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Sample records for sperm cells subcellular

  1. Bovine sperm plasma membrane proteomics through biotinylation and subcellular enrichment.

    PubMed

    Kasvandik, Sergo; Sillaste, Gerly; Velthut-Meikas, Agne; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Hallap, Triin; Padrik, Peeter; Tenson, Tanel; Jaakma, Ülle; Kõks, Sulev; Salumets, Andres

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of mammalian fertilization is mediated through the proteomic composition of the sperm surface. These protein constituents can present as biomarkers to control and regulate breeding of agricultural animals. Previous studies have addressed the bovine sperm cell apical plasma membrane (PM) proteome with nitrogen cavitation enrichment. Alternative workflows would enable to expand the compositional data more globally around the entire sperm's surface. We used a cell surface biotin-labeling in combination with differential centrifugation to enrich sperm surface proteins. Using nano-LC MS/MS, 338 proteins were confidently identified in the PM-enriched proteome. Functional categories of sperm-egg interaction, protein turnover, metabolism as well as molecular transport, spermatogenesis, and signal transduction were represented by proteins with high quantitative signal in our study. A highly significant degree of enrichment was found for transmembrane and PM-targeted proteins. Among them, we also report proteins previously not described on bovine sperm (CPQ, CD58, CKLF, CPVL, GLB1L3, and LPCAT2B) of which CPQ and CPVL cell surface localization was further validated. A descriptive overview of the bovine sperm PM integral and peripheral proteins is provided to complement future studies on animal reproduction and its relation to sperm cell surface. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001096 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001096).

  2. Changes in subcellular elemental distributions accompanying the acrosome reaction in sea urchin sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cantino, M.E.; Schackmann, R.W.; Johnson, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis was used to analyze changes in the subcellular distributions of Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca associated with the acrosome reaction of sea urchin sperm. Within 5 sec after induction of the acrosome reaction, nuclear Na and mitochondrial Ca increased and nuclear and mitochondrial K decreased. Uptake of mitochondrial P was detected after several minutes, and increases in nuclear Mg were detected only after 5-10 min of incubation following induction of the reaction. The results suggest that sudden permeability changes in the sperm plasma membrane are associated with the acrosome reaction, but that complete breakdown of membrane and cell function does not occur for several minutes.

  3. Subcellular preservation in giant ostracod sperm from an early Miocene cave deposit in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Matzke-Karasz, Renate; Neil, John V.; Smith, Robin J.; Symonová, Radka; Mořkovský, Libor; Archer, Michael; Hand, Suzanne J.; Cloetens, Peter; Tafforeau, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cypridoidean ostracods are one of a number of animal taxa that reproduce with giant sperm, up to 10 000 µm in length, but they are the only group to have aflagellate, filamentous giant sperm. The evolution and function of this highly unusual feature of reproduction with giant sperm are currently unknown. The hypothesis of long-term evolutionary persistence of this kind of reproduction has never been tested. We here report giant sperm discovered by propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron micro- and nanotomography, preserved in five Miocene ostracod specimens from Queensland, Australia. The specimens belong to the species Heterocypris collaris Matzke-Karasz et al. 2013 (one male and three females) and Newnhamia mckenziana Matzke-Karasz et al. 2013 (one female). The sperm are not only the oldest petrified gametes on record, but include three-dimensional subcellular preservation. We provide direct evidence that giant sperm have been a feature of this taxon for at least 16 Myr and provide an additional criterion (i.e. longevity) to test hypotheses relating to origin and function of giant sperm in the animal kingdom. We further argue that the highly resistant, most probably chitinous coats of giant ostracod sperm may play a role in delaying decay processes, favouring early mineralization of soft tissue. PMID:24827442

  4. Subcellular localization of phospholipase Cζ in human sperm and its absence in DPY19L2-deficient sperm are consistent with its role in oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Escoffier, Jessica; Yassine, Sandra; Lee, Hoi Chang; Martinez, Guillaume; Delaroche, Julie; Coutton, Charles; Karaouzène, Thomas; Zouari, Raoudha; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Ray, Pierre F; Fissore, Rafael; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    We recently identified the DPY19L2 gene as the main genetic cause of human globozoospermia (70%) and described that Dpy19l2 knockout (KO) mice faithfully reproduce the human phenotype of globozoospermia making it an excellent model to characterize the molecular physiopathology of globozoospermia. Recent case studies on non-genetically characterized men with globozoospermia showed that phospholipase C, zeta (PLCζ), the sperm factor thought to induce the Ca(2+) oscillations at fertilization, was absent from their sperm, explaining the poor fertilization potential of these spermatozoa. Since 30% of globozoospermic men remain genetically uncharacterized, the absence of PLCζ in DPY19L2 globozoospermic men remains to be formally established. Moreover, the precise localization of PLCζ and the reasons underlying its loss during spermatogenesis in globozoospermic patients are still not understood. Herein, we show that PLCζ is absent, or its presence highly reduced, in human and mouse sperm with DPY19L2-associated globozoospermia. As a consequence, fertilization with sperm from Dpy19l2 KO mice failed to initiate Ca(2+) oscillations and injected oocytes remained arrested at the metaphase II stage, although a few human oocytes injected with DPY19L2-defective sperm showed formation of 2-pronuclei embryos. We report for the first time the subcellular localization of PLCζ in control human sperm, which is along the inner acrosomal membrane and in the perinuclear theca, in the area corresponding to the equatorial region. Because these cellular components are absent in globozoospermic sperm, the loss of PLCζ in globozoospermic sperm is thus consistent and reinforces the role of PLCζ as an oocyte activation factor necessary for oocyte activation. In our companion article, we showed that chromatin compaction during spermiogenesis in Dpy19l2 KO mouse is defective and leads to sperm DNA damage. Together, these defects explain the poor fertilization potential of DPY19L2

  5. Subcellular localization of phospholipase Cζ in human sperm and its absence in DPY19L2-deficient sperm are consistent with its role in oocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Escoffier, Jessica; Yassine, Sandra; Lee, Hoi Chang; Martinez, Guillaume; Delaroche, Julie; Coutton, Charles; Karaouzène, Thomas; Zouari, Raoudha; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Ray, Pierre F.; Fissore, Rafael; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified the DPY19L2 gene as the main genetic cause of human globozoospermia (70%) and described that Dpy19l2 knockout (KO) mice faithfully reproduce the human phenotype of globozoospermia making it an excellent model to characterize the molecular physiopathology of globozoospermia. Recent case studies on non-genetically characterized men with globozoospermia showed that phospholipase C, zeta (PLCζ), the sperm factor thought to induce the Ca2+ oscillations at fertilization, was absent from their sperm, explaining the poor fertilization potential of these spermatozoa. Since 30% of globozoospermic men remain genetically uncharacterized, the absence of PLCζ in DPY19L2 globozoospermic men remains to be formally established. Moreover, the precise localization of PLCζ and the reasons underlying its loss during spermatogenesis in globozoospermic patients are still not understood. Herein, we show that PLCζ is absent, or its presence highly reduced, in human and mouse sperm with DPY19L2-associated globozoospermia. As a consequence, fertilization with sperm from Dpy19l2 KO mice failed to initiate Ca2+ oscillations and injected oocytes remained arrested at the metaphase II stage, although a few human oocytes injected with DPY19L2-defective sperm showed formation of 2-pronuclei embryos. We report for the first time the subcellular localization of PLCζ in control human sperm, which is along the inner acrosomal membrane and in the perinuclear theca, in the area corresponding to the equatorial region. Because these cellular components are absent in globozoospermic sperm, the loss of PLCζ in globozoospermic sperm is thus consistent and reinforces the role of PLCζ as an oocyte activation factor necessary for oocyte activation. In our companion article, we showed that chromatin compaction during spermiogenesis in Dpy19l2 KO mouse is defective and leads to sperm DNA damage. Together, these defects explain the poor fertilization potential of DPY19L2

  6. Subcellular localization of phospholipase Cζ in human sperm and its absence in DPY19L2-deficient sperm are consistent with its role in oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Escoffier, Jessica; Yassine, Sandra; Lee, Hoi Chang; Martinez, Guillaume; Delaroche, Julie; Coutton, Charles; Karaouzène, Thomas; Zouari, Raoudha; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Ray, Pierre F; Fissore, Rafael; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    We recently identified the DPY19L2 gene as the main genetic cause of human globozoospermia (70%) and described that Dpy19l2 knockout (KO) mice faithfully reproduce the human phenotype of globozoospermia making it an excellent model to characterize the molecular physiopathology of globozoospermia. Recent case studies on non-genetically characterized men with globozoospermia showed that phospholipase C, zeta (PLCζ), the sperm factor thought to induce the Ca(2+) oscillations at fertilization, was absent from their sperm, explaining the poor fertilization potential of these spermatozoa. Since 30% of globozoospermic men remain genetically uncharacterized, the absence of PLCζ in DPY19L2 globozoospermic men remains to be formally established. Moreover, the precise localization of PLCζ and the reasons underlying its loss during spermatogenesis in globozoospermic patients are still not understood. Herein, we show that PLCζ is absent, or its presence highly reduced, in human and mouse sperm with DPY19L2-associated globozoospermia. As a consequence, fertilization with sperm from Dpy19l2 KO mice failed to initiate Ca(2+) oscillations and injected oocytes remained arrested at the metaphase II stage, although a few human oocytes injected with DPY19L2-defective sperm showed formation of 2-pronuclei embryos. We report for the first time the subcellular localization of PLCζ in control human sperm, which is along the inner acrosomal membrane and in the perinuclear theca, in the area corresponding to the equatorial region. Because these cellular components are absent in globozoospermic sperm, the loss of PLCζ in globozoospermic sperm is thus consistent and reinforces the role of PLCζ as an oocyte activation factor necessary for oocyte activation. In our companion article, we showed that chromatin compaction during spermiogenesis in Dpy19l2 KO mouse is defective and leads to sperm DNA damage. Together, these defects explain the poor fertilization potential of DPY19L2

  7. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.

    1994-12-31

    Theories have suggested that there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and sperm fertility. At present, biochemical analyses have only been performed on bulk populations and existing methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. As part of an investigation into male sperm fertility, nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the ratio of Phosphorus to Sulfur the authors have been able to determine the amount of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in individual cells from bulk fertile samples of bull and mouse sperm. Preliminary results show that, for each species, the relative amounts of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in morphologically normal sperm agree well with expected values.

  8. Subcellular optogenetics – controlling signaling and single-cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Karunarathne, W. K. Ajith; O'Neill, Patrick R.; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variation in signaling activity across a cell plays a crucial role in processes such as cell migration. Signaling activity specific to organelles within a cell also likely plays a key role in regulating cellular functions. To understand how such spatially confined signaling within a cell regulates cell behavior, tools that exert experimental control over subcellular signaling activity are required. Here, we discuss the advantages of using optogenetic approaches to achieve this control. We focus on a set of optical triggers that allow subcellular control over signaling through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling proteins, as well as those that inhibit endogenous signaling proteins. We also discuss the specific insights with regard to signaling and cell behavior that these subcellular optogenetic approaches can provide. PMID:25433038

  9. Sperm Cells of a Primitive Strepsipteran.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Delgado, Juan A; Collantes, Francisco; Miller, Lou Ann; Bee, Charles M; Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney

    2013-09-04

    The unusual life style of Strepsiptera has presented a long-standing puzzle in establishing its affinity to other insects. Although Strepsiptera share few structural similarities with other insect orders, all members of this order share a parasitic life style with members of two distinctive families in the Coleoptera-the order now considered the most closely related to Strepsiptera based on recent genomic evidence. Among the structural features of several strepsipteran families and other insect families that have been surveyed are the organization of testes and ultrastructure of sperm cells. For comparison with existing information on insect sperm structure, this manuscript presents a description of testes and sperm of a representative of the most primitive extant strepsipteran family Mengenillidae, Eoxenos laboulbenei. We compare sperm structure of E. laboulbenei from this family with that of the three other families of Strepsiptera in the other strepsipteran suborder Stylopidia that have been studied as well as with members of the beetle families Meloidae and Rhipiphoridae that share similar life histories with Strepsiptera. Meloids, Rhipiphorids and Strepsipterans all begin larval life as active and viviparous first instar larvae. This study examines global features of these insects' sperm cells along with specific ultrastructural features of their organelles.

  10. Sperm Cells of a Primitive Strepsipteran

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, James B.; Delgado, Juan A.; Collantes, Francisco; Miller, Lou Ann; Bee, Charles M.; Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney

    2013-01-01

    The unusual life style of Strepsiptera has presented a long-standing puzzle in establishing its affinity to other insects. Although Strepsiptera share few structural similarities with other insect orders, all members of this order share a parasitic life style with members of two distinctive families in the Coleoptera—the order now considered the most closely related to Strepsiptera based on recent genomic evidence. Among the structural features of several strepsipteran families and other insect families that have been surveyed are the organization of testes and ultrastructure of sperm cells. For comparison with existing information on insect sperm structure, this manuscript presents a description of testes and sperm of a representative of the most primitive extant strepsipteran family Mengenillidae, Eoxenos laboulbenei. We compare sperm structure of E. laboulbenei from this family with that of the three other families of Strepsiptera in the other strepsipteran suborder Stylopidia that have been studied as well as with members of the beetle families Meloidae and Rhipiphoridae that share similar life histories with Strepsiptera. Meloids, Rhipiphorids and Strepsipterans all begin larval life as active and viviparous first instar larvae. This study examines global features of these insects’ sperm cells along with specific ultrastructural features of their organelles. PMID:26462430

  11. Sperm Cells of a Primitive Strepsipteran.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Delgado, Juan A; Collantes, Francisco; Miller, Lou Ann; Bee, Charles M; Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney

    2013-01-01

    The unusual life style of Strepsiptera has presented a long-standing puzzle in establishing its affinity to other insects. Although Strepsiptera share few structural similarities with other insect orders, all members of this order share a parasitic life style with members of two distinctive families in the Coleoptera-the order now considered the most closely related to Strepsiptera based on recent genomic evidence. Among the structural features of several strepsipteran families and other insect families that have been surveyed are the organization of testes and ultrastructure of sperm cells. For comparison with existing information on insect sperm structure, this manuscript presents a description of testes and sperm of a representative of the most primitive extant strepsipteran family Mengenillidae, Eoxenos laboulbenei. We compare sperm structure of E. laboulbenei from this family with that of the three other families of Strepsiptera in the other strepsipteran suborder Stylopidia that have been studied as well as with members of the beetle families Meloidae and Rhipiphoridae that share similar life histories with Strepsiptera. Meloids, Rhipiphorids and Strepsipterans all begin larval life as active and viviparous first instar larvae. This study examines global features of these insects' sperm cells along with specific ultrastructural features of their organelles. PMID:26462430

  12. Comparative Transcriptomics of Arabidopsis thaliana Sperm Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In flowering plants the two sperm cells are embedded within the cytoplasm of the growing pollen tube and as such are passively transported to the embryo sac, wherein double fertilization occurs upon their release. Understanding the mechanisms and conditions by which male gametes mature and take part...

  13. Metabolic activity of sperm cells: correlation with sperm cell concentration, viability and motility in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sabés-Alsina, Maria; Planell, Núria; Gil, Sílvia; Tallo-Parra, Oriol; Maya-Soriano, Maria José; Taberner, Ester; Piles, Miriam; Sabés, Manel; Lopez-Bejar, Manel

    2016-10-01

    The resazurin reduction test (RRT) is a useful technique to assess the metabolic rate of sperm cells. RRT depends on the ability of metabolically active cells to reduce the non-fluorescent dye resazurin to the fluorescent resorufin. The aim of this study was to develop a vital fluorometric method to evaluate metabolic activity of rabbit sperm cells. Twenty-five rabbit males were included in the study. Viability and morphology, motility and metabolic activity were evaluated using an eosin-nigrosin staining, a computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and the RRT, respectively. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between RRT and semen parameters. After evaluation, a concentration of 10 × 106 sperm cells/ml was selected for further experiments with RRT. No significant correlation was found between the RRT results and the motility parameters. However, after RRT a significant positive correlation between relative fluorescence units and the percentage of alive spermatozoa (r = 0.62; P = 0.001) and a negative one with the percentage of sperm cells with acrosomic abnormalities (r = -0.45; P < 0.05) were detected. The vital assessment of metabolic rate of sperm cells by RRT could provide more information about semen quality than other routine semen analysis, correlating with sperm viability and acrosome status information.

  14. ART success and in vivo sperm cell selection depend on the ultramorphological status of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, A; Eltes, F; Soffer, Y; Zabludovsky, N; Beyth, Y; Farhi, J; Levran, D; Bartoov, B

    1999-01-01

    Management of male infertility has recently shifted from treatment of the subfertile man towards techniques of assisted reproduction (ART). This study aimed to evaluate the possible role of the ultramorphological status of the spermatozoon with respect to sperm selection in vivo and prediction of ART success. Ultramorphological sperm parameters were assessed retrospectively for 92 males with sufficient sperm density (10(7) spermatozoa ejaculate-1) whose wives conceived following a stepwise discarding of the female genital tract barriers, using intra-uterine insemination (IUI) (n = 26), in vitro fertilization (IVF) (n = 45) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) (n = 21). In parallel, sperm samples of 71 fertile males were examined. Normal ultramorphology of all head and tail subcellular organelles was found to be essential for the ability of spermatozoa to pass the lower female genital tract. The ultramorphological migration threshold for this barrier is apparently higher than that essential for oocyte fertilization. No specific indication associated with passage through the upper genital tract was found. A high prevalence of axonema defects was found to impair the ability of sperm cells to penetrate the oocyte investment. The natural fertility index, based on routine sperm parameters and the ultrastructural status of the spermatozoon's subcellular organelles was confirmed to be beneficial for directing patients to ART. A discriminative score based on axonema integrity was found to contribute additional information for the first choice decision between conventional ART and ICSI (75% prediction ability). Thus it may be helpful in finding the simplest and least expensive procedure with the greatest long-term chance for pregnancy.

  15. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shinuo; Shao, Yue; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical homeostasis--a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations--is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths through either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modelling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviours in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight the previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells.

  16. How Cells Measure Length on Subcellular Scales.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2015-12-01

    Cells are not just amorphous bags of enzymes, but precise and complex machines. With any machine, it is important that the parts be of the right size, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that control size of cellular structures remains at a rudimentary level in most cases. One problem with studying size control is that many cellular organelles have complex 3D structures that make their size hard to measure. Here we focus on linear structures within cells, for which the problem of size control reduces to the problem of length control. We compare and contrast potential mechanisms for length control to understand how cells solve simple geometry problems. PMID:26437596

  17. 3D subcellular SIMS imaging in cryogenically prepared single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    The analysis of a cell with dynamic SIMS ion microscopy depends on the gradual erosion (sputtering) of the cell surface for obtaining spatially resolved chemical information in the X-, Y-, and Z-dimensions. This ideal feature of ion microscopy is rarely explored in probing microfeatures hidden beneath the cell surface. In this study, this capability is explored for the analysis of cells undergoing cell division. The mitotic cells required 3D SIMS imaging in order to study the chemical composition of specialized subcellular regions, like the mitotic spindle, hidden beneath the cell surface. Human glioblastoma T98G cells were grown on silicon chips and cryogenically prepared with a sandwich freeze-fracture method. The fractured freeze-dried cells were used for SIMS analysis with the microscope mode of the CAMECA IMS-3f, which is capable of producing 500 nm lateral image resolution. SIMS analysis of calcium in the spindle region of metaphase cells required sequential recording of as many as 10 images. The T98G human glioblastoma tumor cells revealed an unusual depletion/lack of calcium store in the metaphase spindle, which is in contrast to the accumulation of calcium stores generally observed in normal cells. This study shows the feasibility of the microscope mode imaging in resolving subcellular microfeatures in 3D and opens new avenues of research in spatially resolved chemical analysis of dividing cells.

  18. Towards microfluidic sperm refinement: impedance-based analysis and sorting of sperm cells.

    PubMed

    de Wagenaar, B; Dekker, S; de Boer, H L; Bomer, J G; Olthuis, W; van den Berg, A; Segerink, L I

    2016-04-21

    The use of high quality semen for artificial insemination in the livestock industry is essential for successful outcome. Insemination using semen with a high number of sperm cells containing morphological defects has a negative impact on fertilization outcome. Therefore, semen with a high number of these abnormal cells is discarded in order to maintain high fertilization potential, resulting in the loss of a large number of morphologically normal sperm cells (up to 70-80% of original sample). A commonly occurring morphological sperm anomaly is the cytoplasmic droplet on the sperm flagella. Currently, no techniques are available to extract morphologically normal sperm cells from rejected samples. Therefore, we aim to develop a microfluidic setup which is able to detect and sort morphologically normal sperm cells label-free and non-invasively. In a proof-of-concept experiment, differential impedance measurements were used to detect the presence of cytoplasmic droplets on sperm flagella, which was quantified by calculating the area under the curve (AUC) of the corresponding impedance peaks. A receiver operating characteristic curve of this electrical analysis method showed the good predictive power of this analysis method (AUC value of 0.85). Furthermore, we developed a label-free cell sorting system using LabVIEW, which is capable of sorting sperm cells based on impedance. In a proof-of-concept experiment, sperm cells and 3 μm beads were sorted label-free and non-invasively using impedance detection and dielectrophoresis sorting. These experiments present our first attempt to perform sperm refinement using microfluidic technology. PMID:27025866

  19. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  20. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  1. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation. PMID:27078385

  2. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  3. The development of cat testicular sperm cryopreservation protocols: Effects of tissue fragments or sperm cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Thuwanut, Paweena; Morrell, Jane M

    2016-01-15

    In endangered animals that have been found dead or sterilized for medical reasons, testis is the ultimate source of haploid DNA or sperm. Thus, preservation of testicular sperm may be performed to rescue their genetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate protocols for testicular sperm freezing: as tissue fragments or cell suspension in domestic cats as a model. A pair of testes from each cat (n = 9) were cut into eight equal pieces. Four randomly selected pieces were cryopreserved as: (1) tissue pieces using two-step freezing; (2) tissue pieces using a slow passive cooling device (CoolCell); (3) sperm suspension after single-layer centrifugation (SLC) through colloids; and (4) sperm suspension without being processed through SLC. A testicular piece from each cat served as fresh control. Testicular sperm membrane and DNA integrity were evaluated before, and after, the cryopreservation process. In addition, spermatogenic cell types (testicular sperm, spermatogonia, spermatocyte, and spermatid) present in the suspension samples were counted before and after SLC. The results found that testicular sperm membrane integrity in the suspension after SLC process was higher than that in the fragment form neither using the two-step nor CoolCell freezing, both before and after freezing (before freezing: 92.3 ± 3.4 vs. 81 ± 4.5 and 80.0 ± 7.0; after freezing: 84.5 ± 4.6 vs. 71.2 ± 12 and 76.2 ± 4.6; P ≤ 0.05). Testicular sperm DNA integrity was, however, not different among groups. Furthermore, the samples processed through the SLC had higher ration of sperm cells: other spermatogenic cells than those were not processed through the SLC (88.9 ± 3.8 vs. 30 ± 7.9; P ≤ 0.05). In summary, testicular sperm cryopreserved as a minced suspension is considered suitable in terms of preventing sperm membrane integrity, and SLC is considered a selection tool for enriching haploid sperm cells from castrated or postmortem cats.

  4. Distinct cytoskeletal domains revealed in sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies against different cytoskeletal proteins were used to study the cytoskeletal organization of human spermatozoa. A positive staining with actin antibodies was seen in both the acrosomal cap region and the principal piece region of the tail. However, no staining was obtained with nitrobenzoxadiazol-phallacidin, suggesting that most of the actin was in the nonpolymerized form. Most of the myosin immunoreactivity was confirmed to a narrow band in the neck region of spermatozoa. Tubulin was located to the entire tail, whereas vimentin was only seen in a discrete band-like structure encircling the sperm head, apparently coinciding with the equatorial segment region. Surface staining of the spermatozoa with fluorochrome-coupled Helix pomatia agglutinin revealed a similar band-like structure that co-distributed with the vimentin- specific staining. Instead, other lectin conjugates used labeled either the acrosomal cap region (peanut and soybean agglutinins), both the acrosomal cap and the postacrosomal region of the head (concanavalin A), or the whole sperm cell surface membrane (wheat germ and lens culinaris agglutinins and ricinus communis agglutinin l). In lectin blotting experiments, the Helix pomatia agglutinin-binding was assigned to a 80,000-mol-wt polypeptide which, together with vimentin, also resisted treatment with Triton X-100. Only the acrosomal cap and the principal piece of the tail were decorated with rabbit and hydridoma antibodies against an immunoanalogue of erythrocyte alpha-spectrin (p230). p230 appeared to be the major calmodulin-binding polypeptide in spermatozoa, as shown by a direct overlay assay of electrophoretic blots of spermatozoa with 125I-calmodulin. The results indicate that spermatozoa have a highly specialized cytoskeletal organization and that the distribution of actin, spectrin, and vimentin can be correlated with distinct surface specializations of the sperm cells. This suggest that cytoskeleton may regulate the maintenance

  5. [Isolation of sperm cells from rice pollen tubes].

    PubMed

    Lv, Dan; Zhang, Ya Nan; He, En Ming; Lin, Wen Xiong; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2007-04-01

    Isolation of sperm cells from higher plants is a basis for studying the mechanism of double fertilization. In this study, the isolation of rice sperm cells from pollen tube was conducted. When fresh pollen grains from nearly blooming flowers were put into a medium containing 20% sucrose, 10% polyethylene glycol 4500 (PEG 4500), 0.05% CaCl2, 0.01% boric acid, over 40% pollen grains germinated and formed a pollen tube. After pollen tubes were transformed into a broken solution containing 8% mannitol, the tubes broke and released tube cytoplasm including two sperm cells. However, both sperm cells were enrapt in the cytoplasm and could not be identified. When 0.5% cellulase and pectinase were added into the broken solution, two sperm cells were released from cytoplasm. Both sperm cells could be collected using micromanipulator. We also tried to isolate sperm cells using in vivo-in vitro method: styles were pollinated and pollen tubes were allowed to grow for 40 min in vivo. Then styles were cut near ovary and floated in the same medium above-mentioned for 1 h until tubes emerged from the cut end. The styles with pollen tube were transformed into the broken solution and released the content including two sperm cells.

  6. A Sub-Cellular Viscoelastic Model for Cell Population Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Yousef; Azimi, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and ‘in silico’ (computational) models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point) incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM), effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the communication

  7. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Yousef; Azimi, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational) models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point) incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM), effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the communication between

  8. Automatic Identification of Subcellular Phenotypes on Human Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Christian; Erfle, Holger; Warnat, Patrick; Daigle, Nathalie; Lörch, Thomas; Ellenberg, Jan; Pepperkok, Rainer; Eils, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Light microscopic analysis of cell morphology provides a high-content readout of cell function and protein localization. Cell arrays and microwell transfection assays on cultured cells have made cell phenotype analysis accessible to high-throughput experiments. Both the localization of each protein in the proteome and the effect of RNAi knock-down of individual genes on cell morphology can be assayed by manual inspection of microscopic images. However, the use of morphological readouts for functional genomics requires fast and automatic identification of complex cellular phenotypes. Here, we present a fully automated platform for high-throughput cell phenotype screening combining human live cell arrays, screening microscopy, and machine-learning-based classification methods. Efficiency of this platform is demonstrated by classification of eleven subcellular patterns marked by GFP-tagged proteins. Our classification method can be adapted to virtually any microscopic assay based on cell morphology, opening a wide range of applications including large-scale RNAi screening in human cells. PMID:15173118

  9. Reliable single sperm cryopreservation in Cell Sleepers for azoospermia management.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, K; Ozgur, K; Berkkanoglu, M; Bulut, H; Isikli, A

    2016-03-01

    Conventional sperm freezing methods perform best when freezing sperm samples containing at least hundreds of spermatozoa. In this severe male factor infertility case series, we examined the reproductive outcomes in 12 intracytoplasmic sperm injection cases where spermatozoa used were frozen in Cell Sleepers. Cell Sleepers are novel devices in which individual spermatozoa can be frozen in microdroplets. The case series included five men with obstructive azoospermia, six with nonobstructive azoospermia and one with cryptozoospermia, in whom microscopic sperm retrievals from testicular sperm extraction (TESE), micro-TESE extracts and a centrifugation procedure resulted in less than 50 spermatozoa. A total of 304 microscopically retrieved spermatozoa were frozen in 20 Cell Sleepers using a rapid manual cryopreservation method. A total of 179 mature oocytes were injected with recovered thawed spermatozoa, resulting in a fertilisation rate of 65.9% (118 of 179), with no total fertilisation failures. In 10 cases, an embryo transfer was performed, three on day 3 and seven on day 5, resulting in a per cycle pregnancy rate of 58.3% (seven of 12). Four of the pregnancies have progressed past 20 gestation weeks. The recovery and use of spermatozoa that were frozen in Cell Sleepers was uncomplicated and effective and eliminated the need to perform any microscopic sperm retrieval procedures on the day of oocyte collection. Modification of the routine sperm cryopreservation methodology to include the use of Cell Sleepers increases the range of sperm samples that can be effectively cryopreserved, to include men with severe male factor fertility.

  10. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  11. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  12. Ultrastructure of sperm cells in the female gonoduct of Xiphinema.

    PubMed

    Van De Velde, M C; Coomans, A; Van Ranst, L; De W Kruger, J C; Claeys, M

    1991-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the sperm cells in the female gonoduct of the nematodes Xiphinema theresiae and X. pinoides is described. The nucleus of the sperm cells is composed of several electron-dense clumps of chromatin that is not surrounded by a nuclear envelope. A layer of mitochondria, in which the mitochondrial cristae are only rarely visible, lies around the nuclear material. In the surrounding cytoplasm packets of electron-dense fibres are abundant. The sperm in the uterus have the following surface differentiations: highly intertwined protrusions between adjacent sperm cells, protrusions coinciding with the plication of the inner uterine wall and a slightly undulated surface towards the uterine lumen. It is argued that in the uterus, the sperm cells actively move in proximal direction by a mechanism resembling pseudopodial movement, in which the packets of fibres are involved. In the oviduct, the sperm cells loose their surface protrusions and the packets of fibres gradually become less abundant. Since the oviduct has no pre-formed lumen, the sperm cells appear to wedge their way along by forcing oviduct cells apart.

  13. Isolation of viable sperm cells from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Reece, A; Russell, S D

    1996-05-01

    Viable sperm cells of Nicotiana tabacum were isolated by the semi-vivo technique. After pollination, excised styles were floated, cut end immersed, in a solution of 15% sucrose with 0.01% boric acid and 0.03% Ca(NO3)2 at 27 degrees C in a growth chamber until pollen tubes emerged. After sperm cells were formed (at least 8 h after pollination) tubes were immersed in a 9% mannitol solution. In this solution, sperm cells are nearly ellipsoidal and retain viability for over 6 h.

  14. Hydrodynamics of Sperm Cells near Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Gompper, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sperm are propelled by an actively beating tail, and display a wide variety of swimming patterns. When confined between two parallel walls, sperm swim either in circles or on curvilinear trajectories close to the walls. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in combination with a mechanical sperm model to study the swimming behavior near walls. The simulations show that sperm become captured at the wall due to the hydrodynamic flow fields which are generated by the flagellar beat. The circular trajectories are determined by the chiral asymmetry of the sperm shape. For strong (weak) chirality, sperm swim in tight (wide) circles, with the beating plane of the flagellum oriented perpendicular (parallel) to the wall. For comparison, we also perform simulations based on a local anisotropic friction of the flagellum. In this resistive force approximation, surface adhesion and circular swimming patterns are obtained as well. However, the adhesion mechanism is now due to steric repulsion, and the orientation of the beating plane is different. Our model provides a theoretical framework that explains several distinct swimming behaviors of sperm near and far from a wall. Moreover, the model suggests a mechanism by which sperm navigate in a chemical gradient via a change of their shape. PMID:20712984

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  16. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  17. Sperm Cells Induce Distinct Cytokine Response in Peripheral Mononuclear Cells from Infertile Women with Serum Anti-Sperm Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kverka, Miloslav; Ulcova-Gallova, Zdenka; Bartova, Jirina; Cibulka, Jan; Bibkova, Katarina; Micanova, Zdenka; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Anti-sperm antibodies in can markedly reduce the likelihood of natural conception. The etiology of this anti-sperm immunity in human females is unknown. We compared the cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from infertile patients with or without anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) and fertile women. Methodology/Principal Findings We cultivated the PBMCs together with sperm antigens (whole cells or cell lysate), and screened the supernatants for 40 cytokines by antibody array. When stimulated with whole sperm cells, the PBMCs from patients with ASA produce less IL-3, IL-11, IL-13, ICAM-1, GCSF and more IL-2, IL-4 and IL-12p70 as compared to healthy women. PBMCs from patients with ASA produce typically less IL-13, IL-7, IL-17 and MIG, and more MIP-1β and IL-8, as compared to PBMCs from patients without ASA. In response to sperm cell lysate, PBMCs from infertile women without ASA respond initially by increase in production of growth factors (GCSF, GM-CSF and PDGF-BB) followed by increase in chemokines (e.g. IL-8, MCP-1 and MIP-1β). Conclusions Cellular immune responses to sperm antigens, measured by production of cytokines, differ among infertile women with ASA, infertile women without ASA and healthy women. This difference could play an important role in the initial steps of the infertility pathogenesis. PMID:22952917

  18. Motility, viability, and calcium in the sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Sperm cells are complicated in vitro models. Their viability is limited, and physiology is complex. The study of their properties is of great application in the animal production as viable and functional gametes are essential. It has been shown that the decrease of sperm cell viability parallels an increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Reactive oxygen species is secondary to normal metabolic processes of the cell-like flagellar movement. There is evidence of strategies that reduce ROS levels by using exogenous or endogenous antioxidants with the intention that seminal plasma protects the sperm cells and increases viability. Perhaps viability can increase by reducing that flagellar movement which is regulated by calcium. The phenomenon has not been fully characterized, but it is established that in certain mammalian models, the entrance of calcium via specific channels such as CATsper or voltage-dependent channels, signals flagellar movement. Previous reports have indicated that a change in the concentration of calcium or if the temperature is altered, the function of mammal sperm cells is reduced or blocked and viability prolonged. Fish sperm can remain immobile for several weeks but when activated the number of mobile and viable sperm is reduced at a faster rate. However, if the cells are not mobilized the semen can be preserved for longer periods. As presented in this paper, this supports the notion that by modulating calcium channels to reduce motility the viability of these cells can increase.

  19. A new method for multiple sperm cells tracking.

    PubMed

    Imani, Yoones; Teyfouri, Niloufar; Ahmadzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis or quality assessment of human sperm cell is great important for clinical applications of male infertility. Sperm tracking is quite complex due to cell collision, occlusion and missed detection. The aim of this study is simultaneous tracking of multiple human sperm cells. In the first step in this research, the frame difference algorithm is used for background subtraction. There are some limitations to select an appropriate threshold value since the output accuracy is strongly dependent on the selected threshold value. To eliminate this dependency, we propose an improved non-linear diffusion filtering in the time domain. Non-linear diffusion filtering is a smoothing and noise removing approach that can preserve edges in images. Many sperms that move with different speeds in different directions eventually coincide. For multiple tracking over time, an optimal matching strategy is introduced that is based on the optimization of a new cost function. A Hungarian search method is utilized to obtain the best matching for all possible candidates. The results show nearly 3.24% frame based error in dataset of videos that contain more than 1 and less than 10 sperm cells. Hence the accuracy rate was 96.76%. These results indicate the validity of the proposed algorithm to perform multiple sperms tracking.

  20. A one-step rectification of sperm cell targeting ensures the success of double fertilization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jilei; Ju, Yan; Wang, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-05-01

    Successful fertilization in animals depends on competition among millions of sperm cells, whereas double fertilization in flowering plants usually involves just one pollen tube releasing two immobile sperm cells. It is largely a mystery how the plant sperm cells fuse efficiently with their female targets within an embryo sac. We show that the initial positioning of sperm cells upon discharge from the pollen tube is usually inopportune for gamete fusions and that adjustment of sperm cell targeting occurs through release and re-adhesion of one sperm cell, while the other connected sperm cell remains in stagnation. This enables proper adhesion of each sperm cell to a female gamete and coordinates the gamete fusions. Our findings reveal inner embryo sac dynamics that ensure the reproductive success of flowering plants and suggest a requirement for sperm cell differentiation as the basis of double fertilization.

  1. Triggering cell detachment from patterned electrode arrays by programmed subcellular release

    PubMed Central

    Wildt, Bridget; Wirtz, Denis; Searson, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique for the quantitative study of cell detachment. The dynamics of cell contraction are measured by releasing cells from surfaces to which they are attached with spatial and temporal control. Release of subcellular regions of cells is achieved by plating cells on an electrode array created by standard microfabrication methods. The electrodes are then biochemically functionalized with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-terminated thiol. Application of a voltage pulse results in electrochemical desorption of the RGD-terminated thiols, triggering cell detachment. This method allows for the study of the full cascade of events from detachment to subsequent subcellular reorganization. Fabrication of the electrode arrays may take 1–2 d. Preparation for experiments, including surface functionalization and cell plating, can be completed in 10 h. A series of cell release experiments on one device may last several hours. PMID:20595956

  2. Triggering cell detachment from patterned electrode arrays by programmed subcellular release.

    PubMed

    Wildt, Bridget; Wirtz, Denis; Searson, Peter C

    2010-07-01

    Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique for the quantitative study of cell detachment. The dynamics of cell contraction are measured by releasing cells from surfaces to which they are attached with spatial and temporal control. Release of subcellular regions of cells is achieved by plating cells on an electrode array created by standard microfabrication methods. The electrodes are then biochemically functionalized with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-terminated thiol. Application of a voltage pulse results in electrochemical desorption of the RGD-terminated thiols, triggering cell detachment. This method allows for the study of the full cascade of events from detachment to subsequent subcellular reorganization. Fabrication of the electrode arrays may take 1-2 d. Preparation for experiments, including surface functionalization and cell plating, can be completed in 10 h. A series of cell release experiments on one device may last several hours. PMID:20595956

  3. Interaction of resident sperm with sperm-storage tubule (SST) epithelial cell microvilli in the turkey breeder hen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interaction of resident sperm with sperm-storage tubule (SST) epithelial cell microvilli in the turkey breeder hen M.R. Bakst*1 and C. Murphy2, 1Animal Biosciences and Biotechnology Laboratory, 2Electron & Confocal Microscopy Unit, Beltsville Area, ARS, USDA, Beltsville MD Sustained fertilization o...

  4. Hyaluronidase 2: a novel germ cell hyaluronidase with epididymal expression and functional roles in mammalian sperm.

    PubMed

    Modelski, Mark J; Menlah, Gladys; Wang, Yipei; Dash, Soma; Wu, Kathie; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    To initiate the crucial cell adhesion events necessary for fertilization, sperm must penetrate extracellular matrix barriers containing hyaluronic acid (HA), a task thought to be accomplished by neutral-active hyaluronidases. Here we report that the ~57 kDa hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2) that in somatic tissues has been highly characterized to be acid-active is present in mouse and human sperm, as detected by Western blot, flow cytometric, and immunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence revealed its presence on the plasma membrane over the acrosome, the midpiece, and proximal principal piece in mice where protein fractionation demonstrated a differential distribution in subcellular compartments. It is significantly more abundant in the acrosome-reacted (P = 0.04) and soluble acrosomal fractions (P = 0.006) (microenvironments where acid-active hyaluronidases function) compared to that of the plasma membrane where neutral hyaluronidases mediate cumulus penetration. Using HA substrate gel electrophoresis, immunoprecipitated HYAL 2 was shown to have catalytic activity at pH 4.0. Colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation assays reveal that HYAL2 is associated with its cofactor, CD44, consistent with CD44-dependent HYAL2 activity. HYAL2 is also present throughout the epididymis, where Hyal2 transcripts were detected, and in the epididymal luminal fluids. In vitro assays demonstrated that HYAL2 can be acquired on the sperm membrane from epididymal luminal fluids, suggesting that it plays a role in epididymal maturation. Because similar biphasic kinetics are seen for HYAL2 and SPAM1 (Sperm adhesion molecule 1), it is likely that HYAL2 plays a redundant role in the catalysis of megadalton HA to its 20 kDa intermediate during fertilization. PMID:25232017

  5. Hyaluronidase 2: a novel germ cell hyaluronidase with epididymal expression and functional roles in mammalian sperm.

    PubMed

    Modelski, Mark J; Menlah, Gladys; Wang, Yipei; Dash, Soma; Wu, Kathie; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    To initiate the crucial cell adhesion events necessary for fertilization, sperm must penetrate extracellular matrix barriers containing hyaluronic acid (HA), a task thought to be accomplished by neutral-active hyaluronidases. Here we report that the ~57 kDa hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2) that in somatic tissues has been highly characterized to be acid-active is present in mouse and human sperm, as detected by Western blot, flow cytometric, and immunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence revealed its presence on the plasma membrane over the acrosome, the midpiece, and proximal principal piece in mice where protein fractionation demonstrated a differential distribution in subcellular compartments. It is significantly more abundant in the acrosome-reacted (P = 0.04) and soluble acrosomal fractions (P = 0.006) (microenvironments where acid-active hyaluronidases function) compared to that of the plasma membrane where neutral hyaluronidases mediate cumulus penetration. Using HA substrate gel electrophoresis, immunoprecipitated HYAL 2 was shown to have catalytic activity at pH 4.0. Colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation assays reveal that HYAL2 is associated with its cofactor, CD44, consistent with CD44-dependent HYAL2 activity. HYAL2 is also present throughout the epididymis, where Hyal2 transcripts were detected, and in the epididymal luminal fluids. In vitro assays demonstrated that HYAL2 can be acquired on the sperm membrane from epididymal luminal fluids, suggesting that it plays a role in epididymal maturation. Because similar biphasic kinetics are seen for HYAL2 and SPAM1 (Sperm adhesion molecule 1), it is likely that HYAL2 plays a redundant role in the catalysis of megadalton HA to its 20 kDa intermediate during fertilization.

  6. Subcellular location of serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 in renal and mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cordas, Emily; Náray-Fejes-Tóth, Anikó; Fejes-Tóth, Géza

    2007-05-01

    Serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 (SGK1) is involved in aldosterone-induced Na(+) reabsorption by increasing epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) activity in cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells, but its exact mechanisms of action are unknown. Although several potential targets such as Nedd4-2 have been described in expression systems, endogenous substrates mediating SGK1's physiological effects remain to be identified. In addition, subcellular localization studies of SGK1 have provided controversial results. We determined the subcellular location of SGK1 using SGK1-autofluorescent protein (AFP) fusion proteins. Rabbit CCD (RCCT-28A) cells were transiently transfected with a construct encoding for SGK1-AFP and were stained or cotransfected with markers for various subcellular compartments. In live cells, transiently expressed SGK1-AFP clearly colocalized with the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123. Similarly, SGK1-AFP colocalized with the mitochondrial marker MitoTracker when stably expressed using a retroviral system in either RCCT-28A cells or the mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A. To determine which region of SGK1 is responsible for this subcellular localization, we generated RCCT-28A cell lines stably expressing SGK1 mutants. The results indicate that the NH(2)-terminal 60-amino acid region of SGK1 is necessary and sufficient for its subcellular localization. Localization of SGK1 to the mitochondria raises the possibility that SGK1 may play a role in regulating energy metabolism.

  7. Geometrical guidance and trapping transition of human sperm cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidobaldi, A.; Jeyaram, Y.; Berdakin, I.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Condat, C. A.; Marconi, V. I.; Giojalas, L.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    The guidance of human sperm cells under confinement in quasi-2D microchambers is investigated using a purely physical method to control their distribution. Transport property measurements and simulations are performed with diluted sperm populations, for which effects of geometrical guidance and concentration are studied in detail. In particular, a trapping transition at convex angular wall features is identified and analyzed. We also show that highly efficient microratchets can be fabricated by using curved asymmetric obstacles to take advantage of the spermatozoa specific swimming strategy.

  8. Origination of turbulence in dense suspensions of sperm cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denissenko, Petr; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Smith, David; Kantsler, Vasily

    2014-11-01

    Motile micro-organisms with pushing flagella, such as sperm cells, can be directed by ``one way'' microchannels with ratchet teeth-like wall configuration. We use an array of such micro-channels to gradually concentrate human spermatozoa in a circular arena of 1 mm diameter and 200 micron depth. Velocities of individual cells are measured by particle tracking and velocity of cell-carrying fluid is measured using PIV. At high concentrations, fluid velocities and the velocity fluctuations of individual cells exceeding that of individual swimmers in the dilute regime by an order of magnitude have been measured. Velocity correlations are calculated to study evolution of characteristic length scales as the cell concentration increases. Results are discussed in the context of self-organisation phenomena in active fluids and cooperation of sperm cells.

  9. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  10. Detection of dilute sperm samples using photoacoustic flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viator, J. A.; Sutovsky, P.; Weight, R. M.

    2008-02-01

    Detection of sperm cells in dilute samples may have application in forensic testing and diagnosis of male reproductive health. Due to the optically dense subcellular structures in sperm cells, irradiation by nanosecond laser pulses induces a photoacoustic response detectable using a custom flow cytometer. We determined the detection threshold of bull sperm using various concentrations, from 200 to 1,000,000 sperm cells per milliliter. Using a tunable laser system set to 450nm with a 5 ns pulse duration and 11-12 mJ/pulse, we obtained a detection threshold of 3 sperm cells. The flow rate was 4 ml/minute through the flow chamber. The acoustic sensor was a 100 μm PVDF film attached to the glass flow chamber. The acoustic signal was preamplified and sent to an oscilloscope. The threshold signal indicated a signal to noise ratio of approximately 6 to 1. Improved system design may decrease the threshold to single sperm cells.

  11. Human sperm cytogenetics and the one-cell zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.

    1989-11-27

    Human reproductive wastage is known to be a common event. One major cause of embryonic and fetal losses is chromosomal aberrations, identified by karyotyping spontaneous abortion material and in vitro fertilized human embryos. Karyotyping of human gametes has made it possible to document types and frequencies of chromosomal aberrations directly in eggs and sperm themselves. Our studies with human sperm from normal, healthy men support the view that chromosome-specific aneuploidy does in fact occur, and that frequencies of structural chromosomal aberrations appear to be person specific and stable over time. The types of structural aberrations identified suggest that normal human spermiogenesis may be vulnerable to breakage events or precursor lesions leading to such breakage events. After entry into egg cytoplasm and preceding the formation of first-cleavage mitotic chromosomes, the male as well as the female genome replicate their DNA in a pattern qualitatively similar to that in somatic cells. However, at present it is not known what relationship exists between spontaneous chromosome breaks seen at first cleavage and DNA replication activities. Limited data on survivors of radiotherapy lend support to the view that long-term effects on sperm chromosomal integrity can be identified. Studies on sperm cytogenetics thus have the potential for identifying adverse environmental effects on human spermatogenesis as monitored by this well-defined endpoint. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babahosseini, H.; Carmichael, B.; Strobl, J.S.; Mahmoodi, S.N.; Agah, M.

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  13. CellWhere: graphical display of interaction networks organized on subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Malatras, Apostolos; Thorley, Matthew; Aghoghogbe, Idonnya; Mer, Arvind; Duguez, Stéphanie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Duddy, William

    2015-07-01

    Given a query list of genes or proteins, CellWhere produces an interactive graphical display that mimics the structure of a cell, showing the local interaction network organized into subcellular locations. This user-friendly tool helps in the formulation of mechanistic hypotheses by enabling the experimental biologist to explore simultaneously two elements of functional context: (i) protein subcellular localization and (ii) protein-protein interactions or gene functional associations. Subcellular localization terms are obtained from public sources (the Gene Ontology and UniProt-together containing several thousand such terms) then mapped onto a smaller number of CellWhere localizations. These localizations include all major cell compartments, but the user may modify the mapping as desired. Protein-protein interaction listings, and their associated evidence strength scores, are obtained from the Mentha interactome server, or power-users may upload a pre-made network produced using some other interactomics tool. The Cytoscape.js JavaScript library is used in producing the graphical display. Importantly, for a protein that has been observed at multiple subcellular locations, users may prioritize the visual display of locations that are of special relevance to their research domain. CellWhere is at http://cellwhere-myology.rhcloud.com. PMID:25883154

  14. CellWhere: graphical display of interaction networks organized on subcellular localizations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lu; Malatras, Apostolos; Thorley, Matthew; Aghoghogbe, Idonnya; Mer, Arvind; Duguez, Stéphanie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Duddy, William

    2015-01-01

    Given a query list of genes or proteins, CellWhere produces an interactive graphical display that mimics the structure of a cell, showing the local interaction network organized into subcellular locations. This user-friendly tool helps in the formulation of mechanistic hypotheses by enabling the experimental biologist to explore simultaneously two elements of functional context: (i) protein subcellular localization and (ii) protein–protein interactions or gene functional associations. Subcellular localization terms are obtained from public sources (the Gene Ontology and UniProt—together containing several thousand such terms) then mapped onto a smaller number of CellWhere localizations. These localizations include all major cell compartments, but the user may modify the mapping as desired. Protein–protein interaction listings, and their associated evidence strength scores, are obtained from the Mentha interactome server, or power-users may upload a pre-made network produced using some other interactomics tool. The Cytoscape.js JavaScript library is used in producing the graphical display. Importantly, for a protein that has been observed at multiple subcellular locations, users may prioritize the visual display of locations that are of special relevance to their research domain. CellWhere is at http://cellwhere-myology.rhcloud.com. PMID:25883154

  15. Dynamic Polymeric Microtubes for the Remote-Controlled Capture, Guidance, and Release of Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Magdanz, Veronika; Guix, Maria; Hebenstreit, Franziska; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-06-01

    Remote-controlled release of single sperm cells is demonstrated by the use of polymeric microtubes that unfold upon temperature increase to 38 °C. Thermoresponsive, ferromagnetic multilayers are tailored to catch sperm cells and remotely control them by external magnetic fields. These polymeric spermbots are propelled by the sperm flagella. When the temperature is increased, the tubes unfold and the cell is set free. PMID:27003908

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  17. Apical blebs on sperm storage tubule epithelial cell microvilli: their release and interaction with resident sperm in the turkey hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Bakst, Murray R; Bauchan, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Located at the anterior end of the turkey hen's vagina are numerous discrete tubular invaginations of the surface epithelium, collectively referred to as the sperm storage tubules (SSTs). After mating or artificial insemination, sperm ascend the vagina, enter the SSTs, and over the ensuing days and weeks, gradually exit the SSTs and are transported to the anterior end of the oviduct to fertilize a daily succession of ova. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for sperm subsistence in the lumen of the SST. In this study, the origin of microvillus blebs (MvBs) on the apical tips of SST epithelial cells was examined, and their possible role in sperm survival was discussed. Regardless, if sperm are present or not, transmission electron microscopy revealed two types of microvilli differentiated by the presence or absence of pleomorphic unilaminar MvBs localized to their apical tips. Although some MvBs appeared to be discharging their contents into the SST lumen, others appeared to have pinched off the microvillus stem. When SSTs contained clusters of densely packed sperm, the sperm heads of those sperm adjacent to the SST epithelial cell surface were surrounded by the microvilli. Associated with the plasmalemma of sperm throughout the SST lumina were membrane fragments and small vesicles (30-130 nm in diameter), some of which appeared to have fused with sperm. It is concluded that the MvBs are a form of shedding vesicle released from the SST epithelial cell microvilli by apocrine secretion. On the basis of observations described herein and those of other authors, it is suggested that the MvBs contribute to sustained sperm storage in the SSTs by (1) supplying metabolic substrates used by resident sperm, (2) serving as fusogenic vehicles providing exogenous macromolecules that reversibly suppress sperm functions associated with fertilization (decapacitation?) and stabilize the sperm plasmalemma, and (3) acting as transport vesicles

  18. Sperm Cell Dynamics in Shallow Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos; Marconi, Veronica; Guidobaldi, Alejandro; Giojalas, Laura; Silhanek, Alejandro; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamic behavior in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Here we analyze the motion of spermatozoids confined to shallow chambers, investigating the nature of the cell trajectories and their accumulation near the side boundaries. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and down surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion near the center of the gap. Use of microstructured petal-shaped edges limits accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. System stabilization occurs over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate that assumes that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our estimates also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the rosette geometries than in the smooth-edged chambers, which is another practical reason to prefer the former.

  19. [Isolation of sperm cells of Allium tub rosum Roxb].

    PubMed

    Ye, Lv; Lv, Dan; Jian, Ming Xia; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2008-08-01

    Pollen grains of Allium tuberosum Roxb broke and released their content including generative cells using osmotic shock method. In a medium containing 0.05% CaCl2, 0.01% Boric acid, 0.01%KH2PO4, 15%PEG 10% sucrose (710 mOsmol/kg H2O) 86% pollen grains germinated and grew out pollen tubes, which broke after transferred into 6% mannitol solution, and released tube content including generative cell. When pollen grains were cultured in the same medium but adding 0.1% casein, a few generative cells divided into two sperm cells. Stigmas of Allium tuberosum Roxb were pollinated at second day after anthesis and the styles grow 3 h in vivo. Then the styles were cut and cultured in a medium for about 6-8 h, some pollen tubes grew out of the cut end of the style. The cut end of the style was transferred into a solution containing 6% mannitol to burst pollen tubes. Pairs of sperm cells of Allium tuberosum Roxb were released and collected using a micromanipulator.

  20. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  1. Subcellular real-time in vivo imaging of intralymphatic and intravascular cancer-cell trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kaushal, S.; Bouvet, M.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    With the use of fluorescent cells labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and a highly sensitive small animal imaging system with both macro-optics and micro-optics, we have developed subcellular real-time imaging of cancer cell trafficking in live mice. Dual-color cancer cells were injected by a vascular route in an abdominal skin flap in nude mice. The mice were imaged with an Olympus OV100 small animal imaging system with a sensitive CCD camera and four objective lenses, parcentered and parfocal, enabling imaging from macrocellular to subcellular. We observed the nuclear and cytoplasmic behavior of cancer cells in real time in blood vessels as they moved by various means or adhered to the vessel surface in the abdominal skin flap. During extravasation, real-time dual-color imaging showed that cytoplasmic processes of the cancer cells exited the vessels first, with nuclei following along the cytoplasmic projections. Both cytoplasm and nuclei underwent deformation during extravasation. Different cancer cell lines seemed to strongly vary in their ability to extravasate. We have also developed real-time imaging of cancer cell trafficking in lymphatic vessels. Cancer cells labeled with GFP and/or RFP were injected into the inguinal lymph node of nude mice. The labeled cancer cells trafficked through lymphatic vessels where they were imaged via a skin flap in real-time at the cellular level until they entered the axillary lymph node. The bright dual-color fluorescence of the cancer cells and the real-time microscopic imaging capability of the Olympus OV100 enabled imaging the trafficking cancer cells in both blood vessels and lymphatics. With the dual-color cancer cells and the highly sensitive imaging system described here, the subcellular dynamics of cancer metastasis can now be observed in live mice in real time.

  2. Movement characteristics and hyperactivation of human sperm on different epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Guerin, J F; Ouhibi, N; Regnier-Vigouroux, G; Menezo, Y

    1991-12-01

    Studies of sperm movement characteristics concern mainly sperm swimming between two glass surfaces (as in the Makler chamber). Using automated videomicrography, (CellSoft, Cryo Resources, New York, USA), we have analysed the movements of human sperm swimming on monolayers of different origins: monkey kidney (Vero) cells, bovine oviduct cells, and human endometrial cells. About 10(5) sperm were deposited upon preparations consisting of monocellular layers adhering to a coverglass, and placed in a deep slide-coverglass system. Experiments were first performed at room temperature then at 37 degrees C. At room temperature, motion characteristics on Vero cell layers (six samples) were not different from those measured in either the conditioned or corresponding non-conditioned media, except for the amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) which was significantly lower. Comparison of the three different cell monolayers showed no difference between them for the corresponding motion parameters. The data were dramatically different at 37 degrees C: sperm swimming on cell monolayers of genital origin (oviduct or endometrium) exhibited high rates of hyperactivation (HA: 36.7% and 38.6% respectively), which was significantly more than on either Vero cells (10.9%) or in a control medium (12.6%). Moreover, HA rates were significantly higher on genital cell monolayers than in the corresponding conditioned medium. Hyperactivated sperm exhibited lasting 'star-spin' trajectories rather than 'transitional phases'. It is concluded that passage of sperm on either oviduct or endometrial epithelial cell monolayers can induce sperm hyperactivation and improve their fertilizing capacity.

  3. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  4. A Silicone-Based Stretchable Micropost Array Membrane for Monitoring Live-Cell Subcellular Cytoskeletal Response

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Jennifer M.; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Weng, Shinuo; Sun, Yubing; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    External forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cellular structure and function, yet the underlying mechanism by which cells sense forces and transduce them into intracellular biochemical signals and behavioral responses (‘mechanotransduction’) is largely undetermined. To aid in the mechanistic study of mechanotransduction, herein we devised a cell stretch device that allowed for quantitative control and real-time measurements of mechanical stimuli and cellular biomechanical responses. Our strategy involved a microfabricated array of silicone elastomeric microposts integrated onto a stretchable elastomeric membrane. By using a computer-controlled vacuum, this micropost array membrane (mPAM) was activated to apply equibiaxial cell stretching forces to adherent cells attached on the microposts. Using the mPAM, we studied live-cell subcellular dynamic responses of contractile forces of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to sustained static equibiaxial cell stretches. Our data showed that in response to sustained cell stretches, VSMCs regulated their cytoskeletal (CSK) contractility in a biphasic manner: they first acutely enhanced their contraction to resist rapid cell deformation (‘stiffening’) before they allowed slow adaptive inelastic CSK reorganization to release their contractility (‘softening’). The contractile response across entire single VSMCs was spatially inhomogeneous and force-dependent. Our mPAM device and live-cell subcellular contractile measurements will help elucidate the mechanotransductive system in VSMCs and thus contribute to our understanding of pressure-induced vascular disease processes. PMID:22193351

  5. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Patrick R.; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N.

    2016-01-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  6. Defective Human Sperm Cells Are Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidant Production.

    PubMed

    Cassina, Adriana; Silveira, Patricia; Cantu, Lidia; Montes, Jose Maria; Radi, Rafael; Sapiro, Rossana

    2015-11-01

    Infertility affects about 15% of couples of reproductive age. The male factor is involved in nearly 50% of infertility cases. Defective human sperm function has been associated with evidence of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a resultant loss of fertilizing potential in vivo and in vitro. Analogous to what has been observed in somatic cells, mitochondria are likely the major sources of ROS in sperm cells. In this study, we analyzed mitochondrial function using high-resolution respirometry, ROS production, and footprints of oxidative and nitrative stress processes in intact human sperm cells. We showed that mitochondrial dysfunction (measured through the respiratory control ratio) was correlated with a decrease in human sperm motility. The samples analyzed presented nitro-oxidative modifications of proteins, such as protein 3-nitrotyrosine, that were observed mainly in the mid-piece (where mitochondria are localized) and in the sperm head. Semen samples presenting lower percentage of motile sperm showed higher amounts of nitro-oxidative protein modifications than those with larger quantities of motile sperm. When spermatozoa were exposed to inhibitors of the respiratory mitochondrial function, in the presence of a nitric oxide flux, sperm produced potent nitro-oxidative species (i.e., peroxynitrite). This effect was observed in more than 90% of intact living sperm cells and in sperm mitochondrial fractions. These data suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria in sperm cells produce oxidants that may contribute to male infertility. These data provide the rationale for testing the potential of compounds that improve sperm mitochondrial function to treat male infertility.

  7. Direct Imaging of Single Cells and Tissue at Subcellular Spatial Resolution Using Transmission Geometry MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Todd, Erik M.; Rawhouser, Patrick D.; Yang, Junhai; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The need of cellular and sub-cellular spatial resolution in LDI / MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) necessitates micron and sub-micron laser spot sizes at biologically relevant sensitivities, introducing significant challenges for MS technology. To this end we have developed a transmission geometry vacuum ion source that allows the laser beam to irradiate the back side of the sample. This arrangement obviates the mechanical / ion optic complications in the source by completely separating the optical lens and ion optic structures. We have experimentally demonstrated the viability of transmission geometry MALDI MS for imaging biological tissues and cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in conjunction with new sample preparation protocols, the sensitivity of this instrument is sufficient to obtain molecular images at sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23147833

  8. Isolating Sperm from Cell Mixtures Using Magnetic Beads Coupled with an Anti-PH-20 Antibody for Forensic DNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing-Chun; Wang, Le; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Zhang, Er-Li; Ye, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal swabs taken in rape cases usually contain epithelial cells from the victim and sperm from the assailant and forensic DNA analysis requires separation of sperm from these cell mixtures. PH-20, which is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored hyaluronidase located on the head of sperm, has important functions in fertilization. Here we describe a newly developed method for sperm isolation using anti-PH-20 antibody-coupled immunomagnetic beads (anti-PH-20 IMBs). Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed the IMBs recognized the head of sperm specifically and exhibited a great capacity to capture sperm cells. However, we found it necessary to incubate the IMB-sperm complex with DNase I before sperm lysis in order to remove any female DNA completely. We compared the sensitivity of anti-PH-20 IMBs in sperm and epithelial cell discrimination to those coated with a different anti-sperm antibody (anti-SP-10, anti-ADAM2 or anti-JLP). Only the anti-PH-20 IMBs succeeded in isolating sperm from cell mixtures at a sperm/epithelial cell ratio of 103:105. Further, our method exhibited greater power and better stability for sperm isolation compared to the traditional differential lysis strategy. Taken together, the anti-PH-20 IMB method described here could be effective for the isolation of sperm needed to obtain a single-sourced DNA profile as an aid to identifying the perpetrator in sexual assault cases. PMID:27442128

  9. Isolating Sperm from Cell Mixtures Using Magnetic Beads Coupled with an Anti-PH-20 Antibody for Forensic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xing-Chun; Wang, Le; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Zhang, Er-Li; Ye, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal swabs taken in rape cases usually contain epithelial cells from the victim and sperm from the assailant and forensic DNA analysis requires separation of sperm from these cell mixtures. PH-20, which is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored hyaluronidase located on the head of sperm, has important functions in fertilization. Here we describe a newly developed method for sperm isolation using anti-PH-20 antibody-coupled immunomagnetic beads (anti-PH-20 IMBs). Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed the IMBs recognized the head of sperm specifically and exhibited a great capacity to capture sperm cells. However, we found it necessary to incubate the IMB–sperm complex with DNase I before sperm lysis in order to remove any female DNA completely. We compared the sensitivity of anti-PH-20 IMBs in sperm and epithelial cell discrimination to those coated with a different anti-sperm antibody (anti-SP-10, anti-ADAM2 or anti-JLP). Only the anti-PH-20 IMBs succeeded in isolating sperm from cell mixtures at a sperm/epithelial cell ratio of 103:105. Further, our method exhibited greater power and better stability for sperm isolation compared to the traditional differential lysis strategy. Taken together, the anti-PH-20 IMB method described here could be effective for the isolation of sperm needed to obtain a single-sourced DNA profile as an aid to identifying the perpetrator in sexual assault cases. PMID:27442128

  10. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells.

  11. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    PubMed

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  12. Comparison of methods for detecting mitomycin C- and ethyl nitrosourea-induced germ cell damage in mice: sperm enzyme activities, sperm motility, and testis weight

    SciTech Connect

    Ficsor, G.; Oldford, G.M.; Loughlin, K.R.; Panda, B.B.; Dubien, J.L.; Ginsberg, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    Testes weights, sperm motility and enzyme activities in single sperm were compared with respect to their ability to detect either developmental or mutational damage to germ cells. Male mice were injected i.p. with 2.5 mg/kg mitomycin C (MC) or 50 or 100 mg/kg ethylnitrosourea (ENU) or saline and were then killed at times such that sperm derived from treated vas sperm (SZ), spermatids (ST), preleptotene-late-spermatogonial cells (PLSG), spermatogonial cells (SG), or spermatogonial stem cells (SGS) could be evaluated. The authors conclude that testis weight, which is easily obtained, is a sensitive indicator of germ cell damage by these agents. Sperm from each animal were evaluated for sperm motility, acrosin activity, succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity with or without the competitive inhibitor malonate or after exposure to 60/sup 8/C for 10 min. The latter two assays were to detect sperm enzymes resistant to the inhibitor or heat. The presence of the acrosin protein was also detected immunologically. Of the sperm assays, acrosin activity proved to be the most sensitive indicator of germ cell damage and was the simplest to measure.

  13. Active migration into the subcellular space precedes Campylobacter jejuni invasion of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Alphen, Lieke B; Bleumink-Pluym, Nancy M C; Rochat, Klazina D; van Balkom, Bas W M; Wösten, Marc M S M; van Putten, Jos P M

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni invades mucosal cells via largely undefined and rather inefficient (0.01-2 bacteria per cell) mechanisms. Here we report a novel, highly efficient C. jejuni infection pathway resulting in 10-15 intracellular bacteria per cell within 3 h of infection. Electron microscopy, pulse-chase infection assays and time-lapse multiphoton laser confocal microscopy demonstrated that the mechanism involved active and rapid migration of the pathogen into the subcellular space (termed 'subvasion'), followed by bacterial entry ('invasion') at the cell basis. Efficient subvasion was maximal after repeated rounds of selection for the subvasive phenotype. Targeted mutagenesis indicated that the CadF, JlpA or PEB1 adhesins were not required. Dissection of the selected and parental phenotypes by SDS-PAGE yielded comparable capsule polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide profiles. Proteomics revealed reduced amounts of the chemotaxis protein CheW for the subvasive phenotype. Swarming assays confirmed that the selected phenotype exhibited altered migration behaviour. Introduction of a plasmid carrying chemotaxis genes into the subvasive strain yielded wild-type subvasion levels and migration behaviour. These results indicate that alterations in the bacterial migration machinery enable C. jejuni to actively penetrate the subcellular space and gain access to the cell interior with unprecedented efficiency. PMID:18052944

  14. Survivin promotes oxidative phosphorylation, subcellular mitochondrial repositioning, and tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rivadeneira, Dayana B.; Caino, M. Cecilia; Seo, Jae Ho; Angelin, Alessia; Wallace, Douglas C.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2015-01-01

    Survivin promotes cell division and suppresses apoptosis in many human cancers, and increased abundance correlates with metastasis and poor prognosis. Here, we showed that a pool of survivin that localized to the mitochondria of certain tumor cell lines enhanced the stability of oxidative phosphorylation Complex II, which promoted cellular respiration. Survivin also supported the subcellular trafficking of mitochondria to the cortical cytoskeleton of tumor cells, which was associated with increased membrane ruffling, increased focal adhesion complex turnover, and increased tumor cell migration and invasion in cultured cells, and enhanced metastatic dissemination in vivo. Therefore, we found that mitochondrial respiration enhanced by survivin contributes to cancer metabolism, and relocalized mitochondria may provide a “regional” energy source to fuel tumor cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26268608

  15. In vitro production of haploid sperm cells from male germ cells of foetal cattle.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wu-Zi; Hua, Jin-Lian; Shen, Wen-Zheng; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate the foetal cattle male germ cells (mGCs) and then induce them into sperm cells. The mGCs were purified and enriched by a two-step plating method based on the different adherence velocities of mGCs and somatic cells. The percentage of the vasa and the c-kit positive cells were 95.34+/-2.25% and 53.3+/-1.03% by using flow cytometry analysis (FCA), respectively. In feeder-free culture system, the half-suspending cells appeared and formed a 16-cell rosary in medium after the mGCs were cultured for 6-8 days. On immunocytochemical staining during the second passage, some single cells adhering to the plate appeared to be both Oct-4 and alpha6-integrin positive. During the third passage, the mGCs were induced for 48 h by retinol acid (RA) on Sertoli cell-feeder layer, followed by 5-7 days culture in an RA-free medium. Some elongated sperm-like cells appeared in the medium at this stage. We found that the most effective concentration of RA for the inducement was 10(-7)moll(-1) (P<0.01). The haploid cells in suspension were identified by FCA. The elongated sperm-like cells showed proacrosome-like structure and the flagellum with fibre construct under electron microscopy. The mRNA of outer dense fibre-3 (ODF-3) and transcription protein-1 (TP-1) could be detected in the suspended cells by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). About 23.1% bovine oocytes could be activated to perform cleavage by intracytoplasmic injection with the sperm-like cells, but embryos did not further develop. Our investigation further demonstrated that foetal cattle mGCs could be induced in vitro into haploid sperm in the short term. PMID:19632794

  16. In vitro production of haploid sperm cells from male germ cells of foetal cattle.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wu-Zi; Hua, Jin-Lian; Shen, Wen-Zheng; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate the foetal cattle male germ cells (mGCs) and then induce them into sperm cells. The mGCs were purified and enriched by a two-step plating method based on the different adherence velocities of mGCs and somatic cells. The percentage of the vasa and the c-kit positive cells were 95.34+/-2.25% and 53.3+/-1.03% by using flow cytometry analysis (FCA), respectively. In feeder-free culture system, the half-suspending cells appeared and formed a 16-cell rosary in medium after the mGCs were cultured for 6-8 days. On immunocytochemical staining during the second passage, some single cells adhering to the plate appeared to be both Oct-4 and alpha6-integrin positive. During the third passage, the mGCs were induced for 48 h by retinol acid (RA) on Sertoli cell-feeder layer, followed by 5-7 days culture in an RA-free medium. Some elongated sperm-like cells appeared in the medium at this stage. We found that the most effective concentration of RA for the inducement was 10(-7)moll(-1) (P<0.01). The haploid cells in suspension were identified by FCA. The elongated sperm-like cells showed proacrosome-like structure and the flagellum with fibre construct under electron microscopy. The mRNA of outer dense fibre-3 (ODF-3) and transcription protein-1 (TP-1) could be detected in the suspended cells by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). About 23.1% bovine oocytes could be activated to perform cleavage by intracytoplasmic injection with the sperm-like cells, but embryos did not further develop. Our investigation further demonstrated that foetal cattle mGCs could be induced in vitro into haploid sperm in the short term.

  17. Sex-sorting sperm using flow cytometry/cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Garner, Duane L; Evans, K Michael; Seidel, George E

    2013-01-01

    The sex of mammalian offspring can be predetermined by flow sorting relatively pure living populations of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm. This method is based on precise staining of the DNA of sperm with the nucleic acid-specific fluorophore, Hoechst 33342, to differentiate between the subpopulations of X- and Y-sperm. The fluorescently stained sperm are then sex-sorted using a specialized high speed sorter, MoFlo(®) SX XDP, and collected into biologically supportive media prior to reconcentration and cryopreservation in numbers adequate for use with artificial insemination for some species or for in vitro fertilization. Sperm sorting can provide subpopulations of X- or Y-bearing bovine sperm at rates in the 8,000 sperm/s range while maintaining; a purity of 90% such that it has been applied to cattle on a commercial basis. The sex of offspring has been predetermined in a wide variety of mammalian species including cattle, swine, horses, sheep, goats, dogs, cats, deer, elk, dolphins, water buffalo as well as in humans using flow cytometric sorting of X- and Y-sperm. PMID:22992923

  18. Sex-sorting sperm using flow cytometry/cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Garner, Duane L; Evans, K Michael; Seidel, George E

    2013-01-01

    The sex of mammalian offspring can be predetermined by flow sorting relatively pure living populations of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm. This method is based on precise staining of the DNA of sperm with the nucleic acid-specific fluorophore, Hoechst 33342, to differentiate between the subpopulations of X- and Y-sperm. The fluorescently stained sperm are then sex-sorted using a specialized high speed sorter, MoFlo(®) SX XDP, and collected into biologically supportive media prior to reconcentration and cryopreservation in numbers adequate for use with artificial insemination for some species or for in vitro fertilization. Sperm sorting can provide subpopulations of X- or Y-bearing bovine sperm at rates in the 8,000 sperm/s range while maintaining; a purity of 90% such that it has been applied to cattle on a commercial basis. The sex of offspring has been predetermined in a wide variety of mammalian species including cattle, swine, horses, sheep, goats, dogs, cats, deer, elk, dolphins, water buffalo as well as in humans using flow cytometric sorting of X- and Y-sperm.

  19. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  20. Immunostaining: detection of signaling protein location in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Maity, Biswanath; Sheff, David; Fisher, Rory A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this protocol is to describe various methodologies used to detect the distribution and localization of specific proteins within individual cells or tissues using immunostaining, defined as the use of specific antibodies to detect a single target protein. Detection of antigens in cultured cells is referred to as immunocytochemistry, whereas their detection in tissues is generally referred to as immunohistochemistry. Both methods involve exposure of fixed cells or tissues to primary antibodies directed against one or more proteins of interest. Bound antibodies are then detected using commercially available secondary antibodies directed against the invariant portion of the primary antibody. Two primary methodologies exist to visualize antigen-antibody complexes: immunofluorescence using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies or chemiluminescence using antibodies coupled to horse-radish peroxidase. This protocol details the steps involved and appropriate use of both methodologies. Immunostaining is used in cell biology to study differential protein expression, localization and distribution at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular level. PMID:23317899

  1. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  2. An Improved Procedure for Subcellular Spatial Alignment during Live-Cell CLEM

    PubMed Central

    Padman, Benjamin S.; Bach, Markus; Ramm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope. PMID:24755651

  3. Apolipoprotein D subcellular distribution pattern in neuronal cells during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Navarro, Ana; Ordóñez, Cristina; del Valle, Eva; Tolivia, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Apolipoprotein D (Apo D) is a secreted glycoprotein, member of the lipocalin superfamily, with a related beneficial role in metabolism and lipid transport due to the presence of a binding pocket that allows its interaction with several lipids. Nowadays, it has been clearly demonstrated that Apo D expression is induced and its subcellular location undergoes modifications in stressful and pathological conditions that characterize aging processes and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present work was to study in detail the effect of H2O2 on the subcellular location of Apo D, in the hippocampal cell line HT22, by structural, ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, and molecular techniques in order to characterize the Apo D distribution pattern in neurons during oxidative stress. Our results indicate that Apo D is located in the cytoplasm under physiological conditions but treatment with H2O2 induces apoptosis and causes a displacement of Apo D location to the nucleus, coinciding with DNA fragmentation. In addition, we demonstrated that Apo D tends to accumulate around the nuclear envelope in neurons and glial cells of different brain areas in some neurodegenerative diseases and during human aging, but never inside the nucleus. These data suggest that the presence of Apo D in the nucleus, which some authors related with a specific transport, is a consequence of structural and functional alterations during oxidative stress and not the result of a specific role in the regulation of nuclear processes.

  4. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    PubMed

    Padman, Benjamin S; Bach, Markus; Ramm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope. PMID:24755651

  5. Utility of magnetic cell separation as a molecular sperm preparation technique.

    PubMed

    Said, Tamer M; Agarwal, Ashok; Zborowski, Maciej; Grunewald, Sonja; Glander, Hans-Juergen; Paasch, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) have become the treatment of choice in many cases of infertility; however, the current success rates of these procedures remain suboptimal. Programmed cell death (apoptosis) most likely contributes to failed ART and to the decrease in sperm quality after cryopreservation. There is a likelihood that some sperm selected for ART will display features of apoptosis despite their normal appearance, which may be partially responsible for the low fertilization and implantation rates seen with ART. One of the features of apoptosis is the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) residues, which are normally present on the inner leaflet of the sperm plasma membrane. Colloidal superparamagnetic microbeads ( approximately 50 nm in diameter) conjugated with annexin V bind to PS and are used to separate dead and apoptotic spermatozoa by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). Cells with externalized PS will bind to these microbeads, whereas nonapoptotic cells with intact membranes do not bind and could be used during ARTs. We have conducted a series of experiments to investigate whether the MACS technology could be used to improve ART outcomes. Our results clearly indicate that integrating MACS as a part of sperm preparation techniques will improve semen quality and cryosurvival rates by eliminating apoptotic sperm. Nonapoptotic spermatozoa prepared by MACS display higher quality in terms of routine sperm parameters and apoptosis markers. The higher sperm quality is represented by an increased oocyte penetration potential and cryosurvival rates. Thus, the selection of nonapoptotic spermatozoa by MACS should be considered to enhance ART success rates. PMID:18077822

  6. Phagocytosis of sperm by follicle cells of the carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma occidentalis (Porifera, Demospongiae).

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Ana

    2010-06-01

    During spermatogenesis of the carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma occidentalis, follicle cells that lined the spermatocysts phagocytosed unreleased mature sperm. Such follicle cells are part of the complex envelope that limits spermatocysts of A. occidentalis, which is also comprised of a collagen layer, a thick layer of intertwined cells, and spicules. Follicle cells showed vesicles containing single phagocytosed spermatozoa within their cytoplasm. Additionally, lipids and other inclusions were observed within the cytoplasm of follicle cells. It is likely that follicle cells recapture nutrients by phagocytosing spermatozoa and use them to form lipids and other inclusions. Such sperm phagocytosis is usually performed in higher invertebrates and vertebrates by Sertoli cells that are located in the testis wall. While Sertoli cells develop a wide range of functions such as creating a blood-testis barrier, providing crucial factors to ensure correct progression of spermatogenesis, and phagocytosis of aberrant, degenerating, and unreleased sperm cells, sponge follicle cells may only display phagocytotic activity on spermatogenic cells.

  7. Lucifer Yellow as a live cell fluorescent probe for imaging water transport in subcellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Chaurra, Adriana; Gutzman, Brittany M; Taylor, Emily; Ackroyd, P Christine; Christensen, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    While the water permeability of the plasma membranes of mammalian cells has been studied extensively, water transport across membranes of subcellular compartments (e.g., lysosomes, macropinosomes) has been difficult to study. Here we demonstrate a new method for measuring water flux in late endosomes and lysosomes of intact living cells using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Cells were loaded by fluid-phase uptake with a mixture of the Lucifer Yellow dextran (LY-dex), a D(2)O sensitive dye, and a D(2)O insensitive control dye, Alexa fluor 546 dextran (AF546-dex). LY-dex responded linearly to changes in D(2)O concentration and the LY-dex D(2)O sensitivity was not affected by changes in pH, physiological salt, and protein concentrations. The co-loaded control dye, AF546-dex, showed no signal changes as a function of D(2)O concentration. To measure membrane water flux, the LY-dex fluorescence in labeled organelles was recorded during rapid superfusion of cells with isotonic buffers prepared in D(2)O. The time constant of water exchange across the lysosomal membrane of intact cells was determined by fitting the data to a single exponential function. From these data, together with the measured area of the organelles, observed water permeability for intracellular CHO-K1 lysosomes was calculated to be 5.3 × 10(-3) ± 0.3 × 10(-3) cm/s. This work demonstrates the feasibility of measuring water flux into subcellular organelles in live cells using LY-dex. PMID:21211149

  8. Intercellular communication in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen discovered via AHG3 transcript movement from the vegetative cell to sperm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Arabidopsis pollen grain (male gametophyte) consists of three cells: the vegetative cell, which forms the pollen tube, and two sperm cells enclosed within the vegetative cell. It is still unclear if there is intercellular communication between the vegetative cell and the sperm cells. Here we show...

  9. Subcellular SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in human glioblastoma cells treated with a gadolinium containing MRI agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Duane R.; Lorey, Daniel R.; Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary radiotherapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme. Recently, neutron capture therapy with gadolinium-157 has gained attention, and techniques for studying the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157 are needed. In this preliminary study, we have been able to image the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157, as well as the other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium, with SIMS ion microscopy. T98G human glioblastoma cells were treated for 24 h with 25 mg/ml of the metal ion complex diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid Gd(III) dihydrogen salt hydrate (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA is a contrast enhancing agent used for MRI of brain tumors, blood-brain barrier impairment, diseases of the central nervous system, etc. A highly heterogeneous subcellular distribution was observed for gadolinium-157. The nuclei in each cell were distinctly lower in gadolinium-157 than in the cytoplasm. Even within the cytoplasm the gadolinium-157 was heterogeneously distributed. The other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium were imaged from the same cells and exhibited a subcellular distribution consistent with that observed for gadolinium-157. These observations indicate that SIMS ion microscopy may be a viable approach for subcellular studies of gadolinium containing neutron capture therapy drugs and may even play a major role in the development and validation of new gadolinium contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic MRI applications.

  10. Investigation of gastroprotective compounds at subcellular level in isolated gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L; Morales, R E; Beinborn, M; Vattay, P; Szabo, S

    2000-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that recognized gastroprotective agents exert direct protection against ethanol-induced injury in isolated rat gastric mucosal cells in vitro. If protection exists, we also wanted to identify subcellular targets in the reversible and/or irreversible stages of cell injury. Ethanol-induced cell injury was quantified by measuring plasma membrane leakage (trypan blue exclusion and lactate dehydrogenase release), mitochondrial integrity (succinic dehydrogenase), and nuclear damage (ethidium bromide-DNA fluorescence). Initial cell viability and responsiveness were estimated by the effects of carbachol, carbachol + atropine, or 16,16-dimethyl-PGE(2) on chief cell pepsinogen secretion. Enriched parietal cells were stimulated by histamine, carbachol, or histamine + IBMX. Preincubation of cells with PG, sucrose octasulfate, or the sulfhydryl compounds N-acetylcysteine, taurine, or cysteamine increased cell resistance cell injury. Only a few in vivo gastroprotective agents demonstrated in vitro direct cytoprotection, which involved mainly the reversible stage of cell injury (e.g., plasma membrane changes) and, less often, irreversible (e.g., mitochondrial and nuclear) damage. Our findings also indicate that a major part of the beneficial effect of gastroprotective agents is expressed at the tissue level. PMID:11093942

  11. Subcellular proteomic analysis of human host cells infected with H3N2 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Sanying; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jinyang; Sun, Zeyu; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-11-01

    Cross-species transmissions of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) raise great public health concerns. In this study, subcellular proteomic profiles of human A549 cells inoculated with H3N2 subtype SIV were used to characterize dynamic cellular responses to infection. By 2DE and MS, 27 differentially expressed (13 upregulated, 14 downregulated) cytoplasmic proteins and 20 differentially expressed (13 upregulated, 7 downregulated) nuclear proteins were identified. Gene ontology analysis suggested that these differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cell death, stress response, lipid metabolism, cell signaling, and RNA PTMs. Moreover, 25 corresponding genes of the differentially expressed proteins were quantitated by real time RT-PCR to examine the transcriptional profiles between mock- and virus-infected A549 cells. Western blot analysis confirmed that changes in abundance of identified cellular proteins heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) U, hnRNP C, ALDH1A1, tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, IFI35, and HSPB1 in H3N2 SIV-infected cells were consistent with results of 2DE analysis. By confocal microscopy, nucleus-to-cytoplasm translocation of hnRNP C and colocalization between the viral nonstructural protein 1 and hnRNP C as well as N-myc (and STAT) interactor were observed upon infection. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that cellular proteins altered during infection were grouped mainly into NFκB and interferon signaling networks. Collectively, these identified subcellular constituents provide an important framework for understanding host/SIV interactions and underlying mechanisms of SIV cross-species infection and pathogenesis.

  12. Label-free biochemical characterization of bovine sperm cells using Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A. C.; Managò, S.; Ferrara, M. A.; Sirleto, L.; Puglisi, R.; Balduzzi, D.; Galli, A.; Rendina, I.; Ferraro, P.; Coppola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The current study relates to a Raman spectroscopy-based method for addressing the problem of sex assessment in mammals. A direct method for sex predetermination in animals is based on the X- and Y-bearing sperm cells sorting before insemination. Our Raman spectroscope allows distinguishing and characterizing the difference between X- and Y-bearing sperm cells by detecting and analyzing their Raman spectra in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  13. A Novel Function for the PAR Complex in Subcellular Morphogenesis of Tracheal Terminal Cells in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffani A.; Metzstein, Mark M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes that generate cellular morphology are not well understood. To investigate this problem, we use Drosophila melanogaster tracheal terminal cells, which undergo two distinct morphogenetic processes: subcellular branching morphogenesis and subcellular apical lumen formation. Here we show these processes are regulated by components of the PAR-polarity complex. This complex, composed of the proteins Par-6, Bazooka (Par-3), aPKC, and Cdc42, is best known for roles in asymmetric cell division and apical/basal polarity. We find Par-6, Bazooka, and aPKC, as well as known interactions between them, are required for subcellular branch initiation, but not for branch outgrowth. By analysis of single and double mutants, and isolation of two novel alleles of Par-6, one of which specifically truncates the Par-6 PDZ domain, we conclude that dynamic interactions between apical PAR-complex members control the branching pattern of terminal cells. These data suggest that canonical apical PAR-complex activity is required for subcellular branching morphogenesis. In addition, we find the PAR proteins are downstream of the FGF pathway that controls terminal cell branching. In contrast, we find that while Par-6 and aPKC are both required for subcellular lumen formation, neither Bazooka nor a direct interaction between Par-6 and aPKC is needed for this process. Thus a novel, noncanonical role for the polarity proteins Par-6 and aPKC is used in formation of this subcellular apical compartment. Our results demonstrate that proteins from the PAR complex can be deployed independently within a single cell to control two different morphogenetic processes. PMID:21750259

  14. Subcellular Localization of Proteins Responding to Mitoxantrone-Induced DNA Damage in Leukaemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Ćmielová, J; Lesná, M; Řezáčová, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the subcellular localization of proteins participating in the double-strand break response pathway - p53, Mdm2, p21 and Chk2. MOLT-4 cells were pre-treated with mitoxantrone in concentrations 1 nmol/l and 5 nmol/l. The trypan blue technique was used to determine cell viability and proliferation. Western blotting was used to evaluate changes in p53, Mdm2 and Chk2 protein expression and sandwich ELISA was used to evaluate changes in the p21 protein amount. After 1 nmol/l mitoxantrone cells did not die, but their ability to proliferate was decreased. The p53 protein was activated and phosphorylated at serines 15 and 392 and accumulated in the nucleus after 24 and 48 h. The Mdm2 protein was present in the cytoplasm with its maximal level after 8 and 16 h. The p21 protein was detected in the nucleus after 24 and 48 h. Increased levels of phosphorylated Chk2 at threonine 68 were observed in the cytoplasmic fraction after 24 and 48 h of mitoxantrone treatment. We used mitoxantrone as an inducer of double-strand breaks to bring new data about the subcellular distribution of proteins responding to DNA damage. In MOLT-4 cells, the p53 protein was activated. p53 was phosphorylated at serines 15 and 392 and accumulated in the nucleus. The Mdm2 protein was activated in advance to p53 and occurred in the cytoplasm. The p21 protein was present in the nucleus. Chk2 kinase was activated by the phosphorylation at threonine 68 and we observed increased levels of this protein in the cytoplasmic fraction.

  15. Types, Causes, Detection and Repair of DNA Fragmentation in Animal and Human Sperm Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Marín, Clara; Gosálvez, Jaime; Roy, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Concentration, motility and morphology are parameters commonly used to determine the fertilization potential of an ejaculate. These parameters give a general view on the quality of sperm but do not provide information about one of the most important components of the reproductive outcome: DNA. Either single or double DNA strand breaks can set the difference between fertile and infertile males. Sperm DNA fragmentation can be caused by intrinsic factors like abortive apoptosis, deficiencies in recombination, protamine imbalances or oxidative stress. Damage can also occur due to extrinsic factors such as storage temperatures, extenders, handling conditions, time after ejaculation, infections and reaction to medicines or post-testicular oxidative stress, among others. Two singular characteristics differentiate sperm from somatic cells: Protamination and absence of DNA repair. DNA repair in sperm is terminated as transcription and translation stops post-spermiogenesis, so these cells have no mechanism to repair the damage occurred during their transit through the epididymis and post-ejaculation. Oocytes and early embryos have been shown to repair sperm DNA damage, so the effect of sperm DNA fragmentation depends on the combined effects of sperm chromatin damage and the capacity of the oocyte to repair it. In this contribution we review some of these issues. PMID:23203048

  16. Carbohydrate specificity of sea urchin sperm bindin: a cell surface lectin mediating sperm-egg adhesion.

    PubMed

    Glabe, C G; Grabel, L B; Vacquier, V D; Rosen, S D

    1982-07-01

    We have examined the carbohydrate specificity of bindin, a sperm protein responsible for the adhesion of sea urchin sperm to eggs, by investigating the interaction of a number of polysaccharides and glycoconjugates with isolated bindin. Several of these polysaccharides inhibit the agglutination of eggs by bindin particles. An egg surface polysaccharide was found to be the most potent inhibitor of bindin-mediated egg agglutination. Fucoidin, a sulfated fucose heteropolysaccharide, was the next most potent inhibitor, followed by the egg jelly fucan, a sulfated fucose homopolysaccharide, and xylan, a beta(1 leads to 4) linked xylose polysaccharide. A wide variety of other polysaccharides and glycoconjugates were found to have no effect on egg agglutination. We also report that isolated bindin has a soluble lectinlike activity which is assayed by agglutination of erythrocytes. The bindin lectin activity is inhibited by the same polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination by particulate bindin. This suggests that the egg adhesion activity of bindin is directly related to its lectin activity. We have established that fucoidin binds specifically to bindin particles with a high apparent affinity (Kd = 5.5 X 10(-8) M). The other polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination also inhibit the binding of 125I-fucoidin to bindin particles, suggesting that they compete for the same site on bindin. The observation that polysaccharides of different composition and linkage type interact with bindin suggests that the critical structural features required for binding may reside at a higher level of organization. Together, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that sperm-egg adhesion in sea urchins is mediated by a lectin-polysaccharide type of interaction.

  17. Intracellular accumulation, subcellular distribution, and efflux of tilmicosin in bovine mammary, blood, and lung cells.

    PubMed

    Scorneaux, B; Shryock, T R

    1999-06-01

    Tilmicosin is a semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic currently approved for veterinary use in cattle and swine to combat respiratory disease. Because the concentrations of tilmicosin are generally low in bovine serum, the interaction of tilmicosin with three types of bovine phagocytes (monocyte-macrophages, macrophages, and neutrophils from blood, lungs, and mammary gland, respectively) and mammary gland epithelial cells was evaluated to provide an understanding of potential clinical efficacy. After incubation with radiolabeled tilmicosin, uptake was determined and expressed as the ratio of the intracellular to the extracellular drug concentration. Accumulation of tilmicosin at 4 h of incubation by the alveolar macrophages (Cc/Ce 193) was 4 to 13 times more than that observed in monocyte-macrophages (Cc/Ce 43), neutrophils, (Cc/Ce 13), or mammary epithelial cells (Cc/Ce 20). Subcellular distribution showed that 70 to 80% of tilmicosin was localized in the lysosomes. Uptake in mammary gland cells was dependent on cell viability, temperature, and pH, but was not influenced by metabolic inhibitors or anaerobiosis. However, lipopolysaccharide exposure increased tilmicosin uptake by the bovine mammary macrophages and epithelial cells. When neutrophils and epithelial cells were incubated in the presence of tilmicosin and extracellular tilmicosin was then removed, 40% of the intracellular tilmicosin remained cell associated after 4 h of incubation (i.e., 60% effluxed), but only 25% remained in macrophages. These in vitro interactions of tilmicosin with bovine phagocytes and epithelial cells suggest an integral role in effecting clinical efficacy.

  18. The subcellular localization of Otx2 is cell-type specific and developmentally regulated in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Baas, D; Bumsted, K M; Martinez, J A; Vaccarino, F M; Wikler, K C; Barnstable, C J

    2000-05-31

    Recent evidence implicates homeodomain-containing proteins in the specification of cell fates in the central nervous system. Here we report that in the embryonic mouse eye Otx2, a paired homeodomain transcription factor, was found in retinal pigment epithelial cells and a restricted subset of retinal neurons, including ganglion cells. In the postnatal and adult eye, however, both the cellular and subcellular distribution of the Otx2 protein were cell type-specific. Otx2 was detected only in the nuclei of retinal pigment epithelial and bipolar cells, but was present in the cytoplasm of rod photoreceptors. Immunohistochemical studies of retinal explants and transfected cell lines both suggested that the retention of Otx2 in the cytoplasm of immature rods is a developmentally regulated process. The differential distribution of Otx2 in the cytoplasm of rods and the nucleus of other cell types, suggests that subcellular localization of this transcription factor may participate cell fate determination during specific phases of retinal development.

  19. Subcellular and supracellular mechanical stress prescribes cytoskeleton behavior in Arabidopsis cotyledon pavement cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Krupinski, Pawel; Wightman, Raymond; Milani, Pascale; Berquand, Alexandre; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Jönsson, Henrik; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2014-01-01

    Although it is a central question in biology, how cell shape controls intracellular dynamics largely remains an open question. Here, we show that the shape of Arabidopsis pavement cells creates a stress pattern that controls microtubule orientation, which then guides cell wall reinforcement. Live-imaging, combined with modeling of cell mechanics, shows that microtubules align along the maximal tensile stress direction within the cells, and atomic force microscopy demonstrates that this leads to reinforcement of the cell wall parallel to the microtubules. This feedback loop is regulated: cell-shape derived stresses could be overridden by imposed tissue level stresses, showing how competition between subcellular and supracellular cues control microtubule behavior. Furthermore, at the microtubule level, we identified an amplification mechanism in which mechanical stress promotes the microtubule response to stress by increasing severing activity. These multiscale feedbacks likely contribute to the robustness of microtubule behavior in plant epidermis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01967.001 PMID:24740969

  20. Subcellular and supracellular mechanical stress prescribes cytoskeleton behavior in Arabidopsis cotyledon pavement cells.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Krupinski, Pawel; Wightman, Raymond; Milani, Pascale; Berquand, Alexandre; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Jönsson, Henrik; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2014-01-01

    Although it is a central question in biology, how cell shape controls intracellular dynamics largely remains an open question. Here, we show that the shape of Arabidopsis pavement cells creates a stress pattern that controls microtubule orientation, which then guides cell wall reinforcement. Live-imaging, combined with modeling of cell mechanics, shows that microtubules align along the maximal tensile stress direction within the cells, and atomic force microscopy demonstrates that this leads to reinforcement of the cell wall parallel to the microtubules. This feedback loop is regulated: cell-shape derived stresses could be overridden by imposed tissue level stresses, showing how competition between subcellular and supracellular cues control microtubule behavior. Furthermore, at the microtubule level, we identified an amplification mechanism in which mechanical stress promotes the microtubule response to stress by increasing severing activity. These multiscale feedbacks likely contribute to the robustness of microtubule behavior in plant epidermis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01967.001. PMID:24740969

  1. Nanoimaging granule dynamics and subcellular structures in activated mast cells using soft X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Yuan; Chiang, Dapi Meng-Lin; Lin, Zi-Jing; Hsieh, Chia-Chun; Yin, Gung-Chian; Weng, I.-Chun; Guttermann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Lai, Lee-Jene; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an important role in allergic responses. During activation, these cells undergo degranulation, a process by which various kinds of mediators stored in the granules are released. Granule homeostasis in mast cells has mainly been studied by electron microscopy (EM), where the fine structures of subcellular organelles are partially destroyed during sample preparation. Migration and fusion of granules have not been studied in detail in three dimensions (3D) in unmodified samples. Here, we utilized soft X-ray tomography (SXT) coupled with fluorescence microscopy to study the detailed structures of organelles during mast cell activation. We observed granule fission, granule fusion to plasma membranes, and small vesicles budding from granules. We also detected lipid droplets, which became larger and more numerous as mast cells were activated. We observed dramatic morphological changes of mitochondria in activated mast cells and 3D-reconstruction revealed the highly folded cristae inner membrane, features of functionally active mitochondria. We also observed giant vesicles containing granules, mitochondria, and lipid droplets, which we designated as granule-containing vesicles (GCVs) and verified their presence by EM in samples prepared by cryo-substitution, albeit with a less clear morphology. Thus, our studies using SXT provide significant insights into mast cell activation at the organelle level. PMID:27748356

  2. Subcellular and supracellular mechanical stress prescribes cytoskeleton behavior in Arabidopsis cotyledon pavement cells.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Krupinski, Pawel; Wightman, Raymond; Milani, Pascale; Berquand, Alexandre; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Jönsson, Henrik; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2014-04-16

    Although it is a central question in biology, how cell shape controls intracellular dynamics largely remains an open question. Here, we show that the shape of Arabidopsis pavement cells creates a stress pattern that controls microtubule orientation, which then guides cell wall reinforcement. Live-imaging, combined with modeling of cell mechanics, shows that microtubules align along the maximal tensile stress direction within the cells, and atomic force microscopy demonstrates that this leads to reinforcement of the cell wall parallel to the microtubules. This feedback loop is regulated: cell-shape derived stresses could be overridden by imposed tissue level stresses, showing how competition between subcellular and supracellular cues control microtubule behavior. Furthermore, at the microtubule level, we identified an amplification mechanism in which mechanical stress promotes the microtubule response to stress by increasing severing activity. These multiscale feedbacks likely contribute to the robustness of microtubule behavior in plant epidermis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01967.001.

  3. Progesterone from the Cumulus Cells Is the Sperm Chemoattractant Secreted by the Rabbit Oocyte Cumulus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guidobaldi, Héctor Alejandro; Teves, María Eugenia; Uñates, Diego Rafael; Anastasía, Agustín; Giojalas, Laura Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Sperm chemotaxis in mammals have been identified towards several female sources as follicular fluid (FF), oviduct fluid, and conditioned medium from the cumulus oophorus (CU) and the oocyte (O). Though several substances were confirmed as sperm chemoattractant, Progesterone (P) seems to be the best chemoattractant candidate, because: 1) spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor, 2) capacitated spermatozoa are chemotactically attracted in vitro by gradients of low quantities of P; 3) the CU cells produce and secrete P after ovulation; 4) a gradient of P may be kept stable along the CU; and 5) the most probable site for sperm chemotaxis in vivo could be near and/or inside the CU. The aim of this study was to verify whether P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte-cumulus complex (OCC) in the rabbit, as a mammalian animal model. By means of videomicroscopy and computer image analysis we observed that only the CU are a stable source of sperm attractants. The CU produce and secrete P since the hormone was localized inside these cells by immunocytochemistry and in the conditioned medium by enzyme immunoassay. In addition, rabbit spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor detected by western blot and localized over the acrosomal region by immunocytochemistry. To confirm that P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the CU, the sperm chemotactic response towards the OCC conditioned medium was inhibited by three different approaches: P from the OCC conditioned medium was removed with an anti-P antibody, the attractant gradient of the OCC conditioned medium was disrupted by a P counter gradient, and the sperm P receptor was blocked with a specific antibody. We concluded that only the CU but not the oocyte secretes P, and the latter chemoattract spermatozoa by means of a cell surface receptor. Our findings may be of interest in assisted reproduction procedures in humans, animals of economic importance and endangered species. PMID:18725941

  4. Low Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide Activate the Antioxidant Defense System in Human Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Barinova, K V; Turovetskii, V B; Muronetz, V I; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10-100 µM) on sperm motility and on the activity of the sperm enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) was investigated. Incubation of semen samples with 10 and 100 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of spermatozoa with progressive motility by 20 and 18%, respectively, and enhanced the activity of GAPDS in the sperm cells by 27 and 20% compared to a semen sample incubated without additions. It was also found that incubation with 10 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in sperm cells by 50% on average compared to that in the control samples. It is supposed that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide activate the pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in NADPH synthesis and the reduction of the oxidized glutathione by glutathione reductase yielding GSH. The formed GSH reduces the oxidized cysteine residues of the GAPDS active site, increasing the activity of the enzyme, which in turn enhances the content of sperm cells with progressive motility. Thus, the increase in motile spermatozoa in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can serve as an indicator of normal functioning of the antioxidant defense system in sperm cells.

  5. Non-random subcellular distribution of variant EKLF in erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Quadrini, Karen J.; Gruzglin, Eugenia; Bieker, James J.

    2008-01-01

    EKLF protein plays a prominent role during erythroid development as a nuclear transcription factor. Not surprisingly, exogenous EKLF quickly localizes to the nucleus. However, using two different assays we have unexpectedly found that a substantial proportion of endogenous EKLF resides in the cytoplasm at steady state in all erythroid cells examined. While EKLF localization does not appear to change during either erythroid development or terminal differentiation, we find that the protein displays subtle yet distinct biochemical and functional differences depending on which subcellular compartment it is isolated from, with PEST sequences possibly playing a role in these differences. Localization is unaffected by inhibition of CRM1 activity and the two populations are not differentiated by stability. Heterokaryon assays demonstrate that EKLF is able to shuttle out of the nucleus although its nuclear re-entry is rapid. These studies suggest there is an unexplored role for EKLF in the cytoplasm that is separate from its well-characterized nuclear function. PMID:18329016

  6. Non-random subcellular distribution of variant EKLF in erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quadrini, Karen J.; Gruzglin, Eugenia; Bieker, James J.

    2008-04-15

    EKLF protein plays a prominent role during erythroid development as a nuclear transcription factor. Not surprisingly, exogenous EKLF quickly localizes to the nucleus. However, using two different assays we have unexpectedly found that a substantial proportion of endogenous EKLF resides in the cytoplasm at steady state in all erythroid cells examined. While EKLF localization does not appear to change during either erythroid development or terminal differentiation, we find that the protein displays subtle yet distinct biochemical and functional differences depending on which subcellular compartment it is isolated from, with PEST sequences possibly playing a role in these differences. Localization is unaffected by inhibition of CRM1 activity and the two populations are not differentiated by stability. Heterokaryon assays demonstrate that EKLF is able to shuttle out of the nucleus although its nuclear re-entry is rapid. These studies suggest there is an unexplored role for EKLF in the cytoplasm that is separate from its well-characterized nuclear function.

  7. Ubiquitins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus and Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus show distinct subcellular localization in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z J; Zhu, Y M; Li, G H; Chen, K P; Zhang, C X

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB) is a conserved protein that regulates a number of processes in eukaryotic cells. Nearly all lepidopteran baculoviruses encode UB homologs showing a partial sequence identity with human UB (Hu-UB). In this study, the sequence, predicted 3D-structure and subcellular localization of UB homologs encoded by two different nucleopolyhedroviruses of Bombyx mori (BmNPV) and Helicoverpa armigera (HaNPV) were compared. UBs of BmNPV and HaNPV (Bm-UB, Ha-UB, respectively) shared only 73% of sequence identity of the different aa in relation to Hu-UB being localized in non-conserved parts, namely in two heterogeneous regions of aa 15-32 and aa 53-60. Interestingly, Bm-UB and Ha-UB share the same seven lysines except for an additional Lys54 in Bm-UB. However, in spite of the sequence heterogeneity, Bm-UB and Ha-UB have a similar predicted 3D-structure. A difference in their subcellular localization during virus growth in insect cell lines was found in the late stage of formation of occlusion-derived virus (ODV). In particular Bm-UB was localized mainly and evenly in the nucleus, while Ha-UB on the nuclear membrane. These data suggest that (i) UBs, besides being engaged in various cellular processes, have a role in specific processes of virus growth, and (ii) Bm-UB and Ha-UB may show certain different activities associated with the virus growth. PMID:21692557

  8. How a (sub)Cellular Coincidence Detection Mechanism Featuring Layer-5 Pyramidal Cells May Help Produce Various Visual Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual phenomena such as spatio-temporal illusions and masking are typically explained by psychological (cognitive) processing theories or large-scale neural theories involving inter-areal connectivity and neural circuits comprising of hundreds or more interconnected single cells. Subcellular mechanisms are hardly used for such purpose. Here, a mechanistic theoretical view is presented on how a subcellular brain mechanism of integration of presynaptic signals that arrive at different compartments of layer-5 pyramidal neurons could explain a couple of spatiotemporal visual-phenomenal effects unfolding along very brief time intervals within the range of the sub-second temporal scale. PMID:26733926

  9. How a (sub)Cellular Coincidence Detection Mechanism Featuring Layer-5 Pyramidal Cells May Help Produce Various Visual Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Talis

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual phenomena such as spatio-temporal illusions and masking are typically explained by psychological (cognitive) processing theories or large-scale neural theories involving inter-areal connectivity and neural circuits comprising of hundreds or more interconnected single cells. Subcellular mechanisms are hardly used for such purpose. Here, a mechanistic theoretical view is presented on how a subcellular brain mechanism of integration of presynaptic signals that arrive at different compartments of layer-5 pyramidal neurons could explain a couple of spatiotemporal visual-phenomenal effects unfolding along very brief time intervals within the range of the sub-second temporal scale. PMID:26733926

  10. How a (sub)Cellular Coincidence Detection Mechanism Featuring Layer-5 Pyramidal Cells May Help Produce Various Visual Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual phenomena such as spatio-temporal illusions and masking are typically explained by psychological (cognitive) processing theories or large-scale neural theories involving inter-areal connectivity and neural circuits comprising of hundreds or more interconnected single cells. Subcellular mechanisms are hardly used for such purpose. Here, a mechanistic theoretical view is presented on how a subcellular brain mechanism of integration of presynaptic signals that arrive at different compartments of layer-5 pyramidal neurons could explain a couple of spatiotemporal visual-phenomenal effects unfolding along very brief time intervals within the range of the sub-second temporal scale.

  11. Signalling pathways involved in the control of sperm cell volume.

    PubMed

    Petrunkina, A M; Harrison, R A P; Tsolova, M; Jebe, E; Töpfer-Petersen, E

    2007-01-01

    The ability to maintain cellular volume is an important general physiological function, which is achieved by specific molecular mechanisms. Hypotonically induced swelling results in the opening of K+ and Cl- ion channels, through which these ions exit with accompanying water loss. This process is known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). The molecular mechanisms that control the opening of the ion channels in spermatozoa are as yet poorly understood. The present study investigated pathways of osmo-signalling using boar spermatozoa as a model. Spermatozoa were diluted into isotonic and hypotonic Hepes-buffered saline in the presence or absence of effector drugs, and at predetermined intervals volume measurements were performed electronically. Treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors staurosporine, bismaleimide I and bismaleimide X led to dose-dependent increases of both isotonic and hypotonic volumes (P<0.05). However, as the isotonic volume was affected more than the hypotonic volume, the kinase inhibitors appeared to improve RVD, whereas activation of PKC with phorbol dibutyrate blocked RVD. The increase in isotonic cell volume induced by bismaleimide X was observed in chloride-containing medium but not in the medium in which chloride was replaced by sulphate, implying that PKC was involved in the control of chloride channel activity, e.g. by closing the channel after volume adjustment. The protein phosphatase PP1/PP2 inhibitors calyculin and okadaic acid increased the isotonic volume only slightly but they greatly increased the relative cell volume and blocked RVD. The activation of RVD processes was found to be cAMP-dependent; incubation with forskolin and papaverine improved volume regulation. Moreover, papaverine was able to overcome the negative effect of protein phosphatase inhibitors. The mechanism of sperm RVD appears to involve (a) alterations in protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation balance brought about by PKC and PP1 and (b) a c

  12. Neonatal anoxia in rats: hippocampal cellular and subcellular changes related to cell death and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Takada, S H; dos Santos Haemmerle, C A; Motta-Teixeira, L C; Machado-Nils, A V; Lee, V Y; Takase, L F; Cruz-Rizzolo, R J; Kihara, A H; Xavier, G F; Watanabe, I-S; Nogueira, M I

    2015-01-22

    Neonatal anoxia in rodents has been used to understand brain changes and cognitive dysfunction following asphyxia. This study investigated the time-course of cellular and subcellular changes and hippocampal cell death in a non-invasive model of anoxia in neonatal rats, using Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) to reveal DNA fragmentation, Fluoro-Jade® B (FJB) to show degenerating neurons, cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect cells undergoing apoptosis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal fine ultrastructural changes related to cell death. Anoxia was induced by exposing postnatal day 1 (P1) pups to a flow of 100% gaseous nitrogen for 25 min in a chamber maintained at 37 °C. Control rats were similarly exposed to this chamber but with air flow instead of nitrogen. Brain changes following anoxia were evaluated at postnatal days 2, 14, 21 and 60 (P2, P14, P21 and P60). In addition, spatial reference memory following anoxia and control treatments was evaluated in the Morris water maze, starting at P60. Compared to their respective controls, P2 anoxic rats exhibited (1) higher TUNEL labeling in cornus ammonis (CA) 1 and the dentate gyrus (DG), (2) higher FJB-positive cells in the CA2-3, and (3) somato-dendritic swelling, mitochondrial injury and chromatin condensation in irregular bodies, as well as other subcellular features indicating apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and excitotoxicity in the CA1, CA2-3 and DG, as revealed by TEM. At P14, P21 and P60, both groups showed small numbers of TUNEL-positive and FJB-positive cells. Stereological analysis at P2, P14, P21 and P60 revealed a lack of significant differences in cleaved caspase-3 IHC between anoxic and control subjects. These results suggest that the type of hippocampal cell death following neonatal anoxia is likely independent of caspase-3 activation. Neonatal anoxia induced deficits in acquisition and performance of spatial reference

  13. Neonatal anoxia in rats: hippocampal cellular and subcellular changes related to cell death and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Takada, S H; dos Santos Haemmerle, C A; Motta-Teixeira, L C; Machado-Nils, A V; Lee, V Y; Takase, L F; Cruz-Rizzolo, R J; Kihara, A H; Xavier, G F; Watanabe, I-S; Nogueira, M I

    2015-01-22

    Neonatal anoxia in rodents has been used to understand brain changes and cognitive dysfunction following asphyxia. This study investigated the time-course of cellular and subcellular changes and hippocampal cell death in a non-invasive model of anoxia in neonatal rats, using Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) to reveal DNA fragmentation, Fluoro-Jade® B (FJB) to show degenerating neurons, cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect cells undergoing apoptosis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal fine ultrastructural changes related to cell death. Anoxia was induced by exposing postnatal day 1 (P1) pups to a flow of 100% gaseous nitrogen for 25 min in a chamber maintained at 37 °C. Control rats were similarly exposed to this chamber but with air flow instead of nitrogen. Brain changes following anoxia were evaluated at postnatal days 2, 14, 21 and 60 (P2, P14, P21 and P60). In addition, spatial reference memory following anoxia and control treatments was evaluated in the Morris water maze, starting at P60. Compared to their respective controls, P2 anoxic rats exhibited (1) higher TUNEL labeling in cornus ammonis (CA) 1 and the dentate gyrus (DG), (2) higher FJB-positive cells in the CA2-3, and (3) somato-dendritic swelling, mitochondrial injury and chromatin condensation in irregular bodies, as well as other subcellular features indicating apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and excitotoxicity in the CA1, CA2-3 and DG, as revealed by TEM. At P14, P21 and P60, both groups showed small numbers of TUNEL-positive and FJB-positive cells. Stereological analysis at P2, P14, P21 and P60 revealed a lack of significant differences in cleaved caspase-3 IHC between anoxic and control subjects. These results suggest that the type of hippocampal cell death following neonatal anoxia is likely independent of caspase-3 activation. Neonatal anoxia induced deficits in acquisition and performance of spatial reference

  14. Kinematics of hamster sperm during penetration of the cumulus cell matrix.

    PubMed

    Drobnis, E Z; Yudin, A I; Cherr, G N; Katz, D F

    1988-12-01

    During capacitation, mammalian spermatozoa gain the ability to penetrate the cumulus cell matrix (CCM). The role of hyperactivated motility for this capacity is uncertain. In the present study, hamster sperm were observed during penetration and progression through the CCM, and flagellar beat patterns were quantitated by characterization of the underlying flagellar bends. Small numbers of sperm were added to cumulus masses slightly compressed on a slide (150 micron depth), and penetration was videorecorded using interference contrast optics. During penetration of the cumulus surface, sperm did not generate the large flagellar bends and asymmetric beats that are hallmarks of hyperactivation in low viscosity media. Instead, they entered slowly using high-frequency, low-amplitude sinusoidal flagellar motions. Within the CCM, sperm continued to move slowly, and they exhibited three distinct patterns of motility. The first was sinusoidal, produced by alternating, propagated bends: principal bends (PB) moved the head away from the beat midline, with the convex edge of the head leading, and reverse bends (RB) had the opposite curvature. The second pattern was asymmetric and sinusoidal: an extreme RB developed in the distal flagellum, was propagated distally, and was followed by a PB of less curvature. The third motility pattern was a hatchet-like stroke of the sperm head which resulted when an extreme, nonpropagated PB developed slowly in the proximal midpiece, and was released rapidly. In this mode there were no reverse bends, and sperm did not progress. There were subpopulations of capacitating sperm in free-swimming medium which had these same bend types and motility patterns, suggesting that qualitative flagellar movement may not change during CCM penetration. Sperm velocity in the CCM was not strongly correlated with flagellar beat kinematics, suggesting local heterogeneity in cumulus mechanical resistance and/or differences in interaction of the matrix with the

  15. Interaction of resident sperm with sperm-storage tubule (SST) epithelial cell microvilli in the turkey hen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike most mammals, birds do not need to synchronize copulation with ovulation. Hens are endowed with tubular structures, the sperm-storage tubules (SST), in their oviducts which the sperm enter and survive for weeks after mating or artificial insemination. Sperm are slowly but continually releas...

  16. Study of sperm cell phosphorylating systems using nucleotide photoaffinity probes

    SciTech Connect

    Khatoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    The major thrust of the research presented in this thesis was to identify specific nucleotide binding proteins and phosphoproteins of rat caput and cauda sperm. Also, the differences in these proteins between caput and cauda sperm were investigated as well as determination of the membrane sidedness of the proteins and their location in either the head or tail/mid-piece region. In addition, the effects of small molecular weight modifers such as cGMP, cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ on the detection of binding proteins and phosphorylated proteins was studied. The technique used to identify and locate nucleotide binding proteins was photoaffinity labeling using the proven 8-azidopurine nucleotide analogs of cAMP, ATP and GTP in radioactive form. The first study presented involved the use of (/sup 32/P)8-N /sub 3/cAMP which showed that both caput and cauda sperm contained both type I and type II regulatory subunits (R/sub I/ and R/sub II/, respectively) of the cAMP dependent kinases and that the great majority of the regulatory subunits were located in the tail/mid-piece section and not in the sperm head. The second phase of this study involved the use of (..gamma../sup 32/P)8-azidoadensosine triphosphate ((..gamma../sup 32/P)8-N/sub 3/ATP) and (..gamma../sup 32/P)8-azidoguanosine triphosphate ((..gamma../sup 32/P)8-N/sub 3/GTP) to photolable specific ATP and GTP binding proteins and to phosphorylate specific phosphoproteins. Again, this was done on caput versus cauda sperm and the location of the majority of the photolabeled or phosphorylated proteins was shown to be in the tail/mid-piece fraction. In addition, considerable differences were found in both the phosphorylated and photolabeled proteins of caput versus cauda sperm.

  17. Defining the subcellular interface of nanoparticles by live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmerich, Peter H; von Mikecz, Anna H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes.

  18. Defining the Subcellular Interface of Nanoparticles by Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerich, Peter H.; von Mikecz, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes. PMID:23637951

  19. Separation of sperm and epithelial cells based on the hydrodynamic effect for forensic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiran; Chen, Weixing; Liu, Ran; Ou, Yuan; Liu, Haoran; Xie, Lan; Lu, Ying; Li, Caixia; Li, Bin; Cheng, Jing

    2015-01-01

    In sexual assault cases, forensic samples are a mixture of sperm from the perpetrator and epithelial cells from the victim. To obtain an independent short tandem repeat (STR) profile of the perpetrator, sperm cells must be separated from the mixture of cells. However, the current method used in crime laboratories, namely, differential extraction, is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. To achieve a rapid and automated sample pretreatment process, we fabricated a microdevice for hydrodynamic and size-based separation of sperm and epithelial cells. When cells in suspension were introduced into the device's microfluidic channels, they were forced to flow along different streamlines and into different outlets due to their different diameters. With the proposed microdevice, sperm can be separated within a short period of time (0.5 h for a 50-μl mock sample). The STR profiles of the products in the sperm outlet reservoir demonstrated that a highly purified male DNA fraction could be obtained (94.0% male fraction). This microdevice is of low-cost and can be easily integrated with other subsequent analysis units, providing great potential in the process of analyzing sexual assault evidence as well as in other areas requiring cell sorting. PMID:26392829

  20. Assessment of DNA integrity (COMET assay) in sperm cells of boron-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçin; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydin, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçin; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Britta Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann M

    2012-01-01

    An extension of a male reproductive study conducted in a boric acid/borate production zone at Bandırma, Turkey, is presented. The relation between DNA-strand breaks (COMET assay, neutral and alkaline version) in sperm cells and previously described sperm quality parameters was investigated in boron-exposed males. A correlation between blood boron levels and mean DNA-strand breaks in sperm was weak, and DNA-strand breaks in sperm were statistically not different between control and exposed groups. Therefore, increasing boron exposures had no additional contribution in addition to already pre-existing DNA-strand breaks in the sperm cells. Weak but statistically significant correlations between DNA-strand breaks and motility/morphology parameters of sperm samples were observed in the neutral version of the COMET assay, while correlations between the same variables were statistically not significant in the alkaline version. A likely reason for these negative results, even in highly exposed humans, is that experimental exposures that had led to reproductive toxicity in animals were significantly higher than any boron exposures, which may be reached under realistic human conditions.

  1. Multi-color fluorescence imaging of sub-cellular dynamics of cancer cells in live mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2006-02-01

    We have genetically engineered dual-color fluorescent cells with one color in the nucleus and the other in the cytoplasm that enables real-time nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics to be visualized in living cells in the cytoplasm in vivo as well as in vitro. To obtain the dual-color cells, red fluorescent protein (RFP) was expressed of the cancer cells, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B was expressed in the nucleus. Mitotic cells were visualized by whole-body imaging after injection in the mouse ear. Common carotid artery or heart injection of dual-color cells and a reversible skin flap enabled the external visualization of the dual-color cells in microvessels in the mouse where extreme elongation of the cell body as well as the nucleus occurred. The migration velocities of the dual-color cancer cells in the capillaries were measured by capturing individual images of the dual-color fluorescent cells over time. Human HCT-116-GFP-RFP colon cancer and mouse mammary tumor (MMT)-GFP-RFP cells were injected in the portal vein of nude mice. Extensive clasmocytosis (destruction of the cytoplasm) of the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells occurred within 6 hours. The data suggest rapid death of HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells in the portal vein. In contrast, MMT-GFP-RFP cells injected into the portal vein mostly survived and formed colonies in the liver. However, when the host mice were pretreated with cyclophosphamide, the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells also survived and formed colonies in the liver after portal vein injection. These results suggest that a cyclophosphamide-sensitive host cellular system attacked the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells but could not effectively kill the MMT-GFP-RFP cells. With the ability to continuously image cancer cells at the subcellular level in the live animal, our understanding of the complex steps of metastasis will significantly increase. In addition, new drugs can be developed to target these newly visible steps of metastasis.

  2. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-12-29

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell's turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion. PMID:26655343

  3. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-12-29

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell's turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion.

  4. Altered subcellular localization of transcription factor TEAD4 regulates first mammalian cell lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Home, Pratik; Saha, Biswarup; Ray, Soma; Dutta, Debasree; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Yoo, Byunggil; Pal, Arindam; Vivian, Jay L; Larson, Melissa; Petroff, Margaret; Gallagher, Patrick G; Schulz, Vincent P; White, Kenneth L; Golos, Thaddeus G; Behr, Barry; Paul, Soumen

    2012-05-01

    In the preimplantation mouse embryo, TEAD4 is critical to establishing the trophectoderm (TE)-specific transcriptional program and segregating TE from the inner cell mass (ICM). However, TEAD4 is expressed in the TE and the ICM. Thus, differential function of TEAD4 rather than expression itself regulates specification of the first two cell lineages. We used ChIP sequencing to define genomewide TEAD4 target genes and asked how transcription of TEAD4 target genes is specifically maintained in the TE. Our analyses revealed an evolutionarily conserved mechanism, in which lack of nuclear localization of TEAD4 impairs the TE-specific transcriptional program in inner blastomeres, thereby allowing their maturation toward the ICM lineage. Restoration of TEAD4 nuclear localization maintains the TE-specific transcriptional program in the inner blastomeres and prevents segregation of the TE and ICM lineages and blastocyst formation. We propose that altered subcellular localization of TEAD4 in blastomeres dictates first mammalian cell fate specification.

  5. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-11-10

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes.

  6. Partial formation of sperm dimorphism from spermatocytes of the cottoid fish, Hemilepidotus gilberti in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Y; Takayama-Watanabe, E; Watanabe, A; Kobayashi, M; Munehara, H; Onitake, K

    2007-11-01

    Polymorphism of sperm is considered to be significant for the reproductive strategy in some animal species. The phenomenon is thought to occur in the species-specific stage of spermatogenesis, but how the identical germ cells are differentiated towards polymorphic sperm remains unknown. We here performed a germ cell culture in the cottoid fish, Hemilepidotus gilberti, whose sperm exhibit dimorphism with fertilizable eusperm and unfertilizable parasperm. In the culture, germ cells, which were obtained with an identical morphology, a spherical shape of 5-7 microm in diameter, differentiated into smaller spherical cells with a single nucleus, a moving flagellum and localized mitochondria. In addition, large retroflex-shaped cells with two elongated nuclei were also observed in the cell culture. Germ cells that had each morphological feature were histologically also observed in some cysts of the spermatogenetic testis, suggesting that the former type of cell corresponded to developing eusperm and the latter corresponded to developing parasperm. When BrdU was incorporated into germ cells in the culture, it was detected in both cells with eusperm-like and those with parasperm-like morphologies. These findings suggest that DNA-duplicating spermatocytes are potent to autonomously progress a part of spermatogenesis to form dimorphic sperm.

  7. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell’s turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion. PMID:26655343

  8. Intracellular pH governs the subcellular distribution of hexokinase in a glioma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Miccoli, L; Oudard, S; Sureau, F; Poirson, F; Dutrillaux, B; Poupon, M F

    1996-01-01

    Hexokinase plays a key role in regulating cell energy metabolism. Hexokinase is mainly particulate, bound to the mitochondrial outer membrane in brain and tumour cells. We hypothesized that the intracellular pH (pH1) controls the intracellular distribution of hexokinase. Using the SNB-19 glioma cell line, pH1 variations were imposed by incubating cells in a high-K+ medium at different pH values containing specific ionophores (nigericin and valinomycin), without affecting cell viability. Subcellular fractions of cell homogenates were analysed for hexokinase activity. Imposed pH1 changes were verified microspectrofluorimetrically by using the pH1-sensitive probe SNARF-1-AM (seminaphtho-rhodafluor-1-acetoxymethyl ester). Imposition of an acidic pH1 for 30 min strongly decreased the particulate/total hexokinase ratio, from 63% in the control sample to 31%. Conversely, when a basic pH1, was imposed, the particulate/total hexokinase ratio increased to 80%. The glycolytic parameters, namely lactate/pyruvate ratio, glucose 6-phosphate and ATP levels, were measured concomitantly. Lactate/pyruvate ratio and ATP level were both markedly decreased by acidic pH1 and increased by basic pH1. Conversely, the glucose 6-phosphate level was increased by acidic pH1 and decreased by basic pH1. To demonstrate that the change of hexokinase distribution was not due to altered metabolite levels of glycolysis, a pH1 was imposed for a 5 min incubation time. Modification of the hexokinase distribution was similar to that noted after a 30 min incubation, whereas metabolite levels of glycolysis were not affected. These results provide evidence that the intracellular distribution of hexokinase is highly sensitive to variations of the pH1, and regulates hexokinase activity. PMID:8611181

  9. Sequential fractionation and isolation of subcellular proteins from tissue or cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Baghirova, Sabina; Hughes, Bryan G; Hendzel, Michael J; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Many types of studies require the localization of a protein to, or isolation of enriched protein from a specific cellular compartment. Many protocols in the literature and from commercially available kits claim to yield pure cellular fractions. However, in our hands, the former often do not work effectively and the latter may be prohibitively expensive if a large number of fractionations are required. Furthermore, the largely proprietary composition of reagents in commercial kits means that the user is not able to make adjustments if, for example, a particular component affects the activity of a protein of interest. The method described here allows the isolation of purified proteins from three cellular fractions: the cytosol, membrane-bound organelles, and the nucleus. It uses gentle buffers with increasing detergent strength that sequentially lyse the cell membrane, organelle membranes and finally the nuclear membrane.•Quick, simple to replicate or adjust; this method does not require expensive reagents or use of commercial kits•The protocol can be applied to tissue samples or cultured cells without changing buffer components•Yields purified fractions of cytosolic, membrane bound and nuclear proteins, with the proper distribution of the appropriate subcellular markers: GAPDH, VDAC, SERCA2 and lamin A/C. PMID:26740924

  10. HYPOXIA TRIGGERS SUBCELLULAR COMPARTMENTAL REDOX SIGNALING IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Waypa, Gregory B.; Marks, Jeremy D.; Guzy, Robert; Mungai, Paul T.; Schriewer, Jacqueline; Dokic, Danijela; Schumacker, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies have implicated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in regulating hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), but controversy exists regarding whether hypoxia increases or decreases ROS generation. Objective This study tested the hypothesis that hypoxia induces redox changes that differ among sub-cellular compartments in pulmonary (PASMC) and systemic (SASMC) smooth muscle cells. Methods and Results We employed a novel, redox-sensitive, ratiometric fluorescent protein sensor (RoGFP) to assess the effects of hypoxia on redox signaling in cultured PASMC and SASMC. Using genetic targeting sequences, RoGFP was expressed in the cytosol (Cyto-RoGFP), the mitochondrial matrix (Mito-RoGFP), or the mitochondrial inter-membrane space (IMS-RoGFP), allowing assessment of oxidant signaling in distinct intracellular compartments. Superfusion of PASMC or SASMC with hypoxic media increased oxidation of both Cyto-RoGFP and IMS-RoGFP. However, hypoxia decreased oxidation of Mito-RoGFP in both cell types. The hypoxia-induced oxidation of Cyto-RoGFP was attenuated through the over-expression of cytosolic catalase in PASMC. Conclusions These results indicate that hypoxia causes a decrease in non-specific ROS generation in the matrix compartment, while it increases regulated ROS production in the IMS, which diffuses to the cytosol of both PASMC and SASMC. PMID:20019331

  11. Subcellular localization of Regulator of G protein Signaling RGS7 complex in neurons and transfected cells

    PubMed Central

    Liapis, Evangelos; Sandiford, Simone; Wang, Qiang; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Motti, Dario; Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z.

    2012-01-01

    The R7 family of regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) is involved in many functions of the nervous system. This family includes RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11 gene products and is defined by the presence of the characteristic DEP, DHEX, GGL and RGS domains. Here, we examined the subcellular localization of RGS7, the most broadly expressed R7 member. Our immunofluorescence studies of retinal and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons showed that RGS7 concentrated at the plasma membrane of cell bodies, in structures resembling lamellipodia or filopodia along the processes, and at the dendritic tips. At the plasma membrane of DRG neurons, RGS7 co-localized with its known binding partners R7BP, Gαo and Gαq. More than 50% of total RGS7-specific immunofluorescence was present in the cytoplasm, primarily within numerous small puncta that did not co-localize with R7BP. No specific RGS7 or R7BP immunoreactivity was detected in the nuclei. In transfected cell lines, ectopic RGS7 had both diffuse cytosolic and punctate localization patterns. RGS7 also localized in centrosomes. Structure-function analysis showed that the punctate localization was mediated by the DEP/DHEX domains, and centrosomal localization was dependent on the DHEX domain. PMID:22640015

  12. Subcellular localization of regulator of G protein signaling RGS7 complex in neurons and transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Evangelos; Sandiford, Simone; Wang, Qiang; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Motti, Dario; Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2012-08-01

    The R7 family of regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) is involved in many functions of the nervous system. This family includes RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11 gene products and is defined by the presence of the characteristic first found in Disheveled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin (DEP), DEP helical extension (DHEX), Gγ-like, and RGS domains. Herein, we examined the subcellular localization of RGS7, the most broadly expressed R7 member. Our immunofluorescence studies of retinal and dorsal root ganglion neurons showed that RGS7 concentrated at the plasma membrane of cell bodies, in structures resembling lamellipodia or filopodia along the processes, and at the dendritic tips. At the plasma membrane of dorsal root ganglia neurons, RGS7 co-localized with its known binding partners R7 RGS binding protein (R7BP), Gαo, and Gαq. More than 50% of total RGS7-specific immunofluorescence was present in the cytoplasm, primarily within numerous small puncta that did not co-localize with R7BP. No specific RGS7 or R7BP immunoreactivity was detected in the nuclei. In transfected cell lines, ectopic RGS7 had both diffuse cytosolic and punctate localization patterns. RGS7 also localized in centrosomes. Structure-function analysis showed that the punctate localization was mediated by the DEP/DHEX domains, and centrosomal localization was dependent on the DHEX domain.

  13. Alterations in the protein pattern of subcellular fractions isolated from Paramecium cells suppressed in phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Surmacz, L; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and quantitative densitometric analysis revealed alterations in the protein pattern of subcellular fractions (100,000 x g) isolated from Paramecium aurelia (299s axenic) cells suppressed in phagocytosis as compared with the control. Two different agents were used to block phagocytosis: the beta-adrenergic antagonist-1-propranolol (200 microM) and inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent processes--trifluoperazine (20 microM). More than 40 polypeptides were identified in the cytosolic (soluble) fractions S1 and S2. A considerable decrease in band intensity was found for three polypeptides: by 60% for 87 kDa band, 52% for 75 kDa and 37% for 42 kDa in comparison to the control, when S2 fractions from propranolol-treated cells of equal load were quantified. TFP treatment evoked only a small decrease in the intensity of the same bands: 9%, 10% and 6%, respectively. The 42 kDa band was identified by Western blot analysis and chemiluminiscent detection to be actin. This result suggests that actin may be a primary target of pharmacological agents used in this study to inhibit Paramecium phagocytic activity.

  14. Label-Free Imaging and Biochemical Characterization of Bovine Sperm Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Managò, Stefano; De Angelis, Annalisa; Sirleto, Luigi; Coppola, Giuseppe; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2015-01-01

    A full label-free morphological and biochemical characterization is desirable to select spermatozoa during preparation for artificial insemination. In order to study these fundamental parameters, we take advantage of two attractive techniques: digital holography (DH) and Raman spectroscopy (RS). DH presents new opportunities for studying morphological aspect of cells and tissues non-invasively, quantitatively and without the need for staining or tagging, while RS is a very specific technique allowing the biochemical analysis of cellular components with a spatial resolution in the sub-micrometer range. In this paper, morphological and biochemical bovine sperm cell alterations were studied using these techniques. In addition, a complementary DH and RS study was performed to identify X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cells. We demonstrate that the two techniques together are a powerful and highly efficient tool elucidating some important criterions for sperm morphological selection and sex-identification, overcoming many of the limitations associated with existing protocols. PMID:25836358

  15. Morphological evaluation of sperm from infertile men selected by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS).

    PubMed

    Curti, Gianni; Skowronek, Fernanda; Vernochi, Rita; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Ana Laura; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Juan Carlos; Casanova, Gabriela; Sapiro, Rossana

    2014-12-01

    Electron microscopy analysis performed in five infertile human subjects after sperm selection by swim-up followed by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) demonstrated a decrease in the number of spermatozoa with characteristics compatible with cell death. However, no significant differences were found when the swim-up/MACS semen fraction was compared with swim-up fraction alone.

  16. Isolation of two populations of sperm cells from the pollen tube of Torenia fournieri.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su Hong; Liao, Jing Ping; Kuang, An Xiu; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2006-11-01

    The two sperm cells of Torenia fournieri are dimorphic. The dimorphic character suggests that they might be preferentially involved in fertilization during in vivo fusion with the egg cell and central cell. To probe the mechanism of preferential fertilization, it is necessary to use the most current molecular techniques. For this purpose, populations of >1000 individuals of the two dimorphic sperm cells, Sua (unassociated with the vegetative nucleus) and Svn (associated with the vegetative nucleus) were isolated from pollen tubes that had grown out of the cut ends of the styles. The two sperm cells released from pollen tubes remained attached to one another. When the two attached sperm cells were transferred into a solution containing 0.01% cellulose, 0.01% pectinase, and 5% mannitol, the connection between the two cells disappeared, and they were easily separated using a micromanipulator. The collection of these two individual populations containing over a thousand cells will permit research on gametic recognition at the molecular level.

  17. Precision Automation of Cell Type Classification and Sub-Cellular Fluorescence Quantification from Laser Scanning Confocal Images.

    PubMed

    Hall, Hardy C; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Fischer, Urs

    2016-01-01

    While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to (1) segment radial plant organs into individual cells, (2) classify cells into cell type categories based upon Random Forest classification, (3) divide each cell into sub-regions, and (4) quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types. PMID:26904081

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Sub-Cellular Asymmetry of Fat-Dachsous Heterodimer for Generation of Planar Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Sinha, Pradip

    2014-01-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of animal tissues marked by coordinated polarization of cells or structures in the plane of a tissue. In insect wing epithelium, for instance, PCP is characterized by en masse orientation of hairs orthogonal to its apical-basal axis and pointing along the proximal-distal axis of the organ. Directional cue for PCP has been proposed to be generated by complex sets of interactions amongst three proteins - Fat (Ft), Dachsous (Ds) and Four-jointed (Fj). Ft and Ds are two atypical cadherins, which are phosphorylated by Fj, a Golgi kinase. Ft and Ds from adjacent cells bind heterophilically via their tandem cadherin repeats, and their binding affinities are regulated by Fj. Further, in the wing epithelium, sub-cellular levels of Ft-Ds heterodimers are seen to be elevated at the distal edges of individual cells, prefiguring their PCP. Mechanisms generating this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer in proximal and distal edges of cells, however, have not been resolved yet. Using a mathematical modeling approach, here we provide a framework for generation of this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. First, we explain how the known interactions within Ft-Ds-Fj system translate into sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Second, we show that this asymmetric localization of Ft-Ds heterodimer is lost when tissue-level gradient of Fj is flattened, or when phosphorylation of Ft by Fj is abolished, but not when tissue-level gradient of Ds is flattened or when phosphorylation of Ds is abrogated. Finally, we show that distal enrichment of Ds also amplifies Ft-Ds asymmetry. These observations reveal that gradient of Fj expression, phosphorylation of Ft by Fj and sub-cellular distal accumulation of Ds are three critical elements required for generating sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Our model integrates the known experimental data and presents testable predictions for future

  19. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    PubMed

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications.

  20. Effects of X-irradiation on mouse testicular cells and sperm chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, B.L.; Jost, L.K.; Erickson, K.R.; Tajiran, M.A.; Evenson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The testicular regions of male mice were exposed to x-ray doses ranging from 0 to 400 rads. Forty days after exposure the mice were killed and the testes and cauda epididymal sperm removed surgically. Flow cytometric measurements of acridine orange stained testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular cell types following x-ray killing of stem cells. Cauda epididymal sperm were analyzed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), a flow cytometric measurement of the susceptibility of the sperm nuclear DNA to in situ acid denaturation. The SCSA detected increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ after 12.5 rads of x-ray exposure, with significant increases following 25 rads. Abnormal sperm head morphology was not significantly increased until the testes were exposed to 60 rads of x-rays. These data suggest that the SCSA is currently the most sensitive, noninvasive method of detecting x-ray damage to testicular stem spermatogonia. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Syntaxin and VAMP association with lipid rafts depends on cholesterol depletion in capacitating sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; De Vries, Klaas J; De Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Garcia-Gil, Nuria; Van Gestel, Renske A; Colenbrander, Ben; Gadella, Bart M; Van Haeften, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Sperm cells represent a special exocytotic system since mature sperm cells contain only one large secretory vesicle, the acrosome, which fuses with the overlying plasma membrane during the fertilization process. Acrosomal exocytosis is believed to be regulated by activation of SNARE proteins. In this paper, we identified specific members of the SNARE protein family, i.e., the t-SNAREs syntaxin1 and 2, and the v-SNARE VAMP, present in boar sperm cells. Both syntaxins were predominantly found in the plasma membrane whereas v-SNAREs are mainly located in the outer acrosomal membrane of these cells. Under non-capacitating conditions both syntaxins and VAMP are scattered in well-defined punctate structures over the entire sperm head. Bicarbonate-induced in vitro activation in the presence of BSA causes a relocalization of these SNAREs to a more homogeneous distribution restricted to the apical ridge area of the sperm head, exactly matching the site of sperm zona binding and subsequent induced acrosomal exocytosis. This redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP depends on cholesterol depletion and closely resembles the previously reported redistribution of lipid raft marker proteins. Detergent-resistant membrane isolation and subsequent analysis shows that a significant proportion of syntaxin emerges in the detergent-resistant membrane (raft) fraction under such conditions, which is not the case under those conditions where cholesterol depletion is blocked. The v-SNARE VAMP displays a similar cholesterol depletion-dependent lateral and raft redistribution. Taken together, our results indicate that redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP during capacitation depends on association of these SNAREs with lipid rafts and that such a SNARE-raft association may be essential for spatial control of exocytosis and/or regulation of SNARE functioning.

  2. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Vasanth S.; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A.; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K.

    2016-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles.

  3. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vasanth S; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K

    2016-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles. PMID:27632056

  4. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vasanth S; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K

    2016-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles.

  5. Differential Subcellular Localization Renders HAI-2 a Matriptase Inhibitor in Breast Cancer Cells but Not in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D.; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J.; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25786220

  6. An ARID Domain-Containing Protein within Nuclear Bodies Is Required for Sperm Cell Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Binglian; He, Hui; Zheng, Yanhua; Wu, Wenye; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, plays a key role in sperm cell formation by activating expression of several germline genes. But how DUO1 itself is activated and how sperm cell formation is initiated remain unknown. To expand our understanding of sperm cell formation, we characterized an ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain)-containing protein, ARID1, that is specifically required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis. ARID1 localizes within nuclear bodies that are transiently present in the generative cell from which sperm cells arise, coincident with the timing of DUO1 activation. An arid1 mutant and antisense arid1 plants had an increased incidence of pollen with only a single sperm-like cell and exhibited reduced fertility as well as reduced expression of DUO1. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that ARID1 binds to the DUO1 promoter. Lastly, we found that ARID1 physically associates with histone deacetylase 8 and that histone acetylation, which in wild type is evident only in sperm, expanded to the vegetative cell nucleus in the arid1 mutant. This study identifies a novel component required for sperm cell formation in plants and uncovers a direct positive regulatory role of ARID1 on DUO1 through association with histone acetylation. PMID:25057814

  7. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Assessment of Subcellular Localization in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Evan P S; Owens, Jake L; Hockerman, Gregory H; Hu, Chang-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a fluorescence imaging technique used to visualize protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live cells and animals. One unique application of BiFC is to reveal subcellular localization of PPIs. The superior signal-to-noise ratio of BiFC in comparison with fluorescence resonance energy transfer or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer enables its wide applications. Here, we describe how confocal microscopy can be used to detect and quantify PPIs and their subcellular localization. We use basic leucine zipper transcription factor proteins as an example to provide a step-by-step BiFC protocol using a Nikon A1 confocal microscope and NIS-Elements imaging software. The protocol given below can be readily adapted for use with other confocal microscopes or imaging software. PMID:27515079

  8. Pluripotency and differentiation of cells from human testicular sperm extraction: An investigation of cell stemness.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian-Nodoushan, Fatemeh; Aflatoonian, Reza; Borzouie, Zahra; Akyash, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Aghajanpour, Samaneh; Moore, Harry D; Aflatoonian, Behrouz

    2016-04-01

    Human male germ-line stem cells (hmGSCs) and human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like (htESC-like) cells are claimed to be in vitro pluripotent counterparts of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), but the origin and pluripotency of human testis-derived cell cultures are still under debate. The aim of this study was to generate putative pluripotent stem cells in vitro from human testicular sperm-extracted (TESE) samples of infertile men, and to assess their pluripotency and capacity to differentiate. TESE samples were minced, enzymatically disaggregated and dispersed into single-cell or cluster suspensions, and then cultured. Initially, cell clusters resembled those described for hmGSCs and htESC-like cells, and were positive for markers such as OCT4/POU5F1, NANOG, and TRA-2-54. Prolonged propagation of cell clusters expressing pluripotency markers did not thrive; instead, the cells that emerged possessed characteristics of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) such as STRO-1, CD105/EGLN1, CD13/ANPEP, SOX9, vimentin, and fibronectin. KIT, SOX2, and CD44 were not expressed by these MSCs. The multipotential differentiation capacity of these cells was confirmed using Oil Red-O and Alizarin Red staining after induction with specific culture conditions. It is therefore concluded that pluripotent stem cells could not be derived using the conditions previously reported to be successful for TESE samples. PMID:27077675

  9. Changes in Subcellular Localization of Visfatin in Human Colorectal HCT-116 Carcinoma cell Line After Cytochalasin-B Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczna, M.; Bułdak, Ł; Matysiak, N.; Mielańczyk, Ł; Wyrobiec, G.; Kukla, M.; Michalski, M.; Żwirska-Korczala, K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the expression and subcellular localization of visfatin in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells after cytokinesis failure using Cytochalasin B (CytB) and the mechanism of apoptosis of cells after CytB. We observed translocation of visfatin’s antigen in cytB treated colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells from cytosol to nucleus. Statistical and morphometric analysis revealed significantly higher area-related numerical density visfatin-bound nano-golds in the nuclei of cytB-treated HCT-116 cells compared to cytosol. Reverse relation to visfatin subcellular localization was observed in un-treated HCT-116 cells. The total amount of visfatin protein and visfatin mRNA level in HCT-116 cells was also decreased after CytB treatment. Additionally, CytB significantly decreased cell survival, increased levels of G2/M fractions, induced bi-nuclei formation as well as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in HCT-116 cells. CytB treatment showed cytotoxic effect that stem from oxidative stress and is connected with the changes in the cytoplasmic/nuclear amount of visfatin in HCT-116 cells. PMID:25308845

  10. Quantitative evaluation of berberine subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer cells by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been demonstrated to be a safe anti-cancer agent with multiple effects on mitochondria. Intracellular concentration and distribution around the targeting sites are determinants of efficacy, but subcellular distribution of berberine has not been fully elucidated yet, which relies on the sensitive and robustness assay. In this study, a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated with optimized extraction solvents and detection conditions. Key factors such as the purity and integrity of isolated organelle fractions, and the effects of isolation procedures on the subcellular concentration of berberine were systemically evaluated. With the developed assay, we found that the intracellular accumulations of berberine in two gefitinib resistant NSCLC cell lines H1650 and H1975 were 2-3 folds higher than that of normal epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Moreover, significantly different subcellular distribution profiles in NSCLC cancer cells from that of BEAS-2B cells with a striking increase in content in most organelles may contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Furthermore, a predominant accumulation of berberine was observed for the first time in microsomal fraction for all three cell lines. Therefore, this method could be used for quantitative evaluation of subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation of berberine and for further evaluation of the concentration-effects relationship.

  11. Divisome-dependent subcellular localization of cell-cell joining protein SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Ramos-León, Félix; Mariscal, Vicente; Frías, José E; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms that grow as filaments that can be hundreds of cells long. Septal junction complexes, of which SepJ is a possible component, appear to join the cells in the filament. SepJ is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that contains a long predicted periplasmic section and localizes not only to the cell poles in the intercellular septa but also to a position similar to a Z ring when cell division starts suggesting a relation with the divisome. Here, we created a mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 in which the essential divisome gene ftsZ is expressed from a synthetic NtcA-dependent promoter, whose activity depends on the nitrogen source. In the presence of ammonium, low levels of FtsZ were produced, and the subcellular localization of SepJ, which was investigated by immunofluorescence, was impaired. Possible interactions of SepJ with itself and with divisome proteins FtsZ, FtsQ and FtsW were investigated using the bacterial two-hybrid system. We found SepJ self-interaction and a specific interaction with FtsQ, confirmed by co-purification and involving parts of the SepJ and FtsQ periplasmic sections. Therefore, SepJ can form multimers, and in Anabaena, the divisome has a role beyond cell division, localizing a septal protein essential for multicellularity.

  12. Divisome-dependent subcellular localization of cell-cell joining protein SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Ramos-León, Félix; Mariscal, Vicente; Frías, José E; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms that grow as filaments that can be hundreds of cells long. Septal junction complexes, of which SepJ is a possible component, appear to join the cells in the filament. SepJ is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that contains a long predicted periplasmic section and localizes not only to the cell poles in the intercellular septa but also to a position similar to a Z ring when cell division starts suggesting a relation with the divisome. Here, we created a mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 in which the essential divisome gene ftsZ is expressed from a synthetic NtcA-dependent promoter, whose activity depends on the nitrogen source. In the presence of ammonium, low levels of FtsZ were produced, and the subcellular localization of SepJ, which was investigated by immunofluorescence, was impaired. Possible interactions of SepJ with itself and with divisome proteins FtsZ, FtsQ and FtsW were investigated using the bacterial two-hybrid system. We found SepJ self-interaction and a specific interaction with FtsQ, confirmed by co-purification and involving parts of the SepJ and FtsQ periplasmic sections. Therefore, SepJ can form multimers, and in Anabaena, the divisome has a role beyond cell division, localizing a septal protein essential for multicellularity. PMID:25644579

  13. Geometry-specific heterogeneity of the apparent diffusion rate of materials inside sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Kamimura, Shinji

    2010-04-21

    In sea urchin spermatozoa, the energy source powering flagellar motion is provided as ATP produced by mitochondria located at the proximal ends of flagella. However, the bottleneck structure between the sperm head and the flagellar tail seems to restrict the free entry of ATP from mitochondria into the tail region. To test this possibility, we investigated the diffusion properties in sperm cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that the rate of fluorescence recovery in the head region was approximately 10% of that observed in the flagellar tail regions. We also found that, even within the tail region, rates varied depending on location, i.e., rates were slower at the more distal regions. Using computational analysis, the rate heterogeneity was shown to be caused mainly by the geometry of the sperm structure, even if little or no difference in diffusion rates through the neck region was assumed. Therefore, we concluded that materials such as ATP would generally diffuse freely between the heads and the flagella of sperm cells. We believe these findings regarding the diffusion properties inside spermatozoa provide further insights into material transportation and chemical signaling inside eukaryotic cilia and flagella. PMID:20409478

  14. Geometry-specific heterogeneity of the apparent diffusion rate of materials inside sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Kamimura, Shinji

    2010-04-21

    In sea urchin spermatozoa, the energy source powering flagellar motion is provided as ATP produced by mitochondria located at the proximal ends of flagella. However, the bottleneck structure between the sperm head and the flagellar tail seems to restrict the free entry of ATP from mitochondria into the tail region. To test this possibility, we investigated the diffusion properties in sperm cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that the rate of fluorescence recovery in the head region was approximately 10% of that observed in the flagellar tail regions. We also found that, even within the tail region, rates varied depending on location, i.e., rates were slower at the more distal regions. Using computational analysis, the rate heterogeneity was shown to be caused mainly by the geometry of the sperm structure, even if little or no difference in diffusion rates through the neck region was assumed. Therefore, we concluded that materials such as ATP would generally diffuse freely between the heads and the flagella of sperm cells. We believe these findings regarding the diffusion properties inside spermatozoa provide further insights into material transportation and chemical signaling inside eukaryotic cilia and flagella.

  15. Label-free biochemical characterization of bovine sperm cells using Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A. C.; Manago, S.; Ferrara, M. A.; Sirleto, L.; Puglisi, R.; Balduzzi, D.; Galli, A.; Rendina, I.; Ferraro, P.; Coppola, G.

    2013-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free and non-invasive method that measures the inelastic scattered light from a sample giving insight into the vibration eigenmodes of the excited molecules. For these reasons, Raman spectroscopy has been used as a powerful tool to investigate different biological tissues and living cells. In this paper, we present a Raman spectroscopy-based method for sensitive biochemical characterization of bovine sperm cells. Importantly, by analysing separate Raman spectra from the nucleus, acrosomale vesicle and tail of single sperm cells, we are able to identify characteristic Raman features associated with DNA, protein and lipid molecular vibrations for discriminating among different locations inside the cell with sub-micrometric resolution (˜0.3 μm). We demonstrate that our Raman spectroscopy facilitates spectral assignment and increases detection sensitivity, opening the way for novel bio-imaging platforms.

  16. Grouping Annotations on the Subcellular Layered Interactome Demonstrates Enhanced Autophagy Activity in a Recurrent Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis T Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Dong, Yucui; Ju, Huanyu; Yang, Jinfeng; Sun, Jianhua; Li, Xia; Ren, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Human uveitis is a type of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that often shows relapse–remitting courses affecting multiple biological processes. As a cytoplasmic process, autophagy has been seen as an adaptive response to cell death and survival, yet the link between autophagy and T cell-mediated autoimmunity is not certain. In this study, based on the differentially expressed genes (GSE19652) between the recurrent versus monophasic T cell lines, whose adoptive transfer to susceptible animals may result in respective recurrent or monophasic uveitis, we proposed grouping annotations on a subcellular layered interactome framework to analyze the specific bioprocesses that are linked to the recurrence of T cell autoimmunity. That is, the subcellular layered interactome was established by the Cytoscape and Cerebral plugin based on differential expression, global interactome, and subcellular localization information. Then, the layered interactomes were grouping annotated by the ClueGO plugin based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. The analysis showed that significant bioprocesses with autophagy were orchestrated in the cytoplasmic layered interactome and that mTOR may have a regulatory role in it. Furthermore, by setting up recurrent and monophasic uveitis in Lewis rats, we confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that, in comparison to the monophasic disease, recurrent uveitis in vivo showed significantly increased autophagy activity and extended lymphocyte infiltration to the affected retina. In summary, our framework methodology is a useful tool to disclose specific bioprocesses and molecular targets that can be attributed to a certain disease. Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of autophagy pathways may perturb the recurrence of uveitis. PMID:25116327

  17. Derivation of sperm from xenografted testis cells and tissues of the peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Campos-Junior, Paulo Henrique Almeida; Costa, Guilherme Mattos Jardim; Avelar, Gleide Fernandes; Lacerda, Samyra Maria Santos Nassif; da Costa, Nathália Nogueira; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Jorge, Erika Cristina; Guimarães, Diva Anelie; de França, Luiz Renato

    2014-03-01

    Because the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) has a peculiar Leydig cell cytoarchitecture, this species represents a unique mammalian model for investigating testis function. Taking advantage of the well-established and very useful testis xenograft technique, in the present study, testis tissue and testis cell suspensions from immature collared peccaries (n=4; 3 months old) were xenografted in SCID mice (n=48) and evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 8 months after grafting. Complete spermatogenesis was observed at 6 and 8 months after testis tissue xenografting. However, probably due to de novo testis morphogenesis and low androgen secretion, functionally evaluated by the seminal vesicle weight, a delay in spermatogenesis progression was observed in the testis cell suspension xenografts, with the production of fertile sperm only at 8 months after grafting. Importantly, demonstrating that the peculiar testicular cytoarchitecture of the collared peccary is intrinsically programmed, the unique Leydig cell arrangement observed in this species was re-established after de novo testis morphogenesis. The sperm collected from the xenografts resulted in diploid embryos that expressed the paternally imprinted gene NNAT after ICSI. The present study is the first to demonstrate complete spermatogenesis with the production of fertile sperm from testis cell suspension xenografts in a wild mammalian species. Therefore, due to its unique testicular cytoarchitecture, xenograft techniques, particularly testis cell suspensions, may represent a new and very promising approach to evaluate testis morphogenesis and to investigate spermatogonial stem cell physiology and niche in the collared peccary.

  18. Nitric oxide measurements in hTERT-RPE cells and subcellular fractions exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Denton, Michael L.; Holwitt, Eric A.

    2014-02-01

    Cells in a tissue culture model for laser eye injury exhibit increased resistance to a lethal pulse of 2.0-μm laser radiation if the cells are first exposed to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light 24 hr prior to the lethal laser exposure. Changes in expression of various genes associated with apoptosis have been observed, but the biochemical link between light absorption and gene expression remains unknown. Cytochome c oxidase (CCOX), in the electron transport chain, is the currentlyhypothesized absorber. Absorption of the red light by CCOX is thought to facilitate displacement of nitric oxide (NO) by O2 in the active site, increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. However, NO is also an important regulator and mediator of numerous physiological processes in a variety of cell and tissue types that is synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases. In an effort to determine the relative NO contributions from these competing pathways, we measured NO levels in whole cells and subcellular fractions, with and without exposure to red light, using DAF-FM, a fluorescent dye that stoichiometrically reacts with NO. Red light induced a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in fluorescence intensity in whole cells and some subcellular fractions. Whole cells exhibited the highest overall fluorescence intensity followed by (in order) cytosolic proteins, microsomes, then nuclei and mitochondria.

  19. Correlation of spermiogram profiles with DNA damage in sperm cells of infertile men: a comet assay study.

    PubMed

    Tug, Niyazi; Sandal, Suleyman; Ozelgun, Berna; Yilmaz, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated a relationship between DNA damage in sperm and spermiogram profiles in the infertile men. Twenty-one non-smoking infertile men <40 years of age with no systemic or genetic disease were randomly selected from the pool of infertile couples applied to our clinic. Sperm samples were collected and evaluated according to WHO guidelines. DNA damage of sperm cells was assessed using neutral comet assay. Fifty cells per slide and two slides per sample were scored to evaluate DNA damage. The cells were visually classified into four categories based on DNA migration such as undamaged (UD), little damage (LD), moderate damage (MD) and significant damage (SD). Total comet scores (TCS) were calculated as: 1×UD + 2×LD + 3×MD + 4×SD. There was a negative correlation between the percentage of slow- and in situ-motion sperm cells in spermiograms and TCS (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). The relationship between the percentage of non-motile sperm cells and TCS was negative (p < 0.001). This study provides new evidence that DNA damage in spermatozoa and sperm motility parameters are negatively correlated. We suggest that evaluation of sperm DNA by the neutral comet assay may be valuable to use in fertility research.

  20. Purification of the subcellular compartment in which exogenous antigens undergo endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation from dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Jun; Otani, Mayu; Sakai, Takahiro; Hatta, Shinichi

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are capable of processing and presenting exogenous antigens using MHC class I molecules. This pathway is called antigen cross-presentation and plays an important role in the stimulation of naïve CD8(+) T cells for infectious and tumor immunity. Our previous studies in DC2.4 cells and bone marrow-derived DCs revealed that exogenously added ovalbumin (OVA) is processed through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) for cross-presentation. In this study, we aimed to further confirm these results by purification of the subcellular compartment in which exogenous antigens undergo ERAD from homogenates of DC2.4 cells pretreated with biotinylated OVA (bOVA). bOVA-containing vesicles were purified using streptavidin (SA)-magnetic beads from cell homogenates and were found to contain ER chaperones and ERAD components together with proteins for antigen presentation. In purified microsomes, bOVA was retained in membranous fractions and degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system in presence reticulocyte lysates and ATP. These results strongly suggested that DCs processed and degraded exogenous antigens through ERAD for cross-presentation in this purified subcellular compartment. PMID:27656684

  1. Displacement correlations between a single mesenchymal-like cell and its nucleus effectively link subcellular activities and motility in cell migration analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Cheng, Kai; Ren, Tina; Arce, Stephen Hugo; Tseng, Yiider

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is an essential process in organism development and physiological maintenance. Although current methods permit accurate comparisons of the effects of molecular manipulations and drug applications on cell motility, effects of alterations in subcellular activities on motility cannot be fully elucidated from those methods. Here, we develop a strategy termed cell-nuclear (CN) correlation to parameterize represented dynamic subcellular activities and to quantify their contributions in mesenchymal-like migration. Based on the biophysical meaning of the CN correlation, we propose a cell migration potential index (CMPI) to measure cell motility. When the effectiveness of CMPI was evaluated with respect to one of the most popular cell migration analysis methods, Persistent Random Walk, we found that the cell motility estimates among six cell lines used in this study were highly consistent between these two approaches. Further evaluations indicated that CMPI can be determined using a shorter time period and smaller cell sample size, and it possesses excellent reliability and applicability, even in the presence of a wide range of noise, as might be generated from individual imaging acquisition systems. The novel approach outlined here introduces a robust strategy through an analysis of subcellular locomotion activities for single cell migration assessment. PMID:27670131

  2. Displacement correlations between a single mesenchymal-like cell and its nucleus effectively link subcellular activities and motility in cell migration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian; Cheng, Kai; Ren, Tina; Arce, Stephen Hugo; Tseng, Yiider

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is an essential process in organism development and physiological maintenance. Although current methods permit accurate comparisons of the effects of molecular manipulations and drug applications on cell motility, effects of alterations in subcellular activities on motility cannot be fully elucidated from those methods. Here, we develop a strategy termed cell-nuclear (CN) correlation to parameterize represented dynamic subcellular activities and to quantify their contributions in mesenchymal-like migration. Based on the biophysical meaning of the CN correlation, we propose a cell migration potential index (CMPI) to measure cell motility. When the effectiveness of CMPI was evaluated with respect to one of the most popular cell migration analysis methods, Persistent Random Walk, we found that the cell motility estimates among six cell lines used in this study were highly consistent between these two approaches. Further evaluations indicated that CMPI can be determined using a shorter time period and smaller cell sample size, and it possesses excellent reliability and applicability, even in the presence of a wide range of noise, as might be generated from individual imaging acquisition systems. The novel approach outlined here introduces a robust strategy through an analysis of subcellular locomotion activities for single cell migration assessment.

  3. Cell segmentation in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy with temporally varying sub-cellular fusion protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Chagin, Vadim; Cardoso, M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescently tagged proteins such as GFP-PCNA produce rich dynamically varying textural patterns of foci distributed in the nucleus. This enables the behavioral study of sub-cellular structures during different phases of the cell cycle. The varying punctuate patterns of fluorescence, drastic changes in SNR, shape and position during mitosis and abundance of touching cells, however, require more sophisticated algorithms for reliable automatic cell segmentation and lineage analysis. Since the cell nuclei are non-uniform in appearance, a distribution-based modeling of foreground classes is essential. The recently proposed graph partitioning active contours (GPAC) algorithm supports region descriptors and flexible distance metrics. We extend GPAC for fluorescence-based cell segmentation using regional density functions and dramatically improve its efficiency for segmentation from O(N(4)) to O(N(2)), for an image with N(2) pixels, making it practical and scalable for high throughput microscopy imaging studies.

  4. Habits of cell phone usage and sperm quality - does it warrant attention?

    PubMed

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Wiener-Megnazi, Zofnat; Sheinfeld, Yulia; Grach, Bronislava; Lahav-Baratz, Shirly; Dirnfeld, Martha

    2015-09-01

    Male infertility constitutes 30-40% of all infertility cases. Some studies have shown a continuous decline in semen quality since the beginning of the 20th century. One postulated contributing factor is radio frequency electromagnetic radiation emitted from cell phones. This study investigates an association between characteristics of cell phone usage and semen quality. Questionnaires accessing demographic data and characteristics of cell phone usage were completed by 106 men referred for semen analysis. Results were analysed according to WHO 2010 criteria. Talking for ≥1 h/day and during device charging were associated with higher rates of abnormal semen concentration (60.9% versus 35.7%, P < 0.04 and 66.7% versus 35.6%, P < 0.02, respectively). Among men who reported holding their phones ≤50 cm from the groin, a non-significantly higher rate of abnormal sperm concentration was found (47.1% versus 11.1%). Multivariate analysis revealed that talking while charging the device and smoking were risk factors for abnormal sperm concentration (OR = 4.13 [95% CI 1.28-13.3], P < 0.018 and OR = 3.04 [95% CI 1.14-8.13], P < 0.027, respectively). Our findings suggest that certain aspects of cell phone usage may bear adverse effects on sperm concentration. Investigation using large-scale studies is thus needed.

  5. Habits of cell phone usage and sperm quality - does it warrant attention?

    PubMed

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Wiener-Megnazi, Zofnat; Sheinfeld, Yulia; Grach, Bronislava; Lahav-Baratz, Shirly; Dirnfeld, Martha

    2015-09-01

    Male infertility constitutes 30-40% of all infertility cases. Some studies have shown a continuous decline in semen quality since the beginning of the 20th century. One postulated contributing factor is radio frequency electromagnetic radiation emitted from cell phones. This study investigates an association between characteristics of cell phone usage and semen quality. Questionnaires accessing demographic data and characteristics of cell phone usage were completed by 106 men referred for semen analysis. Results were analysed according to WHO 2010 criteria. Talking for ≥1 h/day and during device charging were associated with higher rates of abnormal semen concentration (60.9% versus 35.7%, P < 0.04 and 66.7% versus 35.6%, P < 0.02, respectively). Among men who reported holding their phones ≤50 cm from the groin, a non-significantly higher rate of abnormal sperm concentration was found (47.1% versus 11.1%). Multivariate analysis revealed that talking while charging the device and smoking were risk factors for abnormal sperm concentration (OR = 4.13 [95% CI 1.28-13.3], P < 0.018 and OR = 3.04 [95% CI 1.14-8.13], P < 0.027, respectively). Our findings suggest that certain aspects of cell phone usage may bear adverse effects on sperm concentration. Investigation using large-scale studies is thus needed. PMID:26206279

  6. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

    PubMed Central

    Hardham, Adrienne R; Takemoto, Daigo; White, Rosemary G

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the pathogen as it attempts to

  7. Biochemical and topological analysis of bovine sperm cells induced by low power laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, T. R.; Siqueira, A. F. P.; Magrini, T. D.; Fiorito, P. A.; Assumpção, M. E. O. A.; Nichi, M.; Martinho, H. S.; Milazzotto, M. P.

    2011-07-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) increases ATP production and energy supply to the cell which could increase sperm motility, acrossomal reaction and consequently the fertilizing potential. The aim of this study was to characterize the biochemical and topological changes induced by low power laser irradiation on bull sperm cells. Post-thawing sperm were irradiated with a 633nm laser with fluence rates of 30, 150 and 300mJ.cm-2 (power of 5mW for 1, 5 and 10minutes, respectively); 45, 230, and 450mJ.cm-2 (7.5mW for 1, 5 and 10 minutes); and 60, 300 and 600mJ.cm-2 (10mW for 1, 5 and 10 minutes). Biochemical and metabolical changes were analyzed by FTIR and flow cytometry; oxygen reactive species production was assessed by TBARS and the morphological changes were evaluated by AFM. Motility had no difference among times or powers of irradiation. Increasing in ROS generation was observed with power of 5mW compared to 7.5 and 10mW, and with 10min of irradiation in comparison with 5 and 1min of irradiation. This higher ROS generation was related to an increase in acrossomal and plasma membrane damage. FTIR results showed that the amount of lipids was inversely proportional to the quantity of ROS generated. AFM images showed morphological differences in plasma/acrossomal membrane, mainly on the equatorial region. We conclude that LLLI is an effective method to induce changes on sperm cell metabolism but more studies are necessary to establish an optimal dose to increase the fertility potential of these cells.

  8. Long-term effects of triethylenemelamine exposure on mouse testis cells and sperm chromatin structure assayed by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, D.P.; Baer, R.K.; Jost, L.K. )

    1989-01-01

    The toxic and potentially mutagenic actions of triethylenemelamine (TEM) on mouse body and testis weights, testicular cell kinetics, sperm production, sperm head morphology, and sperm chromatin structure were assessed in two experiments. The first experiment examined effects of four dose levels of TEM, assayed 1, 4, or 10 wk after toxic exposure. In the second study, effects from five dosage levels were measured at 1, 4, and 10 wk, and the highest dosage level was evaluated over 44 wk. TEM produced an expected dose related loss of spermatogenic activity and subsequent recovery as determined by dual-parameter (DNA, RNA) flow cytometry (FCM) measurements of testicular cells. Both testicular weights and caudal sperm reserves remained generally below controls after 44 wk recovery following exposure to the highest dosage. Chromatin structure alterations, defined as increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ, and sperm head morphology were highly correlated with dose and with each other. Sperm head morphology and sperm chromatic structure remained abnormal at 44 wk for the 1.0 mg/kg TEM dosage, suggesting that the abnormalities, present long after the initial toxic response, may be a result of mutation. This study demonstrates that flow cytometry provides a unique, rapid, and efficient means to measure effects of reproductive toxins and potential mutagens.

  9. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for interneuron connectivity at specific subcellular compartments of granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Beuter, Simone; Ardi, Ziv; Horovitz, Omer; Wuchter, Jennifer; Keller, Stefanie; Saha, Rinki; Tripathi, Kuldeep; Anunu, Rachel; Kehat, Orli; Kriebel, Martin; Richter-Levin, Gal; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal transmission is regulated by the local circuitry which is composed of principal neurons targeted at different subcellular compartments by a variety of interneurons. However, mechanisms that contribute to the subcellular localisation and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron terminals are poorly understood. Stabilization of GABAergic synapses depends on clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Lentiviral knockdown experiments in adult rats indicated that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for the stabilisation of basket cell terminals on proximal dendritic and somatic compartments of granular cells of the dentate gyrus. EphA7 deficiency and concomitant destabilisation of GABAergic synapses correlated with impaired long-term potentiation and reduced hippocampal learning. Reduced GABAergic innervation may be explained by an impact of EphA7 on gephyrin clustering. Overexpression or ephrin stimulation of EphA7 induced gephyrin clustering dependent on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is an interaction partner of gephyrin. Gephyrin interactions with mTOR become released after mTOR activation while enhanced interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin was observed in parallel. In conclusion, EphA7 regulates gephyrin clustering and the maintenance of inhibitory synaptic connectivity via mTOR signalling. PMID:27405707

  10. AFM-based mapping of the elastic properties of cell walls: at tissue, cellular, and subcellular resolutions.

    PubMed

    Peaucelle, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    We describe a recently developed method to measure mechanical properties of the surfaces of plant tissues using atomic force microscopy (AFM) micro/nano-indentations, for a JPK AFM. Specifically, in this protocol we measure the apparent Young's modulus of cell walls at subcellular resolutions across regions of up to 100 µmx100 µm in floral meristems, hypocotyls, and roots. This requires careful preparation of the sample, the correct selection of micro-indenters and indentation depths. To account for cell wall properties only, measurements are performed in highly concentrated solutions of mannitol in order to plasmolyze the cells and thus remove the contribution of cell turgor pressure. In contrast to other extant techniques, by using different indenters and indentation depths, this method allows simultaneous multiscale measurements, i.e. at subcellular resolutions and across hundreds of cells comprising a tissue. This means that it is now possible to spatially-temporally characterize the changes that take place in the mechanical properties of cell walls during development, enabling these changes to be correlated with growth and differentiation. This represents a key step to understand how coordinated microscopic cellular changes bring about macroscopic morphogenetic events. However, several limitations remain: the method can only be used on fairly small samples (around 100 µm in diameter) and only on external tissues; the method is sensitive to tissue topography; it measures only certain aspects of the tissue's complex mechanical properties. The technique is being developed rapidly and it is likely that most of these limitations will be resolved in the near future. PMID:25080133

  11. Expression of temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8 in sperm cells correlates with vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Saha, Somdatta; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Arijit; Swain, Nirlipta; Goswami, Luna; Mohapatra, Pratyush; Maity, Apratim; Kumar Sahoo, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily Melastatin, member 8 (TRPM8) is involved in detection of cold temperature, different noxious compounds and in execution of thermo- as well as chemo-sensitive responses at cellular levels. Here we explored the molecular evolution of TRPM8 by analyzing sequences from various species. We elucidate that several regions of TRPM8 had different levels of selection pressure but the 4th–5th transmembrane regions remain highly conserved. Analysis of synteny suggests that since vertebrate origin, TRPM8 gene is linked with SPP2, a bone morphogen. TRPM8, especially the N-terminal region of it, seems to be highly variable in human population. We found 16,656 TRPM8 variants in 1092 human genomes with top variations being SNPs, insertions and deletions. A total of 692 missense mutations are also mapped to human TRPM8 protein of which 509 seem to be delateroiours in nature as supported by Polyphen V2, SIFT and Grantham deviation score. Using a highly specific antibody, we demonstrate that TRPM8 is expressed endogenously in the testis of rat and sperm cells of different vertebrates ranging from fish to higher mammals. We hypothesize that TRPM8 had emerged during vertebrate evolution (ca 450 MYA). We propose that expression of TRPM8 in sperm cell and its role in regulating sperm function are important factors that have guided its molecular evolution, and that these understandings may have medical importance. PMID:26500819

  12. Contact-free isolation of sperm and epithelial cells by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Stephan; Burgemeister, Renate; Hausmann, Roland; Betz, Peter; Lederer, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    With the PALM MicroBeam system, precise laser microdissection of single cells from cell smears or tissue preparations is possible. Furthermore, this system uses a contact-free and therefore contamination-free laser pressure catapulting technique in which high energy generated by a focused laser pulse catapults single dissected cells into a collecting vessel. In this study, this technique was tested for forensic purposes with smear preparations from postcoital vaginal swabs, sperm swabs, and buccal cell swabs on different types of microscopic slides. Apart from super-frosted slides, cutting and catapulting of selected cells was possible in all cases. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction was performed using the genRES MPX-2 Amplification Kit. In the case of sperm cells stained with hematoxylin and eosin, fragments larger than approximately 200 bp could not be detected. Partial genetic profiles were obtained for DNA amounts originating from only two cell equivalents. Complete profiles, however, were observed with all preparations of a minimum of 10 epithelial cells, demonstrating a potential benefit of this technique for the contamination-free forensic analysis of extremely small specimens or mixed stains. PMID:25869953

  13. Contact-free isolation of sperm and epithelial cells by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Stephan; Burgemeister, Renate; Hausmann, Roland; Betz, Peter; Lederer, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    With the PALM MicroBeam system, precise laser microdissection of single cells from cell smears or tissue preparations is possible. Furthermore, this system uses a contact-free and therefore contamination-free laser pressure catapulting technique in which high energy generated by a focused laser pulse catapults single dissected cells into a collecting vessel. In this study, this technique was tested for forensic purposes with smear preparations from postcoital vaginal swabs, sperm swabs, and buccal cell swabs on different types of microscopic slides. Apart from super-frosted slides, cutting and catapulting of selected cells was possible in all cases. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction was performed using the genRES MPX-2 Amplification Kit. In the case of sperm cells stained with hematoxylin and eosin, fragments larger than approximately 200 bp could not be detected. Partial genetic profiles were obtained for DNA amounts originating from only two cell equivalents. Complete profiles, however, were observed with all preparations of a minimum of 10 epithelial cells, demonstrating a potential benefit of this technique for the contamination-free forensic analysis of extremely small specimens or mixed stains.

  14. An ARID domain-containing protein within nuclear bodies is required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, p...

  15. Cellular Distribution and Subcellular Localization of Molecular Components of Vesicular Transmitter Release in Horizontal Cells of Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN H.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying transmitter release from retinal horizontal cells is poorly understood. We investigated the possibility of vesicular transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells by examining the expression of synaptic proteins that participate in vesicular transmitter release at chemical synapses. Using immunocytochemistry, we evaluated the cellular and subcellular distribution of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit retina. Strong labeling for complexin I/II, proteins that regulate a late step in vesicular transmitter release, was found in both synaptic layers of the retina, and in somata of A- and B-type horizontal cells, of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycinergic amacrine cells, and of ganglion cells. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of complexin I/II in horizontal cell processes postsynaptic to rod and cone ribbon synapses. Syntaxin-1, a core protein of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex known to bind to complexin, and synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein involved in the Ca2+-dependent recruitment of synaptic vesicles for transmitter release, were also present in the horizontal cells and their processes at photoreceptor synapses. Photoreceptors and bipolar cells did not express any of these proteins at their axon terminals. The presence of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit horizontal cell processes and tips suggests that a vesicular mechanism may underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells. PMID:15912504

  16. The Usefulness of Selected Physicochemical Indices, Cell Membrane Integrity and Sperm Chromatin Structure in Assessments of Boar Semen Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wysokińska, A.; Kondracki, S.; Iwanina, M.

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes experiments undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of selected physicochemical indices of semen, cell membrane integrity and sperm chromatin structure for the assessment of boar semen sensitivity to processes connected with pre-insemination procedures. The experiments were carried out on 30 boars: including 15 regarded as providers of sensitive semen and 15 regarded as providers of semen that is little sensitive to laboratory processing. The selection of boars for both groups was based on sperm morphology analyses, assuming secondary morphological change incidence in spermatozoa as the criterion. Two ejaculates were manually collected from each boar at an interval of 3 to 4 months. The following analyses were carried out for each ejaculate: sperm motility assessment, sperm pH measurement, sperm morphology assessment, sperm chromatin structure evaluation and cell membrane integrity assessment. The analyses were performed three times. Semen storage did not cause an increase in the incidence of secondary morphological changes in the group of boars considered to provide sperm of low sensitivity. On the other hand, with continued storage there was a marked increase in the incidence of spermatozoa with secondary morphological changes in the group of boars regarded as producing more sensitive semen. Ejaculates of group I boars evaluated directly after collection had an approximately 6% smaller share of spermatozoa with undamaged cell membranes than the ejaculates of boars in group II (p≤0.05). In the process of time the percentage of spermatozoa with undamaged cell membranes decreased. The sperm of group I boars was characterised with a lower sperm motility than the semen of group II boars. After 1 hour of storing diluted semen, the sperm motility of boars producing highly sensitive semen was already 4% lower (p≤0.05), and after 24 hours of storage it was 6.33% lower than that of the boars that produced semen with a low sensitivity. Factors

  17. Prequels to Synthetic Biology: From Candidate Gene Identification and Validation to Enzyme Subcellular Localization in Plant and Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Foureau, E; Carqueijeiro, I; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Melin, C; Lafontaine, F; Besseau, S; Lanoue, A; Papon, N; Oudin, A; Glévarec, G; Clastre, M; St-Pierre, B; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, N; Courdavault, V

    2016-01-01

    Natural compounds extracted from microorganisms or plants constitute an inexhaustible source of valuable molecules whose supply can be potentially challenged by limitations in biological sourcing. The recent progress in synthetic biology combined to the increasing access to extensive transcriptomics and genomics data now provide new alternatives to produce these molecules by transferring their whole biosynthetic pathway in heterologous production platforms such as yeasts or bacteria. While the generation of high titer producing strains remains per se an arduous field of investigation, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways as well as characterization of their complex subcellular organization are essential prequels to the efficient development of such bioengineering approaches. Using examples from plants and yeasts as a framework, we describe potent methods to rationalize the study of partially characterized pathways, including the basics of computational applications to identify candidate genes in transcriptomics data and the validation of their function by an improved procedure of virus-induced gene silencing mediated by direct DNA transfer to get around possible resistance to Agrobacterium-delivery of viral vectors. To identify potential alterations of biosynthetic fluxes resulting from enzyme mislocalizations in reconstituted pathways, we also detail protocols aiming at characterizing subcellular localizations of protein in plant cells by expression of fluorescent protein fusions through biolistic-mediated transient transformation, and localization of transferred enzymes in yeast using similar fluorescence procedures. Albeit initially developed for the Madagascar periwinkle, these methods may be applied to other plant species or organisms in order to establish synthetic biology platform. PMID:27480687

  18. Study of acetowhitening mechanisms in live mammalian cells with label-free subcellular-level multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Teh, Sengkhoon; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    The tissue acetowhitening effect in acetic acid instillation procedure is a simple and economic method for neoplasia detection and has been clinically utilized since 1925. It is suspected that the optical property (e.g. scattering) change in acetowhitening is due to coagulation of intracellular proteins, but no experimental proof has been reported yet. In this work, we use third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the acetowhitening phenomenon induced by acidic acid in live mammalian cells without labeling. We studied the acetowhitening effect with different acetic acid concentrations and the co-localized TPEF and THG imaging on tryptophan and NADH at subcellular-level reveals that the acetowhitening phenomenon is highly related with proteins involved in metabolic pathways in the nucleus and cytoplasm in live cells.

  19. Galactosylceramidase deficiency causes sperm abnormalities in the mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Luddi, A.; Strazza, M.; Carbone, M.; Moretti, E.; Costantino-Ceccarini, E. . E-mail: costantino@unisi.it

    2005-03-10

    The classical recessive mouse mutant, 'the twitcher,' is one of the several animal models of the human globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease) caused by a deficiency in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). The failure to hydrolyze galactosylceramide (gal-cer) and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) leads to degeneration of oligodendrocytes and severe demyelination. Substrate for GALC is also the galactosyl-alkyl-acyl-glycerol (GalAAG), precursor of the seminolipid, the most abundant glycolipid in spermatozoa of mammals. In this paper, we report the pathobiology of the testis and sperm in the twitcher mouse and demonstrate the importance of GALC for normal sperm maturation and function. The GALC deficit results in accumulation of GalAAG in the testis of the twitcher mouse. Morphological studies revealed that affected spermatozoa have abnormally swollen acrosomes and angulation of the flagellum mainly at midpiece-principal piece junction. Multiple folding of the principal piece was also observed. Electron microscopy analysis showed that in the twitcher sperm, acrosomal membrane is redundant, detached from the nucleus and folded over. Disorganization and abnormal arrangements of the axoneme components were also detected. These results provide in vivo evidence that GALC plays a critical role in spermiogenesis.

  20. Effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on testicular antioxidant values, apoptotic germ cell and sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Yüce, A; Türk, G; Çeribaşi, S; Sönmez, M; Çiftçi, M; Güvenç, M

    2013-08-01

    Cinnamon and its contents have multifactorial properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic. Male infertility is one of the major health problems in life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term cinnamon bark oil (CBO) ingestion on testicular antioxidant values, apoptotic germ cell and sperm quality of adult rats. Twelve male healthy Wistar rats were divided into two groups, each group containing six rats. While olive oil was given to control group, 100 mg kg(-1)  CBO was administered to the other group by gavage daily for 10 weeks. Body and reproductive organ weights, sperm characteristics, testicular lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities, and testicular apoptosis via terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) method were examined. A significant decrease in malondialdehyde level and marked increases in reduced glutathione level, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were observed in rats treated with CBO compared with the control group. CBO consumption provided a significant increase in weights of testes and epididymides, epididymal sperm concentration, sperm motility and diameter of seminiferous tubules when compared with the control group. However, CBO consumption tended to decrease the abnormal sperm rate and apoptotic germ cell count, but it did not reach statistical significance. It is concluded that CBO has improvement effect on testicular oxidant-antioxidant balance and sperm quality, and its consumption may be useful for asthenozoospermic men.

  1. Microfilaments and microtubules control the shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of cortical mitochondria in characean internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Foissner, I

    2004-12-01

    The shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of mitochondria in characean internodal cells were studied by visualizing fluorescent dyes with confocal laser scanning microscopy and conducting drug-inhibitor experiments. Shape, size, number, and distribution of mitochondria varied according to the growth status and the metabolic activity within the cell. Vermiform (sausage-shaped), disc-, or amoeba-like mitochondria were present in elongating internodes, whereas very young cells and older cells that had completed growth contained short, rodlike organelles only. Mitochondria were evenly distributed and passively transported in the streaming endoplasm. In the cortex, mitochondria were sandwiched between the plasma membrane and the stationary chloroplast files and distributed in relation to the pattern of pH banding. Highest mitochondrial densities were found at the acid, photosynthetically more active regions, whereas the alkaline sites contained fewer and smaller mitochondria. In the cortex of elongating cells, small mitochondria moved slowly along microtubules or actin filaments. The shape and motility of giant mitochondria depended on the simultaneous interaction with both cytoskeletal systems. There was no microtubule-dependent motility in the cortex of nonelongating mature cells and mitochondria only occasionally travelled along actin filaments. These observations suggest that mitochondria of characean internodes possess motor proteins for microtubules and actin filaments, both of which can be used either as tracks for migration or for immobilization. The cortical cytoskeleton probably controls the spatiotemporal distribution of mitochondria within the cell and promotes their association with chloroplasts, which is necessary for exchange of metabolites during photosynthesis and detoxification.

  2. Cell population indexes of spermatogenic yield and testicular sperm reserves in adult jaguars (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Maria Helena Ferreira; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto da; Fonseca, Cláudio César; da Costa, Eduardo Paulino; Costa, Deiler Sampaio; Peixoto, Juliano Vogas

    2010-03-01

    The intrinsic yield of spermatogenesis and supporting capacity of Sertoli cells are the desirable indicators of sperm production in a species. The objective of the present study was to quantify intrinsic yield and the Sertoli cell index in the spermatogenic process and estimate testicular sperm reserves by histological assessment of fragments obtained by testicular biopsy of five adult jaguars in captivity. The testicular fragments were fixed in 4% glutaric aldehyde, dehydrated at increasing alcohol concentrations, included into hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and were cut into 4 microm thickness. In the seminiferous epithelium of the jaguar, 9.2 primary spermatocytes in pre-leptotene were produced by "A" spermatogonia. During the meiotic divisions only 3.2 spermatids were produced by a primary spermatocyte. The general spermatogenic yield of the jaguar was about 23.4 cells and each Sertoli cell was able to maintain about 19.2 germ cells, 11 of them were round spermatids. In each seminiferous epithelium cycle about 166 million spermatozoa were produced by each gram of testicular tissue. In adult jaguars, the general spermatogenic yield was similar to the yield observed in pumas, greater than that observed for the domestic cat, but less compared to most domestic animals.

  3. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  4. Transforming growth factor beta 1 enhances expression of 50 kDa protein related to 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in human sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Naz, R K; Kumar, R

    1991-01-01

    Human cellular polypeptide factors, namely interferon-alpha, interferon-gamma transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, and TGF-beta 1, were analyzed for their effect on motility of human sperm cells. Both interferons caused an inhibition of sperm cell motility due to direct cytotoxic effects without inducing 2'-5' oligoadenylate [2-5(A)]synthetase activity. TGF-alpha affected neither motility nor the levels of 2-5(A) synthetase in sperm cells. TGF-beta 1 had no affect on sperm motility, yet it caused an induction of 2-5(A)synthetase activity. Western immunoblot analysis of TGF-beta 1-treated sperm indicated an enhancement of a 50 kDa protein. Metabolic labeling of sperm cells revealed biosynthesis of one major protein of 50 kDa and at least five minor proteins in the range of 30-92 kDa; the level of 50 kDa protein increased after treatment with TGF-beta 1. The treatment of sperm cells with TGF-beta 1 did not affect their penetration in zona-free hamster eggs (SPA). These results indicate that TGF-beta 1 enhances expression of a 50 kDa protein related to 2-5(A) synthetase in human sperm cells along with other minor proteins, and this increase does not affect sperm motility and SPA.

  5. Establishment of subcellular fractionation techniques to monitor the intracellular fate of polymer therapeutics II. Identification of endosomal and lysosomal compartments in HepG2 cells combining single-step subcellular fractionation with fluorescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Manunta, Maria; Izzo, Lorella; Duncan, Ruth; Jones, Arwyn Tomos

    2007-01-01

    As they are often designed for lysosomotropic, endosomotropic and/or transcellular delivery, an understanding of intracellular trafficking pathways is essential to enable optimised design of novel polymer therapeutics. Here, we describe a single-step density gradient subcellular fractionation method combined with fluorescent detection analysis that provides a new tool for characterisation of endocytic traffic of polymer therapeutics. Hepatoma (HepG2) cells were used as a model and cell breakage was optimised using a cell cracker to ensure assay of the whole cell population. After removal of unbroken cells and nuclei, the cell lysate as a post-nuclear supernatant (PNS) was layered onto an iodixanol (OptiPrep) density gradient optimised to 5-20%. Early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes were identified from gradient fractions by immunoblotting for marker proteins early endosome antigen 1 (EEA 1) and lysosomal associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP 1) using horseradish peroxidase or fluorescently-labelled secondary antibodies. Lysosomes were also detected using N-acetyl-beta-glucosamindase (Hex A) activity. In addition, cells were incubated with Texas-red labelled transferrin (TxR-Tf) for 5 min to specifically label early endosomes and this was directly detected from SDS-PAGE gels. Internalised macromolecules and colloidal particles can potentially alter vesicle buoyant density. To see if typical macromolecules of interest would alter vesicle density or perturb vesicle traffic, HepG2 cells were incubated with dextran or a polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-polyester dendron G4 (1 mg/ml for 24 h). The PEG-polyester dendron G4 caused a slight redistribution of endocytic structures to lower density fractions but immunofluorescence microscopy showed no obvious dendron effects. In conclusion, the combined subcellular fractionation with fluorescent imaging approach described here can be used as a tool for both fundamental cell biology research and/or the quantitative localisation

  6. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules.

  7. Impact of Bep or Carboplatin Chemotherapy on Testicular Function and Sperm Nucleus of Subjects with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Marco; Berretta, Massimiliano; Bottacin, Alberto; Palego, Pierfrancesco; Sartini, Barbara; Cosci, Ilaria; Finos, Livio; Selice, Riccardo; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Young males have testicular germ cells tumors (TGCT) as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO), the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (CT), basing on tumor histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis, and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP), after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group), 54 with carboplatin (CARB group), and 58 were just surveilled (S-group). All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0) and after 12 (T1) and 24 months (T2) from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones, and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1, we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S-group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S-group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after 2 years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after 1 and 2 years from the end of treatment. Despite

  8. Impact of Bep or Carboplatin Chemotherapy on Testicular Function and Sperm Nucleus of Subjects with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Marco; Berretta, Massimiliano; Bottacin, Alberto; Palego, Pierfrancesco; Sartini, Barbara; Cosci, Ilaria; Finos, Livio; Selice, Riccardo; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Young males have testicular germ cells tumors (TGCT) as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO), the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (CT), basing on tumor histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis, and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP), after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group), 54 with carboplatin (CARB group), and 58 were just surveilled (S-group). All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0) and after 12 (T1) and 24 months (T2) from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones, and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1, we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S-group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S-group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after 2 years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after 1 and 2 years from the end of treatment. Despite

  9. Analysis of the influence of subcellular localization of the HIV Rev protein on Rev-dependent gene expression by multi-fluorescence live-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Horst; Hadian, Kamyar; Ziegler, Manja; Weierich, Claudia; Kramer-Hammerle, Susanne; Kleinschmidt, Andrea; Erfle, Volker; Brack-Werner, Ruth . E-mail: brack@gsf.de

    2006-02-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus Rev protein is a post-transcriptional activator of HIV gene expression. Rev is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein that displays characteristic nuclear/nucleolar subcellular localization in various cell lines. Cytoplasmic localization of Rev occurs under various conditions disrupting Rev function. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between localization of Rev and its functional activity in living cells. A triple-fluorescent imaging assay, called AQ-FIND, was established for automatic quantitative evaluation of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of fluorescently tagged proteins. This assay was used to screen 500 rev genes generated by error-prone PCR for Rev mutants with different localization phenotypes. Activities of the Rev mutants were determined with a second quantitative, dual-fluorescent reporter assay. In HeLa cells, the majority of nuclear Rev mutants had activities similar to wild-type Rev. The activities of Rev mutants with abnormal cytoplasmic localization ranged from moderately impaired to nonfunctional. There was no linear correlation between subcellular distribution and levels of Rev activity. In astrocytes, nuclear Rev mutants showed similar impaired activities as the cytoplasmic wild-type Rev. Our data suggest that steady-state subcellular localization is not a primary regulator of Rev activity but may change as a secondary consequence of altered Rev function. The methodologies described here have potential for studying the significance of subcellular localization for functions of other regulatory factors.

  10. Subcellular Raman Microspectroscopy Imaging of Nucleic Acids and Tryptophan for Distinction of Normal Human Skin Cells and Tumorigenic Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Paola; Berning, Manuel; Boukamp, Petra; Volkmer, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    At present, tumor diagnostic imaging is commonly based on hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemical staining of biopsies, which requires tissue excision, fixation, and staining with exogenous marker molecules. Here, we report on label-free tumor imaging using confocal spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which exploits the intrinsic vibrational contrast of endogenous biomolecular species. We present a chemically specific and quantitative approach to monitoring normal human skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts) as well as the human HaCaT in vitro skin carcinogenesis model and the tumor-derived MET in vivo skin cancer progression model. Mapping the amplitudes of two spectrally well isolated Raman bands at 752 and 785 cm(-1) allowed for direct visualization of the distributions representative of tryptophan-rich proteins and nucleic acids, respectively, with subcellular spatial resolution. Using these Raman markers, it was feasible to discriminate between normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and to confine all tumorigenic cells from both the NHEK and NHDF. First evidence for the successful application of the proposed intracellular nucleic acid and tryptophan Raman signatures for skin cancer diagnosis was further demonstrated in an organotypic cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas model, allowing for the identification of tumor cells and their surrounding stroma in the tissue context.

  11. PSORTdb: expanding the bacteria and archaea protein subcellular localization database to better reflect diversity in cell envelope structures

    PubMed Central

    Peabody, Michael A.; Laird, Matthew R.; Vlasschaert, Caitlyn; Lo, Raymond; Brinkman, Fiona S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization (SCL) is important for understanding protein function, genome annotation, and has practical applications such as identification of potential vaccine components or diagnostic/drug targets. PSORTdb (http://db.psort.org) comprises manually curated SCLs for proteins which have been experimentally verified (ePSORTdb), as well as pre-computed SCL predictions for deduced proteomes from bacterial and archaeal complete genomes available from NCBI (cPSORTdb). We now report PSORTdb 3.0. It features improvements increasing user-friendliness, and further expands both ePSORTdb and cPSORTdb with a focus on improving protein SCL data in cases where it is most difficult—proteins associated with non-classical Gram-positive/Gram-negative/Gram-variable cell envelopes. ePSORTdb data curation was expanded, including adding in additional cell envelope localizations, and incorporating markers for cPSORTdb to automatically computationally identify if new genomes to be analysed fall into certain atypical cell envelope categories (i.e. Deinococcus-Thermus, Thermotogae, Corynebacteriales/Corynebacterineae, including Mycobacteria). The number of predicted proteins in cPSORTdb has increased from 3 700 000 when PSORTdb 2.0 was released to over 13 000 000 currently. PSORTdb 3.0 will be of wider use to researchers studying a greater diversity of monoderm or diderm microbes, including medically, agriculturally and industrially important species that have non-classical outer membranes or other cell envelope features. PMID:26602691

  12. Sperm storage and spermatozoa interaction with epithelial cells in oviduct of Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaofan; Zhang, Linli; Le, Yuan; Waqas, Yasir; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Ullah, Shakeeb; Liu, Tengfei; Hu, Lisi; Li, Quanfu; Yang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Spermatozoa are known to be stored within the female genital tract after mating in various species to optimize timing of reproductive events such as copulation, fertilization, and ovulation. The mechanism supporting long-term sperm storage is still unclear in turtles. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the spermatozoa and oviduct in Chinese soft-shelled turtle by light and electron microscopy to reveal the potential cytological mechanism of long-term sperm storage. Spermatozoa were stored in isthmus, uterine, and vagina of the oviduct throughout the year, indicating long-term sperm storage in vivo. Sperm heads were always embedded among the cilia and even intercalated into the apical hollowness of the ciliated cells in the oviduct mucosal epithelium. The stored spermatozoa could also gather in the gland conduit. There was no lysosome distribution around the hollowness of the ciliated cell, suggesting that the ciliated cells of the oviduct can support the spermatozoa instead of phagocytosing them in the oviduct. Immune cells were sparse in the epithelium and lamina propria of oviduct, although few were found inside the blood vessel of mucosa, which may be an indication of immune tolerance during sperm storage in the oviduct of the soft-shelled turtle. These characteristics developed in the turtle benefited spermatozoa survival for a long time as extraneous cells in the oviduct of this species. These findings would help to improve the understanding of reproductive regularity and develop strategies of species conservation in the turtle. The Chinese soft-shelled turtle may be a potential model for uncovering the mechanism behind the sperm storage phenomenon.

  13. Sperm storage and spermatozoa interaction with epithelial cells in oviduct of Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaofan; Zhang, Linli; Le, Yuan; Waqas, Yasir; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Ullah, Shakeeb; Liu, Tengfei; Hu, Lisi; Li, Quanfu; Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Spermatozoa are known to be stored within the female genital tract after mating in various species to optimize timing of reproductive events such as copulation, fertilization, and ovulation. The mechanism supporting long-term sperm storage is still unclear in turtles. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the spermatozoa and oviduct in Chinese soft-shelled turtle by light and electron microscopy to reveal the potential cytological mechanism of long-term sperm storage. Spermatozoa were stored in isthmus, uterine, and vagina of the oviduct throughout the year, indicating long-term sperm storage in vivo. Sperm heads were always embedded among the cilia and even intercalated into the apical hollowness of the ciliated cells in the oviduct mucosal epithelium. The stored spermatozoa could also gather in the gland conduit. There was no lysosome distribution around the hollowness of the ciliated cell, suggesting that the ciliated cells of the oviduct can support the spermatozoa instead of phagocytosing them in the oviduct. Immune cells were sparse in the epithelium and lamina propria of oviduct, although few were found inside the blood vessel of mucosa, which may be an indication of immune tolerance during sperm storage in the oviduct of the soft-shelled turtle. These characteristics developed in the turtle benefited spermatozoa survival for a long time as extraneous cells in the oviduct of this species. These findings would help to improve the understanding of reproductive regularity and develop strategies of species conservation in the turtle. The Chinese soft-shelled turtle may be a potential model for uncovering the mechanism behind the sperm storage phenomenon. PMID:26357535

  14. Subcellular localization and complements of GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors on bullfrog retinal bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Du, J L; Yang, X L

    2000-08-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on retinal bipolar cells (BCs) are highly relevant to spatial and temporal integration of visual signals in the outer and inner retina. In the present work, subcellular localization and complements of GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors on BCs were investigated by whole cell recordings and local drug application via multi-barreled puff pipettes in the bullfrog retinal slice preparation. Four types of the BCs (types 1-4) were identified morphologically by injection of Lucifer yellow. According to the ramification levels of the axon terminals and the responses of these cells to glutamate (or kainate) applied at their dendrites, types 1 and 2 of BCs were supposed to be OFF type, whereas types 3 and 4 of BCs might be ON type. Bicuculline (BIC), a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, and imidazole-4-acetic acid (I4AA), a GABA(C) receptor antagonist, were used to distinguish GABA receptor-mediated responses. In all BCs tested, not only the axon terminals but also the dendrites showed high GABA sensitivity mediated by both GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors. Subcellular localization and complements of GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors at the dendrites and axon terminals were highly related to the dichotomy of OFF and ON BCs. In the case of OFF BCs, GABA(A) receptors were rather evenly distributed at the dendrites and axon terminals, but GABA(C) receptors were predominantly expressed at the axon terminals. Moreover, the relative contribution of GABA(C) receptors to the axon terminals was prevalent over that of GABA(A) receptors, while the situation was reversed at the dendrites. In the case of ON BCs, GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors both preferred to be expressed at the axon terminals; relative contributions of these two GABA receptor subtypes to both the sites were comparable, while GABA(C) receptors were much less expressed than GABA(A) receptors. GABA(A), but not GABA(C) receptors, were expressed clusteringly at axons of a population of BCs. In a

  15. Subcellular compartment-specific molecular diversity of pre- and postsynaptic GABAB-activated GIRK channels in Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Aguado, Carolina; Ciruela, Francisco; Martín, Ricardo; Colón, José; Cabañero, María José; Gassmann, Martin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Wickman, Kevin; Bettler, Bernhard; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Luján, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Activation of G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K+ (GIRK or Kir3) channels by metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid (B) (GABAB) receptors is an essential signalling pathway controlling neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in the brain. To investigate the relationship between GIRK channel subunits and GABAB receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells at post- and pre-synaptic sites, we used biochemical, functional and immunohistochemical techniques. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that GIRK subunits are co-assembled with GABAB receptors in the cerebellum. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the subunit composition of GIRK channels in Purkinje cell spines is compartment-dependent. Thus, at extrasynaptic sites GIRK channels are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3, postsynaptic densities contain GIRK2/GIRK3 and dendritic shafts contain GIRK1/GIRK3. The postsynaptic association of GIRK subunits with GABAB receptors in Purkinje cells is supported by the subcellular regulation of the ion channel and the receptor in mutant mice. At presynaptic sites, GIRK channels localized to parallel fibre terminals are formed by GIRK1/GIRK2/GIRK3 and co-localize with GABAB receptors. Consistent with this morphological evidence we demonstrate their functional interaction at axon terminals in the cerebellum by showing that GIRK channels play a role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABAB receptors. The association of GIRK channels and GABAB receptors with excitatory synapses at both post- and presynaptic sites indicates their intimate involvement in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellum. PMID:19558451

  16. Efficient production of intersubspecific hybrid mice and embryonic stem cells by intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Shinmen, Akie; Honda, Arata; Ohkawa, Mika; Hirose, Michiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Yuzuriha, Misako; Miki, Hiromi; Mochida, Keiji; Inoue, Kimiko; Abe, Kuniya; Ito, Masao; Ogura, Atsuo

    2007-09-01

    Recently, mice and embryonic stem (ES) cells with allelic polymorphisms have been used extensively in the field of genetics and developmental biology. In this study, we examined whether intersubspecific hybrid mice and ES cells with these genotypes can be efficiently produced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Frozen-thawed spermatozoa from wild-derived strains, JF1 (Mus musculus molossinus), MSM (M. m. molossinus), HMI (M. m. castaneus), and SWN (M. m. spp.), were directly injected into mature oocytes from laboratory mice ([C57BL/6 x DBA2]F1; M. m. domesticus). The in vitro and in vivo developmental capacity of F1 embryos was not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05), and term offspring were efficiently obtained in all groups (27%-34% of transferred embryos). However, the mean body and placental weights of the offspring differed significantly with genotype (P < 5 x 10(-10)), with the HMI hybrid greatest in both body and placental weights. In an application study using these F1 offspring, we analyzed their mitochondrial DNA using intersubspecific polymorphisms and found the consistent disappearance of sperm mitochondrial DNA in the F1 progeny. In a second series of experiments, we generated F1 blastocysts by injecting MSM spermatozoa into C57BL/6 oocytes and used them to generate hybrid ES cell lines. The ES cell lines were established at a high efficiency (9 lines from 20 blastocysts) and their allelic polymorphisms were confirmed. Thus, ICSI using cryopreserved spermatozoa allows the efficient and immediate production of a number of F1 hybrid mice and ES cell lines, which can be used for polymorphic analysis of mouse genetics.

  17. High-resolution quantitative imaging of subcellular morphology and cell refractometry in a liquid environment via endogenous mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-03-01

    Biological cells are composed primarily of water; and as such are challenging to image without staining since the induced intensity modulation of transmitted or reflected light is typically insufficient to permit acceptable contrast for optical imaging. This issue may be resolved with the aid of exogenous contrast agents, but this often has a deleterious effect on the cell and precludes in vivo imaging. A unique approach to this problem is afforded by the phase contrast microscope in which optical-path differences in transmitted light is exploited as a contrast mechanism for qualitative imaging. In recent years however, several quantitative phase imaging techniques have been developed which allow for diffraction limited endogenous-contrast imaging with excellent temporal resolution. We hereby present a laser scanning technique for quantitative phase imaging which achieves sub-diffraction limited resolution at the expense of temporal resolution. This instrument is based on a stabilized fiber interfometer which is incorporated into a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) for tri-modal imaging. Our latest results will focus on modifications made to this system to facilitate imaging in a liquid environment. A simple approach for achieving stable shear-force feedback operation in a liquid will be presented. Acquired high resolution images of white blood cells revealed detailed sub-cellular features. Images of fibroblast cells in air and in a liquid environment confirm the efficacy of the feedback operation in a liquid. Moreover, we demonstrate cell refractometry capability without the need for ad hoc modifications. These results clearly highlight the unique potential of this instrument for the study of living cells.

  18. Subcellular localization of chorismate-mutase isoenzymes in protoplasts from mesophyll and suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris.

    PubMed

    d'Amato, T A; Ganson, R J; Gaines, C G; Jensen, R A

    1984-09-01

    The subcellular locations of two readily discriminated chorismate-mutase (EC 5.4.99.5) isoenzymes from Nicotiana silvestris Speg. et Comes were determined in protoplasts prepared from both leaf tissue and isogenic suspension-cultured cells. Differential centrifugation was used to obtain fractions containing plastids, a mixture of mitochondria and microbodies, and soluble cytosolic proteins. Isoenzyme CM-1 is sensitive to feedback inhibition by L-tyrosine and comprises the major fraction of total chorismate mutase in suspension-cultured cells. Isoenzyme CM-2 is not inhibited by L-tyrosine and its expression is maximal in organismal (leaf) tissue. Isoenzyme CM-1 is located in the plastid compartment since (i) proplastids contained more CM-1 activity than chloroplasts, (ii) both chloroplast and proplastid fractions possessed the tyrosine-sensitive isoenzyme, and (iii) latency determinations on washed chloroplast preparations confirmed the internal location of a tyrosine-sensitive isoenzyme. Isoenzyme CM-2 is located in the cytosol since (i) the supernatant fractions were heavily enriched for the tyrosineinsensitive activity, and (ii) a relatively greater amount of tyrosine-insensitive enzyme was present in the supernatant fraction derived from organismal tissue.

  19. Elucidation of the involvement of p14, a sperm protein during maturation, capacitation and acrosome reaction of caprine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Pinki; Ghosh, Swatilekha; Jana, Kuladip; Sen, Parimal C

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilization. Although progress is being made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little has been yet explored about the potential role(s) of individual sperm cell protein during this process. Therefore elucidation of the role of different sperm proteins in the process of capacitation might be of great importance to understand the process of fertilization. The present work describes the partial characterization of a 14-kDa protein (p14) detected in goat spermatozoa using an antibody directed against the purified protein. Confocal microscopic analysis reveals that the protein is present in both the intracellular and extracellular regions of the acrosomal and postacrosomal portion of caudal sperm head. Though subcellular localization shows that p14 is mainly cytosolic, however it is also seen to be present in peripheral plasma membrane and soluble part of acrosome. Immuno-localization experiment shows change in the distribution pattern of this protein upon induction of capacitation in sperm cells. Increased immunolabeling in the anterior head region of live spermatozoa is also observed when these cells are incubated under capacitating conditions, whereas most sperm cells challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187 to acrosome react, lose their labeling almost completely. Intracellular distribution of p14 also changes significantly during acrosome reaction. Interestingly, on the other hand the antibody raised against this 14-kDa sperm protein enhances the forward motility of caprine sperm cells. Rose-Bengal staining method shows that this anti-p14 antibody also decreases the number of acrosome reacted cells if incubated with capacitated sperm cells before induction of acrosome reaction. All these results taken together clearly indicate that p14 is intimately involved and plays a critical role in the acrosomal membrane fusion event.

  20. Subcellular and Dynamic Coordination between Src Activity and Cell Protrusion in Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Yue; Qian, Tongcheng; Wu, Yiqian; Seong, Jihye; Gong, Ya; Ma, Hongwei; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2015-01-01

    Migration of endothelial cells is essential for wound healing and angiogenesis. Src kinase activity plays important roles at the protrusions of migrating endothelial cells. However, the spatiotemporal coordination between Src kinase activity and the protrusion of cell edge remains unclear. Therefore, we investigate these coordinated molecular events at the initiation of cell migration, by integrating microfabrication, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, and automated computational image analysis. We demonstrate that the physical release of restrictive micropattern triggered a significant decrease of Src activity at the protrusive edge of endothelial cells. Computational cross-correlation analysis reveals that the decrease of Src activity occurred earlier in time, and was well-coordinated with the protrusion of cell edge in polarized cells, but not in non-polarized cells. These results suggest that the spatiotemporal control of Src kinase activity is well-coordinated with cell polarization and protrusion in endothelial cells upon the release of physical constraint, as that experienced by endothelial cells sprouting from stiff tumor micro-environment during angiogenesis. Therefore, our integrative approach enabled the discovery of a new model where Src is de-activated in coordination with membrane protrusion, providing important insights into the regulation of endothelial migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26261043

  1. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Yang, Katy S; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body, but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors and model drug behaviour under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of the PARP-1 inhibitor distribution in real time, showing that PARP-1 inhibitors reach their cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modelling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumour cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARP-1 inhibitor concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA-repair inhibition. This suggests that single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modelling improve our understanding of drug action at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  2. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Yang, Katy S.; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H.; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors (PARPi) and model drug behavior under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of PARPi distribution in real time, showing that PARPi reaches its cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modeling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumor cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARPi concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA repair inhibition. This suggests that single cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modeling improves our understanding of drug action at single cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  3. Using Femtosecond Laser Subcellular Surgery as a Tool to Study Cell Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, N; Colvin, M E; Huser, T

    2007-02-27

    Research on cellular function and regulation would be greatly advanced by new instrumentation using methods to alter cellular processes with spatial discrimination on the nanometer-scale. We present a novel technique for targeting submicrometer sized organelles or other biologically important regions in living cells using femtosecond laser pulses. By tightly focusing these pulses beneath the cell membrane, we can vaporize cellular material inside the cell through nonlinear optical processes. This technique enables non-invasive manipulation of the physical structure of a cell with sub-micrometer resolution. We propose to study the role mitochondria play in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our technique provides a unique tool for the study of cell biology.

  4. Sperm-cell ultrastructure of North American sturgeons. IV. The pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus Forbes and Richardson, 1905)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiLauro, M.N.; Walsh, R.A.; Peiffer, M.; Bennett, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sperm-cell morphology and ultrastructure in the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) were examined using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Metrics and structure were compared with similar metrics obtained from other published descriptions of sturgeon sperm cells. General morphology was found to be similar to that of sperm cells of the white (Acipenser transmontanus), lake (A. fulvescens), stellate (A. stellatus), Chinese (A. sinensis), Russian (A. gueldenstaedti colchicus), and shortnose (A. brevirostrum) sturgeons, which all shared a gradual tapering of the nuclear diameter from posterior to anterior, unlike that of the Atlantic sturgeon (A. oxyrhynchus). The sperm cell of the pallid sturgeon was similar in size to that of the Atlantic sturgeon, being only slightly larger. The sperm cell of the pallid sturgeon differed from those of other sturgeons chiefly in the acrosomal region, where the posterolateral projections (PLP) have the shape of an acute triangle and are arranged in a spiral about the longitudinal axis of the cell. The PLP were longer than those of other sturgeons, being twice the length of those of the Atlantic sturgeon and 58% longer than those of the lake sturgeon. Also, in cross section the acrosome had the shape of a hollow cone rather than the cap of an oak tree acorn, as was found in ultrastructural studies of other sturgeons. In addition, we were able to confirm that the structural arrangement of the distal centriole of the midpiece is identical with that of the proximal centriole: nine sets of microtubular triplets around the periphery of the centriole. This information is of potential use to fishery biologists, forensic biologists, zoologists, reproductive physiologists, taxonomists, evolutionary biologists, and aquaculturists.

  5. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Bruce S.; Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Joldes, Grand R.; Rich, Addison J.; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an ‘agent’, meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory. PMID:26452000

  6. Analysis of Nuclear RNA Interference (RNAi) in Human Cells by Subcellular Fractionation and Argonaute Loading

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Li, Liande; Janowski, Bethany A.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known for its ability to regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In mammalian cell nuclei, however, the impact of RNAi has remained more controversial. A key technical hurdle has been a lack of optimized protocols for the isolation and analysis of cell nuclei. Here we describe a simplified protocol for nuclei isolation from cultured cells that incorporates a method for obtaining nucleoplasmic and chromatin fractions and removing cytoplasmic contamination. Cell fractions can then be used to detect the presence and activity of RNAi factors in the nucleus. We present a protocol for investigating an early step in RNAi, Argonaute protein loading with small RNAs, which is enabled by our improved extract preparations. These protocols facilitate characterization of nuclear RNAi and can be applied to the analysis of other nuclear proteins and pathways. From cellular fractionation to analysis of Argonaute loading results, this protocol takes 4–6 d to complete. PMID:25079428

  7. Identical sets of methylated and nonmethylated genes in Ciona intestinalis sperm and muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The discovery of gene body methylation, which refers to DNA methylation within gene coding region, suggests an as yet unknown role of DNA methylation at actively transcribed genes. In invertebrates, gene bodies are the primary targets of DNA methylation, and only a subset of expressed genes is modified. Results Here we investigate the tissue variability of both the global levels and distribution of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. We find that global 5mC content of early developmental embryos is high, but is strikingly reduced in body wall tissues. We chose sperm and adult muscle cells, with high and reduced levels of global 5mC respectively, for genome-wide analysis of 5mC targets. By means of CXXC-affinity purification followed by deep sequencing (CAP-seq), and genome-wide bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq), we designated body-methylated and unmethylated genes in each tissue. Surprisingly, body-methylated and unmethylated gene groups are identical in the sperm and muscle cells. Our analysis of microarray expression data shows that gene body methylation is associated with broad expression throughout development. Moreover, transgenic analysis reveals contrasting gene body methylation at an identical gene-promoter combination when integrated at different genomic sites. Conclusions We conclude that gene body methylation is not a direct regulator of tissue specific gene expression in C. intestinalis. Our findings reveal constant targeting of gene body methylation irrespective of cell type, and they emphasize a correlation between gene body methylation and ubiquitously expressed genes. Our transgenic experiments suggest that the promoter does not determine the methylation status of the associated gene body. PMID:24279449

  8. The effect of oviductal deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 over porcine sperm is mediated by a signal transduction pathway that involves pro-AKAP4 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Teijeiro, Juan Manuel; Marini, Patricia Estela

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between sperm and oviduct results in the selection of sperm with certain qualities. Porcine oviductal deleted in malignant brain tumor 1, DMBT1 (previously called sperm-binding glycoprotein, SBG), has been proposed to be implicated in sperm selection through acrosome alteration and suppression of motility of a subpopulation of sperm that have begun capacitation prematurely. It produces in vitro acrosome alteration and decrease of motility of boar sperm, concomitant with tyrosine phosphorylation of a 97 kDa sperm protein (p97). We hypothesized that the phosphorylation of p97 may be a link between DMBT1 sensing by a subpopulation of boar sperm and its biological effect. In this work, p97 was identified by mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation as a porcine homologue of AKAP4. Pro-AKAP4 was localized by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation to the periacrosomal membranes and was shown to be tyrosine phosphorylated by DMBT1 regardless of the presence of calcium or bicarbonate, and of cAMP analogs, protein kinase A inhibitors, or a protein kinase C inductor. A processed ∼80 kDa form of AKAP4 was also detected at the tail of boar sperm, which was not tyrosine phosphorylated by DMBT1 under the conditions tested. Immunohistochemistry of testis showed presence of AKAP4 in boar sperm precursor cells. The evidence presented here supports the involvement of AKAP4 in the formation of the fibrous sheath on boar precursor sperm cells and implicates the phosphorylation of pro-AKAP4 as an early step in the signal transduction pathway gated by DMBT1 that leads to sperm selection through acrosome alteration. PMID:22457434

  9. Why so many sperm cells? Not only a possible means of mitigating the hazards inherent to human reproduction but also an indicator of an exaptation

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Redundancy—the excess of supply over necessity—has recently been proposed for human sperm cells. However, the apparent superfluity of cell numbers may be necessary in order to circumvent the hazards, many of which can be quantified, that can occur during the transition from gametogenesis within the testes to zygosis within the female reproductive tract. Sperm cell numbers are directly related to testicular volume, and it is owing to a redundancy, and the possible exaptation, of this latter parameter that a putative excess of sperm cells is perceived. PMID:27574542

  10. Intracellular uptake, trafficking and subcellular distribution of folate conjugated single walled carbon nanotubes within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bin; Yu, De-cai; Chang, Shu-quan; Chen, Da; Dai, Yao-dong; Ding, Yitao

    2008-09-01

    Herein we studied the uptake, trafficking and distribution of folate conjugated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) within living cells. SWNTs were noncovalently functionalized with chitosan and then linked with folate acid and fluorescence dye Alexa Fluor 488 (denoted FA-SWNTs). Hep G2 cells were cultured in vitro and incubated with FA-SWNTs at different levels. The FA-SWNTs exhibited a concentration-dependent uptake within Hep G2 cells, and Hep G2 cells were able to internalize FA-SWNTs via a folate receptor-mediated pathway. The distribution of nanotubes inside cells demonstrated that the FA-SWNTs only locate in the cytoplasm and not in nuclei, indicating the failure of transporting through the nuclear envelope. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed the presence of FA-SWNTs in lysosomes and the discharge to extracellular space after incubation with nanotubes for 5 h. No obvious cellular death rate was observed when the concentration of nanotubes was below 50 µg ml-1. However, cells with FA-SWNT uptake showed a concentration-dependent apoptosis. These discoveries might be helpful for understanding the interaction of SWNTs and living cells.

  11. Thin-film optoacoustic transducers for subcellular Brillouin oscillation imaging of individual biological cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cota, Fernando; Smith, Richard J; Moradi, Emilia; Marques, Leonel; Webb, Kevin F; Clark, Matt

    2015-10-01

    At low frequencies ultrasound is a valuable tool to mechanically characterize and image biological tissues. There is much interest in using high-frequency ultrasound to investigate single cells. Mechanical characterization of vegetal and biological cells by measurement of Brillouin oscillations has been demonstrated using ultrasound in the GHz range. This paper presents a method to extend this technique from the previously reported single-point measurements and line scans into a high-resolution acoustic imaging tool. Our technique uses a three-layered metal-dielectric-metal film as a transducer to launch acoustic waves into the cell we want to study. The design of this transducer and measuring system is optimized to overcome the vulnerability of a cell to the exposure of laser light and heat without sacrificing the signal-to-noise ratio. The transducer substrate shields the cell from the laser radiation, efficiently generates acoustic waves, facilitates optical detection in transmission, and aids with heat dissipation away from the cell. This paper discusses the design of the transducers and instrumentation and presents Brillouin frequency images on phantom, fixed, and living cells. PMID:26479614

  12. A sperm cell toxicity test procedure for the Mediterranean species Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Volpi Ghirardini, A; Arizzi Novelli, A

    2001-04-01

    This work describes the procedure developed in our laboratories for performing sperm cell toxicity tests using the autochthonous North Adriatic sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus Lmk. The procedure, derived from Dinnel (1987), was developed following the auto-ecological characteristics of P. lividus and in harmony with US Environmental Protection Agency standard procedures. Experiments conducted over a four-year period using copper as reference toxicant allowed the evaluation of method precision and intralaboratory reproducibility by different operators using organisms from different batches, in changing spatial (sampling sites) and temporal conditions (EC50 0.055 mg l.1 +/- 0.0081 SD; CV = 14.7%; n = 25). These experiments with copper provided EC50 and NOEC data (0.032 +/- 0.008 mg l-1). Results demonstrated the reliability of the method, as compared to other oceanic sea urchin species. PMID:11329806

  13. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Live-cell CLEM of subcellular targets: an optimized procedure for polymer-based imaging substrates.

    PubMed

    Padman, Benjamin S; Ramm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy permits the visualization of ultrastructure details associated with dynamic biological processes. On the optical level, fluorescence microscopy can be further combined with functional studies of intracellular processes and manipulation of biological samples using laser light. However, the major challenge is to relocate intracellular compartments in three dimensions after the sample has undergone an extensive EM sample preparation process. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for live-cell CLEM that provides easy guidance for 3D relocalization. Based on the use of the novel polymer film TOPAS as direct imaging substrate, we provide a setup that uses highly visible toner particles for tracking the region of interest in 2D and fiducial markers for the 3D relocation of intracellular structures. An example is given where a single mitochondria is targeted by laser microirradiation in live-cell fluorescence microscopy. After relocating the same structure in 3D in serial EM sections, the changes to the mitochondrial ultrastructure are observed by TEM. The method is suitable for correlation of live-cell microscopy of cells and can be performed using any inverted optical microscope. PMID:25287846

  15. Metabolism and bioactivation of 3-methylindole by Clara cells, alveolar macrophages, and subcellular fractions from rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Thornton-Manning, J R; Nichols, W K; Manning, B W; Skiles, G L; Yost, G S

    1993-10-01

    3-Methylindole (3MI), a fermentation product of tryptophan produced by intestinal and ruminal microflora, has been shown to cause pneumotoxicity in several species subsequent to cytochrome P450-mediated biotransformation. Among several species studied, rabbits are comparatively resistant to 3MI-induced pneumotoxicity, especially when compared to goats or mice. In this study, rabbit pulmonary cells and subcellular fractions were used to examine the metabolism and bioactivation of 3MI. A covalent-binding metabolite was produced in 3MI incubations by both Clara cells and macrophages. The addition of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole, to these incubations inhibited the production of covalent-binding metabolite(s) by 94% in Clara cells and only 24% in macrophages. In incubations of Clara cells or macrophages with 3MI and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a polar conjugate was detected and tentatively identified as an adduct of 3-hydroxy-3-methylindolenine (3H3MIN). Also identified were 3[(N-glutathione-S-yl)-methyl]-indole (3MI-GSH) and 3-methyloxindole (3MOI). In rabbit lung microsomal incubations with 3MI and glutathione (GSH), 3MI-GSH, 3MOI, indole-3-carbinol, and a GSH adduct of 3H3MIN were identified. The addition of cytosol to the microsomal incubations with GSH did not increase the rate of formation of the GSH adducts, indicating that cytosolic GSH-S-transferases are not essential in the formation of these metabolites. GSH significantly decreased the covalent binding of an electrophilic metabolite in microsomal incubations. These data suggest that GSH may be important in the mitigation of 3MI toxicity. Furthermore, the comparison of 3MI bioactivation to electrophilic intermediates in Clara cells and alveolar macrophages suggests that 3MI is metabolized by different oxidative pathways in the two different cell types, although the same metabolites were produced by the two cell types. This study shows that rabbit pulmonary enzymes are capable of

  16. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 mediates spermatozoa-oviductal epithelial cell interaction to protect human spermatozoa from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Venus Wenxin; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Lee, Yin-Lau; Lam, Kevin K W; Ko, Jennifer K Y; Yeung, William S B; Ho, Pak-Chung; Chiu, Philip C N

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major cause of sperm dysfunction. Excessive ROS generation reduces fertilization and enhances DNA damage of spermatozoa. Interaction between spermatozoa and oviductal epithelial cells improves the fertilizing ability of and reduces chromatin damage in spermatozoa. Our previous data showed that oviductal epithelial cell membrane proteins interact with the human spermatozoa and protect them from ROS-induced reduction in sperm motility, membrane integrity and DNA integrity. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 (sFUT5) is a membrane carbohydrate-binding protein on human spermatozoa. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that sFUT5 is involved in human spermatozoa-oviduct interaction and the beneficial effects of such interaction on the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa. Anti-sFUT5 antibody-treated spermatozoa had reduced binding to oviductal membrane proteins. It is consistent with the result that affinity-purified sFUT5 is bound to the epithelial lining of human oviduct and to the immortalized human oviductal epithelial cell line, OE-E6/E7. Pretreatment of spermatozoa with anti-sFUT5 antibody and oviductal membrane proteins with sFUT5 suppressed the protective action of oviductal membrane proteins against ROS/cryopreservation-induced oxidative damage in spermatozoa. Asialofetuin, a reported sFUT5 substrate, can partly mimic the protective effect of oviductal epithelial cell membrane proteins on sperm motility, membrane and DNA integrity. The results enhance our understanding on the protective mechanism of oviduct on sperm functions.

  17. The irradiation of rabbit sperm cells with He-Ne laser prevents their in vitro liquid storage dependent damage.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, Nicolaia; Rosato, Maria Pina; Paventi, Gianluca; Pizzuto, Roberto; Gambacorta, Mario; Manchisi, Angelo; Passarella, Salvatore

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different energy doses of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation on both mitochondrial bioenergetics functions and functional quality of rabbit spermatozoa during 48 h of in vitro liquid storage at 15 degrees C. 11 rabbit semen pools were each divided into four aliquots: three of them were irradiated with He-Ne laser with different energy doses (3.96, 6.12 and 9.00 J/cm(2)) being the last control kept under the same experimental conditions without irradiation. Sperm motility, viability and acrosome integrity were monitored together with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity and the cell energy charge (EC) at 0, 24 and 48 h of storage. Irradiated samples stored for 24 and 48 h better maintained motility (P < 0.01), acrosome integrity (P < 0.01) and viability (P < 0.05) with respect to the control, particularly with the energy dose of 6.12 J/cm(2) that showed the most intense biostimulative effect. COX activity and EC were immediately increased by irradiation particularly in the treatments 6.12 and 9.00 J/cm(2) (P < 0.05), that maintained their levels higher with respect to the control after 48 h of storage (P < 0.01). COX activity of rabbit sperm cells was positively correlated with EC (P < 0.05), viability (P < 0.01) and acrosome integrity (P < 0.05) parameters. These results indicate that the effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on sperm cells are mediated through the stimulation of the sperm mitochondrial respiratory chain and that this effect plays a significant role in the augmentation of the rabbit sperm cells' capability to survive during liquid storage conditions. PMID:19932573

  18. Generation and usage of aequorin lentiviral vectors for Ca(2+) measurement in sub-cellular compartments of hard-to-transfect cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dmitry; Bertoli, Alessandro; Sorgato, M Catia; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Targeted aequorin-based Ca(2+) probes represent an unprecedented tool for the reliable measurement of Ca(2+) concentration and dynamics in different sub-cellular compartments. The main advantages of aequorin are its proteinaceous nature, which allows attachment of a signal peptide for targeting aequorin to virtually any sub-cellular compartment; its low Ca(2+)-binding capacity; the wide range of Ca(2+) concentrations that can be measured, ranging from sub-micromolar to millimolar; its robust performance in aggressive environments, e.g., the strong acidic pH of the lysosomal lumen. Lentiviral vectors represent a popular tool to transduce post-mitotic or hard-to-transfect cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it has great potential for gene therapy. Last generation lentiviral vectors represent a perfect compromise for combining large insert size, ease of production and handling, and high degree of biosafety. Here, we describe strategies for cloning aequorin probes - targeted to the cytosol, sub-plasma membrane cytosolic domains, the mitochondrial matrix, and the endoplasmic reticulum lumen - into lentiviral vectors. We describe methods for the production of lentiviral particles, and provide examples of measuring Ca(2+) dynamics by such aequorin-encoding lentiviral vectors in sub-cellular compartments of hard-to-transfect cells, including immortalized striatal neurons, primary cerebellar granule neurons and endothelial progenitor cells, which provide suitable in vitro models for the study of different human diseases. PMID:26992273

  19. RhoH Regulates Subcellular Localization of ZAP-70 and Lck in T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Hee-Don; Siefring, Jamie E.; Hildeman, David A.; Gu, Yi; Williams, David A.

    2010-01-01

    RhoH is an hematopoietic-specific, GTPase-deficient Rho GTPase that plays a role in T development. We investigated the mechanisms of RhoH function in TCR signaling. We found that the association between Lck and CD3ζ was impaired in RhoH-deficient T cells, due to defective translocation of both Lck and ZAP-70 to the immunological synapse. RhoH with Lck and ZAP-70 localizes in the detergent-soluble membrane fraction where the complex is associated with CD3ζ phosphorylation. To determine if impaired translocation of ZAP-70 was a major determinant of defective T cell development, Rhoh-/- bone marrow cells were transduced with a chimeric myristoylation-tagged ZAP-70. Myr-ZAP-70 transduced cells partially reversed the in vivo defects of RhoH-associated thymic development and TCR signaling. Together, our results suggest that RhoH regulates TCR signaling via recruitment of ZAP-70 and Lck to CD3ζ in the immunological synapse. Thus, we define a new function for a RhoH GTPase as an adaptor molecule in TCR signaling pathway. PMID:21103055

  20. Segregation of sperm mitochondria in two- and four-cell embryos of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis: Implications for the mechanism of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cogswell, Andrew T; Kenchington, Ellen L R; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2006-07-01

    Species of the family Mytilidae have 2 mitochondrial genomes, one that is transmitted through the egg and one that is transmitted through the sperm. In the Mytilus edulis species complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus) there is also a strong mother-dependent sex-ratio bias in favor of one or the other sex among progeny from pair matings. In a previous study, we have shown that sperm mitochondria enter the egg and that their behavior during cell division is different depending on whether the egg originated from a female- or male-biased mother. Specifically, in eggs from females that produce mostly or exclusively daughters, sperm mitochondria disperse randomly among cells after egg division. In eggs from females that produce predominantly sons, sperm mitochondria tend to stay together in the same cell. Here, we extend these observations and show that in 2- and 4-cell embryos from male-biased mothers most sperm mitochondria are located near or at the cleavage furrow of the major cell, in contrast to embryos from female-biased mothers where there is no preferential association of sperm mitochondria with the cleavage furrow. This observation provides evidence for an early developmental mechanism through which sperm mitochondria are preferentially channeled into the primordial cells of male embryos, thus making the paternal mitochondrial genome the dominant mtDNA component of the male germ line.

  1. Phosphorylation and subcellular distribution of connexin43 in normal and stressed cells.

    PubMed

    Leykauf, Kerstin; Dürst, Matthias; Alonso, Angel

    2003-01-01

    We have developed polyclonal antibodies (SA226P) to a peptide of the human connexin43 (Cx43) protein between amino acids 271 and 288 containing phosphorylated S279 and S282. Antibodies specific for the phosphorylated form of the peptide were isolated by double immunoaffinity chromatography and were characterised using proteins of the cell line WB-F344, known to contain large amounts of Cx43. SA226P recognises specifically the slowest migrating Cx43 band in immunoblots of proteins isolated from untreated cells. In immunofluorescence experiments SA226P scarcely stains the plasma membrane in untreated cells in contrast to a commercial antibody recognising all isoforms of the Cx43 protein. EGF or stress treatment of the cells results in a rapid increase in the phosphorylated forms of Cx43 as revealed by immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence experiments reveal that both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated Cx43 could be found at the plasma membrane. Whether phosphorylation of S279/S282 takes place before or after incorporation of Cx43 into the membranes is so far unknown. More interestingly, confocal microscopy using our antibodies and a commercial antibody recognising all isoforms of Cx43 shows the coexistence of differentially phosphorylated forms of the protein at the plasma membrane. Our results indicate that MAP kinases erk1/2 are mainly responsible for this phosphorylation, as already published. Nevertheless, treatment of the cells with anisomycin, known to activate stress kinase p38 but not erk1/2, also results in a weak but reproducible Cx43 phosphorylation. PMID:12483281

  2. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  3. Increased expression with differential subcellular location of cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G in human CD4(+) T-cell activation and dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Harold; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Martinez-Navio, José M; Rodríguez-García, Marta; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Climent, Núria; Prado, Carolina; Gil, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; García, Felipe; Miró, José M; Franco, Rafael; Borras, Francesc E; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Gatell, José M; Gallart, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G) is an innate defense protein showing activity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Activated CD4(+) T cells are highly permissive for HIV-1 replication, whereas resting CD4(+) T cells are refractory. Dendritic cells (DCs), especially mature DCs, are also refractory. We investigated whether these differences could be related to a differential A3G expression and/or subcellular distribution. We found that A3G mRNA and protein expression is very low in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs, but increases strongly following T-cell activation and DC maturation. The Apo-7 anti-A3G monoclonal antibody (mAb), which was specifically developed, confirmed these differences at the protein level and disclosed that A3G is mainly cytoplasmic in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs. Nevertheless, A3G translocates to the nucleus in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, yet remaining cytoplasmic in matured DCs, a finding confirmed by immunoblotting analysis of cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Apo-7 mAb was able to immunoprecipitate endogenous A3G allowing to detect complexes with numerous proteins in activated-proliferating but not in resting CD4(+) T cells. The results show for the first time the nuclear translocation of A3G in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells.

  4. Mapping the subcellular mechanical properties of live cells in tissues with fluorescence emission-Brillouin imaging.

    PubMed

    Elsayad, Kareem; Werner, Stephanie; Gallemí, Marçal; Kong, Jixiang; Sánchez Guajardo, Edmundo R; Zhang, Lijuan; Jaillais, Yvon; Greb, Thomas; Belkhadir, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are central to the advent of multicellular life, and their mechanical properties are modulated by and impinge on intracellular signaling pathways that regulate vital cellular functions. High spatial-resolution mapping of mechanical properties in live cells is, however, extremely challenging. Thus, our understanding of how signaling pathways process physiological signals to generate appropriate mechanical responses is limited. We introduce fluorescence emission-Brillouin scattering imaging (FBi), a method for the parallel and all-optical measurements of mechanical properties and fluorescence at the submicrometer scale in living organisms. Using FBi, we showed that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure and cytoplasm viscoelasticity modulate the mechanical signatures of plant ECMs. We further established that the measured "stiffness" of plant ECMs is symmetrically patterned in hypocotyl cells undergoing directional growth. Finally, application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana with photoreceptor mutants revealed that red and far-red light signals are essential modulators of ECM viscoelasticity. By mapping the viscoelastic signatures of a complex ECM, we provide proof of principle for the organism-wide applicability of FBi for measuring the mechanical outputs of intracellular signaling pathways. As such, our work has implications for investigations of mechanosignaling pathways and developmental biology. PMID:27382028

  5. Fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of motile sperm cells and CHO cells in an optical trap (laser tweezers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Liu, Yagang; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Patrizio, Pasquale; Tadir, Yona; Sonek, Gregory J.; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    We describe fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging studies of optically trapped single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and motile human sperm cells. The NIR trapping beam was provided by a tunable, multimode continuous wave Ti:Sapphire laser. The beam was introduced into an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Fluorescence of cells in the single- beam gradient force optical trap was excited with a 488 nm microbeam (laser scanning microscopy) or with 365 nm radiation from a high- pressure mercury lamp. Modifications to NADH-attributed autofluorescence and Rhodamine- and Propidium Iodide-attributed xenofluorescence indicate a significant cell-damaging effect of 760 nm trapping beams. 760 nm effects produce a biological response comparable to UVA-induced oxidative stress and appear to be a consequence to two-photon absorption.

  6. Beholding the subcellular world in your PALM: nanometer resolution optical measurements of protein assemblies in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroff, Hari

    2012-02-01

    Key to understanding a protein's biological function is the accurate determination of its spatial distribution inside a cell. Although fluorescent protein markers enable specific targeting with molecular precision, much of this utility is lost when the resultant fusions are imaged with conventional, diffraction-limited optics. In response, several imaging modalities that rely on the stochastic activation and bleaching of single molecules, and that are capable of resolution 10x below the diffraction limit (250 nm for visible wavelengths), have emerged. This talk will cover superresolution imaging of biological structures using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). In addition to covering the theory, we will also discuss the use of the technique in understanding biological phenomena on the nanoscale, including the organization of bacterial chemoreceptors, the movement of actin in neuronal spines, and the stratification of focal adhesions.

  7. Characterization and sub-cellular localization of GalNAc-binding proteins isolated from human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yaogang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Hanjie; Zhang, Jiaxu; Sun, Xiu-Xuan; Chen, Wentian; Bian, Huijie; Li, Zheng

    2015-12-25

    Although the expression levels of total GalNAc-binding proteins (GNBPs) were up-regulated significantly in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated with transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1), yet little is known about the precise types, distribution and sub-cellular localization of the GNBPs in HSCs. Here, 264 GNBPs from the activated HSCs and 257 GNBPs from the quiescent HSCs were identified and annotated. A total of 46 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly up-regulated and 40 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly down-regulated in the activated HSCs. For example, the GNBPs (i.e. BTF3, COX17, and ATP5A1) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were up-regulated, and those (i.e. FAM114A1, ENO3, and TKT) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were down-regulated in the activated HSCs. The motifs of the isolated GNBPs showed that Proline residue had the maximum preference in consensus sequences. The western blotting showed the expression levels of COX17, and PRMT1 were significantly up-regulated, while, the expression level of CLIC1(B5) was down-regulated in the activated HSCs and liver cirrhosis tissues. Moreover, the GNBPs were sub-localized in the Golgi apparatus of HSCs. In conclusion, the precision alteration of the GNBPs referred to pathological changes in liver fibrosis/cirrhosis may provide useful information to find new molecular mechanism of HSC activation and discover the biomarkers for diagnosis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis as well as development of new anti-fibrotic strategies.

  8. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    development of subcellularly targeted DDSs that will deliver specific drugs to the nuclei of the target cells and will enhance efficacy and reduce toxicity of these drugs. PMID:26731220

  9. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    development of subcellularly targeted DDSs that will deliver specific drugs to the nuclei of the target cells and will enhance efficacy and reduce toxicity of these drugs.

  10. The modified method of two-step differential extraction of sperm and vaginal epithelial cell DNA from vaginal fluid mixed with semen.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Sekiguchi, K; Mizuno, N; Kasai, K; Sakai, I; Sato, H; Seta, S

    1995-03-21

    This investigation was undertaken as an efficient method for isolating sperm DNA from a mixed fluid sample which contains vaginal epithelial cells in a greater amount. The modified method of the two-step differential extraction procedure was found to be suitable for separating sperm DNA and vaginal epithelial cell DNA from the mixed stains. As the first step of digestion, vaginal epithelial cells in the mixed stains were lysed with Proteinase K and SDS, and sperm heads remaining in the lysed solution were collected by centrifugation. As the second step digestion, the sperm heads were lysed with the buffer containing Proteinase K, SDS and DTT as reducing agent. DNA fractions extracted from the two lysed solutions were enriched, one with sperm DNA and the other with vaginal epithelial cell DNA. MCT118(D1S80), ApoB VNTR and HLADQ alpha types of sperm DNA were detected and were confirmed by matching with corresponding male blood DNA. In the case of vaginal secretion mixed with semen of two males, the mixture of MCT118 types of the two males was detected in sperm DNA fraction.

  11. SLC6 family transporter SNF-10 is required for protease-mediated activation of sperm motility in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Fenker, Kristin E; Hansen, Angela A; Chong, Conrad A; Jud, Molly C; Duffy, Brittany A; Norton, J Paul; Hansen, Jody M; Stanfield, Gillian M

    2014-09-01

    Motility of sperm is crucial for their directed migration to the egg. The acquisition and modulation of motility are regulated to ensure that sperm move when and where needed, thereby promoting reproductive success. One specific example of this phenomenon occurs during differentiation of the ameboid sperm of Caenorhabditis elegans as they activate from a round spermatid to a mature, crawling spermatozoon. Sperm activation is regulated by redundant pathways to occur at a specific time and place for each sex. Here, we report the identification of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) transporter protein SNF-10 as a key regulator of C. elegans sperm activation in response to male protease activation signals. We find that SNF-10 is present in sperm and is required for activation by the male but not by the hermaphrodite. Loss of both snf-10 and a hermaphrodite activation factor render sperm completely insensitive to activation. Using in vitro assays, we find that snf-10 mutant sperm show a specific deficit in response to protease treatment but not to other activators. Prior to activation, SNF-10 is present in the plasma membrane, where it represents a strong candidate to receive signals that lead to subcellular morphogenesis. After activation, it shows polarized localization to the cell body region that is dependent on membrane fusions mediated by the dysferlin FER-1. Our discovery of snf-10 offers insight into the mechanisms differentially employed by the two sexes to accomplish the common goal of producing functional sperm, as well as how the physiology of nematode sperm may be regulated to control motility as it is in mammals.

  12. Apical blebs on sperm-storage tubule epithelial cell microvilli: their release and interaction with resident sperm in the turkey hen oviduct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Located at the anterior end of the turkey hen vagina are numerous discrete tubular invaginations of the surface epithelium, collectively referred to as the sperm-storage tubules (SSTs). Following mating or artificial insemination, sperm ascend the vagina, enter the SSTs, and ove...

  13. Ca exchange under non-perfusion-limited conditions in rat ventricular cells: Identification of subcellular compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.A.; Rich, T.L.; Orner, F.B. )

    1990-08-01

    Freshly prepared ventricular myocytes from rat hearts, aliquots of which were tested for sarcolemmal integrity by La exposure, were labeled at high 45Ca specific activity. Isotope was subsequently washed out at a perfusion rate of 2.8 ml/s with washout solution sampled each 1 s. No initial unrecorded period of washout was imposed. Four compartments were distinguishable: (1) a rapid compartment (RC) containing 2.6 mmol Ca/kg dry wt of La-displaceable Ca, half time (t1/2) less than 1 s; (2) an intermediate compartment(s) (IC) containing 2.1 mmol, t1/2 = 3 and 19 s; (3) a slow compartment (SC) containing 1.6 mmol, t1/2 = 3.6 min; (4) an inexchangeable compartment that demonstrated no 45Ca uptake after 60-min labeling containing 1.2 mmol. Introduction of 10 mM caffeine as a probe for sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content at various times during the washouts caused an increased release of 45Ca. The net increased 45Ca release plotted as a function of time at which caffeine was introduced produced a biexponential curve with t1/2s of 2 and 22 s, very similar to the t1/2s of the IC. Ryanodine (1 microM) significantly reduced the caffeine-induced 45Ca release, confirming the SR locus of the IC. Cells were perfused with 10 mM NaH2PO4 to specifically increase mitochondrial 45Ca labeling. Subsequent removal of PO4 at various times during washouts produced large increases in effluent 45Ca. A plot of the net peak release of 45Ca vs. time of PO4 removal was monoexponential with t1/2 = 3.3 min, very similar to the SC t1/2. The large La-accessible RC remains unlocalized, but the rapidity of its exchange places it in the sarcolemma and/or at sites in rapid equilibrium with the sarcolemma.

  14. Sperm Cell Population Dynamics in Ram Semen during the Cryopreservation Process

    PubMed Central

    Ramón, Manuel; Pérez-Guzmán, M. Dolores; Jiménez-Rabadán, Pilar; Esteso, Milagros C.; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Anel-López, Luis; Soler, Ana J.; Fernández-Santos, M. Rocío; Garde, J. Julián

    2013-01-01

    Background Sperm cryopreservation has become an indispensable tool in biology. Initially, studies were aimed towards the development of efficient freezing protocols in different species that would allow for an efficient storage of semen samples for long periods of time, ensuring its viability. Nowadays, it is widely known that an important individual component exists in the cryoresistance of semen, and efforts are aimed at identifying those sperm characteristics that may allow us to predict this cryoresistance. This knowledge would lead, ultimately, to the design of optimized freezing protocols for the sperm characteristics of each male. Methodology/Principal Findings We have evaluated the changes that occur in the sperm head dimensions throughout the cryopreservation process. We have found three different patterns of response, each of one related to a different sperm quality at thawing. We have been able to characterize males based on these patterns. For each male, its pattern remained constant among different ejaculates. This latter would imply that males always respond in the same way to freezing, giving even more importance to this sperm feature. Conclusions/Significance Changes in the sperm head during cryopreservation process have resulted useful to identify the ability of semen of males for freezing. We suggest that analyses of these response patterns would represent an important tool to characterize the cryoresistance of males when implemented within breeding programs. We also propose follow-up experiments to examine the outcomes of the use of different freezing protocols depending on the pattern of response of males. PMID:23544054

  15. DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) synthesis following microinjection of heterologous sperm and somatic cell nuclei into hamster oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Naish, S.J.; Perreault, S.D.; Zirkin, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated the ability of the hamster oocyte to initiate DNA synthesis in nuclei differing in basic protein content. DNA synthesis was studied by autoradiography in oocytes that had been incubated in /sup 3/H-thymidine after being parthenogenetically activated by sham microinjection, or microinjected with hamster, mouse, rabbit, or fish sperm nuclei, or hamster hepatocyte nuclei. Within 6 hr of sham or nucleus microinjection, nuclei of each type underwent transformation into pronuclei and synthesized DNA. These results demonstrated that the hamster egg can access and utilize its own and each type of template provided, whether homologous or heterologous. However, pronuclei derived from hamster sperm nuclei were more likely to be synthesizing DNA at 6 hr than pronuclei derived from sperm nuclei of other species. The authors conclude that the mechanisms employed by the hamster oocyte to transform hamster sperm nuclei into pronuclei and to effect DNA synthesis in these nuclei are not specific for the hamster sperm nucleus. Nevertheless, these mechanisms apparently operate more efficiently when the hamster sperm nucleus, rather than a heterologous sperm nucleus, is present.

  16. Mechanisms underlying the sperm quality advantage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pattarini, James M; Starmer, William T; Bjork, Adam; Pitnick, Scott

    2006-10-01

    Contrary to early predictions of sperm competition theory, postcopulatory sexual selection favoring increased investment per sperm (e.g., sperm size, sperm quality) has been demonstrated in numerous organisms. We empirically demonstrate for Drosophila melanogaster that both sperm quality and sperm quantity independently contribute to competitive male fertilization success. In addition to these independent effects, there was a significant interaction between sperm quality and quantity that suggests an internal positive reinforcement on selection for sperm quality, with selection predicted to intensify as investment per sperm increases and the number of sperm competing declines. The mechanism underlying the sperm quality advantage is elucidated through examination of the relationship between female sperm-storage organ morphology and the differential organization of different length sperm within the organ. Our results exemplify that primary sex cells can bear secondary sexual straits.

  17. A new source of polymorphic DNA markers for sperm typing: Analysis of microsatellite repeats in single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, R.; Schmitt, K.; Zhang, L.; Arnheim, N. ); Weber, J.L. )

    1992-11-01

    The authors show that dinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeat polymorphisms can be analyzed in single cells without using radioactivity or denaturing gels. This provides a new source of DNA polymorphisms for genetic mapping by sperm typing. The recombination fraction between two CA repeat polymorphisms was determined after whole genome amplification of single sperm, followed by typing of two different aliquots, one aliquot for each polymorphic locus. Single-cell analysis of microsatellites may also be valuable both for preimplantation genetic disease diagnosis based on single-blastomere or polar-body analysis and for the typing of forensic or ancient DNA samples containing very small amounts of nucleic acid. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Quantitative ultramorphological analysis of human sperm: fifteen years of experience in the diagnosis and management of male factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Bartoov, B; Eltes, F; Reichart, M; Langzam, J; Lederman, H; Zabludovsky, N

    1999-01-01

    The advantages of quantitative ultramorphological (QUM) sperm analysis in the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility are presented. The QUM methodology is based on three elements: complementary scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations of 7 sperm cell subcellular organelles (acrosome, postacrosomal lamina, nucleus, neck, axoneme, mitochondrial sheath, and outer dense fibers); systematic classification of the specific ultramorphological malformations into 4 pathological and the normal categories, indicating the morphological state of each subcellular organelle; and comparison between well-defined reference groups with opposite fertility status or treatment conditions. QUM has established 2 indices for the in vivo and in vitro male fertility potential: (1) Natural Fertility Index (NFI), with accurate prediction (97% sensitivity and 90% specificity) of 80% of the male patients; and (2) IVF score, with prediction of 76% of the nonfertilizing and 90% of fertilizing IVF groups. QUM has enabled assessment of ultramorphological indications for varicocele and radiation exposure. Varicocele causes defects in sperm head organelles related to early spermatid development, whereas ionizing radiation causes amorphous head shape. QUM established criteria for specific non-in-vitro therapeutic interventions, including varicocelectomy, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) administration, and acupuncture. The varicocele index enabled correct classification of 79 and 89% of patients with and without varicocele. Males with idiopathic impairment of sperm acrosome and nucleus are potential responders to FSH treatment, whereas patients exhibiting low sperm activity are candidates for acupuncture treatment. Patients with a low Natural Fertility Index are recommended for an assisted reproduction technique (ART). based on the ultramorphology of the tail axoneme. Patients who achieved pregnancy following intrauterine insemination or in vitro

  19. Tuning sperm chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Adán; Wood, Christopher D; Nishigaki, Takuya; Carneiro, Jorge; Darszon, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Sperm chemotaxis is a long-term puzzle and most of our knowledge comes from studying marine animals that are external fertilizers. Sperm are attracted by diffusible chemical factors (chemoattractants) released from the egg which redirect their swimming paths towards their source. This redirection is driven by increases in flagellar curvature that correlate with transient flagellar Ca(2+) increases. Recent experimental and modelling results provide insights into the signal flow underlying the translation of an external chemical gradient into an intracellular molecular and motor response. A fundamental element of sea-urchin sperm chemotaxis lies in the ability of these cells to suppress Ca(2+)-mediated increases in flagellar curvature while experiencing an increasing chemoattractant gradient. The article considers this new evidence and summarizes the known underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioural strategies that sperm use to locate and fertilize the oocyte.

  20. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium in human and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin cells.

    PubMed

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study, we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether, the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI).

  1. Comparative Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Hexavalent Chromium in Human and Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W. Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). PMID:21466859

  2. [From spermatic animalcules to sperm cells: the reconceptualization of generation in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Florence

    2009-09-01

    At the end of the 18th and still at the beginning of the 19th century most naturalists considered spermatic animalcules to be parasites of the seminal fluid that played no role in procreation. This view was progressively questioned by 19th century physiologists. They gradually redefined the spermatic animals as (cellular) products of the male organism, as agents of fertilization and bearers of the male heredity material. This article discusses this change from two different perspectives: on a microhistorical level, it analyzes the experimental research of the naturalist Lazzaro Spallanzani (1729-1799) and of the physiologist Albert Kölliker (1817-1905) in order to show how spermatozoa were turned into a new epistemic object of biology--the sperm cell. Further, it asks how the role of the reconceptualization of spermatic animalcules affected the long-term transformations that gave rise of our modern understanding of heredity, generation and the sexed body. By combining these two perspectives, the article aims to connect historiographies that are often kept separate: the macrohistorical narratives about gender and the body in the modern age and the microhistorical studies of biomedical practices and objects.

  3. Disruption of a Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Mouse Enolase 4 (Eno4) Gene Causes Sperm Structural Defects and Male Infertility1

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Noriko; Dai, Qunsheng; Williams, Jason; Goulding, Eugenia H.; Willis, William D.; Brown, Paula R.; Eddy, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sperm utilize glycolysis to generate ATP required for motility, and several spermatogenic cell-specific glycolytic isozymes are associated with the fibrous sheath (FS) in the principal piece of the sperm flagellum. We used proteomics and molecular biology approaches to confirm earlier reports that a novel enolase is present in mouse sperm. We then found that a pan-enolase antibody, but not antibodies to ENO2 and ENO3, recognized a protein in the principal piece of the mouse sperm flagellum. Database analyses identified two previously uncharacterized enolase family-like candidate genes, 64306537H0Rik and Gm5506. Northern analysis indicated that 64306537H0Rik (renamed Eno4) was transcribed in testes of mice by Postnatal Day 12. To determine the role of ENO4, we generated mice using embryonic stem cells in which an Eno4 allele was disrupted by a gene trap containing a beta galactosidase (beta-gal) reporter (Eno4+/Gt). Expression of beta-gal occurred in the testis, and male mice homozygous for the gene trap allele (Eno4Gt/Gt) were infertile. Epididymal sperm numbers were 2-fold lower and sperm motility was reduced substantially in Eno4Gt/Gt mice compared to wild-type mice. Sperm from Eno4Gt/Gt mice had a coiled flagellum and a disorganized FS. The Gm5506 gene encodes a protein identical to ENO1 and also is transcribed at a low level in testis. We conclude that ENO4 is required for normal assembly of the FS and provides most of the enolase activity in sperm and that Eno1 and/or Gm5506 may encode a minor portion of the enolase activity in sperm. PMID:23446454

  4. The Deadbeat Paternal Effect of Uncapped Sperm Telomeres on Cell Cycle Progression and Chromosome Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Takuo; Yasuda, Glenn K; Wakimoto, Barbara T

    2016-06-01

    Telomere-capping complexes (TCCs) protect the ends of linear chromosomes from illegitimate repair and end-to-end fusions and are required for genome stability. The identity and assembly of TCC components have been extensively studied, but whether TCCs require active maintenance in nondividing cells remains an open question. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster requires Deadbeat (Ddbt), a sperm nuclear basic protein (SNBP) that is recruited to the telomere by the TCC and is required for TCC maintenance during genome-wide chromatin remodeling, which transforms spermatids to mature sperm. Ddbt-deficient males produce sperm lacking TCCs. Their offspring delay the initiation of anaphase as early as cycle 1 but progress through the first two cycles. Persistence of uncapped paternal chromosomes induces arrest at or around cycle 3. This early arrest can be rescued by selective elimination of paternal chromosomes and production of gynogenetic haploid or haploid mosaics. Progression past cycle 3 can also occur if embryos have reduced levels of the maternally provided checkpoint kinase Chk2. The findings provide insights into how telomere integrity affects the regulation of the earliest embryonic cell cycles. They also suggest that other SNBPs, including those in humans, may have analogous roles and manifest as paternal effects on embryo quality. PMID:27029731

  5. No evidence of trade-offs in the evolution of sperm numbers and sperm size in mammals.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Delbarco Trillo, J; Roldan, E R S

    2015-10-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection, in the form sperm competition, has influenced the evolution of several male reproductive traits. However, theory predicts that sperm competition would lead to trade-offs between numbers and size of spermatozoa because increased costs per cell would result in a reduction of sperm number if both traits share the same energetic budget. Theoretical models have proposed that, in large animals, increased sperm size would have minimal fitness advantage compared with increased sperm numbers. Thus, sperm numbers would evolve more rapidly than sperm size under sperm competition pressure. We tested in mammals whether sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers and size, and whether there is a trade-off between these traits. Our results showed that sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers in eutherian and metatherian mammals. There was no evidence of a trade-off between sperm numbers and sperm size in any of the two mammalian clades as we did not observe any significant relationship between sperm numbers and sperm size once the effect of sperm competition was taken into account. Maximization of both numbers and size in mammals may occur because each trait is crucial at different stages in sperm's life; for example size-determined sperm velocity is a key determinant of fertilization success. In addition, numbers and size may also be influenced by diverse energetic budgets required at different stages of sperm formation. PMID:26190170

  6. No evidence of trade-offs in the evolution of sperm numbers and sperm size in mammals.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Delbarco Trillo, J; Roldan, E R S

    2015-10-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection, in the form sperm competition, has influenced the evolution of several male reproductive traits. However, theory predicts that sperm competition would lead to trade-offs between numbers and size of spermatozoa because increased costs per cell would result in a reduction of sperm number if both traits share the same energetic budget. Theoretical models have proposed that, in large animals, increased sperm size would have minimal fitness advantage compared with increased sperm numbers. Thus, sperm numbers would evolve more rapidly than sperm size under sperm competition pressure. We tested in mammals whether sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers and size, and whether there is a trade-off between these traits. Our results showed that sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers in eutherian and metatherian mammals. There was no evidence of a trade-off between sperm numbers and sperm size in any of the two mammalian clades as we did not observe any significant relationship between sperm numbers and sperm size once the effect of sperm competition was taken into account. Maximization of both numbers and size in mammals may occur because each trait is crucial at different stages in sperm's life; for example size-determined sperm velocity is a key determinant of fertilization success. In addition, numbers and size may also be influenced by diverse energetic budgets required at different stages of sperm formation.

  7. No evidence of sperm conjugate formation in an Australian mouse bearing sperm with three hooks

    PubMed Central

    Firman, Renée C; Bentley, Blair; Bowman, Faye; Marchant, Fernando García-Solís; Parthenay, Jahmila; Sawyer, Jessica; Stewart, Tom; O'Shea, James E

    2013-01-01

    Sperm conjugation occurs when two or more sperm physically unite for motility or transport through the female reproductive tract. In many muroid rodent species, sperm conjugates have been shown to form by a single, conspicuous apical hook located on the sperm head. These sperm “trains” have been reported to be highly variable in size and, despite all the heads pointing in roughly the same direction, exhibit a relatively disordered arrangement. In some species, sperm “trains” have been shown to enhance sperm swimming speed, and thus have been suggested to be advantageous in sperm competition. Here, we assessed the behavior of sperm in the sandy inland mouse (Pseudomys hermannsburgensis), a muroid rodent that bears sperm with three apical hooks. First, we accrued genetic evidence of multiple paternity within “wild” litters to unequivocally show that sperm competition does occur in this species. Following this we utilized both in vitro and in vivo methodologies to determine whether sandy inland mouse sperm conjugate to form motile trains. Our observations of in vitro preparations of active sperm revealed that sandy inland mouse sperm exhibit rapid, progressive motility as individual cells only. Similarly, histological sections of the reproductive tracts of mated females revealed no in vivo evidence of sperm conjugate formation. We conclude that the unique, three-hooked morphology of the sandy inland mouse sperm does not facilitate the formation of motile conjugates, and discuss our findings in relation to the different hypotheses for the evolution of the muroid rodent hook/s. PMID:23919134

  8. Characterization of pig sperm hyaluronidase and improvement of the digestibility of cumulus cell mass by recombinant pSPAM1 hyaluronidase in an in vitro fertilization assay.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungwon; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Cho, Hongsang; Moon, Jisang; Kim, Ju-Sung; Min, Sung-Hun; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Young Il; Kim, Ekyune

    2014-11-30

    Although sperm hyaluronidase is thought to play an important role in mammalian fertilization, the molecular function underlying these steps remains largely unknown. In mouse models, sperm-specific SPAM1 and HYAL5 hyaluronidase are believed to function in both sperm penetration of the cumulus matrix and sperm-ZP binding. However, gene-targeting studies for SPAM1 or HYAL5 show that hyaluronidases are not essential for fertilization, despite the fact that exogenous hyaluronidase can disrupt the cumulus matrix. Therefore, to evaluate whether sperm hyaluronidase is essential for mammalian fertilization, it is necessary to generate HYAL5/SPAM1 double-knockout mice. However, generating double-knockout mice is very difficult because these two genes exist on the same chromosome. Recently, investigators have begun to employ the pig model system to study human disease due to its similarities to human anatomy and physiology. In this study, we confirmed that pig SPAM1 exists as a single copy gene on chromosome 18 and is specifically expressed in the testis. In addition, we expressed recombinant pig SPAM1 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and showed that these enzymes possess hyaluronidase activity. We also demonstrated that a polyclonal antibody against pig sperm hyaluronidase inhibits sperm-egg interactions in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay. Our results suggest that pig SPAM1 may play a critical role in pig fertilization and that recombinant SPAM1 can disperse the oocyte-cumulus complex in an IVF assay.

  9. Sperm Dynamics in Spiders (Araneae): Ultrastructural Analysis of the Sperm Activation Process in the Garden Spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772)

    PubMed Central

    Vöcking, Oliver; Uhl, Gabriele; Michalik, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that are surrounded by a proteinaceous sheath. These inactive and encapsulated sperm are transferred to the female spermathecae where they are stored for later fertilization. We analyzed the ultrastructural changes of sperm cells during residency time in the female genital system of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We found three clearly distinguishable sperm conditions: encapsulated sperm (secretion sheath present), decapsulated (secretion sheath absent) and uncoiled sperm (cell components uncoiled, presumably activated). After insemination, sperm remain in the encapsulated condition for several days and become decapsulated after variable periods of time. A variable portion of the decapsulated sperm transforms rapidly to the uncoiled condition resulting in a simultaneous occurrence of decapsulated and uncoiled sperm. After oviposition, only decapsulated and uncoiled sperm are left in the spermathecae, strongly suggesting that the activation process is not reversible. Furthermore, we found four different types of secretion in the spermathecae which might play a role in the decapsulation and activation process. PMID:24039790

  10. Sperm dynamics in spiders (Araneae): ultrastructural analysis of the sperm activation process in the garden spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772).

    PubMed

    Vöcking, Oliver; Uhl, Gabriele; Michalik, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that are surrounded by a proteinaceous sheath. These inactive and encapsulated sperm are transferred to the female spermathecae where they are stored for later fertilization. We analyzed the ultrastructural changes of sperm cells during residency time in the female genital system of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We found three clearly distinguishable sperm conditions: encapsulated sperm (secretion sheath present), decapsulated (secretion sheath absent) and uncoiled sperm (cell components uncoiled, presumably activated). After insemination, sperm remain in the encapsulated condition for several days and become decapsulated after variable periods of time. A variable portion of the decapsulated sperm transforms rapidly to the uncoiled condition resulting in a simultaneous occurrence of decapsulated and uncoiled sperm. After oviposition, only decapsulated and uncoiled sperm are left in the spermathecae, strongly suggesting that the activation process is not reversible. Furthermore, we found four different types of secretion in the spermathecae which might play a role in the decapsulation and activation process.

  11. Ultrastructure and lipid composition of detergent-resistant membranes derived from mammalian sperm and two types of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Renske A; Brouwers, Jos F; Ultee, Anton; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are micro-domains of ordered lipids (Lo phase) in biological membranes. The Lo phase of cellular membranes can be isolated from disordered lipids (Ld phase) after treatment with 1 % Triton  X-100 at 4 °C in which the Lo phase forms the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction. The lipid composition of DRM derived from Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, McArdle cells and porcine sperm is compared with that of the whole cell. Remarkably, the unsaturation and chain length degree of aliphatic chains attached to phospholipids is virtually the same between DRM and whole cells. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin were enriched in DRMs but to a cell-specific molar ratio. Sulfatides (sphingolipids from MDCK cells) were enriched in the DRM while a seminolipid (an alkylacylglycerolipid from sperm) was depleted from the DRM. Treatment with <5 mM methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MBCD) caused cholesterol removal from the DRM without affecting the composition and amount of the phospholipid while higher levels disrupted the DRM. The substantial amount of (poly)unsaturated phospholipids in DRMs as well as a low stoichiometric amount of cholesterol suggest that lipid rafts in biological membranes are more fluid and dynamic than previously anticipated. Using negative staining, ultrastructural features of DRM were monitored and in all three cell types the DRMs appeared as multi-lamellar vesicular structures with a similar morphology. The detergent resistance is a result of protein-cholesterol and sphingolipid interactions allowing a relatively passive attraction of phospholipids to maintain the Lo phase. For this special issue, the relevance of our findings is discussed in a sperm physiological context.

  12. Subcellular localization of Bcr, Abl, and Bcr-Abl proteins in normal and leukemic cells and correlation of expression with myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzler, M; Talpaz, M; Van Etten, R A; Hirsh-Ginsberg, C; Beran, M; Kurzrock, R

    1993-01-01

    We used specific antisera and immunohistochemical methods to investigate the subcellular localization and expression of Bcr, Abl, and Bcr-Abl proteins in leukemic cell lines and in fresh human leukemic and normal samples at various stages of myeloid differentiation. Earlier studies of the subcellular localization of transfected murine type IV c-Abl protein in fibroblasts have shown that this molecule resides largely in the nucleus, whereas transforming deletion variants are localized exclusively in the cytoplasm. Here, we demonstrate that the murine type IV c-Abl protein is also found in the nucleus when overexpressed in a mouse hematopoietic cell line. However, in both normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells, c-Abl is discerned predominantly in the cytoplasm, with nuclear staining present, albeit at a lower level. In contrast, normal endogenous Bcr protein, as well as the aberrant p210BCR-ABL and p190BCR-ABL proteins consistently localize to the cytoplasm in both cell lines and fresh cells. The results with p210BCR-ABL were confirmed in a unique Ph1-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line, KBM5, which lacks the normal chromosome 9 and hence the normal c-Abl product. Because the p210BCR-ABL protein appears cytoplasmic in both chronic phase and blast crisis CML cells, as does the p190BCR-ABL in Ph1-positive acute leukemia, a change in subcellular location of Bcr-Abl proteins between cytoplasm and nucleus cannot explain the different spectrum of leukemias associated with p210 and p190, nor the transition from the chronic to the acute leukemia phenotype seen in CML. Further analysis of fresh CML and normal hematopoietic bone marrow cells reveals that p210BCR-ABL, as well as the normal Bcr and Abl proteins, are expressed primarily in the early stages of myeloid maturation, and that levels of expression are reduced significantly as the cells mature to polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Similarly, a decrease in Bcr and Abl levels occurs in HL-60 cells

  13. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bo Yon; Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  14. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Serine Protease PRSS21 (Testisin) Imparts Murine Epididymal Sperm Cell Maturation and Fertilizing Ability1

    PubMed Central

    Netzel-Arnett, Sarah; Bugge, Thomas H.; Hess, Rex A.; Carnes, Kay; Stringer, Brett W.; Scarman, Anthony L.; Hooper, John D.; Tonks, Ian D.; Kay, Graham F.; Antalis, Toni M.

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 25%–40% of infertile men have idiopathic infertility associated with deficient sperm numbers and quality. Here, we identify the membrane-anchored serine protease PRSS21, also known as testisin, to be a novel proteolytic factor that directs epididymal sperm cell maturation and sperm-fertilizing ability. PRSS21-deficient spermatozoa show decreased motility, angulated and curled tails, fragile necks, and dramatically increased susceptibility to decapitation. These defects reflect aberrant maturation during passage through the epididymis, because histological and electron microscopic structural analyses showed an increased tendency for curled and detached tails as spermatozoa transit from the corpus to the cauda epididymis. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa deficient in PRSS21 fail to mount a swelling response when exposed to hypotonic conditions, suggesting an impaired ability to respond to osmotic challenges facing maturing spermatozoa in the female reproductive tract. These data suggest that aberrant regulation of PRSS21 may underlie certain secondary male infertility syndromes, such as “easily decapitated” spermatozoa in humans. PMID:19571264

  15. Impact of spontaneous smoking cessation on sperm quality: case report.

    PubMed

    Santos, E Prentki; López-Costa, S; Chenlo, P; Pugliese, M N; Curi, S; Ariagno, J; Repetto, H; Sardi, M; Palaoro, L; Mendeluk, G

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated sperm quality after a 3-month smoking cessation programme by sperm analysis, objective sperm motility analysis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation in capacitating conditions and DNA fragmentation (TUNEL). Sperm analysis after smoking cessation revealed a distinctive improvement in sperm concentration, fast spermatozoa (≥35 μm/s), sperm vitality, percentage of spermatozoa recuperated after an enrichment technique and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, no changes were observed in the number of germinal cells in the ejaculate, sperm morphology and sperm DNA fragmentation. It is concluded that physicians should strongly advise their patients to quit smoking before undergoing medical treatment or assisted reproduction techniques to achieve pregnancy.

  16. Reduction in amounts of mitochondrial DNA in the sperm cells as a mechanism for maternal inheritance in Hordeum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Sodmergen; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Yingtao; Sakamoto, Wataru; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2002-12-01

    It is known that extranuclear organelle DNA is inherited maternally in the majority of angiosperms. The mechanisms for maternal inheritance have been well studied in plastids but not in mitochondria. In the present study we examined the mitochondrial DNA in the male reproductive cells of Hordeum vulgare L. by immunoelectron microscopy. Our results show that the number of anti-DNA gold particles on sections of sperm cell mitochondria decreased by 97% during pollen development. The reduction occurred rapidly in the generative cells and subsequently in the sperm cells, concomitant with a remarkable reduction in mitochondrial volume. It seems that the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA were reduced in the male reproductive cells, which may be a possible mechanism by which paternal transmission is inhibited. Unlike mitochondria, plastids are excluded from the generative cells during the first pollen mitosis. These data suggest a mechanism for maternal inheritance of mitochondria in angiosperms and for independent control of inheritance of mitochondria and plastids in H. vulgare.

  17. MicroRNA-122 Influences the Development of Sperm Abnormalities from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Regulating TNP2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yanhui; Jiang, Lizhen; Huang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Sperm abnormalities are one of the main factors responsible for male infertility; however, their pathogenesis remains unclear. The role of microRNAs in the development of sperm abnormalities in infertile men has not yet been investigated. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the influence of miR-122 expression on the differentiation of these cells into spermatozoa-like cells in vitro. After induction, mutant miR-122-transfected cells formed spermatozoa-like cells. Flow cytometry of DNA content revealed a significant increase in the haploid cell population in spermatozoa-like cells derived from mutant miR-122-transfected cells as compared to those derived from miR-122-transfected cells. During induction, TNP2 and protamine mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in mutant miR-122-transfected cells than in miR-122-transfected cells. High-throughput isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification were used to identify and quantify the different protein expression levels in miR-122- and mutant miR-122-transfected cells. Among all the proteins analyzed, the expression of lipoproteins, for example, APOB and APOA1, showed the most significant difference between the two groups. This study illustrates that miR-122 expression is associated with abnormal sperm development. MiR-122 may influence spermatozoa-like cells by suppressing TNP2 expression and inhibiting the expression of proteins associated with sperm development. PMID:23327642

  18. Subcellular compartmentalization of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium with catecholamines in adrenal medullary chromaffin vesicles may explain the lack of toxicity to adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, J.F. Jr.; Diliberto, E.J. Jr.; Viveros, O.H.; Daniels, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Cultures of bovine adrenomedullary chromaffin cells accumulated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP/sup +/) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by a process that was prevented by desmethylimipramine. The subcellular localization of the incorporated (methyl-/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ was examined by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient fractionation and was found to be predominantly colocalized with catecholamines in chromaffin vesicles, and negligible amounts were detected within the mitochondrial fraction. When chromaffin cell membranes were made permeable with the detergent digitonin the absence of calcium, there was no increase in the release of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/, indicating that there is negligible accumulation of the neurotoxin in the cytosol. Simultaneous exposure to digitonin and calcium induced cosecretion of MPP/sup +/ and catecholamines. Stimulation of the cells with nicotine released both catecholamines and MPP/sup +/ at identical rates and percentages of cellular content in a calcium-dependent manner. Last, when cells were incubated with MPP/sup +/ in the presence of tetrabenazine (an inhibitor of vesicular uptake), the chromaffin cell toxicity of MPP/sup +/ was potentiated. The authors submit that the ability of the chromaffin cells to take up and store MPP/sup +/ in the chromaffin vesicle prevents the toxin's interaction with other structures and, thus, prevents cell damage. As an extension of this hypothesis, the relative resistance of some brain monoaminergic neurons to the toxic actions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine may result from the subcellular sequestration of MPP/sup +/ in the storage vesicle.

  19. Metabolism of cerebroside sulfate and subcellular distribution of its metabolites in cultured skin fibroblasts from controls, metachromatic leukodystrophy, and globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Inui, K; Furukawa, M; Okada, S; Yabuuchi, H

    1988-02-01

    With pulse-chase study of 1-[14C]stearic acid-labeled cerebroside sulfate (14C-CS) and subsequent subcellular fractionation by Percoll gradient, the metabolism of CS and translocation of its metabolites in human skin fibroblasts from controls, metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) were studied. In control skin fibroblasts, CS was transported to lysosome and metabolized there to galactosylceramide (GalCer) and ceramide (Cer) within 1 h. During the chase period, radioactivity was increased at plasma membrane plus Golgi as phospholipids and no accumulation of GalCer or Cer was found in lysosome. In MLD fibroblasts, 95% of 14C-CS taken up was unhydrolyzed at 24 h-chase and accumulated at not only lysosome but also plasma membrane. In GLD fibroblasts, GalCer was accumulated throughout the subcellular fractions and more accumulated mainly at plasma membrane plus Golgi with longer pulse. This translocation of lipid from lysosome seems to have considerable function, even in lipidosis, which may result in an imbalance of the sphingolipid pattern on the cell surface and these changes might be one of causes of neuronal dysfunction in sphingolipidosis.

  20. Ultrastructural immunogold localization of major sperm protein (MSP) in spermatogenic cells of the nematode Acrobeles complexus (Nematoda, Rhabditida).

    PubMed

    Yushin, Vladimir V; Claeys, Myriam; Bert, Wim

    2016-10-01

    The nematode spermatozoa represent a highly modified (aberrant) type of male gametes that lack a flagellum but for which the process of spermatogenesis culminates in the production of a crawling spermatozoon on the basis of the cytoskeletal component known as "major sperm protein", or MSP. MSP is also known as an important hormone triggering oocyte maturation and ovulation in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where this protein was first identified. However, direct evidence of MSP localization and of its fate in nematode spermatogenic cells is rare. In this study, the spermatogenesis and sperm structure in the rhabditid nematode Acrobeles complexus (Rhabditida: Tylenchina: Cephalobomorpha: Cephaloboidea: Cephalobidae) has been examined with electron microscopy. Morphological observations were followed by high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation which allows post-embedding immunogold localization of MSP in all stages of sperm development using antibodies raised for MSP of C. elegans. In spermatocytes, synthetic activity results in the development of specific cellular components, fibrous bodies (FB) and membranous organelles (MO), which appear as FB-MO complexes where the filamentous matter of FB has been MSP-labeled. The spermatids subdivide into a residual body with superfluous cytoplasm, and a main cell body which contains nucleus, mitochondria and FB-MO complexes. These complexes dissociate into individual components, MO and FB, with the MSP being localized in FB. Immature spermatozoa from testes are opaque cells where a centrally located nucleus is surrounded by mitochondria, MO and FB clustered together, the MSP still being localized only in FB. Cytoplasm of mature spermatozoa from spermatheca is segregated into external pseudopods lacking organelles and a central cluster of mitochondria with intact MO surrounding the central nucleus. The FB ultimately disappear, and the MSP labeling becomes concentrated in the filamentous content of

  1. Ultrastructural immunogold localization of major sperm protein (MSP) in spermatogenic cells of the nematode Acrobeles complexus (Nematoda, Rhabditida).

    PubMed

    Yushin, Vladimir V; Claeys, Myriam; Bert, Wim

    2016-10-01

    The nematode spermatozoa represent a highly modified (aberrant) type of male gametes that lack a flagellum but for which the process of spermatogenesis culminates in the production of a crawling spermatozoon on the basis of the cytoskeletal component known as "major sperm protein", or MSP. MSP is also known as an important hormone triggering oocyte maturation and ovulation in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where this protein was first identified. However, direct evidence of MSP localization and of its fate in nematode spermatogenic cells is rare. In this study, the spermatogenesis and sperm structure in the rhabditid nematode Acrobeles complexus (Rhabditida: Tylenchina: Cephalobomorpha: Cephaloboidea: Cephalobidae) has been examined with electron microscopy. Morphological observations were followed by high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation which allows post-embedding immunogold localization of MSP in all stages of sperm development using antibodies raised for MSP of C. elegans. In spermatocytes, synthetic activity results in the development of specific cellular components, fibrous bodies (FB) and membranous organelles (MO), which appear as FB-MO complexes where the filamentous matter of FB has been MSP-labeled. The spermatids subdivide into a residual body with superfluous cytoplasm, and a main cell body which contains nucleus, mitochondria and FB-MO complexes. These complexes dissociate into individual components, MO and FB, with the MSP being localized in FB. Immature spermatozoa from testes are opaque cells where a centrally located nucleus is surrounded by mitochondria, MO and FB clustered together, the MSP still being localized only in FB. Cytoplasm of mature spermatozoa from spermatheca is segregated into external pseudopods lacking organelles and a central cluster of mitochondria with intact MO surrounding the central nucleus. The FB ultimately disappear, and the MSP labeling becomes concentrated in the filamentous content of

  2. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  3. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  4. How ERK1/2 Activation Controls Cell Proliferation and Cell Death Is Subcellular Localization the Answer?

    PubMed Central

    Mebratu, Yohannes; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase super family that can mediate cell proliferation and apoptosis. The Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK signaling cascade controlling cell proliferation has been well studied but the mechanisms involved in ERK1/2-mediated cell death are largely unknown. This review focuses on recent papers that define ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus and the proteins involved in the cytosolic retention of activated ERK1/2. Cytosolic retention of ERK1/2 denies access to the transcription factor substrates that are responsible for the mitogenic response. In addition, cytosolic ERK1/2, besides inhibiting survival and proliferative signals in the nucleus, potentiates the catalytic activity of some proapoptotic proteins such as DAP kinase in the cytoplasm. Studies that further define the function of cytosolic ERK1/2 and its cytosolic substrates that enhance cell death will be essential to harness this pathway for developing effective treatments for cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:19282669

  5. Tris-egg yolk-glycerol (TEY) extender developed for freezing dog semen is a good option to cryopreserve bovine epididymal sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, G; Soares, L; Ferreira, P; Rocha, A

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa is often performed after shipping the excised testis-epididymis complexes, under refrigeration, to a specialized laboratory. However, epididymal spermatozoa can be collected immediately after excision of the epididymis and sent extended and refrigerated to a laboratory for cryopreservation. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect of both methods of cold storage bovine epididymal spermatozoa as well as of two different extenders on spermatozoa characteristics after freeze-thawing. For that, spermatozoa collected from the caudae epididymis of 19 bulls were extended and cryopreserved in either AndroMed(®) or a Tris-egg yolk (TEY)-based extender. Cryopreservation of sperm cells was performed immediately after castration (Group A, n = 9) or after cold storage for 24 h diluted in the two extenders and (Group B, n = 9) and also after cold storage for 24 h within the whole epididymis (Group C, n = 10). Sperm subjective progressive motility (light microscopy), plasma membrane integrity (hypoosmotic swelling test) and sperm viability (eosin-nigrosin) were evaluated. In vitro fertilization and culture (IVF) was performed to assess the blastocyst rate. No differences (p > 0.05) were observed on post-thaw sperm parameters between samples from Group A, B and C. TEY extended samples presented a higher (p < 0.01) percentage of progressive motile and live sperm, than those extended in AndroMed(®) . Blastocyst rate after IVF differed only (p < 0.05) between the reference group (IVF performed with frozen semen with known in vitro fertility) and Group A extended in AndroMed(®) . We conclude that when cryopreservation facilities are distant from the collection site, bovine epididymal sperm can be shipped chilled overnight either within the epididymal tail or after dilution without deleterious effect on post-thaw sperm quality. TEY extender was more suitable for cold storage and freezing bovine epididymal sperm, than the commercial

  6. Characteristics of stallion epididymal spermatozoa at collection and effect of two refrigeration protocols on the quality of the frozen/thawed sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, T; Lopes, G; Ferreira, P; Leal, I; Rocha, A

    2012-12-01

    Cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa is a useful tool to preserve genetic material of valuable stallions after emergency castration or unexpected death. For that, testicles and epididymides are generally sent refrigerated to the laboratory. Collection of epididymal spermatozoa is a simple procedure that reduces the volume of the material to be shipped, and may improve the quality of the chilled epididymal sperm cells. In the present study we compared the characteristics of frozen/thawed epididymal spermatozoa after refrigeration of the epididymis or after direct refrigeration of the extended epididymal sperm cells. Ejaculated sperm samples were obtained from 10 healthy stallions with at least 15 days of sexual rest, before routine orchiectomies. Spermatozoa were recovered from the epididymal tail immediately after castration (EPI), after refrigeration of the epididymis for 24h at 4°C (EPI R) and recovered from epididymal tail immediately after castration and stored for 24h at 4°C (EPI RR). Total motility, straight-line velocity, percentage of rapid cells, viability and morphological defects were similar (p>0.05) among different treatments, and post-thaw viability was higher (p<0.05) in EPI than in the ejaculated sperm. The similarity of post-thaw parameters led us to conclude that immediate collection and refrigeration of the epididymal sperm cells or refrigeration of the whole epididymis are equally efficient as a means of transporting material for 24h before cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa.

  7. Fast and simple DNA extraction from saliva and sperm cells obtained from the skin or isolated from swabs.

    PubMed

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Mályusz, Victoria; Fremdt, Heike; Koch, Christine; Simeoni, Eva; Schwark, Thorsten

    2006-05-01

    The forensic scientist often has to cope with problematic samples from the crime scene due to their minute size and thus the low amount of extractable DNA. The retrieval of DNA from swabs taken from the surface of the skin, for example, in cases of strangulation, can be especially difficult. We systematically investigated swabs taken from the skin (to obtain a genetic profile from the victim and also from a possible offender) and from sperm cell containing swabs using two extraction kits: the Invisorb forensic and the Invisorb spin swab kit (both Invitek, Germany). DNA quality and quantity were tested on ethidium bromide containing agarose gels and in a highly sensitive duplex-PCR, which amplifies fragments specific for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Absolute quantification was done using real time PCR. Samples, which were positive in the duplex-PCR, were also employed to genetic fingerprinting using the Powerplex ES and the AmpFlSTRIdentifiler(TM) kits. Our study shows that the easy-to-use Invisorb spin swab kit is very suitable for DNA isolation from swabs taken from the skin and also from sperm cells. Retrieval of cells from the skin with swabs moistened in extraction buffer, not in distilled water, led to a significant higher DNA yield.

  8. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  9. Plasma effects on subcellular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gweon, Bomi; Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, Heesoo; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H.

    2010-03-08

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasma treated human hepatocytes exhibit distinctive zones of necrotic and live cells separated by a void. We propose that plasma induced necrosis is attributed to plasma species such as oxygen radicals, charged particles, metastables and/or severe disruption of charged cytoskeletal proteins. Interestingly, uncharged cytoskeletal intermediate filaments are only minimally disturbed by plasma, elucidating the possibility of plasma induced electrostatic effects selectively destroying charged proteins. These bona fide plasma effects, which inflict alterations in specific subcellular structures leading to necrosis and cellular detachment, were not observed by application of helium flow or electric field alone.

  10. Heparin and glutathione II: correlation between decondensation of bull sperm cells and its nucleons.

    PubMed

    Delgado, N M; Flores-Alonso, J C; Rodríguez-Hernández, H M; Merchant-Larios, H; Reyes, R

    2001-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetics of bull sperm nuclear and nucleon decondensation induced by the action of physiological concentrations of heparin/GSH was studied. Sperm and nucleon suspensions were incubated at 37 degrees C in salt medium, at a constant concentration of either heparin or GSH and increasing concentrations of the other reagent. Even though nucleons are pretreated with DTT/CTAB, when they are incubated alone with GSH for 96 h, they remain intact, no matter which concentration is employed, and it was impossible to observe the slightest sign of nuclei decondensation. Therefore, rupture of disulfide bridges is not the main mechanism to induce nuclei decondensation and perhaps the GSH role resides in potentate the heparin effect by increasing its negative charge. Nevertheless, nucleons reach 95% of chromatin decondensation in the presence of heparin plus GSH or heparin alone. The fact that the correlation between heparin and GSH concentrations needed to induce sperm nuclei decondensation was 3- to 4-fold greater that in nucleons might be due to the complete lack of nucleon membranes. Heparin/GSH seem to induce nuclei decondensation by an ionic chromatin charge neutralization mechanism.

  11. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long-range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca(2+) influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  12. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  13. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  14. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120). PMID:21521663

  15. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120).

  16. At the physical limit - chemosensation in sperm.

    PubMed

    Strünker, T; Alvarez, L; Kaupp, U B

    2015-10-01

    Many cells probe their environment for chemical cues. Some cells respond to picomolar concentrations of neuropeptides, hormones, pheromones, or chemoattractants. At such low concentrations, cells encounter only a few molecules. The mechanistic underpinnings of single-molecule sensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic cell. Sea urchin sperm offer a unique model to unveil in quantitative terms the principles underlying chemosensation at the physical limit. Here, we discuss the mechanisms of such exquisite sensitivity and the computational operations performed by sperm during chemotactic steering. Moreover, we highlight commonalities and differences between signalling in sperm and photoreceptors and among sperm from different species. PMID:25768273

  17. Non-viral transfection of goat germline stem cells by nucleofection results in production of transgenic sperm after germ cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, W; Tang, L; Bondareva, A; Luo, J; Megee, S O; Modelski, M; Blash, S; Melican, D T; Destrempes, M M; Overton, S A; Gavin, W G; Ayres, S; Echelard, Y; Dobrinski, I

    2012-04-01

    Germline stem cells (GSCs) can be used for large animal transgenesis, in which GSCs that are genetically manipulated in vitro are transplanted into a recipient testis to generate donor-derived transgenic sperm. The objectives of this study were to explore a non-viral approach for transgene delivery into goat GSCs and to investigate the efficiency of nucleofection in producing transgenic sperm. Four recipient goats received fractionated irradiation at 8 weeks of age to deplete endogenous GSCs. Germ cell transplantations were performed 8-9 weeks post-irradiation. Donor cells were collected from testes of 9-week-old goats, enriched for GSCs by Staput velocity sedimentation, and transfected by nucleofection with a transgene construct harboring the human growth hormone gene under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter (GBC) and a chicken beta-globin insulator (CBGI) sequence upstream of the promoter. For each recipient, transfected cells from 10 nucleofection reactions were pooled, mixed with non-transfected cells to a total of 1.5 × 10(8) cells in 3 ml, and transplanted into one testis (n = 4 recipients) by ultrasound-guided cannulation of the rete testis. The second testis of each recipient was removed. Semen was collected, starting at 9 months after transplantation, for a period of over a year (a total of 62 ejaculates from four recipients). Nested genomic PCR for hGH and CBGI sequences demonstrated that 31.3% ± 12.6% of ejaculates were positive for both hGH and CBGI. This study provides proof-of-concept that non-viral transfection (nucleofection) of primary goat germ cells followed by germ cell transplantation results in transgene transmission to sperm in recipient goats.

  18. Daily exposure to summer temperatures affects the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells but not male fertility in an in vivo rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; Taberner, E; Sabés-Alsina, M; Ramon, J; Rafel, O; Tusell, L; Piles, M; López-Béjar, M

    2015-08-01

    High temperatures have negative effects on sperm quality leading to temporary or permanent sterility. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of long exposure to summer circadian heat stress cycles on sperm parameters and the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells from rabbit bucks. Twelve White New Zealand rabbit bucks were exposed to a daily constant temperature of the thermoneutral zone (from 18 °C to 22 °C; control group) or exposed to a summer circadian heat stress cycles (30 °C, 3 h/day; heat stress group). Spermatozoa were flushed from the epididymis and assessed for sperm quality parameters at recovery. Sperm total motility and progressivity were negatively affected by high temperatures (P < 0.05), as were also specific motility parameters (curvilinear velocity, linear velocity, mean velocity, straightness coefficient, linearity coefficient, wobble coefficient, and frequency of head displacement; P < 0.05, but not the mean amplitude of lateral head displacement). Heat stress significantly increased the percentage of less-motile sperm subpopulations, although the percentage of the high-motile subpopulation was maintained, which is consistent with the fact that no effect was detected on fertility rates. However, prolificacy was reduced in females submitted to heat stress when inseminated by control bucks. In conclusion, our results suggest that environmental high temperatures are linked to changes in the proportion of motile sperm subpopulations of the epididymis, although fertility is still preserved despite the detrimental effects of heat stress. On the other hand, prolificacy seems to be affected by the negative effects of high temperatures, especially by altering female reproduction. PMID:25944779

  19. Daily exposure to summer temperatures affects the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells but not male fertility in an in vivo rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; Taberner, E; Sabés-Alsina, M; Ramon, J; Rafel, O; Tusell, L; Piles, M; López-Béjar, M

    2015-08-01

    High temperatures have negative effects on sperm quality leading to temporary or permanent sterility. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of long exposure to summer circadian heat stress cycles on sperm parameters and the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells from rabbit bucks. Twelve White New Zealand rabbit bucks were exposed to a daily constant temperature of the thermoneutral zone (from 18 °C to 22 °C; control group) or exposed to a summer circadian heat stress cycles (30 °C, 3 h/day; heat stress group). Spermatozoa were flushed from the epididymis and assessed for sperm quality parameters at recovery. Sperm total motility and progressivity were negatively affected by high temperatures (P < 0.05), as were also specific motility parameters (curvilinear velocity, linear velocity, mean velocity, straightness coefficient, linearity coefficient, wobble coefficient, and frequency of head displacement; P < 0.05, but not the mean amplitude of lateral head displacement). Heat stress significantly increased the percentage of less-motile sperm subpopulations, although the percentage of the high-motile subpopulation was maintained, which is consistent with the fact that no effect was detected on fertility rates. However, prolificacy was reduced in females submitted to heat stress when inseminated by control bucks. In conclusion, our results suggest that environmental high temperatures are linked to changes in the proportion of motile sperm subpopulations of the epididymis, although fertility is still preserved despite the detrimental effects of heat stress. On the other hand, prolificacy seems to be affected by the negative effects of high temperatures, especially by altering female reproduction.

  20. Evaluation of sperm tests as indicators of germ-cell damage in men exposed to chemical or physical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Watchmaker, G.; Gordon, L.

    1983-06-15

    As reviewed here, at least 89 chemical exposures have been studied for their effects on human spermatogenesis using sperm tests, with the majority showing some effect on sperm count, motility, or morphology. Approximately 85% of these exposures were to experimental or therapeutic drugs, 10% to occupational or environmental agents, and 5% to recreational drugs. This paper briefly describes the more common sperm-based methods and reviews some of their applications. It also includes guidelines for undertaking a human sperm study, as well as a discussion of the predictive value of induced sperm changes, an evaluation of the role of animal sperm tests, and a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the sperm tests.

  1. Investigation of the effects of cell model and subcellular location of gold nanoparticles on nuclear dose enhancement factors using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhongli; Chattopadhyay, Niladri; Kwon, Yongkyu Luke; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Lechtman, Eli; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The authors’ aims were to model how various factors influence radiation dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to propose a new modeling approach to the dose enhancement factor (DEF).Methods: The authors used Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP 5) computer code to simulate photon and electron transport in cells. The authors modeled human breast cancer cells as a single cell, a monolayer, or a cluster of cells. Different numbers of 5, 30, or 50 nm AuNPs were placed in the extracellular space, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Photon sources examined in the simulation included nine monoenergetic x-rays (10–100 keV), an x-ray beam (100 kVp), and {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds. Both nuclear and cellular dose enhancement factors (NDEFs, CDEFs) were calculated. The ability of these metrics to predict the experimental DEF based on the clonogenic survival of MDA-MB-361 human breast cancer cells exposed to AuNPs and x-rays were compared.Results: NDEFs show a strong dependence on photon energies with peaks at 15, 30/40, and 90 keV. Cell model and subcellular location of AuNPs influence the peak position and value of NDEF. NDEFs decrease in the order of AuNPs in the nucleus, cytoplasm, cell membrane, and extracellular space. NDEFs also decrease in the order of AuNPs in a cell cluster, monolayer, and single cell if the photon energy is larger than 20 keV. NDEFs depend linearly on the number of AuNPs per cell. Similar trends were observed for CDEFs. NDEFs using the monolayer cell model were more predictive than either single cell or cluster cell models of the DEFs experimentally derived from the clonogenic survival of cells cultured as a monolayer. The amount of AuNPs required to double the prescribed dose in terms of mg Au/g tissue decreases as the size of AuNPs increases, especially when AuNPs are in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. For 40 keV x-rays and a cluster of cells, to double the prescribed x-ray dose (NDEF = 2

  2. Quantitative ultramorphological (QUM) analysis of human sperm: diagnosis and management of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Bartoov, B; Eltes, F; Reichart, M; Langzam, J; Lederman, H; Zabludovsky, N

    1999-01-01

    The advantages of quantitative ultramorphological (QUM) sperm analysis in the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility are presented. QUM methodology is based on three elements: (1) complementary SEM and TEM observations of 7 sperm cell subcellular organelles: acrosome, postacrosomal lamina, nucleus, neck, axoneme, mitochondrial sheath, and outer dense fibers; (2) systematic classification of the specific ultramorphological malformations into 4 pathological and the normal categories, which indicate the morphological state of each subcellular organelle; and (3) comparison between well-defined reference groups with opposite fertility status or treatment conditions. QUM analysis has enabled the establishment of two indices that optimally express the in vivo and in vitro male fertility potential: The Natural Fertility Index (NFI), which allowed an accurate prediction (97% sensitivity and 90% specificity) of 80% of the naturally fertile and suspected infertile male patients, and the in vitro fertilization (IVF) score, which enabled prediction of 76% of the nonfertilizing and 90% of the fertilizing IVF groups. Validation tests confirmed these data. QUM also enabled assessment of ultramorphological indications for varicocele and radiation exposure: Both male factor etiologies indicated a persistent effect on the natural fertility potential, as expressed by structural changes in the nucleus. Varicocele was found to cause defects in the sperm head organelles related to early spermatid development, whereas ionizing radiation resulted in amorphous head shape. Criteria for specific non-in vitro therapeutic interventions such as varicocelectomy, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) administration, and acupuncture treatment were established. A varicocele index, which enabled the correct classification of 79 and 89% of the patients pre- and post-high ligation, respectively, was suggested to be a good indicator for varicocele which affects the fertility potential. Males

  3. Leydig cell number and sperm production decrease induced by chronic ametryn exposure: a negative impact on animal reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Dantas, T A; Cancian, G; Neodini, D N R; Mano, D R S; Capucho, C; Predes, F S; Pulz, R Barbieri; Pigoso, A A; Dolder, H; Severi-Aguiar, G D C

    2015-06-01

    Ametryn is an herbicide used to control broadleaf and grass weeds and its acute and chronic toxicity is expected to be low. Since toxicological data on ametryn is scarce, the aim of this study was to evaluate rat reproductive toxicity. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats (90 days) were divided into three groups: Co (control) and T1 and T2 exposed to 15 and 30 mg/kg/day of ametryn, respectively, for 56 days. Testicular analysis demonstrated that ametryn decreased sperm number per testis, daily sperm production, and Leydig cell number in both treated groups, although little perceptible morphological change has been observed in seminiferous tubule structure. Lipid peroxidation was higher in group T2, catalase activity decreased in T1 group, superoxide dismutase activity diminished, and a smaller number of sulphydryl groups of total proteins were verified in both exposed groups, suggesting oxidative stress. These results showed negative ametryn influence on the testes and can compromise animal reproductive performance and survival.

  4. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Using DNA-Fragmented Sperm in Mice Negatively Affects Embryo-Derived Embryonic Stem Cells, Reduces the Fertility of Male Offspring and Induces Heritable Changes in Epialleles

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-González, Raúl; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Calero, Antonia; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in mice using DNA-fragmented sperm (DFS) has been linked to an increased risk of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities both in embryos and offspring. This study examines: whether embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from DFS-ICSI embryos reflect the abnormalities observed in the DFS-ICSI progeny; the effect of DFS-ICSI on male fertility; and whether DFS-ICSI induces epigenetic changes that lead to a modified heritable phenotype. DFS-ICSI-produced embryos showed a low potential to generate ESC lines. However, these lines had normal karyotype accompanied by early gene expression alterations, though a normal expression pattern was observed after several passages. The fertility of males in the DFS-ICSI and control groups was compared by mating test. Sperm quantity, vaginal plug and pregnancy rates were significantly lower for the DFS-ICSI-produced males compared to in vivo-produced mice, while the number of females showing resorptions was higher. The epigenetic effects of DFS-ICSI were assessed by analyzing the phenotype rendered by the Axin1Fu allele, a locus that is highly sensitive to epigenetic perturbations. Oocytes were injected with spermatozoa from Axin1Fu/+ mice and the DFS-ICSI-generated embryos were transferred to females. A significantly higher proportion of pups expressed the active kinky-tail epiallele in the DFS-ICSI group than the controls. In conclusion: 1) ESCs cannot be used as a model of DFS-ICSI; 2) DFS-ICSI reduces sperm production and fertility in the male progeny; and 3) DFS-ICSI affects the postnatal expression of a defined epigenetically sensitive allele and this modification may be inherited across generations. PMID:24743851

  5. Flow cytometric sexing of mammalian sperm.

    PubMed

    Garner, Duane L

    2006-03-15

    This review reexamines parameters needed for optimization of flow cytometric sexing mammalian sperm and updates the current status of sperm sexing for various species where this technology is currently being applied. Differences in DNA content have provided both a method to differentiate between these sex-determining gametes and a method to sort them that can be used for predetermining sex in mammals. Although the DNA content of all cells for each mammalian species is highly conserved, slight but measurable DNA content differences of sperm occur within species even among cattle breeds due to different sizes of Y-chromosomes. Most mammals produce flattened, oval-headed sperm that can be oriented within a sorter using hydrodynamic forces. Multiplying the percentage the difference in DNA content of the X- or Y-chromosome bearing sperm times the area of the flat profile of the sperm head gives a simple sorting index that suggests that bull and boar sperm are well suited for separation in a flow sorter. Successful sperm sexing of various species must take into account the relative susceptibilities of gametes to the stresses that occur during sexing. Sorting conditions must be optimized for each species to achieve acceptable sperm sexing efficiency, usually at 90% accuracy. In the commercial application of sperm sexing to cattle, fertility of sex-sorted bull sperm at 2 x 10(6)/dose remains at 70-80% of unsexed sperm at normal doses of 10 to 20 x 10(6) sperm. DNA content measurements have been used to identify the sex-chromosome bearing sperm populations with good accuracy in semen from at least 23 mammalian species, and normal-appearing offspring have been produced from sexed sperm of at least seven species. PMID:16242764

  6. Quantitative Determination and Subcellular Imaging of Cu in Single Cells via Laser Ablation-ICP-Mass Spectrometry Using High-Density Microarray Gelatin Standards.

    PubMed

    Van Malderen, Stijn J M; Vergucht, Eva; De Rijcke, Maarten; Janssen, Colin; Vincze, Laszlo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-06-01

    This manuscript describes the development and characterization of a high-density microarray calibration standard, manufactured in-house and designed to overcome the limitations in precision, accuracy, and throughput of current calibration approaches for the quantification of elemental concentrations on the cellular level using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). As a case study, the accumulation of Cu in the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea resulting from transition metal exposure (ranging from 0.5 to 100 μg/L) was evaluated. After the Cu exposure, cells of this photosynthetic dinoflagellate were treated with a critical point drying protocol, transferred to a carbon stub, and sputter-coated with a Au layer for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. In subsequent LA-ICPMS analysis, approximately 100 cells of each population were individually ablated. This approach permitted the evaluation of the mean concentration of Cu in the cell population across different exposure levels and also allowed the examination of the cellular distribution of Cu within the populations. In a cross-validation exercise, subcellular LA-ICPMS imaging was demonstrated to corroborate synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microimaging of single cells investigated under in vivo conditions. PMID:27149342

  7. Multiple site optical recording of transmembrane voltage (MSORTV) in patterned growth heart cell cultures: assessing electrical behavior, with microsecond resolution, on a cellular and subcellular scale.

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, S; Salzberg, B M

    1994-01-01

    We have applied multiple site optical recording of transmembrane voltage (MSORTV) to patterned growth cultures of heart cells to analyze the effect of geometry per se on impulse propagation in excitable tissue, with cellular and subcellular resolution. Extensive dye screening led to the choice of di-8-ANEPPS as the most suitable voltage-sensitive dye for this application; it is internalized slowly and permits optical recording with signal-to-noise ratios as high as 40:1 (measured peak-to-peak) and average fractional fluorescence changes of 15% per 100 mV. Using a x 100 objective and a fast data acquisition system, we could resolve impulse propagation on a microscopic scale (15 microns) with high temporal resolution (uncertainty of +/- 5 microseconds). We could observe the decrease in conduction velocity of an impulse propagating along a narrow cell strand as it enters a region of abrupt expansion, and we could explain this phenomenon in terms of the micro-architecture of the tissue. In contrast with the elongated and aligned cells forming the narrow strands, the cells forming the expansions were aligned at random and presented 2.5 times as many cell-to-cell appositions per unit length. If the decrease in conduction velocity results entirely from this increased number of cell-to-cell boundaries per unit length, the mean activation delay introduced by each boundary can be estimated to be 70 microseconds. Using this novel experimental system, we could also demonstrate the electrical coupling of fibroblasts and endotheloid cells to myocytes in culture. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7811945

  8. Females become infertile as the stored sperm's oxygen radicals increase

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Ribou, Anne-Cecile

    2013-01-01

    Predicting infertility is central to reproductive biology, medicine and evolutionary biology. In-vitro studies suggest that oxidative sperm damage causes infertility. Oxidative sperm damage can be reduced via two fundamental pathways: the removal of oxygen radicals by antioxidants, or the interference with cell metabolism to reduce the formation of oxygen radicals. Oxidative damage protection of spermatozoa should evolve frequently, especially during female sperm storage. However, in-vivo evidence linking oxidative protection and fertility is rare. We show that the intra-sperm production rate of oxygen radicals and the sperm metabolic rate were reduced in female bedbugs, Cimex lectularius, compared to males, and females laid fertile eggs. Females became infertile when sperm oxygen radicals and sperm metabolic rate increased to male levels. Our results link female fitness to sublethal sperm damage, imply adaptive benefits of interfering with sperm metabolism and offer the hypothesis that polyandry may serve to replace low-quality sperm.

  9. Sperm Binding to Oviduct Epithelial Cells Enhances TGFB1 and IL10 Expressions in Epithelial Cells as Well as Neutrophils In Vitro: Prostaglandin E2 As a Main Regulator of Anti-Inflammatory Response in the Bovine Oviduct

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Mohamed Samy; Marey, Mohamed Ali; Hambruch, Nina; Hayakawa, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takashi; Hussien, Hassan Ali; Abdel-Razek, Abdel-Razek Khalifa; Pfarrer, Christiane; Miyamoto, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Sperm are allogenic to the female genital tract; however, oviducts provide optimal conditions for survival and capacitation of these non-self cells until fertilization. Recently, we showed that oviduct-conditioned media and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) suppress sperm phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) under physiological conditions. We hypothesized that sperm binding to bovine oviduct epithelial cells (BOECs) could change the local innate immunity via PGE2. As the first step to obtain basic information, sub-confluent BOEC monolayers were co-cultured with swim-up sperm for 2 h. BOECs with viable bound sperm were cultured for an additional 3, 6, 12, or 24 h. Then, we confirmed the impact of the sperm-BOEC binding on both BOECs and PMN gene expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed that BOECs strongly express TGFB1 and IL10 in the oviduct. Sperm binding to BOECs in culture induced the anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGFB1 and IL10) and PGE2 production by BOECs. Exogenous PGE2 in vitro suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (TNF and IL1B) in BOECs. Moreover, pre-exposure of PMNs to BOEC-conditioned media suppressed the TNF expression, but the BOEC media co-cultured with sperm stimulated PMNs to express TGFB1 and IL10, with increasing PGE2 secretion. Of note, exogenous PGE2 led PMNs in vitro to decrease their TNF expression and increase anti-inflammatory cytokines expression. Our findings strongly suggest that BOECs provide an anti-inflammatory environment under physiological conditions and the sperm-BOEC binding further strengthens this milieu thus suppresses PMNs in the bovine oviduct. PGE2 is likely to drive this stable anti-inflammatory environment in the oviduct. PMID:27662642

  10. Sperm counts and serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels before and after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in men with testicular germ cell cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, J.G.

    1984-02-01

    Sperm counts were low (median, 15 X 10(6) per ejaculate) and serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were moderately elevated (median, 31 IU/l) after unilateral orchiectomy and immediately before radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 34 patients with seminomas and 20 patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. The scattered radiation (0.2 to 1.3 Gray (Gy)) reaching the remaining testicle during radiotherapy caused azoospermia in more than two thirds of the patients. A median of 540 days elapsed after the end of treatment before spermatozoa were again found in semen samples, while a median of 1250 days passed before the pretreatment sperm count was reached. One to 5 years after treatment, sperm counts were still low (median, 6 X 10(6) per ejaculate) and serum FSH was elevated (median, 61 IU/l). The adjuvant chemotherapy given to the 20 patients with nonseminomatous tumors did not appear to affect restitution appreciably.

  11. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kenneth A.; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  12. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  13. Effects of dilution and centrifugation on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey semen.

    PubMed

    Miró, J; Taberner, E; Rivera, M; Peña, A; Medrano, A; Rigau, T; Peñalba, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of dilution and centrifugation (i.e., two methods of reducing the influence of the seminal plasma) on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey (Equus asinus) semen. Fifty ejaculates from nine Catalonian jackasses were collected. Gel-free semen was diluted 1:1, 1:5 or 1:10 with Kenney extender. Another sample of semen was diluted 1:5, centrifuged, and then resuspended with Kenney extender until a final dilution of 25x10(6) sperm/ml was achieved (C). After 24 h, 48 h or 72 h of refrigerated storage at 5 degrees C, aliquots of these semen samples were incubated at 37 degrees C for 5 min. The percentage of viable sperm was determined by staining with eosin-nigrosin. The motility characteristics of the spermatozoa were examined using the CASA system (Microptic, Barcelona, Spain). At 24h, more surviving spermatozoa were seen in the more diluted and in the centrifuged semen samples (1:1 48.71%; 1:5 56.58%, 1:10 62.65%; C 72.40%). These differences were maintained at 48 h (1:1 34.31%, 1:5 40.56%, 1:10 48.52%, C 66.30%). After 72 h, only the C samples showed a survival rate of above 25%. The four known donkey motile sperm subpopulations were maintained by refrigeration. However, the percentage of motile sperms in each subpopulation changed with dilution. Only the centrifuged samples, and only at 24h, showed exactly the same motile sperm subpopulation proportions as recorded for fresh sperm. However, the 1:10 dilutions at 24 and 48 h, and the centrifuged semen at 48 h, showed few variations compared to fresh sperm. These results show that the elimination of seminal plasma increases the survival of spermatozoa and the maintenance of motility patterns. The initial sperm concentration had a significant (P<0.05) influence on centrifugation efficacy, but did not influence the number of spermatozoa damaged by centrifugation. In contrast, the percentage of live

  14. Subcellular post-transcriptional targeting: delivery of an intracellular protein to the extracellular leaflet of the plasma membrane using a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor in neurons and polarised epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, O; Cowen, R L; Preston, C M; Castro, M G; Lowenstein, P R

    2000-11-01

    The effectiveness of viral vector-mediated gene transfer depends on the expression of therapeutic transgenes in the correct target cell types. So far, however, little attention has been given to targeted subcellular distribution of expressed transgenes. Targeting individual transgenes to particular subcellular compartments will provide various advantages in increasing the safety, efficacy, and specificity of viral vector-mediated gene delivery. Viruses normally hijack the cellular protein synthesis machinery for their own advantages. It is thus unknown whether cells infected with viral vectors will be able to target proteins to the correct subcellular organelles, or whether the subcellular targeting machinery would be selectively disrupted by viral infection. In this article we explored whether a herpes simplex virus type 1-derived vector could be used to deliver a transgene engineered to be targeted to the extracellular membrane of target cells. To do so we constructed a temperature-sensitive mutant HSV-1 vector, tsK-TT21 expressing a recombinant marker protein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP), linked to sequence encoding a signal for the addition of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor within the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results demonstrate that HSV1-derived viral vectors can be used to target transgenes as GPI anchored proteins to the outside leaflet of plasma membranes, without disrupting the targeting machinery of host epithelial cells or neurons. This approach could then be used to target specific proteins to the cell membrane to modify cell-cell interactions, the function of specific plasma membrane proteins, or their interactions with other membrane proteins, and also to target a prodrug converting enzyme to the plasma membrane of target cells, therefore enhancing its cell killing effects.

  15. Sperm competition leads to functional adaptations in avian testes to maximize sperm quantity and quality.

    PubMed

    Lüpold, Stefan; Wistuba, Joachim; Damm, Oliver S; Rivers, James W; Birkhead, Tim R

    2011-05-01

    The outcome of sperm competition (i.e. competition for fertilization between ejaculates from different males) is primarily determined by the relative number and quality of rival sperm. Therefore, the testes are under strong selection to maximize both sperm number and quality, which are likely to result in trade-offs in the process of spermatogenesis (e.g. between the rate of spermatogenesis and sperm length or sperm energetics). Comparative studies have shown positive associations between the level of sperm competition and both relative testis size and the proportion of seminiferous (sperm-producing) tissue within the testes. However, it is unknown how the seminiferous tissue itself or the process of spermatogenesis might evolve in response to sperm competition. Therefore, we quantified the different germ cell types and Sertoli cells (SC) in testes to assess the efficiency of sperm production and its associations with sperm length and mating system across 10 species of New World Blackbirds (Icteridae) that show marked variation in sperm length and sperm competition level. We found that species under strong sperm competition generate more round spermatids (RS)/spermatogonium and have SC that support a greater number of germ cells, both of which are likely to increase the maximum sperm output. However, fewer of the RS appeared to elongate to mature spermatozoa in these species, which might be the result of selection for discarding spermatids with undesirable characteristics as they develop. Our results suggest that, in addition to overall size and gross morphology, testes have also evolved functional adaptations to maximize sperm quantity and quality. PMID:21307271

  16. Defining the mechanisms by which the reactive oxygen species by-product, 4-hydroxynonenal, affects human sperm cell function.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark A; Weinberg, Anita; Hetherington, Louise; Villaverde, Ana-Izabel; Velkov, Tony; Baell, Jonathan; Gordon, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation products such as the naturally occurring aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) are known to be cytotoxic toward different cell types, including spermatozoa. In order to understand this at the molecular level, we have employed a proteomic approach to characterize direct 4-HNE adducts on human spermatozoa. Several proteins were identified to be of particular interest, including aldehyde labeling of histone methyltransferase and dynein heavy chain. In addition, we found that 4-HNE bound to part of the activation segment, cysteine residue 199, of protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, at low levels, addition of 4-HNE had a stimulatory effect on PKA. However, this did not correlate to increased phosphotyrosine levels during capacitation. This data explains the link between reactive oxygen species and sperm toxicity. Given that epigenetic regulation is likely affected in oxidative-stressed spermatozoa, this data show that spermatozoa appear to shut down under these conditions before reaching the egg.

  17. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  18. PKM2 Subcellular Localization Is Involved in Oxaliplatin Resistance Acquisition in HT29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ginés, Alba; Bystrup, Sara; Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Guardia, Cristina; Musulén, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is the main cause of treatment failure in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. In a previous work we identified low levels of PKM2 as a putative oxaliplatin-resistance marker in HT29 CRC cell lines and also in patients. In order to assess how PKM2 influences oxaliplatin response in CRC cells, we silenced PKM2 using specific siRNAs in HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. MTT test demonstrated that PKM2 silencing induced resistance in HT29 and SW480 cells and sensitivity in HCT116 cells. Same experiments in isogenic HCT116 p53 null cells and double silencing of p53 and PKM2 in HT29 cells failed to show an influence of p53. By using trypan blue stain and FITC-Annexin V/PI tests we detected that PKM2 knockdown was associated with an increase in cell viability but not with a decrease in apoptosis activation in HT29 cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed PKM2 nuclear translocation in response to oxaliplatin in HCT116 and HT29 cells but not in OXA-resistant HTOXAR3 cells. Finally, by using a qPCR Array we demonstrated that oxaliplatin and PKM2 silencing altered cell death gene expression patterns including those of BMF, which was significantly increased in HT29 cells in response to oxaliplatin, in a dose and time-dependent manner, but not in siPKM2-HT29 and HTOXAR3 cells. BMF gene silencing in HT29 cells lead to a decrease in oxaliplatin-induced cell death. In conclusion, our data report new non-glycolytic roles of PKM2 in response to genotoxic damage and proposes BMF as a possible target gene of PKM2 to be involved in oxaliplatin response and resistance in CRC cells.

  19. In vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV) non-structural proteins in insect cells reveals their putative functions

    SciTech Connect

    Maroniche, Guillermo A.; Mongelli, Vanesa C.; Llauger, Gabriela; Alfonso, Victoria; Taboga, Oscar

    2012-09-01

    The in vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV, Fijivirus, Reoviridae) non-structural proteins fused to GFP was analyzed by confocal microscopy. P5-1 showed a cytoplasmic vesicular-like distribution that was lost upon deleting its PDZ binding TKF motif, suggesting that P5-1 interacts with cellular PDZ proteins. P5-2 located at the nucleus and its nuclear import was affected by the deletion of its basic C-termini. P7-1 and P7-2 also entered the nucleus and therefore, along with P5-2, could function as regulators of host gene expression. P6 located in the cytoplasm and in perinuclear cloud-like inclusions, was driven to P9-1 viroplasm-like structures and co-localized with P7-2, P10 and {alpha}-tubulin, suggesting its involvement in viroplasm formation and viral intracellular movement. Finally, P9-2 was N-glycosylated and located at the plasma membrane in association with filopodia-like protrusions containing actin, suggesting a possible role in virus cell-to-cell movement and spread.

  20. Developmental and Subcellular Organization of Single-Cell C₄ Photosynthesis in Bienertia sinuspersici Determined by Large-Scale Proteomics and cDNA Assembly from 454 DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Offermann, Sascha; Friso, Giulia; Doroshenk, Kelly A; Sun, Qi; Sharpe, Richard M; Okita, Thomas W; Wimmer, Diana; Edwards, Gerald E; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-05-01

    Kranz C4 species strictly depend on separation of primary and secondary carbon fixation reactions in different cell types. In contrast, the single-cell C4 (SCC4) species Bienertia sinuspersici utilizes intracellular compartmentation including two physiologically and biochemically different chloroplast types; however, information on identity, localization, and induction of proteins required for this SCC4 system is currently very limited. In this study, we determined the distribution of photosynthesis-related proteins and the induction of the C4 system during development by label-free proteomics of subcellular fractions and leaves of different developmental stages. This was enabled by inferring a protein sequence database from 454 sequencing of Bienertia cDNAs. Large-scale proteome rearrangements were observed as C4 photosynthesis developed during leaf maturation. The proteomes of the two chloroplasts are different with differential accumulation of linear and cyclic electron transport components, primary and secondary carbon fixation reactions, and a triose-phosphate shuttle that is shared between the two chloroplast types. This differential protein distribution pattern suggests the presence of a mRNA or protein-sorting mechanism for nuclear-encoded, chloroplast-targeted proteins in SCC4 species. The combined information was used to provide a comprehensive model for NAD-ME type carbon fixation in SCC4 species.

  1. Cloning and subcellular location of an Arabidopsis receptor-like protein that shares common features with protein-sorting receptors of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S U; Bar-Peled, M; Raikhel, N V

    1997-01-01

    Many receptors involved in clathrin-mediated protein transport through the endocytic and secretory pathways of yeast and animal cells share common features. They are all type I integral membrane proteins containing cysteine-rich lumenal domains and cytoplasmic tails with tyrosine-containing sorting signals. The cysteine-rich domains are thought to be involved in ligand binding, whereas the cytoplasmic tyrosine motifs interact with clathrin-associated adaptor proteins during protein sorting along these pathways. In addition, tyrosine-containing signals are required for the retention and recycling of some of these membrane proteins to the trans-Golgi network. Here we report the characterization of an approximately 80-kD epidermal growth factor receptor-like type I integral membrane protein containing all of these functional motifs from Arabidopsis thaliana (called AtELP for A. thaliana Epidermal growth factor receptor-Like Protein). Biochemical analysis indicates that AtELP is a membrane protein found at high levels in the roots of both monocots and dicots. Subcellular fractionation studies indicate that the AtELP protein is present in two membrane fractions corresponding to a novel, undefined compartment and a fraction enriched in vesicles containing clathrin and its associated adaptor proteins. AtELP may therefore serve as a marker for compartments involved in intracellular protein trafficking in the plant cell. PMID:9159954

  2. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Yon; Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo

    2011-11-18

    In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  3. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  4. Sugar-coated sperm: Unraveling the functions of the mammalian sperm glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Tecle, Eillen; Gagneux, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa are coated with a thick glycocalyx that is assembled during sperm development, maturation, and upon contact with seminal fluid. The sperm glycocalyx is critical for sperm survival in the female reproductive tract and is modified during capacitation. The complex interplay among the various glycoconjugates generates numerous signaling motifs that may regulate sperm function and, as a result, fertility. Nascent spermatozoa assemble their own glycans while the cells still possess a functional endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi in the seminiferous tubule, but once spermatogenesis is complete, they lose the capacity to produce glycoconjugates de novo. Sperm glycans continue to be modified, during epididymal transit by extracellular glycosidases and glycosyltransferases. Furthermore, epididymal cells secrete glycoconjugates (glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins and glycolipids) and glycan-rich microvesicles that can fuse with the maturing sperm membrane. The sperm glycocalyx mediates numerous functions in the female reproductive tract, including the following: inhibition of premature capacitation; passage through the cervical mucus; protection from innate and adaptive female immunity; formation of the sperm reservoir; and masking sperm proteins involved in fertilization. The immense diversity in sperm-associated glycans within and between species forms a remarkable challenge to our understanding of essential sperm glycan functions.

  5. In-situ second harmonic generation by cancer cell targeting ZnO nanocrystals to effect photodynamic action in subcellular space.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bobo; Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Baev, Alexander; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Damasco, Jossana A; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shuangchun; Prasad, Paras N

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces the concept of in-situ upconversion of deep penetrating near infrared light via second harmonic generation from ZnO nanocrystals delivered into cells to effect photo activated therapies, such as photodynamic therapy, which usually require activation by visible light with limited penetration through biological tissues. We demonstrated this concept by subcellular activation of a photodynamic therapy drug, Chlorin e6, excited within its strong absorption Soret band by the second harmonic (SH) light, generated at 409 nm by ZnO nanocrystals, which were targeted to cancer cells and internalized through the folate-receptor mediated endocytosis. By a combination of theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, we show that SH light, generated in-situ by ZnO nanocrystals significantly contributes to activation of photosensitizer, leading to cell death through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways initiated in the cytoplasm. This targeted photodynamic action was studied using label-free Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering imaging of the treated cells to monitor changes in the distribution of native cellular proteins and lipids. We found that initiation of photodynamic therapy with upconverted light led to global reduction in the intracellular concentration of macromolecules, likely due to suppression of proteins and lipids synthesis, which could be considered as a real-time indicator of cellular damage from photodynamic treatment. In prospective applications this in-situ photon upconversion could be further extended using ZnO nanocrystals surface functionalized with a specific organelle targeting group, provided a powerful approach to identify and consequently maximize a cellular response to phototherapy, selectively initiated in a specific cellular organelle. PMID:27442221

  6. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  7. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples.

  8. Sperm traits in farmed and wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Camarillo-Sepulveda, N; Hamoutene, D; Lush, L; Burt, K; Volkoff, H; Fleming, I A

    2016-02-01

    Differences in sperm metabolism and morphology between wild and non-local farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar were assessed by measuring metabolic enzyme activities and length of sperm flagella. No differences were observed between wild and farmed S. salar sperm with regards to cell counts or any of the biochemical variables assessed. Flagella of sperm cells were significantly longer in wild than farmed S. salar; however, this did not result in higher energy levels or different fertilization rates. PMID:26549612

  9. Sperm traits in farmed and wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Camarillo-Sepulveda, N; Hamoutene, D; Lush, L; Burt, K; Volkoff, H; Fleming, I A

    2016-02-01

    Differences in sperm metabolism and morphology between wild and non-local farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar were assessed by measuring metabolic enzyme activities and length of sperm flagella. No differences were observed between wild and farmed S. salar sperm with regards to cell counts or any of the biochemical variables assessed. Flagella of sperm cells were significantly longer in wild than farmed S. salar; however, this did not result in higher energy levels or different fertilization rates.

  10. Sperm specific proteins-potential candidate molecules for fertility control.

    PubMed

    Suri, Anil

    2004-03-10

    The increase in population growth rate warrants the development of additional contraceptive methods that are widely acceptable, free from side effects and less expensive. Immunocontraception, and in particular the targeting of antibodies to gamete-specific antigens implicated in sperm egg binding and fertilization, offers an attractive approach to control fertility. The development of a contraceptive vaccine based on sperm antigen represents a promising approach to contraception. In mammals, fertilization is completed by the direct interaction of sperm and egg, a process mediated primarily by sperm surface proteins. Sperm have proteins that are unique, cell specific, immunogenic and accessible to antibodies. A few of the sperm specific proteins have been isolated and characterized. The antibodies raised against the sperm specific antigens have proved to be extremely effective at reducing sperm-egg interaction in vitro; fertility trials in sub-human primates would eventually prove the effectiveness of the sperm antigens in terms of contraceptive efficacy.

  11. Sperm specific proteins-potential candidate molecules for fertility control

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Anil

    2004-01-01

    The increase in population growth rate warrants the development of additional contraceptive methods that are widely acceptable, free from side effects and less expensive. Immunocontraception, and in particular the targeting of antibodies to gamete-specific antigens implicated in sperm egg binding and fertilization, offers an attractive approach to control fertility. The development of a contraceptive vaccine based on sperm antigen represents a promising approach to contraception. In mammals, fertilization is completed by the direct interaction of sperm and egg, a process mediated primarily by sperm surface proteins. Sperm have proteins that are unique, cell specific, immunogenic and accessible to antibodies. A few of the sperm specific proteins have been isolated and characterized. The antibodies raised against the sperm specific antigens have proved to be extremely effective at reducing sperm-egg interaction in vitro; fertility trials in sub-human primates would eventually prove the effectiveness of the sperm antigens in terms of contraceptive efficacy. PMID:15012833

  12. Subcellular localization of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus proteins and DNA during permissive infection of Crandell feline kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiewicz, M B; Costello, F; Huhtanen, M; Wolfinbarger, J B; Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E

    1996-01-01

    Confocal microscopy allowed us to localize viral nonstructural (NS) and capsid (VP) proteins and DNA simultaneously in cells permissively infected with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Early after infection, NS proteins colocalized with viral DNA to form intranuclear inclusions, whereas VP proteins formed hollow intranuclear shells around the inclusions. Later, nuclei had irregular outlines and were virtually free of ADV products. In these cells, inclusions of viral DNA with or without associated NS protein were embedded in cytoplasmic VP protein. These findings implied that ADV replication within an infected cell is regulated spatially as well as temporally. PMID:8627805

  13. Sperm viability - Determination of sperm viability using fluorescence microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the percentage of viable sperm in a semen sample using stains that differentiates viable (live) sperm from nonviable (dead) sperm. Viable sperm are detected by SYBR-14, which stains the sperm nuclei green. Nonviable sperm are detected by propidium iodide (PI), which stains the sperm red...

  14. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  15. Criteria predicting the absence of spermatozoa in the Sertoli cell-only syndrome can be used to improve success rates of sperm retrieval.

    PubMed

    Anniballo, R; Ubaldi, F; Cobellis, L; Sorrentino, M; Rienzi, L; Greco, E; Tesarik, J

    2000-11-01

    In patients with non-obstructive azoospermia, testicular sperm extraction (TESE) is a method of choice to recover spermatozoa as a male therapeutic approach in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) programmes. However, the efficacy of TESE in this indication is burdened by a frequent failure of sperm recovery, which renders useless both the invasive testicular intervention and ovarian stimulation of the patient's spouse. One of the most frequent pathological pictures characterizing complete absence of spermatozoa is germinal aplasia (Sertoli cell- only syndrome or SCOS). Two different histological patterns of SCOS have been already described during the past five decades. These two patterns can be characterized as the congenital (pure) and the secondary (mixed) forms. Both patterns, with different prognosis to retrieve spermatozoa by therapeutic testicular biopsy, are frequently confused when TESE is performed during ICSI programmes. Useful criteria to predict the absence of spermatozoa can be obtained by a definite recognition of the two typical histological patterns during the diagnostic testicular biopsy. The diagnosis of congenital or acquired SCOS can be refined by endocrine, chemical, immunohistochemical and molecular biology aids. Reduction of both sperm retrieval failure and unnecessary ovarian stimulation can be achieved by combination of these methods.

  16. The Beltsville sperm sexing technology: high-speed sperm sorting gives improved sperm output for in vitro fertilization and AI.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L A; Welch, G R; Rens, W

    1999-01-01

    The Beltsville sperm sexing technology is currently the only effective means of altering the sex ratio of offspring in livestock. The method is based on the flow-cytometric separation of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm based on X/Y DNA content difference. It is an effective means of producing progeny of predetermined sex in cattle, swine, sheep, and laboratory animals. The method involves treating sperm with a DNA-binding fluorochrome, Hoechst 33342, and flow-cytometrically sorting them into separate X and Y populations that can subsequently be used for surgical intratubal or intrauterine insemination, deep-uterine insemination, regular artificial insemination in some cases, in vitro fertilization to produce sexed embryos for transfer, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection of ova. Skewed sex ratios of 85 to 95% of one sex or the other have been repeatably achieved in most species. The method has been used worldwide to produce several hundred morphologically normal animal offspring of the predicted sex. It has also been validated in the laboratory using DNA reanalysis of the sorted sperm populations and by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR of individual sperm. We developed a new orienting nozzle that we have fitted to both conventional and high-speed cell sorters that have been modified for sperm sorting. Recently we completed the adaptation of the new orienting nozzle to a Cytomation MoFlo high-speed cell sorter modified for sperm. This adaptation of the nozzle has increased the overall production rate of sorted X and Y sperm from about .35 million/h to 5 or 6 million sperm/h (each population). Calves have been born from cows artificially inseminated using conventional technique and sexed sperm. In addition, numerous litters of pigs have been born after transfer of embryos produced from X or Y sorted sperm. PMID:15526798

  17. Phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27Kip1 regulated by hydrogen peroxide modulation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Irene L; Bracalente, Candelaria; Notcovich, Cintia; Tropper, Ivanna; Molinari, Beatriz L; Policastro, Lucía L; Durán, Hebe

    2012-01-01

    The Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a key protein in the decision between proliferation and cell cycle exit. Quiescent cells show nuclear p27Kip1, but this protein is exported to the cytoplasm in response to proliferating signals. We recently reported that catalase treatment increases the levels of p27Kip1 in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. In order to characterize and broaden these findings, we evaluated the regulation of p27Kip1 by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in human melanoma cells and melanocytes. We observed a high percentage of p27Kip1 positive nuclei in melanoma cells overexpressing or treated with exogenous catalase, while non-treated controls showed a cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Then we studied the levels of p27Kip1 phosphorylated (p27p) at serine 10 (S10) and at threonine 198 (T198) because phosphorylation at these sites enables nuclear exportation of this protein, leading to accumulation and stabilization of p27pT198 in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated by western blot a decrease in p27pS10 and p27pT198 levels in response to H(2)O(2) removal in melanoma cells, associated with nuclear p27Kip1. Melanocytes also exhibited nuclear p27Kip1 and lower levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 than melanoma cells, which showed cytoplasmic p27Kip1. We also showed that the addition of H(2)O(2) (0.1 µM) to melanoma cells arrested in G1 by serum starvation induces proliferation and increases the levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 leading to cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Nuclear localization and post-translational modifications of p27Kip1 were also demonstrated by catalase treatment of colorectal carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells, extending our findings to these other human cancer types. In conclusion, we showed in the present work that H(2)O(2) scavenging prevents nuclear exportation of p27Kip1, allowing cell cycle arrest, suggesting that cancer cells take advantage of their intrinsic pro-oxidant state to favor cytoplasmic localization of p27

  18. Phosphorylation and Subcellular Localization of p27Kip1 Regulated by Hydrogen Peroxide Modulation in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez, Irene L.; Bracalente, Candelaria; Notcovich, Cintia; Tropper, Ivanna; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Policastro, Lucía L.; Durán, Hebe

    2012-01-01

    The Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a key protein in the decision between proliferation and cell cycle exit. Quiescent cells show nuclear p27Kip1, but this protein is exported to the cytoplasm in response to proliferating signals. We recently reported that catalase treatment increases the levels of p27Kip1 in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. In order to characterize and broaden these findings, we evaluated the regulation of p27Kip1 by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in human melanoma cells and melanocytes. We observed a high percentage of p27Kip1 positive nuclei in melanoma cells overexpressing or treated with exogenous catalase, while non-treated controls showed a cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Then we studied the levels of p27Kip1 phosphorylated (p27p) at serine 10 (S10) and at threonine 198 (T198) because phosphorylation at these sites enables nuclear exportation of this protein, leading to accumulation and stabilization of p27pT198 in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated by western blot a decrease in p27pS10 and p27pT198 levels in response to H2O2 removal in melanoma cells, associated with nuclear p27Kip1. Melanocytes also exhibited nuclear p27Kip1 and lower levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 than melanoma cells, which showed cytoplasmic p27Kip1. We also showed that the addition of H2O2 (0.1 µM) to melanoma cells arrested in G1 by serum starvation induces proliferation and increases the levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 leading to cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Nuclear localization and post-translational modifications of p27Kip1 were also demonstrated by catalase treatment of colorectal carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells, extending our findings to these other human cancer types. In conclusion, we showed in the present work that H2O2 scavenging prevents nuclear exportation of p27Kip1, allowing cell cycle arrest, suggesting that cancer cells take advantage of their intrinsic pro-oxidant state to favor cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. PMID

  19. Phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27Kip1 regulated by hydrogen peroxide modulation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Irene L; Bracalente, Candelaria; Notcovich, Cintia; Tropper, Ivanna; Molinari, Beatriz L; Policastro, Lucía L; Durán, Hebe

    2012-01-01

    The Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a key protein in the decision between proliferation and cell cycle exit. Quiescent cells show nuclear p27Kip1, but this protein is exported to the cytoplasm in response to proliferating signals. We recently reported that catalase treatment increases the levels of p27Kip1 in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. In order to characterize and broaden these findings, we evaluated the regulation of p27Kip1 by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in human melanoma cells and melanocytes. We observed a high percentage of p27Kip1 positive nuclei in melanoma cells overexpressing or treated with exogenous catalase, while non-treated controls showed a cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Then we studied the levels of p27Kip1 phosphorylated (p27p) at serine 10 (S10) and at threonine 198 (T198) because phosphorylation at these sites enables nuclear exportation of this protein, leading to accumulation and stabilization of p27pT198 in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated by western blot a decrease in p27pS10 and p27pT198 levels in response to H(2)O(2) removal in melanoma cells, associated with nuclear p27Kip1. Melanocytes also exhibited nuclear p27Kip1 and lower levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 than melanoma cells, which showed cytoplasmic p27Kip1. We also showed that the addition of H(2)O(2) (0.1 µM) to melanoma cells arrested in G1 by serum starvation induces proliferation and increases the levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 leading to cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Nuclear localization and post-translational modifications of p27Kip1 were also demonstrated by catalase treatment of colorectal carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells, extending our findings to these other human cancer types. In conclusion, we showed in the present work that H(2)O(2) scavenging prevents nuclear exportation of p27Kip1, allowing cell cycle arrest, suggesting that cancer cells take advantage of their intrinsic pro-oxidant state to favor cytoplasmic localization of p27

  20. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  1. Age and markers of Leydig cell function, but not of Sertoli cell function predict the success of sperm retrieval in adolescents and adults with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohayem, J; Fricke, R; Czeloth, K; Mallidis, C; Wistuba, J; Krallmann, C; Zitzmann, M; Kliesch, S

    2015-09-01

    Microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (mTESE), combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) represents a chance for azoospermic men with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) to father children. The objective of this study was to identify predictive factors for the success of mTESE from adolescents and adults with KS. The clinical data of 50 late pubertal adolescents (13-19 years) and 85 adult patients (20-61 years) with non-mosaic KS, who underwent mTESE, were analysed with respect to factors, potentially predictive of active spermatogenesis; specifically a history of cryptorchidism, age, testicular volumes, serum levels of LH, FSH, testosterone (T) and estradiol at the time of surgery. Inhibin B, AMH and INSL3 were additionally analysed in the adolescents. A younger age and a near-compensated Leydig cell function were associated with higher success of sperm retrieval via mTESE: In adolescents ≥15-19 years, spermatozoa were retrieved in 45%, compared to 31% in adults; in adolescents aged 13-14 years, spermatozoa were collected in only 10%. Adolescents with an LH ≤17.5 U/L, along with a T level ≥7.5 nmol/L had the best success rate (54%), which fell to 44% with higher LH, whereas those with low T (<7.5 nmol/L), irrespective of LH had no sperm retrieval. In adults with T levels above and LH below these thresholds, the success rate was 51%, falling to 19%, if LH was higher. When T was lower than threshold, the rate was 17%. No association between testicular volumes, serum levels of FSH, Inhibin B, AMH, estradiol and mTESE success was found. A history of cryptorchidism was associated with lower retrieval rates. A window of opportunity for an approximate 50% chance to retrieve spermatozoa via mTESE exists for young, late pubertal KS patients between age 15 and young adulthood, when Leydig cell function is at its best. In these cases, referral to a centre of expertise should be considered.

  2. Sperm macrocephaly syndrome in a patient without AURKC mutations and with a history of recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Emanuela; Mirabelli, Marzia; Raimondo, Stefania; Brussino, Alessandro; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Bongioanni, Francesca; Revelli, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports a case of recurrent miscarriage in a patient affected by a variant phenotype of sperm macrocephaly syndrome (SMS). SMS is usually related to specific sperm characteristics (large head, multiple tail) and homozygous mutations in the aurora kinase C gene (AURKC). However, the present case observed large-headed spermatozoa with no flagellar abnormalities and no mutations detectable by AURKC sequencing. Furthermore, the patient had repeatedly conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection, but pregnancy always aborted. This study performed morphological analysis (Papanicolau staining), annexin V/propidium iodide staining, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy. This study observed large-headed, mono-tailed, mono-centriolar spermatozoa characterized by abnormal chromatin and swollen mitochondria. SCSA revealed a high ratio of late apoptotic cells with fairly intact amount of DNA. The FISH analysis showed 100% disomy rate. As far as is known, this is the first study to include gene sequencing, TEM, cytogenetic analysis and sperm DNA fragmentation in a case of SMS and also to report recurrent miscarriage related to this specific condition. SMS may be associated with important abnormalities of the sperm subcellular structure and with disomy even in the absence of mutations in the AURKC coding sequence. Sperm macrocephaly syndrome (SMS) is a rare condition that affects spermatozoa and is related to infertility. It is characterized by a specific phenotype of large-headed, multi-tailed spermatozoa with an abnormal chromosomal status. A very few pregnancies have been obtained so far in SMS patients by means of IVF procedures. We present a case of SMS that differs from the classical syndrome as we observed large-headed spermatozoa without tail abnormalities. The affected patient had achieved three pregnancies following IVF, but all aborted. We carried out a detailed examination of

  3. Spatiotemporal quantification of subcellular ATP levels in a single HeLa cell during changes in morphology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Rika; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2015-11-17

    The quantitative relationship between change in cell shape and ATP consumption is an unsolved problem in cell biology. In this study, a simultaneous imaging and image processing analysis allowed us to observe and quantify these relationships under physiological conditions, for the first time. We focused on two marginal regions of cells: the microtubule-rich 'lamella' and the actin-rich 'peripheral structure'. Simultaneous imaging and correlation analysis revealed that microtubule dynamics cause lamellar shape change accompanying an increase in ATP level. Also, image processing and spatiotemporal quantification enabled to visualize a chronological change of the relationships between the protrusion length and ATP levels, and it suggested they are influencing each other. Furthermore, inhibition of microtubule dynamics diminished motility in the peripheral structure and the range of fluctuation of ATP level in the lamella. This work clearly demonstrates that cellular motility and morphology are regulated by ATP-related cooperative function between microtubule and actin dynamics.

  4. Ophiobolin A from Bipolaris oryzae perturbs motility and membrane integrities of porcine sperm and induces cell death on mammalian somatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Ottó; Papp, Tamás; Berta, Máté; Zana, Annamária; Forgó, Péter; Dombi, György; Andersson, Maria A; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Szekeres, András

    2014-09-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a phytopathogenic fungus causing a brown spot disease in rice, and produces substance that strongly perturbs motility and membrane integrities of boar spermatozoa. The substance was isolated from the liquid culture of the fungal strain using extraction and a multi-step semi-preparative HPLC procedures. Based on the results of mass spectrometric and 2D NMR techniques, the bioactive molecule was identified as ophiobolin A, a previously described sesterterpene-type compound. The purified ophiobolin A exhibited strong motility inhibition and viability reduction on boar spermatozoa. Furthermore, it damaged the sperm mitochondria significantly at sublethal concentration by the dissipation of transmembrane potential in the mitochondrial inner membrane, while the plasma membrane permeability barrier remained intact. The study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of ophiobolin A toward somatic cell lines is higher by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to other mitochondriotoxic mycotoxins, and towards sperm cells unique by replacing the progressive motility by shivering tail beating at low exposure concentration. PMID:25251540

  5. Chicken sperm transcriptome profiling by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Shafeeque, C M; Sharma, S K; Singh, R; Mohan, J; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Azeez, P A

    2016-03-01

    It has been confirmed that mammalian sperm contain thousands of functional RNAs, and some of them have vital roles in fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we attempted to characterize transcriptome of the sperm of fertile chickens using microarray analysis. Spermatozoal RNA was pooled from 10 fertile males and used for RNA preparation. Prior to performing the microarray, RNA quality was assessed using a bioanalyzer, and gDNA and somatic cell RNA contamination was assessed by CD4 and PTPRC gene amplification. The chicken sperm transcriptome was cross-examined by analysing sperm and testes RNA on a 4 × 44K chicken array, and results were verified by RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 21,639 predominantly nuclear-encoded transcripts in chicken sperm. The majority (66.55%) of the sperm transcripts were shared with the testes, while surprisingly, 33.45% transcripts were detected (raw signal intensity greater than 50) only in the sperm and not in the testes. The greatest proportion of up-regulated transcripts were responsible for signal transduction (63.20%) followed by embryonic development (56.76%) and cell structure (56.25%). Of the 20 most abundant transcripts, 18 remain uncharacterized, whereas the least abundant genes were mostly associated with the ribosome. These findings lay a foundation for more detailed investigations on sperm RNAs in chickens to identify sperm-based biomarkers for fertility.

  6. Ameliorating Effect of Ginseng on Epididymo-Orchitis Inducing Alterations in Sperm Quality and Spermatogenic Cells Apoptosis following Infection by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Mehdi; Jani, Soghra; Kazemi, Mahsa; Zeighami, Habib; Yazdinezhad, Alireza; Mazloomi, Sahar; Shokri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Objective Epididymo-orchitis (EO) potentially results in reduced fertility in up to 60% of affected patients. The anti-inflammatory effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG) and its ability to act as an immunoenhancer in parallel with the beneficial effects of this ancient herbal medicine on the reproductive systems of animals and humans led us to evaluate its protective effects against acute EO. Materials and Methods This animal experimental study was conducted in the Department of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS), Zanjan, Iran during 2013-2015. We divided 50 Wistar rats into five following groups (n=10 per group): i. Control-intact animals, ii. Vehicle-phosphate buffered saline (PBS) injection into the vas deferens, iii. KRG-an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of KRG, iv. EO-an injection of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain M39 into the vas defer- ens, and v. EO/ KRG-injections of both UPEC strain M39 and KRG. The treatment lasted seven days. We then evaluated sperm parameters, number of germ cell layers, Johnson’s criteria, germ cell apoptosis, body weight and relative sex organs weight. Results Acute EO increased the relative weight of prostate and seminal vesicles (P≤0.05). It also reduced sperm quality such as total motility, sperm concentration (P≤0.01), and the percentage of normal sperm (P≤0.001). Moreover, acute EO decreased Miller’s (P≤0.05) and Johnsen’s scores and increased apoptotic indexes of spermatogenic cells (P≤0.001). KRG treatment decreased prostate weight gain (P≤0.05) and improved the percentage of sperm with normal morphology, total motility (P≤0.01), and progressive motility (P≤0.05). The apoptotic indexes of spermatogenic cells reduced (P≤0.001), whereas both Johnsen’s (P≤0.01) and Miller’s criteria increased in the KRG-treated EO testis (P≤0.05). Conclusion Consequently, KRG ameliorated the devastating effects of EO on the sperm retrieved from either

  7. Ameliorating Effect of Ginseng on Epididymo-Orchitis Inducing Alterations in Sperm Quality and Spermatogenic Cells Apoptosis following Infection by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Mehdi; Jani, Soghra; Kazemi, Mahsa; Zeighami, Habib; Yazdinezhad, Alireza; Mazloomi, Sahar; Shokri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Objective Epididymo-orchitis (EO) potentially results in reduced fertility in up to 60% of affected patients. The anti-inflammatory effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG) and its ability to act as an immunoenhancer in parallel with the beneficial effects of this ancient herbal medicine on the reproductive systems of animals and humans led us to evaluate its protective effects against acute EO. Materials and Methods This animal experimental study was conducted in the Department of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS), Zanjan, Iran during 2013-2015. We divided 50 Wistar rats into five following groups (n=10 per group): i. Control-intact animals, ii. Vehicle-phosphate buffered saline (PBS) injection into the vas deferens, iii. KRG-an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of KRG, iv. EO-an injection of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain M39 into the vas defer- ens, and v. EO/ KRG-injections of both UPEC strain M39 and KRG. The treatment lasted seven days. We then evaluated sperm parameters, number of germ cell layers, Johnson’s criteria, germ cell apoptosis, body weight and relative sex organs weight. Results Acute EO increased the relative weight of prostate and seminal vesicles (P≤0.05). It also reduced sperm quality such as total motility, sperm concentration (P≤0.01), and the percentage of normal sperm (P≤0.001). Moreover, acute EO decreased Miller’s (P≤0.05) and Johnsen’s scores and increased apoptotic indexes of spermatogenic cells (P≤0.001). KRG treatment decreased prostate weight gain (P≤0.05) and improved the percentage of sperm with normal morphology, total motility (P≤0.01), and progressive motility (P≤0.05). The apoptotic indexes of spermatogenic cells reduced (P≤0.001), whereas both Johnsen’s (P≤0.01) and Miller’s criteria increased in the KRG-treated EO testis (P≤0.05). Conclusion Consequently, KRG ameliorated the devastating effects of EO on the sperm retrieved from either

  8. The inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} induces subcellular β-catenin translocation and migration of colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salim, Tavga; Sand-Dejmek, Janna; Sjölander, Anita

    2014-02-15

    The abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway frequently occurs in colorectal cancer. The nuclear translocation of β-catenin activates the transcription of target genes that promote cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. The pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) exerts its effects through the CysLT{sub 1} receptor. We previously reported an upregulation of CysLT{sub 1}R in patients with colon cancer, suggesting the importance of leukotrienes in colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of LTD{sub 4} on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its effects on proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. LTD{sub 4} stimulation led to an increase in β-catenin expression, β-catenin nuclear translocation and the subsequent transcription of MYC and CCND1. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} significantly reduced the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin at the plasma membrane and increased the migration and proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The effects of LTD{sub 4} can be blocked by the inhibition of CysLT{sub 1}R. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} induced the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK)-3β activity, indicating a crosstalk between the G-protein-coupled receptor CysLT{sub 1} and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In conclusion, LTD{sub 4}, which can be secreted from macrophages and leukocytes in the tumor microenvironment, induces β-catenin translocation and the activation of β-catenin target genes, resulting in the increased proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) lowers membrane β-catenin but increases nuclear β-catenin levels in colon cancer cells. • In agreement, LTD{sub 4} triggers inactivation of GSK-3β, activation of TCF/LEF and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. • LTD{sub 4} also caused a significant reduction in the expression of E-cadherin and an increased migration of colon cancer cells.

  9. Interaction of Inflammatory Cells and Oral Microorganisms VII. In Vitro Polymorphonuclear Responses to Viable Bacteria and to Subcellular Components of Avirulent and Virulent Strains of Actinomyces viscosus

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Norton S.; Hammond, Benjamin F.; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Baehni, Pierre C.; McArthur, William P.

    1978-01-01

    Both virulent (V) and avirulent (AV) strains of Actinomyces viscosus T14 are capable of colonizing the oral cavity of gnotobiotic rats, but only T14-V causes destructive periodontal disease. The basis for this difference in in vivo pathogenicity has not been adequately defined. In the present study we compared the capacities of T14-AV and T14-V to provoke in vitro extracellular release of lysosomal constituents from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In serum-free cultures, viable T14-V but not T14-AV stimulated discharge of PMN lysosomes. The release response was correlated with PMN phagocytic activity; thus, PMNs readily ingested T14-V but not T14-AV. To explain these differences in PMN-bacteria interactions, subcellular fractions of T14-AV or T14-V were incubated with PMNs. A crude, insoluble sonic extract derived from T14-V caused PMN lysosome release, but a similar fraction from T14-AV was inactive. However, following extensive washing and treatment with deoxyribonuclease or sodium dodecyl sulfate, cell wall fractions of T14-AV stimulated lysosome release. These procedures apparently removed an extracellular polysaccharide slime which is synthesized by T14-AV but not by T14-V. There was a significant reduction in the capacities of viable T14-V or cell wall fractions of T14-V or T14-AV to provoke PMN lysosome release when these agents were preincubated with a slime material isolated from T14-AV. This inhibitory influence of slime was overcome by the addition of fresh or heated (56°C, 30 min) serum to the PMN-bacteria cultures. The data suggest a relationship between the abilities of the avirulent and virulent strains of A. viscosus T14 to act as periodontal pathogens in vivo and to serve as stimuli for PMN lysosome release in vitro. Images PMID:689737

  10. Population imaging at subcellular resolution supports specific and local inhibition by granule cells in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Wienisch, Martin; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Information processing in early sensory regions is modulated by a diverse range of inhibitory interneurons. We sought to elucidate the role of olfactory bulb interneurons called granule cells (GCs) in odor processing by imaging the activity of hundreds of these cells simultaneously in mice. Odor responses in GCs were temporally diverse and spatially disperse, with some degree of non-random, modular organization. The overall sparseness of activation of GCs was highly correlated with the extent of glomerular activation by odor stimuli. Increasing concentrations of single odorants led to proportionately larger population activity, but some individual GCs had non-monotonic relations to concentration due to local inhibitory interactions. Individual dendritic segments could sometimes respond independently to odors, revealing their capacity for compartmentalized signaling in vivo. Collectively, the response properties of GCs point to their role in specific and local processing, rather than global operations such as response normalization proposed for other interneurons. PMID:27388949

  11. Establishment of a human cell line stably overexpressing mouse Nip45 and characterization of Nip45 subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hashiguchi, Kohtaro; Ozaki, Masumi; Kuraoka, Isao; Saitoh, Hisato

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A human cell line expressing a mouse Nip45 has facilitated Nip45 analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nip45 does not effectively inhibit polySUMOylation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nip45 interacts directly with SUMO and SUMO chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nip45 accumulates at PML bodies in response to proteasome inhibition. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin dependent 2 interacting protein, Nfatc2ip (Nip45), has been implicated as a crucial coordinator of the immune response and of cellular differentiation in humans and mice, and contains SUMO-like domains in its C-terminal region. However, the significance of its N-terminal region and its correlation to the SUMO modification pathway remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, a human cultured cell line was established, in which FLAG-tagged mouse Nip45 (FLAG-mNip45) was stably overexpressed. Under standard, non-stressful conditions, we detected FLAG-mNip45 diffusely distributed in the nucleus. Intriguingly, proteasome inhibition by MG132 caused FLAG-mNip45, together with SUMOylated proteins, to localize in nuclear domains associated with promyelocytic leukemia protein. Finally, using an in vitro binding assay, we showed interaction of the N-terminal region of mNip45 with both free SUMO-3 and SUMO-3 chains, indicating that Nip45 may, in part, exert its function via interaction with SUMO/SUMOylated proteins. Taken together, our study provides novel information on a poorly characterized mammalian protein and suggests that our newly established cell line will be useful for elucidating the physiological role of Nip45.

  12. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  13. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than that of freshwater fish sperm (~150 seconds), with the longevities of both marine and freshwater fish being significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of anuran sperm (~4100 seconds). The average velocity of anuran sperm (25 μm/s) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of marine fish (140 μm/s) or freshwater fish (135 μm/s) sperm. The longevity of the sperm of giant salamanders (Cryptobranchoidea) of approximately 600 seconds was greater than that of freshwater fish sperm but much lower than anuran sperm. Our research and information from the literature showed that higher osmolarities promote greater longevity in anuran sperm, and some freshwater fish sperm, and that anuran and cryptobranchid sperm maintained membrane integrity long after the cessation of motility, demonstrating a preferential sharing of energy reserves toward the maintenance of membrane integrity. The maintenance of the membrane integrity of anuran sperm in fresh water for up to 6 hours showed an extremely high osmotic tolerance relative to fish sperm. The very high longevity and osmotic tolerance of anuran sperm and high longevity of cryptobranchid sperm, relative to those of freshwater fish, may reflect the complex fertilization history of amphibian sperm in

  14. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised. PMID:26621372

  15. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-12-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised.

  16. FRET imaging in living maize cells reveals that plasma membrane aquaporins interact to regulate their subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Enric; Borst, Jan Willem; Muylaert, Mélanie; Batoko, Henri; Hemminga, Marcus A; Chaumont, François

    2007-07-24

    Zea mays plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (ZmPIPs) fall into two groups, ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s, that exhibit different water channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. ZmPIP1s are inactive, whereas ZmPIP2s induce a marked increase in the membrane osmotic water permeability coefficient, P(f). We previously showed that, in Xenopus oocytes, ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 interact to increase the cell P(f). Here, we report the localization and interaction of ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s in living maize cells. ZmPIPs were fused to monomeric yellow fluorescent protein and/or monomeric cyan fluorescent protein and expressed transiently in maize mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed alone, ZmPIP1 fusion proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas ZmPIP2s were found in the plasma membrane. Interestingly, when coexpressed with ZmPIP2s, ZmPIP1s were relocalized to the plasma membrane. Using FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we demonstrated that this relocalization results from interaction between ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided additional evidence for the association of ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 in maize roots and suspension cells. These data suggest that PIP1-PIP2 interaction is required for in planta PIP1 trafficking to the plasma membrane to modulate plasma membrane permeability. PMID:17636130

  17. Regulation of plasminogen activator in 3T3 cells: effect of phorbol myristate acetate on subcellular distribution and molecular weight

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The tumor promoter, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), stimulates plasminogen activator production and extracellular release in confluent Swiss 3T3 cells. Coordinated with the increased extracellular release is a redistribution of the activity into plasma membrane-enriched fractions and a shift in the predominant molecular weight species from 75,000 to 49,000 daltons. The evidence suggests that PMA induces the formation of the 49,000 dalton species which is preferentially located in plasma membrane-enriched fractions. PMID:7197280

  18. Porcine embryo production following in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection from vitrified immature oocytes matured with a granulosa cell co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Fahiel; Ducolomb, Yvonne; Lemus, Ana E; Cuello, Cristina; Betancourt, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the capacity of vitrified-warmed porcine immature oocytes to mature and to be fertilized using in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and to determine the subsequent embryo development. Immature oocytes were vitrified using ethylene glycol and dimethylsulphoxide as cryoprotectants and the Cryolock method. After warming oocytes were cultured 44 h for maturation. Oocytes were randomly distributed in three treatment groups and subjected to in vitro fertilization (Experiment 1) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (Experiment 2) procedures. The results indicate that the embryo development was higher in denuded oocytes co-cultured with granulosa cells (NkO-CC group) fertilized by in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection compared to cumulus-cell oocyte complexes (COCs group), showing no significant differences with control. Vitrified denuded oocytes matured with a co-culture system NkO-CC group, displayed higher cleavage rate and blastocyst production than vitrified COCs group. Blastocysts were successfully obtained after IVF and ICSI procedures; however, the development to the blastocyst stage was better after IVF. These results show that the vitrification-warming media, the employment of a granulosa cell co-culture system and the Cryolock method during vitrification, increased the nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of vitrified porcine immature oocytes. Further experiments are required to enhance porcine embryo production after vitrification.

  19. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  20. THE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIGEN IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kölsch, E.; Mitchison, N. A.

    1968-01-01

    The intracellular fate of phagocytosed antigens in cells from peritoneal exudate in CBA mice has been studied by using 126I and 131I labeled antigens. After uptake of labeled antigen, cells were homogenized and the subcellular fractions were analyzed by isopycnic centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. The uptake of heat-denatured BSA (c BSA) by these cells in vivo is 3.5 µg/mg c BSA injected/108 cells. The uptake by cells in animals which were exposed 2 days earlier to 900 r whole body irradiation is slightly lower but does not differ significantly. 90% of the phagocytosed material is degraded within 2–3 hr, the residual 10% is retained at least over an 8 hr periods. Using a pulse and chase technique, with 125I and 131I c BSA in vitro and in vivo it was shown that newly phagocytosed antigen is found mainly in a lysosomal turnover compartment of a density 1.19 g cm–3. Antigen which has been in the cells for longer was found in a denser fraction (1.26 g cm–3). In a comparison of nhrmal and X-irradiated cells it can be shown that after irradiation with 900 r less c BSA is found in this storage compartment. Binding of the antigen to the subcellular fractions, and its behavior towards several detergents has been studied. Subcellular fractions do not have the increased immunogenic capacity of antigen enclosed in living macrophages. Two synthetic polypeptide antigens, poly(D-Tyr, D-Glu, D-Ala) and poly-(L-Tyr, L-Glu) have a different subcellular distribution from c BSA, BSA, or bovine gamma globulin. Apart from also being found in the 1.26 storage compartment the polypeptide antigens are mainly located in a 1.15 compartment and only to a small extent in the 1.19 compartment. The half-life of these antigens in the cells is much longer than the half-life of the protein antigens studied. The finding of several subcellular compartments is discussed in connection with the functions possibly performed by macrophages. PMID:5682940

  1. Prognostic significance of p62/SQSTM1 subcellular localization and LC3B in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J-L; Chen, F-F; Lung, J; Lo, C-H; Lee, F-H; Lu, Y-C; Hung, C-H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autophagy is a programmed cell survival mechanism that has a key role in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. The relationship between autophagy and cancer is complex because autophagy can act as either a tumour suppressor or as a tumour promoter. The role of autophagy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is controversial. Several studies have claimed that either a high or low expression of autophagy-related proteins was associated with poor prognosis of OSCCs. The aims of the study were to compare autophagy in OSCCs, verrucous hyperplasias, and normal oral mucosas, and to inspect the prognostic role of autophagy in OSCCs. Methods: We used the autophagosome marker, LC3B, and autophagy flux marker, p62/SQSTM1 (p62), by using immunohistochemistry, and examined p62 mRNA by RNA in situ hybridization, to evaluate autophagy in 195 OSCCs, 47 verrucous hyperplasias, and 37 normal oral mucosas. The prognostic roles of LC3B and p62 protein expressions in OSCCs were investigated. Results: We discovered that the normal oral mucosa exhibited limited LC3B punctae and weak cytoplasmic p62 staining, whereas the OSCCs exhibited a marked increase in LC3B punctae and cytoplasmic p62 expression. The expression pattern of LC3B and cytoplasmic p62 of the verrucous hyperplasias were between normal oral mucosas and OSCCs. The normal oral mucosas, verrucous hyperplasias, and OSCCs presented no differences in nuclear p62 expression and the p62 mRNA level. p62 mRNA expression was elevated in a minority of cases. High p62 mRNA expression was associated with high p62 protein expression in the cytoplasm. Increased LC3B punctae, high cytoplasmic p62, and low nuclear p62 expressions in OSCCs were associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and unfavourable prognosis. In addition, low nuclear p62 expression was an independent prognostic factor for overall and disease-specific survival rates. Furthermore, we disclosed that high cytoplasmic p62 expression accompanied

  2. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  3. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases have important roles in spermatozoa; however, little is known about the presence and regulation in these cells of their counterparts in signaling, namely, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs). The objectives of the present study were to identify PTPs and DSPs in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa; to characterize their subcellular distribution; and to investigate the roles of tyrosine phosphatases in maintenance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation level and in sperm motility. Using Western blotting with specific antibodies in boar and stallion sperm lysates, we unequivocally identified two PTPs (PTPRB and PTPN11) and two DSPs (DUSP3 and DUSP4). In dog sperm lysates, only PTPN11, DUSP3, and DUSP4 were detected. In all these species, we did not detect the specific signal with anti-PTPRC (CD45), CDKN3, DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP6, DUSP9, PTPN1, PTPN3, PTPN6, PTPN7, PTPN13, PTPRA, PTPRG, PTPRJ, PTPRK, or PTPRZ antibodies. Positive matches were further investigated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that PTPRB was associated with the plasma membrane in the head and tail of boar and stallion spermatozoa. In agreement with Western blotting results, PTPRB antibodies did not show immunoreactivity in dog sperm analyzed by immunofluorescence. In the three species, DUSP4 was mainly found in the tail of spermatozoa, with little or no immunoreactivity in the head. PTPN11 was mainly located in the postacrosomal region in the head, whereas DUSP3 immunoreactivity was extended within the acrosome. PTPN11 and DUSP3 showed immunoreactivity in the tail that was restricted to the midpiece. Finally, we incubated boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa with pervanadate and sodium orthovanadate, two PTP inhibitors, and analyzed overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation and assessed sperm motility. Sodium orthovanadate and pervanadate showed concentration-dependent inhibition of sperm motility that was

  4. Sperm motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Valiollah

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents a computerized technique for quantitative analysis of the movement characteristics of spermatozoa. Stored video images of spermatozoa are digitized at a fixed time interval. The digital images are stored as a sequence of frames in a microcomputer. The analysis of the sequence comprises two main tasks: finding the location of the centroid for each sperm and tracking them over the entire sequences. Information from the motion of each moving cell will be used for tracking. Experimental results are presented to show the merits of the proposed algorithm for tracking.

  5. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure.

    PubMed

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; El Sayad, Sara; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β(-/-) Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β(-/-) cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β(-/-) cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β-actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β-microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β-EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  6. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; Sayad, Sara El; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W.; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β−/− Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β−/− cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β−/− cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β–actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β–microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β–EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  7. Two Types of Assays for Detecting Frog Sperm Chemoattraction

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Lindsey A.; Tholl, Nathan; Chandler, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    , pelleted and then counted by hemocytometer or flow cytometer. The sperm tracking assay utilizes a Zigmond chamber originally developed for observing neutrophil chemotaxis and modified for observation of sperm by Giojalas and coworkers2,3. The chamber consists of a thick glass slide into which two vertical troughs have been machined. These are separated by a 1 mm wide observation platform. After application of a cover glass, sperm are loaded into one trough, the chemoattractant agent into the other and movement of individual sperm visualized by video microscopy. Video footage is then analyzed using software to identify two-dimensional cell movements in the x-y plane as a function of time (xyt data sets) that form the trajectory of each sperm. PMID:22231741

  8. Cell-penetrating peptides, targeting the regulation of store-operated channels, slow decay of the progesterone-induced [Ca2+]i signal in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jennifer; Jones, Sarah; Howl, John; Lukanowska, Monika; Lefievre, Linda; Publicover, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has provided evidence for involvement of store-operated channels (SOCs) in [Ca2+]i signalling of human sperm, including a contribution to the transient [Ca2+]i elevation that occurs upon activation of CatSper, a sperm-specific cation channel localized to the flagellum, by progesterone. To further investigate the potential involvement of SOCs in the generation of [Ca2+]i signals in human sperm, we have used cell-penetrating peptides containing the important basic sequence KIKKK, part of the STIM–Orai activating region/CRAC activating domain (SOAR/CAD) of the regulatory protein stromal interaction molecule 1. SOAR/CAD plays a key role in controlling the opening of SOCs, which occurs upon mobilization of stored Ca2+. Resting [Ca2+]i temporarily decreased upon application of KIKKK peptide (3–4 min), but scrambled KIKKK peptide had a similar effect, indicating that this action was not sequence-specific. However, in cells pretreated with KIKKK, the transient [Ca2+]i elevation induced by stimulation with progesterone decayed significantly more slowly than in parallel controls and in cells pretreated with scrambled KIKKK peptide. Examination of single-cell responses showed that this effect was due, at least in part, to an increase in the proportion of cells in which the initial transient was maintained for an extended period, lasting up to 10 min in a subpopulation of cells. We hypothesize that SOCs contribute to the progesterone-induced [Ca2+]i transient, and that interference with the regulatory mechanisms of SOC delays their closure, causing a prolongation of the [Ca2+]i transient. PMID:25882543

  9. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... male partner produces too few sperm to do artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination [IUI]) or IVF. • The sperm may ... birth defects may actually be due to the infertility and not the treatments used to overcome the ...

  10. Sperm nuclear proteome and its epigenetic potential.

    PubMed

    Castillo, J; Amaral, A; Oliva, R

    2014-05-01

    The main function of the sperm cell is to transmit the paternal genetic message and epigenetic information to the embryo. Importantly, the majority of the genes in the sperm chromatin are highly condensed by protamines, whereas genes potentially needed in the initial stages of development are associated with histones, representing a form of epigenetic marking. However, so far little attention has been devoted to other sperm chromatin-associated proteins that, in addition to histones and protamines, may also have an epigenetic role. Therefore, with the goal of contributing to cover this subject we have compiled, reviewed and report a list of 581 chromatin or nuclear proteins described in the human sperm cell. Furthermore, we have analysed their Gene Ontology Biological Process enriched terms and have grouped them into different functional categories. Remarkably, we show that 56% of the sperm nuclear proteins have a potential epigenetic activity, being involved in at least one of the following functions: chromosome organization, chromatin organization, protein-DNA complex assembly, DNA packaging, gene expression, transcription, chromatin modification and histone modification. In addition, we have also included and compared the sperm cell proteomes of different model species, demonstrating the existence of common trends in the chromatin composition in the mammalian mature male gamete. Taken together, our analyses suggest that the mammalian sperm cell delivers to the offspring a rich combination of histone variants, transcription factors, chromatin-associated and chromatin-modifying proteins which have the potential to encode and transmit an extremely complex epigenetic information. PMID:24327354

  11. Magnetic activated cell sorting: an effective method for reduction of sperm DNA fragmentation in varicocele men prior to assisted reproductive techniques.

    PubMed

    Degheidy, T; Abdelfattah, H; Seif, A; Albuz, F K; Gazi, S; Abbas, S

    2015-10-01

    Semen parameters of varicocele men have been usually suspected to exhibit higher levels of abnormalities including DNA fragmentation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic markers. Negative correlation between increased level of DNA fragmentation and assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcome has been studied by several authors. In the current study, we aim to evaluate the possible value of magnetic activated cell sorting (MACs) technology in reduction of DNA fragmentation in infertile varicocele patients prior to ART. Semen samples, collected from 36 varicocele patients, were prepared by density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Every sample was subsequently divided into two aliquots. One aliquot was kept untouched as pre-MACs control while the other aliquot was subjected to MACs technique, for depletion of apoptotic spermatozoa, and serves as post-MACs test. Sperm count, motility and DNA fragmentations were evaluated for both control and test samples. Post-MACs samples showed no deleterious reduction in total sperm motility (80.64 ± 6.97%) compared with control samples (80.97 ± 7.74%) while sperm DNA fragmentations were significantly reduced in post-MACs samples (9.61 ± 5.62%) compared with pre-MACs controls (12.43 ± 6.29%) (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that MACs technique is a simple, noninvasive, technique that can efficiently reduce DNA fragmentation in infertile varicocele patients prior to ART.

  12. Establishment of subcellular fractionation techniques to monitor the intracellular fate of polymer therapeutics I. Differential centrifugation fractionation B16F10 cells and use to study the intracellular fate of HPMA copolymer - doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Jones, Arwyn T; Duncan, Ruth

    2006-07-01

    Polymer therapeutics are being designed for lysosomotropic, endosomotropic and transcellular drug delivery. Their appropriate intracellular routing is thus crucial for successful use. For example, polymer-anticancer drug conjugates susceptible to lysosomal enzyme degradation will never deliver their drug payload unless they encounter the appropriate activating enzymes. Many studies use confocal microscopy to monitor intracellular fate, but there is a pressing need for more quantitative methods able to define intracellular compartmentation over time. Only then will it be possible to optimise the next generation of polymer therapeutics for specific applications. The aim of this study was to establish a subcellular fractionation method for B16F10 murine melanoma cells and subsequently to use it to define the intracellular trafficking of N-(2-hydroxyproplylmethacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymer-bound doxorubicin (PK1). Free doxorubicin was used as a reference. The cell cracker method was used to achieve cell breakage and optimised to reproducibly achieve approximately 90% breakage efficiency. This ensured that subsequent subcellular fractionation experiments were representative for the whole cell population. To characterise the subcellular fractions obtained by differential centrifugation, DNA (nuclei), succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondria), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (lysosomes), alkaline phosphatase (plasma membrane) and lactate dehydrogenase (cytosol) were selected as markers and their assay was carefully validated. The relative specific activity (RSA) of the fractions obtained from B16F10 cells were: nuclei (2.2), mitochondria (4.1), lysosomes (3.7) and cytosol (2.5). When used to study the intracellular distribution at non-toxic concentrations of PK1 and doxorubicin, time-dependent accumulation of PK1 in lysosomes was evident and the expected nuclear localisation of free doxorubicin was seen. Live cell fluorescence microscopy and confocal co-localisation studies

  13. Direct binding of boar ejaculate and epididymal spermatozoa to porcine epididymal epithelial cells is also needed to maintain sperm survival in in vitro co-culture.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Castillo-Martín, Míriam; Bonet, Sergi; Briz, Maria Dolors

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of cultured epididymal epithelial cells (EEC) from corpus, caput or cauda, oviductal epithelial cells (OEC) and non-reproductive epithelial cells (LLC-PK1) on function and survival of epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa, in the latter case to determine whether such influence differed between morphologically normal and abnormal spermatozoa. For this purpose, either spermatozoa were directly co-cultured with EEC from caput, corpus, or cauda, OEC and LLC-PK1 cells (experiment 1) or a membrane-diffusible insert was included in these co-cultures (experiment 2). EEC cultured from the three epididymal regions did not differently affect the sperm parameters. Morphologically normal spermatozoa presented a higher ability to bind EEC, OEC, and LLC-PK1 than abnormal spermatozoa with cytoplasmic droplets or with tail/head malformations. Epididymal spermatozoa were more able to bind EEC during the first 24 h of co-culture, while ejaculated spermatozoa presented a higher capacity to bind OEC between 30 min and 3 h of co-incubation. In all cases, the ability to bind to epithelial cells was higher when they were co-cultured with EEC and OEC than with LLC-PK1. After 2 h of co-culture, the viability of epididymal spermatozoa was better maintained when they bound EEC than when they bound OEC. Conversely, the viability of ejaculated spermatozoa was better maintained when bound OEC than when bound EEC after 24 and 48 h of co-culture. Our work, apart from corroborating the involvement of morphologically normal spermatozoa in the formation of sperm reservoir, highlights the importance of direct contact spermatozoa-EEC in maintaining the sperm survival in in vitro co-culture, and also suggests that a specific binding between EEC and epididymal spermatozoa exists.

  14. Flow cytometry of sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1987-09-21

    This brief paper summarizes automated flow cytometric determination of sperm morphology and flow cytometry/sorting of sperm with application to sex preselection. In the latter context, mention is made of results of karyotypic determination of sex chromosome ratios in albumin-processed human sperm. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Advances in flow cytometry for sperm sexing.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J C; Evans, K M

    2009-01-01

    This review presents the key technological developments that have been implemented in the 20 years since the first reports of successful measurement, sorting, insemination and live births using flow cytometry as a proven physical sperm separation technique. Since the first reports of sexed sperm, flow technology efforts have been largely focused on improving sample throughput by increasing the rate at which sperm are introduced to the sorter, and on improving measurement resolution, which has increased the proportion of cells that can be reliably measured and sorted. Today, routine high-purity sorting of X- or Y-chromosome-bearing sperm can be achieved at rates up to 8000 s(-1) for an input rate of 40,000 X- and Y-sperms(-1). With current protocols, straws of sex-sorted sperm intended for use in artificial insemination contain approximately 2 x 10(6)sperm. The sort rate of 8000 sperms(-1) mentioned above corresponds to a production capacity of approximately 14 straws of each sex per hour per instrument. PMID:18950849

  16. Chemical dispersants used in the Gulf of Mexico oil crisis are cytotoxic and genotoxic to sperm whale skin cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Catherine F; Wise, James T F; Wise, Sandra S; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-07-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico drew attention to the need for toxicological studies of chemical dispersants. We are still learning the effects these spills had on wildlife. Little is known about the toxicity of these substances in marine mammals. The objective of this study was to determine the toxicity of the two dispersants (Corexit 9500 and 9527). Corexit 9500 and 9527 were both cytotoxic to sperm whale skin fibroblasts. Corexit 9527 was less cytotoxic than 9500. S9 mediated metabolism did not alter cytotoxicity of either dispersant. Both dispersants were genotoxic to sperm whale skin fibroblasts; S9 mediated metabolism increased Corexit 9527 genotoxicity.

  17. Chemical dispersants used in the Gulf of Mexico oil crisis are cytotoxic and genotoxic to sperm whale skin cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Catherine F; Wise, James T F; Wise, Sandra S; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-07-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico drew attention to the need for toxicological studies of chemical dispersants. We are still learning the effects these spills had on wildlife. Little is known about the toxicity of these substances in marine mammals. The objective of this study was to determine the toxicity of the two dispersants (Corexit 9500 and 9527). Corexit 9500 and 9527 were both cytotoxic to sperm whale skin fibroblasts. Corexit 9527 was less cytotoxic than 9500. S9 mediated metabolism did not alter cytotoxicity of either dispersant. Both dispersants were genotoxic to sperm whale skin fibroblasts; S9 mediated metabolism increased Corexit 9527 genotoxicity. PMID:24813266

  18. Characterisation of the Manduca sexta sperm proteome: Genetic novelty underlying sperm composition in Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Emma; Zhao, Qian; Borziak, Kirill; Walters, James R; Dorus, Steve

    2015-07-01

    The application of mass spectrometry based proteomics to sperm biology has greatly accelerated progress in understanding the molecular composition and function of spermatozoa. To date, these approaches have been largely restricted to model organisms, all of which produce a single sperm morph capable of oocyte fertilisation. Here we apply high-throughput mass spectrometry proteomic analysis to characterise sperm composition in Manduca sexta, the tobacco hornworm moth, which produce heteromorphic sperm, including one fertilisation competent (eupyrene) and one incompetent (apyrene) sperm type. This resulted in the high confidence identification of 896 proteins from a co-mixed sample of both sperm types, of which 167 are encoded by genes with strict one-to-one orthology in Drosophila melanogaster. Importantly, over half (55.1%) of these orthologous proteins have previously been identified in the D. melanogaster sperm proteome and exhibit significant conservation in quantitative protein abundance in sperm between the two species. Despite the complex nature of gene expression across spermatogenic stages, a significant correlation was also observed between sperm protein abundance and testis gene expression. Lepidopteran-specific sperm proteins (e.g., proteins with no homology to proteins in non-Lepidopteran taxa) were present in significantly greater abundance on average than those with homology outside the Lepidoptera. Given the disproportionate production of apyrene sperm (96% of all mature sperm in Manduca) relative to eupyrene sperm, these evolutionarily novel and highly abundant proteins are candidates for possessing apyrene-specific functions. Lastly, comparative genomic analyses of testis-expressed, ovary-expressed and sperm genes identified a concentration of novel sperm proteins shared amongst Lepidoptera of potential relevance to the evolutionary origin of heteromorphic spermatogenesis. As the first published Lepidopteran sperm proteome, this whole-cell

  19. Cytogenetics of human sperm: Structural aberrations and DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1989-07-11

    The human sperm-hamster egg system, first introduced in 1978 (Rudak et al), has yielded some important insights into questions on chromosomal integrity of human sperm. In this system, human sperm are co-incubated with eggs from the golden hamster. After the gametes fuse, eggs are cultured overnight and approximately 15 hours after fusion, display the haploid chromosomal complement of individual human sperm cells. These chromosomes can be analyzed by standard banding techniques to identify and quantify structural and numerical abnormalities in single sperm. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Sperm Associated Antigen 6 (SPAG6) Regulates Fibroblast Cell Growth, Morphology, Migration and Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Mukherjee, Abir; Wu, Jinhua; Zhang, Ling; Teves, Maria E; Li, Hongfei; Nambiar, Shanti; Henderson, Scott C; Horwitz, Alan R; Strauss Iii, Jerome F; Fang, Xianjun; Zhang, Zhibing

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian Spag6 is the orthologue of Chlamydomonas PF16, which encodes a protein localized in the axoneme central apparatus, and regulates flagella/cilia motility. Most Spag6-deficient mice are smaller in size than their littermates. Because SPAG6 decorates microtubules, we hypothesized that SPAG6 has other roles related to microtubule function besides regulating flagellar/cilia motility. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were isolated from Spag6-deficient and wild-type embryos for these studies. Both primary and immortalized Spag6-deficient MEFs proliferated at a much slower rate than the wild-type MEFs, and they had a larger surface area. Re-expression of SPAG6 in the Spag6-deficient MEFs rescued the abnormal cell morphology. Spag6-deficient MEFs were less motile than wild-type MEFs, as shown by both chemotactic analysis and wound-healing assays. Spag6-deficient MEFs also showed reduced adhesion associated with a non-polarized F-actin distribution. Multiple centrosomes were observed in the Spag6-deficient MEF cultures. The percentage of cells with primary cilia was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type MEFs, and some Spag6-deficient MEFs developed multiple cilia. Furthermore, SPAG6 selectively increased expression of acetylated tubulin, a microtubule stability marker. The Spag6-deficient MEFs were more sensitive to paclitaxel, a microtubule stabilizer. Our studies reveal new roles for SPAG6 in modulation of cell morphology, proliferation, migration, and ciliogenesis. PMID:26585507

  1. Sperm Associated Antigen 6 (SPAG6) Regulates Fibroblast Cell Growth, Morphology, Migration and Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Mukherjee, Abir; Wu, Jinhua; Zhang, Ling; Teves, Maria E.; Li, Hongfei; Nambiar, Shanti; Henderson, Scott C.; Horwitz, Alan R.; Strauss III, Jerome F.; Fang, Xianjun; Zhang, Zhibing

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian Spag6 is the orthologue of Chlamydomonas PF16, which encodes a protein localized in the axoneme central apparatus, and regulates flagella/cilia motility. Most Spag6-deficient mice are smaller in size than their littermates. Because SPAG6 decorates microtubules, we hypothesized that SPAG6 has other roles related to microtubule function besides regulating flagellar/cilia motility. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were isolated from Spag6-deficient and wild-type embryos for these studies. Both primary and immortalized Spag6-deficient MEFs proliferated at a much slower rate than the wild-type MEFs, and they had a larger surface area. Re-expression of SPAG6 in the Spag6-deficient MEFs rescued the abnormal cell morphology. Spag6-deficient MEFs were less motile than wild-type MEFs, as shown by both chemotactic analysis and wound-healing assays. Spag6-deficient MEFs also showed reduced adhesion associated with a non-polarized F-actin distribution. Multiple centrosomes were observed in the Spag6-deficient MEF cultures. The percentage of cells with primary cilia was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type MEFs, and some Spag6-deficient MEFs developed multiple cilia. Furthermore, SPAG6 selectively increased expression of acetylated tubulin, a microtubule stability marker. The Spag6-deficient MEFs were more sensitive to paclitaxel, a microtubule stabilizer. Our studies reveal new roles for SPAG6 in modulation of cell morphology, proliferation, migration, and ciliogenesis. PMID:26585507

  2. Interaction of sperm with the zona pellucida during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Gadella, B M

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve fertilization sperm cells, first need to successfully interact with the zona pellucida. To this end, the sperm surface is extensively remodeled during capacitation and the resulting sperm cells also possess hyperactivated motility. Together, this serves to mediate optimal recognition of the zona pellucida in the oviduct or after in vitro fertilization incubations (primary zona pellucida binding). When the sperm cell attaches to the zona pellucida, it will be triggered to undergo the acrosome reaction which allows the hyperactivated motile sperm cell to drill through the zona pellucida (secondary zona pellucida binding coinciding with sequential local zona pellucida digestion and rebinding). After successful zona penetration, some sperm cells may enter the perivitelline space. This delaying strategy of the oocyte allows only one sperm cell at a given time to bind and fuse with the oocyte (fertilization) and thus minimizes the risk of polyspermy. The fertilization fusion between the oocyte and the first sperm cell is immediately followed by a polyspermic fertilization block, in which the content of the oocyte's cortical granules is released into the perivitelline space. The cortical reaction blocks further sperm-oocyte fusion either by sticking at the oolemma or by the induction of a biochemical reaction of the zona pellucida (zona pellucida hardening). The cortical reaction thus blocks sperm-zona pellucida binding and/or sperm-zona pellucida penetration. This review summarizes the current understanding of sperm-zona pellucida interactions in relation to mammalian fertilization. The lack of knowledge about sperm-zona pellucida binding in ruminants will be critically discussed. PMID:21755679

  3. Lactic acid is a sperm motility inactivation factor in the sperm storage tubules

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Mei; Mizushima, Shusei; Hiyama, Gen; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Shiba, Kogiku; Inaba, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Yoshinobu; Atsumi, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Takashi; Sasanami, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Although successful fertilization depends on timely encounters between sperm and egg, the decoupling of mating and fertilization often confers reproductive advantages to internally fertilizing animals. In several vertebrate groups, postcopulatory sperm viability is prolonged by storage in specialized organs within the female reproductive tract. In birds, ejaculated sperm can be stored in a quiescent state within oviductal sperm storage tubules (SSTs), thereby retaining fertilizability for up to 15 weeks at body temperature (41 °C); however, the mechanism by which motile sperm become quiescent within SSTs is unknown. Here, we show that low oxygen and high lactic acid concentrations are established in quail SSTs. Flagellar quiescence was induced by lactic acid in the concentration range found in SSTs through flagellar dynein ATPase inactivation following cytoplasmic acidification (sperm morphology under hypoxic and high temperature conditions indicates that a combination of these factors enables sperm cells to survive during the ovulation cycles. Our findings suggested a novel physiological role for lactic acid in promoting sperm quiescence in SSTs and opened up a new opportunity for technological improvement in prolonging sperm longevity at ambient or body temperature. PMID:26619826

  4. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a clinically approved boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent currently being used in clinical trials of glioblastoma multiforme, melanoma and liver metastases. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) observations from the Cornell SIMS Laboratory provided support for using a 6 h infusion of BPA, instead of a 2 h infusion, for achieving higher levels of boron in brain tumor cells. These observations were clinically implemented in Phase II experimental trials of glioblastoma multiforme in Sweden. However, the mechanisms for higher BPA accumulation with longer infusions have remained unknown. In this work, by using 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine and T98G human glioblastoma cells, comparisons between the 10B-delivery of BPA and the accumulation of labeled phenylalanine after 2 and 6 h treatments were made with a Cameca IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution in fast frozen, freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Due to the presence of the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, the cells maintain an approximately 10/1 ratio of K/Na in the intracellular milieu. Therefore, the quantitative imaging of these highly diffusible species in the identical cell in which the boron or labeled amino acid was imaged provides a rule-of-thumb criterion for validation of SIMS observations and the reliability of the cryogenic sampling. The labeled phenylalanine was detected at mass 28, as the 28(13C15N)- molecular ion. Correlative analysis with optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that fractured freeze-dried glioblastoma cells contained well-preserved ultrastructural details with three discernible subcellular regions: a nucleus or multiple nuclei, a mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region and the remaining cytoplasm. SIMS analysis revealed that the overall cellular signals of both 10B from BPA and 28CN- from labeled phenylalanine increased approximately 1.6-fold between the 2 and 6 h exposures

  5. Sperm motility activation, sperm heterogeneity and sperm-female tract interactions in Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus).

    PubMed

    Boere, Janneke; Díaz, Daniela Esteban; Holt, William V

    2011-01-01

    Sperm-oviduct interactions in Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus) were investigated using in vitro cocultures of cauda epididymal spermatozoa and oviducal epithelial cells. Kidney epithelial cells were used as non-reproductive control tissues. Spermatozoa attached to epithelial cells of both origins, but sperm survival and activity was higher when cocultured with oviducal cells. New findings during live sperm-epithelial interactions included: (1) a high frequency of reversible head movements, from linear (streamlined configuration) to T shape (thumbtack configuration) in swimming spermatozoa immediately after the start of coculture; (2) the loss of sperm tails (tail shedding) increasing with time; and (3) interrupted swimming patterns, where periods of fast movement were interspersed with slower swimming while the spermatozoa interacted with the epithelial cell surface. Sperm motility activation responses were characterised after diluting the epididymal samples in phosphate-buffered saline, medium M199 and Tyrode's medium. The results confirmed that the marsupial oviduct is able to support the viability and motility of a sperm subpopulation for at least 20 h in vitro and suggest that some spermatozoa shed their tails after binding, possibly as a result of a selective process. PMID:21557927

  6. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  7. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  8. Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition.

    PubMed

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Mateo, Rafael; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-03-20

    Sperm competition is a prevalent phenomenon that drives the evolution of sperm function. High levels of sperm competition lead to increased metabolism to fuel higher sperm velocities. This enhanced metabolism can result in oxidative damage (including lipid peroxidation) and damage to the membrane. We hypothesized that in those species experiencing high levels of sperm competition there are changes in the fatty-acid composition of the sperm membrane that makes the membrane more resistant to oxidative damage. Given that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the most prone to lipid peroxidation, we predicted that higher sperm competition leads to a reduction in the proportion of sperm PUFAs. In contrast, we predicted that levels of sperm competition should not affect the proportion of PUFAs in somatic cells. To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus) that differ in their levels of sperm competition. Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels. However, in sperm cells, as predicted, an increase in sperm competition levels was associated with an increase in the proportion of saturated fatty-acids (the most resistant to lipid peroxidation) and by a concomitant decrease in the proportion of PUFAs. Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid). Our findings thus indicate that sperm competition has a pervasive influence in the composition of sperm cells that ultimately may have important effects in sperm function.

  9. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinases (CaMKKs) Effects on AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Regulation of Chicken Sperm Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Combarnous, Yves; Praud, Christophe; Duittoz, Anne; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Sperm require high levels of energy to ensure motility and acrosome reaction (AR) accomplishment. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated to be strongly involved in the control of these properties. We address here the question of the potential role of calcium mobilization on AMPK activation and function in chicken sperm through the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs) mediated pathway. The presence of CaMKKs and their substrates CaMKI and CaMKIV was evaluated by western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Sperm were incubated in presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, or of CaMKKs inhibitor (STO-609). Phosphorylations of AMPK, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, as well as sperm functions were evaluated. We demonstrate the presence of both CaMKKs (α and β), CaMKI and CaMKIV in chicken sperm. CaMKKα and CaMKI were localized in the acrosome, the midpiece, and at much lower fluorescence in the flagellum, whereas CaMKKβ was mostly localized in the flagellum and much less in the midpiece and the acrosome. CaMKIV was only present in the flagellum. The presence of extracellular calcium induced an increase in kinases phosphorylation and sperm activity. STO-609 reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not in its absence. STO-609 did not affect CaMKIV phosphorylation but decreased CaMKI phosphorylation and this inhibition was quicker in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ than in its absence. STO-609 efficiently inhibited sperm motility and AR, both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Our results show for the first time the presence of CaMKKs (α and β) and one of its substrate, CaMKI in different subcellular compartments in germ cells, as well as the changes in the AMPK regulation pathway, sperm motility and AR related to Ca2+ entry in sperm through the Ca2+/CaM/CaMKKs/CaMKI pathway. The Ca2+/CaMKKs/AMPK pathway is activated only under conditions of extracellular Ca2+ entry in the cells

  10. Exogenous neurotensin modulates sperm function in Japanese Black cattle

    PubMed Central

    UMEZU, Kohei; HIRADATE, Yuuki; OIKAWA, Toshinori; ISHIGURO, Hirotoshi; NUMABE, Takashi; HARA, Kenshiro; TANEMURA, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the conception rates after artificial insemination have been pointed out to decline continuously. To overcome this problem, the control of frozen and thawed sperm quality is required. However, the mechanism of bovine sperm functional regulation is still largely unknown. In mammals, the ejaculated sperm are capable of showing fertilizing ability during migration in the female reproductive organs. It is well known that these female organs secrete several factors contributing to sperm capacitation. We previously reported that neurotensin (NT) secreted from the oviduct and cumulus cells enhanced sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in mice. In this study, we confirmed the expression of the NT receptor (NTR1) in the bovine sperm neck region and the secretion of NT in the bovine uterus and oviduct. The similar expression patterns of NT and NTR1 suggests a conserved mechanism of sperm functional regulation between mouse and cattle. Thus, we examined the effects of exogenous NT on the bovine sperm functions. First, we showed that NT induced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT enhances sperm capacitation. Second, we showed that NT induced acrosome reactions of capacitated sperm in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT facilitates acrosome reaction. Finally, we used a computer-aided sperm analysis system to show that NT did not have a great effect on sperm motility. These results suggest that NT acts as a facilitator of sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in the female reproductive tracts in cattle, highlighting the importance of NT-mediated signaling to regulate sperm functions. PMID:27210588

  11. Exogenous neurotensin modulates sperm function in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Kohei; Hiradate, Yuuki; Oikawa, Toshinori; Ishiguro, Hirotoshi; Numabe, Takashi; Hara, Kenshiro; Tanemura, Kentaro

    2016-08-25

    Recently, the conception rates after artificial insemination have been pointed out to decline continuously. To overcome this problem, the control of frozen and thawed sperm quality is required. However, the mechanism of bovine sperm functional regulation is still largely unknown. In mammals, the ejaculated sperm are capable of showing fertilizing ability during migration in the female reproductive organs. It is well known that these female organs secrete several factors contributing to sperm capacitation. We previously reported that neurotensin (NT) secreted from the oviduct and cumulus cells enhanced sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in mice. In this study, we confirmed the expression of the NT receptor (NTR1) in the bovine sperm neck region and the secretion of NT in the bovine uterus and oviduct. The similar expression patterns of NT and NTR1 suggests a conserved mechanism of sperm functional regulation between mouse and cattle. Thus, we examined the effects of exogenous NT on the bovine sperm functions. First, we showed that NT induced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT enhances sperm capacitation. Second, we showed that NT induced acrosome reactions of capacitated sperm in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT facilitates acrosome reaction. Finally, we used a computer-aided sperm analysis system to show that NT did not have a great effect on sperm motility. These results suggest that NT acts as a facilitator of sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in the female reproductive tracts in cattle, highlighting the importance of NT-mediated signaling to regulate sperm functions. PMID:27210588

  12. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  13. Liver X Receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K.; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy. PMID:26450852

  14. Functional platform for controlled subcellular distribution of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Serag, Maged F; Kaji, Noritada; Venturelli, Enrica; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Mizukami, Hajime; Braeckmans, Kevin; Bianco, Alberto; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2011-11-22

    As nanoparticles can cross different cellular barriers and access different tissues, control of their uptake and cellular fate presents a functional approach that will be broadly applicable to nanoscale technologies in cell biology. Here we show that the trafficking of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through various subcellular membranes of the plant cell is facilitated or inhibited by attaching a suitable functional tag and controlling medium components. This enables a unique control over the uptake and the subcellular distribution of SWCNTs and provides a key strategy to promote their cellular elimination to minimize toxicity. Our results also demonstrate that SWCNTs are involved in a carrier-mediated transport (CMT) inside cells; this is a phenomenon that scientists could use to obtain novel molecular insights into CMT, with the potential translation to advances in subcellular nanobiology.

  15. Independent spatial and temporal functions of human sperm centrosomes after dispermic microinjection into bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Ugajin, Tomohisa; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kichiya; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Okamura, Kunihiro

    2009-01-01

    During mammalian fertilization, a centrosome is introduced by the sperm during the first cell cycle to organize a radial array of microtubules known as the sperm aster. In nature, multiple human sperm centrosomes may exist in the same egg cytoplasm during polyspermy. However, critical information concerning individual sperm centrosomal function with regards to the latter case remains unknown. We subsequently examined the sperm aster formation after injection of multiple human sperm into a bovine egg. When 2 fertile human sperm were simultaneously microinjected into different regions of the same bovine egg cytoplasm, no difference in sperm aster formation rate was observed compared to cases in which a single sperm was injected. Two human sperm were also microinjected into bovine eggs 30-, 60- and 120-minute intervals apart from one another, and no difference in sperm aster formation rates were observed. Among eggs in which 1 sperm aster was organized, there was no observable bias towards the first or second injected sperm. These findings indicated that when multiple human sperm are present in a single egg cytoplasm, each centrosome can function independently from the other. This fact suggests the possibility of transplanting a normal sperm centrosome into an egg with a sperm known to have centrosomal dysfunction.

  16. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Amaral, Alexandra; Baptista, Marta; Tavares, Renata; Caballero Campo, Pedro; Caballero Peregrín, Pedro; Freitas, Albertina; Paiva, Artur; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2011-03-23

    Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  17. Optimization of the sperm:oocyte ratio and sperm economy in the artificial reproduction of Rhamdia quelen using fructose as a sperm motility modulator.

    PubMed

    Adames, Maurício Spagnolo; de Toledo, Cesar Pereira Rebechi; Neumann, Giovano; Buzzi, Alexandre Henrique; Buratto, Cíntia Nara; Piana, Pitágoras Augusto; Bombardelli, Robie Allan

    2015-10-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of fructose as a modulator of sperm motility and its effects on the reduction in number of sperm cells in IVF using cryopreserved Rhamdia quelen semen. Sperm activation occurred in solutions containing fructose (0.0, 0.9, 1.8, 2.7, 3.6 and 4.5%). The sperm motility rate, velocity and duration of sperm motility were assessed by polynomial regression analysis and grouped by the principal component analysis (PCA). Then, the oocytes were mixed with semen at proportions of 1×10(4), 3×10(4), 5×10(4), 7×10(4) and 9×10(4) for the sperm:oocyte ratio and fertilization was induced by the activation of gametes with the fructose-containing solutions. The fertilization, hatching and larval normality rate were evaluated by response surface protocol and were further grouped by PCA. All sperm variables were affected by the activating solutions, and the most desirable theoretical results for the rate of sperm motility were obtained when using a solution containing 2.85% fructose. In the IVF and incubation assays, there was an interactive effect between the motile sperm:oocyte ratio and the fructose concentration on the rates of oocyte fertilization, hatching and on the clustered index for reproductive success. The results suggest the possibility of reducing the sperm cells on IVF by 17.77% when using a solution containing 2.28% fructose. In conclusion, the use of solutions containing fructose at concentrations that maximize sperm movement allow the reduction of the motile sperm:oocyte ratio, thus promoting sperm metabolic efficiencies and contributing to the feasibility of using cryopreserved semen at a large-scale in IVF. PMID:26364705

  18. Optimization of the sperm:oocyte ratio and sperm economy in the artificial reproduction of Rhamdia quelen using fructose as a sperm motility modulator.

    PubMed

    Adames, Maurício Spagnolo; de Toledo, Cesar Pereira Rebechi; Neumann, Giovano; Buzzi, Alexandre Henrique; Buratto, Cíntia Nara; Piana, Pitágoras Augusto; Bombardelli, Robie Allan

    2015-10-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of fructose as a modulator of sperm motility and its effects on the reduction in number of sperm cells in IVF using cryopreserved Rhamdia quelen semen. Sperm activation occurred in solutions containing fructose (0.0, 0.9, 1.8, 2.7, 3.6 and 4.5%). The sperm motility rate, velocity and duration of sperm motility were assessed by polynomial regression analysis and grouped by the principal component analysis (PCA). Then, the oocytes were mixed with semen at proportions of 1×10(4), 3×10(4), 5×10(4), 7×10(4) and 9×10(4) for the sperm:oocyte ratio and fertilization was induced by the activation of gametes with the fructose-containing solutions. The fertilization, hatching and larval normality rate were evaluated by response surface protocol and were further grouped by PCA. All sperm variables were affected by the activating solutions, and the most desirable theoretical results for the rate of sperm motility were obtained when using a solution containing 2.85% fructose. In the IVF and incubation assays, there was an interactive effect between the motile sperm:oocyte ratio and the fructose concentration on the rates of oocyte fertilization, hatching and on the clustered index for reproductive success. The results suggest the possibility of reducing the sperm cells on IVF by 17.77% when using a solution containing 2.28% fructose. In conclusion, the use of solutions containing fructose at concentrations that maximize sperm movement allow the reduction of the motile sperm:oocyte ratio, thus promoting sperm metabolic efficiencies and contributing to the feasibility of using cryopreserved semen at a large-scale in IVF.

  19. Changes in Sperm Motility and Capacitation Induce Chromosomal Aberration of the Bovine Embryo following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoku; Nagao, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has become the method of choice to treat human male infertility. One of the outstanding problems associated with this technique is our current lack of knowledge concerning the effect of sperm capacitation and motility upon the subsequent development of oocytes following ICSI. In the present study, we first examined the capacitation state of sperm exhibiting normal motility, along with sperm that had been activated, and examined the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by these sperm types upon embryogenesis following bovine in vitro fertilization (IVF) and ICSI. Data showed that activated sperm reduced the chromosomal integrity of IVF/ICSI embryos at the blastocyst stage, while capacitated sperm produced ROS in capacitation media. Secondly, we treated sperm with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP), a chemical known to uncouple cell respiration within the mitochondria, and investigated the effect of this treatment upon blastocyst formation and chromosomal integrity at the blastocyst stage. Activated sperm in which the mitochondria had been treated with CCCP reduced levels of chromosomal aberration at the blastocyst stage following ICSI, by reducing mitochondrial activity in activated sperm. In conclusion, these findings suggest that capacitated sperm exhibiting activated motility induced chromosomal aberration during development to the blastocyst stage following ICSI. The injection of sperm exhibiting normal motility, or activated sperm in which mitochondrial activity had been reduced, improved the quality of ICSI-derived embryos. Therefore, the selection of sperm exhibiting progressive motility may not always be better for early embryo development and fetal growth following human ICSI, and that the use of a bovine model may contribute to a deeper understanding of sperm selection for human ICSI embryo development.

  20. Sodium affects the sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2016-08-01

    The role of seminal plasma sodium and activation media sodium on sperm motility was examined by selectively removing the element from these two media, in European eel sperm. Sperm size (sperm head area) was also measured using an ASMA (Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses) system, in the different conditions. Intracellular sodium [Na(+)]i was quantitatively analyzed by first time in the spermatozoa from a marine fish species. Measurement of [Na(+)]i was done before and after motility activation, by Flow Cytometry, using CoroNa Green AM as a dye. Sperm motility activation induced an increase in [Na(+)]i, from 96.72mM in quiescent stage to 152.21mM post-activation in seawater. A significant decrease in sperm head area was observed post-activation in seawater. There was a notable reduction in sperm motility when sodium was removed from the seminal plasma, but not when it was removed from the activation media. Sodium removal was also linked to a significant reduction in sperm head area in comparison to the controls. Our results indicate that the presence of the ion Na(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary for the preservation of sperm motility in European eel, probably because it plays a role in maintaining an appropriate sperm cell volume in the quiescent stage of the spermatozoa. PMID:27085371

  1. Sperm phosphoproteomics: historical perspectives and current methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Porambo, James R; Salicioni, Ana M; Visconti, Pablo E; Platt, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian sperm are differentiated germ cells that transfer genetic material from the male to the female. Owing to this essential role in the reproductive process, an understanding of the complex mechanisms that underlie sperm function has implications ranging from the development of novel contraceptives to the treatment of male infertility. While the importance of phosphorylation in sperm differentiation, maturation and fertilization has been well established, the ability to directly determine the sites of phosphorylation within sperm proteins and to quantitate the extent of phosphorylation at these sites is a recent development that has relied almost exclusively on advances in the field of proteomics. This review will summarize the work that has been carried out to date on sperm phosphoproteomics and discuss how the resulting qualitative and quantitative information has been used to provide insight into the manner in which protein phosphorylation events modulate sperm function. The authors also present the proteomics process as it is most often utilized for the elucidation of protein expression, with a particular emphasis on the way in which the process has been modified for the analysis of protein phosphorylation in sperm. PMID:23194270

  2. Seminal plasma effects on sex-sorting bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, C A; Graham, J K; Lenz, R W; Seidel, G E

    2013-02-01

    The objective was to determine which characteristics of bovine ejaculates affected efficacy of sex sorting bovine sperm by flow cytometry. The effects of first versus second ejaculates, seminal plasma content, addition of BSA, and seminal plasma from different bulls during staining were all studied, as was the effect of 8-hour storage with and without seminal plasma. Semen collected by artificial vagina was centrifuged at 1000 ×g for 15 minutes to separate sperm from seminal plasma; seminal plasma was clarified by 10 minutes of additional centrifugation at 2000 ×g. Sperm were rediluted to 160 × 10(6) sperm per mL with: Tyrode's medium plus albumin, lactate, and pyruvate (TALP) containing 0%, 5%, 10%, or 20% homologous seminal plasma, TALP containing 10% heterologous seminal plasma, or TALP containing 0.3% (control), 0.6%, or 1.2% BSA. After incubation with Hoechst 33342 for 45 minutes, an equal volume of TALP containing red food dye was added, and sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry/cell sorting to determine percent of live-oriented sperm, X sort rate, percent of membrane-impaired sperm, and split (degree of separation between X- and Y-bearing sperm populations). The percent of live-oriented sperm was higher for sperm incubated with 0% seminal plasma (64%) than for sperm incubated with 5%, 10%, or 20% seminal plasma (60%, 59%, and 58%, respectively; P < 0.05). The X sort rate was higher for sperm incubated with 0% seminal plasma than sperm with 20% seminal plasma (4.26 vs. 3.61 × 10(3) sperm per second). When seminal plasma was exchanged between bull ejaculates, only one bull had seminal plasma that was detrimental to sperm, resulting in 31% membrane-impaired sperm compared with a range of 16% to 19% for seminal plasmas from other bulls (P < 0.05). The addition of BSA did not affect sort efficiency at the concentrations studied. Sperm from six bulls stored for 8 hours without seminal plasma had more membrane-impaired sperm (which were discarded) during

  3. In vitro cytophotometry evaluation of gamma-radiation effects on human sperm cell by acridine orange staining.

    PubMed

    Roux, C; Neveux, Y; Dadoune, J P

    1990-01-01

    Effects of gamma-radiations on human sperm nuclei in vitro were studied by cytophotometrical quantification on fixed smears stained by acridine orange some of which had undergone heat-treatment. Following irradiations at different doses (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 gy) using a cobalt source, changes in distribution of acridine orange fluorescences emitted by nuclei (total fluorescence greater than 515 nm versus green fluorescence = 525 nm) appeared to be dose-dependent. Heat-treatment of irradiated heads was confirmed to be a complementary procedure necessary for a good evaluation of the initial degree in chromatin compactness. Chromatin alterations related to changes in emitted fluorescence could be due to the initial fragility of the DNA-nucleoprotein complex. These preliminary results suggest that the normality of sperm chromatin could be used as a biologic dosimeter.

  4. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  5. Sperm cell toxicity test using sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus lamarck (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): sensitivity and discriminatory ability toward anionic and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ghirardini, A V; Novelli, A A; Likar, B; Pojana, G; Ghetti, P F; Marcomini, A

    2001-03-01

    A reliable sperm cell toxicity test procedure has been developed for the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The sensitivity and discriminatory ability of the test were investigated with regard to surfactants and their biotransformation products. Aromatic and aliphatic surfactants of anionic (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates [LAS]) and nonionic (alcohol polyethoxylates [AE] and nonylphenol polyethoxylates [NPE]) types and their aerobic biodegradation products, i.e., sulfophenylcarboxylates (SPC), polyethylene glycols (PEG), carboxylated polyethylene glycols (PEGC), carboxylated AE (AEC), and nonylphenol (NP), were examined in order to elucidate the influence of their molecular structure on toxicity. Experimental results reveal that the sperm cell test showed good discriminatory ability among all tested compounds, median effective concentration (EC50) values differing by about four orders of magnitude. The toxicity of anionic surfactants depends on the length of the alkyl chain and that of nonionic surfactants is due to their length and branching. Much lower toxicity was shown by aerobic biodegradation products in comparison with that of their parent compounds, with the exception of NP. The obtained EC50s were comparable with available literature data and constitute new toxicity data regarding surfactants for sea urchins. PMID:11349867

  6. Toxicity of heavy metals using sperm cell and embryo toxicity bioassays with Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): comparisons with exposure concentrations in the Lagoon of Venice, Italy.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Alessandra Arizzi; Losso, Chiara; Ghetti, Pier Francesco; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2003-06-01

    Sperm cell and embryo toxicity tests using the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus Lmk were performed to assess the toxicity of As3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Hg2+. The aim of this study was to improve information about the comparative sensitivity of sea urchin bioassays to the heavy metals, which are an important cause of contamination in the ecosystem of the Lagoon of Venice. Considering the data in mM/L, the order of toxicity is Hg2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > As3+ > or = Cr3+ > or = Cd2+ > or = Pb2+ > or = Ni2+ for the sperm cell test and Hg2+ > or = Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Ni2+ > As3+ > or = Cr3+ for the embryo test. New toxicity data for metals expressed as median effective concentration (EC50) and no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) are reported for the Mediterranean species. Accurate observations of embryotoxic effects at increasing metal concentrations were done, detecting some different behaviors in metal toxicity. Toxicity data compared with water column and pore-water concentrations recorded in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) demonstrate the potential ability of bioassays using sea urchin to detect important contaminants in this ecosystem. PMID:12785587

  7. Toxicity of heavy metals using sperm cell and embryo toxicity bioassays with Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): comparisons with exposure concentrations in the Lagoon of Venice, Italy.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Alessandra Arizzi; Losso, Chiara; Ghetti, Pier Francesco; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2003-06-01

    Sperm cell and embryo toxicity tests using the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus Lmk were performed to assess the toxicity of As3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Hg2+. The aim of this study was to improve information about the comparative sensitivity of sea urchin bioassays to the heavy metals, which are an important cause of contamination in the ecosystem of the Lagoon of Venice. Considering the data in mM/L, the order of toxicity is Hg2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > As3+ > or = Cr3+ > or = Cd2+ > or = Pb2+ > or = Ni2+ for the sperm cell test and Hg2+ > or = Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Ni2+ > As3+ > or = Cr3+ for the embryo test. New toxicity data for metals expressed as median effective concentration (EC50) and no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) are reported for the Mediterranean species. Accurate observations of embryotoxic effects at increasing metal concentrations were done, detecting some different behaviors in metal toxicity. Toxicity data compared with water column and pore-water concentrations recorded in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) demonstrate the potential ability of bioassays using sea urchin to detect important contaminants in this ecosystem.

  8. Subcellular distribution of calcium-binding proteins and a calcium- ATPase in canine pancreas [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Oct;111(4):1726

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Using a 45Ca blot-overlay assay, we monitored the subcellular fractionation pattern of several Ca binding proteins of apparent molecular masses 94, 61, and 59 kD. These proteins also appeared to stain blue with "Stains-All." Additionally, using a monoclonal antiserum raised against canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca- ATPase, we examined the subcellular distribution of a canine pancreatic 110-kD protein recognized by this antiserum. This protein had the same electrophoretic mobility as the cardiac protein against which the antiserum was raised. The three Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase cofractionated into the rough microsomal fraction (RM), previously shown to consist of highly purified RER, in a pattern highly similar to that of the RER marker, ribophorin I. To provide further evidence for an RER localization, native RM were subjected to isopycnic flotation in sucrose gradients. The Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase were found in dense fractions, along with ribophorin I. When RM were stripped of ribosomes with puromycin/high salt, the Ca binding proteins and the Ca- ATPase exhibited a shift to less dense fractions, as did ribophorin I. We conclude that, in pancreas, the Ca binding proteins and Ca-ATPase we detect are localized to the RER (conceivably a subcompartment of the RER) or, possibly, a structure intimately associated with the RER. PMID:2142161

  9. Subcellular transcriptome alterations in a cell culture model of spinal muscular atrophy point to widespread defects in axonal growth and presynaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Lena; Briese, Michael; Kneitz, Susanne; Glinka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal function critically depends on coordinated subcellular distribution of mRNAs. Disturbed mRNA processing and axonal transport has been found in spinal muscular atrophy and could be causative for dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons. Despite the advances made in characterizing the transport mechanisms of several axonal mRNAs, an unbiased approach to identify the axonal repertoire of mRNAs in healthy and degenerating motoneurons has been lacking. Here we used compartmentalized microfluidic chambers to investigate the somatodendritic and axonal mRNA content of cultured motoneurons by microarray analysis. In axons, transcripts related to protein synthesis and energy production were enriched relative to the somatodendritic compartment. Knockdown of Smn, the protein deficient in spinal muscular atrophy, produced a large number of transcript alterations in both compartments. Transcripts related to immune functions, including MHC class I genes, and with roles in RNA splicing were up-regulated in the somatodendritic compartment. On the axonal side, transcripts associated with axon growth and synaptic activity were down-regulated. These alterations provide evidence that subcellular localization of transcripts with axonal functions as well as regulation of specific transcripts with nonautonomous functions is disturbed in Smn-deficient motoneurons, most likely contributing to the pathophysiology of spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:25246652

  10. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  11. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  12. Dynamics of sperm transfer in the ant Leptothorax gredleri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppelt, Angelika; Heinze, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Mating tactics differ remarkably between and within species of social Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, ants) concerning, e.g., mating frequencies, sperm competition, and the degree of male sperm limitation. Although social Hymenoptera might, therefore, potentially be ideal model systems for testing sexual selection theory, the dynamics of mating and sperm transfer have rarely been studied in species other than social bees, and basic information needed to draw conclusions about possible sperm competition and female choice is lacking. We investigated sperm transfer in the ant Leptothorax gredleri, a species in which female sexuals attract males by “female calling.” The analysis of 38 female sexuals fixed immediately or up to 7 days after copulation with a single male each revealed that the sperm is transferred into the female bursa copulatrix embedded in a gelatinous mass, presumably a spermatophore. Sperm cells rapidly start to migrate from the tip of the spermatophore towards the spermatheca, but transfer is drastically slowed down by an extreme constriction of the spermathecal duct, through which sperm cells have to pass virtually one by one. This results in the spermatheca being filled only between one and several hours after mating. During this time, the posterior part of the spermatophore seals the junction between bursa copulatrix and spermathecal duct and prevents sperm loss. The prolonged duration of sperm transfer might allow female sexuals to chose between ejaculates and explain previously reported patterns of single paternity of the offspring of multiply mated queens.

  13. Effects of reactive oxygen species on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2012-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation have been recognized as problems for sperm survival and fertility. The precise roles and detection of superoxide (SO), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and membrane lipid peroxidation have been problematic, because of the low specificity and sensitivity of the established chemiluminescence assay technologies. We developed flow cytometric assays to measure SO, HP, membrane lipid peroxidation, and inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential in boar sperm. These methods were sufficiently sensitive to permit detection of early changes in ROS formation in sperm cells that were still viable. Basal ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in the absence of ROS generators were low in viable sperm of both fresh and frozen-thawed boar semen, affecting less than 4% of the sperm cells on average. However, this is not the case in other species, as human, bovine, and poultry sperm have large increases in sperm ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, loss of motility, and death in vitro. Closer study of the effects of ROS formation on the relationship between sperm motility and ATP content in boar sperm was conducted using menadione (mitochondrial SO generator) and HP treatment. Menadione or HP caused an immediate disruption of motility with delayed or no decrease in sperm ATP content, respectively. Overall, the inhibitory effects of ROS on motility point to a mitochondrial-independent mechanism. The reduction in motility may have been due to a ROS-induced lesion in ATP utilization or in the contractile apparatus of the flagellum. PMID:22704396

  14. Sexual rest and post-meiotic sperm ageing in house mice.

    PubMed

    Firman, R C; Young, F J; Rowe, D C; Duong, H T; Gasparini, C

    2015-07-01

    Fertilization by aged sperm can result in adverse fitness consequences for both males and females. Sperm storage during male sexual rest could provide an environment for post-meiotic sperm senescence causing a deterioration in the quality of stored sperm, possibly impacting on both sperm performance (e.g. swimming ability) and DNA quality. Here, we compared the proportion of sperm with fragmented DNA, an indicator of structural damage of DNA within the sperm cell, among males that had been sexually rested for approximately 2 months, to that of males that had mated recently. We found no evidence of intra-epididymal sperm DNA damage or any impairment in sperm performance, and consequently no evidence of post-meiotic sperm senescence. Our results suggest that male house mice are likely to possess mechanisms that function to ensure that their sperm reserves remain stocked with 'young', viable sperm during periods of sexual inactivity. We also discuss the possibility that our experimental design leads to no difference in the age of sperm among males from the two mating treatments. Post-meiotic sperm senescence is especially relevant under sperm competition. Thus, we sourced mice from populations that differed in their levels of post-copulatory sexual selection, enabling us to gain insight into how selection for higher sperm production influences the rate of sperm ageing and levels of DNA fragmentation. We found that males from the population that produced the highest number of sperm also had the smallest proportion of DNA-fragmented sperm and discuss this outcome in relation to selection acting upon males to ensure that they produce ejaculates with high-quality sperm that are successful in achieving fertilizations under competitive conditions. PMID:26012513

  15. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell’Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant’Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p < 0.05) when boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  16. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  17. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  18. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  19. Molecular Cloning of Spergen-4, Encoding a Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Protein Associated with Sperm Flagella and the Acrosome Region in Rat Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howida, Ali; Salaheldeen, Elsaid; Iida, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We used a differential display in combination with complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning approach to isolate a novel rat gene LOC690919 with an open reading frame of 1227-length nucleotides encoding a protein of 409 amino acids. This gene was designated as Spergen-4 (a spermatogenic cell-specific gene-4). Spergen-4 mRNA was highly expressed in testis, and its expression was detected in rat testis starting at three weeks of postnatal development and persisting up to adulthood. Mouse and human orthologs, which lack N-terminal 77 amino acid residues of rat Spegen-4, were found in the database. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that Spergen-4 was not expressed in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids, but was restrictedly detected at sperm head, cytoplasm, and developing flagella of elongated spermatids in rat testis. In mature spermatozoa, Spergen-4 was detected at the acrosome region as well as the principal piece of flagella. Spergen-4 immunosignal disappeared from sperm heads on acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. These data suggest that Spergen-4 integrated into elongated spermatids during spermiogenesis serves as a constituent for acrosome region and flagella of rat spermatozoa. PMID:27032685

  20. Molecular Cloning of Spergen-4, Encoding a Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Protein Associated with Sperm Flagella and the Acrosome Region in Rat Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howida, Ali; Salaheldeen, Elsaid; Iida, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We used a differential display in combination with complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning approach to isolate a novel rat gene LOC690919 with an open reading frame of 1227-length nucleotides encoding a protein of 409 amino acids. This gene was designated as Spergen-4 (a spermatogenic cell-specific gene-4). Spergen-4 mRNA was highly expressed in testis, and its expression was detected in rat testis starting at three weeks of postnatal development and persisting up to adulthood. Mouse and human orthologs, which lack N-terminal 77 amino acid residues of rat Spegen-4, were found in the database. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that Spergen-4 was not expressed in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids, but was restrictedly detected at sperm head, cytoplasm, and developing flagella of elongated spermatids in rat testis. In mature spermatozoa, Spergen-4 was detected at the acrosome region as well as the principal piece of flagella. Spergen-4 immunosignal disappeared from sperm heads on acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. These data suggest that Spergen-4 integrated into elongated spermatids during spermiogenesis serves as a constituent for acrosome region and flagella of rat spermatozoa.

  1. Characterization of human sperm surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Sokoloski, J E; Dandekar, P; Bechtol, K B

    1983-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against human ejaculated sperm were developed from mice immunized with sperm membrane preparations. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay, with dried sperm as antigen, was employed in McAb screening. The tissue and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies HS 2, 4 and 6 were evaluated after absorption of antibody preparations with heterologous sperm, human serum or seminal plasma or cells from other human organs. The sensitivity of HS 2, 4 and 6 antigens to trypsin exposure was determined: HS 4 antigen was highly sensitive while HS 2 and 6 were not. The regional distribution of McAb 4 on intact sperm cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. HS 4 may be a sperm-coating antigen based on its presence on sperm and in seminal plasma. This possibility led to an investigation of its role in sperm capacitation. HS 4 antibody binding was reduced when capacitated sperm were compared with noncapacitated cells. HS 4 antibody, when present during capacitation and insemination, was without effect on sperm motility or fusion with zona-free hamster eggs. Trypsin removal of as much as 60% of HS 4 antigen from the cell population also did not impact on sperm function. To identify the molecular correlate of HS 4 antigen, membrane components were extracted from washed sperm with Nonidet P-40, concentrated by acetone precipitation and analyzed electrophoretically in SDS-urea on 10% polyacrylamide slab gels. Immunoassays on protein blots with peroxidase-coupled second antibody identified a single reactive species in the molecular weight range of 130,000. Multiple reactive components were detected in blot transfers of seminal plasma.

  2. A novel germ cell protein, SPIF (sperm PKA interacting factor), is essential for the formation of a PKA/TCP11 complex that undergoes conformational and phosphorylation changes upon capacitation.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Simone J; Law, Estelle A; Jamsai, Duangporn; O'Bryan, Moira K; Nixon, Brett; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John; Roman, Shaun D

    2016-08-01

    Spermatozoa require the process of capacitation to enable them to fertilize an egg. PKA is crucial to capacitation and the development of hyperactivated motility. Sperm PKA is activated by cAMP generated by the germ cell-enriched adenylyl cyclase encoded by Adcy10 Male mice lacking Adcy10 are sterile, because their spermatozoa are immotile. The current study was designed to identify binding partners of the sperm-specific (Cα2) catalytic subunit of PKA (PRKACA) by using it as the "bait" in a yeast 2-hybrid system. This approach was used to identify a novel germ cell-enriched protein, sperm PKA interacting factor (SPIF), in 25% of the positive clones. Homozygous Spif-null mice were embryonically lethal. SPIF was coexpressed and coregulated with PRKACA and with t-complex protein (TCP)-11, a protein associated with PKA signaling. We established that these 3 proteins form part of a novel complex in mouse spermatozoa. Upon capacitation, the SPIF protein becomes tyrosine phosphorylated in >95% of sperm. An apparent molecular rearrangement in the complex occurs, bringing PRKACA and TCP11 into proximity. Taken together, these results suggest a role for the novel complex of SPIF, PRKACA, and TCP11 during sperm capacitation, fertilization, and embryogenesis.-Stanger, S. J., Law, E. A., Jamsai, D., O'Bryan, M. K., Nixon, B., McLaughlin, E. A., Aitken, R. J., Roman, S. D. A novel germ cell protein, SPIF (sperm PKA interacting factor), is essential for the formation of a PKA/TCP11 complex that undergoes conformational and phosphorylation changes upon capacitation.

  3. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  4. Sperm preparation: state-of-the-art—physiological aspects and application of advanced sperm preparation methods

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    For assisted reproduction technologies (ART), numerous techniques were developed to isolate spermatozoa capable of fertilizing oocytes. While early methodologies only focused on isolating viable, motile spermatozoa, with progress of ART, particularly intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), it became clear that these parameters are insufficient for the identification of the most suitable spermatozoon for fertilization. Conventional sperm preparation techniques, namely, swim-up, density gradient centrifugation and glass wool filtration, are not efficient enough to produce sperm populations free of DNA damage, because these techniques are not physiological and not modeled on the stringent sperm selection processes taking place in the female genital tract. These processes only allow one male germ cell out of tens of millions to fuse with the oocyte. Sites of sperm selection in the female genital tract are the cervix, uterus, uterotubal junction, oviduct, cumulus oophorus and the zona pellucida. Newer strategies of sperm preparation are founded on: (i) morphological assessment by means of ‘motile sperm organelle morphological examination (MSOME)' (ii) electrical charge; and (iii) molecular binding characteristics of the sperm cell. Whereas separation methods based on electrical charge take advantage of the sperm's adherence to a test tube surface or separate in an electrophoresis, molecular binding techniques use Annexin V or hyaluronic acid (HA) as substrates. Techniques in this category are magnet-activated cell sorting, Annexin V-activated glass wool filtration, flow cytometry and picked spermatozoa for ICSI (PICSI) from HA-coated dishes and HA-containing media. Future developments may include Raman microspectrometry, confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy and polarization microscopy. PMID:22138904

  5. Sexing mammalian sperm--intertwining of commerce, technology, and biology.

    PubMed

    Seidel, George E

    2003-12-15

    Sperm from many mammalian species can be sexed by flow cytometry/cell sorting at about 90% accuracy without damaging them unduly. However, because sperm are evaluated one at a time, in series, the number of sexed sperm produced per unit time is limited. Furthermore, the equipment required currently is expensive, in the order of 300,000 US dollars per machine. Despite these limitations, commercialization of this technology has begun with bovine semen, in part by inseminating cattle with relatively low number of sperms. No other approach to sexing sperm in any practical way is likely to be available within the next few years. The constraints for commercial application of sexed sperm in cattle can be somewhat lowered fertility, the high costs of equipment and skilled personnel, and costs of intellectual property such as licensing fees and royalty payments. Most economic analyses indicate that farmers can afford to pay 10-20 US dollars more per dose of sexed sperm than unsexed sperm if costs must be recouped by selling milk or meat. When the product is breeding stock or for certain niche applications, a higher price for sexed semen may be justified. Sexed sperm will be used more broadly in cattle only when improved production and/or efficiency can compensate for the extra costs of purchasing sexed sperm. PMID:14643102

  6. Evaluation of Lasting Effects of Heat Stress on Sperm Profile and Oxidative Status of Ram Semen and Epididymal Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Thais Rose dos Santos; Mendes, Camilla Mota; de Castro, Letícia Signori; de Assis, Patrícia Monken; Siqueira, Adriano Felipe Perez; Delgado, Juliana de Carvalho; Goissis, Marcelo Demarchi; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José Álvaro; Nichi, Marcílio; Visintin, José Antonio; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz D'Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Higher temperatures lead to an increase of testicular metabolism that results in spermatic damage. Oxidative stress is the main factor responsible for testicular damage caused by heat stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate lasting effects of heat stress on ejaculated sperm and immediate or long-term effects of heat stress on epididymal sperm. We observed decrease in motility and mass motility of ejaculated sperm, as well as an increase in the percentages of sperm showing major and minor defects, damaged plasma and acrosome membranes, and a decrease in the percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential in the treated group until one spermatic cycle. An increased enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidase and an increase of stressed cells were observed in ejaculated sperm of the treated group. A decrease in the percentage of epididymal sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in the treated group. However, when comparing immediate and long-term effects, we observed an increase in the percentage of sperm with low mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, testicular heat stress induced oxidative stress that led to rescuable alterations after one spermatic cycle in ejaculated sperm and also after 30 days in epididymal sperm. PMID:26881013

  7. Subcellular localization of legionella Dot/Icm effectors.

    PubMed

    Vogrin, Adam J; Mousnier, Aurelie; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    The translocation of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system is central to the ability of Legionella pneumophila to persist and replicate within eukaryotic cells. The subcellular localization of translocated Dot/Icm proteins in host cells provides insight into their function. Through co-staining with host cell markers, effector proteins may be localized to specific subcellular compartments and membranes, which frequently reflects their host cell target and mechanism of action. In this chapter, we describe protocols to (1) localize effector proteins within cells by ectopic expression using green fluorescent protein fusions and (2) localize effector proteins within infected cells using epitope-tagged effector proteins and immuno-fluorescence microscopy.

  8. Magnetic propulsion of robotic sperms at low-Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Fatih Tabak, Ahmet; Klingner, Anke; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the microswimming behaviour of robotic sperms in viscous fluids. These robotic sperms are fabricated from polystyrene dissolved in dimethyl formamide and iron-oxide nanoparticles. This composition allows the nanoparticles to be concentrated within the bead of the robotic sperm and provide magnetic dipole, whereas the flexibility of the ultra-thin tail enables flagellated locomotion using magnetic fields in millitesla range. We show that these robotic sperms have similar morphology and swimming behaviour to those of sperm cells. Moreover, we show experimentally that our robotic sperms swim controllably at an average speed of approximately one body length per second (around 125 μm s-1), and they are relatively faster than the microswimmers that depend on planar wave propulsion in low-Reynolds number fluids.

  9. Mass-Specific Metabolic Rate Influences Sperm Performance through Energy Production in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific metabolic rate, the rate at which organisms consume energy per gram of body weight, is negatively associated with body size in metazoans. As a consequence, small species have higher cellular metabolic rates and are able to process resources at a faster rate than large species. Since mass-specific metabolic rate has been shown to constrain evolution of sperm traits, and most of the metabolic activity of sperm cells relates to ATP production for sperm motility, we hypothesized that mass-specific metabolic rate could influence sperm energetic metabolism at the cellular level if sperm cells maintain the metabolic rate of organisms that generate them. We compared data on sperm straight-line velocity, mass-specific metabolic rate, and sperm ATP content from 40 mammalian species and found that the mass-specific metabolic rate positively influences sperm swimming velocity by (a) an indirect effect of sperm as the result of an increased sperm length, and (b) a direct effect independent of sperm length. In addition, our analyses show that species with higher mass-specific metabolic rate have higher ATP content per sperm and higher concentration of ATP per μm of sperm length, which are positively associated with sperm velocity. In conclusion, our results suggest that species with high mass-specific metabolic rate have been able to evolve both long and fast sperm. Moreover, independently of its effect on the production of larger sperm, the mass-specific metabolic rate is able to influence sperm velocity by increasing sperm ATP content in mammals.

  10. Membrane hyperpolarization during human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    López-González, I.; Torres-Rodríguez, P.; Sánchez-Carranza, O.; Solís-López, A.; Santi, C.M.; Darszon, A.; Treviño, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm capacitation is a complex and indispensable physiological process that spermatozoa must undergo in order to acquire fertilization capability. Spermatozoa from several mammalian species, including mice, exhibit a capacitation-associated plasma membrane hyperpolarization, which is necessary for the acrosome reaction to occur. Despite its importance, this hyperpolarization event has not been adequately examined in human sperm. In this report we used flow cytometry to show that a subpopulation of human sperm indeed undergo a plasma membrane hyperpolarization upon in vitro capacitation. This hyperpolarization correlated with two other well-characterized capacitation parameters, namely an increase in intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentration, measured also by flow cytometry. We found that sperm membrane hyperpolarization was completely abolished in the presence of a high external K+ concentration (60 mM), indicating the participation of K+ channels. In order to identify, which of the potential K+ channels were involved in this hyperpolarization, we used different K+ channel inhibitors including charybdotoxin, slotoxin and iberiotoxin (which target Slo1) and clofilium (a more specific blocker for Slo3). All these K+ channel antagonists inhibited membrane hyperpolarization to a similar extent, suggesting that both members of the Slo family may potentially participate. Two very recent papers recorded K+ currents in human sperm electrophysiologically, with some contradictory results. In the present work, we show through immunoblotting that Slo3 channels are present in the human sperm membrane. In addition, we found that human Slo3 channels expressed in CHO cells were sensitive to clofilium (50 μM). Considered altogether, our data indicate that Slo1 and Slo3 could share the preponderant role in the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization of human sperm in contrast to what has been previously reported for mouse sperm, where Slo3 channels are the main contributors to the

  11. Membrane hyperpolarization during human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    López-González, I; Torres-Rodríguez, P; Sánchez-Carranza, O; Solís-López, A; Santi, C M; Darszon, A; Treviño, C L

    2014-07-01

    Sperm capacitation is a complex and indispensable physiological process that spermatozoa must undergo in order to acquire fertilization capability. Spermatozoa from several mammalian species, including mice, exhibit a capacitation-associated plasma membrane hyperpolarization, which is necessary for the acrosome reaction to occur. Despite its importance, this hyperpolarization event has not been adequately examined in human sperm. In this report we used flow cytometry to show that a subpopulation of human sperm indeed undergo a plasma membrane hyperpolarization upon in vitro capacitation. This hyperpolarization correlated with two other well-characterized capacitation parameters, namely an increase in intracellular pH and Ca(2+) concentration, measured also by flow cytometry. We found that sperm membrane hyperpolarization was completely abolished in the presence of a high external K(+) concentration (60 mM), indicating the participation of K(+) channels. In order to identify, which of the potential K(+) channels were involved in this hyperpolarization, we used different K(+) channel inhibitors including charybdotoxin, slotoxin and iberiotoxin (which target Slo1) and clofilium (a more specific blocker for Slo3). All these K(+) channel antagonists inhibited membrane hyperpolarization to a similar extent, suggesting that both members of the Slo family may potentially participate. Two very recent papers recorded K(+) currents in human sperm electrophysiologically, with some contradictory results. In the present work, we show through immunoblotting that Slo3 channels are present in the human sperm membrane. In addition, we found that human Slo3 channels expressed in CHO cells were sensitive to clofilium (50 μM). Considered altogether, our data indicate that Slo1 and Slo3 could share the preponderant role in the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization of human sperm in contrast to what has been previously reported for mouse sperm, where Slo3 channels are the main

  12. Controlling subcellular delivery to optimize therapeutic effect

    PubMed Central

    Mossalam, Mohanad; Dixon, Andrew S; Lim, Carol S

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on drug targeting to specific cellular organelles for therapeutic purposes. Drugs can be delivered to all major organelles of the cell (cytosol, endosome/lysosome, nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes and proteasomes) where they exert specific effects in those particular subcellular compartments. Delivery can be achieved by chemical (e.g., polymeric) or biological (e.g., signal sequences) means. Unidirectional targeting to individual organelles has proven to be immensely successful for drug therapy. Newer technologies that accommodate multiple signals (e.g., protein switch and virus-like delivery systems) mimic nature and allow for a more sophisticated approach to drug delivery. Harnessing different methods of targeting multiple organelles in a cell will lead to better drug delivery and improvements in disease therapy. PMID:21113240

  13. Sperm competition and the evolution of sperm design in mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The influence of sperm competition upon sperm size has been a controversial issue during the last 20 years which remains unresolved for mammals. The hypothesis that, when ejaculates compete with rival males, an increase in sperm size would make sperm more competitive because it would increase sperm swimming speed, has generated contradictory results from both theoretical and empirical studies. In addition, the debate has extended to which sperm components should increase in size: the midpiece to accommodate more mitochondria and produce more energy to fuel motility, or the principal piece to generate greater propulsion forces. Results In this study we examined the influence of sperm competition upon sperm design in mammals using a much larger data set (226 species) than in previous analyses, and we corrected for phylogenetic effects by using a more complete and resolved phylogeny, and more robust phylogenetic control methods. Our results show that, as sperm competition increases, all sperm components increase in an integrated manner and sperm heads become more elongated. The increase in sperm length was found to be associated with enhanced swimming velocity, an adaptive trait under sperm competition. Conclusions We conclude that sperm competition has played an important role in the evolution of sperm design in mammals, and discuss why previous studies have failed to detect it. PMID:21232104

  14. Changes of sperm quality and hormone receptors in the rat testis after exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa; Sueudom, Wanvipa; Tangsrisakda, Nareelak; Thanoi, Samur

    2016-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is known to damage neurons and induce psychosis. It can also induce apoptosis in seminiferous tubules and affect sperm quality. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of a rat model of METH addiction on sperm quality and expression of progesterone receptors (PR) and estrogen receptors (ER) in the testis. Sperm quality parameters including sperm motility, sperm morphology and sperm concentration were examined. Protein and gene expressions PR, ERα and ERβ were studied using immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The percentages of normal sperm motility and normal sperm morphology were significantly decreased in animals receiving METH, especially in escalating dose (ED METH) and escalating dose-binge (ED-binge METH) groups when compared with control. In addition, sperm concentrations in ED METH and ED-binge METH groups were numerically decreased. PR, ERα and ERβ immunoreactive cells were significantly decreased in spermatogonia, spermatogenic cells and especially in Sertoli cells in all METH-treated groups. Furthermore, messenger RNA expression of PR, ERα and ERβ were also significantly decreased in all METH-treated animals. These results indicate that METH can induce abnormal sperm quality. These changes of sperm quality may relate to the reduction of PR, ERα and ERβ expressions in male germ cells and Sertoli cells which are essential for spermatogenesis and development of sperm. PMID:26864947

  15. OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) interacts with Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5) and mediates oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wenbin; Zhou, You; Li, Jiwei; Mysore, Raghavendra; Luo, Wei; Li, Shiqian; Chang, Mau-Sun; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Yan, Daoguang

    2014-04-01

    We earlier identified OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) as an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope oxysterol-binding protein implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5)/Astrin as interaction partner of ORP8. The putative interaction was further confirmed by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. ORP8 did not colocalize with kinetochore-associated SPAG5 in mitotic HepG2 or HuH7 cells, but overexpressed ORP8 was capable of recruiting SPAG5 onto endoplasmic reticulum membranes in interphase cells. In our experiments, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) retarded the HepG2 cell cycle, causing accumulation in G2/M phase; ORP8 overexpression resulted in the same phenotype. Importantly, ORP8 knock-down dramatically inhibited the oxysterol effect on HepG2 cell cycle, suggesting a mediating role of ORP8. Furthermore, knock-down of SPAG5 significantly reduced the effects of both ORP8 overexpression and 25OHC on the cell cycle, placing SPAG5 downstream of the two cell-cycle interfering factors. Taken together, the present results suggest that ORP8 may via SPAG5 mediate oxysterol interference of the HepG2 cell cycle. - Highlights: • The oxysterol-binding protein ORP8 was found to interact with the mitotic regulator SPAG5/Astrin. • Treatment of HepG2 cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol caused cell cycle retardation in G2/M. • ORP8 overexpression caused a similar G2/M accumulation, and ORP8 knock-down reversed the 25-hydroxycholesterol effect. • Reduction of cellular of SPAG5/Astrin reversed the cell cycle effects of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and ORP8 overexpression. • Our results suggest that ORP8 mediates via SPAG5/Astrin the oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle.

  16. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    PubMed Central

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies. PMID:26911251

  17. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  18. Supporters of sperm

    PubMed Central

    Løvlie, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    The Biology of Spermatozoa (BoS) meetings have run on a biannual basis since the early 1990s. They are dedicated to the fascinating research topic of sperm and their complicated route to fertilization. The BoS meetings focus on sperm, but they also explore additional supporting factors important in fertilization, such as those present in seminal and ovarian fluid, as well as the genomic bases of sperm biology. Here, I present a report of the recent BoS meeting, and showcase some of the highlights of this year’s meeting. PMID:25225623

  19. The Molecules of Sperm Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Silvia A; Mayorga, Luis S; Tomes, Claudia N

    2016-01-01

    Exocytosis is a fundamental process used by eukaryotic cells to release biological compounds and to insert lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane. Specialized secretory cells undergo regulated exocytosis in response to physiological signals. Sperm exocytosis or acrosome reaction (AR) is essentially a regulated secretion with special characteristics. We will focus here on some of these unique features, covering the topology, kinetics, and molecular mechanisms that prepare, drive, and regulate membrane fusion during the AR. Last, we will compare acrosomal release with exocytosis in other model systems.

  20. Functional distribution of synapsin I in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Coleman, William L; Kulp, Adam C; Venditti, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Proteins known to function during cell-cell communication and exocytosis in neurons and other secretory cells have recently been reported in human sperm. Synapsins are a group of proteins that have been very well characterized in neurons, but little is known about synapsin function in other cell types. Based upon previous findings and the known function of synapsin, we tested the hypothesis that synapsin I was present in human sperm. Washed, capacitated, and acrosome induced sperm preparations were used to evaluate the functional distribution of synapsin I using immunocytochemistry. Protein extracts from mouse brain, mouse testis/epididymis, and human semen were used for protein blotting techniques. Immunolocalization revealed synapsin I was enriched in the sperm equatorial segment. Protein extracts from mouse brain, mouse testis/epididymis, and human semen were positive for synapsin I using several different antibodies, and dot blot results were confirmed by Western blot analyses. Finally, treatment of capacitated and acrosome reaction induced samples with anti-synapsin antibodies significantly reduced sperm motility. Localization of synapsin I in human sperm is a novel finding. The association of synapsin I with the sperm equatorial segment and effects on motility are suggestive of a role associated with capacitation and/or acrosome reaction, processes that render sperm capable of fertilizing an oocyte.

  1. Metabolic Rate Limits the Effect of Sperm Competition on Mammalian Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Sperm competition leads to increased sperm production in many taxa. This response may result from increases in testes size, changes in testicular architecture or changes in the kinetics of spermatogenesis, but the impact of each one of these processes on sperm production has not been studied in an integrated manner. Furthermore, such response may be limited in species with low mass-specific metabolic rate (MSMR), i.e., large-bodied species, because they cannot process energy and resources efficiently enough both at the organismic and cellular levels. Here we compare 99 mammalian species and show that higher levels of sperm competition correlated with a) higher proportions of seminiferous tubules, b) shorter seminiferous epithelium cycle lengths (SECL) which reduce the time required to produce sperm, and c) higher efficiencies of Sertoli cells (involved in sperm maturation). These responses to sperm competition, in turn, result in higher daily sperm production, more sperm stored in the epididymides, and more sperm in the ejaculate. However, the two processes that require processing resources at faster rates (SECL and efficiency of Sertoli cells) only respond to sperm competition in species with high MSMR. Thus, increases in sperm production with intense sperm competition occur via a complex network of mechanisms, but some are constrained by MSMR. PMID:24069461

  2. Lensless imaging for simultaneous microfluidic sperm monitoring and sorting†‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Khimji, Imran; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Safaee, Hooman; Catalano, Paolo Nicolas; Keles, Hasan Onur; Kayaalp, Emre

    2013-01-01

    5.3 million American couples of reproductive age (9%) are affected by infertility, among which male factors account for up to 50% of cases, which necessitates the identification of parameters defining sperm quality, including sperm count and motility. In vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has become the most widely used assisted reproductive technology (ART) in modern clinical practice to overcome male infertility challenges. One of the obstacles of IVF and ICSI lies in identifying and isolating the most motile and presumably healthiest sperm from semen samples that have low sperm counts (oligozoospermia) and/or low sperm motility (oligospermaesthenia). Microfluidic systems have shown potential to sort sperm with flow systems. However, the small field of view (FOV) of conventional microscopes commonly used to image sperm motion presents challenges in tracking a large number of sperm cells simultaneously. To address this challenge, we have integrated a lensless charge-coupled device (CCD) with a microfluidic chip to enable wide FOV and automatic recording as the sperm move inside a microfluidic channel. The integrated system enables the sorting and tracking of a population of sperm that have been placed in a microfluidic channel. This channel can be monitored in both horizontal and vertical configuration similar to a swim-up column method used clinically. Sperm motilities can be quantified by tracing the shadow paths for individual sperm. Moreover, as the sperm are sorted by swimming from the inlet towards the outlet of a microfluidic channel, motile sperm that reach the outlet can be extracted from the channel at the end of the process. This technology can lead to methods to evaluate each sperm individually in terms of motility response in a wide field of view, which could prove especially useful, when working with oligozoospermic or oligospermaesthenic samples, in which the most motile sperm need to be isolated from

  3. Imaging Subcellular Structures in the Living Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Engerer, Peter; Plucinska, Gabriela; Thong, Rachel; Trovò, Laura; Paquet, Dominik; Godinho, Leanne

    2016-04-02

    In vivo imaging provides unprecedented access to the dynamic behavior of cellular and subcellular structures in their natural context. Performing such imaging experiments in higher vertebrates such as mammals generally requires surgical access to the system under study. The optical accessibility of embryonic and larval zebrafish allows such invasive procedures to be circumvented and permits imaging in the intact organism. Indeed the zebrafish is now a well-established model to visualize dynamic cellular behaviors using in vivo microscopy in a wide range of developmental contexts from proliferation to migration and differentiation. A more recent development is the increasing use of zebrafish to study subcellular events including mitochondrial trafficking and centrosome dynamics. The relative ease with which these subcellular structures can be genetically labeled by fluorescent proteins and the use of light microscopy techniques to image them is transforming the zebrafish into an in vivo model of cell biology. Here we describe methods to generate genetic constructs that fluorescently label organelles, highlighting mitochondria and centrosomes as specific examples. We use the bipartite Gal4-UAS system in multiple configurations to restrict expression to specific cell-types and provide protocols to generate transiently expressing and stable transgenic fish. Finally, we provide guidelines for choosing light microscopy methods that are most suitable for imaging subcellular dynamics.

  4. SPACA7 is a novel male germ cell-specific protein localized to the sperm acrosome that is involved in fertilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Edward B; Westmuckett, Andrew D; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    Sperm acrosome associated 7 (SPACA7) is a novel protein of unknown function with no homology to any known protein. Spaca7 transcripts are detected only in testis and predict a 158-residue mature polypeptide with one potential N-glycosylation site and no cysteines. Orthologs are present in various species, including mice and humans. We developed a polyclonal antibody to mouse SPACA7 to study its expression and function. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy detected SPACA7 only in testis, and it was detected in testis starting at Postnatal Day 21 and into adulthood. Immunofluorescence staining of testicular germ cells detected weak SPACA7 expression as early as zygotene spermatocytes. Higher expression was observed in round spermatids, where SPACA7 was localized to a perinuclear spot adjacent to the Golgi and to the acrosome of elongating spermatids and spermatozoa. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that SPACA7 is localized within the proacrosomal granule of round spermatids and the acrosome of spermatozoa. Finally, we showed that SPACA7 was retained within the acrosome of epididymal sperm and was released upon the acrosome reaction. To assess if SPACA7 was involved in fertilization, in vitro fertilization assays in the presence of anti-SPACA7 IgG were performed. Anti-SPACA7 inhibited fertilization of cumulus-intact eggs and prominently delayed cumulus dispersal. However, anti-SPACA7 did not inhibit fertilization of cumulus-free eggs. Our findings indicate that release of SPACA7 from the acrosome accelerates cumulus dispersal and facilitates fertilization via unknown mechanisms. This study is the first to document the expression of endogenous SPACA7 and a function for this novel acrosomal protein.

  5. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.; Gordon, L.; Ashworth, A.K.; Watchmaker, G.; Carrano, A.V.

    1985-06-19

    A new technology developed by Rudak, et al. for examining the chromosomal constitution of human sperm through fusion with eggs from the Syrian hamster was used to obtain baseline data on the types and frequencies of aberrations in sperm of normal men. The frequency of structural aberrations in 2724 sperm chromosome karyotypes from the 13 healthy non-exposed donors ranged from 2 to 15.8%, demonstrating significant interindividual variability. The most frequently occurring aberrations were chromosome breaks, followed by acentric fragments, chromatid exchanges, chromatid breaks, dicentrics and translocations, chromosome deletions and duplications, inversions, and chromatid deletions. Two donors previously reported had one cell each with multiple chromatid exchanges and breaks. In addition, the oldest donor, AA, had 5 cells out of 124 examined with multiple breaks and rearrangements too extensive to completely identify. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Functional distribution of synapsin I in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, William L.; Kulp, Adam C.; Venditti, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins known to function during cell–cell communication and exocytosis in neurons and other secretory cells have recently been reported in human sperm. Synapsins are a group of proteins that have been very well characterized in neurons, but little is known about synapsin function in other cell types. Based upon previous findings and the known function of synapsin, we tested the hypothesis that synapsin I was present in human sperm. Washed, capacitated, and acrosome induced sperm preparations were used to evaluate the functional distribution of synapsin I using immunocytochemistry. Protein extracts from mouse brain, mouse testis/epididymis, and human semen were used for protein blotting techniques. Immunolocalization revealed synapsin I was enriched in the sperm equatorial segment. Protein extracts from mouse brain, mouse testis/epididymis, and human semen were positive for synapsin I using several different antibodies, and dot blot results were confirmed by Western blot analyses. Finally, treatment of capacitated and acrosome reaction induced samples with anti-synapsin antibodies significantly reduced sperm motility. Localization of synapsin I in human sperm is a novel finding. The association of synapsin I with the sperm equatorial segment and effects on motility are suggestive of a role associated with capacitation and/or acrosome reaction, processes that render sperm capable of fertilizing an oocyte. PMID:26566474

  7. Sperm studies in anesthesiologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Brodsky, J.; Gordon, l.; Moore, D.H., II; Watchmaker, G.; Cohen, E.N.

    1981-11-01

    Semen samples were collected from 46 anesthesiologists each of whom had worked a minimum of one year in hospital operating rooms ventilated with modern gas-scavenging devices. Samples collected from 26 beginning residents in anesthesiology served as controls. Concentrations of sperm and percentage of sperm having abnormal head shapes were determined for each sample. No significant differences were found between anesthesiologists and beginning residents. Limiting the analyses to men having no confounding factors (varicocele, recent illness, medications, heavy smoking, frequent sauna use) did not change the results. The sperm concentration and morphology in 13 men did not change signficantly after one year of exposure to anesthetic gases. However, the group of men who had one or more confounding factors (excluding exposure to anesthetic gases) showed significantly higher percentages of sperm abnormalities than did the group of men without such factors. These results suggest that limited exposure to anesthetic gases does not significantly affect sperm production as judged by changes in sperm concentration and morphology. These data are reassuring, but since the hospitals surveyed used modern gas-scavenging devices, men who are occupationally exposed to anesthetic gases without this protection should be studied for fuller assessment of the possible human spermatotoxic effects.

  8. Interaction of doxorubicin with the subcellular structures of the sensitive and Bcl-xL-overexpressing MCF-7 cell line: confocal and low-energy-loss transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mhawi, A Amir

    2009-10-01

    The present investigation was directed to examine the interaction of the anti-cancer agent doxorubicin (DOX) with the subcellular compartments of the drug sensitive and Bcl-xL-overexpressing (Bcl-xL) MCF-7 cells using confocal and low-energy-loss transmission electron microscopy (LELTEM). Intracellular detection of DOX with LELTEM was carried out without specific antibodies or heavy metal stains but via the electron-induced molecular orbital excitation of the drug. Cells were incubated with 10 microM DOX for 1 min, 1, 24, and 48 h and then examined live by confocal microscope and as very thin sections in an electron microscope equipped with an energy filter having an energy resolution of 1eV. Ultrastructural localization of DOX, obtained from pairs of images taken at energy losses of 3+/-1 and 10+/-1eV, were analyzed and correlated with the confocal observations. When the sensitive and Bcl-xL cells were examined under the confocal microscope after 1 min, DOX uptake could not be detected in the nuclei nor in the cytoplasm whereas LELTEM observation revealed that at this stage of incubation the drug has already been incorporated by both cell types and that the nuclear membrane, nucleolus, and mitochondria of the Bcl-xL cells were temporally less DOX-responsive as compared to the sensitive cells. As the incubation time increased, nuclear membranes and nucleoli of both cell types appeared equally sensitive to DOX, nonetheless, mitochondria of the Bcl-xL cells remained invulnerable to DOX for 24h. The results point to LELTEM feasibility to better characterize yet unresolved cellular events caused by DOX and suggest a transitory role for Bcl-xL overexpression in protecting the cellular compartments from DOX invasion. PMID:19502069

  9. Formation of primary sperm conjugates in a haplogyne spider (Caponiidae, Araneae) with remarks on the evolution of sperm conjugation in spiders.

    PubMed

    Lipke, Elisabeth; Michalik, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Sperm conjugation, where two or more sperm are physically united, is a rare but widespread pheno-menon across the animal kingdom. One group well known for its different types of sperm conjugation are spiders. Particularly, haplogyne spiders show a high diversity of sperm traits. Besides individual cleistospermia, primary (synspermia) and secondary (coenospermia, "spermatophore") sperm conjugation occurs. However, the evolution of sperm conjugates and sperm is not understood in this group. Here, we look at how sperm are transferred in Caponiidae (Haplogynae) in pursuit of additional information about the evolution of sperm transfer forms in spiders. Additionally, we investigated the male reproductive system and spermatozoa using light- and transmission electron-microscopy and provide a 3D reconstruction of individual as of well as conjugated spermatozoa. Mature spermatozoa are characterized by an extremely elongated, helical nucleus resulting in the longest spider sperm known to date. At the end of spermiogenesis, synspermia are formed by complete fusion of four spermatids. Thus, synspermia might have evolved early within ecribellate Haplogynae. The fused sperm cells are surrounded by a prominent vesicular area. The function of the vesicular area remains still unknown but might be correlated with the capacitation process inside the female. Further phylogenetic and functional implications of the spermatozoa and sperm conjugation are discussed.

  10. Sequence conserved for subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    The more proteins diverged in sequence, the more difficult it becomes for bioinformatics to infer similarities of protein function and structure from sequence. The precise thresholds used in automated genome annotations depend on the particular aspect of protein function transferred by homology. Here, we presented the first large-scale analysis of the relation between sequence similarity and identity in subcellular localization. Three results stood out: (1) The subcellular compartment is generally more conserved than what might have been expected given that short sequence motifs like nuclear localization signals can alter the native compartment; (2) the sequence conservation of localization is similar between different compartments; and (3) it is similar to the conservation of structure and enzymatic activity. In particular, we found the transition between the regions of conserved and nonconserved localization to be very sharp, although the thresholds for conservation were less well defined than for structure and enzymatic activity. We found that a simple measure for sequence similarity accounting for pairwise sequence identity and alignment length, the HSSP distance, distinguished accurately between protein pairs of identical and different localizations. In fact, BLAST expectation values outperformed the HSSP distance only for alignments in the subtwilight zone. We succeeded in slightly improving the accuracy of inferring localization through homology by fine tuning the thresholds. Finally, we applied our results to the entire SWISS-PROT database and five entirely sequenced eukaryotes. PMID:12441382

  11. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  12. Accessory sperm: a biomonitor of boar sperm fertilization capacity.

    PubMed

    Ardón, Florencia; Evert, Meike; Beyerbach, Martin; Weitze, Karl-Fritz; Waberski, Dagmar

    2005-04-15

    The number of accessory sperm found in the zona pellucida of porcine embryos was correlated to their individual quality and to the embryo quality range found within a single sow. Our goal was to determine whether accessory sperm counts provide semen evaluation with additional, useful information. Accessory sperm count was highest when only normal embryos were found in a given sow and diminished if oocytes or degenerated embryos were present (P<0.01). Within a given sow, normal embryos had higher (P<0.05) accessory sperm counts than degenerated embryos, although not when oocytes were also present. Fertilization capacity of sperm is optimal when only normal embryos are found in a given sow; this capacity is indicated by high accessory sperm counts. A decrease in fertilization capacity is reflected in diminishing accessory sperm counts. The boar had a significant effect (P<0.01) on accessory sperm count, but not on the percentage of normal embryos; this suggests that accessory sperm may be more sensitive indicators of the fertilization capacity of sperm than the percentage of normal embryos. We conclude that accessory sperm count can be used for the detection of compensable defects in sperm and is a valid parameter for assessing sperm fertilization capacity.

  13. Ultrastructural analysis of testicular tissue and sperm by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chemes, Hector E

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have provided the basis for an in-depth understanding of the cell biology and normal functioning of the testis and male gametes and have opened the way to characterize the functional role played by specific organelles in spermatogenesis and sperm function. The development of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) extended these boundaries to the recognition of cell and organ surface features and the architectural array of cells and tissues. The merging of immunocytochemical and histochemical approaches with electron microscopy has completed a series of technical improvements that integrate structural and functional features to provide a broad understanding of cell biology in health and disease. With these advances the detailed study of the intricate structural and molecular organization as well as the chemical composition of cellular organelles is now possible. Immunocytochemistry is used to identify proteins or other components and localize them in specific cells or organelles with high specificity and sensitivity, and histochemistry can be used to understand their function (i.e., enzyme activity). When these techniques are used in conjunction with electron microscopy their resolving power is further increased to subcellular levels. In the present chapter we will describe in detail various ultrastructural techniques that are now available for basic or translational research in reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. These include TEM, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural histochemistry, and SEM.

  14. Effect of a pre-freezing treatment with cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins on boar sperm longevity, capacitation dynamics, ability to adhere to porcine oviductal epithelial cells in vitro and DNA fragmentation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomás, C; Blanch, E; Fazeli, A; Mocé, E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine how a pre-freezing treatment with cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins (CLC) affects boar sperm longevity, capacitation dynamics, ability to bind to a porcine telomerase-immortalised oviductal epithelial cell line (TERT-OPEC) in vitro and DNA integrity dynamics after freeze-thawing. Although the samples treated with CLC exhibited lower sperm quality than the control samples (P<0.05) immediately after thawing, these differences disappeared (P>0.05) after long-term incubation (26h at 37 or 16°C). Additionally, the CLC-treated spermatozoa underwent similar capacitation and DNA fragmentation dynamics as the control spermatozoa (P>0.05). However, CLC-treated spermatozoa were better able to bind to TERT-OPEC in vitro (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the pre-freezing treatment of boar spermatozoa with CLC enhanced the ability of the spermatozoa to bind to TERT-OPEC in vitro, which could have an effect on the establishment of the sperm reservoir in the ampullary--isthmic junction in vivo. Additionally, frozen-thawed spermatozoa can be stored at 16°C for at least 6h without a significant observable decline in sperm quality, which could be beneficial for the transport of thawed diluted doses of spermatozoa from the laboratory to the farm. PMID:23036662

  15. Predicted Protein Subcellular Localization in Dominant Surface Ocean Bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria consume dissolved organic matter (DOM) through hydrolysis, transport and intracellular metabolism, and these activities occur in distinct subcellular localizations. Bacterial protein subcellular localizations for several major marine bacterial groups were predicted using genomic, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data sets following modification of MetaP software for use with partial gene sequences. The most distinct pattern of subcellular localization was found for Bacteroidetes, whose genomes were substantially enriched with outer membrane and extracellular proteins but depleted of inner membrane proteins compared with five other taxa (SAR11, Roseobacter, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, oligotrophic marine Gammaproteobacteria). When subcellular localization patterns were compared between genes and transcripts, three taxa had expression biased toward proteins localized to cell locations outside of the cytosol (SAR11, Roseobacter, and Synechococcus), as expected based on the importance of carbon and nutrient acquisition in an oligotrophic ocean, but two taxa did not (oligotrophic marine Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes). Diel variations in the fraction and putative gene functions of transcripts encoding inner membrane and periplasmic proteins compared to cytoplasmic proteins suggest a close coupling of photosynthetic extracellular release and bacterial consumption, providing insights into interactions between phytoplankton, bacteria, and DOM. PMID:22773648

  16. Effect of Astaxanthin on Human Sperm Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Donà, Gabriella; Kožuh, Ivana; Brunati, Anna Maria; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Armanini, Decio; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR). Astaxanthin (Asta), a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC). Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam) and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC). Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells. PMID:23736766

  17. Effect of astaxanthin on human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Donà, Gabriella; Kožuh, Ivana; Brunati, Anna Maria; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Armanini, Decio; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-06-01

    In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR). Astaxanthin (Asta), a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC). Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam) and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC). Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells. PMID:23736766

  18. Chemotactic behavior of the sperm of chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Miller, R L

    1977-11-01

    Observations of sperm behavior in the vicinity of gradients of egg-water or alcohol extracts of whole freshly-spawned eggs of several chitons reveal what appear to be directed movements of sperm up the gradient, resulting in the aggregation of motile sperm at the gradient source. Plots of the tracks of the sperm approaching the gradient source show that the cells increase the time during which they move toward the source and decrease the time spent moving away. Although this resembles the kinesis behavior shown by bacteria in a gradient, the path directions are markedly non-random. The reorientation behavior of thigmotactic sperm involves enlargement of the normal circular path diameter in the direction of the source and an alternation of tight loops and wide circular arcs, with the latter made in the direction of the source. The form of the path of attracted chiton sperm is like that observed during chemotaxis of the sperm of the hydroid Tubularia and the tunicate Ciona and resembles the behavior of Ciona sperm in that there is no increase in velocity as the cells move up the gradient. However, unlike the cnidarian and urochordate cases, the attracting substances extracted from chiton eggs do not act species-specifically.

  19. Inorganic lead exposure in battery and paint factory: effect on human sperm structure and functional activity.

    PubMed

    Naha, N; Chowdhury, A Roy

    2006-06-01

    Lead is one of the industrially important heavy metals that causes male reproductive impairment among battery and paint factory workers, but information on the structure-function integrity of human spermatozoa is still limited. Therefore, it was necessary to investigate the effect of lead on sperm structure and functional activity in these workers. Oligozoospermia with concomitant lowering of sperm protein and nucleic acid content and the percentage of sperm DNA hyploidy (P <0.001) suggested the diminution of sperm cell production after occupational lead exposure. Low sperm vitality and hypoosmotic swelling percentage along with high malondialdehyde content and altered seminal plasma ascorbate level (P<0.001) indicating damage of sperm cell surface, might be due to high membrane lipid peroxidation and failure of non-enzymatic antioxidant protection after lead exposure. Alteration of sperm membrane surface was also evidenced from scanning electron microscopy and further authenticated by atomic and lateral force microscopy. Lowering of sperm velocity, gross and forward progressive motility with high stationary motile spermatozoa (P<0.001) suggested retarded sperm activity among the exposed workers, which was supported by high seminal plasma fructose level and reduced activity of sperm ATPase (P < 0.001). Increased incidence of teratozoospermia was also associated with high blood and semen lead level (PbB, PbS) (P<0.001). Therefore, the results suggested that lead not only affects the sperm count, but also damages the sperm structure and membrane integrity, motility and functional activity among the battery and paint factory workers.

  20. Proteomic identification of rainbow trout sperm proteins.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Joanna; Arnold, Georg J; Fröhlich, Thomas; Otte, Kathrin; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Proteomics represents a powerful tool for the analysis of fish spermatozoa, since these cells are transcriptionally inactive. The aim of the present study was to generate an inventory of the most prominent rainbow trout sperm proteins by SDS-PAGE prefractionation combined with nano-LC-MS/MS based identification. This study provides the first in-depth analysis of the rainbow trout sperm proteome, with a total of 206 identified proteins. We found that rainbow trout spermatozoa are equipped with functionally diverse proteins related to energetic metabolism, signal transduction, protein turnover, transport, cytoskeleton, oxidative injuries, and stress and reproduction. The availability of a catalog of rainbow trout sperm proteins provides a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental molecular processes in fish spermatozoa, for the ongoing development of novel markers of sperm quality and for the optimization of short- and long-term sperm preservation procedures. The MS data are available at ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD000355 and DOI 10.6019/PXD000355.

  1. Subcellular storage compartments of bacteriopheophorbide sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Dembeck, U.; Hubert, M.; Spengler, Bernhard; Bayer, Rainer; Wagner, Birgit

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence colocalization with the Golgi specific stain, NBD-ceramide, and the mitochondrial localizing stain, Rhodamine 123, confirmed the earlier assumption that the Golgi apparatus is one of the prominent storage compartments for bacteriopheophorbide esters in OAT 75 SCLC cells and several amelanotic melanoma cell lines (A375, Melur SP18, SkAMel 25). Furthermore, a diffuse staining of mitochondria, of non-structured cytoplasm, and an additional storage in melanine vesicles of the amelanotic melanoma cells suggests further storage compartments with quantitatively different contributions to the phototoxicity of bacteriochlorophyll-derived photosensitizers. Independent observations of early phototoxic effects on microfilamentous networks, enzymatic activities (succinate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase), and redistribution phenomena following primary uptake of the sensitizers let us assume that only a part of the 108 molecules taken up by a cell contribute directly to phototoxicity. Thus it may be asked if a proper subcellular positioning of only a few sensitizer molecules may have similar phototoxic effects as the huge amounts stored at apparently ineffective sites.

  2. Male sperm storage compromises sperm motility in guppies

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Clelia; Kelley, Jennifer L.; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm senescence can have important evolutionary implications due to its deleterious effects on sperm quality and offspring performance. Consequently, it has been argued that polyandry (female multiple mating) may facilitate the selection of younger, and therefore competitively superior, sperm when ejaculates from multiple males compete for fertilization. Surprisingly, however, unequivocal evidence that sperm ageing influences traits that underlie sperm competitiveness is lacking. Here, we used a paired experimental design that compares sperm quality between ‘old’ and ‘young’ ejaculates from individual male guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We show that older sperm exhibit significant reductions in sperm velocity compared with younger sperm from the same males. We found no evidence that the brightness of the male's orange (carotenoid) spots, which are thought to signal resistance to oxidative stress (and thus age-related declines in sperm fitness), signals a male's ability to withstand the deleterious effects of sperm ageing. Instead, polyandry may be a more effective strategy for females to minimize the likelihood of being fertilized by aged sperm. PMID:25392314

  3. Male sperm storage compromises sperm motility in guppies.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Clelia; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2014-11-01

    Sperm senescence can have important evolutionary implications due to its deleterious effects on sperm quality and offspring performance. Consequently, it has been argued that polyandry (female multiple mating) may facilitate the selection of younger, and therefore competitively superior, sperm when ejaculates from multiple males compete for fertilization. Surprisingly, however, unequivocal evidence that sperm ageing influences traits that underlie sperm competitiveness is lacking. Here, we used a paired experimental design that compares sperm quality between 'old' and 'young' ejaculates from individual male guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We show that older sperm exhibit significant reductions in sperm velocity compared with younger sperm from the same males. We found no evidence that the brightness of the male's orange (carotenoid) spots, which are thought to signal resistance to oxidative stress (and thus age-related declines in sperm fitness), signals a male's ability to withstand the deleterious effects of sperm ageing. Instead, polyandry may be a more effective strategy for females to minimize the likelihood of being fertilized by aged sperm.

  4. Male sperm storage compromises sperm motility in guppies.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Clelia; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2014-11-01

    Sperm senescence can have important evolutionary implications due to its deleterious effects on sperm quality and offspring performance. Consequently, it has been argued that polyandry (female multiple mating) may facilitate the selection of younger, and therefore competitively superior, sperm when ejaculates from multiple males compete for fertilization. Surprisingly, however, unequivocal evidence that sperm ageing influences traits that underlie sperm competitiveness is lacking. Here, we used a paired experimental design that compares sperm quality between 'old' and 'young' ejaculates from individual male guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We show that older sperm exhibit significant reductions in sperm velocity compared with younger sperm from the same males. We found no evidence that the brightness of the male's orange (carotenoid) spots, which are thought to signal resistance to oxidative stress (and thus age-related declines in sperm fitness), signals a male's ability to withstand the deleterious effects of sperm ageing. Instead, polyandry may be a more effective strategy for females to minimize the likelihood of being fertilized by aged sperm. PMID:25392314

  5. Modeling biosilicification at subcellular scales.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, Narjes; Cronemberger, Carolina M; Kaandorp, Jaap A

    2013-01-01

    Biosilicification occurs in many organisms. Sponges and diatoms are major examples of them. In this chapter, we introduce a modeling approach that describes several biological mechanisms controlling silicification. Modeling biosilicification is a typical multiscale problem where processes at very different temporal and spatial scales need to be coupled: processes at the molecular level, physiological processes at the subcellular and cellular level, etc. In biosilicification morphology plays a fundamental role, and a spatiotemporal model is required. In the case of sponges, a particle simulation based on diffusion-limited aggregation is presented here. This model can describe fractal properties of silica aggregates in first steps of deposition on an organic template. In the case of diatoms, a reaction-diffusion model is introduced which can describe the concentrations of chemical components and has the possibility to include polymerization chain of reactions. PMID:24420712

  6. Ubiquitination and its influence in boar sperm physiology and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Purdy, P H

    2008-09-15

    Recent reports document the potential use of the ubiquitin protein as an indicator of mammalian sperm quality or fertility, based on poor morphology, sperm count, and other cellular qualities. However, its influence on cellular physiologic mechanisms and boar sperm cryopreservation are unknown. The objective of this research was to determine the influence of boar sperm ubiquitination (n=12 boars) on motility (using CASA), and flow cytometry and fluorescent probes (in parentheses) to evaluate mitochondrial activity (JC-1), plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity (PI and FITC-PNA), membrane fluidity (M540), and chromatin stability (TUNEL) for fresh and frozen-thawed samples. The effects of ubiquitination (determined flow cytometrically) on the ability of frozen-thawed boar sperm to capacitate (FLUO-3AM) and acrosome react (FITC-PNA) were also investigated using flow cytometry. Cryopreservation induced a decrease in the percentage of sperm that were ubiquitinated from 29 to 20% (P<0.0001), but no significant effects of ubiquitin on sperm quality (motility, membrane integrities and organization) were detected. The ability of sperm to capacitate and acrosome react was influenced by ubiquitination. Samples with more ubiquitinated boar sperm were able to maintain plasma membrane integrity (PMI) better and have fewer live acrosome-reacted cells over 120 min of induced capacitation (P<0.05). In conclusion, frozen-thawed ubiquitinated boar sperm were better able to survive the physical stresses of induced capacitation, yet were still capable of capacitating and acrosome reacting, which may enable use of this assay for in the vitro evaluation of the quality of boar sperm. PMID:18579194

  7. Ovum pick up, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer in cattle, buffalo and horses: from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Duchi, Roberto; Colleoni, Silvia; Lagutina, Irina; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques developed for cattle in the last 25 years, like ovum pick up (OPU), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and somatic cell nuclear transfer, have been transferred and adapted to buffalo and horses. The successful clinical applications of these techniques require both the clinical skills specific to each animal species and an experienced laboratory team to support the in vitro phase of the work. In cattle, OPU can be considered a consolidated technology that is rapidly outpacing conventional superovulation for embryo transfer. In buffalo, OPU represents the only possibility for embryo production to advance the implementation of embryo-based biotechnologies in that industry, although it is still mainly in the developmental phase. In the horse, OPU is now an established procedure for breeding from infertile and sporting mares throughout the year. It requires ICSI that in the horse, contrary to what happens in cattle and buffalo, is very efficient and the only option because conventional IVF does not work. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is destined to fill a very small niche for generating animals of extremely high commercial value. The efficiency is low, but because normal animals can be generated it is likely that advancing our knowledge in that field might improve the technology and reduce its cost.

  8. TEX101, a glycoprotein essential for sperm fertility, is required for stable expression of Ly6k on testicular germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Shuichiro; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Kato, Ko; Sakuraba, Mayumi; Takamori, Kenji; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Takeda, Satoru; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    TEX101, a germ cell-specific glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein, is associated with Ly6k during spermatogenesis in testis. Although both Tex101−/− and Ly6k−/− mice can produce morphologically intact spermatozoa, both knockout mice show an infertile phenotype due to a disorder of spermatozoa to migrate into the oviduct. Since Ly6k specifically interacts with TEX101, complex formation of TEX101/Ly6k appears to be potentially important for functional sperm production. This study evaluated the fate of Ly6k in the presence or absence of TEX101 to explore the molecular interaction of both GPI-anchored proteins in seminiferous tubules. The present study showed that: 1) Although Ly6k mRNA was detected, the protein was present at very low levels in mature testes of Tex101−/− mice, 2) Ly6k mRNA level was within the normal range in Tex101−/− mice, 3) Ly6k mRNA was translated into a polypeptide in the testes of Tex101+/+ and Tex101−/− mice, and 4) TEX101, as well as Ly6k, are co-factors that affect to molecular expression. These results indicate that both TEX101 and Ly6k contribute to the post-translational counterpart protein expression at the cell membrane. This mechanism may be important in maintaining the production of fertile spermatozoa during spermatogenesis. PMID:27005865

  9. Toxigenic diversity of two different RAPD groups of Stachybotrys chartarum isolates analyzed by