higher concentrations of metal(loid)s produced in lower intensity events. As and Cu were mobilised preferentially, with all metals exhibiting similar temporal trends. Retention of leached metal(loid)s was observed in lysimeters containing soil. Leaching processes appear to be favoured by the chipping process, diffusion and weathering. This study has shown that weathered waste wood mulch can cause significant pollution in soil water with potential impacts on both the environment and human health.

  15. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Raw and Pre-treated Brewery Spent Grain Utilizing Solid State Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Panjičko, Mario; Zupančič, Gregor Drago; Zelić, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The brewery spent grain (BSG) represents approximately 85% of the total quantity of by-products from the brewing industry. The biogas production from the BSG has been the subject of several studies in recent years, due to relatively high energy consumption in the brewing process and due to the increasing energy costs. The biodegradability of raw and pre-treated BSG in a single-stage and two-stage solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) system was determined in this study. The results show that the BSG have a biogas potential of 120 L/kg(-1). In the single-stage system, the biogas yield obtained from raw BSG (87.4 L/kg(-1)) was almost equal to the yield obtained from the pre-treated BSG (89.1 L/kg(-1)), while the methane yield was 51.9 and 55.3 L/kg(-1) and the biodegradation was 62.0% and 62.2% for raw and pre-treated BSG, respectively. In two-stage SS-AD the pre-treated BSG showed better results, with the biogas yield of 103.2 L/kg(-1) and the biodegradation of 73.6%, while the biogas yield obtained from raw BSG was 89.1 L/kg(-1), with the biodegradation of 63.5%. In two-stage process the obtained methane yields from raw and pre-treated BSG were identical (58.7 L/kg(-1)).

  16. Potassium methyl siliconate-treated pulp fibers and their effects on wood plastic composites: Water sorption and dimensional stability

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Monlezun

    2013-01-01

    Potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) was investigated as a new nano modifier of wood fiber and wood flour to improve the compatibility between the fiber/flour and the plastic matrix in fiber reinforced plastic composites. Before injection molding, bleached and brown pulp fibers and mixed species wood flour were pretreated in PMS solutions. The morphology of the treated...

  17. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD, INTERIM DATA REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is approximately 20 months into a project to evaluate the performance of wood coatings as a way to prevent arsenic, chromium and copper exposure from the surfaces of CCA treated wood. Potential dermal exposure, as measured by wipe sampling dislodgeable CCA chemical from wood ...

  18. Wolfiporia cocos : a potential agent for composting of bioprocessing Douglas-fir wood treated with copper-based preservatives

    Treesearch

    Rodney. De Groot; Bessie. Woodward

    1998-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, Douglas-fir wood blocks that were treated with copper- based wood preservatives were challenged with two wood decay fungi known to be tolerant of copper. Factors influencing the amount of decay, as determined by loss of weight in the test blocks, were preservative, then fungus. Within those combinations, the relative importance of...

  19. Effect of weathering on chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood : leaching of metal salts and change in water repellency

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams; Stan Lebow; Patricia Lebow

    2003-01-01

    Wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative is commonly used for outdoor construction. Oxides of arsenic, copper, and chromium are bound in the wood by a complex series of chemical reactions, but a small percentage of these compounds are gradually released by leaching and weathering. Recent studies suggest that the release of these...

  20. Performance of Northeastern United States wood species treated with copper based preservatives: 10 year above-ground decking evaluation

    Treesearch

    S. T. Lebow; S. A. Halverson

    2015-01-01

    Research was conducted to evaluate the decking performance of northeastern United States wood species treated with copper based preservatives. Decking specimens were treated with one of four wood preservatives and exposed near Madison, Wisconsin. Specimens were evaluated for biological attack and dimensional stability. After 10 years, none of the preservative treated...

  1. CCA-TREATED WOOD DISPOSED IN LANDFILLS AND LIFE-CYCLE TRADE-OFFS WITH WASTE-TO-ENERGY AND MSW LANDFILL DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood is a preservative treated wood construction product that grew in use in the 1970s for both residential and industrial applications. In the U.S. CCA-treated wood is disposed primarily within landfills, however some of the wood is combu...

  2. CCA-TREATED WOOD DISPOSED IN LANDFILLS AND LIFE-CYCLE TRADE-OFFS WITH WASTE-TO-ENERGY AND MSW LANDFILL DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood is a preservative treated wood construction product that grew in use in the 1970s for both residential and industrial applications. In the U.S. CCA-treated wood is disposed primarily within landfills, however some of the wood is combu...

  3. Mycelium growth and degradation of creosote-treated wood by basydiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Galli, E; Brancaleoni, E; Di Mario, F; Donati, E; Frattoni, M; Polcaro, C M; Rapanà, P

    2008-07-01

    Tolerance of wood decay fungi of the genera Agrocybe, Armillaria, Auricularia, Daedalea, Pleurotus, Trametes to the presence of various amounts of creosote-treated wood (CTW) in the growth medium was compared. In the case of the most tolerant strain, Pleurotus ostreatus SMR 684, extracellular laccase and peroxidase specific activities were monitored during growth in the presence of CTW. Degradation of various creosote-constituting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by this strain was evaluated by GC-MS and the ecotoxicity of treated and untreated CTW was compared by Microtox test.

  4. Relative leaching and aquatic toxicity of pressure-treated wood products using batch leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Stook, Kristin; Tolaymat, Thabet; Ward, Marnie; Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Bitton, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Size-reduced samples of southern yellow pine dimensional lumber, each treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-h batch leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary, copper boron azole, copper citrate, and copper dimethyldithiocarbamate. An unpreserved wood sample was tested as well. The batch leaching tests followed methodology prescribed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The wood samples were first size-reduced and then leached using four different leaching solutions (synthetic landfill leachate, synthetic rainwater, deionized water, and synthetic seawater). CCA-treated wood leached greater concentrations of arsenic and copper relative to chromium, with copper leaching more with the TCLP and synthetic seawater. Copper leached at greater concentrations from the arsenic-free preservatives relative to CCA. Arsenic leached from CCA-treated wood at concentrations above the U.S. federal toxicity characteristic limit (5 mg/L). All of the arsenic-free alternatives displayed a greater degree of aquatic toxicity compared to CCA. Invertebrate and algal assays were more sensitive than Microtox. Examination of the relative leaching of the preservative compounds indicated that the arsenic-free preservatives were advantageous over CCA with respect to waste disposal and soil contamination issues but potentially posed a greater risk to aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Processes for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil, and apparatuses for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    DOEpatents

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-11-24

    Processes and apparatuses for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided herein. An exemplary process for washing a spent ion exchange bed employed in purification of biomass-derived pyrolysis oil includes the step of providing a ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream is partially hydrotreated to reduce the oxygen content thereof, thereby producing a partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream having a residual oxygen content that is less than the original oxygen content. At least a portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream is passed through the spent ion exchange bed. Water is passed through the spent ion exchange bed after passing at least the portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream therethrough.

  6. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about possible human or environmental exposure. Two common pathways ...

  7. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about possible human or environmental exposure. Two common pathways ...

  8. A pilot study of children's exposure to CCA-treated wood from playground equipment.

    PubMed

    Shalat, S L; Solo-Gabriele, H M; Fleming, L E; Buckley, B T; Black, K; Jimenez, M; Shibata, T; Durbin, M; Graygo, J; Stephan, W; Van De Bogart, G

    2006-08-15

    Arsenic from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, widely used in playgrounds and other outdoor equipment, can persist as surface residues on wood. This raises concerns about possible health risks associated with children playing on CCA-treated playgrounds. In a Pilot Study, 11 children (13-71 months) in homes with and without CCA-treated playgrounds were evaluated with post-exposure hand rinses and urine for total arsenic. Samples of wood, soil, and mulch, as well as synthetic wipes, were sampled for total arsenic. In non-CCA-treated playgrounds vs. CCA-treated playgrounds, respectively, wood arsenic was <2.0 mg/kg vs. mean arsenic 2370 mg/kg (range 1440-3270 mg/kg); soil arsenic was <3.0 mg/kg vs. mean arsenic of 19 mg/kg (range 4.0-42 mg/kg); mulch arsenic at one non-CCA-treated playground was 0.4 mg/kg vs. two CCA-treated playgrounds of 0.6 and 69 mg/kg. The arsenic removed using a synthetic wipe at non-CCA-treated playgrounds was <0.5 microg, while mean arsenic from CCA-treated wood was 117 microg (range 1.0-313). The arsenic mass from hand rinses for children who played at non-CCA-treated playgrounds was <0.2 microg, while mean arsenic mass was 0.6 microg (range <0.2-1.9) at CCA-treated playgrounds. Mean urinary total arsenic levels were 13.6 pg/ml (range 7.2-23.1 pg/ml) for all children evaluated, but there was no association between access to CCA-playgrounds and urinary arsenic levels. Arsenic speciation was not performed. This preliminary Pilot Study of CCA-treated wood playgrounds observed dislodgeable arsenic on 11 children's hands after brief periods of play exposure. Future efforts should increase the number of children and the play exposure periods, and incorporate speciation in order to discriminate between various sources of arsenic.

  9. From hazardous waste to valuable raw material: hydrolysis of CCA-treated wood for the production of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hakola, Maija; Kallioinen, Anne; Leskelä, Markku; Repo, Timo

    2013-05-01

    Solid wood, metal finnish: Instead of burning waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenite (CCA) or disposing of it in landfills, the CCA-treated wood can be used as a raw material for the production of chemicals. Catalytic or alkaline oxidation together with very mild sulfuric acid extraction produces an easily enzymatically hydrolyzable material. Usage as a raw material for the chemical industry in this manner demonstrates a sustainable and value-added waste management process.

  10. Adsorption of colored pollutants from distillery spent wash by native and treated fungus: neurospora intermedia.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Garima; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2013-02-01

    The native and physico-chemically treated fungal biomasses of Neurospora intermedia were used for adsorption of colored pollutants from distillery spent wash in batch systems. Experiments were conducted at varying color concentrations of the effluent (1,000-6,500 CU). The kinetics of effect of initial sorbate concentration, dose of biosorbent, temperature, and pH on adsorption were studied. Physical and chemical pretreatments of biomass resulted in an increase or decrease in color removal capacity. This effect was further studied by FTIR analysis of the dried fungal mycelium. The maximum color uptake on all the tested fungal biomass preparations was observed at pH 3.0 and temperature 30 °C, within first 4 h. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the biosorption equilibrium and the data showed an optimal fit to these isotherms. Kinetic parameters indicated the dominance of Lagergren pseudo first-order kinetic model for adsorption. On the basis of maximum adsorption capacity, the color removal capacity by fungal preparations was in the order of native > heat > acid, base.

  11. Application of microbial electrolysis cells to treat spent yeast from an alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Hernández, Ornella; Popat, Sudeep C; Parameswaran, Prathap; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán Sidney; Torres, César I; Buitrón, Germán; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Spent yeast (SY), a major challenge for the brewing industry, was treated using a microbial electrolysis cell to recover energy. Concentrations of SY from bench alcoholic fermentation and ethanol were tested, ranging from 750 to 1500mgCOD/L and 0 to 2400mgCOD/L respectively. COD removal efficiency (RE), coulombic efficiency (CE), coulombic recovery (CR), hydrogen production and current density were evaluated. The best treatment condition was 750mgCOD/LSY+1200mgCOD/L ethanol giving higher COD RE, CE, CR (90±1%, 90±2% and 81±1% respectively), as compared with 1500mgCOD/LSY (76±2%, 63±7% and 48±4% respectively); ethanol addition was significantly favorable (p value=0.011), possibly due to electron availability and SY autolysis. 1500mgCOD/LSY+1200mgCOD/L ethanol achieved higher current density (222.0±31.3A/m(3)) and hydrogen production (2.18±0.66 [Formula: see text] ) but with lower efficiencies (87±2% COD RE, 71.0±.4% CE). Future work should focus on electron sinks, acclimation and optimizing SY breakdown.

  12. Corrosion rates of fasteners in treated wood exposed to 100% relative humidity

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    In the past, gravimetric corrosion data for fasteners exposed to treated wood has been reported as a percent weight loss. Although percent weight loss is a valid measure of corrosion for comparing identical fasteners, it can distort the corrosion performance of fasteners with different geometries and densities. This report reevaluates a key report on the corrosiveness...

  13. WASTE REDUCTION PRACTICES AT TWO CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE WOOD-TREATING PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood-treating plants were assessed for their waste reduction practices. The objectives of this study were to estimate the amount of hazardous wastes that a well-designed and well-main- tained CCA treatment facility would generate and to iden- t...

  14. EMISSIONS OF CHROMIUM, COPPER, ARSENIC AND PCDDS/FS FROM OPEN BURNING OF CCA TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aged and weathered chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood was burned in an open burn research facility to characterize the air emissions and residual bottom ash. In addition to continuous measurements of gases and temperature, samples were collected to characterize the emis...

  15. New Approach to Remove Metals from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)-Treated Wood

    Treesearch

    Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Hui Pan

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood particles was investigated using binary acid solutions consisting of acetic, oxalic, and phosphoric acids in a microwave reactor. Formation of an insoluble copper oxalate complex in the binary solution containing oxalic acid was the major factor for low copper removal. Furthermore, the...

  16. PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION FROM DIRECT BURNING OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL-TREATED WOOD WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to identify potential air pollution problems from the combustion of waste wood treated with pentachlorophenol preservative for energy production in a boiler. The study emphasized the characterization of the products of incomplete combustion (PI...

  17. Moisture storage and transport properties of preservative treated and untreated southern pine wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman; Dominique. Derome

    2016-01-01

    Moisture storage and transport properties of southern pine (Pinus spp.) wood were measured for implementation into hygrothermal models. Specimens were untreated or pressure-treated with alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) preservative. Moisture storage was characterized with sorption isotherms in the hygroscopic region (high capillary pressures) and...

  18. Resistance of borax–copper treated wood in aboveground exposure to attack by Formosan subterranean termites

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Douglas Crawford; William Abbott

    2005-01-01

    The spread of Formosan subterranean termites (FSTs) in the southern United States has increased public interest in finding a preservative treatment to protect framing lumber from termite attack. This study evaluated the use of a borax-based preservative to protect wood from FST attack. Southern Pine and Douglas-fir specimens were pressure-treated with three...

  19. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to preservative-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Chi-Leung So; Stan T. Lebow; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Leslie H. Groom; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is now a widely-used technique in the field of forest products, especially for physical and mechanical property determinations. This technique is also ideal for the chemical analysis of wood. There has been a growing need to find a rapid, inexpensive and reliable method to distinguish between preservative-treated and untreated waste...

  20. Integrated Study of the Potential Application of Remediated CCA Treated Spruce Wood in MDF Production

    Treesearch

    Ronald Sabo; Altaf H. Basta; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2013-01-01

    Public health awareness has increased in the past few years regarding the disposal of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) preservative-treated wood wastes. This study demonstrates the potential for using remediated CCA lumber and alternative fiber sources, such as sugar cane bagasse, to produce medium density fiberboard (MDF). The role of both remediated CCA loaded spruce...

  1. WASTE REDUCTION PRACTICES AT TWO CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE WOOD-TREATING PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood-treating plants were assessed for their waste reduction practices. The objectives of this study were to estimate the amount of hazardous wastes that a well-designed and well-main- tained CCA treatment facility would generate and to iden- t...

  2. PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION FROM DIRECT BURNING OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL-TREATED WOOD WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to identify potential air pollution problems from the combustion of waste wood treated with pentachlorophenol preservative for energy production in a boiler. The study emphasized the characterization of the products of incomplete combustion (PI...

  3. Phosphate removal by refined aspen wood fiber treated with carboxymethyl cellulose and ferrous chloride

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Soo-Hong Min; James S. Han

    2006-01-01

    Biomass-based filtration media are of interest as an economical means to remove pollutants and nutrients found in stormwater runoff. Refined aspen wood fiber samples treated with iron salt solutions demonstrated limited capacities to remove (ortho)phosphate from test solutions. To provide additional sites for iron complex formation, and thereby impart a greater...

  4. The application of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to inorganic preservative-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Chi-Leung So; Stan T. Lebow; Leslie H. Groom; Timothy G. Rials

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing need to find a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable method to distinguish between treated and untreated waste wood. This paper evaluates the ability of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with multivariate analysis (MVA) to distinguish preservative types and retentions. It is demonstrated that principal component analysis (PCA) can differentiate lumber...

  5. Laboratory Evaluations of Durability of Southern Pine Pressure Treated With Extractives From Durable Wood Species

    Treesearch

    Grant T. Kirker; Amy Blodgett; Patricia Lebow

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from sawdust of four naturally durable wood species [Alaskan yellow cedar, AYC, Cupressus nootkanansis D. Don 1824; eastern red cedar, ERC, Juniperus virginiana L.; honey mesquite, HM, Prosopis glandulosa Torr.; and black locust, BL, Robinia pseudoacacia L.] were used to treat...

  6. Nondestructive methods of evaluating quality of wood in preservative-treated piles

    Treesearch

    Xiping. Wang; Robert J. Ross; John R. Erickson; John W. Forsman; Gary D. McGinnis; Rodney C. De Groot

    2000-01-01

    Stress-wave-based nondestructive evaluation methods were used to evaluate the potential quality and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of wood in used preservative-treated Douglas-fir and southern pine piles. Stress wave measurements were conducted on each pile section. Stress wave propagation speeds in the piles were then obtained to estimate their MOE. This was followed by...

  7. Long-term efficacy of wood dip-treated with multicomponent biocides

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2005-01-01

    Biocides designed for prevention of indoor mold growth on wood-based materials need to provide long-term protection under conditions of high humidity. Specimens of kiln-dried southern pine and unseasoned southern pine, aspen, and Douglas-fir were dip-treated with borate-dimethylcocoamine (DMCA) supplemented with voriconazole, thiabendazole, or thujaplicin and evaluated...

  8. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about the exposure of humans as well as the environment to the parti...

  9. Above ground performance of preservative-treated western wood species

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey J. Morrell; D.J. Miller; Stan T. Lebow

    2000-01-01

    Incised and non-incised Douglas-fir, western hemlock, and ponderosa pine L- joints were treated with ammoniacal-based pentachlorophenol, chromated zinc chloride, thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole (TCMBT) or TCMTB plus methylenebisthiocyanate or 3 iodo-2-propynyl carbamate with or without chlorpyrifos to retentions between 0.8 and 6.4 kg/m3 and exposed, uncoated, above...

  10. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about the exposure of humans as well as the environment to the parti...

  11. Fungal bioremediation of creosote-treated wood: a laboratory scale study on creosote components degradation by Pleurotus ostreatus mycelium.

    PubMed

    Polcaro, C M; Brancaleoni, E; Donati, E; Frattoni, M; Galli, E; Migliore, L; Rapanà, P

    2008-08-01

    A bioremediation system for creosote-treated wood is proposed, based on the detoxifying capability of Pleurotus ostreatus, a ligninolythic fungus. Non-sterilized chipped contaminated wood was mixed at various ratios with wheat straw on which Pleurotus mycelia was grown. At 1:2 initial ratio contaminated wood:wheat straw, chemical analyses demonstrated an almost complete degradation of creosote oil components after 44 days, also confirmed by a significant reduction of ecotoxicity. Lower ratios, i.e. higher amount of contaminated wood, lower system efficiency, although a better creosote degradation was obtained by a stepped up wood addition.

  12. Rapid microwave-assisted acid extraction of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood

    Treesearch

    Bin Yu; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    The effects of acid concentration, reaction time, and temperature in a microwave reactor on recovery of CCA-treated wood were evaluated. Extraction of copper, chromium, and arsenic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood samples with three different acids (i.e., acetic acid, oxalic acid, and phosphoric acid) was investigated using in...

  13. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition.

  14. Metal loss from treated wood products in contact with municipal solid waste landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2010-03-15

    The research presented in this paper evaluates the potential impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill leachate quality on the loss of metals from discarded treated wood during disposal. The loss of arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), and boron (B) from several types of pressure-treated wood (CCA: chromated copper arsenate, ACQ: alkaline copper quaternary, CBA: copper boron azole, and DOT: disodium octaborate tetrahydrate) using leachate collected from 26 MSW landfills in Florida was examined. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), and California's waste extraction test (WET) were also performed. The results suggested that loss of preservative components was influenced by leachate chemistry. Copper loss from CCA-, ACQ- and CBA-treated wood was similar in magnitude when in contact with landfill leachates compared to synthetic TCLP and SPLP solutions. Ammonia was found as one of the major parameters influencing the leaching of Cu from treated wood when leached with MSW landfill leachates. The results suggest that disposal of ACQ- and CBA-treated wood in substantial quantity in MSW landfills may elevate the Cu concentration in the leachate; this could be of potential concern, especially for a bioreactor MSW landfill in which relatively higher ammonia concentrations in leachate have been reported in recent literature. For the As, Cr and B the concentrations observed with the landfill leachate as the leaching solutions were over a range from some sample showing the concentrations below and some showing above the observed value from corresponding SPLP and TCLP tests. In general the WET test showed the highest concentrations.

  15. Ground-contact durability of wood treated with borax-copper preservative

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Patricia K. Lebow

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a borax-copper(BC) preservative to protect wood exposed in ground contact. Southern pine sapwood stakes were pressure-treated with 0.9%, 1.4%, 2.3%, and 4.7% BC solution concentrations and placed into the ground at test sites near Mississippi, or Madison, Wisconsin. Untreated stakes and stakes treated with 1% chromated copper...

  16. Pilot-scale investigation of the robustness and efficiency of a copper-based treated wood wastes recycling process.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Lucie; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Gastonguay, Louis; Morris, Paul; Janin, Amélie; Reynier, Nicolas

    2013-10-15

    The disposal of metal-bearing treated wood wastes is becoming an environmental challenge. An efficient recycling process based on sulfuric acid leaching has been developed to remove metals from copper-based treated wood chips (0treated wood wastes at a pilot plant scale (130-L reactor tank). After 3 × 2 h leaching steps followed by 3 × 7 min rinsing steps, up to 97.5% of As, 87.9% of Cr, and 96.1% of Cu were removed from CCA-treated wood wastes with different initial metal loading (>7.3 kgm(-3)) and more than 94.5% of Cu was removed from ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood. The treatment of effluents by precipitation-coagulation was highly efficient; allowing removals more than 93% for the As, Cr, and Cu contained in the effluent. The economic analysis included operating costs, indirect costs and revenues related to remediated wood sales. The economic analysis concluded that CCA-treated wood wastes remediation can lead to a benefit of 53.7 US$t(-1) or a cost of 35.5 US$t(-1) and that ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood wastes recycling led to benefits ranging from 9.3 to 21.2 US$t(-1).

  17. Wood

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Robert H. White; Antoni TenWolde; William Simpson; Joseph Murphy; Robert J. Ross; Roland Hernandez; Stan T. Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood is a naturally formed organic material consisting essentially of elongated tubular elements called cells arranged in a parallel manner for the most part. These cells vary in dimensions and wall thickness with position in the tree, age, conditions of growth, and kind of tree. The walls of the cells are formed principally of chain molecules of cellulose, polymerized...

  18. Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.E. ); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

  19. Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.E.; Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

  20. Soil quality in a cropland soil treated with wood ash containing charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omil, Beatriz; Balboa, Miguel A.; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Arias-González, Ander; Vega, Jose A.; Merino, Agustin

    2014-05-01

    The strategy of the European Union "Europe 2020" states that by 2020, 20% of final energy consumption must come from renewables. In this scenario, there is an increasing use of biomass utilization for energy production. Indeed, it is expected that the production of wood-ash will increase in coming years. Wood ash, a mixture of ash and charcoal, generated as a by-product of biomass combustion in power plants, can be applied to soil to improve the soil quality and crop production. Since the residue contains significant content of charcoal, the application of mixed wood ash may also improve the SOM content and soil quality in the long term, in soils degraded as a consequence of intensive management. The objective of this study was asses the changes in SOM quality and soil properties in a degraded soils treated with wood ash containing charcoal. The study was carried out in a field devoted to cereal crops during the last decades. The soil was acidic (pH 4.5) with a low SOC content (3 %) and fine texture. The experiment was based on a randomised block design with four replicates. Each block included the following four treatments: Control, 16 Mg fly wood ash ha-1, 16 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (16 Mg) and 32 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (32 Mg). The application was carried out once. The ash used in the study was obtained from a thermal power plant and was mainly derived from the combustion of Pinus radiata bark and branches. The wood ash is highly alkaline (pH= 10), contains 10 % of highly condensed black carbon (atomic H/C ratio < 0.5 and T50 en DSC= 500 ºC). The evolution of SOM properties were monitored over three years by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). These techniques were applied in bulk samples and aggregates of different sizes. The changes in microbial activity were studied by analysis of microbial biomass C and basal respiration. The soil bacterial community was studied by the Biolog method. Several physical properties, such soil

  1. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD; FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a study to evaluate the effect of coatings on dislodgeable arsenic, chromium, and copper residues on the surfaces of chromated copper arsenate (CAA) treated wood. Dislodgeable CCA, determined by wipe sampling the wood surfaces, was the primary evaluation criterion f...

  2. Improving the two-step remediation process for CCA-treated wood. Part I, Evaluating oxalic acid extraction

    Treesearch

    Carol Clausen

    2004-01-01

    In this study, three possible improvements to a remediation process for chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) treated wood were evaluated. The process involves two steps: oxalic acid extraction of wood fiber followed by bacterial culture with Bacillus licheniformis CC01. The three potential improvements to the oxalic acid extraction step were (1) reusing oxalic acid for...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD; FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a study to evaluate the effect of coatings on dislodgeable arsenic, chromium, and copper residues on the surfaces of chromated copper arsenate (CAA) treated wood. Dislodgeable CCA, determined by wipe sampling the wood surfaces, was the primary evaluation criterion f...

  4. Carcinogenic risk of chromium, copper and arsenic in CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Nakano, Chihiro; Wenting, Wu; Ohnuma, Shoko; Kato, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    We showed that 2.1% of 233 pieces of lumber debris after the Great East Japan Earthquake was chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Since hexavalent chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and pentavalent arsenic (As) in the debris may be diffused in the air via incineration, we exposed human lung normal (BEAS-2B) and carcinoma (A549) cells to Cr, Cu and As at the molar ratio in a representative CCA-treated wood. Co-exposure to 0.10 μM Cr and 0.06 μM As, which solely had no effect on colony formation, synergistically promoted colony formation in BEAS-2B cells, but not A549 cells, with activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Sole exposure and co-exposure to Cu showed limited effects. Since previous reports showed Cr and As concentrations to which human lungs might be exposed, our results suggest the importance to avoid diffusion of Cr and As in the air via incineration of debris including CCA-treated wood after the disaster.

  5. Effect of simulated rainfall and weathering on release of preservative elements from CCA treated wood.

    PubMed

    Lebow, Stan; Williams, R Sam; Lebow, Patricia

    2003-09-15

    The release of arsenic from wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) can be decreased by application of wood finishes, but little is known about the types of finishes that are best suited for this purpose. This study evaluated the effects of finish water repellent content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the release of arsenic, copper, and chromium from CCA-treated wood exposed to simulated rainfall. Deck boards treated with CCA were either left unfinished or dipped in a finish prepared with 1%, 3%, or 5% water repellent. All specimens were exposed to leaching from simulated rainfall, and a subset of specimens was also exposed to UV radiation. The rainfall was collected and analyzed for total elemental arsenic, copper, and chromium. The water repellent significantly decreased the amounts of these elements in the runoff, but for the short duration of this study there was no difference among the three water repellent concentrations. It is possible that water repellent content would have a greater effect over a longer exposure period. Exposure to UV radiation caused a significant increase in leaching from both finished and unfinished specimens. This effect may be a result of increased surface area during weathering as well as loss of fibers caused by UV-induced surface erosion.

  6. Waste-minimization assessment for a manufacturer producing treated wood products. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, F.W.; Maginn, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant producing treated wood products--approximately 1,700,000 cu.ft./yr. Railroad crossties and poles are treated with creosote in pressure cylinders to increase their serviceability under conditions that promote decay, weathering, insect destruction, or exposure to fire. Lumber is treated by Wolmanizing, a closed loop process in which a 2% chromated copper arsenate solution is used for treatment in a pressure cylinder. The team's report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that most waste was generated in the creosote treatment process, and also that cost savings could be obtained by arranging an exchange of accumulated bark and wood chips with others who use wood scrap as a raw material.

  7. Decontamination of CCA-treated eucalyptus wood waste by acid leaching.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, Suzana Frighetto; dos Santos, Heldiane Souza; Miranda, Luciana Gampert; Azevedo, Carla Maria Nunes; Maia, Sandra Maria; Pires, Marçal

    2016-03-01

    Preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) are used to increase the resistance of wood to deterioration. The components of CCA are highly toxic, resulting in growing concern over the disposal of the waste generated. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of Cu, Cr and As present in CCA-treated eucalyptus wood from utility poles removed from service in southern Brazil, in order to render them non-hazardous waste. The removal was carried out by acid leaching in bench-scale and applying optimal extractor concentration, total solid content, reactor volume, temperature and reaction time obtained by factorial experiments. The best working conditions were achieved using three extraction steps with 0.1 mol L(-1) H2SO4 at 75°C for 2h each (total solid content of 15%), and 3 additional 1h-long washing steps using water at ambient temperature. Under these conditions, removal of 97%, 85% and 98% were obtained for Cu, Cr and As, respectively, rendering the decontaminated wood non-hazardous waste. The wastewater produced by extraction showed acid pH, high organic loading as well as high concentrations of the elements, needing prior treatment to be discarded. However, rinsing water can be recycled in the extraction process without compromising its efficiency. The acid extraction is a promising alternative for CCA removal from eucalyptus wood waste in industrial scale.

  8. Effects of bulkheads made of pressure-treated wood on estuarine benthos

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, J.S.; Weis, P.

    1995-12-31

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is in very common use for pilings and bulkheads. Studies of benthic effects of bulkheads include chemical analyses of sediments, chemical analysis of uptake by benthic organisms, and the benthic community structure at different distances from the bulkhead. The authors have measured these parameters at a number of CCA bulkheads, at two bulkheads constructed of other materials (untreated hardwood, aluminum) and at unbulkheaded sites. Sediments adjacent to CCA bulkheads had elevated Cu, Cr, and As in the fine particulate fraction, and the concentration of contaminants decreased with distance. However, the percentage of fine particles increased with distance (to 10 or 20 m) as the sandy sediments adjacent to the bulkheads became siltier with greater depth. Benthic organisms (polychaete worms) had the highest body burdens of the contaminants right at the bulkhead and generally decreased with distance, up to 20 m. The benthic community was evaluated by species richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity index, total number of individuals, and dry weight. These parameters were lowest immediately adjacent to CCA wood bulkheads, and recovered at distances where the amount of contamination of the fine particles was reduced. There was not a comparable reduction in the benthic community adjacent to bulkheads made of other materials. The effects of CCA wood were greatest by new wood, and in areas that were poorly flushed. Pilings in well-flushed areas produced no measurable effects.

  9. Phosphate removal by refined aspen wood fiber treated with carboxymethyl cellulose and ferrous chloride.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Thomas L; Min, Soo-Hong; Han, James S

    2006-12-01

    Biomass-based filtration media are of interest as an economical means to remove pollutants and nutrients found in stormwater runoff. Refined aspen wood fiber samples treated with iron salt solutions demonstrated limited capacities to remove (ortho)phosphate from test solutions. To provide additional sites for iron complex formation, and thereby impart a greater capacity for phosphate removal, a fiber pretreatment with an aqueous solution of a non-toxic anionic polymer, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), was evaluated. Problems with excessive viscosities during the screening of commercially available CMC products led to the selection of an ultra low viscosity CMC product that was still usable at a 4% concentration in water. Soxhlet extractions of chipped aspen wood and refined aspen wood fiber samples showed a higher extractives content for the refined material. Analysis of these extracts by FTIR spectroscopy suggested that the higher extractives content for the refined material resulted from the fragmentation of cell wall polymers (e.g., lignin, hemicelluloses) normally insoluble in their native states. Spectroscopic analysis of CMC and ferrous chloride treated fibers showed that the complex formed was sufficiently stable to resist removal during subsequent water washes. Equilibrium sorption data, which fit better with a Freundlich isotherm model than a Langmuir isotherm model, showed that phosphate removal could be enhanced by the CMC pretreatment. Results suggest that the process outlined may provide a facile means to improve the phosphate removal capacity of biomass-based stormwater filtration media.

  10. Release of Arsenic to the Environment from CCA-Treated Wood: Part II – Leaching and Speciation during Disposal

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, BERNINE I.; JAMBECK, JENNA; SOLO-GABRIELE, HELENA M.; TOWNSEND, TIMOTHY G.; CAI, YONG

    2008-01-01

    Wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is primarily disposed within construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills, with wood monofills and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills as alternative disposal options. This study evaluated the extent and speciation of arsenic leaching from landfills containing CCA-treated wood. In control lysimeters where untreated wood was used, DMAA represented the major arsenic species. The dominant arsenic species differed in the lysimeters containing CCA-treated wood, with As(V) greatest in the monofill and C&D lysimeters and As(III) greatest in the MSW lysimeters. In CCA-containing lysimeters, the organoarsenic species MMAA and DMAA were virtually absent in the monofill lysimeter and observed in the C&D and MSW lysimeters. Overall arsenic leaching rate varied for the wood monofill (0.69% per meter of water added), C&D (0.36% per m), and MSW (0.84% per m) lysimeters. Utilizing these rates with annual disposal data, a mathematical model was developed to quantify arsenic leaching from CCA-treated wood disposed to Florida landfills. Model findings showed between 20 to 50 metric tons of arsenic (depending on lysimeter type) had leached prior to 2000 with an expected increase between 350 to 830 metric tons by 2040. Groundwater analysis from 21 Florida C&D landfills suspected of accepting CCA-treated wood showed that groundwater at 3 landfills were characterized by elevated arsenic concentrations with only 1 showing impacts from the C&D waste. The slow release of arsenic from disposed treated wood may account for the lack of significant impact to groundwater near most C&D facilities at this time. However, greater impacts are anticipated in the future given that the maximum releases of arsenic are expected by the year 2100. PMID:16509348

  11. Use of handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometry units for identification of arsenic in treated wood

    PubMed Central

    Block, Colleen N.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of handheld XRF analyzers on wood that has been treated with a preservative containing arsenic. Experiments were designed to evaluate precision, detection limit, effective depth of analysis, and accuracy of the XRF arsenic readings. Results showed that the precision of the XRF improved with increased sample concentration and longer analysis times. Reported detection limits decreased with longer analysis times to values of less than 1 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg, depending on the model used. The effective depth of analysis was within the top 1.2 cm and 2.0 cm of sample for wood containing natural gradients of chemical preservative and concentration extremes, respectively. XRF results were found to be 1.5-2.3 times higher than measurements from traditional laboratory analysis. Equations can be developed to convert XRF values to results which are consistent with traditional laboratory testing. PMID:17241725

  12. Robust and Low-cost Flame-Treated Wood for High-Performance Solar Steam Generation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Guobin; Liu, Kang; Chen, Qian; Yang, Peihua; Li, Jia; Ding, Tianpeng; Duan, Jiangjiang; Qi, Bei; Zhou, Jun

    2017-04-12

    Solar-enabled steam generation has attracted increasing interests in recent years for its potential applications in power generation, desalination and wastewater treatment etc. Latest researches have reported many strategies to promote the efficiency by employing absorbers based on carbon materials or plasmonic metal nanoparticles with well-defined pores. In this work, we report that natural wood can be utilized as an ideal solar absorber after a simple flame treatment. With ultra-high solar absorbance (~99%), low thermal conductivity (0.33 W m-1 K-1), good hydrophilicity, the flame-treated wood can localize the solar-heating at the evaporation surface and enable a solar thermal efficiency of ~72% under a solar intensity of 1 kW m-2, which demonstrating a renewable, scalable, low-cost and robust material for solar steam applications.

  13. Determination of chemical changes in heat-treated wood using ATR-FTIR and FT Raman spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Özgenç, Özlem; Durmaz, Sefa; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Eksi-Kocak, Haslet

    2017-01-15

    In this study, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier-transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy techniques were used to determine changes in the chemical structure of heat-treated woods. For this purpose, scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L.), and oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L.) wood species were heat-treated at different temperatures. The effect of chemical changes on the FT-Raman and ATR-FTIR bands or ratios of heat-treated wood was related with the OH association of cellulose, functional groups, and the aromatic system of lignin. The effects of heat treatment on the carbohydrate and lignin peaks varied depending on the wood species. The spectral changes that occurred after heat treatment reflected the progress of the condensation reaction of lignin. Degradation of hemicelluloses led to a decrease in free hydroxyl groups. High temperature caused crystalline cellulose to increase due to the degradation of amorphous cellulose.

  14. Determination of chemical changes in heat-treated wood using ATR-FTIR and FT Raman spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgenç, Özlem; Durmaz, Sefa; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Eksi-Kocak, Haslet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier-transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy techniques were used to determine changes in the chemical structure of heat-treated woods. For this purpose, scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L.), and oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L.) wood species were heat-treated at different temperatures. The effect of chemical changes on the FT-Raman and ATR-FTIR bands or ratios of heat-treated wood was related with the OH association of cellulose, functional groups, and the aromatic system of lignin. The effects of heat treatment on the carbohydrate and lignin peaks varied depending on the wood species. The spectral changes that occurred after heat treatment reflected the progress of the condensation reaction of lignin. Degradation of hemicelluloses led to a decrease in free hydroxyl groups. High temperature caused crystalline cellulose to increase due to the degradation of amorphous cellulose.

  15. The SHEDS-Wood Model: Incorporation of Observational Data to Estimate Exposure to Arsenic for Children Playing on CCA-Treated Wood Structures

    PubMed Central

    Barraj, Leila M.; Tsuji, Joyce S.; Scrafford, Carolyn G.

    2007-01-01

    Background Lumber treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) compounds has been used in residential outdoor wood structures and public playgrounds. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has conducted a probabilistic assessment of children’s exposure to arsenic using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for the wood preservative scenario (SHEDS-Wood). The assessment relied on data derived from an experimental study conducted using adult volunteers and designed to result in maximum hand and wipe loadings to estimate the residue–skin transfer efficiency. Recent analyses of arsenic hand-loading data generated by studies of children actively involved in playing on CCA-treated structures indicate that the transfer efficiency coefficient and hand-loading estimates derived from the experimental study significantly overestimate the amount that occurs during actual play. Objectives Our goal was to assess the feasibility of using child hand-loading data in the SHEDS-Wood model and their impact on exposure estimates. Methods We used data generated by the larger of the studies of children in SHEDS-Wood, instead of the distributions used by U.S. EPA. We compared our estimates of the lifetime average daily dose (LADD) and average daily dose (ADD) with those derived by the U.S. EPA. Results Our analysis indicates that data from observational studies of children can be used in SHEDS-Wood. Our estimates of the mean (and 95th percentile) LADD and ADD were 27% (10%) and 29% (15%) of the estimates derived by U.S. EPA. Conclusion We recommend that the SHEDS-Woods model use data from studies of children actively playing on playsets to more accurately estimate children’s actual exposures to CCA. PMID:17520068

  16. Counter-current acid leaching process for copper azole treated wood waste.

    PubMed

    Janin, Amélie; Riche, Pauline; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Morris, Paul

    2012-09-01

    This study explores the performance of a counter-current leaching process (CCLP) for copper extraction from copper azole treated wood waste for recycling of wood and copper. The leaching process uses three acid leaching steps with 0.1 M H2SO4 at 75degrees C and 15% slurry density followed by three rinses with water. Copper is recovered from the leachate using electrodeposition at 5 amperes (A) for 75 min. Ten counter-current remediation cycles were completed achieving > or = 94% copper extraction from the wood during the 10 cycles; 80-90% of the copper was recovered from the extract solution by electrodeposition. The counter-current leaching process reduced acid consumption by 86% and effluent discharge volume was 12 times lower compared with the same process without use of counter-current leaching. However, the reuse of leachates from one leaching step to another released dissolved organic carbon and caused its build-up in the early cycles.

  17. Chemical Speciation and Bioaccessibility of Arsenic and Chromiumin Chromated Copper Arsenate-Treated Wood and Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, Peter S.; Ruby, Michael V.; Lowney, Yvette W.; Holm,Stewart E.

    2005-10-12

    This research compares the As and Cr chemistry ofdislodgeable residues from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)-treated woodcollected by two different techniques (directly from the board surfaceeither by rubbing with a soft bristle brush or from human hands aftercontact with CCA-treated wood), and demonstrates that these materials areequivalent in terms of the chemical form and bonding of As and Cr and interms of the As leaching behavior. This finding links the extensivechemical characterization and bioavailability testing that has been donepreviously on the brush-removed residue to a material that is derivedfrom human skin contact with CCA-treated wood. Additionally, thisresearch characterizes the arsenic present in biological fluids (sweatand simulated gastric fluid) following contact with these residues. Thedata demonstrate that in biological fluids, the arsenic is presentprimarily as free arsenate ions.Arsenic-containing soils were alsoextracted into human sweat to evaluate the potential for arsenicdissolution from soils at the skin surface. For soils from field sites,only a small fraction of the total arsenic is soluble in sweat. Based oncomparisons to reference materials that have been used in in vivo dermalabsorption studies, these findings suggest that the actual relativebioavailability via dermal absorption of As from CCA-residues and soilmay be well below the current default value of 3 percent used by U.S.EPA.

  18. Cladosporium sp. , a potential fungus for bioremediation of wood-treating wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Borazjani, H.; Ferguson, B.; Hendrix, F.; McFarland, L.; McGinnis, G.; Pope, D.; Strobel, D.; Wagner, J. )

    1989-01-01

    A fungus, Cladosporium sp., was isolated from a very old wood-treating plant sludge pond in Weed, California. A preliminary study showed no inhibition of mycelial growth at 5,500 {mu}g polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) per ml of potato dextrose agar (PDA). Pentachlorophenol (PCP) inhibited mycelial growth at 10 {mu}g/ml of PDA. Rates of breakdown of both PAHs and PCP in the soil and water system were studied using this fungus. The results of this study and the application of this fungus for cleaning up contaminated sites will be discussed.

  19. Treated wood in transition : a look at CCA and the candidates to replace it

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Jerrold Winandy; Donald Bender

    2003-01-01

    Wood is one of the most versatile and widely used building materials. However, it is also biodegradable, and may be attacked by decay fungi or insects when used in some applications or geographic locations. Uses that allow the wood to frequently become wet, such as embedded posts or other exposed wood members, are familiar examples of applications where wood will...

  20. Treated wood in transition : a look at CCA and the candidates to replace it

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Jerrold Winandy; Donald Bender

    2004-01-01

    Wood is one of the most versatile and widely used building materials. However, it is also biodegradable and may be attacked by decay fungi or insects when used in some applications or geographic locations. Uses that allow the wood to frequently become wet, such as embedded posts or other exposed wood members, are familiar examples of applications where wood will...

  1. Method development for the determination of wood preservatives in commercially treated wood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šťávová, Jana; Sedgeman, Carl A; Smith, Zachary T; Frink, Lillian A; Hart, Jessica A; Niri, Vadoud H; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-09-30

    Fungicides and insecticides are commonly used preservatives to protect wood products against microbiological degradations. Currently, there is a lack of analytical methods addressing the quantitative determination of a wide range of wood preserving species in wood matrices. In this study, a reliable method was developed for the determination of a mixture of wood preserving agents with differing chemical structures (i.e., properties), including tebuconazole (TAZ), propiconazole (PAZ), 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), and permethrin (PER), in pine wood. The analyte recoveries obtained by Soxhlet and multiple-stage sonication extractions were compared. While both extraction methods yielded similar results (80-100%), Soxhlet extraction was found to be less labor-intensive and thus preferred providing also lower RSDs of 1-6%. In comparison to methanol, commonly used as an extraction solvent for triazoles, acetone yielded similar extraction efficiencies for all analytes while reducing the time of sample concentration. The solid phase extraction method for triazoles was adapted to allow for a separation of IPBC and PER from the wood matrix. As opposed to previous studies, three recovery standards were employed, which enabled the correction of individual analyte losses during the sample preparation. The matrix-affected limits of detection (LODs) using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection were nearly the same for triazoles 0.07 and 0.21 ng g(-1) for PAZ and TAZ in sapwood and 0.18 and 0.21 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. Higher LODs were observed for IPBC and PER: 3.9 and 1.7 ng g(-1) in sapwood, and 2.0 and 6.0 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. The recoveries in the wood submitted to commercial sample treatment showed gradient distribution of analytes depending on the penetration of the treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution and oxidation state of copper in the cell walls of treated wood examined by synchrotron based XANES and XFM

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Grant T. Kirker; Joseph E. Jakes; Leandro Passarini; Barry Lai

    2016-01-01

    Recently, synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) were used to examine the metal fastener corrosion in copper-treated wood. XFM is able to map the copper concentration in the wood with a spatial resolution of 0.5 µm and is able to quantify the copper concentration to within 0.05 µg cm-3...

  3. [Possible carcinogenic risk associated with production and use of creosote-treated wood].

    PubMed

    Holme, J A; Refsnes, M; Dybing, E

    1999-08-10

    Creosote is a coal tar product which contains varying amounts of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene. Marketing and use of creosote and preparations containing creosote, as well as creosote-treated wood, are regulated by a EU Directive. According to the EU classification of such mixtures, inclusion of a warning against creosote as a carcinogen is not necessary if the contents of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and benzene are lower than 50 ppm (parts per million) and 1000 ppm, respectively. A recent well designed skin painting study in mice clearly indicates that the creosote preparations had a five-fold higher potency to induce skin cancer than the potency based on BaP content. Furthermore, it was estimated that creosote containing 50 ppm BaP would induce a significant incidence of skin cancer. Preliminary results from determination of concentrations of various carcinogens (BaP and benzene) in the air close to creosote impregnation plants as well as the crudely estimated exposure of children to dermal contact with creosote-treated wood, indicate that the life-time cancer risk from such exposures is in the order of one per 10,000. Despite the uncertainty related to such estimates, these risk levels give reasons for some concern. A further reduction in the content of PAH and benzene in creosote preparations should be considered.

  4. VOCs and PAHs emissions from creosote-treated wood in a field storage area.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Roca, F J; Perales, J F; Guardino, X; Berenguer, M J

    2008-08-25

    In this study, the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, in this case aromatic hydrocarbons containing one benzene ring and furans) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from wood recently treated with creosote are examined. The VOCs and PAHs were identified and quantified in the gas phase. Additionally, the PAHs were quantified in the particulate phase. Glass multi-sorbent tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen-569) were used to hold the VOCs. The analysis was performed using automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). PAHs vapours were collected on XAD-2 resin, and particulate matter was collected on glass fibre filters. The PAHs were analysed using GC/MS. The main components of the vapours released from the creosote-treated wood were naphthalene, toluene, m+p-xylene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, isopropylbenzene, benzene and 2-methylnaphthalene. VOCs emission concentrations ranged from 35 mg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 5 mg m(-3) eight days later. PAHs emission concentrations ranged from 28 microg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 4 microg m(-3) eight days later. The air concentrations of PAHs in particulate matter were composed predominantly of benzo[b+j]fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, fluoranthene, benzo[e]pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene. The emission concentrations of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons varied between 0.2 and 43.5 ng m(-3). Finally, the emission factors of VOCs and PAHs were determined.

  5. Laboratory Evaluations of Durability of Southern Pine Pressure Treated With Extractives From Durable Wood Species.

    PubMed

    Kirker, G T; Bishell, A B; Lebow, P K

    2016-02-01

    Extracts from sawdust of four naturally durable wood species [Alaskan yellow cedar, AYC, Cupressus nootkanansis D. Don 1824; eastern red cedar, ERC, Juniperus virginiana L.; honey mesquite, HM, Prosopis glandulosa Torr.; and black locust, BL, Robinia pseudoacacia L.] were used to treat southern pine, Pt, Pinus taeda L. sapwood blocks. Extractive treated blocks were evaluated for decay resistance in standard soil bottle fungal assays challenged with brown and white rot decay fungi. Results showed that extractives did impart some improvement to decay resistance of Pt blocks. BL- and HM-treated Pt blocks were also used in choice and no-choice assays to determine feeding preference and damage by eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes) Kollar. Minimal feeding on treated blocks was seen in both choice and no-choice assays. In choice assays, there was similar mortality between HM and BL arenas; however, in no-choice assays, complete mortality was recorded for HM-treated Pt and high mortality was seen with BL-treated Pt. Subsequent dose mortality termite assays showed HM to be effective in killing R. flavipes at low concentrations. Both HM and BL show promise as deterrents or termiticidal protectants and will be further evaluated in field studies.

  6. Fire-retardant-treated low-formaldehyde-emission particleboard made from recycled wood-waste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-Yung; Yang, Te-Hsin; Lin, Li-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to manufacture fire-retardant-treated low-formaldehyde-emission particleboard from recycled wood-waste particles using polymeric 4,4'-methylenediphenyl isocyanate (PMDI) and phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins. The influence of the PMDI/PF ratio (ratio of particles sprayed with PMDI to particles sprayed with PF, w/w) after fire retardant treatment on formaldehyde emissions, mechanical properties, and surface fire resistant performance of the manufactured particleboard was investigated. The experimental results showed that the formaldehyde emissions linearly decreased with an increasing PMDI/PF ratio. Moreover, the bending strength, internal bond strength, and screw holding strength increased with an increasing PMDI/PF ratio. The thickness swelling of the particleboard was improved by using an increasing PMDI/PF ratio. Furthermore, the fire-retardant-treated low-formaldehyde-emission particleboards fabricated in our study could pass the third grade standard of surface fire resistant performance as specified by CNS 6532.

  7. Exposure of Creosote-Naive and Creosote-Conditioned Limnoria tripunctata (Menzies) of Untreated and Creosote-Treated Wood.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-13

    20 AGSTRACT (Conflnuod) -5 A creosote-naive (never exposed to creosote) population of L . tripunciata exhibited 95% sur- vival and produced numerous...ENTA L D ESIG N .................................................................................................. 4 Exposure of Creosote-Naive...and ammoniacal -copper-arsenate) are effective, but wood treated with these preservatives tends to lose its mechanical strength 15,61, and treated

  8. Fire performance and decay resistance of solid wood and plywood treated with quaternary ammonia compounds and common fire retardants

    Treesearch

    Evren Terzi; S. Nami Kartal; Robert White; Katsumi Shinoda; Yuji Imamura

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the fire performance and decay resistance of solid wood and plywood treated with quaternary ammonia compounds (didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DBF)) were compared with the performance of untreated control specimens and specimens treated with common fire retardants ((monoammonium phosphate (MAP),...

  9. Semi-solid state bioremediation of CCA-treated wood using malted barley as a nutrient source

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2002-01-01

    Bioremediation processes for recovery and reuse of CCA-treated wood invariably increase the cost of any secondary products manufactured from the remediated fiber. Microbial remediation using either bacteria or fungi has been shown to remove heavy metals from CCA-treated southern yellow pine (SYP). In a two-step remediation process utilizing oxalic acid extraction and...

  10. Quantitative determination of benzalkonium chloride in treated wood by solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Teruhisa; Mori, Mitsunori; Ito, Katsuhiko

    2005-11-18

    Ammoniacal copper quat (ACQ) compound wood preservative is comprised of copper and quaternary ammonium compounds with benzalkonium chloride (BAC) as the active ingredient. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (LC-UV) was developed for quantitative determination of BAC in treated wood. Five species of wood were used, Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese larch (Larix leptolepis), Yezo spruce (Picea jezoensis), Sakhalin fir (Abies sachalinensis), and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). BAC used in the present study was composed of 66% C12, 33% C14 and less than 1% C16. BAC was added to each wood species (500 mg) then extracted with HCl-ethanol (20 ml) and quantitatively determined with LC-UV (262 nm). Wood extractives from the heartwood of each species, except western hemlock, interfered with quantitative determination of BAC, but SPE with an Oasis MCX cartridge was effective in preventing this. Using the present methods, BAC homologue peaks were clearly confirmed without interference. Recoveries from wood ranged from 92 to 101% and the limit of quantitation was approximately 240 microg/g wood for the C12 and C14 homologues.

  11. Leaching of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood in a simulated monofill and its potential impacts to landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Jambeck, Jenna R; Townsend, Timothy; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2006-07-31

    The proper end-of-life management of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, which contains arsenic, copper, and chromium, is a concern to the solid waste management community. Landfills are often the final repository of this waste stream, and the impacts of CCA preservative metals on leachate quality are not well understood. Monofills are a type of landfill designed and operated to dispose a single waste type, such as ash, tires, mining waste, or wood. The feasibility of managing CCA-treated wood in monofills was examined using a simulated landfill (a leaching lysimeter) that contained a mix of new and weathered CCA-treated wood. The liquid to solid ratio (LS) reached in the experiment was 0.63:1. Arsenic, chromium, and copper leached from the lysimeter at average concentrations of 42 mg/L for arsenic, 9.4 mg/L for chromium, and 2.4 mg/L for copper. Complementary batch leaching studies using deionized water were performed on similar CCA-treated wood samples at LS of 5:1 and 10:1. When results from the lysimeter were compared to the batch test results, copper and chromium leachability appeared to be reduced in the lysimeter disposal environment. Of the three metals, arsenic leached to the greatest extent and was found to have the best correlation between the batch and the lysimeter experiments.

  12. Effects of compost and phosphate on plant arsenic accumulation from soils near pressure-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Ma, Lena Q

    2004-12-01

    Leaching of arsenic (As) from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood may elevate soil arsenic levels. Thus, an environmental concern arises regarding accumulation of As in vegetables grown in these soils. In this study, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate As accumulation by vegetables from the soils adjacent to the CCA-treated utility poles and fences and examine the effects of soil amendments on plant As accumulation. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were grown for ten weeks in the soil with or without compost and phosphate amendments. As expected, elevated As concentrations were observed in the pole soil (43 mg kg(-1)) and in the fence soil (27 mg kg(-1)), resulting in enhanced As accumulation of 44 mg kg(-1) in carrot and 32 mg kg(-1) in lettuce. Addition of phosphate to soils increased As accumulation by 4.56-9.3 times for carrot and 2.45-10.1 for lettuce due to increased soil water-soluble As via replacement of arsenate by phosphate in soil. However, biosolid compost application significantly reduced plant As uptake by 79-86%, relative to the untreated soils. This suppression is possibly because of As adsorbed by biosolid organic mater, which reduced As phytoavailability. Fractionation analysis showed that biosolid decreased As in soil water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fraction by 45%, whereas phosphate increased it up to 2.61 times, compared to the untreated soils. Our results indicate that growing vegetables in soils near CCA-treated wood may pose a risk of As exposure for humans. Compost amendment can reduce such a risk by reducing As accumulation by vegetables and can be an important strategy for remediating CCA-contaminated soils. Caution should be taken for phosphate application since it enhances As accumulation.

  13. Transformation and Release of Micronized Cu used as a Wood Preservative in Treated Wood in Wetland Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized Cu (µ-Cu) is used as a wood preservative, replacing toxic Chromated Copper Arsenates. Micronized Cu is Malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2] that has been milled to micron/submicron particles, many with diameters less than 100 nm, and then mixed with quat or azol biocides. I...

  14. Transformation and Release of Micronized Cu used as a Wood Preservative in Treated Wood in Wetland Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized Cu (µ-Cu) is used as a wood preservative, replacing toxic Chromated Copper Arsenates. Micronized Cu is Malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2] that has been milled to micron/submicron particles, many with diameters less than 100 nm, and then mixed with quat or azol biocides. I...

  15. Utilization of chemically treated municipal solid waste (spent coffee bean powder) as reinforcement in cellulose matrix for packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Thiagamani, Senthil Muthu Kumar; Nagarajan, Rajini; Jawaid, Mohammad; Anumakonda, Varadarajulu; Siengchin, Suchart

    2017-07-31

    As the annual production of the solid waste generable in the form of spent coffee bean powder (SCBP) is over 6 million tons, its utilization in the generation of green energy, waste water treatment and as a filler in biocomposites is desirable. The objective of this article is to analyze the possibilities to valorize coffee bean powder as a filler in cellulose matrix. Cellulose matrix was dissolved in the relatively safer aqueous solution mixture (8% LiOH and 15% Urea) precooled to -12.5°C. To the cellulose solution (SCBP) was added in 5-25wt% and the composite films were prepared by regeneration method using ethyl alcohol as a coagulant. Some SCBP was treated with aq. 5% NaOH and the composite films were also prepared using alkali treated SCBP as a filler. The films of composites were uniform with brown in color. The cellulose/SCBP films without and with alkali treated SCBP were characterized by FTIR, XRD, optical and polarized optical microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile tests. The maximum tensile strength of the composite films with alkali treated SCBP varied between (106-149MPa) and increased with SCBP content when compared to the composites with untreated SCBP. The thermal stability of the composite was higher at elevated temperatures when alkali treated SCBP was used. Based on the improved tensile properties and photo resistivity, the cellulose/SCBP composite films with alkali treated SCBP may be considered for packaging and wrapping of flowers and vegetables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time–Temperature Superposition Principle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Teng-Chun; Chien, Yi-Chi; Wu, Tung-Lin; Hung, Ke-Chang; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time–temperature superposition principle (TTSP), and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance (ICR) of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature. PMID:28772726

  17. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time-Temperature Superposition Principle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng-Chun; Chien, Yi-Chi; Wu, Tung-Lin; Hung, Ke-Chang; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2017-03-30

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP), and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance (ICR) of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature.

  18. Advances in corrosion testing of metals in contact with treated wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    A January 2004 change in the regulation of wood preservatives used in the U.S.has increased the use of newer wood preservatives, such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz). These preservatives contain high amounts of cupric ions, which may be reduced to copper metal at the expense of less noble steel and galvanized fasteners in the wood....

  19. Distribution and mobility of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soils collected near CCA-treated wood structures in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hekap; Kim, Dong-Jin; Koo, Jin-Hoi; Park, Jeong-Gue; Jang, Yong-Chul

    2007-03-15

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is currently the most commonly used wood preservative in Korea. Questions, however, have been raised regarding the potential environmental impacts of metal leaching from CCA-treated wood to soil. Although a number of researchers from other countries have reported that chromium, copper, and arsenic do leach from CCA-treated wood over time, to date few field studies have been performed on those metals in soils adjacent to CCA-treated wood structures in Korea. The present study was conducted to determine the lateral and vertical distributions and accumulation of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soils collected from CCA-treated wood structures. A total of fifty-five composite soil samples were collected from four CCA-treated wood structures of approximately one year in age. The samples were analyzed for physicochemical properties as well as for the total chromium, copper, and arsenic concentrations. The chromium, copper, and arsenic concentrations in soil samples adjacent to the structures were as high as 79.0, 98.9, and 128 mg/kg, respectively, compared to background soil samples (48.2, 26.9, and 6.27 mg/kg, respectively). Arsenic was more mobile in soil than chromium and copper. The concentration gradient of arsenic in soil was observed only to the depth of approximately 5 cm in one year of outdoor exposure, whereas chromium and copper apparently remained near the surface (approximately less than 1 cm) after their release. Future efforts should be made to observe seasonal impacts on the release of metals and incorporate metal speciation into determining more detailed mobility and distribution.

  20. Emissions of chromium, copper, arsenic, and PCDDs/Fs from open burning of CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Shirley J; Linak, William P; Gullett, Brian K; King, Charles J; Touati, Abderrahmane; Huggins, Frank E; Chen, Yuanzhi; Shah, Naresh; Huffman, Gerald P

    2005-11-15

    Aged and weathered chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood was burned in an open burn research facility to characterize the air emissions and residual ash. The objectives were to simulate, to the extent possible, the combustion of such waste wood as might occur in an open field or someone's backyard; to characterize the composition and particle size distribution (PSD) of the emitted fly ash; to determine the partitioning of arsenic, chromium, and copper between the fly ash and residual ash; and to examine the speciation of the CCA elements. This work reports preliminary air emission concentrations and estimated emission factors for total particulate matter, arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) totals and toxic equivalents (TEQs). The partitioning of As, Cr, and Cu between the emitted fly ash and residual ash is examined and thermochemical predictions from the literature are used to explain the observed behavior. Results indicate a unimodal fly ash PSD between 0.1 and 1.0 microm diameter. In addition to a large carbonaceous component, between 11 and 14% of the As present in the burned CCA treated wood was emitted with the air emissions, with the remainder present in the residual ash. In contrast, less than 1% of both the Cr and Cu present in the wood was emitted with the air emissions. PCDD/F levels were unremarkable, averaging 1.7 ng TEQ/kg of treated wood burned, a value typical for wood combustion. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was unable to resolve inorganic particles consisting of Cu, Cr, or As in the wood samples, but X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy confirmed that the oxidation states of the CCA elements in the wood were Cu2+, Cr3+, and As5+. SEM examination of the fly ash samples revealed some inorganic microcrystals within the mostly carbonaceous fly ash, while XAFS spectroscopy of the same samples showed that the oxidation states after combustion were mixed Cu+ and

  1. Kinetic modelling and microbial community assessment of anaerobic biphasic fixed film bioreactor treating distillery spent wash.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bhavik K; Pathak, Hilor; Mohana, Sarayu; Shouche, Yogesh; Singh, Vasdev; Madamwar, Datta

    2011-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion, microbial community structure and kinetics were studied in a biphasic continuously fed, upflow anaerobic fixed film reactor treating high strength distillery wastewater. Treatment efficiency of the bioreactor was investigated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) and organic loading rates (OLR 5-20 kg COD m⁻³ d⁻¹). Applying the modified Stover-Kincannon model to the reactor, the maximum removal rate constant (U(max)) and saturation value constant (K(B)) were found to be 2 kg m⁻³ d⁻¹ and 1.69 kg m⁻³ d⁻¹ respectively. Bacterial community structures of acidogenic and methanogenic reactors were assessed using culture-independent analyses. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes exhibited a total of 123 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) comprising 49 from acidogenic reactor and 74 (28 of eubacteria and 46 of archaea) from methanogenic reactor. The findings reveal the role of Lactobacillus sp. (Firmicutes) as dominant acid producing organisms in acidogenic reactor and Methanoculleus sp. (Euryarchaeotes) as foremost methanogens in methanogenic reactor.

  2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a tool for measuring corrosion of polymer-coated fasteners used in treated wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Lorraine Ortiz-Candelaria; Donald S. Stone; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    Currently, many of the polymer-coated fasteners on the market are designed for improved corrosion performance in treated wood; yet, there is no way to evaluate their corrosion performance. In this study, a common technique for measuring the corrosion performance of polymer-coated metals, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), was used to evaluate commercial...

  3. Improving the two-step remediation process for CCA-treated wood. Part II, Evaluating bacterial nutrient sources

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2004-01-01

    Remediation processes for recovery and reuse of chromated-copper-arsenate-(CCA) treated wood are not gaining wide acceptance because they are more expensive than landfill disposal. One reason is the high cost of the nutrient medium used to culture the metal tolerant bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis, which removes 70-100% of the copper, chromium, and arsenic from CCA-...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 2 year study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of deck sealants in reducing or eliminating potential exposure to arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate-treated wood used in residential settings, like decks and playsets.

  5. Case study : performance of a house built on a treated wood foundation system in a cold climate

    Treesearch

    Charles G. Carll; Charles R. Boardman; Collin L. Olson

    2010-01-01

    Performance attributes of a home, constructed in 2001 in Madison, WI, on a treated-wood foundation system were investigated over a multiyear period. Temperature conditions in the basement of the building were, without exception, comfortable, even though the basement was not provided with supply registers for heating or cooling. Basement humidity conditions were...

  6. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  7. MANAGING SOURCES TO REDUCE RISK IN AND AROUND THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT: IMPACT OF COATINGS ON DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC ON THE SURFACES OF CCA-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the potential for ingestion of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) by the hand-to-mouth activities of young children who contact CCA treated wood, EPA has used wipe samples to study the potential benefits of paint-like coatings on CCA treated wood. Citizens who may be concern...

  8. MANAGING SOURCES TO REDUCE RISK IN AND AROUND THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT: IMPACT OF COATINGS ON DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC ON THE SURFACES OF CCA-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the potential for ingestion of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) by the hand-to-mouth activities of young children who contact CCA treated wood, EPA has used wipe samples to study the potential benefits of paint-like coatings on CCA treated wood. Citizens who may be concern...

  9. Effects of liquefaction time and temperature on heavy metal removal and distribution in liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui

    2010-06-01

    Wood liquefaction was studied as a recycling method for chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste. The effects of liquefaction temperature and time on the removal of the heavy metals and their distribution in liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge were investigated. The residue content decreased as the temperature increased from 120 to 180 degrees C regardless of the reaction time. It decreased gradually with the increase of reaction time under liquefaction temperatures 120 and 150 degrees C. But it decreased as the reaction time increased from 30 to 60min then increased when the reaction time increased to 90min under liquefaction temperature 180 degrees C due to the re-condensation of decomposed wood components. The total concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and copper in the sludge samples increased, while the percentage of the removed metals decreased, with increasing liquefaction temperature, which could be related to the changes of wood residue content and the fate of the heavy metals under different liquefaction conditions. The exchangeable/acid extractable fraction of all three heavy metals decreased as the liquefaction temperature increased. At the same time, Cr and As increased in both oxidizable and reducible fractions. The amount of Cr in the oxidizable fraction increased 40% as the liquefaction temperature increased from 120 to 180 degrees C. The major change of Cu distribution was the increase in reducible fraction with the increase of liquefaction time. The results of this study suggested that high liquefaction temperature tends to inhibit the heavy metal recovery when liquefaction is used as a recycling method for CCA-treated wood waste.

  10. Assessing the current and future impacts of the disposal of chromated copper arsenate-treated wood in unlined landfills.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Elisabeth L; Kresic, Neven; Wright, Alexandra P; Kavanaugh, Michael C

    2009-03-01

    Several states have recently considered altering disposal requirements for chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste, particularly Florida, where CCA-treated wood waste is disposed in unlined construction and demolition (C&D) debris and Class III municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The primary concern is the potential for CCA-treated wood waste to elevate arsenic levels in groundwater downgradient of the disposal sites. To address this concern, we evaluated the impact of past disposal practices of these wastes in unlined Florida C&D and Class III landfills by conducting a statistical analysis of two sets of groundwater data compiled by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). The databases contain water quality data from C&D and Class III landfills in Florida covering 15 yr of record from February 1992 through February 2007 and together provide the most complete datasets to evaluate this issue. Comparative statistics of the different population groups in the databases showed that the arithmetic mean concentrations of total arsenic were in most cases higher in background wells than in wells downgradient of the landfills. The statistical analysis indicates that past disposal of CCA-treated wood in C&D and Class III landfills in Florida has not increased arsenic levels downgradient of the landfills. Policy decisions regarding the continued disposal of CCA-treated wood waste as a nonhazardous waste in unlined landfills must therefore be based on a scientifically sound assessment of potential future impacts. Quantitative predictions of future impacts are difficult and pose several scientific challenges. Therefore, future management decisions should be based on a more accurate and comprehensive risk analysis that assesses the risks and benefits of different alternatives and takes into account the natural attenuation capacity of soils and aquifer solids for arsenic and the practical limitations of managing this waste stream as a hazardous

  11. Influence of corn steep liquor and glucose on colonization of control and CCB (Cu/Cr/B)-treated wood by brown rot fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Humar, Miha; Pohleven, Franc

    2006-07-01

    There are increasing problems with regard to the disposal of treated wood waste. Due to heavy metals or arsenic in impregnated wood waste, burning and landfill disposal options are not considered to be environmentally friendly solutions for dealing with this problem. Extraction of the heavy metals and recycling of the preservatives from the wood waste is a much more promising and environmentally friendly solution. In order to study the scale up of this process, copper/chromium/boron-treated wood specimens were exposed to copper tolerant (Antrodia vaillantii and Leucogyrophana pinastri) and copper sensitive wood decay fungi (Gloeophyllum trabeum and Poria monticola). Afterwards, the ability of fungal hyphae to penetrate and overgrow the wood specimens was investigated. The fungal growths were stimulated by immersing the specimens into aqueous solution of glucose or corn steep liquor prior to exposure to the fungi. The fastest colonization of the impregnated wood was by the copper tolerant A. vaillantii. Addition of glucose onto the surface of the wood specimens increased the fungi colonization of the specimens; however, immersion of the specimens into the solution of corn steep liquor did not have the same positive influence. These results are important in elucidating copper toxicity in wood decay fungi and for using these fungi for bioremediation of treated wood wastes.

  12. Chemical yields from low-temperature pyrolysis of CCA-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Qirong Fu; Dimitris Argyropolous; Lucian Lucia; David Tilotta; Stan Lebow

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature pyrolysis offers a feasible option for wood-waste management and the recovery of a variety of useful chemicals. The effect of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative on the yield and composition of various pyrolysis products was investigated in the present research. A novel quantitative 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (...

  13. Formosan and native subterranean termite attack of pressure-treated SPF wood species exposed in Louisiana

    Treesearch

    Stan Lebow; Todd Shupe; Bessie Woodward; Douglas Crawford; Brian Via; Cherilyn Hatfield

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the relative ability of three types of wood preservatives to inhibit attack by Formosan subterranean termites (FST) (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) and native subterranean termites (Reticulitermes spp.). The study also evaluated the roles of preservative retention and penetration in preventing termite damage. Sections of boards from six wood...

  14. Thermal degradation of fire-retardant -treated wood : predicting residual service life

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a review of more than 10 years of research on the effects of fire-retardant treatments on wood properties and the potential of these treatments for in-service degradation when exposed to elevated temperatures. It presents an in-depth discussion of the findings and implications of a major wood engineering research program to assess the current...

  15. Evaluating the corrosiveness of southern pine treated with several wood preservatives using electrochemical techniques

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone

    2009-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA), the most widely used wood preservative of the past 50 years, has been replaced for most uses with alkaline-copper systems such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CuAz) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ). Preliminary research using high-temperature, high-humidity environments have shown that some of these wood...

  16. Effect of compression wood on leaching of chromium, copper, and arsenic from CCA-C treated red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)

    Treesearch

    S. Nami. Kartal; Stan. Lebow

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of compression wood formation on the release rate of chromium, copper, and arsenic elements from red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait) was investigated. Wood blocks from red pine containing compression and normal wood portions were treated with a 1.0% CCA-C solution and were then allowed to fix at 23 * 2*C (74 * 4*F) for 0, 6, 24, 48, 96, 192, and 336...

  17. Arsenic levels in wipe samples collected from play structures constructed with CCA-treated wood: impact on exposure estimates.

    PubMed

    Barraj, Leila M; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Eaton, W Cary; Rogers, Robert E; Jeng, Chwen-Jyh

    2009-04-01

    Lumber treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been used in residential outdoor wood structures and playgrounds. The U.S. EPA has conducted a probabilistic assessment of children's exposure to arsenic from CCA-treated structures using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for the wood preservative scenario (SHEDS-Wood). The EPA assessment relied on data from an experimental study using adult volunteers and designed to measure arsenic in maximum hand and wipe loadings. Analyses using arsenic handloading data from a study of children playing on CCA-treated play structures in Edmonton, Canada, indicate that the maximum handloading values significantly overestimate the exposure that occurs during actual play. The objective of our paper is to assess whether the dislodgeable arsenic residues from structures in the Edmonton study are comparable to those observed in other studies and whether they support the conclusion that the values derived by EPA using modeled maximum loading values overestimate hand exposures. We compared dislodgeable arsenic residue data from structures in the playgrounds in the Edmonton study to levels observed in studies used in EPA's assessment. Our analysis showed that the dislodgeable arsenic levels in the Edmonton playground structures are similar to those in the studies used by EPA. Hence, the exposure estimates derived using the handloading data from children playing on CCA-treated structures are more representative of children's actual exposures than the overestimates derived by EPA using modeled maximum values. Handloading data from children playing on CCA-treated structures should be used to reduce the uncertainty of modeled estimates derived using the SHEDS-Wood model.

  18. Increased bioavailability of metals in two contrasting agricultural soils treated with waste wood-derived biochar and ash.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, P; Quilliam, R S; Deluca, T H; Vamerali, T; Jones, D L

    2014-03-01

    Recycled waste wood is being increasingly used for energy production; however, organic and metal contaminants in by-products produced from the combustion/pyrolysis residue may pose a significant environmental risk if they are disposed of to land. Here we conducted a study to evaluate if highly polluted biochar (from pyrolysis) and ash (from incineration) derived from Cu-based preservative-treated wood led to different metal (e.g., Cu, As, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Zn) bioavailability and accumulation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). In a pot experiment, biochar at a common rate of 2 % w/w, corresponding to ∼50 t ha(-1), and an equivalent pre-combustion dose of wood ash (0.2 % w/w) were added to a Eutric Cambisol (pH 6.02) and a Haplic Podzol (pH 4.95), respectively. Both amendments initially raised soil pH, although this effect was relatively short-term, with pH returning close to the unamended control within about 7 weeks. The addition of both amendments resulted in an exceedance of soil Cu statutory limit, together with a significant increase of Cu and plant nutrient (e.g., K) bioavailability. The metal-sorbing capacity of the biochar, and the temporary increase in soil pH caused by adding the ash and biochar were insufficient to offset the amount of free metal released into solution. Sunflower plants were negatively affected by the addition of metal-treated wood-derived biochar and led to elevated concentration of metals in plant tissue, and reduced above- and below-ground biomass, while sunflower did not grow at all in the Haplic Podzol. Biochar and ash derived from wood treated with Cu-based preservatives can lead to extremely high Cu concentrations in soil and negatively affect plant growth. Identifying sources of contaminated wood in waste stream feedstocks is crucial before large-scale application of biochar or wood ash to soil is considered.

  19. CCA-treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal.

    PubMed

    Jambeck, Jenna; Weitz, Keith; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy; Thorneloe, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is a preservative treated wood construction product that grew in use in the 1970s for both residential and industrial applications. Although some countries have banned the use of the product for some applications, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition and remodeling projects. CCA-treated wood as a solid waste is managed in various ways throughout the world. In the US, CCA-treated wood is disposed primarily within landfills; however some of the wood is combusted in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, sometimes including CCA-treated wood, is combustion for the production of energy. This paper presents an estimate of the quantity of CCA-treated wood entering the disposal stream in the US, as well as an examination of the trade-offs between landfilling and WTE combustion of CCA-treated wood through a life-cycle assessment and decision support tool (MSW DST). Based upon production statistics, the estimated life span and the phaseout of CCA-treated wood, recent disposal projections estimate the peak US disposal rate to occur in 2008, at 9.7 million m(3). CCA-treated wood, when disposed with construction and demolition (C&D) debris and municipal solid waste (MSW), has been found to increase arsenic and chromium concentrations in leachate. For this reason, and because MSW landfills are lined, MSW landfills have been recommended as a preferred disposal option over unlined C&D debris landfills. Between landfilling and WTE for the same mass of CCA-treated wood, WTE is more expensive (nearly twice the cost), but when operated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, it produces energy and does not emit fossil carbon emissions. If the wood is managed via WTE, less landfill area is required, which could be an influential trade-off in some countries. Although metals are concentrated

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site, Hollywood, MD, September 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site (`the Site`), in Hollywood, Maryland. This is the second and final phase of remedial action for the Site. This phase addresses soil and sediment contamination and non-aqueous phase liquids (`NAPLs`) which are the principal threats remaining at the Site and are a source of contamination to the ground water and surface water.

  1. Modulus of elasticity loss as a rapid indicator of rot-fungal attack on untreated and preservative-treated wood in laboratory tests

    Treesearch

    Xingxia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Carol A. Clausen; Mingliang Jiang; Haibin Zhou

    2017-01-01

    The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of wood is a sensitive indicator of rotfungal attack. To develop an alternative method of rapid assessment of fungal decay in the laboratory, changes in static MOE of untreated and preservative-treated wood were measured during exposure to the brownrot fungus, Gloeophyllum trabeum, and the white-rot fungus, Trametes...

  2. Partial dissolution of ACQ-treated wood in lithium chloride/N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone: Separation of copper from potential lignocellulosic feedstocks

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Stan Lebow; Karen G. Reed

    2012-01-01

    A cellulose solvent system based on lithium chloride (LiCl) in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) was used to assess the merits of partial dissolutions of coarsely ground wood samples. Alkaline Copper Quaternary (ACQ)-treated pine wood was of particular interest for treatment given the potential to generate a copper- rich stream apart from solid and/or liquid...

  3. Magnetic separation of carbon-encapsulated Fe nanoparticles from thermally-treated wood char

    Treesearch

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Wood char,a by-product from the fast-pyrolysis process of southern yellow pine wood for bio-oil production, was carbonized with Fenano particles (FeNPs) as a catalyst to prepare carbon-encapsulated Fe nanoparticles. A magnetic separation method was tested to isolate carbon-encapsulated Fe nano particles from the carbonized char. X-ray diffraction pattern clearly shows...

  4. Optimization of bioleaching conditions for metal removal from CCA-treated wood by using an unknown Polyporales sp. KUC8959.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Min-Ji; Son, Jino; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok

    2013-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction conditions (i.e., culture filtrate concentration, extraction temperature, and extraction time) on the removal of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood particles by using an unknown Polyporales sp. KUC8959. As the first research, a 20-run central composite design using response surface methodology was applied to optimize the system and construct the models, which predicted metal removal by bioleaching. The coefficients of determination of fitted models were 0.874-0.989, which indicated that the models can predict the metal removal yield accurately under various conditions. The Cu removal model suggested that the following conditions, culture filtrate concentration of 45.8%, extraction temperature of 34.2 °C, and extraction time of 20.6 h, were required for maximal removal of Cu (82.1%). The model predicted that extraction conditions of increased severity would result in complete removal of Cr and As from CCA-treated wood particles. In order to confirm actual metals removal efficiency, metals extraction was subsequently conducted under optimal bioleaching condition evaluated in this study. By applying the model, we demonstrated 83.9% Cu, 96.0% Cr, and 99.3% As removal from treated wood particles.

  5. Detection of environmentally persistent free radicals at a superfund wood treating site.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Gehling, William; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Cook, Robert; Dellinger, Barry

    2011-08-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have previously been observed in association with combustion-generated particles and airborne PM(2.5) (particulate matter, d < 2.5um). The purpose of this study was to determine if similar radicals were present in soils and sediments at Superfund sites. The site was a former wood treating facility containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) as a major contaminant. Both contaminated and noncontaminated (just outside the contaminated area) soil samples were collected. The samples were subjected to the conventional humic substances (HS) extraction procedure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the EPFR concentrations and determine their structure for each sample fraction. Analyses revealed a ∼30× higher EPFR concentration in the PCP contaminated soils (20.2 × 10(17) spins/g) than in the noncontaminated soil (0.7 × 10(17) spins/g). Almost 90% of the EPFR signal originated from the minerals/clays/humins fraction. GC-MS analyses revealed ∼6500 ppm of PCP in the contaminated soil samples and none detected in the background samples. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES) analyses revealed ∼7× higher concentrations of redox-active transition metals, in the contaminated soils than the noncontaminated soil. Vapor phase and liquid phase dosing of the clays/minerals/humins fraction of the soil with PCP resulted in an EPR signal identical to that observed in the contaminated soil, strongly suggesting the observed EPFR is pentachlorophenoxyl radical. Chemisorption and electron transfer from PCP to transition metals and other electron sinks in the soil are proposed to be responsible for EPFR formation.

  6. Detection of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals at a Superfund Wood Treating Site

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N.; Gehling, William; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Cook, Robert; Dellinger, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have previously been observed in association with combustion-generated particles and airborne PM2.5 (particulate matter, d < 2.5um). The purpose of this study was to determine if similar radicals were present in soils and sediments at Superfund sites. The site was a former wood treating facility containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) as a major contaminant. Both contaminated and non-contaminated (just outside the contaminated area) soil samples were collected. The samples were subjected to the conventional humic substances (HS) extraction procedure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the EPFR concentrations and determine their structure for each sample fraction. Analyses revealed a ~30× higher EPFR concentration in the PCP contaminated soils (20.2 × 1017 spins/g) than in the non-contaminated soil (0.7 × 1017 spins/g). Almost 90% of the EPFR signal originated from the Minerals/Clays/Humins fraction. GC-MS analyses revealed ~6500 ppm of PCP in the contaminated soil samples and none detected in the background samples. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES) analyses revealed ~7× higher concentrations of redox-active transition metals, in the contaminated soils than the non-contaminated soil. Vapor phase and liquid phase dosing of the clays/minerals/humins fraction of the soil with PCP resulted in an EPR signal identical to that observed in the contaminated soil, strongly suggesting the observed EPFR is pentachlorophenoxyl radical. Chemisorption and electron transfer from PCP to transition metals and other electron sinks in the soil are proposed to be responsible for EPFR formation. PMID:21732664

  7. Evaluating the potential for environmental pollution from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste: a new mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Mercer, T G; Frostick, L E

    2014-07-15

    The potential for pollution from arsenic, chromium and copper in chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste was assessed using two lysimeter studies. The first utilised lysimeters containing soil and CCA wood waste mulch exposed to natural conditions over a five month period. The second study used the same lysimeter setup in a regulated greenhouse setting with a manual watering regime. Woodchip, soil and leachate samples were evaluated for arsenic, chromium and copper concentrations. Resultant concentration data were used to produce mass balances, an approach thus far unused in such studies. This novel analysis revealed new patterns of mobility and distribution of the elements in the system. The results suggest that CCA wood waste tends to leach on initial exposure to a leachant and during weathering of the wood. When in contact with soil, metal(loid) transport is reduced due to complexation reactions. With higher water application or where the adsorption capacity of the soil is exceeded, the metal(loid)s are transported through the soil column as leachate. Overall, there was an unexplained loss of metal(loid)s from the system that might be attributed to volatilisation of arsenic and plant uptake. This suggests a hitherto unidentified risk to both the environment and human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Arsenic, chromium, and copper leaching from CCA-treated wood and their potential impacts on landfill leachate in a tropical country.

    PubMed

    Kamchanawong, S; Veerakajohnsak, C

    2010-04-01

    This study looks into the potential risks of arsenic, chromium, and copper leaching from disposed hardwoods treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in a tropical climate. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the Waste Extraction Test (WET) were employed to examine new CCA-treated Burseraceae and Keruing woods, weathered CCA-treated teak wood, and ash from new CCA-treated Burseraceae wood. In addition, a total of six lysimeters, measuring 2 m high and 203 mm in diameter were prepared to compare the leachate generated from the wood monofills, construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, containing CCA-treated Burseraceae wood. The TCLP and WET results showed that the CCA-treated Burseraceae wood leached higher metal concentrations (i.e. 9.19-17.70 mg/L, 1.14-5.89 mg/L and 4.83-23.89 mg/L for arsenic, chromium, and copper, respectively) than the CCA-treated Keruing wood (i.e. 1.74-11.34 mg/L, 0.26-3.57 mg/L and 0.82-13.64 mg/L for arsenic, chromium and copper, respectively). Ash from the CCA-treated Burseraceae wood leached significantly higher metal concentrations (i.e. 108.5-116.9 mg/L, 1522-3862 mg/L and 84.03-114.4 mg/L for arsenic, chromium and copper, respectively), making this type of ash of high concern. The lysimeter study results showed that the MSW lysimeter exhibited higher reducing conditions, more biological activities and more dissolved ions in their leachates than the wood monofill and C&D debris lysimeters. All leachates generated from the lysimeters containing the CCA-treated Burseraceae wood contained significantly higher concentrations of arsenic in comparison to those of the untreated wood: in the range of 0.53-15.7 mg/L. It can be concluded that the disposal of CCA-treated Burseraceae wood in an unlined C&D landfill or a MSW landfill has the potential to contaminate groundwater.

  9. Partial dissolution of ACQ-treated wood in lithium chloride/N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone: separation of copper from potential lignocellulosic feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Thomas L; Lebow, Stan; Reed, Karen G

    2012-02-01

    A cellulose solvent system based on lithium chloride (LiCl) in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) was used to assess the merits of partial dissolutions of coarsely ground wood samples. Alkaline Copper Quaternary (ACQ)-treated pine wood was of particular interest for treatment given the potential to generate a copper-rich stream apart from solid and/or liquid lignocellulosic feedstocks. Treatment with NMP alone gave yields of soluble materials that were higher than typical extractives contents thereby suggesting a limited degree of wood dissolution. Inclusion of LiCl, which disrupts hydrogen bonding, gave lower wood residue recoveries (i.e., higher dissolution) with higher LiCl concentration. Lower wood residue recoveries coincided with lower Klason lignin and hemicellulose-derived sugar contents in the wood residues. After treatment with 8% LiCl in NMP, subsequent filtration afforded 34% of the ACQ-treated sapwood as a wood residue retaining only 2% of the original copper. Pouring the filtrate over an excess of water resulted in the recovery of 30% of the solids and 50% of the copper together as a copper-enriched lignocellulosic precipitate. Results demonstrate a solvent system showing potential as a means to separate heavy metals from preservative-treated wood and to recover lignocellulosic feedstocks that may be suitable for use in a biorefinery. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cadmium contamination of wood ash and fire-treated coniferous humus: Effect on soil respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Fritze, H.; Kapanen, A.; Vanhala, P.

    1995-05-01

    Atmospheric acidic deposition is known to affect soil fertility and in many countries, liming has been used to counteract anthropogenic soil acidification in coniferous forest soils. Other measures used to improve the acid neutralization capacity of forest soils are wood ash application and prescribed burning. In both cases, ash is deposited on the forest floor, resulting in a pH increase in the humus layer. Currently, application of forests with wood ash is under discussion in Finland, since the naturally occurring cadmium of forest trees is concentrated into the wood ash which then contains between 4 and 20 {mu} g{sup {minus}1} of dry matter. Microbes are essential for maintaining soil fertility and plant growth because they play a fundamental role in nutrient availability. Soil respiration rate, which is an indicator of the microbially-mediated nutrient turnover rate, is decreased by addition of cadmium to the soil environment. In this paper we report on the effects of cadmium addition on the soil respiration rate of forest humus having received wood ash or fire treatments. The underlying objectives of this study were: (i) to determine the cadmium level which decreases the soil respiration of a Vaccinium site type forest humus to half of its original value (EC{sub 50}), (ii) to estimate how the forest treatments influence the EC{sub 50}, and (iii) to discuss the effect of Cd addition provided by wood ash on the nutrient mineralization rate. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Exergy analysis of the Chartherm process for energy valorization and material recuperation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, A; Auweele, M Vanden; Govaerts, J; Helsen, L

    2011-04-01

    The Chartherm process (Thermya, Bordeaux, France) is a thermochemical conversion process to treat chromated copper arsenate (CCA) impregnated wood waste. The process aims at maximum energy valorization and material recuperation by combining the principles of low-temperature slow pyrolysis and distillation in a smart way. The main objective of the exergy analysis presented in this paper is to find the critical points in the Chartherm process where it is necessary to apply some measures in order to reduce exergy consumption and to make energy use more economic and efficient. It is found that the process efficiency can be increased with 2.3-4.2% by using the heat lost by the reactor, implementing a combined heat and power (CHP) system, or recuperating the waste heat from the exhaust gases to preheat the product gas. Furthermore, a comparison between the exergetic performances of a 'chartherisation' reactor and an idealized gasification reactor shows that both reactors destroy about the same amount of exergy (i.e. 3500kWkg(wood)(-1)) during thermochemical conversion of CCA-treated wood. However, the Chartherm process possesses additional capabilities with respect to arsenic and tar treatment, as well as the extra benefit of recuperating materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Plywood Treated with a new Wood Preservative (CEB) Chemical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalawate, Aparna; Shahoo, Shadhu Charan; Khatua, Pijus Kanti; Das, Himadri Sekhar

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the physical and mechanical properties of the plywood made with phenolic glue and rubber wood as core veneer with CEB as a wood preservative. The studied properties were glue shear strength in dry, wet mycological, modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture and tensile strength in parallel to grain direction as per IS:1734 part-4, 11 and 9 (1983) respectively. Results of the above mentioned tests were compared with the prescribed values given in IS 710-2010 and results revealed that samples conformed the prescribed values.

  13. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Plywood Treated with a new Wood Preservative (CEB) Chemical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalawate, Aparna; Shahoo, Shadhu Charan; Khatua, Pijus Kanti; Das, Himadri Sekhar

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the physical and mechanical properties of the plywood made with phenolic glue and rubber wood as core veneer with CEB as a wood preservative. The studied properties were glue shear strength in dry, wet mycological, modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture and tensile strength in parallel to grain direction as per IS:1734 part-4, 11 and 9 (1983) respectively. Results of the above mentioned tests were compared with the prescribed values given in IS 710-2010 and results revealed that samples conformed the prescribed values.

  14. A mass balance approach for evaluating leachable arsenic and chromium from an in-service CCA-treated wood structure.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Fleming, Lora E; Cai, Yong; Townsend, Timothy G

    2007-01-01

    Many existing residential wood structures, such as playsets and decks, have been treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA). This preservative chemical can be released from these structures incrementally over time through contact with rainfall. The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of arsenic and chromium leached from an in-service CCA-treated deck exposed to rainfall, as well as their possible impacts on soils and shallow groundwater. Two monitoring stations, one containing a CCA-treated deck and the other containing an untreated deck as a control, were constructed outside for this study. Rainfall, runoff water from the decks, soils below the decks, and infiltrated water through 0.7-m depth of soil were monitored for arsenic and chromium over a period of 3 years. The concentration of the CCA-treated deck runoff for arsenic (0.114-4.66 mg/L) and chromium (0.008-0.470 mg/L) were significantly (p<0.001) higher than the untreated deck runoff (< or =0.002 mg/L for both). During the 3-year monitoring period, 13% of the arsenic and 1.4% of the chromium were leached from the amount initially present in the CCA-treated wood. Arsenic levels (<0.1-46 mg/kg) in soils under the CCA-treated deck were significantly (p<0.001) higher than under the untreated deck (<0.1-2.7 mg/kg), while chromium levels were statistically the same below the two decks (2.4-9.6 mg/kg). Approximately 94% of the arsenic from the runoff was absorbed in the soils below the CCA-treated deck; the upper 2.5 cm of the soils captured 42% of the total. The infiltrated water concentrations for arsenic (<0.001-0.085 mg/L) and chromium (<0.001-0.010 mg/L) below the CCA-treated deck were both significantly (p<0.001) higher than below the untreated deck (< or =0.006 mg/L). The amounts of arsenic found in the infiltrated water below the CCA-treated deck represented 6% of total arsenic leached and less than 0.7% of the initial mass in the wood. The study demonstrated that exposure of a CCA-treated

  15. A Mass Balance Approach for Evaluating Leachable Arsenic and Chromium from an In-Service CCA-Treated Wood Structure

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Fleming, Lora E.; Cai, Yong; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2007-01-01

    Many existing residential wood structures, such as playsets and decks, have been treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA). This preservative chemical can be released from these structures incrementally over time through contact with rainfall. The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of arsenic and chromium leached from an in-service CCA-treated deck exposed to rainfall, as well as their possible impacts on soils and shallow groundwater. Two monitoring stations, one containing a CCA-treated deck and the other containing an untreated deck as a control, were constructed outside for this study. Rainfall, runoff water from the decks, soils below the decks, and infiltrated water through 0.7 m depth of soil were monitored for arsenic and chromium over a period of 3 years. The concentration of the CCA-treated deck runoff for arsenic (0.114 – 4.66 mg/L) and chromium (0.008 – 0.470 mg/L) were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than the untreated deck runoff (≤ 0.002 mg/L for both). During the 3 year monitoring period, 13% of the arsenic and 1.4 % of the chromium were leached from the amount initially present in the CCA-treated wood. Arsenic levels (< 0.1 – 46 mg/kg) in soils under the CCA-treated deck were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than under the untreated deck (< 0.1 – 2.7 mg/kg), while chromium levels were statistically the same below the two decks (2.4 – 9.6 mg/kg). Approximately 94% of the arsenic from the runoff was absorbed in the soils below the CCA-treated deck; the upper 2.5 cm of the soils captured 42% of the total. The infiltrated water concentrations for arsenic (< 0.001 – 0.085 mg/L) and chromium (< 0.001 – 0.010 mg/L) below the CCA-treated deck were both significantly (p < 0.001) higher than below the untreated deck (≤ 0.006 mg/L). The amounts of arsenic found in the infiltrated water below the CCA-treated deck represented 6% of total arsenic leached and less than 0.7% of the initial mass in the wood. The study

  16. Establishment and succession of an epibiotic community on chromated copper arsenate-treated wood in Mediterranean waters.

    PubMed

    Karayanni, Hera; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar; Cragg, Simon; Nicolaidou, Artemis

    2010-01-01

    Colonization and succession of an epibiotic animal community on chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood were studied for 18 months in the eastern Mediterranean (Saronikos Gulf, Aegean Sea). Pine wood panels, 200 x 100 x 25 mm, impregnated with CCA at retentions of 0, 12, 24, and 48 kg m(-3) were used. The abundance or surface coverage of the most characteristic taxa (polychaetes, mollusca, crustacea bryozoa, sponges, ascidians) was measured in situ, while 12 months after submersion two panels of each retention were removed and examined in the laboratory. A total of 26 taxa were identified, among which polychaetes of the family Serpulidae dominated. The controls carried the largest number of species (17) but the lowest number of individuals. On panels with CCA retentions of 12 and 24 kg m(-3), 14 and 16 species were observed, respectively, while at 48 kg m(-3), only 9 species were found. Only the controls were affected by boring bivalves of the family Teredinidae and started to break up within 3 months of submersion. Statistically significant differences in barnacle and polychaete abundance were found between treated and untreated panels. There were no significant differences among panels treated at the three CCA loadings. Ordination by nonmetric multidimensional scaling showed a seasonal effect on the colonization of the treated panels, with the highest recruitment during the warmer months of the study.

  17. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper azole (MCA) and micronized copper quaternary are the latest wood preservatives to replace the liquid lkaline copper and chromated copper arsenate preservatives due to concerns over the toxicity or lack of effectiveness of the earlier formulations. Today, the use...

  18. Removal of nano- and micronized-copper from treated wood by chelating agents

    Treesearch

    S. Nami Kartal; Evren Terzi; Bessie Woodward; Carol A. Clausen; Stan T. Lebow

    2013-01-01

    Micronized and nano-copper (Cu)-based and arsenic and chromium-free systems have received much attention for wood protection in recent years. Because they have different fixation, and micro-distribution properties, such copper systems may be more or less subject to release using known remediation methods than soluble forms of Cu. This study evaluated Cu recovery from...

  19. Soil organic matter dynamics and microbial activity in a cropland and soil treated with wood ash containing charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omil, B.; Fonturbel, M. T.; Vega, J. A.; Balboa, M. A.; Merino, A.

    2012-04-01

    Wood ash is generated as a by-product of biomass combustion in power plants, and can be applied to soil to improve nutritional status and crop production. The application of mixed wood ash, a mixture of ash and charcoal, may also improve the SOM content and quality. The charcoal contained in mixed wood ash is a pyrogenic organic material, a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered polymers with aromatic domains. This structure may favour oxidation, facilitating further microbial attack and generation of new SOM compounds. In addition, accelerated C mineralization of this material may also be due to the priming effect of the rhizosphere, which may even enhance the decomposition of more recalcitrant SOM. The study was carried out in a field devoted to cereal crops during the last few decades. The soil was acidic (pH 4.5) with a low SOC content (3 %). The experiment was based on a randomised block design with four replicates. Each block included the following four treatments: Control, 16 Mg fly wood ash, 16 Mg mixed wood ash and 32 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1. The ash used in the study was obtained from a thermal power plant and was mainly derived from the combustion of Pinus radiata bark. The changes in SOM were monitored over two years by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The changes in microbial activity were studied by analysis of microbial biomass C and basal respiration. The soil bacterial community was studied by the Biolog method. Both 13 C-CPMAS NMR spectra and DSC curves revealed that the SOM in the treated soils displayed a higher degree of aromaticity than in the untreated soils, indicating a gain in more stable SOM compounds. However, both methods also revealed increases in other labile C compounds. Microbial biomass and soil respiration increased significantly as a result of these effects and possibly also due to a priming effect. The treatments also led to increases in the functional diversity indices. The amended soils

  20. Variation of arsenic concentration on surfaces of in-service CCA-treated wood planks in a park and its influencing field factors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ya; Gao, Wei; Wang, Xiuli; Ding, Shiming; An, Taicheng; Xiao, Weiyang; Wong, Ming H; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2015-01-01

    Wood preservatives can protect wood from dry rot, fungi, mould and insect damage, and chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been used as an inorganic preservative for many years. However, wood treated with CCA has been restricted from residential uses in the EU from June 30, 2004, due to its potential toxicity. Such a regulation is not in place in China yet, and CCA-treated wood is widely used in public parks. A portable XRF analyser was used to investigate arsenic (As) concentration on surfaces of in-service CCA-treated wood planks in a popular park as well as the influencing field factors of age in-service, immersion and human footfall. With a total of 1207 readings, the observed As concentrations varied from below the detection limit (<10 mg/kg) to 15,746 mg/kg with a median of 1160 mg/kg. Strong variation of As concentrations were observed in different wood planks of the same age, on the surface of the same piece of wood, inside the same piece of wood, and different surfaces of walkway planks, hand rails and poles in the field. The oldest planks exhibited high As concentrations, which was related to its original treatment with high retention of CCA preservative. The effect of immersion in the field for about 4 months was insignificant for As concentration on the surfaces. However, a significant reduction of As was observed for immersion combined with human footfall (wiping by shoes). Human traffic in general caused slightly reduced and more evenly distributed As concentrations on the wood surfaces. The strong variation, slow aging and relatively weak immersion effects found in this study demonstrate that the in-service CCA-treated wood poses potential health risks to the park users, due to easy dermal contact especially when the wood is wet after rainfall. It is suggested that further comprehensive investigations and risk assessments of CCA-treated wood in residential areas in China are needed, and precautionary measures should be considered to reduce the

  1. Arsenic and Chromium Concentrations in Sand and Soil Below Play Structures Constructed With Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCR) Treated Wood in San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polly, J.; Delos Santos, D.; Negrete, R.; Orellana, S.; Santo, D.; Beier, J.

    2006-12-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is a chemical wood preservative containing chromium, copper and arsenic. CCA is used in pressure treated wood to protect wood from rotting due to insects and microbial agents. Since the 1970s, the majority of the wood used in the construction of outdoor play structures has been CCA-treated wood. In December 2003, the Environmental Protection Agency classified CCA as a restricted use product, for use only by certified pesticide applicators. Of the City of San Francisco's 142 play structures, 92 are constructed with CCA pressure-treated wood. Eighty-five were tested by the City of San Francisco and 34 play structures tested positive for As by wipe tests of the play structures themselves. The SF-ROCKS high school outreach program hypothesized that we would find significant levels of As and Cr, in the sand or clay below each structure due to the weathering and flaking off of the CCA-treated wood. We visited 18 of the playgrounds that showed the highest levels of As and sampled the sand and clay beneath the structures for the presence of transported As and Cr. We collected 2-3 samples from varying depth at each of the 11 playgrounds that had not yet been replaced by the City of San Francisco. Sand and clay samples were then extracted and analyzed for As and Cr totals. This study outlines the As and Cr concentrations present in the sand and clay below each CCA-treated wood play structure we visited in San Francisco.

  2. Formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in fires of arsenic-free treated wood: role of organic preservatives.

    PubMed

    Tame, Nigel W; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z; Kennedy, Eric M

    2007-09-15

    This article demonstrates that biocidal organochlorines such as tebuconazole and permethrin, employed in formulations of wood preservatives, produce significant quantities of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) when subjected to thermal decomposition under oxidative conditions. Both tebuconazole and permethrin form PCDD/F during gas-phase oxidation, but much greater yields occurred in the presence of surrogate ash corresponding to wood treated with copper-based fungicides. The significant yields have implications for the increased toxicity of PCDD/F emissions during fires of wood impregnated by combination of organic and copper-based preservatives. The oxidative pyrolysis of tebuconazole and permethrin over simulated wood ash generated amounts of PCDD/F exceeding those of untreated wood by 3 orders of magnitude. We obtained yields of 1000 ng WHO97-TEQ/g tebuconazole and 5500 ng WHO97-TEQ/g permethrin when reacting the organochlorines in an oxidizing atmosphere over surrogate wood ash. Gas-phase oxidation also produce measurable quantities of PCDD/F, corresponding to 1 ng WH097-TEQ/g tebuconazole and 36 ng WHO97-TEQ/g permethrin. In the case of tebuconazole, the present measurements correlate well with those obtained from oxidative pyrolysis of CBA-treated wood in the cone calorimeter. It appears that permethrin and tebuconazole provide phenyl and diphenyl precursors to formation of PCDD/F and both constitute a source of chlorine upon fragmentation.

  3. Development of a combined pyro- and hydro-metallurgical route to treat spent zinc-carbon batteries.

    PubMed

    Baba, A A; Adekola, A F; Bale, R B

    2009-11-15

    The potential of solvent extraction using Cynanex272 for the recovery of zinc from spent zinc carbon batteries after a prior leaching in hydrochloric acid has been investigated. The elemental analysis of the spent material was carried out by ICP-MS. The major metallic elements are: ZnO (41.30%), Fe(2)O(3) (4.38%), MnO(2) (2.69%), Al(2)O(3) (1.01%), CaO (0.36%) and PbO (0.11%). The quantitative leaching by hydrochloric acid showed that the dissolution rates are significantly influenced by temperature and concentration of the acid solutions. The experimental data for the dissolution rates have been analyzed and were found to follow the shrinking core model for mixed control reaction with surface chemical reaction as the rate-determining step. About 90.3% dissolution was achieved with 4M HCl solution at 80 degrees C with 0.050-0.063 mm particle size within 120 min at 360 rpm. Activation energy value of 22.78 kJ/mol and a reaction order of 0.74 with respect to H(+) ion concentration were obtained for the dissolution process. An extraction yield of 94.23% zinc by 0.032M Cyanex272 in kerosene was obtained from initial 10 g/L spent battery leach liquor at 25+/-2 degrees C and at optimal stirring time of 25 min. Iron has been effectively separated by precipitation prior to extraction using ammoniacal solution at pH 3.5, while lead and other trace elements were firstly separated from Zn and Fe by cementation prior to iron removal and zinc extraction. Finally, the stripping study showed that 0.1M HCl led to the stripping of about 95% of zinc from the organic phase.

  4. Chromium on the hands of children after playing in playgrounds built from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Hamula, Camille; Wang, Zhongwen; Zhang, Hongquan; Kwon, Elena; Li, Xing-Fang; Gabos, Stephan; Le, X Chris

    2006-03-01

    Children's exposure to arsenic and chromium from playground equipment constructed with chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is a potential concern because of children's hand-to-mouth activity. However, there exists no direct measure of Cr levels on the hands of children after playing in such playgrounds. In this study we measured both soluble and total Cr on the hands of 139 children playing in playgrounds, eight of which were constructed with CCA-treated wood and eight of which were not. Children's age and duration of play were recorded. The hands of each child were washed after play with 150 mL deionized water, which was collected in a bag and subsequently underwent analysis of Cr and 20 other elements, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Total average Cr on the hands of 63 children who played in CCA playgrounds was 1,112 +/- 1,089 ng (median, 688; range 78-5,875). Total average Cr on the hands of 64 children who played in non-CCA playgrounds was 652 +/- 586 ng (median, 492; range 61-3,377). The difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p < 0.01). Cr levels were highly correlated to both Cu (r = 0.672) and As (r = 0.736) levels in CCA playgrounds (p < or = 0.01), but not non-CCA playgrounds (r = 0.252 and 0.486 for Cu and As, respectively). Principal-component analysis indicates that Cr, Cu, and As are more closely grouped together in CCA than in non-CCA playgrounds. These results suggest that the elevated levels of Cr and As on children's hands are due to direct contact with CCA wood.

  5. Chromium on the Hands of Children After Playing in Playgrounds Built from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)–Treated Wood

    PubMed Central

    Hamula, Camille; Wang, Zhongwen; Zhang, Hongquan; Kwon, Elena; Li, Xing-Fang; Gabos, Stephan; Le, X. Chris

    2006-01-01

    Children’s exposure to arsenic and chromium from playground equipment constructed with chromated copper arsenate (CCA)–treated wood is a potential concern because of children’s hand-to-mouth activity. However, there exists no direct measure of Cr levels on the hands of children after playing in such playgrounds. In this study we measured both soluble and total Cr on the hands of 139 children playing in playgrounds, eight of which were constructed with CCA-treated wood and eight of which were not. Children’s age and duration of play were recorded. The hands of each child were washed after play with 150 mL deionized water, which was collected in a bag and subsequently underwent analysis of Cr and 20 other elements, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Total average Cr on the hands of 63 children who played in CCA playgrounds was 1,112 ± 1,089 ng (median, 688; range 78–5,875). Total average Cr on the hands of 64 children who played in non-CCA playgrounds was 652 ± 586 ng (median, 492; range 61–3,377). The difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p < 0.01). Cr levels were highly correlated to both Cu (r = 0.672) and As (r = 0.736) levels in CCA playgrounds (p ≤ 0.01), but not non-CCA playgrounds (r = 0.252 and 0.486 for Cu and As, respectively). Principal-component analysis indicates that Cr, Cu, and As are more closely grouped together in CCA than in non-CCA playgrounds. These results suggest that the elevated levels of Cr and As on children’s hands are due to direct contact with CCA wood. PMID:16507472

  6. Electrolytic arsenic removal for recycling of washing solutions in a remediation process of CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Nanseu-Njiki, Charles-Péguy; Alonzo, Véronique; Bartak, Duane; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Darchen, André

    2007-10-01

    The remediation of chromated copper arsenate or CCA-treated wood is a challenging problem in many countries. In a wet remediation, the recycling of the washing solutions is the key step for a successful process. Within this goal, owing to its solubility and its toxicity, the removal of arsenic from washing solution is the most difficult process. The efficiency of arsenic removal from As(III) solutions by electrolysis was investigated in view of the recycling of acidic washing solutions usable in the remediation of CCA-treated wood. Electrochemical reduction of As(III) is irreversible and thus difficult to perform at carbon electrodes. However the electrolytic extraction of arsenic can be performed by the concomitant reduction of the cupric cation and arsenite anion. The cathodic deposits obtained by controlled potential electrolysis were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. XRD diffraction data indicated that these deposits were mixtures of copper and copper arsenides Cu(3)As and Cu(5)As(2). Electrolysis was carried out in an undivided cell with graphite cathode and copper anode, under a controlled nitrogen atmosphere. The evolution of arsine gas AsH(3) was not observed under these conditions.

  7. Demonstration of the efficiency and robustness of an acid leaching process to remove metals from various CCA-treated wood samples.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Lucie; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Janin, Amélie; Gastonguay, Louis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an efficient and economically attractive leaching process has been developed to remove metals from copper-based treated wood wastes. This study explored the applicability of this leaching process using chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood samples with different initial metal loading and elapsed time between wood preservation treatment and remediation. The sulfuric acid leaching process resulted in the solubilization of more than 87% of the As, 70% of the Cr, and 76% of the Cu from CCA-chips and in the solubilization of more than 96% of the As, 78% of the Cr and 91% of the Cu from CCA-sawdust. The results showed that the performance of this leaching process might be influenced by the initial metal loading of the treated wood wastes and the elapsed time between preservation treatment and remediation. The effluents generated during the leaching steps were treated by precipitation-coagulation to satisfy the regulations for effluent discharge in municipal sewers. Precipitation using ferric chloride and sodium hydroxide was highly efficient, removing more than 99% of the As, Cr, and Cu. It appears that this leaching process can be successfully applied to remove metals from different CCA-treated wood samples and then from the effluents.

  8. Formation of metal agglomerates during carbonisation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste: Comparison between a lab scale and an industrial plant.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Lieve; Hacala, Amélie

    2006-10-11

    This paper compares the results obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled to X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) of the solid product after carbonisation of treated wood waste in a lab scale and in an industrial installation. These setups (lab scale and industrial) are characterized by different operating conditions of the carbonisation process. Moreover, the wood waste input to the processes differs significantly. From this study, it is clear that some similarities but also some differences exist between the lab scale study and the study with the industrial Chartherm plant. In both reactors, a metal (and mineral) agglomeration process takes place, even in the case of untreated wood. The agglomerates initially present in the wood input may serve as a seed for the metal agglomeration process during "chartherisation". The industrial setup leads to a broader range of agglomerates' size (0.1-50 microm) and composition (all possible combinations of Cu, Cr, As and wood minerals). Some agglomerates contain the three metals but the major part is a combination of wood minerals and one or two of the three preservative metals, while all agglomerates analysed in the lab scale product contain the three metals. The separate influence of wood input characteristics and process conditions cannot be derived from these experiments, but the observations suggest that the higher the CCA retention in the wood input is, the easier is the metal agglomeration process during chartherisation of CCA treated wood waste. From the analyses performed in this study it seems that copper behaves differently in the sense that it agglomerates easily, but the resulting particles are small (<1 microm).

  9. Comparison of the protection effectiveness of acrylic polyurethane coatings containing bark extracts on three heat-treated North American wood species: Surface degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaefe, Duygu; Saha, Sudeshna

    2012-04-01

    High temperature heat-treatment of wood is a very valuable technique which improves many properties (biological durability, dimensional stability, thermal insulating characteristics) of natural wood. Also, it changes the natural color of wood to a very attractive dark brown color. Unfortunately, this color is not stable if left unprotected in external environment and turns to gray or white depending on the wood species. To overcome this problem, acrylic polyurethane coatings are applied on heat-treated wood to delay surface degradations (color change, loss of gloss, and chemical modifications) during aging. The acrylic polyurethane coatings which have high resistance against aging are further modified by adding bark extracts and/or lignin stabilizer to enhance their effectiveness in preventing the wood aging behavior. The aging characteristic of this coating is compared with acrylic polyurethane combined with commercially available organic UV stabilizers. In this study, their performance on three heat-treated North American wood species (jack pine, quaking aspen and white birch) are compared under accelerated aging conditions. Both the color change data and visual assessment indicate improvement in protective characteristic of acrylic polyurethane when bark extracts and lignin stabilizer are used in place of commercially available UV stabilizer. The results showed that although acrylic polyurethane with bark extracts and lignin stabilizer was more efficient compared to acrylic polyurethane with organic UV stabilizers in protecting heat-treated jack pine, it failed to protect heat-treated aspen and birch effectively after 672 h of accelerated aging. This degradation was not due to the coating adhesion loss or coating degradation during accelerated aging; rather, it was due to the significant degradation of heat-treated aspen and birch surface beneath this coating. The XPS results revealed formation of carbonyl photoproducts after aging on the coated surfaces and

  10. A Wood-Waste Cover Prevents Sulphide Oxidation and Treats Acid Effluents at the East-Sullivan Mine Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germain, D.; Tassé, N.; Cyr, J.

    2004-05-01

    At the East Sullivan site, wood wastes covering the abandoned mine tailings impoundment prevent sulphide oxidation by creating an anoxic environment. The addition of coarse ligneous wastes favours infiltration, resulting in a water table rise. This maintains most tailings saturated and thus provides an additional protection against sulphide oxidation. Moreover, high infiltration allows a more rapid flushing of acid prone groundwater generated prior to the cover placement. Finally, the pore-waters under the cover are characterized by a strong reducing potential and high alkalinity. These conditions favour sulphate reduction and base metal precipitation as sulphides and carbonates. The restoration strategy capitalized on the alkaline and reductive properties of the waters underlying the wood-waste cover. An original treatment of acid effluents, based on the recirculation of water discharging around the impoundment through the organic cover, was implemented in 1998. In 2003, the total volume of water treated was 725 000 m3. Data gathered near the dispersal zone show that despite dispersing acid water, the groundwater pH decreases by only one unit from 7 to 6, during the recirculation period: May to October. However, alkalinity decreases from 800 to 100 mg/L-CaCO3. But it is back up to 800 mg/L the following spring, thanks to sulphate reduction. Fe2+ concentrations near the dispersal zone are maintained below 2 mg/L. Evolution of the iron mass in the surface waters suggests that the contaminated groundwater flush is completed in the north and west sectors of the impoundment; the east and south ones are expected to be recovered within 3 to 4 years. A wood-waste cover, besides limiting sulphide oxidation, can fill the role of alkaline reducing barrier for the treatment of these acidogenic waters, until a balance between acidity and alkalinity in the effluent is reached.

  11. Wood mouse and box turtle populations in an area treated annually with DDT for five years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1951-01-01

    A 117-acre area of dense woodland on the Patuxent Research Refuge received an aerial application of DDT in oil at the rate of 2 pounds per acre gnnually for five years. DDT reached ground level in a much smaller amount (thousandths to hundredths of a pound per acre). Treatment was made during the first week of June of each year from 1945 through 1949. Field studies of the wood mouse population in DDT and check areas showed no significant differences in the two areas before and after the 1949 DDT treatment. There was no significant difference between trapping samples taken in DDT and check areas in 1945 and those taken in 1949. Field studies of the box turtles in DDT and check areas in 1945 and 1949 showed no significant difference in population size. Growth of the four young turtles taken in the DDT area in both 1945 and 1949 appeared to be normal in comparison with growth of check area turtles.

  12. Wastewater from wood and pulp industry treated by combination of coagulation, adsorption on modified clinoptilolite tuff and membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Bennani, Yasmina; Kosutić, Kresimir; Drazević, Emil; Rozeć, Mirela

    2012-06-01

    Wastewater from the wood and pulp industry is of environmental concern. It contains high concentrations of organic and inorganic matter. In this work a combined method of coagulation, adsorption and nanofiltration/reverse osmosis (NF/RO) was investigated in the purification of biologically treated wastewater from wood processing. Coagulation with 0.8 g dm(-3) AlCl3 x 6H2O and adsorption on 2.5 g m(-3) modified clinoptilolite tuff resulted in removal efficiencies of total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC) and inorganic carbon (IC) up to 67.1%, 77.4% and 49.5%, respectively. Almost complete removal of solutes was achieved after NF/RO treatment. The TOC removal efficiency with RO membrane (CPA-3, LFC-1, XLE) and tight NF membrane (NF90) was 98% and with highly porous NF membrane (DK), 88%. After the proposed treatment the purified water stream can be recycled into the process or safely disposed to the river.

  13. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous extracts of spent Pleurotus ostreatus substrates in mouse ears treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Pérez, Nallely; Ayala-Martínez, Maricela; Zepeda-Bastida, Armando; Meneses-Mayo, Marcos; Ojeda-Ramírez, Deyanira

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the application of spent Pleurotus ostreatus substrates, enriched or not with medicinal herbs, as a source of anti-inflammatory compounds. P. ostreatus was cultivated on five different substrates: Barley straw (BS) and BS combined 80:20 with medicinal herbs (Chenopodium ambrosioides L. [BS/CA], Rosmarinus officinalis L. [BS/RO], Litsea glaucescens Kunth [BS/LG], and Tagetes lucida Cav. [BS/TL]). The anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts of spent mushroom substrates (SMSs) (4 mg/ear) was studied using an acute inflammation model in the mouse ear induced with 2.5 μg/ear 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol13-acetate (TPA). Groups treated with BS/CA, BS/RO, and BS/LG aqueous extracts exhibited the best anti-inflammatory activity (94.0% ± 5.5%, 92.9% ± 0.6%, and 90.4% ± 5.0% inhibition of auricular edema [IAO], respectively), and these effects were significantly different (P < 0.05) from that of the positive control indomethacin (0.5 mg/ear). BS/TL and BS were also able to reduce TPA-induced inflammation but to a lesser extent (70.0% ± 6.7% and 43.5% ± 6.6% IAO, respectively). Spent P. ostreatus substrate of BS possesses a slight anti-inflammatory effect. The addition of CA L. to mushroom substrate showed a slightly synergistic effect while RO L. had an additive effect. In addition, LG Kunth and TL Cav. enhanced the anti-inflammatory effect of SMS. However, to determine whether there is a synergistic or additive effect, it is necessary to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of each medicinal herb.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous extracts of spent Pleurotus ostreatus substrates in mouse ears treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate

    PubMed Central

    Rivero-Pérez, Nallely; Ayala-Martínez, Maricela; Zepeda-Bastida, Armando; Meneses-Mayo, Marcos; Ojeda-Ramírez, Deyanira

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the application of spent Pleurotus ostreatus substrates, enriched or not with medicinal herbs, as a source of anti-inflammatory compounds. Subjects and Methods: P. ostreatus was cultivated on five different substrates: Barley straw (BS) and BS combined 80:20 with medicinal herbs (Chenopodium ambrosioides L. [BS/CA], Rosmarinus officinalis L. [BS/RO], Litsea glaucescens Kunth [BS/LG], and Tagetes lucida Cav. [BS/TL]). The anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts of spent mushroom substrates (SMSs) (4 mg/ear) was studied using an acute inflammation model in the mouse ear induced with 2.5 μg/ear 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol13-acetate (TPA). Results: Groups treated with BS/CA, BS/RO, and BS/LG aqueous extracts exhibited the best anti-inflammatory activity (94.0% ± 5.5%, 92.9% ± 0.6%, and 90.4% ± 5.0% inhibition of auricular edema [IAO], respectively), and these effects were significantly different (P < 0.05) from that of the positive control indomethacin (0.5 mg/ear). BS/TL and BS were also able to reduce TPA-induced inflammation but to a lesser extent (70.0% ± 6.7% and 43.5% ± 6.6% IAO, respectively). Conclusions: Spent P. ostreatus substrate of BS possesses a slight anti-inflammatory effect. The addition of CA L. to mushroom substrate showed a slightly synergistic effect while RO L. had an additive effect. In addition, LG Kunth and TL Cav. enhanced the anti-inflammatory effect of SMS. However, to determine whether there is a synergistic or additive effect, it is necessary to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of each medicinal herb. PMID:27127316

  16. Decay resistance of wood treated with boric acid and tall oil derivates.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Ali; Alfredsen, Gry; Eikenes, Morten; Terziev, Nasko

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the effect of two boric acid concentrations (1% and 2%) and four derivates of tall oil with varying chemical composition were tested separately and in combination. The tall oil derivates were chosen in a way that they consist of different amounts of free fatty, resin acids and neutral compounds. Decay tests using two brown rot fungi (Postia placenta and Coniophora puteana) were performed on both unleached and leached test samples. Boric acid showed a low weight loss in test samples when exposed to fungal decay before leaching, but no effect after leaching. The tall oil derivates gave better efficacy against decay fungi compared to control, but are not within the range of the efficacy needed for a wood preservative. Double impregnation with boric acid and tall oil derivates gave synergistic effects for several of the double treatments both in unleached and leached samples. In the unleached samples the double treatment gave a better efficacy against decay fungi than tall oil alone. In leached samples a better efficacy against brown rot fungi were achieved than in samples with boron alone and a nearly similar or better efficacy than for tall oil alone. Boric acid at 2% concentration combined with the tall oil derivate consisting of 90% free resin acids (TO-III) showed the best performance against the two decay fungi with a weight loss less than 3% after a modified pure culture test.

  17. Particleboard made from remediated CCA-treated wood : evaluation of panel properties

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; S. Nami. Kartal; James. Muehl

    2001-01-01

    CCA-treated southern yellow pine (SYP) chips were remediated utilizing acid extraction alone, and using acid extraction followed by bioleaching with the metal-tolerant bacterium Bacillus licheniformis CC01. bCleanedc chips were used to make particleboard (PB) with 10 percent urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin, and the PB samples were evaluated for internal bond (IB), modulus...

  18. Bacterial associations with decaying wood : a review

    Treesearch

    C. A. Clausen

    1996-01-01

    Wood-inhabiting bacteria are associated with wood decay and may have an indirect influence on the decay process. Bacteria are able to affect wood permeability, attack wood structure, or work synergistically with other bacteria and soft-rot fungi to predispose wood to fungal attack. Bacteria that can inhabit chemically treated wood are recognized. The natural ability of...

  19. Investigation of the volatile organic substances that cause the characteristic odor of pentachlorophenol treated wood utility poles.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Myriam; Gilbert, Roland; Besner, André; Labrecque, Jean-François; Hubert, Joseph

    2002-12-01

    The nature of the volatile organic compounds that could be at the origin of the characteristic odor of treated wood utility poles was investigated by the study of compositional changes in the chromatographic profiles of fresh-pentachlorophenol (PCP) solvent samples and weathered samples collected from an in-service red pine pole. Over 99 peaks were identified in the chromatogram of the fresh solvent from which a large portion of the C3-, C4-, C5-, C6-alkylbenzene isomers and early eluting n-alkanes was missing from the analysis of weathered samples. Three domains in the chromatographic profile (volatile, semivolatile, and nonvolatile components) were confirmed by assessing the headspace of fresh-PCP solvent samples using direct syringe sampling and solid-phase microextraction. A first level of field validation was achieved using an emission cell for measuring substances emanating from sapwood specimens at different temperatures. The average latent heat of vaporization (deltaHvap) of the PCP-solvent components was estimated at 99.9 kJ/mol from these results. Finally, the analysis of airborne substances at a treating plant and a utility pole storage site confirmed that the C4-, C5-, and C6-alkylbenzene isomers could contribute to the characteristic odor perceived by humans.

  20. Serum profiles of PCDDs and PCDFs, in individuals near the Escambia Wood Treating Company Superfund site in Pensacola, FL.

    PubMed

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Rao, K Ranga; Lanza, John J; Davis, Deeya A; Wilson, Patricia A

    2007-10-01

    The Escambia Wood Treating Company (ETC) Superfund site, Pensacola, FL, is contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), benzo(a)pyrene, lead and arsenic from pentachlorophenol (PCP), creosote, and other compounds used to treat utility poles and foundation pilings. Although ETC's operations ceased in 1982, soils in the areas surrounding the facility continue to exhibit elevated levels of contaminants attributable to ETC operations. In July 2000, individuals who may have been affected by contamination from the ETC site, including current and former residents and former workers and their household members were invited to participate in a study, which included a health and exposure history and routine blood analysis. We also conducted a toxicological health evaluation of a subset of these eligible workers/residents by analyzing serum levels of 17 PCDD/F congeners. Members of the ETC cohort exhibited elevated serum PCDD/F relative to the general population, and congener profiles in members of the cohort reflected patterns commonly observed in persons exposed to PCP. Hypertension prevalence in the cohort was found to correlate with PCDD/F levels, although no other significant relationships were identified with monitored health indices.

  1. Wood preservative testing

    Treesearch

    Rebecca Ibach; Stan T. Lebow

    2012-01-01

    Most wood species used in commercial and residential construction have little natural biological durability and will suffer from biodeterioration when exposed to moisture. Historically, this problem has been overcome by treating wood for outdoor use with toxic wood preservatives. As societal acceptance of chemical use changes, there is continual pressure to develop and...

  2. A comparison of co-combustion characteristics of coal with wood and hydrothermally treated municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Marisamy; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2010-04-01

    In this work, thermogravimetric analysis was used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics of wood and municipal solid waste (MSW) with Indian coal. Combustion characteristics like volatile release, ignition were studied. Wood presented an enhanced reaction rate reflecting its high volatile and low ash contents, while MSW enhanced ignition behavior of Indian coal. The results indicate that blending of both, wood and MSW improves devolatization properties of coal. Significant interaction was detected between wood and Indian coal, and reactivity of coal has improved upon blending with wood. On the other hand, MSW shows a good interaction with Indian coal leading to significant reduction in ignition temperature of coal and this effect was more pronounced with higher blending ratio of MSW. Hence MSW blending could more positively support the combustion of low quality Indian coal as compared to wood, due to its property of enhancement of ignition characteristics.

  3. Equilibrium, kinetic and mass transfer studies and column operations for the removal of arsenic(III) from aqueous solutions using acid treated spent bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Mahramanlioglu, M; Güçlü, K

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, a new adsorbent was produced from spent bleaching earth by H2SO4 impregnation method. The sorption of arsenic(III) by acid treated spent bleaching earth was studied to examine the possibility of utilizing this material in water treatment systems. The effect of time, pH, initial concentration, temperature on the adsorption of arsenic(III) was studied. Maximum adsorption was found to occur at pH 9.0. The adsorption process followed the first order Lagergren equation. Mass transfer coefficients and rate constants of intraparticle diffusion were calculated. The experimental data points were fitted to the Langmuir equation in order to calculate the adsorption capacity (Q0) of the adsorbent and the value of Q0 was found to be 0.46 mmol g(-1). In order to understand the adsorption mechanism, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) isotherm was used. The magnitude of E calculated from DR equation was found to be 5.12 kJ mol(-1). The heat of adsorption (deltaH0 = -30367 J mol(-1)) implied that the adsorption was physical exothermic adsorption. The column studies were also carried out to simulate water treatment processes. The capacity values obtained in column studies were found to be greater than the capacity values obtained in batch studies. This result was explained by the difference between batch system and column system. The factors that affect the capacity values of column and batch systems were explained. The effect of other anions on the adsorption of arsenic(III) in the presence of NO3-, SO4(2-), Cl-, Br- was studied. The presence of these anions did not affect the adsorption of arsenic(III) significantly.

  4. A novel "wastes-treat-wastes" technology: role and potential of spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst assisted ozonation of petrochemical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunmao; Yu, Ji; Yoza, Brandon A; Li, Qing X; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Catalytic ozonation is a promising wastewater treatment technology. However, the high cost of the catalyst hinders its application. A novel "wastes-treat-wastes" technology was developed to reuse spent fluid catalytic cracking catalysts (sFCCc) for the ozonation of petrochemical wastewater in this study. Multivalent vanadium (V(4+) and V(5+)), iron (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)) and nickel (Ni(2+)) oxides that are distributed on the surface of sFCCc and poisoned FCC catalysts are the catalytic components for ozonation. The sFCCc assisted catalytic ozonation (sFCCc-O) of nitrobenzene indicated that the sFCCc significantly promoted hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation. The degradation rate constant of nitrobenzene in sFCCc-O (0.0794 min(-1) at 298 K) was approximately doubled in comparison with that in single ozonation (0.0362 min(-1) at 298 K). The sFCCc-O of petrochemical wastewater increased chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency by three-fold relative to single ozonation. The number of oxygen-containing (Ox) polar contaminants in the effluent (253) from sFCCc-O treatment decreased to about 70% of the initial wastewater (353). The increased oxygen/carbon atomic ratio and decreased number of Ox polar contaminants indicated a high degree of degradation. The present study showed the role and potential of sFCCc for catalytic ozonation of petrochemical wastewater, particularly in an advantage of the cost-effectiveness through "wastes-treat-wastes".

  5. Characterization of low molecular weight organic acids from beech wood treated in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kei; Kusaki, Junko; Ehara, Katsunobu; Saka, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume), its cell wall components, and model compounds were treated by supercritical water (380 degrees C, 100 MPa) for 5 s using a batch-type reactor to investigate the production behavior of low molecular weight organic acids. It was found that cellulose and hemicellulose were decomposed to formic acid, pyruvic acid, glycolic acid, acetic acid, and lactic acid, whereas lignin was barely decomposed to such organic acids under the given conditions. However, after prolonged treatment (380 degrees C, 100 MPa, 4 min) of lignin, some organic acids were recovered owing perhaps to the decomposition of the propyl side chain of lignin. It was additionally revealed that the predominant organic acid recovered was acetic acid, which might be derived from the acetyl group of hemicellulose in Japanese beech.

  6. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  7. Combination of pyrolysis and hydroliquefaction of CCB-treated wood for energy recovery: optimization and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Kinata, Silao Espérance; Loubar, Khaled; Paraschiv, Maria; Belloncle, Christophe; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, pyrolysis and hydroliquefaction processes were successively used to convert CCB-treated wood into bio-oil with respect to environment. Pyrolysis temperature has been optimized to produce maximum yield of charcoal with a high metal content (Cu, Cr, and B). The results obtained indicate that the pyrolysis at 300 °C and 30 min are the optimal conditions giving high yield of charcoal about 45% which contains up to 94% of Cu, 100% of Cr and 88% of B. After pyrolysis process, the charcoal has been converted into bio-oil using hydroliquefaction process. The optimization approach for the yield of bio-oil using a complete factorial design with three parameters: charcoal/solvent, temperature and hydrogen pressure was discussed. It is observed that the temperature is the most significant parameter and the optimum yield of bio-oil is around 82%. The metal analysis shows that the metals present in the bio-oil is very negligible.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and microbial community shifts during co-composting of creosote-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; Fabianová, Tereza; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Burianová, Eva; Filipová, Alena; Vořísková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of decontaminating creosote-treated wood (CTW) by co-composting with agricultural wastes was investigated using two bulking agents, grass cuttings (GC) and broiler litter (BL), each employed at a 1:1 ratio with the matrix. The initial concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in CTW (26,500 mg kg(-1)) was reduced to 3 and 19% after 240 d in GC and BL compost, respectively. PAH degradation exceeded the predicted bioaccesible threshold, estimated through sequential supercritical CO2 extraction, together with significant detoxification, assessed by contact tests using Vibrio fisheri and Hordeum vulgare. GC composting was characterized by high microbial biomass growth in the early phases, as suggested by phospholipid fatty acid analyses. Based on the 454-pyrosequencing results, fungi (mostly Saccharomycetales) constituted an important portion of the microbial community, and bacteria were characterized by rapid shifts (from Firmicutes (Bacilli) and Actinobacteria to Proteobacteria). However, during BL composting, larger amounts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic PLFA markers were observed during the cooling and maturation phases, which were dominated by Proteobacteria and fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and those putatively related to the Glomeromycota. This work reports the first in-depth analysis of the chemical and microbiological processes that occur during the co-composting of a PAH-contaminated matrix.

  9. Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, L.F.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option.

  10. Migration of iron and manganese into CCA-treated wood in soil contact and the resulting error in leaching results when using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometers

    Treesearch

    Tor P. Schultz; Darrel D. Nicholas; Stan Lebow

    2003-01-01

    In a laboratory leaching study, we found that chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood, which had been exposed to one of five soils examined, unexpectedly appeared to gain significant Cr (47%) when measured with an energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument (American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA) Method A9-01 2001). Analysis of some of the leached...

  11. Transport and interaction of arsenic, chromium, and copper associated with CCA-treated wood in columns of sand and sand amended with peat.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ligang; Diez-Rivas, Cristina; Hasan, A Rasem; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Fieber, Lynne; Cai, Yong

    2010-02-01

    Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to investigate the transport and interaction of As, Cr, and Cu associated with CCA-treated wood in sand with and without peat amendment. Results showed that leaching behavior of As, Cr, and Cu in these substrates were totally different. Substrate characteristics and microorganism activity posed distinct effects on the transport and transformation of these three elements. Arsenic was rapidly leached out from the columns with or without the amendment of peat, while Cr remained in all columns during the entire experimental period (215d). Copper was leached out only in the substrate column without peat. The presence of microorganism clearly facilitated the transport of As, while it did not show obvious effects on the transport of Cr and Cu. Interactions among these three elements were observed during the processes of adsorption and transport. The adsorption of Cu on soil was enhanced with the adsorption of As, likely caused by a more negatively charged soil surface because of As adsorption. The adsorption of Cr on soil increased the adsorption of As due to the additional As binding sites induced by Cr adsorption. These results suggest that As concentrations in the soil affected by CCA-treated wood could largely exceed predictions based on soil adsorption capacity for As. The evaluation of the impact on human health associated with CCA-treated wood should take consideration of the distinct transport characteristics of three elements and their interactions in soils.

  12. Surface free radicals detection using molecular scavenging method on black spruce wood treated with cold, atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Jean-Michel; Levasseur, Olivier; Vlad, Mirela; Stafford, Luc; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Formation of surface free radicals on wood surfaces during plasma treatment could be an important factor when it comes to wood coating adhesion enhancement. In order to explore this aspect, freshly sanded black spruce (Picea mariana) wood samples were exposed to either plane-to-plane atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) or the flowing afterglow of an AP-DBD and then dipped in a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) solution. Wood veneers (extracted to eliminate small molecules prior to each plasma treatment) showed an increase of their reaction rate toward DPPH after treatment in the AP-DBD operated in nominally pure He; a feature ascribed to the plasma-assisted formation of free radicals on the wood surface. Addition of trace amounts (0.1%) of O2 in the He plasma produced a decrease in DPPH reactivity, suggesting that oxygen-spruce interaction during plasma treatment quenches free radicals formation. Similar experiments performed using the flowing afterglow of AP-DBD operated in either N2 or N2/O2 showed that both treatments do not generate significant amount of surface free radicals. This partially results from oxygen-wood interactions due to the open-air configuration of the afterglow reactor.

  13. Reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide (Gibbs reagent) with permethrin – an optical sensor for rapid detection of permethrin in treated wood

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A novel optical sensor for the rapid and direct determination of permethrin preservatives in treated wood was designed. The optical sensor was fabricated from the immobilisation of 2,6-dichloro-p-benzoquinone-4-chloroimide (Gibbs reagent) in nafion/sol–gel hybrid film and the mode of detection was based on absorption spectrophotometry. Physical entrapment was employed as a method of immobilisation. Results The sensor gave a linear response range of permethrin between 2.56–383.00 μM with detection limit of 2.5 μM and demonstrated good repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 μM at 5.3%, 100 μM at 2.7%, and 200 μM at 1.8%. The response time of the sensor was 40 s with an optimum response at pH 11. Conclusions The sensor was useful for rapid screening of wood or treated wood products before detailed analysis using tedious procedure is performed. The validation study of the optical sensor against standard method HPLC successfully showed that the permethrin sensor tended to overestimate the permethrin concentration determined. PMID:23867006

  14. Monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and water-extractable phenols in creosotes and creosote-treated woods made and procurable in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Kaniwa, Masa-aki; Tsuchiya, Toshie

    2005-09-01

    The recycling of disused railway sleepers treated with wood preservatives such as creosote as exterior wood for use in gardens has recently become popular in Japan. Creosote contains high quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and can lead to skin irritation and disease. In this work we have determined the amount of PAHs and water-extractable phenols in creosote and creosote-treated wood products such as railway sleepers and stakes for agricultural use that are either made or are procurable in Japan. PAHs were extracted with dichloromethane and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among carcinogenic PAHs, benz(a)anthracene was detected in the highest concentration, varying between 228 and 6328 microg/g in creosotes. Benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were found in the range of 67-3541 microg/g. Almost all creosotes contained more than 50 microg/g of BaP, which is the upper limit level that is permitted in the European Union (EU). Creosote-impregnated wood products, such as brand-new or secondhand railway sleepers and foundations, contained large amounts of BaP (58-749 microg/g) and benz(a)anthracene (250-1282 microg/g). Concentrations of between 692 and 2489 microg/g of phenols were determined in the water extracts from creosotes, but the level was considerably less than the EU control value (3% by mass), and there was no correlation between the amount of water-extractable phenols and the amount of PAHs detected in each sample. The situation that consumers are free to use the creosotes containing a high concentration of carcinogens such as BaP may cause unacceptable damage to the health of persons handling these creosote products.

  15. Biosorbents prepared from wood particles treated with anionic polymer and iron salt: Effect of particle size on phosphate adsorption

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Soo-Hong Min

    2008-01-01

    Biomass-based adsorbents have been widely studied as a cost-effective and environmentally-benign means to remove pollutants and nutrients from water. A two-stage treatment of aspen wood particles with solutions of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and ferrous chloride afforded a biosorbent that was effective in removing phosphate from test solutions. FTIR spectroscopy of...

  16. Toxicity of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood to non-target marine fouling communities in Langstone Harbour, Portsmouth, UK.

    PubMed

    Brown, C J; Eaton, R A

    2001-04-01

    The effect of the anti-marine-borer timber preservative chromated copper arsenate (CCA) (a pressure impregnated solution of copper, chromium and arsenic compounds) on non-target marine fouling animals was investigated during a subtidal exposure trial. Panels of Scots pine treated to target retentions of 12, 24 and 48 kg CCA per m-3 of wood, plus untreated controls were submerged at a coastal site on the south coast of the UK for 6, 12 and 18 months. After each exposure period the fouling communities that formed on the surface of panels were assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Community structure was similar on panels treated to the three CCA loadings, but was significantly different from community structure on untreated panels. The total number of species (species richness) was similar on all panels, although the number of individual organisms attached to the surface of panels was significantly higher on CCA-treated panels than on untreated panels. k-dominance curves revealed that the difference in numbers of individuals between CCA-treated and untreated panels was caused by higher numbers of the dominant species (Elminius modestus, Hydroides ezoensis, and Electra pilosa) on CCA-treated panels. Other species were present in similar numbers on panels of all treatments. Results indicate that there are no detrimental toxic effects to epibiota caused by the presence of CCA preservative within the matrix of the wood at any of the treatment levels. Differences in community structure between CCA-treated and untreated panels may be due to enhanced larval settlement on CCA-treated timber by some species as a result of modifications to the surface properties of the timber by the CCA preservative.

  17. Accumulation of copper, chromium, and arsenic in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from laboratory and field exposures to wood treated with chromated copper arsenate type C

    SciTech Connect

    Adler-Ivanbrook, L.; Breslin, V.T.

    1999-02-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to examine the uptake of Cu, Cr, and As leached from southern yellow pine (SYP) treated with chromated copper arsenate type C (CCA-C), as well as effects on mortality and growth, in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussels were exposed to CCA-C-treated wood at a preservative retention of 40 kg/m{sup 3} and control (nontreated) SYP in laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments for 9 months in 1994 and 3 months in 1995. Mussels were sampled at regular intervals to evaluate possible short- and long-term exposure effects., Individual mussels were measured to determine the length, dry weight, and condition index. Mussel tissues were than analyzed for Cu, Cr, and As. Results showed few significant differences in condition index, dry weight, and length between CCA-C-exposed and control mussels. In addition, no statistically significant differences in mortality were found between the mussels exposed to CCA-C-treated and nontreated SYP in the laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments. Significant differences in Cu, As, and Cr contents in mussel tissues between treatments were few, and generally cannot be attributed to exposure to CCA-C-treated SYP. The lack of Cu, Cr, and As uptake from CCA-C-treated SYP was attributed to the low, although continuous, rate of release of these elements from CCA-C-treated wood and to the experimental design, which allowed continuous flushing, prohibiting the accumulation of these elements in the water surrounding the mussels.

  18. Wood and Wood Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Raymond A.

    Wood has been utilized by humans since antiquity. Trees provided a source of many products required by early humans such as food, medicine, fuel, and tools. For example, the bark of the willow tree, when chewed, was used as a painkiller in early Greece and was the precursor of the present-day aspirin. Wood served as the primary fuel in the United States until about the turn of the 19th century, and even today over one-half of the wood now harvested in the world is used for heating fuel.

  19. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caufield

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture”. Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  20. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture.” Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  1. Effect of different extracting solutions on the electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated wood waste Part I. Behaviour of Cu and Cr.

    PubMed

    Velizarova, Emiliya; Ribeiro, Alexandra B; Mateus, Eduardo; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2004-03-19

    Removal of Cu and Cr from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste under batch electrodialytic conditions was studied. The effect of different types of extracting solutions, such as deionised water or aqueous solutions of NaCl, formic acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA, on the magnitude and direction of the fluxes of Cu- and Cr-containing species in the electrodialytic cell was investigated. Oxalic acid was found to have the best performance if simultaneous removal of the two elements is required (removal efficiencies of 80.5% for Cu and 87.4% for Cr, respectively). A mixture of oxalic acid and formic acid also led to similar removal efficiencies. In these experiments, the target elements were accumulated in both the anode and cathode compartments of the electrodialytic cell due to the formation of negatively charged complexes with the organic acids used besides the free cationic forms. The latter were not present if EDTA was the extracting solution resulting in directing the Cu and Cr fluxes to the anode compartment. Contrary, these fluxes were exclusively to the cathode compartment if deionised water or an aqueous solution of NaCl were used. These extracting solutions proved suitable for solubilising (re-mobilisation) of Cu but were less efficient for Cr removal (less than 20% removal). Overall, the results obtained show the important role of the proper selection of the type and composition of the extracting solution for the success of subsequent electrodialytic removal of Cu and Cr from CCA-treated wood waste.

  2. Selective recovery of Cr and Cu in leachate from chromated copper arsenate treated wood using chelating and acidic ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Janin, Amélie; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Drogui, Patrick

    2009-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to selectively remove chromium and copper from CCA-treated wood acid leachates (initial concentrations of 447-651 mg As l(-1), 374-453 mg Cu l(-1) and 335-622 mg Cr l(-1)) using ion exchange resins and precipitation techniques. Batch experiments revealed that the chelating resin Dowex M4195 had a high copper selectivity in the presence of chromium while the Amberlite IR120 resin had a high chromium sorption capacity. Combining M4195 and IR120 resins in four successive columns, made with Plexiglas tube, led to 96% copper extraction and 68% chromium extraction. NH(4)OH (4M) efficiently eluted copper from the chelating resin while H(2)SO(4) (10%v/v) was used for IR120 resin elution. Copper and chromium recovery by elution reached 94% and 81%, respectively. Successive sorption and elution steps using M4195 and IR120 ion exchange resins presented similar metal removal capacities over the five cycles. No resin deterioration was observed but the results suggested arsenic bulk diffusion into the M4195 resin. Successive treatments of CCA-treated wood leachate with M4195 and IR120 allowed for copper and chromium removal while arsenic could be extracted by coagulation treatment with ferric chloride and precipitation with Ca(OH)(2) at pH 5.7. This final process led to 99.9% arsenic removal. The final effluent contained less than 1 mg l(-1) of arsenic, chromium and copper.

  3. Modeling of electrodialytic and dialytic removal of Cr, Cu and As from CCA-treated wood chips.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A B; Rodríguez-Maroto, J M; Mateus, E P; Velizarova, E; Ottosen, L M

    2007-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is developed for simulating the electrodialytic and dialytic treatment of a saturated bed of wood chips containing chromium, copper and arsenic. The movement of Cr, Cu and As is mathematically modeled taking into account the diffusion transport resulting from the concentration gradients of their compounds and the electromigration of their ionic, simple and complex species during the operation. The model also includes the electromigration of the non-contaminant principal ionic species in the system, H(+) and OH(-), proceeding from the electrolysis at the electrodes, Na(+) and NO(3)(-) used as electrolyte solutions in the electrode compartments, and oxalate ions and protons incorporated with the oxalic acid solution during wood chips incubation. The model simulation also takes into account that OH(-) generated on the cathode, during electrodialytic remediation, is periodically neutralized by addition of nitric acid in the cathode compartment. The anion and cation-exchange membranes are simply represented as ionic filters that preclude the transport of co-ions (the cations and anions respectively) with the exception of H(+), which is retarded but considered to pass through the anion-exchange membrane.

  4. Removal of basic (Methylene Blue) and acid (Egacid Orange) dyes from waters by sorption on chemically treated wood shavings.

    PubMed

    Janos, Pavel; Coskun, Sezen; Pilarová, Vera; Rejnek, Jaroslav

    2009-02-01

    Spruce wood shavings from Picea abies were used for an adsorptive removal of both basic as well as acid dyes from waters. The sorption properties of the sorbents were modified with HCl, Na(2)CO(3) and Na(2)HPO(4). The treatment of the wood sorbents with alkaline carbonate solution as well as with phosphate solution increased the sorption ability for the basic dye (Methylene Blue), whereas the treatment with mineral acid decreased the sorption ability for Methylene Blue to some extent. The opposite is true for the sorption of the acid dye--Egacid Orange. The maximum sorption capacities estimated from the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms ranged from 0.060 to 0.165 mmol g(-1) for Methylene Blue, and from 0.045 to 0.513 mmol g(-1) for Egacid Orange. The basic dye sorption decreased at low pH values in accordance with a presupposed ion-exchange mechanism of the sorption. The sorption of acid dye, on the other hand, decreased with increasing pH. The presence of inorganic salts as well as surfactants exhibited only minor effects on the dye sorption.

  5. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow

    2010-01-01

    Many commonly used wood species can deteriorate if exposed to conditions that support growth of wood-degrading organisms (see Chap. 14). Wood products can be protected from the attack of decay fungi, harmful insects, or marine borers by applying chemical preservatives. Preservative treatments greatly increase the life of wood structures, thus reducing replacement costs...

  6. Retrospective cohort mortality study and nested case-control study of workers exposed to creosote at 11 wood-treating plants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wong, Otto; Harris, Fran

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess both malignant and nonmalignant mortality risks of workers exposed to creosote. For background, a literature review is also presented. The retrospective cohort study consisted of 2179 employees at 11 plants in the United States where wood (primarily railroad ties and utility poles) is treated with creosote-based preservatives. The observation period covered 1979-2001. Mortality data in the cohort study were analyzed in terms of cause-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), with expected deaths based on U.S. national cause-, gender-, race-, year-, age-specific mortality rates. In addition to the cohort investigation, a nested case-control study of lung cancer and multiple myeloma was conducted. Information on tobacco consumption and detailed employment (job titles) was obtained for cases and matched controls. Jobs were classified into 5 categories according to potential for exposure to creosote. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were calculated for job categories and length of exposure. Overall mortality for the entire cohort was lower than expected (293 observed deaths vs. 325.37 expected, SMR = 90.1, 95% CI = 80.0-101.0). Close to 90% employees were hourly, whose potential for exposure was generally much higher than that of salaried employees. Among hourly employees, except for multiple myeloma, none of the specific cancer sites showed any significant increase. Furthermore, detailed analysis by length of employment did not reveal any significant mortality excess or upward trend. Six deaths were from multiple myeloma, whereas 1.50 deaths were expected (SMR = 401.1, 95% CI = 147.2-873.1). However, analysis by length of employment did not show any upward trend for multiple myeloma. No significant mortality increase was reported for any nonmalignant disease, and analysis by length of employment did not reveal any upward trend. In the case-control study, an increased risk of lung cancer

  7. Dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability of furfuryl alcohol and nano-SiO2 treated poplar wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Youming; Shen, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Shifeng; Li, Jianzhang

    2015-07-01

    Wood polymer nanocomposites (WPNC) were prepared from the furfuryl alcohol and nano-SiO2 using a method of vacuum impregnation. Dynamic mechanical properties in storage modulus and mechanical loss factor, as well as the thermal stability of the WPNC were evaluated. The interface interaction between the organic and inorganic compounds was also studied by the scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The dynamic mechanical analysis showed the improvement in the storage modulus and mechanical loss factor of WPNC as a result of the strong interfacial interaction between the organic and inorganic matrix. Additionally, with an increase in nanoparticles content in the composites, the thermo-stability of WPNC improved significantly.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site, Hollywood, Maryland (first remedial action) June 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Southern Maryland Wood Treating (SMWT) site is located in Hollywood, St. Mary's County, Maryland. The site is situated within a wetland area in a drainage divide such that runoff from the site discharges into Brooks Run and McIntosh Run tributaries, which flow into the Potomac River. The area surrounding the site is predominantly used for agricultural and residential purposes. Currently, part of the site is being used as a retail outlet for pretreated lumber and crab traps. The waste generated at the site included retort and cylinder sludges, process wastes, and material spillage. These wastes were in six onsite unlined lagoons. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the onsite ground water, soil, surface water, sediments, and debris include: VOCs, PNA, and base/neutral acid extractables. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  9. Characterization of pyrolytic products obtained from fast pyrolysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)- and alkaline copper quaternary compounds (ACQ)-treated wood biomasses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Tae-Sung; Eom, In-Yong; Kang, Sung Mo; Cho, Tae-Su; Choi, In Gyu; Choi, Joon Weon

    2012-08-15

    In this study, chromated copper arsenate-treated wood (CCA-W) and alkaline copper quaternary compounds-treated wood (ACQ-W) were subjected to fast pyrolysis at 500°C for ca. 2s to produce bio-oil and char. The physicochemical properties of the pyrolytic products as well as the distribution of heavy metals - arsenic, copper and chrome - during fast pyrolysis were investigated. The water content, viscosity, pH and higher heating value (HHV) of bio-oil from CCA-W were 24.8 wt%, 13.5 cSt, 2.1 and 16 MJ/kg, respectively, whereas those of bio-oil from ACQ-W were 27.9 wt%, 16 cSt, 3.0 and 14.1 MJ/kg, respectively. The yields of bio-oil from CCA-W and ACQ-W were 43.3% and 46.6%, respectively, significantly lower than that of control (61.6%). In the pyrolytic products of CCA-W, the concentrations of arsenic, copper and chromium were determined to be 36.4 wt%, 74.0 wt% and 75.4 wt% in char, respectively, 34.5 wt%, 10.3 wt% and 9.0 wt% in bio-oil, respectively, and 29.0 wt%, 15.7 wt% and 15.5 wt% in gas, respectively. In addition, most of the copper appeared in the char (98.8 wt%) and only a trace amount of copper was detected in the bio-oil (0.2 wt%) produced by ACQ-W.

  10. Effects of long-term ambient ozone exposure on biomass and wood traits in poplar treated with ethylenediurea (EDU).

    PubMed

    Carriero, G; Emiliani, G; Giovannelli, A; Hoshika, Y; Manning, W J; Traversi, M L; Paoletti, E

    2015-11-01

    This is the longest continuous experiment where ethylenediurea (EDU) was used to protect plants from ozone (O3). Effects of long-term ambient O3 exposure (23 ppm h AOT40) on biomass of an O3 sensitive poplar clone (Oxford) were examined after six years from in-ground planting. Trees were irrigated with either water or 450 ppm EDU. Above (-51%) and below-ground biomass (-47%) was reduced by O3 although the effect was significant only for stem and coarse roots. Ambient O3 decreased diameter of the lower stem, and increased moisture content along the stem of not-protected plants (+16%). No other change in the physical wood structure was observed. A comparison with a previous assessment in the same experiment suggested that O3 effects on biomass partitioning to above-ground organs depend on the tree ontogenetic stage. The root/shoot ratios did not change, suggesting that previous short-term observations of reduced allocation to tree roots may be overestimated.

  11. Wood Smoke

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine, microscopic particles produced when wood and other organic matter burn. The biggest health threat from wood smoke comes from fine particles (also called particulate matter).

  12. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2003-01-01

    When wood is exposed to various environmental conditions, many degradation reactions (biological, ultraviolet, mechanical, moisture, and chemical) can occur. To protect wood from biological degradation, chemical preservatives are applied by nonpressure or pressure treatment. Penetration and retention of a chemical depend upon the wood species and the amount of...

  13. Nephrotoxicity of CCA-treated wood: A comparative study with As(2)O(5) and CrO(3) on mice.

    PubMed

    Matos, Rita Cerejeira; Vieira, Catarina; Morais, Simone; de Lourdes Pereira, Maria; de Jesus, Júlio Pedrosa

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the acute toxicity on male mice to a chromated copper arsenate (CCA) solution, a widespread wood preservative used in building industry until 2002. Animals were subcutaneously injected with CCA (7.2mg/kg arsenic and 10.2mg/kg chromium per body weight), CrO(3) (10.2mg/kg), As(2)O(5) (7.2mg/kg) and NaCl (0.9%) per se, during 48h and 96h, for histopathology, histochemistry, chromium and arsenic analysis. The results showed some histopathological changes within renal tubules lumen of CCA exposed animals (during 48h, and 96h), and CrO(3) (for the period of 96h). Furthermore, the renal levels of arsenic and chromium in treated animals were statistically more evident than controls. Although, the same contents of pentavalent arsenic and hexavalent chromium were injected into treated animals with CCA and with the prepared solutions of As(2)O(5) and CrO(3), a different distribution of the pattern of these compounds was observed in kidneys. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Testing to evaluate the suitability of waste forms developed for electrometallurgically treated spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel for disposal in the Yucca Mountain reporsitory.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. E.

    2006-01-31

    The results of laboratory testing and modeling activities conducted to support the development of waste forms to immobilize wastes generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel and their qualification for disposal in the federal high-level radioactive waste repository are summarized in this report. Tests and analyses were conducted to address issues related to the chemical, physical, and radiological properties of the waste forms relevant to qualification. These include the effects of composition and thermal treatments on the phase stability, radiation effects, and methods for monitoring product consistency. Other tests were conducted to characterize the degradation and radionuclide release behaviors of the ceramic waste form (CWF) used to immobilize waste salt and the metallic waste form (MWF) used to immobilize metallic wastes and to develop models for calculating the release of radionuclides over long times under repository-relevant conditions. Most radionuclides are contained in the binder glass phase of the CWF and in the intermetallic phase of the MWF. The release of radionuclides from the CWF is controlled by the dissolution rate of the binder glass, which can be tracked using the same degradation model that is used for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass. Model parameters measured for the aqueous dissolution of the binder glass are used to model the release of radionuclides from a CWF under all water-contact conditions. The release of radionuclides from the MWF is element-specific, but the release of U occurs the fastest under most test conditions. The fastest released constituent was used to represent all radionuclides in model development. An empirical aqueous degradation model was developed to describe the dependence of the radionuclide release rate from a MWF on time, pH, temperature, and the Cl{sup -} concentration. The models for radionuclide release from the CWF and MWF are both bounded by the HLW glass

  15. Untreated and copper-treated wood soaked in sodium oxalate: effects of decay by copper-tolerant and copper-sensitive fungi

    Treesearch

    Katie M. Ohno; Grant T. Kirker; Amy B. Bishell; Carol A. Clausen

    2017-01-01

    Copper is widely used as the primary component in wood protectants because it demonstrates a broad range of biocidal properties. However, a key concern with using copper in wood preservative formulations is the possibility for brown-rot basidiomycetes to resist the toxic effect. Many brown-rot basidiomycetes have evolved mechanisms, like the production and accumulation...

  16. Dual protection of wood surface treated with melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resin mixed with ammonium polyphosphate against both fire and decay

    Treesearch

    Xing-xia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Ming-liang Jiang; Yu-zhang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings of melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resins (MUFs) containing ammonium polyphosphate (APP) have been shown to significantly improve the fire retardancy of wood by prolonging the ignition time and reducing the heat release rate, total heat released, and mass loss rate. Dual protection of wood against both decay and fire has been proposed for remedial...

  17. Removal of Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions by biochar derived from KMnO4 treated hickory wood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Gao, Bin; Wang, Shenseng; Fang, June; Xue, Yingwen; Yang, Kai

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a novel approach was developed to prepare an engineered biochar from KMnO4 treated hickory wood through slow pyrolysis (600°C). Characterization experiments with various tools showed that the engineered biochar surface was covered with MnOx ultrafine particles. In comparison to the pristine biochar, the engineered biochar also had more surface oxygen-containing functional groups and much larger surface area. Batch sorption experiments showed that the engineered biochar had strong sorption ability to Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) with maximum sorption capacities of 153.1, 34.2, and 28.1mg/g, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of the pristine biochar. Batch sorption experiments also showed that the dosage, initial solution pH, and ionic strength affected the removal of the heavy metals by the biochars. The removal of the metals by the engineered biochar was mainly through surface adsorption mechanisms involving both the surface MnOx particles and oxygen-containing groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Wood composites

    Treesearch

    Lars Berglund; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    A composite can be defined as two or more elements held together by a matrix. By this definition, what we call “solid wood” is a composite. Solid wood is a three-dimensional composite composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (with smaller amounts of inorganics and extractives), held together by a lignin matrix. The advantages of developing wood composites are (...

  19. Comparative study of Nd:YAG laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser-induced gas plasma spectroscopy on chromated copper arsenate preservative-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Khumaeni, Ali; Lie, Zener Sukra; Niki, Hideaki; Lee, Yong Inn; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Wakasugi, Motoomi; Takahashi, Touru; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2012-03-01

    Taking advantage of the specific characteristics of a transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) laser, a sophisticated technique for the analysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood samples has been developed. In this study, a CCA-treated wood sample with a dimension of 20 mm × 20 mm and a thickness of 2 mm was attached in contact to a nickel plate (20 mm × 20 mm × 0.15 mm), which functions as a subtarget. When the TEA CO(2) laser was successively irradiated onto the wood surface, a hole with a diameter of approximately 2.5 mm was produced inside the sample and the laser beam was directly impinged onto the metal subtarget. Strong and stable gas plasma with a very large diameter of approximately 10 mm was induced once the laser beam had directly struck the metal subtarget. This gas plasma then interacted with the fine particles of the sample inside the hole and finally the particles were effectively dissociated and excited in the gas plasma region. By using this technique, high precision and sensitive analysis of CCA-treated wood sample was realized. A linear calibration curve of Cr was successfully made using the CCA-treated wood sample. The detection limits of Cr, Cu, and As were estimated to be approximately 1, 2, and 15 mg/kg, respectively. In the case of standard LIBS using the Nd:YAG laser, the analytical intensities fluctuate and the detection limit was much lower at approximately one-tenth that of TEA CO(2) laser. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  20. Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.F.; Matens, B.L.; Buchalter, D.S.; Montgomery, D.N.

    1997-12-31

    The Enhanced Bioremediation Process (EBP) technology is an exsitu biodegradation process that utilizes bacterial and fungal inoculants to effectively oxidize and bioremediate persistent hard to degrade organics in contaminated soils. The EBP fungal inoculants produce highly reactive extracellular peroxidase enzymes that can oxidize and degrade lignin, a complex, natural polymer composed of phenylpropane units that is resistant to decay. The lignin peroxidase enzymes are highly nonspecific because of their ability to oxidize the heterogenic lignin molecule, and are capable of degrading a wide variety of complex organic compounds. Because the chemical sub-structure of lignin (1,2-aryl diethers, alkyl sidechains and connected aryl systems) resembles that of many persistent organic compounds, the EBP inoculants are very effective in biodegrading similar hazardous organic pollutants in contaminated soils. As an inadvertent by-product of these biochemical processes, the EBP organisms reduce the organic constituents to a soluble form. In a soluble form, the indigenous organisms can further degrade the contaminants. The technology is applied in such a manner as to maximize the activity of the indigenous organisms by establishing optimum growth conditions. The efficacy of the EBP technology in degrading persistent environmental pollutants has been documented at both the bench scale and pilot demonstration levels. A recently completed field pilot demonstration was conducted at a creosote contaminated site. The demonstration entailed the treatment of approximately 700 tons of soil contaminated with PAH constituents. Laboratory analyses of pre and post-treated soils indicate that total average PAH concentrations in many samples were reduced by greater than 91 percent over a two month treatment period.

  1. Advances and challenges of wood polymer composites

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2006-01-01

    Wood flour and fiber have been blended with thermoplastic such as polyethylene, polypropylene, polylactic acid and polyvinyl chloride to form wood plastic composites (WPC). WPCs have seen a large growth in the United States in recent years mainly in the residential decking market with the removal of CCA treated wood decking from residential markets. While there are...

  2. Water repellency and dimensional stability of wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; W. Bart Banks

    1985-01-01

    A discussion of the interaction between wood and water makes clear the distinction between water repellency of wood (a rate of change) and dimensional stability (a level of equilibrium). A review of methods of treating wood follows, leading to comparison of their effectiveness, description of test procedures to evaluate treatments, and discussion of deficiencies of the...

  3. Biotechnology in the wood industry.

    PubMed

    Mai, C; Kües, U; Militz, H

    2004-02-01

    Wood is a natural, biodegradable and renewable raw material, used in construction and as a feedstock in the paper and wood product industries and in fuel production. Traditionally, biotechnology found little attention in the wood product industries, apart from in paper manufacture. Now, due to growing environmental concern and increasing scientific knowledge, legal restrictions to conventional processes have altered the situation. Biotechnological approaches in the area of wood protection aim at enhancing the treatability of wood with preservatives and replacing chemicals with biological control agents. The substitution of conventional chemical glues in the manufacturing of board materials is achieved through the application of fungal cultures and isolated fungal enzymes. Moreover, biotechnology plays an important role in the waste remediation of preservative-treated waste wood.

  4. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp., to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  5. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    1999-01-01

    When left untreated in many outdoor applications, wood becomes subject to degradation by a variety of natural causes. Although some trees possess naturally occurring resistance to decay (Ch. 3, Decay Resistance), many are in short supply or are not grown in ready proximity to markets. Because most commonly used wood species, such as Southern Pine, ponderosa pine, and...

  6. STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE SCENARIO (SHEDS-WOOD), VERSION 2 MODEL SAS CODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns have been raised regarding the safety of young children contacting arsenic and chromium residues while playing on and around Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) treated wood playground structures and decks. Although CCA registrants voluntarily canceled treated wood for resi...

  7. STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE SCENARIO (SHEDS-WOOD), VERSION 2 MODEL SAS CODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns have been raised regarding the safety of young children contacting arsenic and chromium residues while playing on and around Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) treated wood playground structures and decks. Although CCA registrants voluntarily canceled treated wood for resi...

  8. A review of double-diffusion wood preservation suitable for Alaska.

    Treesearch

    K. Josephine. Pavia

    2006-01-01

    Currently, all treated lumber used in Alaska is imported from the 48 contiguous states and Canada because there are no wood-treating facilities in Alaska. This report explores conventional and alternative wood-treating methods and reviews previous studies and laboratory tests on treated wood. In investigating wood treatment as a possible processing option for Alaska...

  9. Plasma treatment of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, G. G.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Sinitsyn, V. A.; Volokitin, O. G.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Vaschenko, S. P.; Kuz'min, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma technology was developed to create protective-decorative coatings on the wood surfaces. Experimental investigation on applying the protective coating using the low-temperature plasma energy as well as studies of the distribution of temperature fields over the section of the treated workpiece have been carried out, and the calculated results have been compared with the experimental data.

  10. Application of solid-phase extraction to quantitatively determine cyproconazole and tebuconazole in treated wood using liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Teruhisa; Mori, Mitsunori; Ito, Katsuhiko

    2005-01-21

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedures were developed to avoid interference during the quantitative determination of cyproconazole and tebuconazole co-existing in wood extractives. Five species of wood were used, Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese larch (Larix leptolepis), Yezo spruce (Picea jezoensis), Sakhalin fir (Abies sachalinensis), and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). Methanol extractives from the heartwood of all wood samples, except western hemlock, interfered with the quantitative determination of cyproconazole and tebuconazole using liquid chromatography (LC) with UV detection (LC-UV). SPE with Oasis MCX was effective in avoiding this interference. This method also reduced the time and volume of mobile phase required for LC-UV, since wood extractives with long retention times were also removed.

  11. An innovative wood-chip-framework substrate used as slow-release carbon source to treat high-strength nitrogen wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Huai; Chi, Zifang; Yan, Baixing; Cheng, Long; Li, Jianzheng

    2017-01-01

    Removal of nitrogen in wastewater before discharge into receiving water courses is an important consideration in treatment systems. However, nitrogen removal efficiency is usually limited due to the low carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio. A common solution is to add external carbon sources, but amount of liquid is difficult to determine. Therefore, a combined wood-chip-framework substrate (with wood, slag and gravel) as a slow-release carbon source was constructed in baffled subsurface-flow constructed wetlands to overcome the problem. Results show that the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N), total nitrogen (TN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) could reach 37.5%-85%, 57.4%-86%, 32.4%-78%, respectively, indicating the combined substrate could diffuse sufficient oxygen for the nitrification process (slag and gravel zone) and provide carbon source for denitrification process (wood-chip zone). The nitrification and denitrification were determined according to the location of slag/gravel and wood-chip, respectively. Nitrogen removal was efficient at the steady phase before a shock loading using slag-wood-gravel combined substrate because of nitrification-denitrification process, while nitrogen removal was efficient under a shock loading with wood-slag-gravel combined substrate because of ANAMMOX process. This study provides a new idea for wetland treatment of high-strength nitrogen wastewater. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Qualitative mass spectrometric analysis of the volatile fraction of creosote-treated railway wood sleepers by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Eduardo P; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R; Ribeiro, Alexandra B; Marriott, Philip J

    2008-01-18

    The volatile composition of 20-year-old out-of-service creosote-treated railway wood sleepers was studied. The emitted volatile fraction was collected by means of dynamic purge-and-trap concentration at ambient temperature, and analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) hyphenated with mass spectrometric detection systems, using quadrupole (GC x GC/qMS) and time-of-flight (GC x GC/ToF-MS) mass analyzers and selective nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC x GC-NPD). The analysis of mass spectrometry data and GC x GC retention time allowed the tentative identification of about 300 compounds based on spectrometric data and positioning of each compound in the GC x GC plot. Major important headspace components are polyaromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and benzene derivatives, hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds containing nitrogen, sulphur or oxygen atoms. Many of the reported compounds are listed as belonging to toxicological substance classes which have been related to harmful health effects. GC x GC provides greater speciation and evidence of composition heterogenicity of the sample than one-dimensional GC analysis, thus allowing to better demonstrate its potential toxicity. Data obtained by specific detection systems for N-heterocycles assisted mass data interpretation assignments. The enhanced separation power obtained after GC x GC compared to one-dimensional gas chromatography (1D-GC) together with spectral deconvolution and correlation with physical-chemical data, allowed the identification of complex isomer clusters, as demonstrated for alkylquinolines, and applied also to alkylphenols, alkylbenzenes and alkylnaphthalenes.

  13. Spent Fuel Reprocessing: More Value for Money Spent in a Geological Repository?

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.; Vinoche, R.; Devezeaux, J-G.; Bailly, F.

    2003-02-25

    Today, each utility or country operating nuclear power plants can select between two long-term spent fuel management policies: either, spent fuel is considered as waste to dispose of through direct disposal or, spent fuel is considered a resource of valuable material through reprocessing-recycling. Reading and listening to what is said in the nuclear community, we understand that most people consider that the choice of policy is, actually, a choice among two technical paths to handle spent fuel: direct disposal versus reprocessing. This very simple situation has been recently challenged by analysis coming from countries where both policies are on survey. For example, ONDRAF of Belgium published an interesting study showing that, economically speaking for final disposal, it is worth treating spent fuel rather than dispose of it as a whole, even if there is no possibility to recycle the valuable part of it. So, the question is raised: is there such a one-to-one link between long term spent fuel management political option and industrial option? The purpose of the presentation is to discuss the potential advantages and drawbacks of spent fuel treatment as an implementation of the policy that considers spent fuel as waste to dispose of. Based on technical considerations and industrial experience, we will study qualitatively, and quantitatively when possible, the different answers proposed by treatment to the main concerns of spent-fuel-as-a-whole geological disposal.

  14. Raman spectroscopic characterization of wood and pulp fibers

    Treesearch

    Umesh Prasad Agarwal

    2008-01-01

    This chapter reviews applications of Raman spectroscopy in the field of wood and pulp fibers. Most of the literature examined was published between 1998 and 2006. In addition to introduction, this chapter contains sections on wood and components, mechanical pulp, chemical pulp, modified/treated wood, cellulose I crystallinity of wood fibers, and the self-absorption...

  15. Methods for Mitigating the Environmental Risks Associated with Wood Preservatives

    Treesearch

    Dennis Hayward; Stan T. Lebow; Kenneth M. Brooks

    2011-01-01

    As noted in earlier chapters, the treatment of wood is both art and science. Wood is a variable material; treatment results tend to vary with the preservative and wood species and even within boards of the same species. This means that treated wood often contains a range of preservative retentions. Some pieces will have less than the desired retention, while others may...

  16. Corrosion of metals in wood : comparing the results of a rapid test method with long-term exposure tests across six wood treatments

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Donald S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of measuring the corrosion of steel and galvanized steel in wood: a long-term exposure test in solid wood and a rapid test method where fasteners are electrochemically polarized in extracts of wood treated with six different treatments. For traditional wood preservatives, the electrochemical extract method correlates with solid wood...

  17. Wood stains

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in wood stains are hydrocarbons, or substances that contain only carbon and hydrogen. Other harmful ingredients may include: Alcohol Alkanes Cyclo alkanes Glycol ether Corrosives, such as sodium ...

  18. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Kevin Archer; Stan Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood preservation can be interpreted to mean protection from fire, chemical degradation, mechanical wear, weathering, as well as biological attack. In this chapter, the term preservation is applied more restrictively to protection from biological hazards.

  19. Effect of different wood pretreatments on the sorption-desorption of linuron and metalaxyl by woods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, M Sonia; Andrades, M Soledad; Parada, A María; Sánchez-Martín, M Jesús

    2008-08-27

    The sorption-desorption of two different pesticides, linuron and metalaxyl, by woods was studied. Sorbent/solution ratio and sorption kinetics were also determined. Untreated wood and water, NaOH, HCl, and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA) treated pine (softwood) and oak (hardwood) were used as sorbents. Linuron and metalaxyl were sorbed by untreated woods up to 80 and 40%, respectively, in a short time when the sorbent/solution ratio of 1:10 was used. Sorption of pesticides was significantly higher by pine, having higher lignin content, than by oak. Freundlich sorption constants (K(f)) were 96.2 and 74.4 (linuron) and 8.28 and 4.95 (metalaxyl) for untreated pine and oak woods and increased 1.04-2.35-fold (linuron) and 1.33-2.17-fold (metalaxyl) when woods were treated. The sorption was higher by HCl- and ODTMA-treated woods. Additionally, Freundlich desorption constants also indicated greater sorption irreversibility of both pesticides for treated woods than for untreated woods. The results revealed wood residues as a promising, low-cost, and environmentally friendly material to immobilize pesticides in soils, preventing water contamination. Wood treatments aimed at removing soluble wood extracts or at modifying wood chemical structure could increase their sorption capacity.

  20. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material.

    Treesearch

    Forest Products Laboratory

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  1. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Ross; Forest Products Laboratory. USDA Forest Service.

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  2. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  3. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  4. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  5. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  6. Effect of size, seasoning and toasting in the volatile compounds in toasted oak wood and in a red wine treated with them.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Simón, B; Cadahía, E; del Alamo, M; Nevares, I

    2010-02-15

    The increasing demand for wood for barrel-making in addition to the rapid extension of alternative aging system, have led to looking into the possibility of utilizing Spanish oak. Quercus pyrenaica is the species that predominates in Spain, and the chemical composition of its heartwood (ellagitannins, low molecular weight phenolic and volatile compounds) and its incidence in characteristics of wine are similar to that of other species that are of recognized oenological quality for barrel-making, showing only quantitative differences with respect to French (Quercus petraea) and American (Quercus alba) species. However, at present, the quantity of good quality wood that we can obtain from the Q. pyrenaica Spanish forest is limited. Hence, in the short term, and considering the high chemical oenological quality of Q. pyrenaica wood, we propose the utilizing of chips, segments, staves, and other oak alternatives for wine aging, which would be obtained from wooden remnants from barrel-making as well as from trees with small diameters or physical defects which would normally be inappropriate for cooperage. With regards to the latter idea, studies on special chip-making processes, and other oak wood pieces are being carried out, especially focused on reducing seasoning time, and to toasting optimization as a function of wood piece size, in addition to its behaviour when incorporated into the different alternative aging systems. We present in this study the effect of seasoning way (traditional or unconventional) on volatile composition of Q. pyrenaica chips and staves at three toasting levels (light, medium and heavy), and the evolution of the wood-released aromatic composition of a Spanish artificially aged wine, using these alternative products. The wines showed in general small differences in their oak-derived characteristics, which were more related to the wood piece size and the toasting intensity than to the seasoning way, and they could be linked with the

  7. Environmental Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Fasteners in Wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the durability of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) nails in treated wood. The FRP nails were exposed to four conditions: (1) accelerated weathering, consisting of exposure to ultraviolet light and condensation; (2) 100% relative humidity (RH); (3) being driven into untreated wood and exposed to 100% RH; and (4) being driven into wood treated with...

  8. Wood as an adherend

    Treesearch

    Bryan H. River; Charles B. Vick; Robert H. Gillespie

    1991-01-01

    Wood is a porous, permeable, hygroscopic, orthotropic, biological composite material of extreme chemical diversity and physical intricacy. Table 1.1 provides an overview of the may variables, including wood variables, that bear on the bonding and performance of wood in wood joints and wood-based materials. Of particular note is the fact that wood properties vary...

  9. Guides to pollution prevention: Wood preserving industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The guide provides an overview of the wood preserving industry and presents options for minimizing waste generation through source reduction and recycling. Treatment with both oilborne and waterborne preservatives is discussed in the guide. However, because in the United States, the majority of wood is treated with chromated copper arsenate, the guide focuses on waterborne preservatives. Process wastewater surface runoff water, and sludge are possible sources of contamination in the wood preserving industry, although in waterborne processes the majority of wastewater is reused. Process wastewater includes water from conditioning, kiln drying, treated wood washing, accumulations in doors or retort sumps, preservative formulation recovery, and rinsing.

  10. Spent fuel storage. Facts booklet

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    In October 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced a spent nuclear fuel policy where the Government would, under certain conditions, take title to and store spent nuclear fuel from commercial power reactors. The policy is intended to provide spent fuel storage until final disposition is available. DOE has programs for providing safe, long-term disposal of nuclear waste. The spent fuel storage program is one element of waste management and compliments the disposal program. The costs for spent fuel services are to be fully recovered by the Government from the utilities. This will allow the utilities to confidently consider the costs for disposition of spent fuel in their rate structure. The United States would also store limited amounts of foreign spent fuel to meet nonproliferation objectives. This booklet summarizes information on many aspects of spent fuel storage.

  11. Significance of wood extractives for wood bonding.

    PubMed

    Roffael, Edmone

    2016-02-01

    Wood contains primary extractives, which are present in all woods, and secondary extractives, which are confined in certain wood species. Extractives in wood play a major role in wood-bonding processes, as they can contribute to or determine the bonding relevant properties of wood such as acidity and wettability. Therefore, extractives play an immanent role in bonding of wood chips and wood fibres with common synthetic adhesives such as urea-formaldehyde-resins (UF-resins) and phenol-formaldehyde-resins (PF-resins). Extractives of high acidity accelerate the curing of acid curing UF-resins and decelerate bonding with alkaline hardening PF-resins. Water-soluble extractives like free sugars are detrimental for bonding of wood with cement. Polyphenolic extractives (tannins) can be used as a binder in the wood-based industry. Additionally, extractives in wood can react with formaldehyde and reduce the formaldehyde emission of wood-based panels. Moreover, some wood extractives are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and insofar also relevant to the emission of VOC from wood and wood-based panels.

  12. Wood fuel preparation

    Treesearch

    L. H. Reineke

    1965-01-01

    This report gives information on the preparation of wood fuel from wood residues and other wood raw materials. Types of wood fuel discussed are cordwood, stovewood, slabwood, kindling, chips, hogged fuel, sawdust and shavings, bark, charcoal, alcohol, and briquets. Related information is given on types of machinery for preparing wood fuel and on possible markets for...

  13. Finishes for Wood Decks

    Treesearch

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Wood decks have become an important part of residential construction. Wood decks can add versatile living space to a home and, with minimal maintenance, provide decades of use. However, wood decks are exposed to high levels of stress from severe weather conditions that shrink and swell the wood. Without proper maintenance, wood decks can develop problems such as checks...

  14. Chemical modification of wood : a short review

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2006-01-01

    For most markets for wood, it is used without any treatments or modifications. When wood is used in adverse environments, it may be treated with chemicals to help prevent decay, improve water resistance, reduce the effects of ultraviolet radiation or increase fire retardancy. Many of these treatments involve the use of toxic or corrosive chemicals that can harm the...

  15. Sectioning Refractory Woods for Anatomical Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    Describes a new technique for softening wood, using a 4 percent solution of ethylenediamine; a shortcut method for removing silica and crystalline ... materials with hydrofluoric acid; a method for rapidly neutralizing wood blocks which have been treated with hydrofluoric acid; and a method for

  16. Sectioning Refractory Woods for Anatomical Studies.

    Treesearch

    B. F. Kukachka

    1977-01-01

    Describes a new technique for softening wood, using a 4 percent solution of ethylenediamine; a shortcut method for removing silica and crystalline materials with hydrofluoric acid; a method for rapidly neutralizing wood blocks which have been treated with hydrofluoric acid; and a method for maintaining the flatness of sections through staining, dehydration, and...

  17. Integrated control of wood destroying basidiomycetes combining Cu-based wood preservatives and Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Javier; Fink, Siegfried; Bas, Maria Del Carmen; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2017-01-01

    The production of new generation of wood preservatives (without addition of a co-biocide) in combination with an exchange of wood poles on identical sites with high fungal inoculum, has resulted in an increase of premature failures of wood utility poles in the last decades. Wood destroying basidiomycetes inhabiting sites where poles have been installed, have developed resistance against wood preservatives. The objective of the in vitro studies was to identify a Trichoderma spp. with a highly antagonistic potential against wood destroying basidiomycetes that is capable of colonizing Cu-rich environments. For this purpose, the activity of five Trichoderma spp. on Cu-rich medium was evaluated according to its growth and sporulation rates. The influence of the selected Trichoderma spp. on wood colonization and degradation by five wood destroying basidiomycetes was quantitatively analyzed by means of dry weight loss of wood specimens. Furthermore, the preventative effect of the selected Trichoderma spp. in combination with four Cu-based preservatives was also examined by mass loss and histological changes in the wood specimens. Trichoderma harzianum (T-720) was considered the biocontrol agent with higher antagonistic potential to colonize Cu-rich environments (up to 0.1% CuSO4 amended medium). T. harzianum demonstrated significant preventative effect on wood specimens against four wood destroying basidiomycetes. The combined effect of T. harzianum and Cu-based wood preservatives demonstrated that after 9 months incubation with two wood destroying basidiomycetes, wood specimens treated with 3.8 kg m-3 copper-chromium had weight losses between 55-65%, whereas containers previously treated with T. harzianum had significantly lower weight losses (0-25%). Histological studies on one of the wood destroying basidiomycetes revealed typical decomposition of wood cells by brown-rot fungi in Cu-impregnated samples, that were notably absent in wood specimens previously exposed to T

  18. Integrated control of wood destroying basidiomycetes combining Cu-based wood preservatives and Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The production of new generation of wood preservatives (without addition of a co-biocide) in combination with an exchange of wood poles on identical sites with high fungal inoculum, has resulted in an increase of premature failures of wood utility poles in the last decades. Wood destroying basidiomycetes inhabiting sites where poles have been installed, have developed resistance against wood preservatives. The objective of the in vitro studies was to identify a Trichoderma spp. with a highly antagonistic potential against wood destroying basidiomycetes that is capable of colonizing Cu-rich environments. For this purpose, the activity of five Trichoderma spp. on Cu-rich medium was evaluated according to its growth and sporulation rates. The influence of the selected Trichoderma spp. on wood colonization and degradation by five wood destroying basidiomycetes was quantitatively analyzed by means of dry weight loss of wood specimens. Furthermore, the preventative effect of the selected Trichoderma spp. in combination with four Cu-based preservatives was also examined by mass loss and histological changes in the wood specimens. Trichoderma harzianum (T-720) was considered the biocontrol agent with higher antagonistic potential to colonize Cu-rich environments (up to 0.1% CuSO4 amended medium). T. harzianum demonstrated significant preventative effect on wood specimens against four wood destroying basidiomycetes. The combined effect of T. harzianum and Cu-based wood preservatives demonstrated that after 9 months incubation with two wood destroying basidiomycetes, wood specimens treated with 3.8 kg m-3 copper-chromium had weight losses between 55–65%, whereas containers previously treated with T. harzianum had significantly lower weight losses (0–25%). Histological studies on one of the wood destroying basidiomycetes revealed typical decomposition of wood cells by brown-rot fungi in Cu-impregnated samples, that were notably absent in wood specimens previously exposed

  19. Effect of wood ash treatment on improving the fermentability of wood hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Miyafuji, Hisashi; Danner, Herbert; Neureiter, Markus; Thomasser, Christiane; Braun, Rudolf

    2003-11-05

    Softwood hydrolysates were overlimed with wood ash to improve the fermentability of hydrolysates. It could be demonstrated in fermentation tests that wood ash treatment increases fermentability compared to the hydrolysates untreated and treated with alkaline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2), NaOH, and KOH, which are commonly used for overliming. The enhanced fermentability of the hydrolysate treated with wood ash is due to the reduction of the inhibitors of the fermentation such as furan and phenolic compounds and to nutrient effects of some inorganic components from the wood ash on the fermentation.

  20. Groundwater remediation at a wood preservatives site

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, H.K.; Damera, R.

    1994-12-31

    A wood treatment facility in Pennsylvania allegedly discharged about a million gallons of spent wood preservatives containing pentachlorophenol into a well from 1947 to 1963. Contaminated water was noticed in a creek adjacent to the site and was reported by the residents in 1972. Subsequently this site was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the EPA in 1982. Tetra Tech, Inc. has performed Remedial Investigations (RI), Feasibility Studies (FS), Remedial Designs (RD) and Remedial Action (RA) at this Superfund site, for five years. This paper presents an overview of RI, FS, RD and treatability studies related to groundwater remediation.

  1. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  2. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  3. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  4. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  5. Causes and control of wood decay, degradation & stain

    Treesearch

    Todd Shupe; Stan Lebow; Dennis Ring

    2008-01-01

    Our society depends on wood for a variety of uses. As population increases, so does our need for wood. Steel, concrete and aluminum are some alternatives to treated wood in certain applications, but they have higher material costs, higher energy requirements in the production process, greater air and water pollution or environmental protection costs, and greater...

  6. Flavanoid biocides: Wood preservatives based on condensed tannins

    Treesearch

    Peter Laks; Peggy A. McKaig; Richard W. Hemingway

    1988-01-01

    The condensed tannins are natural wood preservatives found in high concentrations in the bark and wood of some tree species. Condensed tannin-containing bark extracts from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) were evaluated as wood preservatives using standard methods. Bark extracts by themselves did not cause any reduction in weight loss of pressure-treated...

  7. Chapter 23: Corrosion of Metals in Wood Products

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion of metals in contact with wood has been studied for over 80 years, and in most situations wood is not corrosive [1]. Recently, however, the durability of fasteners in preservative--treated wood has become a concern. Changes in legislation and certification in the United States, the European Union, and Australasia have restricted the use of chromated...

  8. Harvested wood products : basis for future methodological development

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Skog

    2003-01-01

    The IPCC Guidelines (IPCC 1997) provide an outline of how harvested wood could be treated in national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. This section shows the relation of that outline to the approaches and estimation methods to be presented in this Appendix. Wood and paper products are referred to as harvested wood products (HWP). It does not include carbon in...

  9. Considerations in recycling of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    J.E. Winandy; N.M. Stark; C.M. Clemons

    2004-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite decking has made major advances in material performance, processing and user acceptance. The growth of wood-plastic composite decking in North America has grown from less than 1 % in mid- 0's to over 10% today with growth projected by several studies to reach +20% before the end of this decade (2010). Preservative-treated wood decking...

  10. How much arsenic is released when CCA wood is burned?

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon; Parshall B. Bush; Edwin A. Woolson

    1986-01-01

    Abstract. Waterborne salts have been used to preserve wood for many years. One of the more common formulations contains copper, chromium, and arsenic salts and is known as chromated copper arsenate, or CCA. Questions have been raised about the amount of arsenic released when CCA treated wood is burned in wood stoves, fireplaces, or boilers....

  11. Direct current testing to measure corrosiveness of wood preservatives

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone; James T. Gilbertson

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative test that mimics the corrosion behaviour of metals in contact with treated wood without using wood specimens would be of great value in rapidly evaluating the corrosiveness of new wood preservatives. The objective of this study was to determine whether the linear polarisation resistance of metals immersed in a solution of preservative chemicals is related...

  12. Choosing Wood Burning Appliances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information to assist consumers in choosing a wood burning appliance, including types of appliances, the differences between certified and non-certified appliances, and alternative wood heating options.

  13. Spent potlining utilisation possibilities.

    PubMed

    Miksa, Dragan; Homsak, Marko; Samec, Niko

    2003-10-01

    As the world's capacity for aluminium production increases, the amount of waste connected with this industry is also increasing. Spent potlining (SPL) from aluminium reduction cell cathodes presents a major environmental concern in the primary aluminium industry. It is concluded, after laboratory tests, that leachable cyanide and fluoride compounds present the major problem in SPL disposal. The behaviour of cyanide and fluoride under high temperature treatment has been investigated. On the basis of this laboratory investigation, the possibilities for SPL utilisation in red brick manufacturing, cement industry and thermal power stations were evaluated. SPL refractory material is already re-used in red brick manufacturing. In the cement industry, a pilot test on the utilisation of 25 t SPL carbon waste mixed with green petrol coke gave positive results. Additionally a fluoride emission forecast for a thermal power station utilising carbon waste SPL mixed with coal was elaborated.

  14. Reclaim spent catalysts properly

    SciTech Connect

    Lassner, J.A.; Lasher, L.B.; Koppel, R.L.; Hamilton, J.N.

    1994-08-01

    Treatment of spent catalysts and metallic by products has become increasingly more complex over the last couple of years, due to tightening environmental concerns. Three options are available: (1) Reclaiming the metals and either reusing them to make new catalyst or recycling them for other uses. This is now the preferred option. A reclaiming firm is generally employed to handle the task. (2) Regeneration and reuse. While this generally is the preferred option, few commercial catalysts can be regenerated effectively and economically. (3) Landfilling. This has been the traditional route. However, stricter environmental regulations have made landfilling unattractive. To maximize the reclamation both economically and environmentally, five factors should be addressed: (1) proper planning and physical handling; (2) transportation of materials; (3) environmental concerns; (4) end uses of the catalyst; and (5) choosing the proper reclamation partner. These factors are discussed.

  15. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. This plant is run and operated by Southern Clean Fuels. A large sample of spent catalyst from this facility has been obtained. The second material is an unsupported ammonium molybdate catalyst used in a pilot process by the Department of Energy at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This material was obtained in late February 1990 but has not been pursued since the No content of this particular sample is too low for the current studies. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp. and possibly Sulfolobus, to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  16. Spent fuel treatment at ANL-West

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Levinskas, D.

    1994-12-31

    At Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) there are several thousand kilograms of metallic spent nuclear fuel containing bond sodium. This fuel will be treated in the Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-West to produce stable waste forms for storage and disposal. The treatment operations will employ a pyrochemical process that also has applications for treating most of the fuel types within the Department of Energy complex. The treatment equipment is in its last stage of readiness, and operations will begin in the Fall of 1994.

  17. Finishing of wood

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams

    1999-01-01

    The primary function of any wood finish (paint, varnish, and stain, for example) is to protect the wood surface, help maintain a certain appearance, and provide a cleanable surface. Although wood can be used both outdoors and indoors without finishing, unfinished wood surfaces exposed to the weather change color, are roughened by photodegradation and surface checking,...

  18. The EBR-II spent fuel treatment program

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for demonstrating a high-temperature electrometallurgical process for treating spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-11. Two waste forms will be produced and qualified for geologic disposal of the fission and activation products. Relatively pure uranium will be separated for storage. Following additional development, transuranium elements will be blended into one of the high-level waste streams. The spent fuel treatment program will help assess the viability of electrometallurgical technology as a spent fuel management option.

  19. Assessment of spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.

    1997-02-01

    The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD`s work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools.

  20. Intermodal transportation of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, H.K.

    1983-09-01

    Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

  1. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  2. Transportation of spent MTR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Raisonnier, D.

    1997-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various aspects of MTR spent fuel transportation and provides in particular information about the on-going shipment of 4 spent fuel casks to the United States. Transnucleaire is a transport and Engineering Company created in 1963 at the request of the French Atomic Energy Commission. The company followed the growth of the world nuclear industry and has now six subsidiaries and affiliated companies established in countries with major nuclear programs.

  3. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy of wood.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, C; Farina, A; Comelli, D; Pifferi, A; Taroni, P; Valentini, G; Cubeddu, R; Zoia, L; Orlandi, M; Kienle, A

    2008-05-01

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that picosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared (NIR) region (700-1040 nm) is a useful technique for noninvasive characterization of wood. This technique has been demonstrated on both softwood and hardwood samples treated in different ways simulating the aging process suffered by waterlogged woods. In all the cases, alterations of absorption and scattering spectra were observed, revealing changes of chemical and structural composition.

  4. The spent fuel safety experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, G.A.; Davis, F.J.; Ford, J.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy is conducting an ongoing investigation of the consequences of taking fuel burnup into account in the design of spent fuel transportation packages. A series of experiments, collectively called the Spent Fuel Safety Experiment (SFSX), has been devised to provide integral benchmarks for testing computer-generated predictions of spent fuel behavior. A set of experiments is planned in which sections of unirradiated fuel rods are interchanged with similar sections of spent PWR fuel rods in a critical assembly. By determining the critical size of the arrays, one can obtain benchmark data for comparison with criticality safety calculations. The SFSX provides a direct measurement of the reactivity effects of spent PWR fuel using a well-characterized, spent fuel sample. The SFSX also provides an experimental measurement of the end-effect, i.e., the reactivity effect of the variation of the burnup profile at the ends of PWR fuel rods. The design of the SFSX is optimized to yield accurate benchmark measurements of the effects of interest, well above experimental uncertainties.

  5. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-10-15

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

  6. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... more For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds a wide array of programs which ...

  7. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... message For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds a wide array of programs which ...

  8. Wood's lamp illumination (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A Wood's lamp emits ultraviolet light and can be a diagnostic aid in determining if someone has a fungal ... is an infection on the area where the Wood's lamp is illuminating, the area will fluoresce. Normally ...

  9. A PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CCA-TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE EXPOSURE SCENARIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a probabilistic exposure and dose assessment on the arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) components of Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives (SHEDS-Wood...

  10. A PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CCA-TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE EXPOSURE SCENARIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a probabilistic exposure and dose assessment on the arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) components of Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives (SHEDS-Wood...

  11. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. A large sample of spent catalyst has been obtained. The second material is an unsupported ammonium molybdate catalyst used in a pilot process by the Department of energy at the Pittsburgh energy Technology Center. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp. and possibly Sulfolobus, to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  12. Environmental issues: New techniques for managing and using wood fuel ash

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrs, J.E.; Donovan, C.T.

    1993-12-31

    Continued research and development of environmentally-acceptable and cost-effective end uses for wood ash is having a significant affect on the ability to use wood and wood waste for fuel. This is particularly true for ash resulting from treated wood combustion. Concerns about the contents of ash from wood containing paint, stain, preservatives, or other chemicals is one of the largest regulatory barriers to its use as fuel. The purpose of this paper is to: (1) Identify the physical and chemical characteristics of ashes produced from the combustion of untreated and treated wood; (2) Explain the types of {open_quotes}clean, untreated{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}treated{close_quotes} wood that are likely to produce ash that can beneficially used; (3) Describe existing and potential products and end uses for untreated and treated wood ash.

  13. Iron Stain on Wood

    Treesearch

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  14. Wood Formation in Trees

    Treesearch

    Melanie Mauriat; Gregoire Le Provost; Phillippe Rozenberg; Sylvain Delzon; Nathalie Breda; Bruno Clair; Catherine Coutand; Jean-Christoph Domec; Thierry Fourcaud; Jacqueline Grima-Pettenati; Raul Herrera; Jean-Charles Leple; Nicolas Richet; Jean-Francois Trontin; Christophe Plomion

    2014-01-01

    Among the ecosystem services provided by forests, wood provisioning takes a central position. Wood and derived products have played a critical role in the evolution of human kind and demand for raw material is increasing in a foreseeable future. Wood is used for energy production, construction and a wide variety of products for which different properties are required....

  15. Wood and society

    Treesearch

    Christopher D. Risbrudt

    2005-01-01

    Forests, and the wood they produce, have played an important role in human activity since before recorded history. Indeed, one of the first major innovations of humankind was utilizing fire, fueled by wood, for cooking and heating. It is very likely that early hominids used wood fires for cooking as long as 1.5 million years ago (Clark and Harris 1985). Clear evidence...

  16. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Roger M. Rowell

    2010-01-01

    The wood industry can expand into new sustainable markets with the formation of a new class of composites with the marriage of the wood industry and the plastics industry. The wood component, usually a flour or fiber, is combined with a thermoplastic to form an extrudable, injectable or thermoformable composite that can be used in many non-structural applications....

  17. Wood adhesion and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An appreciation of rheology, material science, organic chemistry, polymer science, and mechanics leads to better understanding of the factors controlling the performance of the bonded assemblies. Given the complexity of wood as a substrate, it is hard to understand why some wood adhesives work better than other wood adhesives, especially when under the more severe...

  18. Chemical modification of wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The properties of any resource are, in general, a result of the chemistry of the components of that resource. In the case of wood, the cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin) are the components that, if modified, would change the properties of the resource. If the properties of the wood are modified, the performance of the modified wood would be...

  19. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  20. Biodeterioration of wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2010-01-01

    Under proper conditions, wood will give centuries of service. However, under conditions that permit the development of wood-degrading organisms, protection must be provided during processing, merchandising, and use. The organisms that can degrade wood are principally fungi, insects, bacteria, and marine borers.

  1. Biodeterioration of wood

    Treesearch

    Terry L. Highley

    1999-01-01

    Under proper conditions, wood will give centuries of service. However, if conditions exist that permit the development of wood-degrading organisms, protection must be provided during processing, merchandising, and use. The principal organisms that can degrade wood are fungi, insects, bacteria, and marine borers. Molds, most sapwood stains, and decay are caused by fungi...

  2. Energy from wood

    Treesearch

    J.I. Zerbe

    2004-01-01

    In most developing countries wood and charcoal are the predominant fuels for preparation of food to maintain the quality of life that encompasses the majority of citizens. In many developing countries wood fuels are also important for small and medium size industries. Moreover, energy from wood continues to be important in industrial countries. In the USA biomass...

  3. Sodium Fluoride for Protection of Wood Against Field Populations of Subterranean Termites.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chengyuan; Wang, Chenzhi

    2015-08-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) is a wood preservative with fungicidal activity and antifeedant activity against termites. In this study, wood blocks of Pinus massoniana were treated with a 0.5% (wt/wt) aqueous solution of NaF, and placed in soil contact under field conditions to evaluate leachability of NaF and resistance to Reticulitermes flaviceps (Oshima). Fluoride leachate levels in soil from wood-soil locations were also determined. After 12-mo outdoor exposure, 91.54% of fluoride was leached from NaF-treated wood and fluoride retention of the wood was 154.28 μg/g wood. In NaF-treated wood-soil locations, soil fluoride residues were significantly higher than locations with the water-treated negative control. Termite activity (presence or occupation) on NaF-treated blocks was 6.25% which was significantly less than 40.00% activity on water-treated control blocks. The mass lost from the wood of NaF-treated blocks was 17.46% which was significantly less than the 45.21% loss from the water-treated blocks. The results show that fluoride is readily leachable from treated wood into surrounding soil. NaF treatment can reduce termite damage to wood under field conditions, and this compound should receive further consideration as a wood preservative to protect timber from termite damage.

  4. Economics of wood dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    This article reviews the economic effects of wood dust. The most important use of wood today is a fuel, and wood chips and shavings are sources of feedstock for boilers. Other uses include wood chips in the manufacture of particleboard, wood dust as bedding in riding stables and race tracks, as mulch for florists, and as an absorbent in the meat packing industry. The installation of dust collection systems is strongly urged as the consequences of inadequate collection include rapid machine wear, poor environmental conditions for workers, general interference with work, and its combustibility makes it a constant fire hazard.

  5. Laccase production by Aspergillus heteromorphus using distillery spent wash and lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Bajar, Somvir; Bishnoi, Narsi R; Singh, Namita

    2010-04-15

    Laccase is among the major enzymes which plays an important role in ligninolytic system of fungi. Laccase production by Aspergillus heteromorphus was studied using anaerobically treated distillery spent wash (ADSW) and lignocellulosic biomass. Lignocellulosic biomass (rice straw, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse) generated during biomass processing leads to solid waste and distillery spent wash is unwanted liquid waste produced by distilleries, both causes environmental pollution. Two mineral media and anaerobically treated distillery spent wash medium was tested for laccase production. Enzyme production in various media and in presence and absence of lignocellulosic biomass supplements showed that anaerobically treated distillery spent wash medium was a better laccase inducer medium than the mineral media. Addition of lignocellulosic biomass enhances laccase production and highest laccase activity was obtained in 5% anaerobically treated distillery spent wash medium with rice straw.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  7. Gliomas and exposure to wood preservatives.

    PubMed

    Cordier, S; Poisson, M; Gerin, M; Varin, J; Conso, F; Hemon, D

    1988-10-01

    A case-referent study was undertaken to look for occupational risk factors among patients with glioma treated in a neurological hospital in Paris between 1975 and 1984. In the study group were 125 men with gliomas (aged less than or equal to 65) and 238 patients (also less than or equal to 65) admitted for non-neoplastic, non-malformative vascular diseases in the same department during the same period constituting the reference group. All diagnoses were confirmed by tomodensitometry. Information on occupational history was obtained from a postal questionnaire and from medical records. Comparison of cases and referents showed a significant excess risk among teachers (OR = 4.1) and a raised risk among wood workers (OR = 1.6). Four of nine cases of glioma who had been employed as wood workers reported that a colleague had suffered from glioma (those reports were confirmed by hospital records). None were reported among 11 referent wood workers. Using a complementary questionnaire on wood work, exposure assessment to wood preservatives and solvents showed that frequent exposure to organochlorine wood preservatives and to organic solvents occurred more often among cases than referent wood workers (p less than 0.10).

  8. Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Venkobachar, C.; Iyengar, L.; Mishra, U.K.; Chauhan, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper deals with cementation as the method for the disposal of spent biosorbent, Ganoderma lucidum (a wood rotting macrofungi) after it is used for the removal of Uranium. Results on the uranium release during the curing of cement-concrete (CC) blocks indicated that placing the spent sorbent at the center of the blocks during their casting yields better immobilization of uranium as compared to the homogeneous mixing of the spent sorbent with the cement. Short term leach tests indicated that the uranium release was negligible in simulated seawater, 1.8% in 0.2 N sodium carbonate and 6.0% in 0.2 N HCl. The latter two leachates were used to represent the extreme environmental conditions. It was observed that the presence of the spent biosorbent up to 5% by weight did not affect the compressive strength of CC blocks. Thus cementation technique is suitable for the immobilization of uranium loaded biosorbent for its ultimate disposal.

  9. Reaction of Epoxides with Wood.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Temperature Timegain treating wood. Southern pine ( SP ) sapwood blocks, C Hr 2 by 2 by 15 cm (all dimensions shown in this report are . listed in the...for 16 hours (hr). 80 3 6.3 120 1 32.5 The dry SP blocks were reacted in a stainless steel 110 1 28.0 reactor at 150 lbin.2 nitrogen pressure. The...catalysts and solvents, were determined after two different treating conditions: (1) heating an SP Time Weight block. 2 by 2 by 0.6 cm, with each

  10. Spent Pot Lining Characterization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Gustavo; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2017-06-01

    Spent pot lining (SPL) management represents a major concern for aluminum smelters. There are two key elements for spent pot lining management: recycling and safe storage. Spent pot lining waste can potentially have beneficial uses in co-firing in cement plants. Also, safe storage of SPL is of utmost importance. Gas generation of SPL reaction with water and ignition sensitivity must be studied. However, determining the feasibility of SPL co-firing and developing the required procedures for safe storage rely on determining experimentally all the necessary SPL properties along with the appropriate test methods, recognized by emissions standards and fire safety design codes. The applicable regulations and relevant SPL properties for this purpose are presented along with the corresponding test methods.

  11. Spent Pot Lining Characterization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Gustavo; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2017-09-01

    Spent pot lining (SPL) management represents a major concern for aluminum smelters. There are two key elements for spent pot lining management: recycling and safe storage. Spent pot lining waste can potentially have beneficial uses in co-firing in cement plants. Also, safe storage of SPL is of utmost importance. Gas generation of SPL reaction with water and ignition sensitivity must be studied. However, determining the feasibility of SPL co-firing and developing the required procedures for safe storage rely on determining experimentally all the necessary SPL properties along with the appropriate test methods, recognized by emissions standards and fire safety design codes. The applicable regulations and relevant SPL properties for this purpose are presented along with the corresponding test methods.

  12. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species.

    PubMed

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect.

  13. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species

    PubMed Central

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N.; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect. PMID:27649315

  14. Coatings to reduce wood preservative leaching.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Mojgan; Cooper, Paul

    2010-08-15

    The efficiency of semitransparent penetrating stains to reduce leaching of wood preservative components was evaluated. Five commercial wood deck finishes were applied to untreated and chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quat (ACQ), and copper azole (CA) treated wood, and leachates were collected and analyzed during 3 years of natural weathering exposure in Toronto, Canada. All stains evaluated effectively reduced the cumulative leaching of all inorganic preservative components by about 60% on average. Although most coatings showed significant film degradation starting around 12 months, the reduced leaching persisted even after 3 years. This suggests that temporary protection of wood with a coating during the early stages of use resulted in long-term reduction in preservative leaching potential. A two-week screening leaching test was able to predict the long-term leaching performance of different coatings reasonably well. Cured coating glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid coating viscosity were the most important variables affecting a leaching prediction model. To effectively reduce leaching of preservative components from treated wood, coatings should have Tg low enough to withstand stresses caused by freezing in winter and have adequate viscosity to form a barrier film layer on the wood surface.

  15. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  16. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  17. Plasma impregnation of wood with fire retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabeliña, Karel G.; Lumban, Carmencita O.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy of chemical and plasma treatments with phosphate and boric compounds, and nitrogen as flame retardants on wood are compared in this study. The chemical treatment involved the conventional method of spraying the solution over the wood surface at atmospheric condition and chemical vapor deposition in a vacuum chamber. The plasma treatment utilized a dielectric barrier discharge ionizing and decomposing the flame retardants into innocuous simple compounds. Wood samples are immersed in either phosphoric acid, boric acid, hydrogen or nitrogen plasmas or a plasma admixture of two or three compounds at various concentrations and impregnated by the ionized chemical reactants. Chemical changes on the wood samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) while the thermal changes through thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Plasma-treated samples exhibit superior thermal stability and fire retardant properties in terms of highest onset temperature, temperature of maximum pyrolysis, highest residual char percentage and comparably low total percentage weight loss.

  18. Toxic hazard and chemical analysis of leachates from furfurylated wood.

    PubMed

    Pilgård, Annica; Treu, Andreas; van Zeeland, Albert N T; Gosselink, Richard J A; Westin, Mats

    2010-09-01

    The furfurylation process is an extensively investigated wood modification process. Furfuryl alcohol molecules penetrate into the wood cell wall and polymerize in situ. This results in a permanent swelling of the wood cell walls. It is unclear whether or not chemical bonds exist between the furfuryl alcohol polymer and the wood. In the present study, five different wood species were used, both hardwoods and softwoods. They were treated with three different furfurylation procedures and leached according to three different leaching methods. The present study shows that, in general, the leachates from furfurylated wood have low toxicity. It also shows that the choice of leaching method is decisive for the outcome of the toxicity results. Earlier studies have shown that leachates from wood treated with furfuryl alcohol prepolymers have higher toxicity to Vibrio fischeri than leachates from wood treated with furfuryl alcohol monomers. This is probably attributable to differences in leaching of chemical compounds. The present study shows that this difference in the toxicity most likely cannot be attributed to maleic acid, furan, furfural, furfuryl alcohol, or 2-furoic acid. However, the difference might be caused by the two substances 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 2,5-furandimethanol. The present study found no difference in the amount of leached furfuryl alcohol between leachates from furfurylated softwood and furfurylated hardwood species. Earlier studies have indicated differences in grafting of furfuryl alcohol to lignin. However, nothing was found in the present study that could support this. The leachates of furfurylated wood still need to be

  19. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  20. EBR-II spent fuel treatment demonstration project status

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, R.W.; Henslee, S.P.

    1998-07-01

    The application of electrometallurgical technology to spent nuclear fuel treatment is being demonstrated by treating 410 kg uranium spent driver fuel and 1,200 kg uranium spent blanket fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) spent driver and blanket fuel. This fuel is a metallic uranium alloy and contains elemental sodium, which is a reactive material. Since reactive material is considered hazardous by US Environmental Protection Agency regulations, this fuel requires treatment before disposal in a geologic repository. The EBR-II spent fuel treatment demonstration conditions this fuel in an integrated process where the fuel is converted into three different products: low enriched uranium (LEU), ceramic waste and metallic waste. This demonstration was initiated in June 1996 and has treated approximately 50% of the driver fuel. The higher throughput equipment that will be used for blanket treatment processes has been installed in the hot cell facility and is being tested with depleted uranium. Metal waste forms have been produced from the irradiated metals from the driver fuel. Ceramic waste process equipment has been built and is being tested before installation in the hot cell facilities. This paper discusses the processes and the current results from the first 20 months of operation.

  1. WASTE TREATABILITY TESTS OF SPENT SOLVENT AND OTHER ORGANIC WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some commercial and industrial facilities treat RCRA spent solvent wastewaters by steam stripping, carbon adsorption, and/or biological processes. Thirteen facilities were visited by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) from June 1985 to September 1986, to conduct sampl...

  2. WASTE TREATABILITY TESTS OF SPENT SOLVENT AND OTHER ORGANIC WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some commercial and industrial facilities treat RCRA spent solvent wastewaters by steam stripping, carbon adsorption, and/or biological processes. Thirteen facilities were visited by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) from June 1985 to September 1986, to conduct sampl...

  3. Characteristics of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Notz, K.J.

    1988-04-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the spent fuels and other wastes that will, or may, eventually be disposed of in a geological repository. The two major sources of these materials are commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized high-level waste (HLW). Other wastes that may require long-term isolation include non-LWR spent fuels and miscellaneous sources such as activated metals. This report deals with spent fuels, but for completeness, the other sources are described briefly. Detailed characterizations are required for all of these potential repository wastes. These characteristics include physical, chemical, and radiological properties. The latter must take into account decay as a function of time. In addition, the present inventories and projected quantities of the various wastes are needed. This information has been assembled in a Characteristics Data Base which provides data in four formats: hard copy standard reports, menu-driven personal computer (PC) data bases, program-level PC data bases, and mainframe computer files. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  5. Structure and function of wood

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Regis B. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Despite the many human uses to which various woods are suited, at a fundamental level wood is a complex biological structure, itself a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of the plant. Although humans have striven to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood...

  6. Lignification and tension wood.

    PubMed

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  7. Spent fuel characteristics & disposal considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Oversby, V.M.

    1996-06-01

    The fuel used in commercial nuclear power reactors is uranium, generally in the form of an oxide. The gas-cooled reactors developed in England use metallic uranium enclosed in a thin layer of Magnox. Since this fuel must be processed into a more stable form before disposal, we will not consider the characteristics of the Magnox spent fuel. The vast majority of the remaining power reactors in the world use uranium dioxide pellets in Zircaloy cladding as the fuel material. Reactors that are fueled with uranium dioxide generally use water as the moderator. If ordinary water is used, the reactors are called Light Water Reactors (LWR), while if water enriched in the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is used, the reactors are called Heavy Water reactors. The LWRs can be either pressurized reactors (PWR) or boiling water reactors (BWR). Both of these reactor types use uranium that has been enriched in the 235 isotope to about 3.5 to 4% total abundance. There may be minor differences in the details of the spent fuel characteristics for PWRs and BWRs, but for simplicity we will not consider these second-order effects. The Canadian designed reactor (CANDU) that is moderated by heavy water uses natural uranium without enrichment of the 235 isotope as the fuel. These reactors run at higher linear power density than LWRs and produce spent fuel with lower total burn-up than LWRs. Where these difference are important with respect to spent fuel management, we will discuss them. Otherwise, we will concentrate on spent fuel from LWRs.

  8. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD INITIATIVE SITE PROFILE: ESCAMBIA WOOD PRESERVING SITE - BROOKHAVEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Escambia Wood Preserving Site—Brookhaven in Brookhaven, Mississippi, is a former wood preserving facility that used pentachlo- rophenol (PCP) and creosote to treat wooden poles. The site contains two pressure treatment cylinders, a wastewater treatment system, five bulk pr...

  9. Sol-gel modification of wood substrates to retard weathering

    Treesearch

    Mandla A Tshabalala; Sam Williams

    2008-01-01

    Wood specimens were treated with sol-gel systems based on metalorganic precursors of silicon (Si), iron (Fe), zirconium (Zr), and titanium (Ti). The effect of these sol-gel systems on weathering properties of wood was investigated. These sol-gel systems were found to have a positive effect on surface color stability and water vapor resistance of the specimens. Under...

  10. Cone calorimeter tests of wood-based decking materials

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    New technologies in building materials have resulted in the use of a wide variety of materials in decks. As part of our effort to address fire concerns in the wildland-urban interface, the Forest Products Laboratory has been examining the fire performance of decking products. In addition to preservative-treated wood, decking products include wood-plastic composites and...

  11. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD INITIATIVE SITE PROFILE: ESCAMBIA WOOD PRESERVING SITE - BROOKHAVEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Escambia Wood Preserving Site—Brookhaven in Brookhaven, Mississippi, is a former wood preserving facility that used pentachlo- rophenol (PCP) and creosote to treat wooden poles. The site contains two pressure treatment cylinders, a wastewater treatment system, five bulk pr...

  12. Chapter 9: Wood Energy

    Treesearch

    Francisco X. Aguilar; Karen Abt; Branko Glavonjic; Eugene Lopatin; Warren  Mabee

    2016-01-01

    The availabilty of information on wood energy continues to improve, particularly for commoditized woodfuels.  Wood energy consumption and production vary in the UNECE region because demand is strngly affected by weather and the prices of competing energy sources.  There has been an increase in wood energy in the power-and-heat sector in the EU28 and North American...

  13. Chelating efficiency and thermal, mechanical and decay resistance performances of chitosan copper complex in wood-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Lu, John Z; Duan, Xinfang; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun

    2008-09-01

    Wood-polymer composites (WPC) have been extensively used for building products, outdoor decking, automotive, packaging materials, and other applications. WPC is subject to fungal and termite attacks due to wood components enveloped in the thermoplastic matrix. Much effort has been made to improve decay resistance of WPC using zinc borate and other chemicals. In this study, chitosan copper complex (CCC) compounds were used as a potential preservative for wood-HDPE composites. CCC was formulated by reacting chitosan with copper salts under controlled conditions. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analytical results indicated that chitosan had high chelating efficiency with copper cations. CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites had a thermal behavior similar to untreated and zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites. Incorporation of CCC in wood-HDPE composites did not significantly influence board density of the resultant composites, but had a negative effect on tensile strength at high CCC concentration. In comparison with solid wood and the untreated wood-HDPE composites, 3% CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites significantly improved the decay resistance against white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Especially, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites were more effectively against the brown rot than the untreated and chitosan-treated wood-HDPE composites. Moreover, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites performed well as zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites on fungal decay resistance. Accordingly, CCC can be effectively used as a preservative for WPC.

  14. Residual strength and stiffness of lumber from decommissioned chromated copper arsenate-treated southern pine utility poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Leslie Groom

    2010-01-01

    The reusability of decommissioned treated wood is primarily dependent on the residual strength of the wood after service. Determining the residual strength can provide useful information for structural design and reuse of the decommissioned treated wood. This study evaluated the residual strength of decommissioned chromated copper arsenate–treated utility pole wood....

  15. Cary Woods Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Glenda

    1994-01-01

    Describes the school reading program at Cary Woods Elementary School (in Auburn, Alabama), one of several school reading programs designated by the International Reading Association as exemplary. (SR)

  16. Wood formation in Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Déjardin, Annabelle; Laurans, Françoise; Arnaud, Dominique; Breton, Christian; Pilate, Gilles; Leplé, Jean-Charles

    2010-04-01

    Wood formation is a complex biological process, involving five major developmental steps, including (1) cell division from a secondary meristem called the vascular cambium, (2) cell expansion (cell elongation and radial enlargement), (3) secondary cell wall deposition, (4) programmed cell death, and (5) heartwood formation. Thanks to the development of genomic studies in woody species, as well as genetic engineering, recent progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying wood formation. In this review, we will focus on two different aspects, the lignification process and the control of microfibril angle in the cell wall of wood fibres, as they are both key features of wood material properties.

  17. Cary Woods Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Glenda

    1994-01-01

    Describes the school reading program at Cary Woods Elementary School (in Auburn, Alabama), one of several school reading programs designated by the International Reading Association as exemplary. (SR)

  18. Hot water extracted wood fiber for production of wood plastic composites (WPCs)

    Treesearch

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Eini Lowell; Thomas E. Amidon; Timothy L. Chaffee

    2013-01-01

    Undebarked ponderosa pine chips were treated by hot water extraction to modify the chemical composition. In the treated pine (TP) , the mass was reduced by approximately 20%, and the extract was composed mainly of degradation products of hemicelluloses. Wood flour produced from TP and unextracted chips (untreated pine, UP) was blended with high-density polyethylene (...

  19. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  20. Transferable Durability: Enhancing decay resistance of non-durable species with extractives from durable wood species

    Treesearch

    G.T. Kirker; A.B. Blodgett; S. Lebow; C.A. Clausen

    2013-01-01

    Extractive content and composition is a vital component of naturally durable woods; however, variability in extractives can limit their usefulness in the field. Two extractive-free, non-durable wood species were pressure treated with ethanol-toluene extractives from 8 durable wood species. Extracted Southern pine, Paulownia and unextracted Southern pine blocks were...

  1. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL REMEDIATION TREATABILITY STUDIES FOR TWO WOOD TREATER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of the applicability of thermal remediation at two wood treater sites is ongoing. The two wood treaters had been in operation for 50 to 80 years, and a variety of wood treating chemicals had been employed, including creosote, pentachlorophenol, and various metal prepa...

  2. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL REMEDIATION TREATABILITY STUDIES FOR TWO WOOD TREATER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of the applicability of thermal remediation at two wood treater sites is ongoing. The two wood treaters had been in operation for 50 to 80 years, and a variety of wood treating chemicals had been employed, including creosote, pentachlorophenol, and various metal prepa...

  3. How to decrease the hydrophilicity of wood flour to process efficient composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouzet, M.; Gautier, D.; Charlet, K.; Dubois, M.; Béakou, A.

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic fluorination and static fluorination were applied to wood flour to decrease its hydrophilic character, aiming at processing wood-polymer composites with good properties. Fourier-Transform infrared spectra and 19F solid state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) results proved the successful covalent bonding of fluorine atoms onto the wood's chemical structure. It revealed that static fluorination brings about a less damaged and less hydrophilic fluorinated wood than with dynamic fluorination. Composites manufactured from this fluorinated wood presented a hydrophobic character directly related to the hydrophicity of these wood reinforcements. A composite made with fluorinated wood and polyester exhibited a higher hydrophobicity than the neat polyester and than the composite made with non-treated wood. Moreover, the further fluorination of a composite made of fluorinated wood led to a contact angle comparable to that of some metals (steel, gold) due to the etching of the composite surface during fluorination.

  4. Effects of bacterial treatments on wood extractives.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Vaari, Anu; Rättö, Marjaana; Konn, Jonas; Siika-aho, Matti; Viikari, Liisa

    2003-06-12

    Bacterial strains were isolated from spruce wood chips and their ability to reduce the content of wood extractives was studied. Strains were screened by cultivation on liquid media containing wood extractives as the major nutrient. Some bacterial species could decrease remarkably the amount of extractives in the liquid media and reduced the amount of triglycerides, steryl esters and total extractives by 100, 20 and 39%, respectively. Spruce wood chips were treated in controlled conditions with selected bacteria to test their effects on the chips. All the bacteria grew well on wood chips. The effect of bacterial metabolism on wood extractives was significant. Bacterial treatments reduced the amount of lipophilic extractives by 16-38% in 1 week of treatment and up to 67% in 2 weeks. The most efficient strain removed 90, 66 and 50% of triglycerides, steryl esters and resin acids, respectively, in 2 weeks. These results indicate that bacteria may be promising agents for the removal of extractives for improved pulping and papermaking processes.

  5. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  6. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  7. Spent-fuel storage requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    Spent fuel storage requirements, as projected through the year 2000 for U.S. LWRs, were calculated using information supplied by the utilities reflecting plant status as of December 31, 1981. Projections through the year 2000 combined fuel discharge projections of the utilities with the assumed discharges of typical reactors required to meet the nuclear capacity of 165 GWe projected by the Energy Information Administration for the year 2000. Three cases were developed and are summarized. A reference case, or maximum at-reactor capacity case, assumes that all reactor storage pools are increased to their maximum capacities as estimated by the utilities for spent fuel storage utilizing currently licensed technologies. The reference case assumes no transshipments between pools except as current licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This case identifies an initial requirement for 13 MTU of additional storage in 1984, and a cumulative requirement for 14,490 MTU additional storage in the year 2000.

  8. Pilot-scale biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Rajganesh, B.; Sublette, K.L.; Camp, C.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refining to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. It was previously demonstrated that spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries could be successfully biotreated at the bench scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate to Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic. Biotreatment of a Conoco spent sulfidic caustic has now been demonstrated at pilot scale (1000 gal or 3875 L). Results were comparable to those obtained at the bench scale. The economics and design of a commercial system to treat 1 gpm (3.8 L/min) of spent caustic are resented.

  9. Spent fuel receipt scenarios study

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.B.; Montan, D.N.; Revelli, M.A.

    1990-09-01

    This study reports on the results of an assignment from the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to evaluate of the effects of different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel on the potential performance of the waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. The initial evaluations were performed and an interim letter report was prepared during the fall of 1988. Subsequently, the scope of work was expanded and additional analyses were conducted in 1989. This report combines the results of the two phases of the activity. This study is a part of a broader effort to investigate the options available to the DOE and the nuclear utilities for selection of spent fuel for acceptance into the Federal Waste Management System for disposal. Each major element of the system has evaluated the effects of various options on its own operations, with the objective of providing the basis for performing system-wide trade-offs and determining an optimum acceptance scenario. Therefore, this study considers different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel by the repository only from the narrow perspective of their effect on the very-near-field temperatures in the repository following permanent closure. This report is organized into three main sections. The balance of this section is devoted to a statement of the study objective, a summary of the assumptions. The second section of the report contains a discussion of the major elements of the study. The third section summarizes the results of the study and draws some conclusions from them. The appendices include copies of the waste acceptance schedule and the existing and projected spent fuel inventory that were used in the study. 10 refs., 27 figs.

  10. Spent catalyst processing with electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.; Frye, J.G.; Buehler, M.F.

    1994-11-01

    Increasing concern for pollution prevention and waste disposal has created a need for clean alternatives for spent catalyst processing. In addition, expanded use of catalysts for the production of fuels and chemical feedstocks will continue in response to (1) economic pressure to upgrade heavier crudes and other feeds having high levels of impurities; (2) competitive pressure to achieve higher conversions using less energy; and (3) pressure to increase reaction selectivities to minimize waste production. While the incentives for using catalysts are great, all catalysts gradually lose activity through coking; poisoning by metals, sulfur, or halides; or loss of surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Regeneration is possible where the catalyst deactivation can easily be reversed. Electrochemical dissolution is a new technique to oxidize catalyst contaminants and dissolve catalyst metals in an aqueous solution for further recovery of the raw materials. The key to this process is adding spent catalyst to a solution containing small amounts of species that form kinetically active, strongly oxidizing ions such as cerium(IV) or silver(II). The oxidizing ions are regenerated at the anode; they act in a catalytic manner carrying electrons from the solid surface to the anode of the electrochemical cell. A cerium oxidizer was used for the experiments described in this paper. For this procedure, solution is added to the anode side of an electrochemical cell. At the anode, aqueous cerium(III) is oxidized to cerium(IV). The cerium(IV), in turn, oxidizes organic material adhered to the catalyst to carbon dioxide and water. Many spent catalysts used in hydrogenations contain metal sulfides that have contaminated the catalyst surface during processing. Metal sulfides are oxidized to dissolved metal ions and sulfur species. Because cerium is continuously reoxidized to cerium(IV) at the anode, a small amount of cerium is needed to oxidize the spent catalyst.

  11. Criticality of spent reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The storage capacity of spent reactor fuel pools can be greatly increased by consolidation. In this process, the fuel rods are removed from reactor fuel assemblies and are stored in close-packed arrays in a canister or skeleton. An earlier study examined criticality consideration for consolidation of Westinghouse fuel, assumed to be fresh, in canisters at the Millstone-2 spent-fuel pool and in the General Electric IF-300 shipping cask. The conclusions were that the fuel rods in the canister are so deficient in water that they are adequately subcritical, both in normal and in off-normal conditions. One potential accident, the water spill event, remained unresolved in the earlier study. A methodology is developed here for spent-fuel criticality and is applied to the water spill event. The methodology utilizes LEOPARD to compute few-group cross sections for the diffusion code PDQ7, which then is used to compute reactivity. These codes give results for fresh fuel that are in good agreement with KENO IV-NITAWL Monte Carlo results, which themselves are in good agreement with continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations. These methodologies are in reasonable agreement with critical measurements for undepleted fuel.

  12. Heat sterilization of wood

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions should be considered in heat sterilizing solid wood materials: First, what temperature–time regime is required to kill a particular pest? Second, how much time is required to heat the center of any wood configuration to the kill temperature? The entomology research on the first question has facilitated the development of international standards...

  13. Wood supply and demand

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Ince; David B. McKeever

    2011-01-01

    At times in history, there have been concerns that demand for wood (timber) would be greater than the ability to supply it, but that concern has recently dissipated. The wood supply and demand situation has changed because of market transitions, economic downturns, and continued forest growth. This article provides a concise overview of this change as it relates to the...

  14. Chemical modification of wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2007-01-01

    After millions of years of evolution, wood was designed to perform in a wet environment, and nature is programmed to recycle it, in a timely way, back to the basic building blocks of carbon dioxide and water through biological, thermal, aqueous, photochemical, chemical, and mechanical degradation. The properties of wood are, for the most part, a result of the chemistry...

  15. How James Wood Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Evan R., Comp.

    2008-01-01

    Reading through news-media clippings about James Wood, one might reasonably conclude that "pre-eminent critic" is his official job title. In fact, Wood is a staff writer for "The New Yorker" and a professor of the practice of literary criticism at Harvard University. But at a time when there is much hand-wringing about the death of the…

  16. Structure of wood

    Treesearch

    Regis B. Miller

    1999-01-01

    The fibrous nature of wood strongly influences how it is used. Wood is primarily composed of hollow, elongate, spindle-shaped cells that are arranged parallel to each other along the trunk of a tree. When lumber and other products are cut from the tree, the characteristics of these fibrous cells and their arrangement affect such properties as strength and shrinkage as...

  17. How James Wood Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Evan R., Comp.

    2008-01-01

    Reading through news-media clippings about James Wood, one might reasonably conclude that "pre-eminent critic" is his official job title. In fact, Wood is a staff writer for "The New Yorker" and a professor of the practice of literary criticism at Harvard University. But at a time when there is much hand-wringing about the death of the…

  18. Multifactorial antimicrobial wood protectants

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Coleman; Carol A. Clausen

    2008-01-01

    It is unlikely that a single antimicrobial compound, whether synthetic or natural, will provide the ‘magic bullet’ for eliminating multiple biological agents affecting wood products. Development of synergistic combinations of selected compounds, especially those derived from natural sources, is recognized as a promising approach to improved wood protection. Recent...

  19. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Rodney E. Jacobson; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood-plastic composites” refers to any number of composites that contain wood (of any form) and either thermoset or thermoplastic polymers. Thermosets or thermoset polymers are plastics that, once cured, cannot be remelted by heating. These include cured resins, such as epoxies and phenolics, plastics with which the forest products industry is most familiar (...

  20. Wood : mechanical fasteners

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer

    2001-01-01

    The strength and stability of any structure depends heavily on the fasteners that hold its parts together. One prime advantage of wood as a structural material is the ease with which wood structural parts can be joined together using a wide variety of fasteners: nails, staples, screws, lag screws, bolts, and various types of metal connectors. For the utmost rigidity,...

  1. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach fluid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread use of copper in treated lumber may result in a potential for human exposure. Due to a lack of information concerning the release of copper from treated wood particles following oral ingestion, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust i...

  2. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach fluid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread use of copper in treated lumber may result in a potential for human exposure. Due to a lack of information concerning the release of copper from treated wood particles following oral ingestion, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust i...

  3. Multifunctional wood materials with magnetic, superhydrophobic and anti-ultraviolet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Wentao; Gao, Likun; Sun, Qingfeng; Jin, Chunde; Lu, Yun; Li, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional wood materials with magnetic, superhydrophobic and anti-ultraviolet properties were obtained successfully by precipitated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles on the wood surface and then treated with a layer of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). The as-fabricated wood composites exhibited excellent magnetic property and the water contact angle of the OTS-modified magnetic wood surface reached as high as 150°, revealed the superhydrophobic property. Moreover, accelerated aging tests suggested that the treated wood composites also have an excellent anti-ultraviolet property.

  4. Treatment of wood with glucose-diammonium phosphate for fire and fungal decay protection

    Treesearch

    George C. Chen

    2002-01-01

    This study describes a method for dual protection of wood against fungal and fire degradation in one treatment. The method consists of impregnating wood with aqueous solution of glucose-diammonium phosphate at pH 9, followed by heating the treated wood at temperatures of 160 °C and 190 °C for various lengths of time to form water insoluble products in wood.

  5. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION STRATEGIES FOR ORGANIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory biotreatability studies evaluated the use of bioventing and biosparging plus groundwater circulation (UVB technology) for their potential abililty to treat soil and groundwater containing creosote and pentachlorophenol. Soils from two former wood-treatment facilities w...

  6. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION STRATEGIES FOR ORGANIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory biotreatability studies evaluated the use of bioventing and biosparging plus groundwater circulation (UVB technology) for their potential abililty to treat soil and groundwater containing creosote and pentachlorophenol. Soils from two former wood-treatment facilities w...

  7. Corrosion avoidance with new wood preservatives

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on considerations that need to be made when choosing products, other than stainless steel, to minimize corrosion of metals in contact with treated wood. With so many ?corrosion-resistant? alternative products on the market, it is important to know the fundamental principles of corrosion protection to make informed decisions when designing...

  8. Cone calorimeter evaluation of wood products

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2004-01-01

    The Forest Products Laboratory uses the cone calorimeter for the initial evaluation of the flammability of untreated and fire retardant treated wood products. The results of various studies are reviewed using a model presented at the 12th Annual BBC Conference on Flame Retardancy. The model uses data from the cone calorimeter to provide measures of fire growth...

  9. Spent fuel data for waste storage programs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, E M

    1980-09-01

    Data on LWR spent fuel were compiled for dissemination to participants in DOE-sponsored waste storage programs. Included are mechanical descriptions of the existing major types of LWR fuel assemblies, spent LWR fuel fission product inventories and decay heat data, and inventories of LWR spent fuel currently in storage, with projections of future quantities.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF REACTIVE DYES IN SPENT DYEBATHS AND WASTEWATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis with diode array detection and mass spectrometry combined with solid-phase extraction were employed for the identification of reactive vinylsulfone and chlorotriazine dyes and their hydrolysis products in spent dyebaths and raw and treated wastewater. Re...

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF REACTIVE DYES IN SPENT DYEBATHS AND WASTEWATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis with diode array detection and mass spectrometry combined with solid-phase extraction were employed for the identification of reactive vinylsulfone and chlorotriazine dyes and their hydrolysis products in spent dyebaths and raw and treated wastewater. Re...

  12. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood.

  13. Wood adhesives : vital for producing most wood products

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    A main route for the efficient utilization of wood resources is to reduce wood to small pieces and then bond them together (Frihart and Hunt 2010). Although humankind has been bonding wood since early Egyptian civilizations, the quality and quantity of bonded wood products has increased dramatically over the past 100 years with the development of new adhesives and...

  14. Performance of a Treatment Loop for Recycling Spent Rinse Waters

    SciTech Connect

    DONOVAN,ROBERT PATRICK; TIMON,ROBERT P.; DEBUSK,MICHAEL JOHN; JONES,RONALD V.; ROGERS,DARELL M.

    2000-11-15

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of a treatment loop designed to upgrade the quality of spent rinse waters discharged from 10 wet benches located in the fab at Sandia's Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL). The goal of the treatment loop is to make these waters, presently being discharged to the fab's acid waste neutralization (AWN) station, suitable for recycling as feed water back into the fab's ultrapure water (UPW) plant. The MDL typically operates 2 shifts per day, 5 days per week. Without any treatment, the properties of the spent rinse waters now being collected have been shown to be compatible with recycling about 30% (50/168) of the time (weekends primarily, when the fab is idling) which corresponds to about 12% of the present water discharged from the fab to the AWN. The primary goal of adding a treatment loop is to increase the percentage of recyclable water from these 10 wet benches to near 100%, increasing the percentage of total recyclable water to near 40% of the total present fab discharge to the AWN. A second goal is to demonstrate compatibility with recycling this treated spent rinse water to the present R/O product water tank, reducing both the present volume of R/O reject water and the present load on the R/O. The approach taken to demonstrate achieving these goals is to compare all the common metrics of water quality for the treated spent rinse waters with those of the present R/O product water. Showing that the treated rinse water is equal or superior in quality to the water presently stored in the R/O tank by every metric all the time is assumed to be sufficient argument for proceeding with plans to incorporate recycling of these spent rinse waters back into MDL's R/O tank.

  15. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Trojanowski, R.; Wei, G.

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  16. Health hazards of natural and introduced chemical components of boatbuilding woods.

    PubMed

    Jagels, R

    1985-01-01

    The major components of untreated wood--cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin--have not been implicated as toxicants, but extractive substances, especially in heartwood, can be toxic. Decay-resistant woods are more likely to contain irritants or sensitizers than nondurable woods. Short-term exposures to certain wood dusts may result in asthma, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, or allergic dermatitis, but long-term effects may include nasal cancer and Hodgkin's disease. Some thermophilic microorganisms found in wood are human pathogens, and septic splinters (chromomycosis) and inhalation of ascomycete spores from stored wood chips have been implicated in human illnesses. Reconstituted wood can contain formaldehyde resins, which pose health risks in enclosed humid areas. Pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood is particularly toxic--short-term exposures to PCP-treating solutions can lead to aplastic anemia and mortality, while diseases such as Hodgkin's disease are associated with long-term exposures. Since much commercial lumber is dipped in PCP, the separation of the chronic effects of wood dust from PCP exposure is difficult. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)- and ammoniacal copper arsenite (ACA)-treated wood may leach arsenic. CCA-treated wood is potentially safer, since it contains the pentavalent arsenic, which is a common constituent in the environment. ACA contains the trivalent arsenic, which is more toxic.

  17. Chapter 6: Wood energy and competing wood product markers

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Karen Abt

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effect of expanding wood energy markets is important to all wood-dependent industries and to policymakers debating the implementation of public programs to support the expansion of wood energy generation. A key factor in determining the feasibility of wood energy projects (e.g. wood boiler or pellet plant) is the long-term (i.e. 20-30year) supply...

  18. Structure and Function of Wood

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many cell types and chemistries acting together to serve the needs of living plant. Attempting to understand wood inthe context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants-conduction of water from the...

  19. Metal contaminated biochar and wood ash negatively affect plant growth and soil quality after land application.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Quilliam, R S

    2014-07-15

    Pyrolysis or combustion of waste wood can provide a renewable source of energy and produce byproducts which can be recycled back to land. To be sustainable requires that these byproducts pose minimal threat to the environment or human health. Frequently, reclaimed waste wood is contaminated by preservative-treated timber containing high levels of heavy metals. We investigated the effect of feedstock contamination from copper-preservative treated wood on the behaviour of pyrolysis-derived biochar and combustion-derived ash in plant-soil systems. Biochar and wood ash were applied to soil at typical agronomic rates. The presence of preservative treated timber in the feedstock increased available soil Cu; however, critical Cu guidance limits were only exceeded at high rates of feedstock contamination. Negative effects on plant growth and soil quality were only seen at high levels of biochar contamination (>50% derived from preservative-treated wood). Negative effects of wood ash contamination were apparent at lower levels of contamination (>10% derived from preservative treated wood). Complete removal of preservative treated timber from wood recycling facilities is notoriously difficult and low levels of contamination are commonplace. We conclude that low levels of contamination from Cu-treated wood should pose minimal environmental risk to biochar and ash destined for land application.

  20. Velcro mechanics in wood

    Treesearch

    David Kretschmann

    2003-12-01

    The remarkable deformability of wood in a moist environment resembles that of ductile metals. A combination of traditional mechanical tests and cutting-edge diffraction experiments reveal the molecular mechanism that determines such behaviour.

  1. Maximizing wood Failure

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1965-01-01

    The durability of plywood bonds in exterior exposure is commonly measured indirectly by failing wetted specimens in shear; a high percentage of wood failure is accepted in the industry as evidence that the gluebond will be durable.

  2. Profile: Susan Wood.

    PubMed

    Wilan, Ken

    2007-05-01

    When US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official Susan Wood resigned over foot-dragging on Plan B, she found herself at the center of a maelstrom concerning political interference in agency decision-making.

  3. Impact Tests for Woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Although it is well known that the strength of wood depends greatly upon the time the wood is under the load, little consideration has been given to this fact in testing materials for airplanes. Here, results are given of impact tests on clear, straight grained spruce. Transverse tests were conducted for comparison. Both Izod and Charpy impact tests were conducted. Results are given primarily in tabular and graphical form.

  4. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  5. Mechanical properties of wood

    Treesearch

    David Kretschmann

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties presented in this chapter were obtained from tests of pieces of wood termed “clear” and “straight grained” because they did not contain characteristics such as knots, cross grain, checks, and splits. These test pieces did have anatomical characteristics such as growth rings that occurred in consistent patterns within each piece. Clear wood...

  6. Impact of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood mulch.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Timothy G; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Tolaymat, Thabet; Stook, Kristin

    2003-06-20

    The production of landscape mulch is a major market for the recycling of yard trash and waste wood. When wood recovered from construction and demolition (C&D) debris is used as mulch, it sometimes contains chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. The presence of CCA-treated wood may cause some potential environmental problems as a result of the chromium, copper, and arsenic present. Research was performed to examine the leachability of the three metals from a variety of processed wood mixtures in Florida. The mixtures tested included mixed wood from C&D debris recycling facilities and mulch purchased from retail outlets. The synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) was performed to examine the leaching of chromium, copper and arsenic. Results were compared to Florida's groundwater cleanup target levels (GWCTLs). Eighteen of the 22 samples collected from C&D debris processing facilities leached arsenic at concentrations greater than Florida's GWCTL of 50 microg/l. The mean leachable arsenic concentration for the C&D debris samples was 153 microg/l with a maximum of 558 microg/l. One of the colored mulch samples purchased from a retail outlet leached arsenic above 50 microg/l, while purchased mulch samples derived from virgin materials did not leach detectable arsenic (<5 microg/l). A mass balance approach was used to compute the potential metal concentrations (mg/kg) that would result from CCA-treated wood being present in wood mulch. Less than 0.1% CCA-treated wood would cause a mulch to exceed Florida's residential clean soil guideline for arsenic (0.8 mg/kg).

  7. Growing with wood waste

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.M.

    1995-05-01

    When officials at Regional Waste Services (Peabody, Mass.) were looking for an outlet for their used wood products in the late 1980s, they had no idea that the material would eventually turn into a whole new market for them. Simply tired of paying exorbitant disposal fees and seeking out obscure landfills willing to accept the waste, company officials decided to build and operate their own 1,000-tpd wood recycling facility. Encouraged by the immediate success of the facility, principals at Regional Waste Services, which at the time was the fifth largest independent waste hauling, transfer, and disposal firm in the US made a strategic business decision to sell their waste hauling business and to concentrate on the wood recycling operation full time. Their newly named company, Wood Recycling, Inc. (WRI, Peabody, Mass.), was officially established in July 1990. Today, nearly five years later, that decision appears to be paying off in a big way. WRI has successfully diverted thousands of tons of urban wood wastes from landfills. It also has turned that waste into an innovative line of recycled wood and paper fiber mulch lawn care products that are being marketed to consumers and commercial entities across the country.

  8. Gas pollution control apparatus and method and wood drying system employing same

    SciTech Connect

    Eatherton, J.R.

    1984-02-14

    Pollution control apparatus and method are disclosed in which hot exhaust gas containing pollutants including solid particles and hydrocarbon vapors is treated by transmitting such exhaust gas through a container containing wood members, such as wood chips, which serve as a filter media for filtering out such pollutants by causing such solids to deposit and such hydrocarbon vapors to condense upon the surface of the wood members. The contaminated wood chips are discharged from the filter and further processed into chip board or other commercial wood products thereby disposing of the pollutants. Lumber may be used as the wood members of the filter in a lumber kiln by deposition of solid particles on the rough surface of such lumber. The contaminated surfaces of the lumber are removed by a planer which produces a smooth finished lumber and contaminated wood chips that may be processed into chip board or other commercial wood products. A wood drying system employing such pollution control apparatus and method includes a hot air dryer for wood or other organic material, such as a wood chip rotary dryer or a wood veneer dryer, which produces hot exhaust gases containing pollutants including hydrocarbon vapors and solid particles. This hot exhaust air is transmitted through a lumber kiln to dry lumber thereby conserving heat energy and causing solid particle pollutants to deposit on the surface of the lumber. The kiln exhaust air containing solid and hydrocarbon vapor pollutants is then transmitted up through a filter stack of wood chips.

  9. Fermentation to ethanol of pentose-containing spent sulphite liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Wayman, M.; Parekh, S.K.

    1987-06-01

    Ethanolic fermentation of spent sulphite liquor with ordinary bakers' yeast is incomplete because this yeast cannot ferment the pentose sugars in the liquor. This results in poor alcohol yields, and a residual effluent problem. By using the yeast Candida shehatae (R) for fermentation of the spent sulphite liquor from a large Canadian alcohol-producing sulphite pulp and paper mill, pentoses as well as hexoses were fermented nearly completely, alcohol yields were raised by 33%, and sugar removal increased by 46%. Inhibitors were removed prior to fermentation by steam stripping. Major benefits were obtained by careful recycling of this yeast, which was shown to be tolerant both of high sugar concentrations and high alcohol concentrations. When sugar concentrations over 250 g/L (glucose:xylose 70:30) were fermented, ethanol became an inhibitor when its concentration reached 90 g/L. However, when the ethanol was removed by low-temperature vacuum distillation, fermentation continued and resulted in a yield of 0.50 g ethanol/g sugar consumed. Further improvement was achieved by combining enzyme saccharification of sugar oligomers with fermentation. This yeast is able to ferment both hexoses and pentoses simultaneously, efficiently, and rapidly. Present indications are that it is well suited to industrial operations wherever hexoses and pentoses are both to be fermented to ethanol, for example, in wood hydrolysates. (Refs. 6).

  10. Transportation accident scenarios for commercial spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmot, E L

    1981-02-01

    A spectrum of high severity, low probability, transportation accident scenarios involving commercial spent fuel is presented together with mechanisms, pathways and quantities of material that might be released from spent fuel to the environment. These scenarios are based on conclusions from a workshop, conducted in May 1980 to discuss transportation accident scenarios, in which a group of experts reviewed and critiqued available literature relating to spent fuel behavior and cask response in accidents.

  11. Distillery spent wash: treatment technologies and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Acharya, Bhavik K; Madamwar, Datta

    2009-04-15

    Distillery spent wash is the unwanted residual liquid waste generated during alcohol production and pollution caused by it is one of the most critical environmental issue. Despite standards imposed on effluent quality, untreated or partially treated effluent very often finds access to watercourses. The distillery wastewater with its characteristic unpleasant odor poses a serious threat to the water quality in several regions around the globe. The ever-increasing generation of distillery spent wash on the one hand and stringent legislative regulations of its disposal on the other has stimulated the need for developing new technologies to process this effluent efficiently and economically. A number of clean up technologies have been put into practice and novel bioremediation approaches for treatment of distillery spent wash are being worked out. Potential microbial (anaerobic and aerobic) as well as physicochemical processes as feasible remediation technologies to combat environmental pollution are being explored. An emerging field in distillery waste management is exploiting its nutritive potential for production of various high value compounds. This review presents an overview of the pollution problems caused by distillery spent wash, the technologies employed globally for its treatment and its alternative use in various biotechnological sectors.

  12. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts. [Thiobacillus sulfolobus

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. This plant is run and operated by Southern Clean Fuels. A large sample of spent catalyst from this facility has been obtained. The second material is an unsupported ammonium molybdate catalyst used in a pilot process by the Department of Energy at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This material was obtained in late February 1990 but has not been pursued since the No content of this particular sample is too low for the current studies and no new catalyst has since been obtained. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp. and possibly Sulfolobus, to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  13. Boron impregnation treatment of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    PubMed

    Dhamodaran, T K; Gnanaharan, R

    2007-08-01

    Eucalyptus grandis is suitable for small timber purposes, but its wood is reported to be non-durable and difficult to treat. Boron compounds being diffusible, and the vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) method being more suitable for industrial-scale treatment, the possibility of boron impregnation of partially dry to green timber was investigated using a 6% boric acid equivalent (BAE) solution of boric acid and borax in the ratio 1:1.5 under different treatment schedules. It was found that E. grandis wood, even in green condition, could be pressure treated to desired chemical dry salt retention (DSR) and penetration levels using 6% BAE solution. Up to a thickness of 50mm, in order to achieve a DSR of 5 kg/m(3) boron compounds, the desired DSR level as per the Indian Standard for perishable timbers for indoor use, it was found that neither the moisture content of wood nor the treatment schedule posed any problem as far as the treatability of E. grandis wood was concerned.

  14. Development of polypropylene/wood flour ecocomposites. Evaluation of silane as coupling agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.; Montero, B.

    2010-06-02

    The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane--treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of the coupling agent.

  15. Development of polypropylene/wood flour ecocomposites. Evaluation of silane as coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.; Montero, B.

    2010-06-01

    The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane—treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of the coupling agent.

  16. Leaching of wood preservative components and their mobility in the environment : summary of pertinent literature

    Treesearch

    S. Lebow

    1996-01-01

    Preservative-treated wood is an economical, durable, and aesthetically pleasing building material; therefore, it is a natural choice for construction projects in our National Forests, National Parks, and other public lands. However, we need to ensure that the chemicals used in treated wood do not pose a threat to people or the environment. The purpose of this report is...

  17. Gene Expression Analysis of Copper Tolerance and Wood Decay in the Brown Rot Fungus Fibroporia radiculosa

    Treesearch

    J. D. Tang; L. A. Parker; A. D. Perkins; T. S. Sonstegard; S. G. Schroeder; D. D. Nicholas; S. V. Diehl

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput transcriptomics was used to identify Fibroporia radiculosa genes that were differentially regulated during colonization of wood treated with a copper-based preservative. The transcriptome was profiled at two time points while the fungus was growing on wood treated with micronized copper quat (MCQ). A total of 917 transcripts were...

  18. New environmentally-benign concepts in wood protection: the combination of organic biocides and non-biocidal additives

    Treesearch

    Frederick Green; Tor P. Schultz

    2003-01-01

    The principal wood preservative for residential use is currently a broad-spectrum biocide which contains As, Cr and Cu. However, the use of totally organic wood preservative systems in certain applications or localities may be required in the future. This will greatly increase the price of treated wood. The combination of organic biocides with non-biocidal additives to...

  19. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  20. Wood for sound.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2006-10-01

    The unique mechanical and acoustical properties of wood and its aesthetic appeal still make it the material of choice for musical instruments and the interior of concert halls. Worldwide, several hundred wood species are available for making wind, string, or percussion instruments. Over generations, first by trial and error and more recently by scientific approach, the most appropriate species were found for each instrument and application. Using material property charts on which acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient are plotted against one another for woods. We analyze and explain why spruce is the preferred choice for soundboards, why tropical species are favored for xylophone bars and woodwind instruments, why violinists still prefer pernambuco over other species as a bow material, and why hornbeam and birch are used in piano actions.