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  1. GC-1 mRHBDD1 knockdown spermatogonia cells lose their spermatogenic capacity in mouse seminiferous tubules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Song, Wei; Li, Shuchun; Guan, Xin; Miao, Shiying; Zong, Shudong; Koide, SS; Wang, Linfang

    2009-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is important for regulating spermatogenesis. The protein mRHBDD1 (mouse homolog of human RHBDD1)/rRHBDD1 (rat homolog of human RHBDD1) is highly expressed in the testis and is involved in apoptosis of spermatogonia. GC-1, a spermatogonia cell line, has the capacity to differentiate into spermatids within the seminiferous tubules. We constructed mRHBDD1 knockdown GC-1 cells and evaluated their capacity to differentiate into spermatids in mouse seminiferous tubules. Results Stable mRHBDD1 knockdown GC-1 cells were sensitive to apoptotic stimuli, PS341 and UV irradiation. In vitro, they survived and proliferated normally. However, they lost the ability to survive and differentiate in mouse seminiferous tubules. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mRHBDD1 may be associated with mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:19358743

  2. Spermatogonial multiplication in the Chinese hamster. I. Cell cycle properties and synchronization of differentiating spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Lok, D; de Rooij, D G

    1983-01-01

    The cell cycle properties of the six successive generations of differentiating spermatogonia in the Chinese hamster were analysed by the fraction of labelled mitoses technique (FLM). Except for the A1 spermatogonia most of which have a longer cell cycle time (Tc), Tc was found to be c. 60 hr for all types of differentiating spermatogonia. As in the mouse and the rat this represents c. 14% of the duration of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. With ongoing differentiation, ts of the differentiating spermatogonia increases from 14 to 25 hr, while tG2 shortens from 22 to 10 hr, ts + tG2 remaining at around 35 hr throughout. Autoradiography of whole mounted seminiferous tubules at 1 hr after injection of [3H]thymidine, and experiments with Ara-C revealed that the differentiating spermatogonia traverse S in sharply defined tubular segments. Thus adjacent clones of differentiating spermatogonia start and finish their S phase at virtually the same moment. This synchronization is not yet fully established among the first generation, as clones of A1 spermatogonia in the S phase were found intermingled with A1 cells in other phases of the cell cycle. Since there is little variation in tS and tG2 in the A1 spermatogonia, it was concluded that adjacent clones of A2 spermatogonia do not always arise at the same moment. Yet A2 spermatogonia do start S synchronously, and the FLM study confirms the expected variability in their tG1. A hypothesis is proposed that each generation of differentiating spermatogonia receives a stimulus to divide from outside the spermatogonial compartment. This would ensure the synchronous behaviour of adjacent clones and the strict relationship of the pattern of proliferation to the stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium.

  3. ETV5 regulates sertoli cell chemokines involved in mouse stem/progenitor spermatogonia maintenance.

    PubMed

    Simon, Liz; Ekman, Gail C; Garcia, Thomas; Carnes, Kay; Zhang, Zhen; Murphy, Theresa; Murphy, Kenneth M; Hess, Rex A; Cooke, Paul S; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2010-10-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells are the only stem cells in the body that transmit genetic information to offspring. Although growth factors responsible for self-renewal of these cells are known, the factors and mechanisms that attract and physically maintain these cells within their microenvironment are poorly understood. Mice with targeted disruption of Ets variant gene 5 (Etv5) show total loss of stem/progenitor spermatogonia following the first wave of spermatogenesis, resulting in a Sertoli cell-only phenotype and aspermia. Microarray analysis of primary Sertoli cells from Etv5 knockout (Etv5(-/-)) versus wild-type (WT) mice revealed significant decreases in expression of several chemokines. Chemotaxis assays demonstrated that migration of stem/progenitor spermatogonia toward Etv5(-/-) Sertoli cells was significantly decreased compared to migration toward WT Sertoli cells. Interestingly, differentiating spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids were not chemoattracted by WT Sertoli cells, whereas stem/progenitor spermatogonia showed a high and significant chemotactic index. Rescue assays using recombinant chemokines indicated that C-C-motif ligand 9 (CCL9) facilitates Sertoli cell chemoattraction of stem/progenitor spermatogonia, which express C-C-receptor type 1 (CCR1). In addition, there is protein-DNA interaction between ETV5 and Ccl9, suggesting that ETV5 might be a direct regulator of Ccl9 expression. Taken together, our data show for the first time that Sertoli cells are chemoattractive for stem/progenitor spermatogonia, and that production of specific chemokines is regulated by ETV5. Therefore, changes in chemokine production and consequent decreases in chemoattraction by Etv5(-/-) Sertoli cells helps to explain stem/progenitor spermatogonia loss in Etv5(-/-) mice.

  4. Dedifferentiating spermatogonia outcompete somatic stem cells for niche occupancy in the Drosophila testis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, X Rebecca; Brawley, Crista M; Matunis, Erika L

    2009-08-07

    Differentiating cells can dedifferentiate to replace stem cells in aged or damaged tissues, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the Drosophila testis, a cluster of stromal cells called the hub creates a niche by locally activating Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak-STAT) signaling in adjacent germline and somatic stem cells. Here, we establish a system to study spermatogonial dedifferentiation. Ectopically expressing the differentiation factor bag-of-marbles (Bam) removes germline stem cells from the niche. However, withdrawing ectopic Bam causes interconnected spermatogonia to fragment, move into the niche, exchange positions with resident somatic stem cells, and establish contact with the hub. Concomitantly, actin-based protrusions appear on subsets of spermatogonia, suggesting acquired motility. Furthermore, global downregulation of Jak-STAT signaling inhibits dedifferentiation, indicating that normal levels of pathway activation are required to promote movement of spermatogonia into the niche during dedifferentiation, where they outcompete somatic stem cells for niche occupancy.

  5. Imatinib has deleterious effects on differentiating spermatogonia while sparing spermatogonial stem cell self renewal.

    PubMed

    Heim, Crystal; Minniear, Kayla; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2011-05-01

    Imatinib mesylate is among a growing number of effective cancer drugs that provide molecularly targeted therapy; however, imatinib causes reproductive defects in rodents. The availability of an in vitro system for screening the effect of drugs on spermatogenesis would be beneficial. The imatinib targets, KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRB), were shown here to be expressed in "germline stem" (GS) cell cultures that contain spermatogonia, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). GS cell cultures were utilized to determine whether imatinib affects SSC self renewal or differentiation. GS cells grown in imatinib retained self renewal based on multiple assays, including transplantation. However, growth in imatinib led to decreased numbers of differentiated spermatogonia and reduced culture growth consistent with the known requirement for KIT in survival and proliferation of spermatogonia. These results build upon the in vivo studies and support the possibility of utilizing GS cell cultures for preclinical drug tests.

  6. Retinoic acid induces Sertoli cell paracrine signals for spermatogonia differentiation but cell autonomously drives spermatocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Raverdeau, Mathilde; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Féret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Benoit, Gérard; Davidson, Irwin; Chambon, Pierre; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B

    2012-10-09

    Direct evidence for a role of endogenous retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A in the initial differentiation and meiotic entry of spermatogonia, and thus in the initiation of spermatogenesis is still lacking. RA is synthesized by dedicated enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH), and binds to and activates nuclear RA receptors (RARA, RARB, and RARG) either within the RA-synthesizing cells or in the neighboring cells. In the present study, we have used a combination of somatic genetic ablations and pharmacological approaches in vivo to show that during the first, prepubertal, spermatogenic cycle (i) RALDH-dependent synthesis of RA by Sertoli cells (SC), the supporting cells of the germ cell (GC) lineage, is indispensable to initiate differentiation of A aligned into A1 spermatogonia; (ii) RARA in SC mediates the effects of RA, possibly through activating Mafb expression, a gene whose Drosophila homolog is mandatory to GC differentiation; (iii) RA synthesized by premeiotic spermatocytes cell autonomously induces meiotic initiation through controlling the RAR-dependent expression of Stra8. Furthermore, we show that RA of SC origin is no longer necessary for the subsequent spermatogenic cycles but essential to spermiation. Altogether, our data establish that the effects of RA in vivo on spermatogonia differentiation are indirect, via SC, but direct on meiotic initiation in spermatocytes, supporting thereby the notion that, contrary to the situation in the female, RA is necessary to induce meiosis in the male.

  7. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  8. Mouse differentiating spermatogonia can generate germinal stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Lassalle, Bruno; Coureuil, Mathieu; Louis, Jean Paul; Le Page, Florence; Testart, Jacques; Allemand, Isabelle; Riou, Lydia; Fouchet, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    In adults, stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of many actively renewing tissues, such as haematopoietic, skin, gut and germinal tissues. These stem cells can self-renew or be committed to becoming progenitors. Stem-cell commitment is thought to be irreversible but in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, it was shown recently that differentiating germ cells can revert to functional stem cells that can restore germinal lineage. Whether progenitors are also able to generate stem cells in mammals remains unknown. Here we show that purified mouse spermatogonial progenitors committed to differentiation can generate functional germinal stem cells that can repopulate germ-cell-depleted testes when transplanted into adult mice. We found that GDNF, a key regulator of the stem-cell niche, and FGF2 are able to reprogram in vitro spermatogonial progenitors for reverse differentiation. This study supports the emerging concept that the stem-cell identity is not restricted in adults to a definite pool of cells that self-renew, but that stemness could be acquired by differentiating progenitors after tissue injury and throughout life.

  9. FSH-initiated differentiation of newt spermatogonia to primary spermatocytes in germ-somatic cell reaggregates cultured within a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Ito, R; Abé, S I

    1999-03-01

    We previously cultured fragments of newt testes in chemically defined media and showed that mammalian follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates proliferation of spermatogonia as well as their differentiation into primary spermatocytes (Ji et al., 1992; Abe and Ji, 1994). Next, we indicated in cultures composed of spermatogonia and somatic cells (mainly Sertoli cells) that FSH stimulates germ cell proliferation via Sertoli cells (Maekawa et al., 1995). However, the spermatogonia did not differentiate into primary spermatocytes, but instead died. In the present study, we embedded large reaggregates of spermatogonia and somatic cells (mainly Sertoli cells) within a collagen matrix and cultured the reaggregates on a filter that floated on chemically defined media containing FSH; in this revised culture system, spermatogonia proliferated and differentiated into primary spermatocytes. The viability and percentage of germ cells differentiating into primary spermatocytes were proportional to the percentage of somatic cells in the culture, indicating that differentiation of spermatogonia into primary spermatocytes is mediated by Sertoli cells.

  10. The heterogeneity of spermatogonia is revealed by their topology and expression of marker proteins including the germ cell-specific proteins Nanos2 and Nanos3.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitomi; Sada, Aiko; Yoshida, Shosei; Saga, Yumiko

    2009-12-15

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) reside in undifferentiated type-A spermatogonia and contribute to continuous spermatogenesis by maintaining the balance between self-renewal and differentiation, thereby meeting the biological demand in the testis. Spermatogonia have to date been characterized principally through their morphology, but we herein report the detailed characterization of undifferentiated spermatogonia in mouse testes based on their gene expression profiles in combination with topological features. The detection of the germ cell-specific proteins Nanos2 and Nanos3 as markers of spermatogonia has enabled the clear dissection of complex populations of these cells as Nanos2 was recently shown to be involved in the maintenance of stem cells. Nanos2 is found to be almost exclusively expressed in A(s) to A(pr) cells, whereas Nanos3 is detectable in most undifferentiated spermatogonia (A(s) to A(al)) and differentiating A(1) spermatogonia. In our present study, we find that A(s) and A(pr) can be basically classified into three categories: (1) GFRalpha1(+)Nanos2(+)Nanos3(-)Ngn3(-), (2) GFRalpha1(+)Nanos2(+)Nanos3(+)Ngn3(-), and (3) GFRalpha1(-)Nanos2(+/-)Nanos3(+)Ngn3(+). We propose that the first of these groups is most likely to include the stem cell population and that Nanos3 may function in transit amplifying cells.

  11. Spermatogonia, Germline Cells, and Testicular Organization in the Characiform Prochilodus lineatus Studied Using Histological, Stereological, and Morphometric Approaches.

    PubMed

    De Melo Dias, Gisele Cristiane; Cassel, Mônica; Oliveira De Jesus, Lázaro Wender; Batlouni, Sergio Ricardo; Borella, Maria Inés

    2017-03-01

    Prochilodus lineatus is an important representative of the order Characiformes and a species that offers great advantages to fish farming. Therefore, detailed knowledge of its reproductive biology can be applied to various fields of production and biotechnology. In this study, we have identified testicular germ cells during spermatogenesis and have evaluated the volumetric proportion of the testes occupied by structures of the tubular and intertubular compartments. In addition, the individual volume of type A spermatogonia was measured and used to estimate the mean number of these cells per testis. Gonads of adult P. lineatus males were extracted and fixed. Light and transmission electron microscopy were applied to fragments of three testicular regions. Histological, stereological, and morphometric analyses were performed. The stereological data suggest that components of the tubular and intertubular compartments of the P. lineatus testes present a uniform distribution in all three regions and therefore reflect regions with similar distributions of cell types. In addition, P. lineatus testes showed ∼0.6% of type A spermatogonia, as well as a predominance of cysts of primary spermatocytes and spermatids during the reproductive phase evaluated. The results from this study provide a better understanding of the morphology and structure of the testis and of the characterization of the type A spermatogonia in P. lineatus. The nuclear diameter of germ cells also decreases significantly during spermatogenesis. The data presented herein are the first of its kind for the order Characiformes and may be useful for future biotechnology studies on fish reproduction. Anat Rec, 300:589-599, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparison of the genetic effects of equimolar doses of ENU and MNU: while the chemicals differ dramatically in their mutagenicity in stem-cell spermatogonia, both elicit very high mutation rates in differentiating spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Russell, William L

    2007-03-01

    Mutagenic, reproductive, and toxicity effects of two closely related chemicals, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and methylnitrosourea (MNU), were compared at equimolar and near-equimolar doses in the mouse specific-locus test in a screen of all stages of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. In stem-cell spermatogonia (SG), ENU is more than an order of magnitude more mutagenic than MNU. During post-SG stages, both chemicals exhibit high peaks in mutation yield when differentiating spermatogonia (DG) and preleptotene spermatocytes are exposed. The mutation frequency induced by 75mgMNU/kg during this peak interval is, to date, the highest induced by any single-exposure mutagenic treatment - chemical or radiation - that allows survival of the exposed animal and its germ cells, producing an estimated 10 new mutations per genome. There is thus a vast difference between stem cell and differentiating spermatogonia in their sensitivity to MNU, but little difference between these stages in their sensitivity to ENU. During stages following meiotic metaphase, the highest mutation yield is obtained from exposed spermatids, but for both chemicals, that yield is less than one-quarter that obtained from the peak interval. Large-lesion (LL) mutations were induced only in spermatids. Although only a few of the remaining mutations were analyzed molecularly, there is considerable evidence from recent molecular characterizations of the marker genes and their flanking chromosomal regions that most, if not all, mutations induced during the peak-sensitive period did not involve lesions outside the marked loci. Both ENU and MNU treatments of post-SG stages yielded significant numbers of mutants that were recovered as mosaics, with the proportion being higher for ENU than for MNU. Comparing the chemicals for the endpoints studied and additional ones (e.g., chromosome aberrations, toxicity to germ cells and to animals, teratogenicity) revealed that while MNU is generally more effective, the opposite

  13. Regulation of crucial lncRNAs in differentiation of chicken embryonic stem cells to spermatogonia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Ji, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Zhang, C; Zhang, W; Lu, Z; Sun, C; Ahmed, M F; He, N; Jin, K; Cheng, S; Wang, Y; He, Y; Song, J; Zhang, Y; Li, B

    2017-04-01

    Regulation of crucial lncRNAs involved in differentiation of chicken embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to spermatogonia stem cells (SSCs) was explored by sequencing the transcriptome of ESCs, primordial germ cells (PGCs) and SSCs with RNA-Seq; analytical bioinformatic methods were used to excavate candidate lncRNAs. We detected expression of candidate lncRNAs in ESCs, PGCs and SSCs and forecasted related target genes. Utilizing wego, david and string, function and protein-protein interactions of target genes were analyzed. Finally, based on string analysis, interaction diagrams and relevant signaling pathways were established. Our results indicate a total of 9657 lncRNAs in ESCs, PGCs and SSCs, with 3549 defined as significantly different. We screened 20 candidate lncRNAs, each demonstrating a greater than eight-fold difference in |logFC| value between groups (ESCs vs. PGCs, ESCs vs. SSCs and PGCs vs. SSCs) or specifically expressed in an individual cell type. qRT-PCR results indicated that expression tendencies of candidate lncRNAs were consistent with RNA-Seq. Fifteen cis and four trans target genes were forecasted. Based on wego and string analyses, we found lnc-SSC1, lnc-SSC5, lnc-SSC2 and lnc-ESC2 negatively regulated target genes SUFU, EPHA3, KLF3, ARL3 and TRIM8, whereas SHH, NOTCH, TGF-β, cAMP/cGMP and JAK/STAT signaling pathways were promoted, causing differentiation of ESCs into SSCs. Our findings represent a preliminary unveiling of lncRNA-associated regulatory mechanisms during differentiation of chicken ESCs into SSCs, filling a research void in male germ cell differentiation related to lncRNA. Our results also provide basic information for improving in vitro induction systems for differentiation of chicken ESCs into SSCs.

  14. Sin3a is required by sertoli cells to establish a niche for undifferentiated spermatogonia, germ cell tumors, and spermatid elongation.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Gallagher, Shannon J; Foreman, Oded; Dannenberg, Jan Hermen; Depinho, Ronald A; Braun, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    Microenvironments support the maintenance of stem cells and the growth of tumors through largely unknown mechanisms. While cell-autonomous chromatin modifications have emerged as important determinants for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells, a role for non-cell autonomous epigenetic contributions is not well established. Here, we genetically ablated the chromatin modifier Swi-independent 3a (Sin3a) in fetal Sertoli cells, which partly comprise the niche for male germline stem cells, and investigated its impact on spermatogenic cell fate and teratoma formation in vivo. Sertoli cell-specific Sin3a deletion resulted in the formation of few undifferentiated spermatogonia after birth while initially maintaining spermatogenic differentiation. Stem cell-associated markers Plzf, Gfra1, and Oct4 were downregulated in the mutant fetal gonad, while Sertoli cell markers Steel and Gdnf, which support germ cells, were not diminished. Following birth, markers of differentiating spermatogonia, Kit and Sohlh2, exhibited normal levels, but chemokine-signaling molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4), expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells, respectively, were not detected. In the juvenile, mutant testes exhibited a progressive loss of differentiating spermatogonia and a block in spermatid elongation, followed by extensive germ cell degeneration. Sertoli cell-specific Sin3a deletion also suppressed teratoma formation by fetal germ cells in an in vivo transplantation assay. We conclude that the epigenome of Sertoli cells influences the establishment of a niche for germline stem cells as well as for tumor initiating cells.

  15. GDNF-expressing STO feeder layer supports the long-term propagation of undifferentiated mouse spermatogonia with stem cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiang; Jia, Yuanyuan; Xue, Yuanyuan; Geng, Lei; Wang, Min; Li, Lufan; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xuemei; Wu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The development of a stem cell culture system would expedite our understanding of the biology of tissue regeneration. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) is the foundation for lifelong male spermatogenesis and the SSC culture has been optimized continuously in recent years. However, there have been many inconveniences to reconstruct SSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro, such as the frequent refreshment of recombinant cytokines, including GDNF, the essential growth factor for SSC maintenance. In the present study, we observed that both STO and MEF cells, which were previously used as feeders for SSC growth, did not express GDNF, but a GDNF-expressing STO feeder could support undifferentiated mouse spermatogonia propagation in vitro for three months without the refreshment of recombinant growth factor GDNF. The cell morphology, growth rate and SSC-associated gene expression remained identical to the SSCs cultured using previous methods. The transplantation of SSCs growing on these GDNF-expressing STO feeders could generate extensive colonies of spermatogenesis in recipient testes, functionally validating the stemness of these cells. Collectively, our data indicated that the further modification of feeder cells might facilitate the self-renewal and propagation of SSCs in vitro. PMID:27827452

  16. Undifferentiated primate spermatogonia and their endocrine control.

    PubMed

    Plant, Tony M

    2010-08-01

    The biology of spermatogonial stem cells is currently an area of intensive research and contemporary studies in primates are emerging. Quantitative regulation of sperm output by the primate testis seems to be exerted primarily on the transition from undifferentiated to differentiating spermatogonia. This review examines recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms governing spermatogonial renewal and early differentiation in male primates, with a focus on the monkey. Emerging revisions to the classic view of dark and pale type A spermatogonia as reserve and renewing spermatogonial stem cells, respectively, are critically evaluated and essential features of endocrine control of undifferentiated spermatogonia throughout postnatal primate development are discussed. Obstacles in gaining a more complete understanding of primate spermatogonia are also identified.

  17. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 1: background to spermatogenesis, spermatogonia, and spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermo, Louis; Pelletier, R-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G; Smith, Charles E

    2010-04-01

    Spermatogenesis, a study of germ cell development, is a long, orderly, and well-defined process occurring in seminiferous tubules of the testis. It is a temporal event whereby undifferentiated spermatogonial germ cells evolve into maturing spermatozoa over a period of several weeks. Spermatogenesis is characterized by three specific functional phases: proliferation, meiosis, and differentiation, and it involves spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids. Germ cells at steps of development form various cellular associations or stages, with 6, 12, and 14 specific stages being identified in human, mouse, and rat, respectively. The stages evolve over time in a given area of the seminiferous tubule forming a cycle of the seminiferous epithelium that has a well-defined duration for a given species. In this part, we discuss the proliferation and meiotic phase whereby spermatogonia undergo several mitotic divisions to form spermatocytes that undergo two meiotic divisions to form haploid spermatids. In the rat, spermatogonia can be subdivided into several classes: stem cells (A(s)), proliferating cells (A(pr), A(al)), and differentiating cells (A(1)-A(4), In, B). They are dependent on a specific microenvironment (niche) contributed by Sertoli, myoid, and Leydig cells for proper development. Spermatogonia possess several surface markers whereby they can be identified from each other. During meiosis, spermatocytes undergo chromosomal pairing, synapsis, and genetic exchange as well as transforming into haploid cells following meiosis. The meiotic cells form specific structural entities such as the synaptonemal complex and sex body. Many genes involved in spermatogonial renewal and the meiotic process have been identified and shown to be essential for this event.

  18. Inhibitor of DNA binding 4 is expressed selectively by single spermatogonia in the male germline and regulates the self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Oatley, Melissa J; Kaucher, Amy V; Racicot, Karen E; Oatley, Jon M

    2011-08-01

    Continual spermatogenesis at a quantitatively normal level is required to sustain male fertility. The foundation of this process relies on maintenance of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population consisting of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that self-renew as well as transient amplifying progenitors produced by differentiation. In mammals, type A(single) spermatogonia form the SSC population, but molecular markers distinguishing these from differentiating progenitors are undefined and knowledge of mechanisms regulating their functions is limited. We show that in the mouse male germline the transcriptional repressor ID4 is expressed by a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia and selectively marks A(single) spermatogonia. In addition, we found that ID4 expression is up-regulated in isolated SSC-enriched fractions by stimulation from GDNF, a key growth factor driving self-renewal. In mice lacking ID4 expression, quantitatively normal spermatogenesis was found to be impaired due to progressive loss of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population during adulthood. Moreover, reduction of ID4 expression by small interfering RNA treatment abolished the ability of wild-type SSCs to expand in vitro during long-term culture without affecting their survival. Collectively, these results indicate that ID4 is a distinguishing marker of SSCs in the mammalian germline and plays an important role in the regulation of self-renewal.

  19. Differentiation of Spermatogonia Stem Cells into Functional Mature Neurons Characterized with Differential Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Bojnordi, Maryam Nazm; Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh; Shojaei, Amir; Hamidabadi, Hatef Ghasemi

    2016-09-19

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, ESCs are not usable clinically due to immunological and ethical limitations. The identification of an alternative safe cell source opens novel options via autologous transplantation in neuro-regeneration circumventing these problems. Here, we examined the neurogenic capacity of embryonic stem-like cells (ES-like cells) derived from the testis using neural growth factor inducers and utilized them to generate functional mature neurons. The neuronal differentiation of ES-like cells is induced in three stages. Stage 1 is related to embryoid body (EB) formation. To induce neuroprogenitor cells, EBs were cultured in the presence of retinoic acid, N2 supplement and fibroblast growth factor followed by culturing in a neurobasal medium containing B27, N2 supplements for additional 10 days, to allow the maturation and development of neuronal progenitor cells. The neurogenic differentiation was confirmed by immunostaining for markers of mature neurons. The differentiated neurons were positive for Tuj1 and Tau1. Real-time PCR dates indicated the expression of Nestin and Neuro D (neuroprogenitor markers) in induced cells at the second stage of the differentiation protocol. The differentiated mature neurons exhibited the specific neuron markers Map2 and β-tubulin. The functional maturity of neurons was confirmed by an electrophysiological analysis of passive and active neural membrane properties. These findings indicated a differentiation capacity of ES-like cells derived from the testis to functionally mature neurons, which proposes them as a novel cell source for neuroregenerative medicine.

  20. Melatonin promotes goat spermatogonia stem cells (SSCs) proliferation by stimulating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Bowen; Li, Bo; Wu, Chongyang; Wu, Jiang; Yan, Yuan; Shang, Rui; Bai, Chunling; Li, Guangpeng; Hua, Jinlian

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been reported to be an important endogenous hormone for regulating neurogenesis, immunityand the biological clock. Recently, the effects of melatonin on neural stem cells (NSCs), mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells(iPSCs) have been reported; however, the effects of melatonin on spermatogonia stem cells (SSCs) are not clear. Here, 1μM and 1nM melatonin was added to medium when goat SSCs were cultured in vitro, the results showed that melatonin could increase the formation and size of SSC colonies. Real-time quantitative PCR (QRT-PCR) and western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of SSC proliferation and self-renewal markers were up-regulated. Meanwhile, QRT-PCR results showed that melatonin inhibit the mRNA expression level of SSC differentiation markers. ELISA analysis showed an obvious increase in the concentration of GDNF (a niche factor secreted by Sertoli cells) in the medium when treated with melatonin. Meanwhile, the phosphorylation level of AKT, a downstream of GDNF-GFRa1-RET pathway was activated. In conclusion, melatonin promotes goat SSC proliferation by stimulating GDNF production in Sertoli cells. PMID:27769051

  1. Differential expression of c-kit in mouse undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Schrans-Stassen, B H; van de Kant, H J; de Rooij, D G; van Pelt, A M

    1999-12-01

    The proto-oncogene c-kit is encoded at the white-spotting locus and in the mouse mutations at this locus affect the precursor cells of melanocytes, hematopoietic cells, and germ cells. c-kit is expressed in type A spermatogonia, but whether or not c-kit is present both in undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia or only in the latter cell type is still a matter of debate. Using the vitamin A-deficient mouse model, we studied messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia. Furthermore, we quantified the immuno-positive type A spermatogonia in the epithelial stages VI, VII, IX/X, and XII in normal mice to correlate c-kit expression in type A spermatogonia with the differentiation of these cells. Our results show that in the VAD situation undifferentiated type A spermatogonia express little c-kit mRNA. The A spermatogonia with a larger nucleus expressed c-Kit protein, whereas the A spermatogonia with a smaller one did not. After induction of differentiation of these cells into type A1 spermatogonia, c-kit mRNA was enhanced. The percentage of A spermatogonia expressing c-Kit protein did not change during this process, suggesting that A spermatogonia, which are committed to differentiate express c-kit. Under normal circumstances in epithelial stage VI 16%+/-2% (mean +/- SD), in VII 45%+/-15%, in IX/X 78%+/-14% and in XII 90%+/-1.9% of the type A spermatogonia were c-kit positive, suggesting that Aaligned spermatogonia gradually change from c-Kit negative to c-Kit positive cells before their differentiation into A1 spermatogonia. It is concluded that c-kit can be used as a marker for differentiation of undifferentiated into differentiating type A spermatogonia.

  2. A monoclonal antibody that specifically reacts with human embryonal carcinomas, spermatogonia and oocytes is able to induce human EC cell death.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Umezawa, A; Abe, H; Suzuki, N; Yamada, T; Nozawa, S; Hata, J

    1995-02-01

    We developed a mouse monoclonal antibody, 6E2 (IgG3), against a human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line, NCR-G3, that possesses totipotent differentiation capabilities. Culturing human EC cells in the presence of 6E2 causes their death. It has been shown that 6E2 kills EC cells dose dependently. In immunohistochemical examination with normal human germ cells, 6E2 reacted specifically with spermatogonia and oocytes. Among human germ cell tumor tissues on aceton-fixed frozen sections, 6E2 reacted with embryonal carcinomas, seminomas and dysgerminomas, but it did not react with choriocarcinomas or with yolk sac tumors. Consistently, in flow cytometric analysis of cultured human germ cell tumor cell lines, 6E2 reacted exclusively with EC cells including NCR-G3 cells. It was revealed, by preserving its antigenicity after treatment with periodic acid and tunicamycin and by radiolabeling cells followed by immunoprecipitation, that the molecule defined by 6E2 is a cell surface protein having a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. These data illustrate that the molecule defined by 6E2 links human germ cell tumors, especially embryonal carcinoma, seminoma and dysgerminoma, to their normal counterparts and that it may play a role in survival and proliferation of human EC cells.

  3. Effect of X-ray and ethylnitrosourea exposures separated by 24 h on specific-locus mutation frequency in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L; Carpenter, D A; Hitotsumachi, S

    1988-04-01

    Specific-locus mutation frequencies in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia were determined in 3 experiments in which mature male mice were exposed to 100,m 300, or 500 R of X-rays followed, 24 h later, by intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of ethylnitrosourea (ENU). The purpose was to find out if the mutation frequencies would be augmented over those expected on the basis of additivity of the effects of the separate treatments. Such augmentation had been observed in earlier work in which exposure to 100 or 500 R of X-rays was followed 24 h later by a second exposure of 500 R. No augmentation was observed for X-rays followed by ENU. The mutation frequencies in all 3 experiments actually fell below those expected on the basis of additivity, although the reductions were not statistically significant.

  4. Rad9a is required for spermatogonia differentiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Qi, Shu-Tao; Ma, Xue-Shan; Liang, Qiu-Xia; Lei, Guo; Meng, Tie-Gang; Liang, Li-Feng; Xian, Ye-Xin; Hou, Yi; Sun, Xiao-Fang; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Wei-Hua; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in testes requires precise spermatogonia differentiation. Spermatocytes lacking the Rad9a gene are arrested in pachytene prophase, implying a possible role for RAD9A in spermatogonia differentiation. However, numerous RAD9A-positive pachytene spermatocytes are still observed in mouse testes following Rad9a excision using the Stra8-Cre system, and it is unclear whether Rad9a deletion in spermatogonia interrupts differentiation. Here, we generated a mouse model in which Rad9a was specifically deleted in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) using Cre recombinase expression driven by the germ cell-specific Vasa promoter. Adult Rad9a-null male mice were infertile as a result of completely blocked spermatogonia differentiation. No early spermatocytes were detected in mutant testicular cords of 9-day-old mice. Mutant spermatogonia were prone to apoptosis, although proliferation rates were unaffected. Rad9a deletion also resulted in malformation of seminiferous tubules, in which cells assembled irregularly into clusters, and malformation led to testicular cord disruption. Our findings suggest that Rad9a is indispensable for spermatogonia differentiation and testicular development in mice. PMID:27861152

  5. Transcriptome analysis of differentiating spermatogonia stimulated with kit ligand.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Pellegrino; Lolicato, Francesca; Grimaldi, Paola; Dolci, Susanna; Di Sauro, Annarita; Filipponi, Doria; Geremia, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    Kit ligand (KL) is a survival factor and a mitogenic stimulus for differentiating spermatogonia. However, it is not known whether KL also plays a role in the differentiative events that lead to meiotic entry of these cells. We performed a wide genome analysis of difference in gene expression induced by treatment with KL of spermatogonia from 7-day-old mice, using gene chips spanning the whole mouse genome. The analysis revealed that the pattern of RNA expression induced by KL is compatible with the qualitative changes of the cell cycle that occur during the subsequent cell divisions in type A and B spermatogonia, i.e. the progressive lengthening of the S phase and the shortening of the G2/M transition. Moreover, KL up-regulates in differentiating spermatogonia the expression of early meiotic genes (for instance: Lhx8, Nek1, Rnf141, Xrcc3, Tpo1, Tbca, Xrcc2, Mesp1, Phf7, Rtel1), whereas it down-regulates typical spermatogonial markers (for instance: Pole, Ptgs2, Zfpm2, Egr2, Egr3, Gsk3b, Hnrpa1, Fst, Ptch2). Since KL modifies the expression of several genes known to be up-regulated or down-regulated in spermatogonia during the transition from the mitotic to the meiotic cell cycle, these results are consistent with a role of the KL/kit interaction in the induction of their meiotic differentiation.

  6. Coculture of spermatogonia with somatic cells in a novel three-dimensional soft-agar-culture-system.

    PubMed

    Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Wistuba, Joachim; Luetjens, C Marc; Elhija, Mahmoud Abu; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Lunenfeld, Eitan; Gromoll, Jörg; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Schlatt, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Isolation and culture of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) has become an approach to study the milieu and the factors controlling their expansion and differentiation. Traditional conventional cell culture does not mimic the complex situation in the seminiferous epithelium providing a basal, intraepithelial, and adluminal compartment to the developing male germ cells. SSCs are located in specific stem cell niches whose features and functional parameters are thus far poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to isolate SSCs and to explore their expansion and differentiation potential in a novel three-dimensional Soft-Agar-Culture-System (SACS). This system provides three-dimensional structural support and multiple options for manipulations through the addition of factors, cells, or other changes. The system has revolutionized research on blood stem cells by providing a tool for clonal analysis of expanding and differentiating blood cell lineages. In our studies, SSCs are enriched using Gfralpha-1 as a specific surface marker and magnetic-activated cell sorting as a separation approach. At termination of the culture, we determined the type and number of germ cells obtained after the first 24 hours of culture. We also determined cell types and numbers in expanding cell clones of differentiating germ cells during the subsequent 15 days of culture. We analyzed a supportive effect of somatic cell lineages added to the solid part of the culture system. We conclude that our enrichment and culture approach is highly useful for exploration of SSC expansion and have found indications that the system supports differentiation up to the level of postmeiotic germ cells.

  7. Sohlh2 knockout mice are male-sterile because of degeneration of differentiating type A spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jing; Yamamoto, Miwako; Richardson, Timothy E; Chapman, Karen M; Denard, Bray S; Hammer, Robert E; Zhao, Guang Quan; Hamra, F Kent

    2008-06-01

    The spermatogenesis and oogenesis-specific transcription factor Sohlh2 is normally expressed only in premeiotic germ cells. In this study, Sohlh2 and several other germ cell transcripts were found to be induced in mouse embryonic stem cells when cultured on a feeder cell line that overexpresses bone morphogenetic protein 4. To study the function of Sohlh2 in germ cells, we generated mice harboring null alleles of Sohlh2. Male Sohlh2-deficient mice were infertile because of a block in spermatogenesis. Although normal prior to birth, Sohlh2-null mice had reduced numbers of intermediate and type B spermatogonia by postnatal day 7. By day 10, development to the preleptotene spermatocyte stage was severely disrupted, rendering seminiferous tubules with only Sertoli cells, undifferentiated spermatogonia, and degenerating colonies of differentiating spermatogonia. Degenerating cells resembled type A2 spermatogonia and accumulated in M-phase prior to death. A similar phenotype was observed in Sohlh2-null mice on postnatal days 14, 21, 35, 49, 68, and 151. In adult Sohlh2-mutant mice, the ratio of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia (DAZL+/PLZF+) to differentiating type A spermatogonia (DAZL+/PLZF-) was twice normal levels. In culture, undifferentiated type A spermatogonia isolated from Sohlh2-null mice proliferated normally but linked the mutant phenotype to aberrant cell surface expression of the receptor-tyrosine kinase cKit. Thus, Sohlh2 is required for progression of differentiating type A spermatogonia into type B spermatogonia. One conclusion originating from these studies would be that testicular factors normally regulate the viability of differentiating spermatogonia by signaling through Sohlh2. This regulation would provide a crucial checkpoint to optimize the numbers of spermatocytes entering meiosis during each cycle of spermatogenesis. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  8. Induction of reciprocal translocations in rhesus monkey stem-cell spermatogonia: effects of low doses and low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    van Buul, P.P.; Richardson, J.F. Jr.; Goudzwaard, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of reciprocal translocation in rhesus monkey spermatogonial stem cells was studied following exposure to low doses of acute X rays (0.25 Gy, 300 mGy/min) or to low-dose-rate X rays (1 Gy, 2 mGy/min) and gamma rays (1 Gy, 0.2 mGy/min). The results obtained at 0.25 Gy of X rays fitted exactly the linear extrapolation down from the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy points obtained earlier. Extension of X-ray exposure reduced the yield of translocations similar to that in the mouse by about 50%. The reduction to 40% of translocation rate after chronic gamma exposure was clearly less than the value of about 80% reported for the mouse over the same range of dose rates. Differential cell killing with ensuing differential elimination of aberration-carrying cells is the most likely explanation for the differences between mouse and monkey.

  9. Resistance of differentiating spermatogonia to radiation-induced apoptosis and loss in p53-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Zhang, Y; Niibe, H; Terry, N H; Meistrich, M L

    1998-03-01

    The effect of the p53 gene on the survival of mouse testicular cells was evaluated by analysis of degenerating and terminal transferase-mediated end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and the subsequent production of further differentiated progeny. In p53 null mice, in contrast to wild-type mice, radiation induced negligible levels of degenerating or TUNEL-positive differentiating spermatogonia within 24 h. This was correlated with higher production of differentiated progeny of the differentiating spermatogonia in p53 null mice. Contrary to the differentiating spermatogonia, the stem spermatogonia of p53 null mice produced fewer differentiated progeny after irradiation than did the stem cells of wild-type mice. We conclude that, because the degeneration and TUNEL positivity of the differentiating spermatogonia in mice of different genotypes were correlated with each other and were dependent on p53, this process is indeed apoptosis. In the differentiating spermatogonia, p53-dependent apoptosis accounted for the bulk of the loss of their progeny after irradiation. Furthermore, whereas the differentiating spermatogonia died by apoptosis that was dependent on p53, the stem spermatogonia, which are more radioresistant, did not.

  10. Isolation of highly purified type A spermatogonia from prepubertal rat testis.

    PubMed

    Morena, A R; Boitani, C; Pesce, M; De Felici, M; Stefanini, M

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method that allows isolation of highly purified type A spermatogonia from prepubertal rats. The procedure is based on the maximal release of spermatogonia from the seminiferous epithelium obtained by the complete enzymatic digestion of the tubular basal lamina, followed by removal of contaminating somatic cells through adhesion to plastic dishes coated with the lectin Datura stramonium agglutinin and fractionation on a discontinuous Percoll gradient. The cell suspension obtained contains up to 85% type A spermatogonia. Besides morphological criteria, the identification of germ cells and somatic cells has been performed by means of immunocytochemical markers, such as c-kit receptor, which is present only in germ cells, and vimentin, which is present only in somatic cells. All type A spermatogonia isolated were c-kit positive, thus suggesting that c-kit receptor is present in both undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia. Preliminary culture experiments demonstrate that spermatogonia survival in vitro was significantly improved by the addition of 10% fetal calf serum or horse serum to the culture medium; however, optimal culture conditions remain to be established. In vitro studies on isolated spermatogonia may provide a significant contribution toward elucidation of the mechanisms regulating spermatogonial proliferation and differentiation.

  11. Spermatogonia-specific proteins expressed in prepubertal buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) testis and their utilization for isolation and in vitro cultivation of spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sandeep; Reddy, Niranjan; Mandal, Suman; Fujihara, Mayako; Kim, Sung-Min; Imai, Hiroshi

    2010-10-15

    Buffalo is an economically important livestock species in Asia. Little is known about male germ line technology owing to lack of sufficient understanding regarding expression of germ- and somatic-cell specific-proteins in the testis. In this study, we identified UCHL-1 (PGP 9.5) and lectin- Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) as specific markers for spermatogonia in buffalo testis. Expression of germ-cell and pluripotency-specific proteins such as DDX4 (VASA) and POU5F1 (OCT3/4) were also present in spermatogonia. Interestingly, the expression of somatic cell-specific proteins such as VIMENTIN and GATA4 were also detected in germ cells. Using two-step enzymatic digestion followed by differential plating and Percoll density-gradient centrifugation, an approximately 55% spermatogonia-enriched cell population could be obtained from the prepubertal buffalo testis. Isolated spermatogonia could survive and proliferate in vitro in DMEM/F12 medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum in the absence of any specific growth factors for a week. Cultured spermatogonia showed DBA affinity and expressed DDX4 and POU5F1. These results may help to establish a long-term culture system for buffalo spermatogonia.

  12. Comparison of the genetic effects of equimolar doses of ENU and MNU: While the chemicals differ dramatically in their mutagenicity in stem-cell spermatogonia, both elicit very high mutation rates in differentiating spermatogonia

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Russell, William

    2007-03-01

    Mutagenoic, reproductive, and toxicity effects of two closely related chemicals, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and methylnitrosourea (MNU), were compared at equimolar and near-equimolar doses in the mouse specific-locus test in a screen of all stages of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. In stem cell spermatogonial (SG), ENU is more than an order of magnitude more mutagenic than MNU. During post-SG stages, both chemicals exhibit high peaks in mutation yield when differentiating spermatogonial (DG) and preleptotene spermatocytes are exposed. The mutation frequency induced by 75 mg MNU/kg during this peak interval is, to date, the highest induced by any single- xposure mutagenic treatment chemical or radiation that allows survival of the exposed animal and its germ cells, producing an estimated 10 new mutations per genome. There is thus a vast difference between stem cell and differentiating spermatogonial in their sensitivity to MNU, but little difference between these stages in their sensitivity to ENU. During stages following meiotic metaphase, the highest mutation yield is obtained from exposed spermatids, but for both chemicals, that yield is less than one-quarter that obtained from the peak interval. Large-lesion (LL) mutations were induced only in spermatids. Although only a few of the remaining mutations were analyzed molecularly, there is considerable evidence from recent molecular characterizations of the marker genes and their flanking chromosomal regions that most, if not all, mutations induced during the peak-sensitive period did not involve lesions outside the marked loci. Both ENU and MNU treatments of post-SG stages yielded significant numbers of mutants that were recovered as mosaics, with the proportion being higher for ENU than for MNU. Comparing the chemicals for the endpoints studied and additional ones (e.g., chromosome aberrations, toxicity to germ cells and to animals, teratogenicity) revealed that while MNU is generally more effective, the opposite

  13. Marker expression reveals heterogeneity of spermatogonia in the neonatal mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Niedenberger, Bryan A; Busada, Jonathan T; Geyer, Christopher B

    2015-04-01

    Prospermatogonia transition to type A spermatogonia, which provide the source for the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) pool. A percentage of these type A spermatogonia then differentiate to enter meiosis as spermatocytes by ∼P10. It is currently unclear as to when these distinct populations are initially formed in the neonatal testis, and when the expression of markers both characteristic of and required for the adult undifferentiated and differentiating states is established. In this study, we compared expression of known spermatogonial cell fate markers during normal development and in response to the differentiation signal provided by retinoic acid (RA). We found that some markers for the undifferentiated state (ZBTB16/PLZF and CDH1) were expressed in nearly all spermatogonia from P1 through P7. In contrast, differentiation markers (STRA8 and KIT) appeared in a subset of spermatogonia at P4, coincident with the onset of RA signaling. GFRA1, which was present in nearly all prospermatogonia at P1, was only retained in STRA8/KIT- spermatogonia. From P4 through P10, there was a great deal of heterogeneity in the male germ cell population in terms of expression of markers, as markers characteristic of the undifferentiated (except GFRA1) and differentiating states were co-expressed through this interval. After P10, these fate markers diverged to mark distinct populations of undifferentiated and differentiating spermatogonia, and this pattern was maintained in juvenile (P18) and adult (P>60) testes. Taken together, these results reveal that the spermatogonia population is heterogeneous during the first wave of spermatogenesis, and indicate that neonatal spermatogonia may not serve as an ideal substitute for studying the function of adult spermatogonia.

  14. A Simple Method for Labeling Human Embryonic Stem Cells Destined to Lose Undifferentiated Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Ayako; Suga, Mika; Yanagihara, Kana; Itoh, Yumi; Furue, Miho K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is a major source of cellular ATP. Its usage as an energy source varies, not only according to the extracellular environment, but also during development and differentiation, as indicated by the reported changes in the flux ratio of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. The fluorescent probe JC-1 allows visualization of changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Strong JC-1 signals were localized in the differentiated cells located at the edge of H9 ES colonies that expressed vimentin, an early differentiation maker. The JC-1 signals were further intensified when individual adjacent colonies were in contact with each other. Time-lapse analyses revealed that JC-1-labeled H9 cells under an overconfluent condition were highly differentiated after subculture, suggesting that monitoring oxidative phosphorylation in live cells might facilitate the prediction of induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as ES cells, that are destined to lose their undifferentiated potency. Significance Skillful cell manipulation is a major factor in both maintaining and disrupting the undifferentiation potency of human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Staining with JC-1, a mitochondrial membrane potential probe, is a simple monitoring method that can be used to predict embryonic stem cell quality under live conditions, which might help ensure the future use of hES and human induced pluripotent stem cells after subculture. PMID:26819254

  15. Distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Nadine; Bruentgens, Felicitas; Geilenkirchen, Petra; Machado, Patricia A.; Veitinger, Thomas; Veitinger, Sophie; Lipartowski, Susanne M.; Engelhardt, Corinna H.; Oldiges, Marco; Spehr, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis ranks among the most complex, yet least understood, developmental processes. The physiological principles that control male germ cell development in mammals are notoriously difficult to unravel, given the intricate anatomy and complex endo- and paracrinology of the testis. Accordingly, we lack a conceptual understanding of the basic signaling mechanisms within the testis, which control the seminiferous epithelial cycle and thus govern spermatogenesis. Here, we address paracrine signal transduction in undifferentiated male germ cells from an electrophysiological perspective. We identify distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia, both in vitro and in situ. ATP—a dynamic, widespread, and evolutionary conserved mediator of cell to cell communication in various developmental contexts—activates at least two different spermatogonial purinoceptor isoforms. Both receptors operate within nonoverlapping stimulus concentration ranges, display distinct response kinetics and, in the juvenile seminiferous cord, are uniquely expressed in spermatogonia. We further find that spermatogonia express Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channels that appear to function as a safeguard against prolonged ATP-dependent depolarization. Quantitative purine measurements additionally suggest testicular ATP-induced ATP release, a mechanism that could increase the paracrine radius of initially localized signaling events. Moreover, we establish a novel seminiferous tubule slice preparation that allows targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified testicular cell types in an intact epithelial environment. This unique approach not only confirms our in vitro findings, but also supports the notion of purinergic signaling during the early stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:27574293

  16. Data on in vivo phenotypes of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by interstitial GDNF signals in mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Aya; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-09-01

    This article contains the data related to the research article "in vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay" (Uchida et al., 2016) [1]. A novel transplantation assay of growth factor-soaked beads into the mammalian testicular interstitium was developed, in order to examine the effects of various soluble factors on in vivo dynamics of the spermatogonia including spermatogonial stem cells (SSC). Here we provide the image data of GFRα1-positive stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mouse seminiferous tubules near the beads soaked in GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor), one of the SSC niche factors. The data provide various phenotypes of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia induced by bead-derived GDNF signals, which are useful to understand the active state of GFRα1-positive stem/progenitor spermatogonia in vivo.

  17. Losing Things.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Reviews five children's books that deal with the theme of losing things and the feelings that can accompany it. Also discusses the loss of intangible things, such as talent, concentration, temper, or patience, and presents five creative activities that deal more with the loss of objects. (LRW)

  18. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Enriched Human Spermatogonia after Short- and Long-Term Culture

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Hatami, Maryam; Kubista, Mikael; Bonin, Michael; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Renninger, Markus; Skutella, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to provide a molecular signature for enriched adult human stem/progenitor spermatogonia during short-term (<2 weeks) and long-term culture (up to more than 14 months) in comparison to human testicular fibroblasts and human embryonic stem cells. Human spermatogonia were isolated by CD49f magnetic activated cell sorting and collagen−/laminin+ matrix binding from primary testis cultures obtained from ten adult men. For transcriptomic analysis, single spermatogonia-like cells were collected based on their morphology and dimensions using a micromanipulation system from the enriched germ cell cultures. Immunocytochemical, RT-PCR and microarray analyses revealed that the analyzed populations of cells were distinct at the molecular level. The germ- and pluripotency-associated genes and genes of differentiation/spermatogenesis pathway were highly expressed in enriched short-term cultured spermatogonia. After long-term culture, a proportion of cells retained and aggravated the “spermatogonial” gene expression profile with the expression of germ and pluripotency-associated genes, while in the majority of long-term cultured cells this molecular profile, typical for the differentiation pathway, was reduced and more genes related to the extracellular matrix production and attachment were expressed. The approach we provide here to study the molecular status of in vitro cultured spermatogonia may be important to optimize the culture conditions and to evaluate the germ cell plasticity in the future. PMID:24738045

  19. The first round of mouse spermatogenesis is a distinctive program that lacks the self-renewing spermatogonia stage.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosei; Sukeno, Mamiko; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Ohbo, Kazuyuki; Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is maintained by a continuous supply of differentiating cells from self-renewing stem cells. The stem cell activity resides in a small subset of primitive germ cells, the undifferentiated spermatogonia. However, the relationship between the establishment of this population and the initiation of differentiation in the developing testes remains unclear. In this study, we have investigated this issue by using the unique expression of Ngn3, which is expressed specifically in the undifferentiated spermatogonia, but not in the differentiating spermatogonia or their progenitors, the gonocytes. Our lineage analyses demonstrate that the first round of mouse spermatogenesis initiates directly from gonocytes, without passing through the Ngn3-expressing stage (Ngn3- lineage). By contrast, the subsequent rounds of spermatogenesis are derived from Ngn3-positive undifferentiated spermatogonia, which are also immediate descendents of the gonocytes and represent the stem cell function (Ngn3+ lineage). Thus, in mouse spermatogenesis, the state of the undifferentiated spermatogonia is not an inevitable step but is a developmental option that ensures continuous sperm production. In addition, the segregation of gonocytes into undifferentiated spermatogonia (Ngn3+ lineage) or differentiating spermatogonia (Ngn3- lineage) is topographically related to the establishment of the seminiferous epithelial cycle, thus suggesting a role of somatic components in the establishment of stem cells.

  20. Hypermaintenance and hypofunction of aged spermatogonia: insight from age-related increase of Plzf expression.

    PubMed

    Ferder, Ianina C; Wang, Ning

    2015-06-30

    Like stem cells in other tissues, spermatogonia, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) at the foundation of differentiation hierarchy, undergo age-related decline in function. The promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (Plzf) protein plays an essential role in spermatogonia maintenance by preventing their differentiation. To evaluate whether there is an age-related change in Plzf expression, we found that aged mouse testes exhibited a robust "Plzf overexpression" phenotype, in that they showed not only a higher frequency of Plzf-expressing cells but also an increased level of Plzf expression in these cells. Moreover, some Plzf-expressing cells in aged testes even aberrantly appeared in the differentiating spermatogonia compartment, which is usually low or negative for Plzf expression. Importantly, ectopic Plzf expression in F9 cells suppressed retinoic acid (RA)-induced Stra8 activation, a gene required for meiosis initiation. These data, together with our observation of a lack of meiosis-initiating spermatocytes associated with high Plzf-expressing spermatogonia in the aged testes, particularly in the degenerative seminiferous tubules, suggest that age-related increase in Plzf expression represents a novel molecular signature of spermatogonia aging by functionally arresting their differentiation.

  1. Retinoic acid induces multiple hallmarks of the prospermatogonia-to-spermatogonia transition in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Busada, Jonathan T; Kaye, Evelyn P; Renegar, Randall H; Geyer, Christopher B

    2014-03-01

    In mammals, most neonatal male germ cells (prospermatogonia) are quiescent and located in the center of the testis cords. In response to an unknown signal, prospermatogonia transition into spermatogonia, reenter the cell cycle, divide, and move to the periphery of the testis cords. In mice, these events occur by 3-4 days postpartum (dpp), which temporally coincides with the onset of retinoic acid (RA) signaling in the neonatal testis. RA has a pivotal role in initiating germ cell entry into meiosis in both sexes, yet little is known about the mechanisms and about cellular changes downstream of RA signaling. We examined the role of RA in mediating the prospermatogonia-to-spermatogonia transition in vivo and found 24 h of precocious RA exposure-induced germ cell changes mimicking those that occur during the endogenous transition at 3-4 dpp. These changes included: 1) spermatogonia proliferation; 2) maturation of cellular organelles; and 3), expression of markers characteristic of differentiating spermatogonia. We found that germ cell exposure to RA did not lead to cellular loss from apoptosis but rather resulted in a delay of ∼2 days in their entry into meiosis. Taken together, our results indicate that exogenous RA induces multiple hallmarks of the transition of prospermatogonia to spermatogonia prior to their entry into meiosis.

  2. AZFc deletions do not affect the function of human spermatogonia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nickkholgh, B; Korver, C M; van Daalen, S K M; van Pelt, A M M; Repping, S

    2015-07-01

    Azoospermic factor c (AZFc) deletions are the underlying cause in 10% of azoo- or severe oligozoospermia. Through extensive molecular analysis the precise genetic content of the AZFc region and the origin of its deletion have been determined. However, little is known about the effect of AZFc deletions on the functionality of germ cells at various developmental steps. The presence of normal, fertilization-competent sperm in the ejaculate and/or testis of the majority of men with AZFc deletions suggests that the process of differentiation from spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) to mature spermatozoa can take place in the absence of the AZFc region. To determine the functionality of AZFc-deleted spermatogonia, we compared in vitro propagated spermatogonia from six men with complete AZFc deletions with spermatogonia from three normozoospermic controls. We found that spermatogonia of AZFc-deleted men behave similar to controls during culture. Short-term (18 days) and long-term (48 days) culture of AZFc-deleted spermatogonia showed the same characteristics as non-deleted spermatogonia. This similarity was revealed by the same number of passages, the same germ cell clusters formation and similar level of genes expression of spermatogonial markers including ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1), zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha 1 (GFRA1), as well as germ cell differentiation markers including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loophelix 2 (SOHLH2), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) and synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3). The only exception was melanoma antigen family A4 (MAGEA4) which showed significantly lower expression in AZFc-deleted samples than controls in short-term culture while in long-term culture it was hardly detected in both AZFc-deleted and control

  3. Effect of continuous gamma-radiation on the stem and differentiating spermatogonia of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Erickson, B H

    1978-10-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated continuously (60Co, gamma) at a dose-rate of either 1 (0.0007 rad/min), 3 or 6 rad/23-h day for monthly intervals of 1 to 6. At one month after irradiation, counts of differentiating spermatogonia (A1 and A4) were reduced to a level that remained essentially unchanged during the succeeding 5 months of irradiation. The magnitude of the irradiation effect was greatest at stage 1 of the spermatogenic cycle where numbers of differentiating spermatogonia were reduced to 50% of control by 1 rad/day and to 30 and 20% of control by 3 and 6 rad/day, respectively. Number of stem spermatogonia was not significantly affected by 1 rad/day (P greater than 0.10). At 3 and 6 rad, however, number of stem cells declined from 80% of control at 1 month to 60 and 40% of control at 6 months, respectively. At a dose-rate of 1 rad/day there was neither a reduction in number of A1 spermatogonia per clone nor significant evidence of necrosis among either stem or differentiating spermatogonia; therefore, a reduction of stem-cell mitotic activity appears to be the principal effect of continuous low-level irradiation on spermatogenesis in the rat.

  4. Gonocytes-to-spermatogonia transition initiates prior to birth in murine testes and it requires FGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Pui, Han Pin; Saga, Yumiko

    2017-03-21

    Spermatogenesis is a continuous and highly coordinated process of spermatozoa production. In mice, this process is believed to initiate shortly after birth with the emergence of nascent spermatogonia in the testes. However, because the nascent spermatogonia originated from the gonocytes are morphologically indistinguishable from their predecessors and there is no clear definition for the gonocytes-to-spermatogonia transition (GST), it remains unclear when and how spermatogenesis is initiated in the mouse testes. To address these questions, we characterized the emergence of nascent spermatogonia in ICR mice. We found that GST is initiated in a subset of gonocytes as early as E18.5. These nascent spermatogonia express markers typical of undifferentiated spermatogonia residing in testes of adult mice. In addition to markers expression, we identified FOXO1 nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation as a novel feature of GST distinguishing nascent spermatogonia from the gonocytes. Using those criteria, we demonstrated that GST requires FGF signaling. When FGF signaling was inhibited pharmacologically, gonocytes retained nuclear FOXO1 expression, did not express spermatogonial markers and failed to proliferate. We found that FGF signaling acts upstream of GDNF and RA signalings for the activation of the MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways in germ cells during GST. Taken together, we defined the precise timing of GST and revealed FGF signaling as a master regulator of GST in the perinatal mouse testes.

  5. Expression of stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8) and maturation of murine gonocytes and spermatogonia induced by retinoic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Li, Ying; Nie, Rong; Friel, Patrick; Mitchell, Debra; Evanoff, Ryan M; Pouchnik, Derek; Banasik, Brent; McCarrey, John R; Small, Christopher; Griswold, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiency in the mouse results in an arrest in the progression of undifferentiated spermatogonia to differentiating spermatogonia. The supplement of retinol to vitamin-A-deficient mice reinitiates spermatogenesis in a synchronous manner throughout the testes. It is unclear whether the effects of retinoids are the result of a direct action on germ cells or are indirectly mediated through Sertoli cells. The expression of Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), which is required for spermatogenesis, is directly related to the availability of retinoic acid (RA). Analysis of gene expression by microarrays revealed moderate levels of Stra8 transcript in gonocytes and high levels in A and B spermatogonia. Stra8 mRNA levels were greatly reduced or absent in germ cells once they entered meiosis. This study examined the effect of retinoic acid on cultured neonatal testes and isolated gonocytes/spermatogonia in vitro. THY1(+) and KIT(+) germ cells were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from the testes of mice of different ages. Isolated germ cells were cultured and treated with either vehicle (ethanol) or RA without feeder cells. We found that 1) Stra8 is predominantly expressed in premeiotic germ cells, 2) RA stimulates gonocyte DNA replication and differentiation in cultured neonatal testes, 3) in the absence of feeder cells, RA directly induces the transition of undifferentiated spermatogonia to differentiating spermatogonia by stimulating Stra8 and Kit gene expression, 4) RA dramatically stimulates Stra8 expression in undifferentiated spermatogonia but has a lesser impact in differentiating spermatogonia, 5) endogenous Stra8 gene expression is higher in differentiating spermatogonia than in undifferentiated spermatogonia and could mediate the RA effects on spermatogonial maturation, and 6) RA stimulates a group of genes involved in the metabolism, storage, transport, and signaling of retinoids.

  6. An epigenetic switch is crucial for spermatogonia to exit the undifferentiated state toward a Kit-positive identity.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Takayuki; Yaman-Deveci, Ruken; Tomizawa, Shin-Ichi; Kamizato, Yoshito; Nakajima, Kuniko; Sone, Hidetoshi; Sato, Yasuyuki; Sharif, Jafar; Yamashita, Akio; Takada-Horisawa, Yuki; Yoshida, Shosei; Ura, Kiyoe; Muto, Masahiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Suda, Toshio; Ohbo, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic modifications influence gene expression and chromatin remodeling. In embryonic pluripotent stem cells, these epigenetic modifications have been extensively characterized; by contrast, the epigenetic events of tissue-specific stem cells are poorly understood. Here, we define a new epigenetic shift that is crucial for differentiation of murine spermatogonia toward meiosis. We have exploited a property of incomplete cytokinesis, which causes male germ cells to form aligned chains of characteristic lengths, as they divide and differentiate. These chains revealed the stage of spermatogenesis, so the epigenetic differences of various stages could be characterized. Single, paired and medium chain-length spermatogonia not expressing Kit (a marker of differentiating spermatogonia) showed no expression of Dnmt3a2 and Dnmt3b (two de novo DNA methyltransferases); they also lacked the transcriptionally repressive histone modification H3K9me2. By contrast, spermatogonia consisting of ~8-16 chained cells with Kit expression dramatically upregulated Dnmt3a2/3b expression and also displayed increased H3K9me2 modification. To explore the function of these epigenetic changes in spermatogonia in vivo, the DNA methylation machinery was destabilized by ectopic Dnmt3b expression or Np95 ablation. Forced Dnmt3b expression induced expression of Kit; whereas ablation of Np95, which is essential for maintaining DNA methylation, interfered with differentiation and viability only after spermatogonia become Kit positive. These data suggest that the epigenetic status of spermatogonia shifts dramatically during the Kit-negative to Kit-positive transition. This shift might serve as a switch that determines whether spermatogonia self-renew or differentiate.

  7. Upregulation and nuclear translocation of testicular ghrelin protects differentiating spermatogonia from ionizing radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, W; Zeng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhu, C-J; Hou, W-G; Zhang, S

    2014-01-01

    Proper control of apoptotic signaling is important for maintenance of testicular homeostasis after ionizing radiation (IR). Herein, we challenged the hypothesis that ghrelin, a pleiotropic modulator, is potentially involved in IR-induced germ cell injury. Lower body exposure to 2 Gy of IR induced a notable increase of ghrelin expression in the nuclear of differentiating spermatogonia at defined stages, with an impairment in the Leydig cells (LCs)-expressing ghrelin. Unexpectedly, inhibition of the ghrelin pathway by intraperitoneal injection of a specific GHS-R1α antagonist enhanced spermatogonia elimination by apoptosis during the early recovery following IR, and thereafter resulted in impaired male fertility, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic effects of evoked ghrelin, although transient along testicular IR injury, have a profound influence on the post-injury recovery. In addition, inhibition of ghrelin signaling resulted in a significant increase in the intratesticular testosterone (T) level at the end of 21 days after IR, which should stimulate the spermatogenic recovery from surviving spermatogonia to a certain extent during the late stage. We further demonstrated that the upregulation and nuclear trafficking of ghrelin, elaborately regulated by IR-elicited antioxidant system in spermatogonia, may act through a p53-dependent mechanism. The elicitation of ghrelin expression by IR stress, the regulation of ghrelin expression by IR-induced oxidative stress and the interaction between p53 and ghrelin signaling during IR injury were confirmed in cultured spermatogonia. Hence, our results represent the first evidence in support of a radioprotective role of ghrelin in the differentiating spermatogonia. The acutely, delicate regulation of local-produced ghrelin appears to be a fine-tune mechanism modulating the balance between testicular homeostasis and early IR injury. PMID:24853426

  8. Upregulation and nuclear translocation of testicular ghrelin protects differentiating spermatogonia from ionizing radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zeng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhu, C-J; Hou, W-G; Zhang, S

    2014-05-22

    Proper control of apoptotic signaling is important for maintenance of testicular homeostasis after ionizing radiation (IR). Herein, we challenged the hypothesis that ghrelin, a pleiotropic modulator, is potentially involved in IR-induced germ cell injury. Lower body exposure to 2 Gy of IR induced a notable increase of ghrelin expression in the nuclear of differentiating spermatogonia at defined stages, with an impairment in the Leydig cells (LCs)-expressing ghrelin. Unexpectedly, inhibition of the ghrelin pathway by intraperitoneal injection of a specific GHS-R1α antagonist enhanced spermatogonia elimination by apoptosis during the early recovery following IR, and thereafter resulted in impaired male fertility, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic effects of evoked ghrelin, although transient along testicular IR injury, have a profound influence on the post-injury recovery. In addition, inhibition of ghrelin signaling resulted in a significant increase in the intratesticular testosterone (T) level at the end of 21 days after IR, which should stimulate the spermatogenic recovery from surviving spermatogonia to a certain extent during the late stage. We further demonstrated that the upregulation and nuclear trafficking of ghrelin, elaborately regulated by IR-elicited antioxidant system in spermatogonia, may act through a p53-dependent mechanism. The elicitation of ghrelin expression by IR stress, the regulation of ghrelin expression by IR-induced oxidative stress and the interaction between p53 and ghrelin signaling during IR injury were confirmed in cultured spermatogonia. Hence, our results represent the first evidence in support of a radioprotective role of ghrelin in the differentiating spermatogonia. The acutely, delicate regulation of local-produced ghrelin appears to be a fine-tune mechanism modulating the balance between testicular homeostasis and early IR injury.

  9. Bleomycin, unlike other male-mouse mutagens, is most effective in spermatogonia, inducing primarily deletions.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Kerley, M K; Johnson, D K; Shelby, M D

    2000-08-21

    Dominant-lethal tests [P.D. Sudman, J.C. Rutledge, J.B. Bishop, W.M. Generoso, Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice, Mutat. Res. 296 (1992) 205-217] had suggested that Bleomycin sulfate (Blenoxane), BLM, might be a female-specific mutagen. While confirming that BLM is indeed a powerful inducer of dominant-lethal mutations in females that fails to induce such mutations in postspermatogonial stages of males, we have shown in a specific-locus test that BLM is, in fact, mutagenic in males. This mutagenicity, however, is restricted to spermatogonia (stem-cell and differentiating stages), for which the specific-locus mutation rate differed significantly (P<0.008) from the historical control rate. In treated groups, dominant mutations, also, originated only in spermatogonia. With regard to mutation frequencies, this germ-cell-stage pattern is different from that for radiation and for any other chemical studied to date, except ethylnitrosourea (ENU). However, the nature of the spermatogonial specific-locus mutations differentiates BLM from ENU as well, because BLM induced primarily (or, perhaps, exclusively) multilocus deletions. Heretofore, no chemical that induced specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia did not also induce specific-locus as well as dominant-lethal mutations in postspermatogonial stages, making the dominant lethal test, up till now, predictive of male mutagenicity in general. The BLM results now demonstrate that there are chemicals that can induce specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia without testing positive in postspermatogonial stages. Thus, BLM, while not female-specific, is unique, (a) in its germ-cell-stage specificity in males, and (b) in inducing a type of mutation (deletions) that is atypical for the responding germ-cell stages (spermatogonia).

  10. Failure of spermatogenesis to recover despite the presence of a spermatogonia in the irradiated LBNF1 rat.

    PubMed

    Kangasniemi, M; Huhtaniemi, I; Meistrich, M L

    1996-06-01

    The dose and time response of LBNF1, rat testis to gamma irradiation was studied with use of single doses from 2.5 Gy to 6.0 Gy. Germ cells were initially depleted as a result of killing the radiosensitive differentiating spermatogonia. Some recovery of spermatogenesis was observed at 4 and 6 wk after irradiation as indicated by the repopulation of tubules with germ cells derived from surviving stem spermatogonia. Although spermatogenesis showed additional recovery and was maintained throughout the 60-wk follow-up period after 2.5 Gy, at doses from 3.5 Gy to 6.0 Gy, repopulation indices declined after 6 wk to less than 2%. The numbers of Sertoli cells per nonrepopulating tubule were constant, independent of radiation dose or time. In addition, the nonrepopulating tubules contained an average of one A spermatogonium per 100 Sertoli cells. The size and shape of these cells corresponded to undifferentiated A spermatogonia in nonirradiated control tests. Despite high labeling (40%) and mitotic (20%) indices, the numbers of A spermatogonia changed very little with time, and no differentiated cells were produced in these tubules. The failure of spermatogenesis to recover was not due to hormone deficiency: serum gonadotropin levels increased after irradiation, and serum testosterone remained at control levels. The irradiated LBNF1 rat model may be useful for studying the regulation of differentiation of A spermatogonia.

  11. Peroxisomes are present in murine spermatogonia and disappear during the course of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lüers, Georg H; Thiele, Samuel; Schad, Arno; Völkl, Alfred; Yokota, Sadaki; Seitz, Jürgen

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles that are almost ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells. They have, however, never been described in germ cells within the testis. Since some peroxisomal diseases like Adrenoleukodystrophy are associated with reduced fertility, we have re-investigated the peroxisomal compartment of the germinal epithelium of mice using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunoelectron microscopy. Within the seminiferous tubules, peroxisomes are present in Sertoli cells and in germ cells. We could show that small-sized peroxisomes of typical ultrastructure are concentrated in spermatogonia and disappear during the course of spermatogenesis. Peroxisomes of spermatogonia differ in their relative protein composition from previously described peroxisomes of interstitial cells of Leydig. Since germ cells differentiate in mouse testis in a synchronized fashion, the disappearence of peroxisomes could be a suitable model system to investigate the degradation of an organelle as part of a physiological differentiation process in higher eukaryotes.

  12. BMP4 Cooperates with Retinoic Acid to Induce the Expression of Differentiation Markers in Cultured Mouse Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongguang; Feng, Yanmin; Feng, Xue; Liao, Shangying; Wang, Xiuxia; Gan, Haiyun; Wang, Lixian; Lin, Xiwen; Han, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is sustained by the proliferation and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). However, the molecules controlling these processes remain largely unknown. Here, we developed a simplified high concentration serum-containing system for the culture of mouse SSCs. Analysis of SSCs markers and transplantation results revealed that the cultured spermatogonia retained stem cell characteristics after long-term in vitro propagation. Using this culture system, the expression and function of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) were explored. Immunostaining showed that BMP4 was predominantly expressed in germ cells and that its level increased as spermatogenesis progresses. BMP4 receptors BMPR1A and BMPRII were present in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids. Moreover, despite the mRNAs of these two genes being present in mouse Sertoli cells, only BMPRII was detected by using Western blotting assays. While exogenous BMP4 by itself did not induce the expression of Stra8 and c-Kit, two marker genes of differentiating spermatogonia, a significant cooperative effect of BMP4 and retinoic acid (RA) was observed. Moreover, pretreatment of cultured spermatogonia with the BMP4 antagonist Noggin could inhibit RA-induced expression of these two marker genes. In conclusion, BMP4 may exert autocrine effects and act cooperatively with RA to induce the differentiation of spermatogonia in vivo.

  13. BMP4 Cooperates with Retinoic Acid to Induce the Expression of Differentiation Markers in Cultured Mouse Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yanmin; Feng, Xue; Wang, Xiuxia; Gan, Haiyun; Wang, Lixian; Lin, Xiwen

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is sustained by the proliferation and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). However, the molecules controlling these processes remain largely unknown. Here, we developed a simplified high concentration serum-containing system for the culture of mouse SSCs. Analysis of SSCs markers and transplantation results revealed that the cultured spermatogonia retained stem cell characteristics after long-term in vitro propagation. Using this culture system, the expression and function of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) were explored. Immunostaining showed that BMP4 was predominantly expressed in germ cells and that its level increased as spermatogenesis progresses. BMP4 receptors BMPR1A and BMPRII were present in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids. Moreover, despite the mRNAs of these two genes being present in mouse Sertoli cells, only BMPRII was detected by using Western blotting assays. While exogenous BMP4 by itself did not induce the expression of Stra8 and c-Kit, two marker genes of differentiating spermatogonia, a significant cooperative effect of BMP4 and retinoic acid (RA) was observed. Moreover, pretreatment of cultured spermatogonia with the BMP4 antagonist Noggin could inhibit RA-induced expression of these two marker genes. In conclusion, BMP4 may exert autocrine effects and act cooperatively with RA to induce the differentiation of spermatogonia in vivo. PMID:27795714

  14. Potential role of Nanos3 in maintaining the undifferentiated spermatogonia population.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Marino, Rita; Paronetto, Maria Paola; Pellegrini, Manuela; Dolci, Susanna; Geremia, Raffaele; Grimaldi, Paola

    2008-01-15

    Nanos gene encodes for zinc-finger protein with putative RNA-binding activity which shows an evolutionary conserved function in germ cell development. In the mouse, three Nanos homologs have been identified: Nanos1, Nanos2 and Nanos3. The Nanos3 ortholog is expressed in both male and female gonads of early embryo and, after birth, it is found only in the testis. Nanos3 targeted disruption results in the complete loss of germ cells in both sexes; however the role of Nanos3 in the testis during the postnatal period has not been explored yet. In this study, we show that, in prepuberal testis, Nanos3 is expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia and that its up-regulation causes accumulation of cells in the G1 phase, indicating that this protein is able to delay the cell cycle progression of spermatogonial cells. This is in line with the observation that the cell cycle length of the undifferentiated germ cells is longer than in differentiating spermatogonia. We also demonstrate a conserved mechanism of action of Nanos3, involving the interaction with the murine RNA-binding protein Pumilio2 and consisting of a potential translational repressor activity. According to the possible role of Nanos3 in inhibiting spermatogonia cell differentiation, we show that treatment with the differentiating factor all-trans retinoic acid induces a dramatic down-regulation of its expression. These results allow to conclude that, in the prepuberal testis, Nanos3 is important to maintain undifferentiated spermatogonia via the regulation of their cell cycle.

  15. Wnt some lose some: transcriptional governance of stem cells by Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Wen-Hui; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, Wnt/β-catenin signaling features prominently in stem cells and cancers, but how and for what purposes have been matters of much debate. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its downstream transcriptional regulators in normal and malignant stem cells. We centered this review largely on three types of stem cells—embryonic stem cells, hair follicle stem cells, and intestinal epithelial stem cells—in which the roles of Wnt/β-catenin have been extensively studied. Using these models, we unravel how many controversial issues surrounding Wnt signaling have been resolved by dissecting the diversity of its downstream circuitry and effectors, often leading to opposite outcomes of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated regulation and differences rooted in stage- and context-dependent effects. PMID:25030692

  16. The KIT is a putative marker for differentiating spermatogonia in stallions.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heejun; Song, Hyuk; Yoon, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Putative markers have been discovered and are used to identify and separate certain lineage of spermatogonia. The KIT is a marker for differentiating spermatogonial stem cells in several species including mice and goats. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate reproductive stage-dependent KIT expression patterns in stallions and (2) to identify spermatogonia subpopulations expressing KIT in stallion testes. To achieve these objectives, testicular samples were obtained during routine field castration of stallions. The reproductive stage of the stallions was classified as pre-pubertal (<1 year, n=3), pubertal (1-1.5 year, n=4), post-pubertal (2-3 year, n=6), or adult (4-8 year, n=6). For immunohistochemistry, KIT was used at a dilution of 1:200. In the pre-pubertal and pubertal stage, most germ cells were immunolabeled with KIT. In the post-pubertal and adult stages, immunolabeling of KIT was evident in the germ cells attached to the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules with exception of some spermatogonia. Co-immunolabeling with KIT and deleted in azoospermia like (DAZL) showed different co-staining patterns, including KIT only, both KIT and DAZL), or DAZL positive germ cell populations alone. The KIT was not immunolabeled in Sertoli or Leydig cells at any reproductive stages. The result of Western blot analysis verified the cross-activity of the KIT antibody with horse testes tissue. In conclusion, KIT appears to be expressed in differentiating spermatogonia, and may be used to identify and isolate differentiating germ cells from stallions.

  17. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  18. A vasculature-associated niche for undifferentiated spermatogonia in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosei; Sukeno, Mamiko; Nabeshima, Yo-Ichi

    2007-09-21

    Mammalian spermatogenesis produces numerous sperm for a long period based on a highly potent stem cell system, which relies on a special microenvironment, or niche, that has not yet been identified. In this study, using time-lapse imaging of green fluorescent protein-labeled undifferentiated spermatogonia (A(undiff)) and three-dimensional reconstitution, we revealed a biased localization of A(undiff) to the vascular network and accompanying Leydig and other interstitial cells, in intact testes. Differentiating spermatogonia left these niche regions and dispersed throughout the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Moreover, rearrangement of A(undiff) accompanied the vasculature alteration. We propose that the mammalian germline niche is established as a consequence of vasculature pattern formation. This is different from what is observed in Drosophila or Caenorhabditis elegans, which display developmentally specified niche structures within polarized gonads.

  19. Survival and renewal of murine stem Spermatogonia following /sup 60/Co radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.H.

    1981-04-01

    Spermatogonia, with the exception of the few that are either isolated or paired, exist in clones of varying size, and even though the spermatogonium has been the object of much study, our understanding of the radioresponse of the components of this triumvirate is incomplete. Isolated, paired, and clonal spermatogonia are distinguished most reliably when viewed in segments of seminiferous tubules mounted in toto. Tubular segments were isolated from the testes of 80- to 90-day-old BALB/c mice following irradiation doses of 25 to 800 rad and intervals of 1 to 14 days. Neither isolated nor paired spermatogonia were apparently affected by doses up to 200 rad. In contrast the population of A/sub 1/-spermatogonial clones was markedly reduced by a dose of 25 rad. The D/sub 0/ and n for the clone were 217 rad and 0.5, respectively. In the apparent absence of a significant elevation in necrosis at doses of 20 rad and less, the loss of A/sub 1/ clones was attributed to mitotic inhibition. The comparative unresponsiveness of the isolated spermatogonium to irradiation, its low mitotic rate when contrasted with the clone's high radiosensitivity and mitotic activity, and its apparent ability to excise an abnormal cell and otherwise fragment to give rise to additional clones led to the tentative conclusion that the clone, and not the isolated spermatogonium, is the stem cell.

  20. Stability of DNA methylation patterns in mouse spermatogonia under conditions of MTHFR deficiency and methionine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Garner, Justine L; Niles, Kirsten M; McGraw, Serge; Yeh, Jonathan R; Cushnie, Duncan W; Hermo, Louis; Nagano, Makoto C; Trasler, Jacquetta M

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the conditions contributing to the stability of DNA methylation patterns in male germ cells. Altered folate pathway enzyme activity and methyl donor supply are two clinically significant factors that can affect the methylation of DNA. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key folate pathway enzyme involved in providing methyl groups from dietary folate for DNA methylation. Mice heterozygous for a targeted mutation in the Mthfr gene (Mthfr(+/-)) are a good model for humans homozygous for the MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism, which is found in 10% of the population and is associated with decreased MTHFR activity and infertility. High-dose folic acid is administered as an empirical treatment for male infertility. Here, we examined MTHFR expression in developing male germ cells and evaluated DNA methylation patterns and effects of a range of methionine concentrations in spermatogonia from Mthfr(+/-) as compared to wild-type, Mthfr(+/+) mice. MTHFR was expressed in prospermatogonia and spermatogonia at times of DNA methylation acquisition in the male germline; its expression was also found in early spermatocytes and Sertoli cells. DNA methylation patterns were similar at imprinted genes and intergenic sites across chromosome 9 in neonatal Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) spermatogonia. Using spermatogonia from Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) mice in the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) culture system, we examined the stability of DNA methylation patterns and determined effects of low or high methionine concentrations. No differences were detected between early and late passages, suggesting that DNA methylation patterns are generally stable in culture. Twenty-fold normal concentrations of methionine resulted in an overall increase in the levels of DNA methylation across chromosome 9, suggesting that DNA methylation can be perturbed in culture. Mthfr(+/-) cells showed a significantly increased variance of DNA methylation at multiple loci across chromosome

  1. E-cadherin can be expressed by a small population of rat undifferentiated spermatogonia in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Su, Huimin; Luo, Fenhua; Wu, Sachula; Liu, Linhong; Liu, Taodi; Yu, Boyang; Wu, Yingji

    2011-09-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) maintain gamete production in the testes throughout adult life by balancing self-renewal and differentiation. In vitro culture of SSCs is a crucial technique for gene manipulation of SSCs to generate transgenic animals, for transplantation of SSCs to restore male fertility for infertile man, and for generation of pluripotent stem cells from SSCs to differentiate into various cell lineages. Isolation of highly purified SSCs is an all-important component for development of these techniques. However, definitive markers for SSCs, which purify SSCs (100% enrichment), are unknown. SSCs of many species can colonize the mouse testis; thus, we reasoned that same molecules of SSCs are conserved between species. In mouse, undifferentiated spermatogonia express the surface marker E-cadherin. The hypothesis tested in this work was that E-cadherin (also known as CDH1) can be expressed by undifferentiated spermatogonia of rat testes. In this paper, cross-section immunohistochemistry and whole-mount immunohistochemistry of rat seminiferous tubules were conducted to show that E-cadherin-positive cells were small in number and there are single, paired, and aligned spermatogonia attached along the basement membrane. During in vitro culture period, the undifferentiated rat spermatogonial colonies co-expressed E-cadherin and glial-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha-1 or E-cadherin and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger. Data collected during the study demonstrate that E-cadherin is expressed by a small population of rat undifferentiated spermatogonia both in vivo and during in vitro culture period.

  2. Depletion of the spermatogonia from the seminiferous epithelium of the rhesus monkey after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1988-03-01

    In unirradiated testes large differences were found in the total number of spermatogonia among different monkeys, but the number of spermatogonia in the right and the left testes of the same monkey appeared to be rather similar. During the first 11 days after irradiation with 0.5 to 4.0 Gy of X rays the number of Apale spermatogonia (Ap) decreased to about 13% of the control level, while the number of Adark spermatogonia (Ad) did not change significantly. A significant decrease in the number of Ad spermatogonia was seen at Day 14 together with a significant increase in the number of Ap spermatogonia. It was concluded that the resting Ad spermatogonia are activated into proliferating Ap spermatogonia. After Day 16 the number of both Ap and Ad spermatogonia decreased to low levels. Apparently the new Ap spermatogonia were formed by lethally irradiated Ad spermatogonia and degenerated while attempting to divide. The activation of the Ad spermatogonia was found to take place throughout the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. Serum FSH, LH, and testosterone levels were measured before and after irradiation. Serum FSH levels already had increased during the first week after irradiation to 160% of the control level. Serum LH levels increased between 18 and 25 days after irradiation. Serum testosterone levels did not change at all. The results found in the rhesus monkey are in line with those found in humans, but due to the presence of Ad spermatogonia they differ from those obtained in non-primates.

  3. Distinct requirements for Sin3a in perinatal male gonocytes and differentiating spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Shannon J; Kofman, Amber E; Huszar, Jessica M; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; DePinho, Ronald A; Braun, Robert E; Payne, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifier Swi-independent 3a (SIN3A), together with associated histone deacetylases, influences gene expression during development and differentiation through a variety of transcription factors in a cell-specific manner. Sin3a is essential for the maintenance of inner cell mass cells of mouse blastocysts, embryonic fibroblasts, and myoblasts, but is not required for the survival of trophectoderm or Sertoli cells. To better understand how this transcriptional regulator modulates cells at different developmental stages within a single lineage, we used conditional gene targeting in mice to ablate Sin3a from perinatal quiescent male gonocytes and from postnatal differentiating spermatogonia. Mitotic germ cells expressing stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8) that lacked Sin3a exhibited increased DNA damage and apoptosis, yet collectively progressed through meiosis and spermiogenesis and generated epididymal sperm at approximately 50% of control levels, sufficient for normal fertility. In contrast, perinatal gonocytes lacking Sin3a underwent rapid depletion that coincided with cell cycle reentry, exhibiting 2.5-fold increased histone H3 phosphorylation upon cycling that suggested a prophase/metaphase block; germ cells were almost entirely absent two weeks after birth, resulting in sterility. Gene expression profiling of neonatal testes containing Sin3a-deleted gonocytes identified upregulated transcripts highly associated with developmental processes and pattern formation, and downregulated transcripts involved in nuclear receptor activity, including Nr4a1 (Nur77). Interestingly, Nr4a1 levels were elevated in testes containing Stra8-expressing, Sin3a-deleted spermatogonia. SIN3A directly binds to the Nr4a1 promoter, and Nr4a1 expression is diminished upon spermatogonial differentiation in vitro. We conclude that within the male germline, Sin3a is required for the mitotic reentry of gonocytes, but is dispensable for the maintenance of differentiating

  4. Developmental expression of BMP4/ALK3/SMAD5 signaling pathway in the mouse testis: a potential role of BMP4 in spermatogonia differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Manuela; Grimaldi, Paola; Rossi, Pellegrino; Geremia, Raffaele; Dolci, Susanna

    2003-08-15

    It is well established that the c-kit gene plays an essential role in the proliferation of differentiating spermatogonia in prepuberal mice. However, the mechanisms that regulate the onset of spermatogenesis, i.e. differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells and c-kit expression, are poorly understood. Here we identify a novel signal transduction system in mouse prepuberal testis regulating this developmental event, involving bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and its transduction machinery. BMP4 is produced by Sertoli cells very early in the postnatal life and is successively down regulated in peri-puberal Sertoli cells. Its receptor Alk3 and the R-Smad Smad5 are specifically expressed both in proliferating primordial germ cells and in postnatal spermatogonia. BMP4 stimulation of cultured spermatogonia induces Smad4/5 nuclear translocation and the formation of a DNA-binding complex with the transcriptional coactivator p300/CBP. In vitro exposure of undifferentiated spermatogonia to BMP4 exerts both mitogenic and differentiative effects, inducing [3H]thymidine incorporation and Kit expression. As a result of the latter event, Kit-negative spermatogonia acquire sensitivity to Stem Cell Factor.

  5. Losing weight after pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... below the minimum number of calories you need. Breastfeeding If you are breastfeeding, you will want to lose weight slowly. Weight ... not affect your milk supply or your health. Breastfeeding makes your body burn calories. It helps you ...

  6. In vitro differentiation of rat spermatogonia into round spermatids in tissue culture

    PubMed Central

    Reda, A.; Hou, M.; Winton, T.R.; Chapin, R.E.; Söder, O.; Stukenborg, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do the organ culture conditions, previously defined for in vitro murine male germ cell differentiation, also result in differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting specific markers for haploid germ cells? SUMMARY ANSWER We demonstrated the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic cells in vitro, with emphasis on exhibiting, protein markers described for round spermatids. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Full spermatogenesis in vitro from immature germ cells using an organ culture technique in mice was first reported 5 years ago. However, no studies reporting the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting the characteristic protein expression profile or into functional sperm have been reported. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Organ culture of testicular fragments of 5 days postpartum (dpp) neonatal rats was performed for up to 52 days. Evaluation of microscopic morphology, testosterone levels, mRNA and protein expression as measured by RT-qPCR and immunostaining were conducted to monitor germ cell differentiation in vitro. Potential effects of melatonin, Glutamax® medium, retinoic acid and the presence of epidydimal fat tissue on the spermatogenic process were evaluated. A minimum of three biological replicates were performed for all experiments presented in this study. One-way ANOVA, ANOVA on ranks and student's t-test were applied to perform the statistical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Male germ cells, present in testicular tissue pieces grown from 5 dpp rats, exhibited positive protein expression for Acrosin and Crem (cAMP (cyclic adenosine mono phosphate) response element modulator) after 52 days of culture in vitro. Intra-testicular testosterone production could be observed after 3 days of culture, while when epididymal fat tissue was added, spontaneous contractility of cultured seminiferous tubules could be observed after 21 days. However, no

  7. Stage-specific DNA synthesis of rat spermatogenesis as an indicator of genotoxic effects of vinblastine, mitomycin C and ionizing radiation on rat spermatogonia and spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, T; Parvinen, M; Lähdetie, J

    1995-10-01

    We have studied the effects of three known mutagens: vinblastine sulphate, mitomycin C and local irradiation of testes on the stage-specific DNA synthesis in the rat testis by using transillumination assisted microdissection of rat seminiferous tubules. It enables us to investigate the sensitivity of different types of spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes to the genotoxic effects of these agents. According to our results, spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes are quite resistant to the action of vinblastine at the treatment times and the doses used. After treatment with mitomycin C, type A2, A3 and A4 spermatogonia seem to be the first cell types affected, which shows itself as a reduction in the DNA synthesis at stages I, II-III, XIII-XIV of the epithelial cycle two and/or three days after the treatment. It also seems that they are mostly affected during the S-phase of their cell cycles. In addition, preleptotene spermatocytes are also sensitive to the action of mitomycin C when they are treated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The local irradiation of 3 Gy has severe effects on the spermatogonia of rat testis which can be seen already 18 h after the treatment and becomes more evident 42 and 66 h after the treatment as a reduction of DNA synthesis at stages XII-V. Type A spermatogonia (A1-A4) seem to be the most sensitive cell types to the action of irradiation. This study indicates that the novel method of stage-specific DNA synthesis in rat spermatogenesis allows detailed studies of sensitivities in differentiating spermatogonia to genotoxic agents.

  8. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name,…

  9. A G-quadruplex DNA structure resolvase, RHAU, is essential for spermatogonia differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, X; Ma, W; Nie, J; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Yao, G; Han, J; Xu, J; Hu, B; Du, Y; Shi, Q; Yang, Z; Huang, X; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) DNA and G4 DNA resolvase are involved in a variety of biological processes. To understand the biological function of G4 DNA structures and their resolvases in spermatogenesis, we investigated the distribution of G4 structures in mouse testis and identified their alterations during spermatogenesis. Meanwhile, we studied the function of RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element (RHAU), a G4 DNA resolvase, in spermatogenesis with a germ-cell-specific knockout mouse model. The results showed that the ablation of RHAU in germ cells caused the increase of G4 structures and thus resulted in the decrease of spermatogonial differentiation. c-kit, a spermatogonia differentiation-related gene, contains two G4 DNA motifs on its promoter. We found its expression was significantly downregulated in RHAU conditional knockout testis. A further analysis demonstrated that RHAU directly bound to the G4 structures to activate c-kit expression. We concluded that RHAU regulates spermatogonia differentiation by promoting c-kit expression via directly binding to the G4 DNA motifs c-kit promoter. PMID:25611385

  10. B7-H1 antibodies lose antitumor activity due to activation of p38 MAPK that leads to apoptosis of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wu, Xiaosheng; Cao, Siyu; Harrington, Susan M.; Yin, Peng; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Dong, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    B7-H1 (aka PD-L1) blocking antibodies have been used in treatment of human cancers through blocking B7-H1 expressed by tumor cells; however, their impact on B7-H1 expressing tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells is still unknown. Here, we report that tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells expressing B7-H1 are functional effector cells. In contrast to normal B7-H1 blocking antibody, B7-H1 antibodies capable of activating p38 MAPK lose their antitumor activity by deleting B7-H1+ tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells via p38 MAPK pathway. B7-H1 deficiency or engagement with certain antibody results in more activation of p38 MAPK that leads to T cell apoptosis. DNA-PKcs is a new intracellular partner of B7-H1 in the cytoplasm of activated CD8+ T cells. B7-H1 suppresses p38 MAPK activation by sequestering DNA-PKcs in order to preserve T cell survival. Our findings provide a new mechanism of action of B7-H1 in T cells and have clinical implications in cancer immunotherapy when anti-B7-H1 (PD-L1) antibody is applied. PMID:27824138

  11. Influence of histological degree of seminiferous tubular degeneration and stage of seminiferous cycle on the proliferation of spermatogonia in aged Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Bernal-Mañas, C M; Cortes, S; Morales, E; Horn, R; Seco-Rovira, V; Beltran-Frutos, E; Ferrer, C; Canteras, M; Pastor, L M

    2014-08-01

    The ageing testis is associated with germ loss in the seminiferous epithelium and a decrease in spermatogonia proliferation. In this work, we study whether the stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle and/or the degree of histological tubular degeneration resulting from ageing is related with this decrease in spermatogonia proliferation. Eleven hamsters were used, five aged 6 months and six aged 24 months. In both groups, the proliferative activity was studied by BrdU immunostaining. The number of BrdU-positive and BrdU-negative cells was measured, providing the overall proliferation index in adult and aged testes. The mean number of BrdU-positive cells was also determined for each degree of histological degeneration of seminiferous epithelium, and a spermatogonia proliferation index was obtained for each stage of the seminiferous cycle. Ageing caused an overall decrease in the BrdU-positive cell percentage and a decrease in the number of BrdU-positive cells in the tubular sections with hypospermatogenesis, the sloughing of germ cells and maturation arrest, these changes being similar in both young and old animals. The spermatogonia proliferation index was only seen to be significantly lower in ageing hamster in stages VII-VIII of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. In conclusion, the overall decrease in proliferation observed in aged seminiferous epithelium is correlated with an increase in the number of degenerated sections of the seminiferous tubules, and this decrease is a phenomenon which occurs in specific stages of the seminiferous cycle.

  12. BCAS2 is involved in alternative mRNA splicing in spermatogonia and the transition to meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenbo; Wang, Fengchao; Xu, Qianhua; Shi, Junchao; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Lu, Xukun; Zhao, Zhen-Ao; Gao, Zheng; Ma, Huaixiao; Duan, Enkui; Gao, Fei; Gao, Shaorong; Yi, Zhaohong; Li, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer amplified sequence 2 (BCAS2) is involved in multiple biological processes, including pre-mRNA splicing. However, the physiological roles of BCAS2 are still largely unclear. Here we report that BCAS2 is specifically enriched in spermatogonia of mouse testes. Conditional disruption of Bcas2 in male germ cells impairs spermatogenesis and leads to male mouse infertility. Although the spermatogonia appear grossly normal, spermatocytes in meiosis prophase I and meiosis events (recombination and synapsis) are rarely observed in the BCAS2-depleted testis. In BCAS2 null testis, 245 genes are altered in alternative splicing forms; at least three spermatogenesis-related genes (Dazl, Ehmt2 and Hmga1) can be verified. In addition, disruption of Bcas2 results in a significant decrease of the full-length form and an increase of the short form (lacking exon 8) of DAZL protein. Altogether, our results suggest that BCAS2 regulates alternative splicing in spermatogonia and the transition to meiosis initiation, and male fertility. PMID:28128212

  13. Oestrogen-induced androgen insufficiency results in a reduction of proliferation and differentiation of spermatogonia in the zebrafish testis.

    PubMed

    de Waal, Paul P; Leal, Marcelo C; García-López, Angel; Liarte, Sergio; de Jonge, Hugo; Hinfray, Nathalie; Brion, François; Schulz, Rüdiger W; Bogerd, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Androgens can induce complete spermatogenesis in immature or prepubertal teleost fish. However, many aspects of the role of androgens in adult teleost spermatogenesis have remained elusive. Since oestrogens inhibit androgen synthesis, we used an oestrogen-induced androgen depletion model to identify androgen-dependent stages during adult zebrafish spermatogenesis. Exposure to 10 nM 17beta-oestradiol (E(2)) in vivo at least halved the mass of differentiating germ cells (from type B spermatogonia to spermatids), while type A spermatogonia accumulated. Studies on the cellular dynamics revealed that a reduction of spermatogonial proliferation together with an inhibition of their differentiation to type B spermatogonia were the basis for the oestrogen-mediated disturbance of spermatogenesis. The capacity of the zebrafish testis to produce 11-ketotestosterone as well as the expression of steroidogenesis-related genes was markedly decreased after in vivo oestrogen exposure. Moreover, the androgen-release response to recombinant zebrafish Lh was lost after oestrogen exposure. We conclude that oestrogen exposure caused a state of androgen insufficiency in adult male zebrafish. Since the downregulation of the steroidogenic system as well as the disturbance of spermatogenesis in testicular explants exposed to E(2) ex vivo was much less severe than after in vivo exposure, the main inhibitory effect appears to be exerted via feedback inhibition of gonadotropin release. This experimental set-up helped to identify spermatogonial proliferation and their differentiation as androgen targets in adult zebrafish spermatogenesis.

  14. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2017-01-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a rare complication of intestinal diseases. Its main manifestation is hypoproteinemic edema. The diagnosis of PLE is based on the verification of protein loss into the intestinal lumen, by determining fecal α1-antitrypsin concentration and clearance. The localization of the affected colonic segment is clarified using radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The mainstay of treatment for PLE is a fat-free diet enriched with medium-chain triglycerides. Surgical resection of the affected segment of the colon may be the treatment of choice for severe hypoproteinemia resistant to drug therapy.

  15. Senescent Atrophic Epidermis Retains Lrig1+ Stem Cells and Loses Wnt Signaling, a Phenotype Shared with CD44KO Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Laurent; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Kaya, Gürkan

    2017-01-01

    Lrig1 is known to repress the epidermal growth through its inhibitory activity on EGFR, while CD44 promotes it. We analyzed the expression of these molecules in senescent atrophic human epidermis and in the epidermis of CD44KO mice. In normal human epidermis, Lrig1+ cells form clusters located in the basal layer in which CD44 expression is downregulated and Lef1 expression reflects an active Wnt signaling. In senescent atrophic human epidermis, we found retention of Lrig1high+ cells all along the basal layer, forming no clusters, with decrease of CD44 and lef1 expression. In vitro silencing of CD44 indicated that CD44 may be required for Wnt signaling. However, if looking at the ear epidermis of CD44KO mice, we only found a limited interfollicular epidermal atrophy and unchanged Lrig1high+ cells in the hair follicle. Cell lineage tracing further revealed that interfollicular epidermis did lost its self-renewing capacity but that its homeostasis relied on Lrig1-derived keratinocytes migrating from the hair follicle. Therefore, we conclude that CD44 downregulation is part of the phenotype of senescent atrophic human epidermis, and contributes to reduce Wnt signaling and to alter Lrig1high+ stem cell distribution. PMID:28099467

  16. Hypothermic storage of isolated spermatogonia and oogonia from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Falahatkar, Bahram; Poursaeid, Samaneh; Kitada, Ryota; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2017-03-14

    A growing number of fish species are endangered due to human activities. A short- or long-time preservation of gametes could conserve genetic resources of threatened fish species. The aim of this study was to evaluate a hypothermic condition for short-term preservation of spermatogonia and oogonia cells isolated from immature transgenic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and to determine the maximum time point for further transplantation. Viability rate of germ cells was investigated after isolation and during storage at 4 °C up to 24 h. Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium supplemented with Hepes fetal bovine serum and l-glutamine was used as hypothermic storage media. The results showed that while viability decreased following 24 h storage, the remaining viable cells did not vary morphologically as well as GFP intensity retained similar to those observed in freshly isolated cells. The hypothermal storage study indicated that culture medium is suitable for preserving germ cells in the short periods of time. Simplicity, easily available culture media and low cost provide new insight into hypothermic conditions for preserving and transporting of germ cells for next applied and basic studies.

  17. Antidepressants: Can They Lose Effectiveness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... doesn't seem to be having the same effect. Can antidepressants lose effectiveness? Answers from Daniel K. ... Another medical condition. Underlying health problems, such as hypothyroidism, can cause or worsen depression. A new medication. ...

  18. Eating Well and Losing Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking - Eating Well and Losing Weight • Tools & Resources Sodium & High Blood Pressure Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart ...

  19. Isolation of undifferentiated and early differentiating Type A spermatogonia from Pou5f1-GFP reporter mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Thomas; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells hampers our ability to develop new therapeutic and contraceptive approaches. Mouse models of spermatogonial stem cell development are key to developing new insights into the biology of both the normal and diseased testis. Advances in transgenic reporter mice have enabled the isolation, molecular characterization, and functional analysis of mouse Type A spermatogonia subpopulations from the normal testis, including populations enriched for spermatogonial stem cells. Application of these reporters both to the normal testis and to gene-deficient and over-expression models will promote a better understanding of the earliest steps of spermatogenesis, and the role of spermatogonial stem cells in germ cell tumor. PMID:22144234

  20. Isolation of undifferentiated and early differentiating type A spermatogonia from Pou5f1-GFP reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Thomas; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells hampers our ability to develop new therapeutic and contraceptive approaches. Mouse models of spermatogonial stem cell development are key to developing new insights into the biology of both the normal and diseased testis. Advances in transgenic reporter mice have enabled the isolation, molecular characterization, and functional analysis of mouse Type A spermatogonia subpopulations from the normal testis, including populations enriched for spermatogonial stem cells. Application of these reporters both to the normal testis and to gene-deficient and over-expression models will promote a better understanding of the earliest steps of spermatogenesis, and the role of spermatogonial stem cells in germ cell tumor.

  1. mTOR/P70S6K promotes spermatogonia proliferation and spermatogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Shen, Lianju; Chen, Xuemei; Ding, Yubin; He, Junlin; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Yingxiong; Liu, Xueqing

    2016-02-01

    Spermatogenesis is a critical process for maintaining male fertility. Sustained spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal and differentiation ensures constant spermatogenesis, and several signalling pathways regulate this process. An increasing number of studies have suggested that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway plays an important role in spermatogenesis; however, the mechanism remains unknown. Our study showed that mTOR was positively related with spermatogenesis by detecting mTOR expression and the expression of its target p70s6k, rps6 and 4e-bp1 at different developmental stages. Phosphorylated p70s6k, rps6 and 4ebp1 levels were independently and gradually down-regulated with age. Subsequently, we showed in vivo and in vitro that, upon mTOR inactivation by rapamycin, the number of sperm significantly decreased (P < 0.05) and spermatogonia proliferation was blocked. Phosphorylated p70s6k and rps6 levels were down-regulated, but the levels of phosphorylated 4e-bp1 did not change. Spermatogonia were treated with the specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and p70s6k, rps6 and 4ebp1 phosphorylation overtly decreased. Therefore, we suggest that mTOR plays an important role in spermatogenesis by regulating p70s6k activation and that 4e-bp1 is either directly or indirectly regulated by PI3K.

  2. B cells present skewed profile and lose the function of supporting T cell inflammation after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Weiguo; Zhan, Junfang; Zeng, Songhua; Ran, Dongzhi; Zhang, Hongbin; Song, Zhigao; Song, Ken H; Wu, Liangping

    2017-02-01

    Bariatric surgeries, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are currently the best treatment for obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism of bariatric surgeries is not entirely understood. Further investigations are needed to improve the success rate and achieve sustained health benefits. Given that B cell dysregulation is a critical component of etiology in inflammatory diseases, whereas obesity and type 2 diabetes represent two major inflammatory disorders, we investigated the effect of RYGB on B cell inflammation. We found that B cells after RYGB presented significantly elevated frequency of interleukin (IL)-10-producing cells and reduced frequency of IL-6-producing cells compared to those before RYGB. When grouping B cell subsets into regulatory (secreting IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) and effector (secreting IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, interferon gamma [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) types, we found that after RYGB, the regulatory to effector B cell ratio was significantly increased. Function analyses showed that B cells before RYGB supported IL-17 secretion from T cells whereas these cells after RYGB lost such capacity. B cells after RYGB also gained the capacity to suppress T cell IFN-γ production through TGF-β-mediated effects, a feature not present in B cells before RYGB. Interestingly, the regulatory to effector B cell ratio was directly associated with the reductions in obesity markers following RYGB, such as BMI and fat mass percentage. Together, these results demonstrated a potential mechanism through which RYGB promoted amelioration of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  3. Macrophages and Myeloid Dendritic Cells Lose T Cell-Stimulating Function in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Associated with Diminished IL-12 and IFN-α Production.

    PubMed

    Wonderlich, Elizabeth R; Wu, Wen-Chi; Normolle, Daniel P; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M

    2015-10-01

    Impaired T cell responses are a defining characteristic of HIV infection, but the extent to which altered mononuclear phagocyte function contributes to this defect is unclear. We show that mononuclear phagocytes enriched from rhesus macaque lymph nodes have suppressed ability to stimulate CD4 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release after acute SIV infection. When individual populations were isolated, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and macrophages but not plasmacytoid DC (pDC) had suppressed capacity to stimulate CD4 T cell proliferation, with macrophage function declining as infection progressed. Macrophages, but not pDC or mDC, had suppressed capacity to induce IFN-γ release from CD4 T cells in acute infection, even after stimulation with virus-encoded TLR7/8 ligand. Changes in expression of costimulatory molecules did not explain loss of function postinfection. Conversely, pDC and mDC had marked loss of IFN-α and IL-12 production, respectively, and macrophages lost production of both cytokines. In T cell cocultures without TLR7/8 ligand, macrophages were the primary source of IL-12, which was profoundly suppressed postinfection and correlated with loss of IFN-γ release by T cells. TLR7/8-stimulated pDC, mDC and macrophages all produced IL-12 in T cell cocultures, which was suppressed in chronic infection. Supplementing IL-12 enhanced mDC-driven IFN-γ release from T cells, and IL-12 and IFN-α together restored function in TLR7/8-activated macrophages. These findings reveal loss of macrophage and mDC T cell-stimulating function in lymph nodes of SIV-infected rhesus macaques associated with diminished IL-12 and IFN-α production that may be a factor in AIDS immunopathogenesis.

  4. Ultrastructure of spermatogonia and spermatocyte lobules in Taenia solium strobilae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea, Taeniidae) from golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Willms, Kaethe; Caro, Jose Antonio; Robert, Lilia

    2003-08-01

    Golden hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus) were infected with Taenia solium metacestodes dissected from infected pig meat. Adult worms were collected from hamster intestines of animals killed 5-60 days post-infection (dpi), incubated in RPMI 1640 medium with or without colchicine, fixed and processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sections for light microscopy from 40 different blocks with scolex, immature and mature proglottids were photographed. Thin sections were cut from 25 selected blocks, examined and photographed with TEM. Metaphase mitosis figures were observed in the subtegument of the germinative tissue and interpreted as germ cell precursors. In immature proglottids (20 dpi), discrete cell clusters of three to four cells surrounded by a thin cytoplasmic envelope were identified along the inner border of the lateral excretory ducts. These were also observed in more mature proglottids (40-60 dpi) as clusters of eight cells enclosed in a cytoplasmic envelope, with nuclei of spermatogonia exhibiting the synaptolems of primary meiotic cells. In mature proglottids from 45 dpi, a large number of spermatocyte lobules were found, exhibiting different stages of spermatogenesis from primary spermatocytes to mature filiform spermatids with a single axoneme, annular nucleus and spiral cortical microtubules, similar to spermatozoa described for type III spermiogenesis of species of the family Taeniidae. All mature spermatocyte lobules were enclosed in a highly organized cellular envelope and surrounded by a basal lamina. The envelopes contained a number of distinct organelles, seen in cross-section as discrete lattices of microtubules located between two layers of plasma membrane, as well as thickened furled cytoplasm with numerous strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum and pockets of microtubules.

  5. Igf Binding Proteins Protect Undifferentiated Spermatogonia in the Zebrafish Testis Against Excessive Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Safian, Diego; Morais, Roberto D V S; Bogerd, Jan; Schulz, Rüdiger W

    2016-11-01

    IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) modulate the availability of IGFs for their cognate receptors. In zebrafish testes, IGF3 promotes the proliferation and differentiation of type A undifferentiated (Aund) spermatogonia, and igf3 expression is strongly elevated by FSH but also responds to T3. Here we report the effects of FSH and T3 on igfbp transcript levels in adult zebrafish testis. We then examined T3 and FSH effects on zebrafish spermatogenesis and explored the relevance of IGFBPs in modulating these T3 or FSH effects, using a primary tissue culture system for adult zebrafish testis. T3 up-regulated igfbp1a and igfbp3 expression, whereas FSH reduced igfbp1a transcript levels. To quantify effects on spermatogenesis, we determined the mitotic index and relative section areas occupied by Aund, type A differentiating, or type B spermatogonia. In general, T3 and FSH stimulated spermatogonial proliferation and increased the areas occupied by spermatogonia, suggesting that both self-renewal and differentiating divisions were stimulated. Preventing IGF/IGFBP interaction by NBI-31772 further increased T3- or FSH-induced spermatogonial proliferation. However, under these conditions the more differentiated type A differentiating and B spermatogonia occupied larger surface areas at the expense of the area held by Aund spermatogonia. Clearly decreased nanos2 transcript levels are in agreement with this finding, and reduced amh expression may have facilitated spermatogonial differentiation. We conclude that elevating IGF3 bioactivity by blocking IGFBPs shifted T3- or FSH-induced signaling from stimulating spermatogonial self-renewal as well as differentiation toward predominantly stimulating spermatogonial differentiation, which leads to a depletion of type Aund spermatogonia.

  6. The decision to lose weight.

    PubMed

    Brink, P J; Ferguson, K

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the reasons people give for deciding to lose weight compared by weight history and gender. The sample consisted of 162 Caucasian community volunteers. Data were obtained from an extensive open-ended interview that was analyzed using content analysis. Respondents were categorized into five groups, according to their success at weight loss: Successful, Always Normal Weight, Underweight, Clinically Successful, and Always Obese. The Clinically Successful and Always Obese were included in the category Unsuccessful Dieter. Reasons given for entering a weight-loss regime included attractiveness or appearance, health, fear, self-esteem issues, age, and competition. For the Successful Dieter, attractiveness and health were the two major motivations. Men and women were similar in their reasons for entering a weight-loss program. The issue of what makes a decision of sufficient importance to maintain weight loss remains unexplained. "Centrality" is offered as a possible explanation.

  7. The hot-spot p53R172H mutant promotes formation of giant spermatogonia triggered by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Raharja, A; Sim, W; Wong, E S M; Rahmat, S A B; Lane, D P

    2017-04-06

    Overexpression of mutant p53 is a common finding in most cancers but testicular tumours accumulate wild-type p53 (wtp53). In contrast to the accepted concept that p53 homozygous mutant mice do not accumulate mutant p53 in normal cells, our study on a mutant p53 mouse model of Li-Fraumeni syndrome harbouring the hot-spot p53R172H mutation described an elevated level of mutant p53 in non-cancerous mouse tissues. Here we use detailed immunohistochemical analysis to document the expression of p53R172H in mouse testis. In developing and adult testes, p53R172H was expressed in gonocytes, type A, Int, B spermatogonia as well as in pre-Sertoli cells and Leydig cells but was undetectable in spermatocytes and spermatids. A similar staining pattern was demonstrated for wtp53. However, the intensity of wtp53 staining was generally weaker than that of p53R172H, which indicates that the expression of p53R172H can be a surrogate marker of p53 gene transcription. Comparing the responses of wtp53 and p53R172H to irradiation, we found persistent DNA double-strand breaks in p53R172H testes and the formation of giant spermatogonia (GSG) following persistent DNA damage in p53R172H and p53-null mice. Strikingly, we found that p53R172H promotes spontaneous formation of GSG in non-stressed p53R172H ageing mice. Two types of GSG: Viable and Degenerative GSG were defined. We elucidate the factors involved in the formation of GSG: the loss of p53 function is a requirement for the formation of GSG whereas DNA damage acts as a promoting trigger. The formation of GSG does not translate to higher efficacy of testicular tumorigenesis arising from mutant p53 cells, which might be due to the presence of delayed-onset of p53-independent apoptosis.

  8. How Did Mars Lose Its Atmosphere?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Though it doesn't look like a nice place to live now, Mars may have had an atmosphere more like ours on Earth! But how did it lose it? One way a planet can lose its atmosphere is through a process ...

  9. You Can Lose What You Never Had

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Cam

    2016-01-01

    An often-used idiom states: "you can't lose what you never had." Yet contrary to this expression, it "is" possible to lose what you never had--at least when special education support is concerned. In Ontario, as in other jurisdictions, special education exists as a codified system. An ever-changing nexus of discourses and…

  10. Radiation-Induced Germ Cell Mutations-Their Detection and Modification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-30

    representative of cells irradiated as differentiating spermatogonia . No reduction in the fertilization * rate was detected in animals mated 100 or more days... spermatogonia . This damage is manifest only as a failure to differentiate and proliferate an inner cell mass atop the trophectoderm outgrowth. The nature of...Ford, C.E., Searle, A.G., Evans, E.P. and B.J. West. Differential transmission of translocation induced in spermatogonia of mice by irradiation

  11. Will Titan lose its veil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, V.

    2007-08-01

    . If the real stock (CH4)real (CH4)crit=1.65.1020 kg, than Titan will lose its veil inevitably (scenario of the "mosaic history"), otherwise (CH4)real (CH4)crit the veil survives down to Titan's dying day ("continuous history"). References [1] H. B. Niemann and 17-co-authors, Nature, 438, 779, (2005). [2] V. Dimitrov, Prog. React. Kin. Mech. 30, N4, 227, (2006).

  12. Medical Mystery: Losing the sense of smell

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing Disorders Medical Mystery: Losing the sense of smell Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... a teenager that took away her sense of smell. Photo courtesy of Malone University Imagine, if you ...

  13. How Can I Lose Weight Safely?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the simple suggestions listed below to get started. Weight management is about long-term success. People who lose ... habits. continue Tips for Success Therefore, the best weight-management strategies are those that you can maintain for ...

  14. Reflections on reducing insulin to lose weigh.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Val

    Diabulimia is not a recognised medical condition, although it is thought to affect one-third of women with type 1 diabetes. Diabulimia involves deliberately omitting or reducing insulin dosages to lose weight. This article reports the reflections of women with long-duration type 1 diabetes who said that they had manipulated their insulin in the past to lose weight. Many were now dealing with serious heart and neuropathic complications, which they felt were a result of their diabulimia.

  15. 'Doctor, How Can I Lose Weight?'

    PubMed Central

    Bright-See, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Millions of Canadians are trying to lose weight. According to the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company's recently released height and weight tables, some of them don't need to lose weight from a health standpoint. For those who would benefit from weight loss, a good program includes a balanced, low fat, high fiber diet; exercise; behavior modification and moral support. Few of the popular books and self-help groups offer all these essential components. PMID:21283478

  16. The effect of dose rate on the frequency of specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonia is restricted to larger lesions; a retrospective analysis of historical data.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B; Hunsicker, Patricia R

    2012-05-01

    A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

  17. The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B; Hunsicker, Patricia R

    2012-01-01

    A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

  18. The Histone Demethylase FBXL10 Regulates the Proliferation of Spermatogonia and Ensures Long-Term Sustainable Spermatogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Manabu; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Reiko; Honda, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-04-01

    The F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 10 (Fbxl10) gene encodes a protein that catalyzes demethylation of H3K4 and H3K36. In this study, we show the important roles of FBXL10 as a histone demethylase in sustainable sperm production using mice in which the JmjC domain of Fbxl10 was deleted (Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ)). In histological analysis, testis sections from 10-wk-old Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ) mice appeared normal. On the other hand, testes from 7-mo-old Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ) mice contained a greater ratio of seminiferous tubules exhibiting degeneration of spermatogenesis. Further analysis using an in vitro spermatogonia culture system, that is, germline stem cells (GSCs), revealed that Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ) GSCs expressed a significantly higher level of P21 and P19 mRNA, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and also known as cellular senescence markers, than wild-type (WT) GSCs. Furthermore, the ratio of Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ) GSCs in G0/G1 phase was higher and the ratios in S and G2/M phases were lower than the corresponding ratios of WT GSCs, and the doubling speed of Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ) GSCs was significantly slower than that of WT GSCs. In addition to these in vitro results, an in vivo study indicated that recovery of spermatogenesis after a transient reduction in the number of testicular germ cells by busulfan treatment was significantly slower in Fbxl10(DeltaJ/DeltaJ) mice than in WT mice. These data suggest that Fbxl10 plays important roles in long-term sustainable spermatogenesis via regulating cell cycle.

  19. In vitro differentiation of fertile sperm from cryopreserved spermatogonia of the endangered endemic cyprinid honmoroko (Gnathopogon caerulescens)

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Shogo; Shimada, Manami; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Todo, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Tooyama, Ikuo; Fujioka, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Noriyoshi; Takada, Tatsuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Many endemic fish species are threatened with extinction. Conservation strategies and the restoration of endemic fish after extinction must therefore be investigated. Although sperm cryopreservation is indispensable for the conservation of endangered fishes, the limited number of mature fish and limited availability (volume and period) of sperm from small endemic fish hinders the optimization and practical use of this material. In this report, we demonstrate the in vitro differentiation of fertile sperm from cryopreserved spermatogonia of juveniles of the endangered small cyprinid honmoroko (Gnathopogon caerulescens), which is endemic to Lake Biwa in Japan. The entire process of spermatogenesis was recapitulated in vitro using cryopreserved spermatogonia of non-spawning adult and juvenile fish. The differentiation of sperm from spermatogonia was captured as a time-lapse video and confirmed by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation into sperm. Fertility was demonstrated by artificial insemination. These results suggest that the combination of cryopreservation of spermatogonia and in vitro sperm differentiation will provide a new and promising strategy for the preservation of paternal genetic materials. PMID:28211534

  20. In vitro differentiation of fertile sperm from cryopreserved spermatogonia of the endangered endemic cyprinid honmoroko (Gnathopogon caerulescens)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Shogo; Shimada, Manami; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Todo, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Tooyama, Ikuo; Fujioka, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Noriyoshi; Takada, Tatsuyuki

    2017-02-01

    Many endemic fish species are threatened with extinction. Conservation strategies and the restoration of endemic fish after extinction must therefore be investigated. Although sperm cryopreservation is indispensable for the conservation of endangered fishes, the limited number of mature fish and limited availability (volume and period) of sperm from small endemic fish hinders the optimization and practical use of this material. In this report, we demonstrate the in vitro differentiation of fertile sperm from cryopreserved spermatogonia of juveniles of the endangered small cyprinid honmoroko (Gnathopogon caerulescens), which is endemic to Lake Biwa in Japan. The entire process of spermatogenesis was recapitulated in vitro using cryopreserved spermatogonia of non-spawning adult and juvenile fish. The differentiation of sperm from spermatogonia was captured as a time-lapse video and confirmed by 5-ethynyl-2‧-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation into sperm. Fertility was demonstrated by artificial insemination. These results suggest that the combination of cryopreservation of spermatogonia and in vitro sperm differentiation will provide a new and promising strategy for the preservation of paternal genetic materials.

  1. "Losing Battles": The Tests of Endurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienstra, Phillis

    The works of Eudora Welty challenge the abilities of the oral reader who wishes to interpret them properly. Her novel, "Losing Battles," requires careful attention to the narrative point of view as a guide to its various dimensions of meaning. The narrative shifts through the consciousnesses of various characters of four generations in a rural…

  2. Bubble-fusion professor loses faculty post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Purdue University in the US has announced that Rusi Taleyarkhan - who was found guilty of scientific misconduct by the university in July - will lose his title of Al Bement Jr Professor of Nuclear Engineering and will not be able to advise graduate students for at least three years. Purdue has also denied an appeal from the researcher about the misconduct verdict.

  3. NRG1 and KITL Signal Downstream of Retinoic Acid in the Germline to Support Soma-Free Syncytial Growth of Differentiating Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Karen M; Medrano, Gerardo A; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Hamra, F Kent

    Defined culture systems supporting spermatogonial differentiation will provide experimental platforms to study spermatogenesis. However, germline-intrinsic signaling mechanisms sufficient to support spermatogonial differentiation without somatic cells remain largely undefined. Here, we analyzed EGF superfamily receptor and ligand diversity in rat testis cells, and delineated germline-intrinsic signaling via an ERBB3 co-transducer, ERBB2, as essential for retinoic acid-induced syncytial growth by differentiating spermatogonia. Like the ERBB2/3 agonist NRG1, we found KIT Ligand (KITL) robustly supported spermatogonial differentiation without serum or somatic cells. ERBB2 inhibitors failed to disrupt KITL-dependent spermatogonial development, and, KITL prevented ERBB3-deficient spermatogonial degeneration upon differentiation. Thus, we report NRG1 and KITL activate alternative pathways downstream of retinoic acid signaling in the germline that are essential for stem cells to undergo pre-meiotic steps of spermatogenesis in culture. Robust serum/soma-free spermatogonial differentiation opens new doors to study mammalian germ cell biology in culture, which will facilitate the discovery of spermatogenic factors that can drive meiotic progression in vitro.

  4. The "Biggest Loser" Expounds on the Benefits of Losing Pounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Biggest Loser" Expounds on the Benefits of Losing Pounds Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... 186 pounds, going from 361 to 175 pounds. The Twins on Losing Weight Bill: "The only way ...

  5. Fgf9 inhibition of meiotic differentiation in spermatogonia is mediated by Erk-dependent activation of Nodal-Smad2/3 signaling and is antagonized by Kit Ligand.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, V; Campolo, F; Cesarini, V; Todaro, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P

    2015-03-12

    Both fibroblast growth factor 9 (Fgf9) and Kit Ligand (Kl) signal through tyrosine kinase receptors, yet they exert opposite effects on meiotic differentiation in postnatal spermatogonia, Fgf9 acting as a meiosis-inhibiting substance and Kl acting as a promoter of the differentiation process. To understand the molecular mechanisms that might underlie this difference, we tried to dissect the intracellular signaling elicited by these two growth factors. We found that both Fgf9 and Kl stimulate Erk1/2 activation in Kit+ (differentiating) spermatogonia, even though with different time courses, whereas Kl, but not Fgf9, elicits activation of the Pi3k-Akt pathway. Sustained Erk1/2 activity promoted by Fgf9 is required for induction of the autocrine Cripto-Nodal-Smad2/3 signaling loop in these cells. Nodal signaling, in turn, is essential to mediate Fgf9 suppression of the meiotic program, including inhibition of Stra8 and Scp3 expression and induction of the meiotic gatekeeper Nanos2. On the contrary, sustained activation of the Pi3k-Akt pathway is required for the induction of Stra8 expression elicited by Kl and retinoic acid. Moreover, we found that Kl treatment impairs Nodal mRNA expression and Fgf9-mediated Nanos2 induction, reinforcing the antagonistic effect of these two growth factors on the meiotic fate of male germ cells.

  6. Study of the potential spermatogonial stem cell compartment in dogfish testis, Scyliorhinus canicula L.

    PubMed

    Loppion, Geraldine; Crespel, Amélie; Martinez, Anne-Sophie; Auvray, Pierrïck; Sourdaine, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    In the lesser-spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula), spermatogenesis takes place within spermatocysts made up of Sertoli cells associated with stage-synchronized germ cells. As shown in testicular cross sections, cysts radiate in maturational order from the germinative area, where they are formed, to the opposite margin of the testis, where spermiation occurs. In the germinative zone, which is located in a specific area between the tunica albuginea of the testis and the dorsal testicular vessel, individual large spermatogonia are surrounded by elongated somatic cells. The aim of this study has been to define whether these spermatogonia share characteristics with spermatogonial stem cells described in vertebrate and non-vertebrate species. We have studied their ultrastructure and their mitotic activity by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunodetection. Additionally, immunodetection of c-Kit receptor, a marker of differentiating spermatogonia in rodents, and of alpha- and beta-spectrins, as constituents of the spectrosome and the fusome, has been performed. Ultrastructurally, nuclei of stage I spermatogonia present the same mottled aspect in dogfish as undifferentiated spermatogonia nuclei in rodents. Moreover, intercellular bridges are not observed in dogfish spermatogonia, although they are present in stage II spermatogonia. BrdU and PCNA immunodetection underlines their low mitotic activity. The presence of a spectrosome-like structure, a cytological marker of the germline stem cells in Drosophila, has been observed. Our results constitute the first step in the study of spermatogonial stem cells and their niche in the dogfish.

  7. Surgical management of Menetrier's disease with protein-losing gastropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, H W; Shull, H J; Law, D H; Burko, H; Page, D L

    1975-01-01

    Three patients with Menetrier's disease and protein-losing gastropathy who were studied during a 12 year period have been presented. The characteristic findings which differentiate them from patients with hypertrophic hypersecretory gastropathy, including the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, are: 1) hypertrophy of gastric mucosa with giant rugal folds involving the fundus, cardia and body of the stomach but sparing the antrum; 2) muscosal hypertrophy consisting of gastric mjcus-secreting cells while parietal cells and chief cells are diminished in number and may be absent from many microscopic sections; 3) gastric secretion of large volume containing excess mucus, low to absent hydrochloric acid and protein concentration 5 or 6 times normal (1.7 mg/ml); 4) hypoalbuminemia and hypoglobulinemia due to loss of serum proteins fron gastric mucosa into the gastric lumen; 5) rare association with gastric ulcer. Unlike the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome none of our patients had duodenal ucler or multiple endocrine adenomatosis or a family history of these conditions. We have found no authenticated reports in the literature which document a relationship of Menetrier's disease ( as defined above) with multiple endocrine adenomatosis. Menetrier's disease with protein-losing gastropathy is a potentially lethal disorder of unknown cause with no specific treatment. Resection of the site of gastric protein losses as first done by Waugh is logical and effective. One of our three patients died in hospital before gastrectomy was done. Two others have done well for 11 months and 12 years, respectively, after total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy and Hunt-Lawrence jejunal pouch. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6A. Fig. 6B. Fig. 7. Fig. 8A. Fig. 8B. Fig. 9A. Fig. 9B. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. PMID:1130890

  8. The effect of losing the twin and losing the partner on mortality.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, Cecilia; Rosina, Alessandro; Billari, Francesco C; Skytthe, Axel; Christensen, Kaare

    2002-06-01

    Several studies have explored the impact of marital bereavement on mortality, while increasing emphasis has recently been placed on genetic factors influencing longevity - in this paper, we study the impact of losing the spouse and losing the co-twin, for twins aged 50 to 70. We use data from the Danish Twin Registry and the Population Register of Denmark for the period 1968 through 1999. Firstly, we use survival analysis to study mortality after the death of the spouse or the co-twin. We find that the risk of dying is highest in the first year after the death of the spouse, as well as in the second year after the death of the co-twin. We then use event history analysis techniques to show that there is a strong impact of the event 'losing the co-twin' even after controlling for age, sex and zygosity and that this effect is significantly higher in the second year of bereavement. The effect is similar for men and women, and it is higher for monozygotic twins. The latter confirms the influence of genetic factors on survival, while the mortality trajectory with a peak in the second year after the death of the co-twin is consistent with the existence of a twin bereavement effect.

  9. Winning and Losing: Effects on Impulsive Action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of wins and losses on impulsive action in gambling (Experiments 1–3) and nongambling tasks (Experiments 4–5). In each experiment, subjects performed a simple task in which they had to win points. On each trial, they had to choose between a gamble and a nongamble. The gamble was always associated with a higher amount but a lower probability of winning than the nongamble. After subjects indicated their choice (i.e., gamble or not), feedback was presented. They had to press a key to start the next trial. Experiments 1–3 showed that, compared to the nongambling baseline, subjects were faster to initiate the next trial after a gambled loss, indicating that losses can induce impulsive actions. In Experiments 4 and 5, subjects alternated between the gambling task and a neutral decision-making task in which they could not win or lose points. Subjects were faster in the neutral decision-making task if they had just lost in the gambling task, suggesting that losses have a general effect on action. Our results challenge the dominant idea that humans become more cautious after suboptimal outcomes. Instead, they indicate that losses in the context of potential rewards are emotional events that increase impulsivity. PMID:27808548

  10. Saving a life but losing the patient.

    PubMed

    Greene, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Gregor Samsa awakes to find himself transformed into a gigantic bug. The creature's inchoate flailing leads Gregor's sister to conclude that Gregor is no more, having been replaced by a brute beast lacking any vestige of human understanding. Sadly, real cases of brain injury and disease can lead to psychological metamorphoses so profound that we cannot easily think that the survivor is the person we knew. I argue that there can be cases in which statements like, "It's just not Gregor anymore," are not merely figures of speech. With this in mind, I consider three possible results of saving a biological life: (1) ordinary cases where saving the life will save the person, with strong duties to save the life; (2) cases where the intervention needed to save the life will replace the person, with strong duties not to save the life; (3) cases in which it is indeterminate whether the person will be saved or replaced. How should we think about indeterminate cases? Impersonal ethical considerations miss the point, while standard person-affecting considerations are inapplicable. I suggest turning attention away from survival towards a richer focus on what I call "personal concern." I show how considerations of personal concern, unlike those of self-interest, need not be tied to survival and how this allows personal concern to provide a basis for ethically substantive discussion of cases where saving a life might result in losing the patient.

  11. Effects of multiple doses of cyclophosphamide on mouse testes: accessing the germ cells lost, and the functional damage of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drumond, Ana Luiza; Weng, Connie C; Wang, Gensheng; Chiarini-Garcia, Helio; Eras-Garcia, Leticia; Meistrich, Marvin L

    2011-12-01

    Spermatogenesis is sensitive to the chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide, which decreases the patients' sperm count. Since the recovery of fertility is dependent on regeneration from stem cells, in the present study we evaluated the ability of cyclophosphamide-exposed stem spermatogonia from mice to regenerate spermatogenesis in situ and after transplantation. When seven doses of cyclophosphamide were given at 4-day intervals, the differentiating germ cells were largely eliminated but ~50% of the undifferentiated type A spermatogonia remained. We monitored the recovery and found that sperm production recovered to 64% of control within the time expected. When the cyclophosphamide-surviving spermatogonia were transplanted into recipient mice, recovery of spermatogenesis from the cyclophosphamide-exposed donor cells was observed, but was reduced when compared to cells from cryptorchid donors. Thus, multidose regimens of cyclophosphamide did not eliminate the stem spermatogonia, but resulted in cell loss and residual damage.

  12. The effects of steel mutation on testicular germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nishimune, Y; Haneji, T; Kitamura, Y

    1980-10-01

    The effects of artificial cryptorchidism and its surgical reversal on spermatogenesis were examined in germ cell mutant, S1/+ and wild type, +/+, mice. In cryptorchid testes no difference was found between S1/+ and +/+ mice in the number of undifferentiated type A spermatogonia. The activity of type A spermatogonia in mutant mice appeared normal as judged by its mitotic cell number and DNA synthesis. The surgical reversal of cryptorchidism resulted in regenerative differentiation of mature germ cells in both types of mice, but the pattern of cellular differentiation in the mutant testes was completely different from that of the wild type testes. At two steps of cellular differentiation, intermediate or type B spermatogonia and spermatid, the numbers of cells were much smaller in the S1/+ testes than those in the +/+ testes. The steel gene was therefore suggested to exert its effects on the differentiation of type A spermatogonia to intermediate or type B spermatogonia, on meiotic division and/or the survival rate of these cells, but not on the undifferentiated type A spermatogonia or stem cells.

  13. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight...

  16. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight...

  17. Transcription and imprinting dynamics in developing postnatal male germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Saher Sue; Low, Diana H.P.; Yi, Chongil; Lee, Chee Leng; Oatley, Jon M.; Payne, Christopher J.; Carrell, Douglas T.; Guccione, Ernesto; Cairns, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) progress through proliferative and developmental stages to populate the testicular niche prior to productive spermatogenesis. To better understand, we conducted extensive genomic profiling at multiple postnatal stages on subpopulations enriched for particular markers (THY1, KIT, OCT4, ID4, or GFRa1). Overall, our profiles suggest three broad populations of spermatogonia in juveniles: (1) epithelial-like spermatogonia (THY1+; high OCT4, ID4, and GFRa1), (2) more abundant mesenchymal-like spermatogonia (THY1+; moderate OCT4 and ID4; high mesenchymal markers), and (3) (in older juveniles) abundant spermatogonia committing to gametogenesis (high KIT+). Epithelial-like spermatogonia displayed the expected imprinting patterns, but, surprisingly, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia lacked imprinting specifically at paternally imprinted loci but fully restored imprinting prior to puberty. Furthermore, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia also displayed developmentally linked DNA demethylation at meiotic genes and also at certain monoallelic neural genes (e.g., protocadherins and olfactory receptors). We also reveal novel candidate receptor–ligand networks involving SSCs and the developing niche. Taken together, neonates/juveniles contain heterogeneous epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like spermatogonial populations, with the latter displaying extensive DNA methylation/chromatin dynamics. We speculate that this plasticity helps SSCs proliferate and migrate within the developing seminiferous tubule, with proper niche interaction and membrane attachment reverting mesenchymal-like spermatogonial subtype cells back to an epithelial-like state with normal imprinting profiles. PMID:26545815

  18. Vegetarian Diet: Will It Help Me Lose Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifestyle Weight loss If I switch to a vegetarian diet, will I lose weight? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. Not necessarily. A vegetarian diet is not inherently a weight-loss diet, ...

  19. Lose to win: marT pseudogenization in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi contributed to the surV-dependent survival to H2O2, and inside human macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A P; Villagra, N A; Urrutia, I M; Valenzuela, L M; Talamilla-Espinoza, A; Hidalgo, A A; Rodas, P I; Gil, F; Calderón, I L; Paredes-Sabja, D; Mora, G C; Fuentes, J A

    2016-11-01

    The difference in host range between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) can be partially attributed to the gain of functions, to the loss of functions (i.e. pseudogenization), or to a combination of both processes. As previously reported, the loss of functions by pseudogenization may play a role in bacterial evolution, especially in host-restricted pathogens such as S. Typhi. The marT-fidL operon, located at the SPI-3, encodes the MarT transcriptional regulator and a hypothetical protein (i.e. FidL) with no significant similarities to known proteins, respectively. Even though predicted S. Typhimurium FidL exhibit 99.4% identity with S. Typhi FidL, marT has been annotated as a pseudogene in S. Typhi. In this work, we found that S. Typhi expressing S. Typhimurium marT-fidL exhibited an increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to a decreased survival in presence of H2O2. Moreover, we found that that the presence of a functional copy of S. Typhimurium marT-fidL in S. Typhi resulted in a repression of surV (STY4039), an ORF found in the S. Typhi SPI-3 but absent from S. Typhimurium SPI-3, that contribute to the resistance to H2O2 by decreasing the accumulation of ROS. Finally, we observed that the presence of S. Typhimurium marT-fidL in S. Typhi negatively affected the survival inside macrophage-like cells, but not in epithelial cells, after 24h post infection. Therefore, this work provides evidence arguing that marT pseudogenization in Salmonella Typhi contributed to the surV-dependent survival against H2O2, and inside human macrophage-like cells. This is a good example of how the loss of functions (marT pseudogenization) and the gain of functions (presence of surV) might contribute to phenotypic changes improving virulence.

  20. Losing more by losing it: poker experience, sensitivity to losses and tilting severity.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Jussi; Laakasuo, Michael; Salmela, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    In poker, detrimental decision-making as a result of losing control due to negative emotions is known as tilting. Previous evidence suggests that poker experience is related to better emotion regulation in dealing with poker losses, and possibly to reduced severity of tilting in the game. A correlational on-line study (N = 417) was conducted to operationalize the tilting phenomenon by defining certain experiential characteristics that conceivably protect players from tilting or predispose them to it. These characteristics, as well as a measurement of poker experience, were then used in predicting the severity of tilting. It was hypothesized that (1) players with more poker experience are more likely to perceive having tilted less severely, as a result of accumulating poker experience; (2) players with more poker experience have lower severity of tilting; (3) players with more poker experience report lower emotional sensitivity to losses; and (4) players with a higher emotional sensitivity to losses have higher severity of tilting. Hypotheses 1 and 4 were supported, hypothesis 3 was weakly supported, but contrary to hypothesis 2, poker experience was associated with higher tilting severity. It is argued that these results are sensible if experienced players are less likely to tilt in relative terms, per single hand, but more likely to tilt in the long run.

  1. Why radiologists lose their hospital contracts: is your contract secure?

    PubMed

    Muroff, Lawrence R

    2010-03-01

    Previously, a hospital contract meant tenure for the incumbent group of radiologists; however, those days are long gone. Exclusive contracts have morphed into exclusive contracts with carve-outs. Turf erosion has become a fact of life for radiology practices. Now radiologists are losing their hospital contracts in record numbers. Group size, though helpful for a variety of reasons, does not ensure that a practice will be secure in its hospital setting. The reasons that groups lose their hospital contracts are varied, and in this paper, the author discusses the most common ones. Suggestions to help practices avoid this unfortunate fate are presented.

  2. Genome-Wide Deletion Screening with the Array CGH Method in Mouse Offspring Derived from Irradiated Spermatogonia Indicates that Mutagenic Responses are Highly Variable among Genes.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Jun-Ichi; Kodaira, Mieko; Miura, Akiko; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Yoshiko; Imanaka, Masaaki; Kitamura, Jun; Cullings, Harry; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Nakamura, Nori

    2016-12-01

    Until the end of the 20th century, mouse germ cell data on induced mutation rates, which were collected using classical genetic methods at preselected specific loci, provided the principal basis for estimates of genetic risks from radiation in humans. The work reported on here is an extension of earlier efforts in this area using molecular methods. It focuses on validating the use of array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) methods for identifying radiation-induced copy number variants (CNVs) and specifically for DNA deletions. The emphasis on deletions stems from the view that it constitutes the predominant type of radiation-induced genetic damage, which is relevant for estimating genetic risks in humans. In the current study, deletion mutations were screened in the genomes of F1 mice born to unirradiated or 4 Gy irradiated sires at the spermatogonia stage (100 offspring each). The array CGH analysis was performed using a "2M array" with over 2 million probes with a mean interprobe distance of approximately 1 kb. The results provide evidence of five molecularly-confirmed paternally-derived deletions in the irradiated group (5/100) and one in the controls (1/100). These data support a calculation, which estimates that the mutation rate is 1 × 10(-2)/Gy per genome for induced deletions; this is much lower than would be expected if one assumes that the specific locus rate of 1 × 10(-5)/locus per Gy (at 34 loci) is applicable to other genes in the genome. The low observed rate of induced deletions suggests that the effective number of genes/genomic regions at which recoverable deletions could be induced would be only approximately 1,000. This estimate is far lower than expected from the size of the mouse genome (>20,000 genes). Such a discrepancy between observation and expectation can occur if the genome contains numerous genes that are far less sensitive to radiation-induced deletions, if many deletion-bearing offspring are not viable or if the current

  3. Reduction of spermatogonia and testosterone in rat testes flown on Space Lab-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, Delbert E.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of space flight on rat testes were investigated. The weight, spermatogonial cell count, and testosterone levels in six rats flown on Space Lab-3 were measured. It is observed that compared to ground control rats the average weight loss was 7.1 percent and the spermatogonial cell count decreased by 7.5 percent. The data reveal that the testosterone level for large control rats was 9.13 ng/ml and 0.31 ng/ml for flight rats; and 2.54 ng/ml and 0.233 ng/ml for smaller control and flight rats, respectively. It is noted that spermatogenesis and testosterone production are reduced during spaceflight.

  4. Nothing to lose: why early career scientists make ideal entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N

    2014-12-01

    An entrepreneurial movement within science strives to invert the classical trajectory of academic research careers by positioning trainees at the apex of burgeoning industries. Young scientists today have nothing to lose and everything to gain by pursuing this 'third road', and academic institutes and established companies only stand to benefit from supporting this emerging movement of discovery research with economic purpose.

  5. Meaning-Making through Narrative: On Not Losing the Plot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Terry

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the process of meaning-making from within the "narrative" mode and in particular considers the difficulty or even impossibility, in certain kinds of organisational and social situations, of constructing viable narratives. This experience is sometimes referred to as "losing the plot", hence the subtitle of…

  6. Analysis of "Babar Loses His Crown." Technical Report No. 169.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, G. M.; And Others

    This report presents the text analysis of "Babar Loses His Crown," a story for beginning readers. (The techniques used in arriving at the analysis are presented in a Reading Center Technical Report, Number 168, "Problems and Techniques of Text Analysis.") Tables are given for a statistical lexical analysis and for a syntactic…

  7. Who Gains, Who Loses from School Choice: A Research Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce

    Although the school-choice movement has spread quickly, little time has been taken to assess whether the claimed benefits of school choice have actually been realized. This policy brief summarizes empirical evidence to date and addresses the following questions: Who gains from school choice and who loses? Do innovative school organizations arise…

  8. 5 CFR 352.205 - Appeal of losing agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 352.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS Reemployment Rights Based on Movement Between Executive Agencies During Emergencies § 352.205 Appeal of losing agency. An appointing officer who intends to employ with reemployment rights an...

  9. 5 CFR 352.205 - Appeal of losing agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 352.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS Reemployment Rights Based on Movement Between Executive Agencies During Emergencies § 352.205 Appeal of losing agency. An appointing officer who intends to employ with reemployment rights an...

  10. 5 CFR 352.205 - Appeal of losing agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 352.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS Reemployment Rights Based on Movement Between Executive Agencies During Emergencies § 352.205 Appeal of losing agency. An appointing officer who intends to employ with reemployment rights an...

  11. 5 CFR 352.205 - Appeal of losing agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 352.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS Reemployment Rights Based on Movement Between Executive Agencies During Emergencies § 352.205 Appeal of losing agency. An appointing officer who intends to employ with reemployment rights an...

  12. 5 CFR 352.205 - Appeal of losing agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 352.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS Reemployment Rights Based on Movement Between Executive Agencies During Emergencies § 352.205 Appeal of losing agency. An appointing officer who intends to employ with reemployment rights an...

  13. Learning to Lose: Weight Loss Classes and Personal Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Adult learning takes place not only in educational organisations, but through participation in leisure and special interest groups. Commercially operated weight management organisations recruit large numbers of adults to their classes to learn how to eat healthily and lose weight. They publish readers' "real life" success stories in their…

  14. They Snooze, You Lose: The Educator's Guide to Successful Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmark, Lynell

    2011-01-01

    In today's increasingly visual world, the art of giving presentations is a much-needed talent. "They Snooze, You Lose", provides a comprehensive guide made especially for teachers and administrators who want to become presentation "stars" in their classrooms, at board meetings, or any time they are in front of an audience. This book describes how…

  15. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) and deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL) expression in the testes of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Jung, H J; Yoon, M J

    2017-04-01

    Putative markers for each specific germ cell stage can be a useful tool to study the fate and functions of these cells. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) is a putative marker for undifferentiated spermatogonia in humans, rats and horses. The deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL) protein is also expressed by differentiated spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes in several species. However, whether the expression patterns of these molecular markers are identical and applicable to donkeys remains to be elucidated. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression patterns of UTF1 and DAZL in donkey testicular tissue, using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Testicular samples were collected from routine field castration of donkeys in Korea. The reproductive stages (pre- or post-puberty) of the testes were determined from the morphological characteristics of cross-sections of the seminiferous tubules. For IHC, the UTF1 and DAZL primary antibodies were diluted at 1:100 and 1:200, respectively. The immunolabelling revealed that UTF1 was expressed in approximately 50% of spermatogonia in the pre-pubertal stage, whereas its expression was limited to an early subset of spermatogonia in the post-pubertal stage. DAZL was expressed in some, but not all, spermatogonia in the pre-pubertal spermatogonia, and interestingly, its expression was also observed in spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes in the post-pubertal stage. Co-immunolabelling of the germ cells with both UTF1 and DAZL revealed three types of protein expression patterns at both reproductive stages, namely UTF1 only, DAZL only and both UTF1 and DAZL. These protein molecules were not expressed in Sertoli and Leydig cells. In conclusion, a co-immunolabelling system with UTF1 and DAZL antibodies may be used to identify undifferentiated (UTF1 only), differentiating (UTF1 and DAZL), and differentiated spermatogonia (DAZL only) in donkey testes.

  16. The effect of losing and gaining flow conditions on hyporheic exchange in heterogeneous streambeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, A.; Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Arnon, S.

    2016-09-01

    Bed form-induced hyporheic exchange flux (qH) is increasingly viewed as a key process controlling water fluxes and biogeochemical processes in river networks. Despite the fact that streambeds are inherently heterogeneous, the majority of bed form flume-scale studies were done on homogeneous systems. We conducted salt and dye tracer experiments to study the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions on qH using a laboratory recirculating flume system packed with a heterogeneous streambed, and equipped with a drainage system that enabled us to apply losing or gaining fluxes. We found that when either losing or gaining fluxes increased (regardless of whether the flux was upward or downward), qH followed an exponential decline, the volume of the hyporheic flow cell drastically reduced, and the mean residence times declined moderately. A numerical flow model for the heterogeneous streambed was set up and fitted against the experimental data in order to test whether an equivalent homogeneous case exists. The measured qH were accurately predicted with the heterogeneous model, while it was underestimated using a homogeneous model characterized by the geometric mean of the hydraulic conductivity. It was also shown that in order to produce the results of the heterogeneous model with an equivalent hydraulic conductivity, the latter had to be increased as the losing or gaining fluxes increase. The results strongly suggest that it is critical to adequately account for the heterogeneous streambed structure in order to accurately predict the effect of vertical exchange fluxes between the stream and groundwater on hyporheic exchange.

  17. Structural characterization and primary in vitro cell culture of locust male germline stem cells and their niche.

    PubMed

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2011-03-01

    The establishment of in vitro culture systems to expand stem cells and to elucidate the niche/stem cell interaction is among the most sought-after culture systems of our time. To further investigate niche/stem cell interactions, we evaluated in vitro cultures of isolated intact male germline-niche complexes (i.e., apical complexes), complexes with empty niche spaces, and completely empty niches (i.e., isolated apical cells) from the testes of Locusta migratoria and the interaction of these complexes with isolated germline stem cells, spermatogonia (of transit-amplifying stages), cyst progenitor cells, cyst progenitor cell-like cells, cyst cells, and follicle envelope cells. The structural characteristics of these cell types allow the identification of the different cell types in primary cultures, which we studied in detail by light and electron microscopy. In intact testes germline stem cells strongly adhere to their niche (the apical cell), but emigrate from their niche and form filopodia if the apical complex is put into culture with "standard media." The lively movements of the long filopodia of isolated germline stem cells and spermatogonia may be indicative of their search for specific signals to home to their niche. All other incubated cell types (except for follicle envelope cells) expressed rhizopodia and lobopodia. Nevertheless isolated germline stem cells in culture do not migrate to empty niche spaces of nearby apical cells. This could indicate that apical cells lose their germline stem cell attracting ability in vitro, although apical cells devoid of germline stem cells either by emigration of germline stem cells or by mechanical removal of germline stem cells are capable of surviving in vitro up to 56 days, forming many small lobopodia and performing amoeboid movements. We hypothesize that the breakdown of the apical complex in vitro with standard media interrupts the signaling between the germline stem cells and the niche (and conceivably the cyst

  18. Basic features of bovine spermatogonial culture and effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Pedro M; Soda, Takeshi; van de Kant, H J G; de Rooij, Dirk G

    2006-06-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) are a small self-renewing subpopulation of type A spermatogonia, which for the rest are composed of differentiating cells with a very similar morphology. We studied the development of primary co-cultures of prepubertal bovine Sertoli cells and A spermatogonia and the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) on the numbers and types of spermatogonia, the formation of spermatogonial colonies and the capacity of the cultured SSC to colonize a recipient mouse testis. During the first week of culture many, probably differentiating, A spermatogonia entered apoptosis while others formed pairs and chains of A spermatogonia. After 1 week colonies started to appear that increased in size with time. Numbers of single (A(s)) and paired (A(pr)) spermatogonia were significantly higher in GDNF treated cultures at Days 15 and 25 (P < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively), and the ratio of A(s) to A(pr) and spermatogonial chains (A(al)) was also higher indicating enhanced self-renewal of the SSC. Furthermore, spermatogonial outgrowths in the periphery of the colonies showed a significantly higher number of A spermatogonia with a more primitive morphology under the influence of GDNF (P < 0.05). Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation experiments revealed a 2-fold increase in stem cell activity in GDNF treated spermatogonial cultures (P < 0.01). We conclude that GDNF rather than inducing proliferation, enhances self-renewal and increases survival rates of SSC in the bovine spermatogonial culture system.

  19. Retractile mesenteritis presenting as protein-losing gastroenteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Bahe; Duerksen, Donald R

    2006-01-01

    Retractile mesenteritis is a rare, idiopathic condition characterized by nonspecific inflammation of the mesenteric adipose tissue. The majority of patients present with abdominal pain and/or a palpable mass. In the present report, a 68-year-old man with peripheral edema and mild hypoalbuminemia is presented. Protein-losing gastroenteropathy was confirmed with an abnormal stool alpha1-antitrypsin clearance test and retractile mesenteritis was diagnosed at laparoscopy. This rare condition may respond to therapy with corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, colchicine, progesterone, tamoxifen or thalidomide. Gastroenterologists should consider the diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy in patients who present with unexplained peripheral edema or hypoalbuminemia. The test of choice to confirm this diagnosis is the stool alpha1-antitrypsin clearance test. PMID:17171198

  20. Losing Thomas & Ella: A Father's Story (A Research Comic).

    PubMed

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B

    2015-10-14

    "Losing Thomas & Ella" presents a research comic about one father's perinatal loss of twins. The comic recounts Paul's experience of the hospital and the babies' deaths, and it details the complex grieving process afterward, including themes of anger, distance, relationship stress, self-blame, religious challenges, and resignation. A methodological appendix explains the process of constructing the comic and provides a rationale for the use of comics-based research for illness, death, and grief among practitioners, policy makers, and the bereaved.

  1. Losing a valued member of the medical practice team.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Losing a valued member of your staff can be disruptive, painful, and costly to your medical practice. And despite your best intentions and impeccable employee management policies and skills, things will happen beyond your control, and people move on. Being prepared for that possibility will help you minimize and contain the damage and move your practice forward. This article suggests 15 strategies that you can use to mitigate the effects of losing a valued employee. These include strategies to protect your practice's interests and several that will smooth the transition for your remaining staff. This article also describes 10 ways that losing a valued employee can impact a practice. It offers 10 additional strategies to help you cope with the death of an employee, one of the most difficult challenges a practice manager may ever face. This article further suggests several easy-to-implement practice management techniques that will help you soften the blow of employee turnover. It offers a sample farewell letter to announce an employee's departure from your practice and suggests six knowledge transfer questions to ask before the employee leaves. Finally, this article provides a comprehensive list of more than 30 thoughtful, eye-opening, and revealing questions that you can ask in an employee exit interview or exit survey.

  2. MicroRNAs 221 and 222 regulate the undifferentiated state in mammalian male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-En; Racicot, Karen E; Kaucher, Amy V; Oatley, Melissa J; Oatley, Jon M

    2013-01-15

    Continuity of cycling cell lineages relies on the activities of undifferentiated stem cell-containing subpopulations. Transition to a differentiating state must occur periodically in a fraction of the population to supply mature cells, coincident with maintenance of the undifferentiated state in others to sustain a foundational stem cell pool. At present, molecular mechanisms regulating these activities are poorly defined for most cell lineages. Spermatogenesis is a model process that is supported by an undifferentiated spermatogonial population and transition to a differentiating state involves attained expression of the KIT receptor. We found that impaired function of the X chromosome-clustered microRNAs 221 and 222 (miR-221/222) in mouse undifferentiated spermatogonia induces transition from a KIT(-) to a KIT(+) state and loss of stem cell capacity to regenerate spermatogenesis. Both Kit mRNA and KIT protein abundance are influenced by miR-221/222 function in spermatogonia. Growth factors that promote maintenance of undifferentiated spermatogonia upregulate miR-221/222 expression; whereas exposure to retinoic acid, an inducer of spermatogonial differentiation, downregulates miR-221/222 abundance. Furthermore, undifferentiated spermatogonia overexpressing miR-221/222 are resistant to retinoic acid-induced transition to a KIT(+) state and are incapable of differentiation in vivo. These findings indicate that miR-221/222 plays a crucial role in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mammalian spermatogonia through repression of KIT expression.

  3. Germline stem cells: the first guards of heredity.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Fouchet, Pierre

    2008-02-07

    The genes involved in the cellular response to DNA damage are crucial for ensuring DNA integrity during spermatogenesis. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Takubo et al. (2008) show that ATM, a key kinase of the DNA damage response, is also involved in maintaining the stem cell potential of undifferentiated spermatogonia.

  4. Cool and luminous transients from mass-losing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disc-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity vesc. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The resulting spiral stream becomes unbound for binary mass ratios 0.06 ≲ q ≲ 0.8. For synchronous binaries with non-degenerate components, the spiral-stream arms merge at a radius of ˜10a, where a is the binary semi-major axis, and the accompanying shock thermalizes about 10 per cent of the kinetic power of the outflow. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to ˜106 L⊙ and effective temperatures spanning 500 ≲ Teff ≲ 6000 K, which is compatible with many of the class of recently discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients. Outflows from mass-losing binaries can produce luminous (105 L⊙) and cool (Teff ≲ 1500 K) transients lasting a year or longer, as has potentially been detected by Spitzer surveys of nearby galaxies.

  5. Tumor suppressor gene Rb is required for self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueh-Chiang; de Rooij, Dirk G; Page, David C

    2013-07-30

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb is essential for maintaining the quiescence and for regulating the differentiation of somatic stem cells. Inactivation of Rb in somatic stem cells typically leads to their overexpansion, often followed by increased apoptosis, defective terminal differentiation, and tumor formation. However, Rb's roles in germ-line stem cells have not been explored. We conditionally disrupted the Rb gene in mouse germ cells in vivo and discovered unanticipated consequences for GFRa1-protein-expressing A(single) (GFRa1(+) A(s)) spermatogonia, the major source of male germ-line stem cells. Rb-deficient GFRa1(+) A(s) spermatogonia were present at normal density in testes 5 d after birth, but they lacked the capacity for self-renewal, resulting in germ cell depletion by 2 mo of age. Rb deficiency did not affect the proliferative activity of GFRa1(+) A(s) spermatogonia, but their progeny were exclusively transit-amplifying progenitor spermatogonia and did not include GFRa1(+) A(s) spermatogonia. In addition, Rb deficiency caused prolonged proliferation of progenitor spermatogonia, transiently enlarging this population. Despite these defects, Rb deficiency did not block terminal differentiation into functional sperm; offspring were readily obtained from young males whose germ cell pool was not yet depleted. We conclude that Rb is required for self-renewal of germ-line stem cells, but contrary to its critical roles in somatic stem cells, it is dispensable for their proliferative activity and terminal differentiation. Thus, this study identifies an unexpected function for Rb in maintaining the stem cell pool in the male germ line.

  6. WHO in retreat: is it losing its influence?

    PubMed Central

    Godlee, F.

    1994-01-01

    WHO says it has three main functions: to set normative standards; to provide technical advice and assistance on medical matters; and to advocate changes in health policy. During its 46 year history the first two functions have been a constant and uncontroversial backbone through which WHO has earned its reputation for scientific excellence. The third function, advocacy, came to the fore with the launch of Health for All in 1977, after which WHO took a key role in influencing international health policy. WHO's friends and critics alike now say that the organisation is losing its influence and retreating into its technical and biomedical shell. This article maps the changes in WHO's approach over the past 46 years and considers whether fears about its loss of influence are justified. Images p1492-a p1492-b p1493-a p1494-a FIG 1 PMID:7804058

  7. Honeybee society destruction by losing control of self-reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peipei; Su, Beibei; He, Da-Ren

    2004-03-01

    Recently the mechanism of the damage caused by invasion of Apis mellifera capensis honeybee into the normal A. M. Scutellata colonies became interesting for scientists due to the fact that the mechanism may resemble those of cancer vicious hyperplasia, spreading of some epidemic, and turbulence of society induced by some bad society groups. For the mechanism, we suggest a new guess, which means that the losing control of self-reproduction disturbs and throws information structure of the society into confuse. We also simulate the damage process with a cellular automata based on the idea. The simulation shows that the process is equivalent to a non-equilibrium percolation phase transition. This discussion remind us that the management and monitor on the information network between society members may be a more effective way for avoiding the overflow of the destructor sub-colonies.

  8. Aging neural progenitors lose competence to respond to mitogenic Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Dylan R.; Bayraktar, Omer Ali; Doe, Chris Q.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila neural stem cells (neuroblasts) are a powerful model system for investigating stem cell self-renewal, specification of temporal identity, and progressive restriction in competence. Notch signaling is a conserved cue that is an important determinant of cell fate in many contexts across animal development; for example mammalian T cell differentiation in the thymus and neuroblast specification in Drosophila are both regulated by Notch signaling. However, Notch also functions as a mitogen, and constitutive Notch signaling potentiates T cell leukemia as well as Drosophila neuroblast tumors. While the role of Notch signaling has been studied in these and other cell types, it remains unclear how stem cells and progenitors change competence to respond to Notch over time. Notch is required in type II neuroblasts for normal development of their transit amplifying progeny, intermediate neural progenitors (INPs). Here we find that aging INPs lose competence to respond to constitutively active Notch signaling. Moreover, we show that reducing the levels of the old INP temporal transcription factor Eyeless/Pax6 allows Notch signaling to promote the de-differentiation of INP progeny into ectopic INPs, thereby creating a proliferative mass of ectopic progenitors in the brain. These findings provide a new system for studying progenitor competence, and identify a novel role for the conserved transcription factor Eyeless/Pax6 in blocking Notch signaling during development. PMID:26585279

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Pluripotent Human Spermatogonial Stem Cell-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kossack, Nina; Meneses, Juanito; Shefi, Shai; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Chavez, Shawn; Nicholas, Cory; Gromoll, Joerg; Turek, Paul J; Reijo-Pera, Renee A

    2009-01-01

    Several reports have documented the derivation of pluripotent cells (multipotent germline stem cells) from spermatogonial stem cells obtained from the adult mouse testis. These spermatogonia-derived stem cells express embryonic stem cell markers and differentiate to the three primary germ layers, as well as the germline. Data indicate that derivation may involve reprogramming of endogenous spermatogonia in culture. Here, we report the derivation of human multipotent germline stem cells (hMGSCs) from a testis biopsy. The cells express distinct markers of pluripotency, form embryoid bodies that contain derivatives of all three germ layers, maintain a normal XY karyotype, are hypomethylated at the H19 locus, and express high levels of telomerase. Teratoma assays indicate the presence of human cells 8 weeks post-transplantation but limited teratoma formation. Thus, these data suggest the potential to derive pluripotent cells from human testis biopsies but indicate a need for novel strategies to optimize hMGSC culture conditions and reprogramming. PMID:18927477

  10. Marginal Zone Lymphoma Complicated by Protein Losing Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stanek, Nadine; Bauerfeind, Peter; Herzog, Guido; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Reiner, Cäcilia; Manz, Markus G.; Goede, Jeroen S.

    2016-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) refers to excessive intestinal protein loss, resulting in hypoalbuminemia. Underlying pathologies include conditions leading to either reduced intestinal barrier or lymphatic congestion. We describe the case of a patient with long-lasting diffuse abdominal problems and PLE. Repetitive endoscopies were normal with only minimal lymphangiectasia in biopsies. Further evaluations revealed an indolent marginal zone lymphoma with minor bone marrow infiltration. Monotherapy with rituximab decreased bone marrow infiltration of the lymphoma but did not relieve PLE. Additional treatments with steroids, octreotide, a diet devoid of long-chain fatty-acids, and parenteral nutrition did not prevent further clinical deterioration with marked weight loss (23 kg), further reduction in albumin concentrations (nadir 8 g/L), and a pronounced drop in performance status. Finally, immunochemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine resulted in hematological remission and remarkable clinical improvement. 18 months after therapy the patient remains free of gastrointestinal complaints and has regained his body weight with normal albumin levels. We demonstrate a case of PLE secondary to indolent marginal zone lymphoma. No intestinal pathologies were detected, contrasting a severe and almost lethal clinical course. Immunochemotherapy relieved lymphoma and PLE, suggesting that a high suspicion of lymphoma is warranted in otherwise unexplained cases of PLE. PMID:27891267

  11. Marginal Zone Lymphoma Complicated by Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Nadine; Bauerfeind, Peter; Herzog, Guido; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Reiner, Cäcilia; Manz, Markus G; Goede, Jeroen S; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) refers to excessive intestinal protein loss, resulting in hypoalbuminemia. Underlying pathologies include conditions leading to either reduced intestinal barrier or lymphatic congestion. We describe the case of a patient with long-lasting diffuse abdominal problems and PLE. Repetitive endoscopies were normal with only minimal lymphangiectasia in biopsies. Further evaluations revealed an indolent marginal zone lymphoma with minor bone marrow infiltration. Monotherapy with rituximab decreased bone marrow infiltration of the lymphoma but did not relieve PLE. Additional treatments with steroids, octreotide, a diet devoid of long-chain fatty-acids, and parenteral nutrition did not prevent further clinical deterioration with marked weight loss (23 kg), further reduction in albumin concentrations (nadir 8 g/L), and a pronounced drop in performance status. Finally, immunochemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine resulted in hematological remission and remarkable clinical improvement. 18 months after therapy the patient remains free of gastrointestinal complaints and has regained his body weight with normal albumin levels. We demonstrate a case of PLE secondary to indolent marginal zone lymphoma. No intestinal pathologies were detected, contrasting a severe and almost lethal clinical course. Immunochemotherapy relieved lymphoma and PLE, suggesting that a high suspicion of lymphoma is warranted in otherwise unexplained cases of PLE.

  12. Indemnification: Win/lose or win/win

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, G.M.

    1996-08-01

    Some of you may be wondering how an oil company employee came to be speaking on indemnity. I`ve been wondering that myself and have even considered the possibility that the conference thought it might be interesting to have a presentation in which the sacrificial lamb is led to the slaughter. I hope that`s not the case. I am not speaking today as a representative of Conoco or as a spokesperson for the operator perspective. I do not intend to tell you what position to take with respect to contractual indemnification. My purpose is to share with you some of my thoughts on indemnification and provide you with some perspective in which to consider your own objectives in structuring indemnities and evaluate whether your current positions meet those objectives. What is contractual indemnification? To some, it is a vehicle by which to transfer all the risk inherent in their operations to another party. Others view it as a means of protecting a deductible or self-insured retention. Some think of it as a bloodbath. There are a few who believe that it is a game in which the only way to win is to ensure the other party loses. The states of Texas and Louisiana believe contractual indemnities are {open_quotes}inequities foisted on certain contractors.{close_quotes} I would like to propose that indemnity can be nothing more than an economic transaction which attempts to allocate risk in a cost effective manner.

  13. Age at which the long-cycling spermatogonial stem-cell population is established in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Oakberg, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The long-cycling A/sub 5/ spermatogonia are the cells of primary importance in estimating the reproductive and genetic hazards of radiation, chemicals, and pollutants in mammals. This addresses the following questions: (1) when do the long-cycling cells appear; (2) are they present at birth; and (3) from which cells do they arise. (ACR)

  14. Fractionation of human spermatogenic cells using STA-PUT gravity sedimentation and their miRNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hai, Yanan; Yuan, Qingqing; Liu, Yang; Guo, Ying; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2015-01-30

    Human spermatogenic cells have not yet been isolated, and notably, their global miRNA profiles remain unknown. Here we have effectively isolated human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids using STA-PUT velocity sedimentation. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and meiosis spread assays revealed that the purities of isolated human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes, and round spermatids were 90%, and the viability of these isolated cells was over 98%. MiRNA microarrays showed distinct global miRNA profiles among human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes, and round spermatids. Thirty-two miRNAs were significantly up-regulated whereas 78 miRNAs were down-regulated between human spermatogonia and pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that these miRNAs are involved in the meiosis and mitosis, respectively. In total, 144 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated while 29 miRNAs were down-regulated between pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids, reflecting potential roles of these miRNAs in mediating spermiogenesis. A number of novel binding targets of miRNAs were further identified using various softwares and verified by real-time PCR. Our ability of isolating human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids and unveiling their distinct global miRNA signatures and novel targets could provide novel small RNA regulatory mechanisms mediating three phases of human spermatogenesis and offer new targets for the treatment of male infertility.

  15. Effect of experimental wood addition on hyporheic exchange and thermal dynamics in a losing meadow stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2012-10-01

    Stream restoration structures such as large wood can enhance shallow river-groundwater exchange, or hyporheic exchange, and alter temperature dynamics in restored reaches. We added and then removed channel-spanning logs in a second-order mountain meadow stream to test short-term impacts on hyporheic exchange, streambed temperatures, and surface water temperatures. Based on vertical seepage measurements and numerical simulations of hyporheic fluid and heat flow, large wood addition increased hyporheic exchange and altered streambed temperatures. In this losing stream, meter-scale hyporheic exchange cells formed beneath large wood. Upwelling pore water downstream of logs stabilized diel temperature cycles across <8% of the streambed, creating localized but potentially valuable thermal refuge. Exchange rates were <0.1% of channel discharge—too small to impact the range of diel temperature signals in surface water. However, the lag between downstream and upstream diel temperature signals was slightly greater with large wood, which may indicate that surface storage zones rather than hyporheic storage zones increased thermal retardation. Losing conditions limited the spatial extent and rates of hyporheic exchange near large wood. Impacts of large wood reintroduction on hyporheic exchange depend on ambient groundwater discharge or recharge, streambed permeability, channel Froude number, large wood blockage ratio, and large wood spacing. In many streams, large wood reintroduction may increase hyporheic habitat volume and complexity but may not increase exchange rates enough to alter surface water temperature or chemistry. Surface storage zones such as eddies and pools can still influence heat and solute retention in the channel.

  16. Towards a no-lose theorem for naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Saraswat, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    We derive a phenomenological no-lose theorem for naturalness up to the TeV scale, which applies when quantum corrections to the Higgs mass from top quarks are canceled by perturbative beyond Standard Model (BSM) particles (top partners) of similar multiplicity due to to some symmetry. Null results from LHC searches already seem to disfavor such partners if they are colored. Any partners with SM charges and ˜TeV masses will be exhaustively probed by the LHC and a future 100 TeV collider. Therefore, we focus on neutral top partners. While these arise in twin Higgs theories, we analyze neutral top partners as model-independently as possible using effective field theory and simplified model methods. We classify all perturbative neutral top partner structures in order to compute their irreducible low-energy signatures at proposed future lepton and hadron colliders, as well as the irreducible tunings suffered in each scenario. Central to our theorem is the assumption that SM-charged BSM states appear in the UV completion of neutral naturalness, which is the case in all known examples. Direct production at the 100 TeV collider then allows this scale to be probed at the ˜10 TeV level. We find that proposed future colliders probe any such scenario of naturalness with tuning of 10% or better. This provides very strong model-independent motivation for both new lepton and hadron colliders, which in tandem act as discovery machines for general naturalness. We put our results in context by discussing other possibilities for naturalness, including "swarms" of top partners, inherently nonperturbative or exotic physics, or theories without SM-charged states in the UV completion. Realizing a concrete scenario which avoids our arguments while still lacking experimental signatures remains an open model-building challenge.

  17. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments...

  18. Leaders as combat fighter pilots. Research project targets leaders who support money-losing business strategies.

    PubMed

    Mitlyng, J W; Francis, D M; Wenzel, F J

    2001-01-01

    When strategic plans go awry and begin losing money, the smart thing to do is change course. But some leaders get so involved with the plan, they fail to navigate properly and fly right into the target. The organization can lose millions. Examine why this happens and what you can do to prevent it from happening in your organization.

  19. Body image and strategies to lose weight and increase muscle among boys and girls.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Marita P; Ricciardelli, Lina A

    2003-01-01

    This study examined factors that influence body image and strategies to either lose weight or increase muscle among children. Participants were 237 boys and 270 girls. Body mass index (BMI), body dissatisfaction, cognitions and behaviors to both lose weight and increase muscles, as well as self-esteem and positive and negative affect, were evaluated. Self-esteem was associated with body satisfaction, positive affect predicted strategies to lose weight and increase muscles, and negative affect predicted body dissatisfaction and cognitions to lose weight and increase muscles. Boys were more likely to focus on changing muscles. Respondents with higher BMIs were more focused on losing weight butnot muscle. The discussion focuses on health risk behaviors related to eating and exercise among children.

  20. Spermatogonial stem cells in the testis of an endangered bovid: Indian black buck (Antilope cervicapra L.).

    PubMed

    Goel, Sandeep; Reddy, Niranjan; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Suman, Sanjay Kumar; Pawar, Rahul Mohanchandra

    2011-07-01

    Numerous wild bovids are facing threat of extinction owing to the loss of habitat and various other reasons. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) represent the only germline stem cells in adult body that are capable of self-renewal and that can undergo differentiation to produce haploid germ cells. SSCs can, therefore, serve as a useful resource for preservation of germplasm of threatened and endangered mammals. The Indian black buck (Antilope cervicapra L.) is a small Indian antelope that is listed as endangered by the Indian Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. Immunohistochemical analysis of testes tissues of black buck revealed the presence of spermatogonia that were specifically stained by lectin-Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA). The expression of pluripotent cell-specific markers, NANOG and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), was detected in spermatogonia. Interestingly, the expression of POU5F1 (OCT3/4) was absent from spermatogonia, however, it was detected in differentiating cells such as spermatocytes and round spermatids but not in elongated spermatids. The expression of NANOG protein was also present in spermatocytes but absent in round and elongated spermatids. Using the testis transplantation assay, stem cell potential of black buck spermatogonia was confirmed as indicated by the presence of colonized DBA-stained cells in the basal membrane of seminiferous tubules of xenotransplanted mice testis. The findings from this study suggest the presence of SSCs in the testis of an endangered bovid for the first time and open new possibility to explore the use of SSCs in conservation.

  1. Immunological changes following protein losing enteropathy after surgery total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) by cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Lenz, Dominik; Mittag, Anja; Sauer, Ursula; Wild, Lena; Hess, John; Schranz, Dietmar; Hambsch, Jörg; Schneider, Peter; Tárnok, Attila

    2008-02-01

    Complex immunophenotyping single-cell analysis are essential for systems biology and cytomics. The application of cytomics in immunology and cardiac research and diagnostics is very broad, ranging from the better understanding of the cardiovascular cell biology to the identification of heart function and immune consequences after surgery. TCPC or Fontan-type circulation is an accepted palliative surgery for patients with a functionally univentricular heart. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), the enteric loss of proteins, is a potential late complication after TCPC surgery. PLE etiology is poorly understood, but immunological factors seem to play a role. This study was aimed to gain insight into immune phenotype alterations following post-TCPC PLE. Patients were studied during routine follow-up up to 5yrs after surgery, blood samples of TCPC patients without (n=21, age 6.8+/-2.6 years at surgery; mean+/-SD) and with manifest PLE (n=12, age 12.8+/- 4.5 years at sampling) and age matched healthy children (control, n=22, age 8.6+/-2.5 years) were collected. Routine laboratory, immune phenotype and serological parameters were determined. Following PLE the immune phenotype dramatically changed with signs of acute inflammation (increased neutrophil and monocyte count, CRP, IL-8). In contrast, lymphocyte count (NK-cells, αβTCR +CD4 +, αβTCR +CD8 + cells) decreased (p<0.001). The residual T-cells had elevated CD25 and CD69 expression. In PLE-patients unique cell populations with CD3 +αβ/γδTCR - and αβTCR +CD4 -8 - phenotype were present in increased frequencies. Our studies show dramatically altered leukocyte phenotype after PLE in TCPC patients. These alterations resemble to changes in autoimmune diseases. We conclude that autoimmune processes may play a role in etiology and pathophysiology of PLE.

  2. Isolation and cultivation of stem cells from adult mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Kaomei; Wolf, Frieder; Becker, Alexander; Engel, Wolfgang; Nayernia, Karim; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) as well as induction of SSCs into pluripotent stem cells will allow us to study their biological characteristics and their applications in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the isolation of testicular cells from adolescent mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the enrichment of undifferentiated spermatogonia by laminin selection or genetic selection using Stra8-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) transgenic mice; the cultivation and conversion of undifferentiated spermatogonia into embryonic stem-like cells, so-called multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs); and characterization of these cells. Normally, it will take about 16 weeks to obtain stable maGSC lines starting from the isolation of testicular cells.

  3. spict, a cyst cell-specific gene, regulates starvation-induced spermatogonial cell death in the Drosophila testis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ason C-Y; Yang, Heiko; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2017-01-10

    Tissues are maintained in a homeostatic state by balancing the constant loss of old cells with the continued production of new cells. Tissue homeostasis can shift between high and low turnover states to cope with environmental changes such as nutrient availability. Recently, we discovered that the elimination of transit-amplifying cells plays a critical role in maintaining the stem cell population during protein starvation in the Drosophila testis. Here, we identify spict, a gene expressed specifically in differentiating cyst cells, as a regulator of spermatogonial death. Spict is upregulated in cyst cells that phagocytose dying spermatogonia. We propose that phagocytosis and subsequent clearance of dead spermatogonia, which is partly promoted by Spict, contribute to stem cell maintenance during prolonged protein starvation.

  4. spict, a cyst cell-specific gene, regulates starvation-induced spermatogonial cell death in the Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ason C.-Y.; Yang, Heiko; Yamashita, Yukiko M.

    2017-01-01

    Tissues are maintained in a homeostatic state by balancing the constant loss of old cells with the continued production of new cells. Tissue homeostasis can shift between high and low turnover states to cope with environmental changes such as nutrient availability. Recently, we discovered that the elimination of transit-amplifying cells plays a critical role in maintaining the stem cell population during protein starvation in the Drosophila testis. Here, we identify spict, a gene expressed specifically in differentiating cyst cells, as a regulator of spermatogonial death. Spict is upregulated in cyst cells that phagocytose dying spermatogonia. We propose that phagocytosis and subsequent clearance of dead spermatogonia, which is partly promoted by Spict, contribute to stem cell maintenance during prolonged protein starvation. PMID:28071722

  5. [Dominant lethality and translocations in the sex cells of male rats under low-intensity gamma irradiation].

    PubMed

    Baev, I A; Rupova, I M

    1978-11-01

    Adult male rats were given 1300 rad of chronic gamma-irradiation (0.08 rad/min) Dominant lethal rates were found to be high (ranging from 48 to 75%) in irradiated postmeiotic cells and clearly lower (6.8%) in spermatogonia. The chromosome aberration (reciprocal translocation) yields observed with 1300 rad chronic irradiation were comparatively low, averaging 1.6%. Spermatogonia irradiation at low dose rate resulted in a smaller effect as compared to the genetic effects of a single acute exposure.

  6. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Aggregation Behaviors of a Two-Species System with Lose-Lose Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Xia; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ke, Jian-Hong

    2010-06-01

    We propose an aggregation evolution model of two-species (A- and B-species) aggregates to study the prevalent aggregation phenomena in social and economic systems. In this model, A- and B-species aggregates perform self-exchange-driven growths with the exchange rate kernels K (k,l) = Kkl and L(k,l) = Lkl, respectively, and the two species aggregates perform self-birth processes with the rate kernels J1(k) = J1k and J2(k) = J2k, and meanwhile the interaction between the aggregates of different species A and B causes a lose-lose scheme with the rate kernel H(k,l) = Hkl. Based on the mean-field theory, we investigated the evolution behaviors of the two species aggregates to study the competitions among above three aggregate evolution schemes on the distinct initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 of the two species. The results show that the evolution behaviors of A- and B-species are crucially dominated by the competition between the two self-birth processes, and the initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 play important roles, while the lose-lose scheme play important roles in some special cases.

  7. EDITORIAL: Advanced fractions? or use it or lose it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1997-09-01

    kind of mixture of skill, knowledge and understanding required for successful mathematical operations is use it or lose it. We went `decimal' a long time ago, and the ideas of pence as 12ths of a shilling and shillings as 20ths of a pound are positively mediaeval for everyone under 40 or so. Remember farthings? In those days fractions were everywhere. Nowadays they are somewhat esoteric for the average citizen - and physicist. Yet fractions are vital in advanced mathematics, e.g. involving the differentiation and integration of polynomial fractions, as Peter Gill pointed out. This is why he was teaching simple fractions to his students, and possibly why their competence at these was such a good indicator of success in their end-of-year mathematics exam. What can we conclude from all this? I suggest two things. First, that fractions as illustrated above might well be considered as advanced mathematics, a fit and intriguing topic for an A-level course. Ordinary citizens should be taught - very thoroughly - to understand and use that useful kind of fraction based on dividing things into 100 parts, called percentages. Secondly, and more fundamentally, we should learn from this example to take a hard look at what we teach and what we need to teach, removing or adapting those things that exist in syllabuses and the National Curriculum for reasons of purely historical inertia. I hope that the IoP Working Party on Mathematics and Physics, due to report in the autumn, has looked hard at issues like this. And, of course, anyone interested in this topic is cordially invited to the Education Group's 16 - 19 Day Conference, which this year is about this vexed question of what mathematics physics learners need - and how they get it. At IoP Headquarters on Saturday, 15 November 1997. Details from Catherine Wilson.

  8. Estimation of mutation induction rates in AT-rich sequences using a genome scanning approach after X irradiation of mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Nori; Katayama, Hiroaki; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-08-01

    We have previously used NotI as the marker enzyme (recognizing GCGGCCGC) in a genome scanning approach for detection of mutations induced in mouse spermatogonia and estimated the mutation induction rate as about 0.7 x 10(-5) per locus per Gy. To see whether different parts of the genome have different sensitivities for mutation induction, we used AflII (recognizing CTTAAG) as the marker enzyme in the present study. After the screening of 1,120 spots in each mouse offspring, we found five mutations among 92,655 spots from the unirradiated paternal genome, five mutations among 218,411 spots from the unirradiated maternal genome, and 13 mutations among 92,789 spots from 5 Gy-exposed paternal genome. Among the 23 mutations, 11 involved mouse satellite DNA sequences (AT-rich), and the remaining 12 mutations also involved AT-rich but non-satellite sequences. Both types of sequences were found as multiple, similar-sequence blocks in the genome. Counting each member of cluster mutations separately and excluding results on one hypermutable spot, the spontaneous mutation rates were estimated as 3.2 (+/- 1.9) x 10(-5) and 2.3 (+/- 1.0) x 10(-5) per locus per generation in the male and female genomes, respectively, and the mutation induction rate as 1.1 (+/- 1.2) x 10(-5) per locus per Gy. The induction rate would be reduced to 0.9 x 10(-5) per locus per Gy if satellite sequence mutations were excluded from this analysis. The results indicate that mutation induction rates do not largely differ between GC-rich and AT-rich regions: 1 x 10(-5) per locus per Gy or less, which is close to 1.08 x 10(-5) per locus per Gy, the current estimate for the mean mutation induction rate in mice.

  9. The effect of the interval between dose applications on the observed specific-locus mutation rate in the mouse following fractionated treatments of spermatogonia with ethylnitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Favor, J; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Ehling, U H; Wulff, A; van Zeeland, A A

    1997-03-21

    Our earlier analyses have suggested an apparent threshold dose-response for ethylnitrosourea-induced specific-locus mutations in treated spermatogonia of the mouse to be due to a saturable repair process. In the current study a series of fractionated-treatment experiments was carried out in which male (102 x C3H)F1 mice were exposed to 4 x 10, 2 x 40. 4 x 20 or 4 x 40 mg ethylnitrosourea per kg body weight with 24 h between applications; 4 x 40 mg ethylnitrosourea per kg body weight with 72 h between dose applications; and 2 x 40, 4 x 20 and 4 x 40 mg ethylnitrosourea per kg body weight with 168 h between dose applications. For all experiments with 24-h intervals between dose applications, there was no effect due to dose fractionation on the observed mutation rates, indicating the time interval between dose applications to be shorter than the recovery time of the repair processes acting on ethylnitrosourea-induced DNA adducts. In contrast, a fractionation interval of 168 h was associated with a significant reduction in the observed mutation rate due to recovery of the repair process. However, although reduced, the observed mutation rates for fractionation intervals of 168 h were higher than the spontaneous specific-locus mutation rate. These observations contradict the expectation for a true threshold dose response. We interpret this discrepancy to be due to the differences in the predictions of a mathematical abstraction of experimental data and the complexities of the biological system being studied. Biologically plausible explanations of the discrepancy are presented.

  10. Testicular histology and germ cell cytology during spermatogenesis in the Mississippi map turtle, Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, from Northeast Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Kelsey; Trauth, Stanley E; Gribbins, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The testicular histology and cytology of spermatogenesis in Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii were examined using specimens collected between July 1996 and May 2004 from counties in northeastern Arkansas. A histological examination of the testes and germ cell cytology indicates a postnuptial testicular cycle of spermatogenesis and a major fall spermiation event. The majority of the germ cell populations in May and June specimens are represented by resting spermatogonia, type A spermatogonia, type B spermatogonia, pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and numerous Sertoli cell nuclei near the basement membrane. The start of proliferation is evident as spermatogonia in metaphase are present near the basal lamina and many of these germ cells have entered meiosis in June seminiferous tubules. Major spermatogenic events occur in the June and July specimens and result in an increased height of the seminiferous epithelium and increased diameter of the seminiferous tubules. The germ cell population during this time is represented by spermatogonia (type A, B, and resting), hypertrophic cells, large populations of early primary spermatocytes, and early round spermatids. By September, the major germ cell population has progressed past meiosis with abundant round and early elongating spermatids dominating the seminiferous epithelium. October seminiferous epithelia are marked by a decreas in height and mature spermatozoa fill the luminal space. Round and elongating spermatids constitute the largest portion of the germ cell population. Following the spermiation event, the testes enter a period of quiescence that lasts till the next spermatogenic cycle, which begins in the subsequent spring. Based on the cytological development of the seminiferous tubules revealed by our study, Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii demonstrates a temporal germ cell development strategy similar to other temperate reptiles. A single major generation of germ cells progresses through spermatogenesis each year

  11. Testicular histology and germ cell cytology during spermatogenesis in the Mississippi map turtle, Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, from Northeast Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Kelsey; Trauth, Stanley E; Gribbins, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The testicular histology and cytology of spermatogenesis in Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii were examined using specimens collected between July 1996 and May 2004 from counties in northeastern Arkansas. A histological examination of the testes and germ cell cytology indicates a postnuptial testicular cycle of spermatogenesis and a major fall spermiation event. The majority of the germ cell populations in May and June specimens are represented by resting spermatogonia, type A spermatogonia, type B spermatogonia, pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and numerous Sertoli cell nuclei near the basement membrane. The start of proliferation is evident as spermatogonia in metaphase are present near the basal lamina and many of these germ cells have entered meiosis in June seminiferous tubules. Major spermatogenic events occur in the June and July specimens and result in an increased height of the seminiferous epithelium and increased diameter of the seminiferous tubules. The germ cell population during this time is represented by spermatogonia (type A, B, and resting), hypertrophic cells, large populations of early primary spermatocytes, and early round spermatids. By September, the major germ cell population has progressed past meiosis with abundant round and early elongating spermatids dominating the seminiferous epithelium. October seminiferous epithelia are marked by a decreas in height and mature spermatozoa fill the luminal space. Round and elongating spermatids constitute the largest portion of the germ cell population. Following the spermiation event, the testes enter a period of quiescence that lasts till the next spermatogenic cycle, which begins in the subsequent spring. Based on the cytological development of the seminiferous tubules revealed by our study, Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii demonstrates a temporal germ cell development strategy similar to other temperate reptiles. A single major generation of germ cells progresses through spermatogenesis each year

  12. Low-Carb Diet: Could It Help You Lose Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... provide bulk and serve other body functions beyond fuel. Rising levels of blood sugar trigger the body to release insulin. Insulin helps glucose enter your body's cells. Some glucose is used by your body for energy, fueling all of your activities, whether it's going ...

  13. The histone demethylase KDM1A is essential for the maintenance and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells and progenitors.

    PubMed

    Lambrot, Romain; Lafleur, Christine; Kimmins, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Little is known of the fundamental processes governed by epigenetic mechanisms in the supplier cells of spermatogenesis, the spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). The histone H3 lysine demethylase KDM1A is expressed in spermatogonia. We hypothesized that KDM1A serves in transcriptional regulation of SSCs and fertility. Using a conditional deletion of Kdm1a [conditional knockout (cKO)] in mouse spermatogonia, we determined that Kdm1a is essential for spermatogenesis as adult cKO males completely lack germ cells. Analysis of postnatal testis development revealed that undifferentiated and differentiating spermatogonial populations form in Kdm1a-cKO animals, yet the majority fail to enter meiosis. Loss of germ cells in the cKO was rapid with none remaining by postnatal day (PND) 21. To gain insight into the mechanistic implications of Kdm1a ablation, we isolated PND 6 spermatogonia enriched for SSCs and analyzed their transcriptome by RNA sequencing. Loss of Kdm1a was associated with altered transcription of 1206 genes. Importantly, differentially expressed genes between control and Kdm1a-cKO animals included those that are essential for SSC and progenitor maintenance and spermatogonial differentiation. The complete loss of fertility and failure to establish spermatogenesis indicate that Kdm1a is a master controller of gene transcription in spermatogonia and is required for SSC and progenitor maintenance and differentiation.

  14. Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell compartment in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis occurs throughout the adult lifetime of males and is supported by a robust stem cell system. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the stem cells of postnatal male germ cells, and not only self-renew but also produce differentiated progeny continuously. Recent report revealed that differentiating spermatogonia could revert into an undifferentiated state, although it was believed that SSCs were homogeneous and that differentiating spermatogonia was not reversible. Although several molecules, which regulate SSC, have been identified so far, molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of SSCs as well as the reversible developmental lineage of SSCs remain to be elucidated. In this review, we describe a brief overview of spermatogenesis and summarize the molecular regulation of SSC compartment.

  15. Quantitative analysis of male germline stem cell differentiation reveals a role for the p53-mTORC1 pathway in spermatogonial maintenance.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Mulin; Ferder, Ianina C; Ohguchi, Yasuyo; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    p53 protects cells from DNA damage by inducing cell-cycle arrest upon encountering genomic stress. Among other pathways, p53 elicits such an effect by inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the master regulator of cell proliferation and growth. Although recent studies have indicated roles for both p53 and mTORC1 in stem cell maintenance, it remains unclear whether the p53-mTORC1 pathway is conserved to mediate this process under normal physiological conditions. Spermatogenesis is a classic stem cell-dependent process in which undifferentiated spermatogonia undergo self-renewal and differentiation to maintain the lifelong production of spermatozoa. To better understand this process, we have developed a novel flow cytometry (FACS)-based approach that isolates spermatogonia at consecutive differentiation stages. By using this as a tool, we show that genetic loss of p53 augments mTORC1 activity during early spermatogonial differentiation. Functionally, loss of p53 drives spermatogonia out of the undifferentiated state and causes a consistent expansion of early differentiating spermatogonia until the stage of preleptotene (premeiotic) spermatocyte. The frequency of early meiotic spermatocytes is, however, dramatically decreased. Thus, these data suggest that p53-mTORC1 pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of early spermatogonial differentiation. Moreover, our FACS approach could be a valuable tool in understanding spermatogonial differentiation.

  16. Disseminated Cytomegalovirus Infection and Protein Losing Enteropathy as Presenting Feature of Pediatric Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Safak; Akbulut, Ulas Emre

    2015-01-01

    We report a pediatric patient admitted with abdominal pain, diffuse lower extremity edema and watery diarrhea for two months. Laboratory findings including complete blood count, serum albumin, lipid and immunoglobulin levels were compatible with protein losing enteropathy. Colonoscopic examination revealed diffuse ulcers with smooth raised edge (like "punched out holes") in the colon and terminal ileum. Histopathological examination showed active colitis, ulcerations and inclusion bodies. Immunostaining for cytomegalovirus was positive. Despite supportive management, antiviral therapy, the clinical condition of the patient worsened and developed disseminated cytomegalovirus infection and the patient died. Protein losing enteropathy and disseminated cytomegalovirus infection a presenting of feature in steroid-naive patient with inflammatory bowel disease is very rare. Hypogammaglobulinemia associated with protein losing enteropathy in Crohn's disease may predispose the cytomegalovirus infection in previously healthy children. PMID:25866735

  17. Hiding the plot: parents' moral dilemmas and strategies when helping their overweight children lose weight.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Pernille; Grøn, Lone; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2013-10-01

    In this study we investigated the moral dilemmas and strategies of a group of Danish parents who were trying to help their overweight children lose weight. Data were drawn from repeated semistructured interviews carried out over a period of 2 years with 12 families with overweight children. Using a narrative approach, we show the moral dilemmas parents found themselves in when trying to further the two seemingly incompatible goals of helping their children lose weight and simultaneously strengthening their self-worth. When the children were young, the parents tried to hide the fact that they needed to lose weight to protect them from feeling stigmatized. As the children grew older, the parents became more forthright about weight loss so the children would take on more responsibility. We suggest that for parents, weight loss is experienced as a risky undertaking because they perceive their children's self-worth as being in jeopardy during the process.

  18. Testosterone changes during vicarious experiences of winning and losing among fans at sporting events.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, P C; Dabbs, J M; Fielden, J A; Lutter, C D

    1998-08-01

    Basking in reflected glory, in which individuals increase their self-esteem by identifying with successful others, is usually regarded as a cognitive process that can affect behavior. It may also involve physiological processes, including changes in the production of endocrine hormones. The present research involved two studies of changes in testosterone levels among fans watching their favorite sports teams win or lose. In the first study, participants were eight male fans attending a basketball game between traditional college rivals. In the second study, participants were 21 male fans watching a televised World Cup soccer match between traditional international rivals. Participants provided saliva samples for testosterone assay before and after the contest. In both studies, mean testosterone level increased in the fans of winning teams and decreased in the fans of losing teams. These findings suggest that watching one's heroes win or lose has physiological consequences that extend beyond changes in mood and self-esteem.

  19. Gambling warning messages: The impact of winning and losing on message reception across a gambling session.

    PubMed

    Ginley, Meredith K; Whelan, James P; Keating, Holly A; Meyers, Andrew W

    2016-12-01

    Gambling warning messages have been shown to lead to prevention and modification of risk-taking behaviors. Laboratory studies have shown messages can increase a player's knowledge about gambling specific risks, modify their gambling-related cognitive distortions, and even change play. In the present laboratory study, participants were randomly assigned to a winning or losing slot machine gambling experience where they either viewed periodic warning messages or not. It was hypothesized that those in the message conditions would place smaller bets, spend more time considering bets, and spend less time gambling than those in the control conditions. We also hypothesized participants would play differently across the contexts of winning or losing. The results showed those who received warning messages while winning made the fewest number of spins and did not speed up their bet rate over the course of play as much as those in other conditions. Players who received warning messages while losing decreased the size of their bets over the course of play compared to those who received messages while winning. Despite receiving warning messages, losing players did not decrease their number of spins or rate of betting. Winning or losing during slot machine play appears to have significant consequences on the impact of a warning message. Whereas a message to change gambling behavior may encourage a winning gambler to stop play, the same message for a losing player may lead to a small minimization in harm by helping them to decrease bet size, though not their rate of betting. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Your money or your self-esteem: threatened egotism promotes costly entrapment in losing endeavors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqing; Baumeister, Roy F

    2006-07-01

    The present research explored egotism-maintaining favorable views of the self-as a motivation underlying entrapment in losing endeavors. Four studies suggested that threatened selfesteem would cause decision makers to invest and lose more money in a previously chosen course of action. Ego-threatened participants consistently lost more money than nonthreatened participants across diverse entrapping situations regardless of whether the outcome was ostensibly determined by luck (Experiments 1 and 4), ability (Experiment 2), or interpersonal competition (Experiment 3). Thus, pursuing favorable views of the self could be costly to decision makers' financial well-being and may produce self-defeating behaviors.

  1. Win-stay-lose-learn promotes cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game with voluntary participation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chen; Liu, Jinzhuo; Shen, Chen; Jin, Jiahua; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary participation, demonstrated to be a simple yet effective mechanism to promote persistent cooperative behavior, has been extensively studied. It has also been verified that the aspiration-based win-stay-lose-learn strategy updating rule promotes the evolution of cooperation. Inspired by this well-known fact, we combine the Win-Stay-Lose-Learn updating rule with voluntary participation: Players maintain their strategies when they are satisfied, or players attempt to imitate the strategy of one randomly chosen neighbor. We find that this mechanism maintains persistent cooperative behavior, even further promotes the evolution of cooperation under certain conditions.

  2. Novel SCC mutation in a patient of Mexican descent with sex reversal, salt-losing crisis and adrenal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rice, Alan M; O’Connor, Elizabeth; Piya, Anil; Buckler, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is caused by mutations in cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1 and old name, SCC). Errors in cholesterol side chain cleavage by the mitochondrial resident CYP11A1 results in an inadequate amount of pregnenolone production. This study was performed to evaluate the cause of salt-losing crisis and possible adrenal failure in a pediatric patient whose mother had a history of two previous stillbirths and loss of another baby within a week of birth. CAH can appear in any population in any region of the world. The study was conducted at Memorial University Medical Center and Mercer University School of Medicine. The patient was admitted to Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic due to salt-losing crisis and possible adrenal failure. The patient had CAH, an autosomal recessive disease, due to a novel mutation in exon 5 of the CYP11A1 gene, which generated a truncated protein of 286 amino acids compared with wild-type protein that has 521 amino acids (W286X). Although unrelated, both parents are carriers. Mitochondrial protein import analysis of the mutant CYP11A1 in steroidogenic MA-10 cells showed that the protein is imported in a similar fashion as observed for the wild-type protein and was cleaved to a shorter fragment. However, mutant’s activity was 10% of that obtained for the wild-type protein in non-steroidogenic COS-1 cells. In a patient of Mexican descent, a homozygous CYP11A1 mutation caused CAH, suggesting that this disease is not geographically restricted even in a homogeneous population. Learning points: Novel mutation in CYP11A1 causes CAH; This is a pure population from Central Mexico; Novel mutation created early truncated protein. PMID:27855232

  3. 41 CFR 301-51.103 - What is my liability if I lose a GTR?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... I lose a GTR? 301-51.103 Section 301-51.103 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES, PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT 51-PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES Paying for Common Carrier...

  4. Lose to Win: A Goal-Oriented Group for Overweight Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Roselyn

    1985-01-01

    Describes the Lose to Win Program, a weight loss program for third, fourth and fifth grade students. The program included nutrition education, exercise, and improving the self concept, and involved the use of rewards, and support of parents and school staff. (JAC)

  5. Communicative Acts in Coach-Athlete Interactions: When Losing Competitions and when Making Mistakes in Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Sam S.; Jowett, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' perceptions of coaches' communicative acts of interaction in two key interpersonal situations were examined, and their impact on the athletes: (a) when athletes lose competitions; and, (b) when athletes make mistakes in training. Athletes (N = 324, M age = 20.11) completed an open-ended survey. Data were deductively and inductively…

  6. Assets and Depreciation: Or, Only an Accountant Would Claim Books Lose Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    Examines the purpose for using historical costs in library financial records. Discusses the difference between spending money and losing resources. Describes how financial record systems operate and the ways in which accounting treats classes of expenditures. Uses the example of a bookmobile. (AEF)

  7. Why Some Hope Scholarship Recipients Retain the Scholarship and Others Lose It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trant, Eleanore C.; Crabtree, Katelyn E.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hart, Leslie A.; Watson, Tiffany B.; Williams, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The study we report here examined parental, pre-course, and in-course predictors of students' probability of retaining (n = 136) or losing the HOPE scholarship (n = 41). The study was conducted in a multi-section, entry-level course (n = 203) for the Teacher-Education Program at a large state university in the southeastern U.S. Logistic regression…

  8. A Longitudinal Study of Body Image and Strategies to Lose Weight and Increase Muscles among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, M. P.; Ricciardelli, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    A longitudinal study was used to examine age differences in the role of body mass index (BMI) and sociocultural pressures in predicting changes in body image and strategies to both lose weight and increase muscles among 443 children aged between 8 and 12 years (207 boys, 236 girls) over a 16-month period. The strongest predictors of body image and…

  9. Winning or Losing against an Opposite-Sex Peer on a Gender-Based Competitive Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Stefanie; Thompson, J. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Explored the effects on college students' mood and body image of a negative versus positive outcome in an opposite-sex, competitive peer interaction. Used one gender-neutral and one gender stereotypical task. There were no gender differences in reactions to winning or losing gender-neutral competitions, except marginally for depression. The…

  10. Evaluation of the "Lose Your Excuse" Public Service Advertising Campaign for Tweens to Save Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Jane T.; Goldman, Patty; Zhivan, Natalia; Agyeman, Yaw; Barber, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the 2008-2009 "Lose your Excuse" public service advertising (PSA) campaign on energy efficiency targeting 8- to 12-year-olds, intended to increase knowledge, foster proactive attitudes, and change energy usage behaviors. Baseline and two follow-up surveys were conducted with online samples representative of the national…

  11. Who Gains, Who Loses?: The Fiscal Impact of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Do school vouchers save the taxpayer money, or do they add to taxpayer burdens? Which groups of taxpayers are most affected, and do they gain or lose? What is the financial impact on public school districts? Usually, these questions are debated in the abstract. Now it is possible to get more concrete answers from the nation's longest-running…

  12. Children Who Lose Their Parents to HIV/AIDS: Agency Guidelines for Adoptive and Kinship Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkel-Holguin, Lisa

    Across the United States and world, children who lose their parents to HIV/AIDS are one of the fasted emerging groups affected by this epidemic. Increasingly, child welfare and family service agencies are helping infected parents to secure legal and permanent care arrangements for their children. These guidelines address the issues of placing…

  13. Losing ground.

    PubMed

    Carter, D

    1993-01-01

    A recent research effort by the Nepalese Topological Survey Branch and the Department of Soil Science and the University of British Columbia, Canada, found with the use of the geographic information system (GIS) that forest cover has expanded, but soil fertility is decreasing at a rapid rate in Nepal. These findings conflict with media allegations which allege forest destruction from farmers' wood-cutting practices and responsibility for flooding in Bangladesh. The research was conducted in the Jhikhu Khola watershed in the Middle Mountains, which is Nepal's most populous region that is intensively used in subsistence farming and grazing. Migration adds to the existing problems of soil erosion, sedimentation, deforestation, and loss in soil fertility. The soil is prone to erosion. Data were collected through the GIS system by aerial photos, field surveys, and soil analysis. Hydrometric stations to measure the sedimentation process were established in 7 places and farmers monitored the climate, water loss and gain, and sediment movement. Interviews were also conducted among the farm population on demographics, livestock, fodder and fuel consumption, crop yields and practices, and fertilizer use. Researchers aimed both to identify the causes of soil degradation and to estimate the productivity, profitability, and sustainability of different land uses and farming systems. Another finding was that, in Jhikhu Khola, the deforestation of the 1960s has been abated by reforestation efforts in the 1980s. This has contributed to a 10% expansion of forest cover, and increase of sloping terrace by 9%, and a decline in grazing land by 9% and shrub land by 6%. Calculations for the year 2000 showed that the fuelwood surplus would drop to 6% from 73% and food surplus of 25% would become a 27% deficit. The 40% deficiency in animal feed would increase to 54%. Although reforestation has added to forest cover, pine tree cultivation occurred on moderate elevations where grazing and food production are possible, while higher altitudes on steep slopes were untouched. Workshops are conducted in the villages and efforts are being made to promote the exchange of information between departments. The ultimate solution is to increase agricultural production for profit.

  14. Losing it.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Diane L

    2004-04-01

    "It's worse than I thought.... She's completely lost her mind," says Harry Beecham, the CEO of blue chip management consultancy Pierce and Company. The perplexed executive was in a hotel suite with his wife in Amsterdam, the latest stop on his regular trek to dozens of Pierce offices worldwide. In his hand was a sheaf of paper--the same message sent over and over again by his star employee and protégée Katharina Waldburg. The end of the world is coming, she warned. "Someone is going to die." Harry wouldn't have expected this sort of behavior from Katharina. After graduating with distinction from Oxford, she made a name for herself by single-handedly building Pierce's organizational behavior practice. At 27, she's poised to become the youngest partner ever elected at the firm. But Harry can't ignore the faxes in his hand. Or the stream-of-consciousness e-mails Katharina's been sending to one of the directors in Pierce's Berlin office--mostly gibberish but potentially disastrous to Katharina's reputation if they ever got out. Harry also can't dismiss reports from Roland Fuoroli, manager of the Berlin office, of a vicious verbal exchange Katharina had with him, or of an "over the top" lunch date Katharina had with one of Pierce's clients in which she was explaining the alphabet's role in the creation of the universe. Harry is planning to talk to Katharina when he gets to Berlin. What should he say? And will it be too late? Four commentators offer their advice in this fictional case study. They are Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry and a coauthor of Manic-Depressive Illness; David E. Meen, a former director at McKinsey & Company; Norman Pearlstine, the editor in chief at Time Incorporated; and Richard Primus, an assistant law professor at the University of Michigan.

  15. Losing Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckholm, Erik

    1976-01-01

    Past unsound agricultural practices coupled with drought and high winds eroded away topsoil in the Great Plains. Because of technology and food surpluses productivity returned to the deteriorated lands. Ecosystem overstress could become devastating especially in poor countries as food surpluses and energy decline and populations soar. (MR)

  16. Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Testes of Infertile Male Rats and New Germ Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh-Hasankolaei, Mohammad; Batavani, Roozali; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Sayahpour, Foroughazam

    2016-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been suggested as a potential choice for treatment of male infertility. Yet, the effects of MSCs on regeneration of germinal epithelium of seminiferous tubules and recovery of spermatogenesis have remained controversial. In this research, we have evaluated and compared the fate of autologous bone marrow (BM)-MSCs during three different periods of time- 4, 6 and 8 weeks after transplantation into the testes of busulfan-induced infertile male rats. Methods Rats BM samples were collected from tibia bone under anesthesia. The samples were directly cultured in culture medium. Isolated, characterized and purified BM-MSCs were labeled with PKH26, and transplanted into the testes of infertile rats. After 4, 6 and 8 weeks, the testes were removed and underwent histological evaluations. Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed that transplanted BM-MSCs survived in all three groups. Some of the cells homed at the germinal epithelium and expressed spermatogonia markers (Dazl and Stella). The number of homed spermatogonia-like cells in 4-week testes, was more than the 6-week testes. The 8-week testes had the least numbers of homed cells (p<0.05). Immunostaining for vimentin showed that BM-MSCs did not differentiate into the sertoli cells in the testes. Conclusions From our results, it could be concluded that, autologous BM-MSCs could survive in the testis, migrate onto the seminiferous tubules basement membrane and differentiate into spermatogonia. Although, no more differentiation was observed in the produced spermatogonia, generation of such endogenous GCs would be a really promising achievement for treatment of male infertility using autologous stem cells. PMID:27430978

  17. Testicular structure and germ cells morphology in salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mari Carmen; Mejía-Roa, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Testes of salamanders or urodeles are paired elongated organs that are attached to the dorsal wall of the body by a mesorchium. The testes are composed of one or several lobes. Each lobe is morphologically and functionally a similar testicular unit. The lobes of the testis are joined by cords covered by a single peritoneal epithelium and subjacent connective tissue. The cords contain spermatogonia. Spermatogonia associate with Sertoli cells to form spermatocysts or cysts. The spermatogenic cells in a cyst undergo their development through spermatogenesis synchronously. The distribution of cysts displays the cephalo-caudal gradient in respect to the stage of spermatogenesis. The formation of cysts at cephalic end of the testis causes their migration along the lobules to the caudal end. Consequently, the disposition in cephalo-caudal regions of spermatogenesis can be observed in longitudinal sections of the testis. The germ cells are spermatogonia, diploid cells with mitotic activity; primary and second spermatocytes characterized by meiotic divisions that develop haploid spermatids; during spermiogenesis the spermatids differentiate to spermatozoa. During spermiation the cysts open and spermatozoa leave the testicular lobules. After spermiation occurs the development of Leydig cells into glandular tissue. This glandular tissue regressed at the end of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26413406

  18. RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alkasalias, Twana; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Hennig, Katharina; Danielsson, Frida; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Fielden, Matthew; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Lehti, Kaisa; Kashuba, Vladimir; Madapura, Harsha S.; Bozoky, Benedek; Lundberg, Emma; Balland, Martial; Guvén, Hayrettin; Klein, George; Gad, Annica K. B.; Pavlova, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of α-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth. PMID:28174275

  19. RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alkasalias, Twana; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Hennig, Katharina; Danielsson, Frida; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Fielden, Matthew; Turunen, S Pauliina; Lehti, Kaisa; Kashuba, Vladimir; Madapura, Harsha S; Bozoky, Benedek; Lundberg, Emma; Balland, Martial; Guvén, Hayrettin; Klein, George; Gad, Annica K B; Pavlova, Tatiana

    2017-02-21

    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of α-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth.

  20. Tests for urethane induction of germ-cell mutations and germ-cell killing in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Oakberg, E F; Cummings, C C; Schmoyer, R L

    1987-08-01

    Urethane, a chemical that has given varied results in mutagenesis assays, was tested in the mouse specific-locus test, and its effect on germ-cell survival was explored. Altogether 32,828 offspring were observed from successive weekly matings of males exposed to the maximum tolerated i.p. dose of 1750 mg urethane/kg. The combined data rule out (at the 5% significance level) an induced mutation rate greater than 1.7 times the historical control rate. For spermatogonial stem cells alone, the multiple ruled out is 3.2, and for poststem-cell stages, 3.5. Litter sizes from successive conceptions made in any of the first 7 weeks give no indication of induced dominant lethality, confirming results of past dominant-lethal assays. That urethane (or an active metabolite) reaches germ cells is indicated by SCE induction in spermatogonia demonstrated by other investigators. Cytotoxic effects in spermatogonia are suggested by our finding of a slight reduction in numbers of certain types of spermatogonia in seminiferous tubule cross-sections and of a borderline decrease in the number of litters conceived during the 8th and 9th posttreatment weeks. The negative results for induction of gene mutations as well as clastogenic damage are at variance with Nomura's reports of dominant effects (F1 cancers and malformations) produced by urethane.

  1. The effects on employment and wages when working mothers lose Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Boushey, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the importance of health insurance in promoting employment and wage growth for prime-age mothers. Many mothers on welfare and other low-income mothers are eligible for Medicaid, but as they move up the job ladder, they lose eligibility. Losing work supports limits mothers' ability to stay employed: mothers who make this transition into employer-provided health insurance are nine times more likely to stay employed than mothers who leave Medicaid without this benefit. However, few mothers make the transition from Medicaid to employer-provided health insurance--not because they lack employment but because they do not find jobs that offer health insurance. Between the beginning of 2002 and the end of 2003, 37.2 percent of those on Medicaid left the program, but fewer than a quarter (23.4 percent) of those had employer-provided health insurance.

  2. Losing the Dark: Public Outreach about Light Pollution and Its Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Petersen, Mark C.; Walker, Constance E.; Kardel, W. Scott; International Dark Sky Association Education Committee

    2015-01-01

    Losing the Dark is a PSA video available for public outreach through fulldome theaters as well as conventional venues (classroom, lecture hall, YouTube, Vimeo). It was created by Loch Ness Productions for the International Dark Sky Association. It explains problems caused by light pollution, which targets astronomy, health, and the environment. Losing the Dark also suggests ways people can implement "wise lighting" practices to help mitigate light pollution. The video is available free of charge for outreach professionals in planetarium facilities (both fulldome and classical), science centers, classroom, and other outreach venues, and has been translated into 13 languages. It is available via download, USB key (at cost), and through online venues. This paper summarizes the program's outreach to more than a thousand fulldome theaters, nearly 100,000 views via four sites on Youtube and Vimeo,a number of presentations at other museum and classroom facilities, and shares some preliminary metrics and commentary from users.

  3. Octreotide-Treated Diabetes Accompanied by Endogenous Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia and Protein-Losing Gastroenteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Nagamine, Miho; Fukuda, Mitsuko; Motomura, Wataru; Abiko, Atsuko; Haneda, Masakazu; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Ieko, Masahiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Occurrence of hypoglycemia in diabetes patients is very rare. We report here a case of frequent hypoglycemic attacks caused by inappropriate endogenous hyperinsulinemia in a female patient with poorly controlled diabetes and protein-losing gastroenteropathy. The blood glucose profiles of the patient were unstable. Results of the fasting test performed to investigate the cause of hypoglycemia suggested endogenous hyperinsulinism. Repeated selective arterial calcium injection tests suggested that hyperinsulinemia might be extrapancreatic in origin. However, efforts to detect a responsible lesion such as insulinoma were unsuccessful. Octreotide was used for the treatment of hypoglycemia and protein-losing gastroenteropathy. After treatment, although her leg edema caused by hypoalbuminemia persisted, hypoglycemia almost disappeared. PMID:21826148

  4. Marathon to the Stars: How the US Can Avoid Losing the Global Space Race

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    AU/ACSC/2010 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY MARATHON TO THE STARS : HOW THE US CAN AVOID LOSING THE GLOBAL SPACE RACE...Van Allen which eventually discovered Earth‘s radiation belts. 9 These innocuous beginnings would spawn several notable firsts over the next...Navigation - GPS 2 - Galileo - GLONASS - Beidou Table 1. Current space capabilities by country Today‘s Space Race showcases a field of four near-peer

  5. Oxygen consumption along bed forms under losing and gaining streamflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that bed forms are the most significant geomorphological structure that drives hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes in stream networks. Other studies also demonstrated that due to the hyporheic flow patterns within bed form, biogeochemical processes do not occur uniformly along and within the bed forms. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate how losing or gaining flow conditions affect oxygen consumption by biofilm along sandy bed forms. We measured the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions on oxygen consumption by combining modeling and experiments in a novel laboratory flume system that enable the control of losing and gaining fluxes. Oxygen consumption was measured after growing a benthic biofilm fed with Sodium Benzoate (as a carbon source) and measuring the distribution of oxygen in the streambed with microelectrodes. The experimental results were analyzed using a novel code that calculates vertical profiles of reaction rates in the presence of hyporheic water fluxes. These experimental observations and modeling revealed that oxygen distribution varied along the bed forms. The zone of oxygen consumption (i.e. depth of penetration) was the largest at the upstream side of the bed form and the smallest in the lee side (at the lowest part of the bed form), regardless of the flow conditions. Also, the zone of oxygen consumption was the largest under losing conditions, the smallest under gaining conditions, and in-between under neutral conditions. The distribution of oxygen consumption rates determined with our new model will be also discussed. Our preliminary results enable us to show the importance of the coupling between flow conditions and oxygen consumption along bed forms and are expected to improve our understanding of nutrient cycling in streams.

  6. Seizures Associated With Hypocalcemia in a Yorkshire Terrier With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Jim; Quimby, Jessica; Bayliss, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old, male, castrated, Yorkshire terrier was presented on emergency for an acute onset of seizure activity. The owner also reported that the dog had previously exhibited other symptoms, including intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia for several yr. The initial workup revealed a marked decrease in ionized calcium and total protein. Further diagnostics revealed decreases in magnesium, 25 hydroxyvitamin D, albumin, and globulins, and an increased parathyroid hormone level. Intestinal biopsies revealed inflammatory bowel disease and lymphangiectasia. The dog received intravenous calcium gluconate for treatment of hypocalcemia followed by oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Seizure activity ceased once calcium levels approached the normal range. Medical and dietary therapy for lymphangiectasia and inflammatory bowel disease consisted of prednisone, rutin, and a low-fat diet. Decreased serum total ionized calcium levels have been reported previously in dogs with protein-losing enteropathies. Typically, the hypocalcemia is not associated with clinical signs. Severe clinical signs of hypocalcemia are rarely reported in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy, but seizures, facial twitching, and tremors can occur. When presented with a dog with a history of seizure activity, panhypoproteinemia, and hypocalcemia, protein-losing enteropathy should be included on the list of differential diagnoses.

  7. Winning and losing tree species of reassembly in Minnesota's mixed and broadleaf forests.

    PubMed

    Hanberry, Brice B; Palik, Brian J; He, Hong S

    2013-01-01

    We examined reassembly of winning and losing tree species, species traits including shade and fire tolerance, and associated disturbance filters and forest ecosystem types due to rapid forest change in the Great Lakes region since 1850. We identified winning and losing species by changes in composition, distribution, and site factors between historical and current surveys in Minnesota's mixed and broadleaf forests. In the Laurentian Mixed Forest, shade-intolerant aspen replaced shade-intolerant tamarack as the most dominant tree species. Fire-tolerant white pine and jack pine decreased, whereas shade-tolerant ashes, maples, and white cedar increased. In the Eastern Broadleaf Forest, fire-tolerant white oaks and red oaks decreased, while shade-tolerant ashes, American basswood, and maples increased. Tamarack, pines, and oaks have become restricted to sites with either wetter or sandier and drier soils due to increases in aspen and shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive species on mesic sites. The proportion of shade-tolerant species increased in both regions, but selective harvest reduced the applicability of functional groups alone to specify winners and losers. Harvest and existing forestry practices supported aspen dominance in mixed forests, although without aspen forestry and with fire suppression, mixed forests will transition to a greater composition of shade-tolerant species, converging to forests similar to broadleaf forests. A functional group framework provided a perspective of winning and losing species and traits, selective filters, and forest ecosystems that can be generalized to other regions, regardless of species identity.

  8. Winning and Losing Tree Species of Reassembly in Minnesota’s Mixed and Broadleaf Forests

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Palik, Brian J.; He, Hong S.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reassembly of winning and losing tree species, species traits including shade and fire tolerance, and associated disturbance filters and forest ecosystem types due to rapid forest change in the Great Lakes region since 1850. We identified winning and losing species by changes in composition, distribution, and site factors between historical and current surveys in Minnesota’s mixed and broadleaf forests. In the Laurentian Mixed Forest, shade-intolerant aspen replaced shade-intolerant tamarack as the most dominant tree species. Fire-tolerant white pine and jack pine decreased, whereas shade-tolerant ashes, maples, and white cedar increased. In the Eastern Broadleaf Forest, fire-tolerant white oaks and red oaks decreased, while shade-tolerant ashes, American basswood, and maples increased. Tamarack, pines, and oaks have become restricted to sites with either wetter or sandier and drier soils due to increases in aspen and shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive species on mesic sites. The proportion of shade-tolerant species increased in both regions, but selective harvest reduced the applicability of functional groups alone to specify winners and losers. Harvest and existing forestry practices supported aspen dominance in mixed forests, although without aspen forestry and with fire suppression, mixed forests will transition to a greater composition of shade-tolerant species, converging to forests similar to broadleaf forests. A functional group framework provided a perspective of winning and losing species and traits, selective filters, and forest ecosystems that can be generalized to other regions, regardless of species identity. PMID:23613911

  9. Photo-generated carriers lose energy during extraction from polymer-fullerene solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Melianas, Armantas; Etzold, Fabian; Savenije, Tom J.; Laquai, Frédéric; Inganäs, Olle; Kemerink, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    In photovoltaic devices, the photo-generated charge carriers are typically assumed to be in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. In conventional materials, this assumption is experimentally justified as carrier thermalization completes before any significant carrier transport has occurred. Here, we demonstrate by unifying time-resolved optical and electrical experiments and Monte Carlo simulations over an exceptionally wide dynamic range that in the case of organic photovoltaic devices, this assumption is invalid. As the photo-generated carriers are transported to the electrodes, a substantial amount of their energy is lost by continuous thermalization in the disorder broadened density of states. Since thermalization occurs downward in energy, carrier motion is boosted by this process, leading to a time-dependent carrier mobility as confirmed by direct experiments. We identify the time and distance scales relevant for carrier extraction and show that the photo-generated carriers are extracted from the operating device before reaching thermal equilibrium. PMID:26537357

  10. Photo-generated carriers lose energy during extraction from polymer-fullerene solar cells.

    PubMed

    Melianas, Armantas; Etzold, Fabian; Savenije, Tom J; Laquai, Frédéric; Inganäs, Olle; Kemerink, Martijn

    2015-11-05

    In photovoltaic devices, the photo-generated charge carriers are typically assumed to be in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. In conventional materials, this assumption is experimentally justified as carrier thermalization completes before any significant carrier transport has occurred. Here, we demonstrate by unifying time-resolved optical and electrical experiments and Monte Carlo simulations over an exceptionally wide dynamic range that in the case of organic photovoltaic devices, this assumption is invalid. As the photo-generated carriers are transported to the electrodes, a substantial amount of their energy is lost by continuous thermalization in the disorder broadened density of states. Since thermalization occurs downward in energy, carrier motion is boosted by this process, leading to a time-dependent carrier mobility as confirmed by direct experiments. We identify the time and distance scales relevant for carrier extraction and show that the photo-generated carriers are extracted from the operating device before reaching thermal equilibrium.

  11. Evaluation of infiltration from losing-disconnected rivers using a geophysical characterisation of the riverbed and a simplified infiltration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, Russell S.; Taylor, Andrew R.; Davis, Aaron C.; Lamontagne, Sébastien; Munday, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We estimated recharge from a losing-disconnected stream.Electrical resistivity surveys were used to characterise the riverbed clay layer.Simple model able to reproduce results of numerical model.Hydraulic conductivity of clay greatest source of uncertainty.

  12. Protein-losing enteropathy associated with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus with a good response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Sansinanea, Pierina; Carrica, Sebastián Augusto; Marcos, Josefina; García, Mercedes Argentina

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 17 year-old female patient, who presented with ascites, edema and hypoalbuminemia. The diagnosis of SLE was based on the presence of: malar rash, oral ulcers, thrombocytopenia, antinuclear antibodies, IgM anticardiolipin antibody, and lupus anticoagulant. Renal and liver diseases were ruled out. The PLE diagnosis was confirmed with fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin clearance. The PLE was refractory to different lines of immunosuppressive agents like glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and cyclosporine, showing a satisfactory and sustained response with rituximab, allowing steroid sparing and long term remission.

  13. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. )

    1989-09-01

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  14. [Protein-losing enteropathy with systemic lupus erythematosus effectively treated with octreotide and medium chain triglyceride diet: A case report].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Makoto; Uchida, Kousuke; Nakashima, Tadaaki; Oda, Seiko; Nakamura, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Watada, Toshiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Araki, Jun; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Yano, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    In January 2009, a 62-year-old man presented with diarrhea, leg edema, and thrombopenia and was admitted to our hospital. The past medical history revealed Sjögren's syndrome and autoimmune hepatitis for which he had been administered prednisolone. On admission, a laboratory examination revealed massive hypoalbuminemia and high levels of C-reactive protein and platelet-associated IgG. Anti-double stranded DNA and anti-Sm antibodies were negative. Analysis of the bone marrow aspirate and Tc-99m albumin scintigraphy findings suggested autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) and protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), respectively. We diagnosed him as SLE, because past immunoserological testing had showed positivity for anti-double stranded DNA antibody and LE cells. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy were ineffective. Rituximab was ineffective against PLE but was effective against AITP. Cyclosporine and Cyclophosphamide were ineffective against PLE. Subcutaneous injection of 200-μg octreotide daily and a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) diet was effective against PLE, and the patient's condition dramatically improved. The effectiveness of octreotide treatment and an MCT diet in the treatment of PLE with SLE is discussed.

  15. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen as a molecular biomarker for spermatogenesis in PTU-induced hypothyroidism of rats.

    PubMed

    Tousson, Ehab; Ali, Ehab M M; Ibrahim, Wafaa; Mansour, Mohammed A

    2011-07-01

    The thyroid hormone has few serious effects on the testes except during the neonatal stage. There is little knowledge concerning the prolonged effect of thyroid hormone deficiency throughout the rat's life span and its effect on spermatogenesis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a nuclear matrix protein, which is essential for multiple cell cycle pathways. Here we used PCNA immunohistochemistry as a marker to differentiate between the testes of control and hypothyroid rats. About 20 rats were equally divided into 2 groups; the first group was the control group, while the second group was the experimental group in which rats were fed 0.05% 6-n-propyl thiouracil (PTU) in drinking water for 6 weeks. Immunohistochemistry, using an antibody against PCNA, showed at least 3 differences in the pattern of PCNA immunoreactivity (PCNA-ir). First, PCNA-ir was not detected in Sertoli and Leydig cells in the testes of control rats and detected in some of the hypothyroid rats. Second, in the control group more than 96% of spermatogonia were PCNA-positive cells; however, hypothyroidism caused the reduction to approximately 25% PCNA staining in spermatogonia. The third difference was in the abnormal distribution of spermatogonia seen in the hypothyroid rat testis, not in the control one. These results suggest that prepubertal hypothyroidism affects the proliferation of spermatogenic cells leading to impaired spermatogenesis and that PCNA index is a useful marker for assessing germ cell kinetics and spermatogenesis in prepubertal hypothyroidism.

  16. Adaptive thermogenesis can make a difference in the ability of obese individuals to lose body weight.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, A; Royer, M-M; Chaput, J-P; Doucet, E

    2013-06-01

    The decrease in energy expenditure that occurs during weight loss is a process that attenuates over time the impact of a restrictive diet on energy balance up to a point beyond which no further weight loss seems to be possible. For some health professionals, such a diminished energy expenditure is the normal consequence of a progressive decrease in the motivation to exercise over the course of a weight-reducing program. Another explanation of decreased energy needs during weight loss is the decrease in body energy stores (that is, fat mass and muscle mass) and its related obligatory costs of living. Many studies have also documented the existence of adaptive thermogenesis in the context of weight loss, which represents a greater-than-predicted decrease in energy expenditure. In this paper, we pursue the analysis of this phenomenon by demonstrating that an adaptive decrease in thermogenesis can have a major role in the occurrence of resistance to further lose fat in weight-reduced obese individuals. Evidence is also presented to support the idea of greater hunger sensations in individuals displaying more pronounced thermogenic changes. Finally, as the decrease in thermogenesis persists over time, it is also likely associated with a greater predisposition to body-weight regain after weight loss. Globally, these observations suggest that the adaptive reduction in thermogenesis that accompanies a prolonged negative energy balance is a major determinant of the ability to spontaneously lose body fat.

  17. Strategy changes in subsequent fights as consequences of winning and losing in fruit fly fights.

    PubMed

    Trannoy, Séverine; Kravitz, Edward A

    2016-11-11

    In competition for food, territory and mates, male fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) engage in agonistic encounters with conspecifics. The fighting strategies used to obtain these resources are influenced by previous and present experience, environmental cues, and the internal state of the animal including hormonal and genetic influences. Animals that experience prior defeats show submissive behavior and are more likely to lose 2(nd) contests, while animals that win 1(st) fights are more aggressive and have a higher probability of winning 2(nd) contests. In a recent report, we examined these loser and winner effects in greater detail and demonstrated that both winners and losers show short-term memory of the results of previous bouts while only losers demonstrate a longer-term memory that requires protein synthesis. The recent findings also suggested that an individual recognition mechanism likely exists that can serve important roles in evaluating the fighting ability of opponents and influencing future fighting strategy. In this article, we follow up on these results by asking how previous defeated and victorious flies change their fighting strategies in the presence of 2(nd) losing and winning flies, by searching for evidence of territory marking, and discussing the existing literature in light of our findings.

  18. The cost of defeat: Capuchin groups travel further, faster and later after losing conflicts with neighbors.

    PubMed

    Crofoot, Margaret C

    2013-09-01

    Although competition between social groups is central to hypotheses about the evolution of human social organization, competitive interactions among group-mates are thought to play a more dominant role in shaping the behavior and ecology of other primate species. However, few studies have directly tested the impact of intergroup conflicts in non-human primates. What is the cost of defeat? To address this question, the movements of six neighboring white-faced capuchin (Cebus capucinus) social groups living on Barro Colorado Island, Panama were tracked simultaneously using an Automated Radio Telemetry System (ARTS), for a period of six months. Groups moved 13% (441 m) further on days they lost interactions compared with days they won interactions. To cover these larger distances, they traveled faster, stopped less frequently, and remained active later in the evening. Defeat also caused groups to alter their patterns of space use. Losing groups had straighter travel paths than winning groups, larger net displacements and were more likely to change their sleeping site. These results demonstrate that losing groups pay increased travel costs and suggest that they forage in low-quality areas. They provide some of the first direct evidence that intergroup conflicts have important energetic consequences for members of competitively unsuccessful primate social groups. A better understanding of how intergroup competition impacts patterns of individual fitness is thus needed to clarify the role that this group-level process plays in shaping the evolution of human- and non-human primate behavior.

  19. Win-stay-lose-learn promotes cooperation in the spatial prisoner's dilemma game.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongkui; Chen, Xiaojie; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Long; Perc, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    Holding on to one's strategy is natural and common if the later warrants success and satisfaction. This goes against widespread simulation practices of evolutionary games, where players frequently consider changing their strategy even though their payoffs may be marginally different than those of the other players. Inspired by this observation, we introduce an aspiration-based win-stay-lose-learn strategy updating rule into the spatial prisoner's dilemma game. The rule is simple and intuitive, foreseeing strategy changes only by dissatisfied players, who then attempt to adopt the strategy of one of their nearest neighbors, while the strategies of satisfied players are not subject to change. We find that the proposed win-stay-lose-learn rule promotes the evolution of cooperation, and it does so very robustly and independently of the initial conditions. In fact, we show that even a minute initial fraction of cooperators may be sufficient to eventually secure a highly cooperative final state. In addition to extensive simulation results that support our conclusions, we also present results obtained by means of the pair approximation of the studied game. Our findings continue the success story of related win-stay strategy updating rules, and by doing so reveal new ways of resolving the prisoner's dilemma.

  20. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Krieg, R.; Martienssen, M.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-06-01

    Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSO's) can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPT's) up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPT's the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany). Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3- showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg m-1stream d-1, respectively, while Cl- (16.8 to 47.3 g m-1stream d-1) and SO42- (20.3 to 32.2 g m-1stream d-1) revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  1. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Krieg, R.; Martienssen, M.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-10-01

    Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates per stream length unit Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPTs) up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPTs the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany). Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3- showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg mstream-1 d-1, respectively, while Cl- (16.8 to 47.3 g mstream-1 d-1) and SO42- (20.3 to 32.2 g mstream-1 d-1) revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  2. [Having and losing friends: necessary social-emotional competencies in adolescents].

    PubMed

    von Salisch, Maria; Lüpschen, Nadine; Kanevski, Rimma

    2013-01-01

    Supportive friendships are an invaluable resource for adolescents because of their various developmental tasks, but establishing and maintaining them requires particular interpersonal skills. In order to identify social-emotional competencies associated with having and losing friends, N = 206 early adolescents (12-14 years of age) were examined longitudinally right after the transition to secondary school in the beginning of grade 7 and again at the end of this school year. Adolescents who had at least one reciprocal friend at both times were compared to those who lost all their friends over the school year. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicate effects of time (and development) that underline an increase of self-disclosure, explanations and humor as well as a general decrease of openly aggressive behavior when angry at the friend. Interaction effects suggest that adolescents who lost their friend(s) intensified their use of physically and relationally aggressive behavior and of fantasies of revenge over time while continuously befriended adolescents decreased in their aggressive behavior when coping with anger in their friendships. Adolescents who had friends at both times were more willing to disclose private information whereas the self-disclosure of adolescents who lost their friends stagnated. These results are discussed in terms of deficient social-emotional competencies as the cause and the consequence of losing friends.

  3. Direct Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Haploid Spermatogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Charles A.; Phillips, Bart T.; McGuire, Megan M.; Barringer, Jennifer M.; Valli, Hanna; Hermann, Brian P.; Simerly, Calvin R.; Rajkovic, Aleksander; Miki, Toshio; Orwig, Kyle E.; Schatten, Gerald P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate into primordial germ cells (PGCs) but not into spermatogonia nor haploid spermatocytes or spermatids. Here we show that hESCs and hiPSCs differentiate directly into advanced male germ cell lineages including post-meiotic, spermatid-like cells in vitro without genetic manipulation. Furthermore, our procedure mirrors spermatogenesis in vivo by differentiating pluripotent stem cells into UTF1, PLZF and CDH1-positive spermatogonia-like cells, HIWI and HILI-positive spermatocyte-like cells, and haploid cells expressing acrosin, transition protein 1 and protamine 1, proteins found uniquely in either spermatids and/or sperm. These spermatids show uniparental genomic imprints similar to human sperm on two loci: H19 and IGF2. These results demonstrate that male pluripotent stem cells have the capability to directly differentiate into advanced germ cell lineages and may represent a novel strategy for studying spermatogenesis in vitro. PMID:22921399

  4. Application of Integral Pumping Tests to estimate the influence of losing streams on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Urban streams receive effluents of wastewater treatment plants and untreated wastewater during combined sewer overflow events. In the case of losing streams substances, which originate from wastewater, can reach the groundwater and deteriorate its quality. The estimation of mass flow rates Mex from losing streams to the groundwater is important to support groundwater management strategies, but is a challenging task. Variable inflow of wastewater with time-dependent concentrations of wastewater constituents causes a variable water composition in urban streams. Heterogeneities in the structure of the streambed and the connected aquifer lead, in combination with this variable water composition, to heterogeneous concentration patterns of wastewater constituents in the vicinity of urban streams. Groundwater investigation methods based on conventional point sampling may yield unreliable results under these conditions. Integral Pumping Tests (IPT) can overcome the problem of heterogeneous concentrations in an aquifer by increasing the sampled volume. Long-time pumping (several days) and simultaneous sampling yields reliable average concentrations Cav and mass flow rates Mcp for virtual control planes perpendicular to the natural flow direction. We applied the IPT method in order to estimate Mex of a stream section in Leipzig (Germany). The investigated stream is strongly influenced by combined sewer overflow events. Four pumping wells were installed up- and downstream of the stream section and operated for a period of five days. The study was focused on four inorganic (potassium, chloride, nitrate and sulfate) and two organic (caffeine and technical-nonylphenol) wastewater constituents with different transport properties. The obtained concentration-time series were used in combination with a numerical flow model to estimate Mcp of the respective wells. The difference of the Mcp's between up- and downstream wells yields Mex of wastewater constituents that increase

  5. Dynamic expression of DNMT3a and DNMT3b isoforms during male germ cell development in the mouse.

    PubMed

    La Salle, Sophie; Trasler, Jacquetta M

    2006-08-01

    In the male germ line, sequence-specific methylation patterns are initially acquired prenatally in diploid gonocytes and are further consolidated after birth during spermatogenesis. It is still unclear how DNA methyltransferases are involved in establishing and/or maintaining these patterns in germ cells, or how their activity is regulated. We compared the temporal expression patterns of the postulated de novo DNA methyltransferases DNMT3a and DNMT3b in murine male germ cells. Mitotic, meiotic and post-meiotic male germ cells were isolated, and expression of various transcript variants and isoforms of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b was examined using Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. We found that proliferating and differentiating male germ cells were marked by distinctive expression profiles. Dnmt3a2 and Dnmt3b transcripts were at their highest levels in type A spermatogonia, decreased dramatically in type B spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes and rose again in leptotene/zygotene spermatocytes, while Dnmt3a expression was mostly constant, except in type B spermatogonia where it increased. In all cases, expression declined as pachynema progressed. At the protein level, DNMT3a was the predominant isoform in type B spermatogonia, while DNMT3a2, DNMT3b2, and DNMT3b3 were expressed throughout most of spermatogenesis, except in pachytene spermatocytes. We also detected DNMT3a2 and DNMT3b2 in round spermatids. Taken together, these data highlight the tightly regulated expression of these genes during spermatogenesis and provide evidence that DNMTs may be contributing differentially to the establishment and/or maintenance of methylation patterns in male germ cells.

  6. Comparison of game-related statistics in men's international championships between winning and losing teams according to margin of victory.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jose M; Escalantel, Yolanda; Madera, Joaquin; Mansilla, Mirella; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to compare water polo game-related statistics by game outcome (winning and losing teams) and margins of victory (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games), and (ii) to identify characteristics that mark the differences in performances for each group of margin of victory. The game-related statistics of the 308 men's matches played in seven International Championships (Olympic Games, World and European Championships) were analysed. A cluster analysis established three groups (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games) according to the margin of victory. Differences between game outcomes (winning or losing teams) and margins of victory (close, unbalanced, and very unbalanced games) were determined using the chi-squared statistic, also calculating the effect sizes of the differences. A discriminant analysis was then performed applying the sample-splitting method according to game outcome (winning and losing teams) by margin of victory. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each final score group, with 7 (offensive and defensive) variables differentiating winners from losers in close games, 16 in unbalanced games, and 11 in very unbalanced games. In all three types of game, the game-related statistics were shown to discriminate performance (85% or more), with two variables being discriminatory by game outcome (winning or losing teams) in all three cases: shots and goalkeeper-blocked shots.

  7. Flipping the thin film model: Mass transfer by hyporheic exchange in gaining and losing streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Alexander H.; Grant, Stanley B.; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    The exchange of mass between a stream and its hyporheic zone, or "hyporheic exchange," is central to many important ecosystem services. In this paper we show that mass transfer across the streambed by linear mechanisms of hyporheic exchange in a gaining or losing stream can be represented by a thin film model in which (a) the mass transfer coefficient is replaced with the average Darcy flux of water downwelling into the sediment and (b) the driving force for mass transfer is "flipped" from normal to the surface (concentration difference across a boundary layer) to parallel to the surface (concentration difference across downwelling and upwelling zones). Our analysis is consistent with previously published analytical, computational, and experimental studies of hyporheic exchange in the presence of stream-groundwater interactions, and links stream network, advection-dispersion, and stochastic descriptions of solute fate and transport in rivers.

  8. Sociocultural influences on strategies to lose weight, gain weight, and increase muscles among ten cultural groups.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Marita P; Busija, Lucy; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Ricciardelli, Lina; Mellor, David; Mussap, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This study determined how sociocultural messages to change one's body are perceived by adolescents from different cultural groups. In total, 4904 adolescents, including Australian, Chilean, Chinese, Indo-Fijian, Indigenous Fijian, Greek, Malaysian, Chinese Malaysian, Tongans in New Zealand, and Tongans in Tonga, were surveyed about messages from family, peers, and the media to lose weight, gain weight, and increase muscles. Groups were best differentiated by family pressure to gain weight. Girls were more likely to receive the messages from multiple sociocultural sources whereas boys were more likely to receive the messages from the family. Some participants in a cultural group indicated higher, and others lower, levels of these sociocultural messages. These findings highlight the differences in sociocultural messages across cultural groups, but also that adolescents receive contrasting messages within a cultural group. These results demonstrate the difficulty in representing a particular message as being characteristic of each cultural group.

  9. Evaluation of the "Lose Your Excuse" public service advertising campaign for tweens to save energy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Jane T; Goldman, Patty; Zhivan, Natalia; Agyeman, Yaw; Barber, Erin

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the 2008-2009 "Lose your Excuse" public service advertising (PSA) campaign on energy efficiency targeting 8- to 12-year-olds, intended to increase knowledge, foster proactive attitudes, and change energy usage behaviors. Baseline and two follow-up surveys were conducted with online samples representative of the national population of households with kids with online access. Almost half (47%) of the tweens recognized at least one ad from the campaign. Ad recognition was positively associated with knowledge, proactive attitudes, and energy-saving behavior. Propensity score analysis confirmed a small but measurable and statistically significant effect on energy-saving behavior. The discussion section compares these results to public health campaigns in terms of ghost awareness, reach, and effect size.

  10. Do stars that lose mass expand or contract? A semianalytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisler, J.; Alcock, C.

    1986-01-01

    Semianalytic methods are used to determine whether a star of polytropic index n expands or contracts following an insentropic loss of mass. It is found that most stars shrink, including radiative stars which can be approximated by polytropes of index roughly three. However, stars that have a ratio of specific heats gamma only slightly larger than 1 + 1/n do expand if the perturbation of the core density is sufficiently large. For stars that shrink, the fractional change in the radius is not a linear function of the fractional change in mass. Using Lane's theorem, it is shown that a star with gamma = 4/3 cannot lose mass isentropically, although the radius increases if the core density is reduced.

  11. Early diagnosis of salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a newborn boy.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, I. A.; Winter, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Assays of serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentration may be relied upon to establish a diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia within a few hours of birth. In a male infant the concentration of 17-hydroxyprogesterone was increased in cord serum and remained elevated until glucocorticoid therapy was started on the 5th day of life. Plasma renin activity was increased only slightly in the first few days, but a striking increase on day 5, along with a gradual increase in the serum potassium concentration, confirmed that the infant had the salt-losing form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. It was not possible to demonstrate an increased concentration of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, in amniotic fluid obtained at 30 weeks' gestation, presumably because of interference in this assay by cross-reacting steroids. Studies of the mother's serum concentration of 17-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol during delivery did not disclose any deviation from normal. PMID:890632

  12. Technical and Tactical Aspects that Differentiate Winning and Losing Performances in Elite Male Karate Fighters.

    PubMed

    Vidranski, Tihomir; Sertić, Hrvoje; Jukić, Josefina

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the fighters' technical and tactical activity indicators in order to determine indicator significance regarding situational efficiency and designation between winning and losing performances in a karate match. We scientifically observed a sample of 274 male contesters of 137 karate matches during the 2008 World Karate Championship in Tokyo. Each individual competitor was observed in maximum of three matches. The matches were recorded using a DVD camera in order to collect data for further analysis, and the sample was further described using 48 technical and tactical indicators of situational efficiency and match outcome variables. The obtained results indicate that a karate match is composed of 91% of non-scoring techniques and 9% of scoring techniques in the total technique frequency. On this basis a significant difference in the situational efficiency between the match winners and the losing contesters has been discovered. Those two groups of fighters exhibit a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in 11 out of 21 observed variables of situational efficiency in the table of derived situational indicators. A prevalence of non-scoring techniques suggests that energy demand and technical and tactical requirements of a karate match are in the largest extent defined by non-scoring techniques. Therefore, it would be a grave mistake to disregard non-scoring karate techniques in any future situational efficiency studies. It has been discovered that the winners differ from the defeated contesters by a higher level of situational efficiency in their executed techniques, which incorporate versatility, biomechanical and structural complexity, topological diversity and a specific tactical concept of technique use in the attack phase.

  13. Differential and spermatogenic cell-specific expression of DMRT1 during sex reversal in protogynous hermaphroditic groupers.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Zhou, Li; Yao, Bo; Li, Chuang-Ju; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2007-01-15

    DMRT1 has been suggested to play different roles in sex determination and gonad differentiation, because different expression patterns have been reported among different vertebrates. The groupers, since their gonads first develop as ovary and then reverse into testis, have been thought as good models to study sex differentiation and determination. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNAs of DMRT1 gene from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), and prepared corresponding anti-EcDMRT1 antiserum to study the relationship of DMRT1 to sex reversal. One important finding is that the grouper DMRT1 is not only differentially expressed in different stage gonads, but also restricted to specific stages and specific cells of spermatogenesis. Grouper DMRT1 protein exists only in spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and secondary spermatocytes, but not in the supporting Sertoli cells. Moreover, we confirmed that EcSox3 is expressed not only in oogonia and different stage oocytes, but also in Sertoli cells and spermatogonia, and EcSox9 is expressed only in Sertoli cells. The data suggested that grouper DMRT1 might be a more specific sex differentiation gene for spermatogenesis, and play its role at the specific stages from spermatogonia to spermatocytes. In addition, no introns were found in the grouper DMRT1, and no duplicated DMRT1 genes were detected. The finding implicates that the intronless DMRT1 that is able to undergo rapid transcriptional turnover might be a significant gene for stimulating spermatogenesis in the protogynous hermaphroditic gonad.

  14. Cleavage-like cell division and explosive increase in cell number of neonatal gonocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Noce, Toshiaki; Yamashina, Shohei

    2004-02-01

    Based on previous conventional quantitative observations of rat testes, it was proposed that large numbers of gonocytes degenerate after birth and this notion was widely accepted. However, many studies show that neonatal gonocytes display high levels of mitotic activity. In order to resolve the apparent contradiction of increased mitotic activity in gonocytes despite a decrease in their numbers at the neonate stage, quantitative analysis using a marker of suitably higher resolution is required. It has been shown that the vasa protein could be used as a marker of germ cells. In this study, quantitative changes in gonocytes were re-examined using a germ-cell-specific marker in order to delineate more clearly the process of development from gonocytes to spermatogonia after birth. The vasa-positive cells, which correspond to gonocytes and spermatogonia, increased exponentially after birth. This observation suggests that all gonocyte divide actively after birth and do not degenerate as previously believed. Surprisingly, the cell volume of gonocytes decreased during their division. The largest population size was 2000-4000 micro3 at day 2, 1000-2000 micro3 at day 4 and 500-1000 micro3 at day 6. This finding suggests that gonocytes divide in a similar way to cleavage, which can be considered a special mode of fertilized eggs. Judging from the growth of seminiferous tubules and the degree of volume reduction, 60% of the contribution rate is estimated to be due to ordinal cell growth, and 40% due to volume reduction as in cleavage of a fertilized egg. This unique cleavage-like division may contribute to the supply of large numbers of spermatogonia.

  15. Somatostatin inhibits stem cell factor messenger RNA expression by Sertoli cells and stem cell factor-induced DNA synthesis in isolated seminiferous tubules.

    PubMed

    Goddard, I; Bauer, S; Gougeon, A; Lopez, F; Giannetti, N; Susini, C; Benahmed, M; Krantic, S

    2001-12-01

    Immature porcine Sertoli cells have been reported to be targets for the regulatory peptide somatostatin (SRIF), which inhibits the basal and FSH-induced proliferation of Sertoli cells through a decrease of cAMP production. In the present study, we show that SRIF inhibits both basal and FSH-stimulated expression of the stem cell factor (SCF), a Sertoli cell-specific gene. The SRIF-mediated inhibition of forskolin-triggered, but not of 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP-triggered, SCF mRNA expression demonstrates the involvement of adenylyl cyclase in underlying peptide actions. Moreover, these effects require functional coupling of specific plasma membrane receptors to adenylyl cyclase via inhibitory G proteins, because pertussis toxin prevents SRIF-mediated inhibition of SCF mRNA expression. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assays suggest the involvement of sst2 receptors in SRIF actions on Sertoli cells. The biological relevance of these data is supported by an SRIF-mediated decrease in SCF-induced incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine in isolated seminiferous tubules. In situ hybridization and confocal microscopy show that, in seminiferous tubules only, spermatogonia display both c-kit and sst2 receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that SCF-stimulated DNA synthesis can be inhibited by SRIF in spermatogonia, but not in Sertoli and peritubular cells. Combined RT-PCR and immunohistochemical approaches point toward spermatogonia and Leydig cells as the source of testicular SRIF. These data argue in favor of paracrine/autocrine SRIF actions in testis.

  16. Dynamic Hedgehog signalling pathway activity in germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Z; Szczepny, A; McLaughlin, E A; Meistrich, M L; Zhou, W; Ustunel, I; Loveland, K L

    2014-03-01

    Although the contribution of Hedgehog (Hh) signalling to stem cell development and oncogenesis is well recognised, its importance for spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) has not been established. Here we interrogate adult rat SSCs using an established model in which only undifferentiated spermatogonial cells remain in the testis at 15 weeks following irradiation, and spermatogonial differentiation is induced within 4 weeks by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH-ant) administration. Synthesis of Hh pathway components in untreated adult rat testes was compared with that in irradiated testes prior to and after GnRH-ant exposure using in situ hybridization. In adult testes with complete spermatogenesis, the Desert Hedgehog ligand transcript, Dhh, was detected in Sertoli cells, some spermatogonia and in spermatocytes by in situ hybridization. Spermatogenic cells were identified as sites of Hh signalling through detection of transcripts encoding the Hh receptor, Ptc2 transcripts and proteins for the key downstream target of Hh signalling, Gli1 and the Hh transcriptional activator, Gli2. Remarkably, the undifferentiated spermatogonia present in irradiated adult rat testes contained Dhh in addition to Ptc2, Gli1 and Gli2, revealing the potential for an autocrine Hh signalling loop to sustain undifferentiated spermatogonial cells. These transcripts became undetectable by in situ hybridization following GnRH-ant induction of spermatogonial differentiation, however, detection of Gli1 protein in spermatogonia in all groups indicates that Hh signalling is sustained. This is the first evidence of active Hh signalling in mammalian male germline stem cells, as has been documented for some cancer stem cells.

  17. A point-by-point analysis of performance in a fencing match: psychological processes associated with winning and losing streaks.

    PubMed

    Doron, Julie; Gaudreau, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to revisit the complex nature of serial dependency of performance during a match, examining the prospective associations between psychological processes and subsequent performance at the within-person level of analysis, and explore whether psychological processes are associated with the likelihood of winning series of points. A process-oriented sequential approach was used with 16 elite fencers during a simulated competition. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that serial dependency of performance fluctuates within a match. Results of a Bayesian multilevel structural equation model showed that prior performance subsequently influenced psychological processes. Although psychological processes did not predict performance in the subsequent point, successive winnings were associated with higher perceived control and task-oriented coping and lower negative affectivity compared with both losing streaks and nonstreaks. Overall, serial dependencies of performance are nonstationary during a match whereas psychological processes significantly differ in episodes of winning after winning versus losing after losing.

  18. Gaining, losing, and dry stream reaches at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, March and September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.A.; Mitchell, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to delineate stream reaches that were gaining flow, losing flow, or that were dry in the upper reaches of Bear Creek Valley near the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The study included a review of maps and discharge data from a seepage investigation conducted at Bear Creek Valley; preparation of tables showing site identification and discharge and stream reaches that were gaining flow, losing flow, or that were dry; and preparation of maps showing measurement site locations and discharge measurements, and gaining, losing, and dry stream reaches. This report will aid in developing a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions in the upper reaches of Bear Creek.

  19. Longitudinal association of maternal attempt to lose weight during the postpartum period and child obesity at age 3 years.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Kendrin R; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Oken, Emily; Peterson, Karen E; Gortmaker, Steven L; Gillman, Matthew W; Taveras, Elsie M

    2011-10-01

    The effect of maternal attempt to lose weight during the postpartum period on later child weight has not been explored. Among 1,044 mother-infant pairs in Project Viva, we estimated longitudinal associations of maternal attempt to lose weight during the postpartum period with child weight and adiposity at age 3 years and examined differences in associations by type of weight loss strategy used. Using covariate-adjusted linear and logistic regression models, we estimated associations before and after adjusting for maternal weight-related variables including prepregnancy BMI. At 6 months postpartum, 53% mothers were trying to lose weight. At age 3 years, mean (s.d.) child BMI z-score was 0.44 (1.01) and 8.9% of children were obese. Children whose mothers were trying to lose weight at 6 months postpartum had higher BMI z-scores (0.30 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18, 0.42)) and were more likely to be obese (3.0 (95% CI 1.6, 5.8)) at 3 years of age. Addition of maternal prepregnancy BMI to the models attenuated but did not eliminate the associations seen for BMI z-score (0.24 (95% CI 0.12, 0.36) and obesity (2.4 (95% CI 1.2, 4.7)). Attempting to lose weight by exercising alone was the only weight loss strategy that consistently predicted higher child BMI z-score (0.36 (95% CI 0.14, 0.58)) and odds of obesity (6.0 (95% CI 2.2, 16.5)) at age 3 years. In conclusion, we observed an association between maternal attempt to lose weight at 6 months postpartum, particularly through exercise alone, measured using a single item and child adiposity at age 3 years. This association should be thoroughly examined in future studies.

  20. Win-stay-lose-learn promotes cooperation in the prisoner’s dilemma game with voluntary participation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chen; Liu, Jinzhuo; Shen, Chen; Jin, Jiahua; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary participation, demonstrated to be a simple yet effective mechanism to promote persistent cooperative behavior, has been extensively studied. It has also been verified that the aspiration-based win-stay-lose-learn strategy updating rule promotes the evolution of cooperation. Inspired by this well-known fact, we combine the Win-Stay-Lose-Learn updating rule with voluntary participation: Players maintain their strategies when they are satisfied, or players attempt to imitate the strategy of one randomly chosen neighbor. We find that this mechanism maintains persistent cooperative behavior, even further promotes the evolution of cooperation under certain conditions. PMID:28182707

  1. Viability of rat spermatogenic cells in vitro is facilitated by their coculture with Sertoli cells in serum-free hormone-supplemented medium.

    PubMed Central

    Tres, L L; Kierszenbaum, A L

    1983-01-01

    Spermatogenic cells from 20- to 35-day-old rats were grown in vitro in the presence of Sertoli cells maintained in serum-free hormone/growth factor-supplemented medium and alternating high/low concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone in the medium. In cell reaggregation experiments, spermatogenic cells reassociate with Sertoli cells but not with peritubular cells or cell-free substrate. Autoradiographic experiments using [3H]thymidine as a labeled precursor for DNA synthesis show that spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes, connected by cytoplasmic bridges, have a synchronous S phase. [3H]Thymidine-labeled preleptotene spermatocytes progress until later stages of meiotic prophase. Time-lapse cinematographic studies of Sertoli/spermatogenic cell cocultures show three major movement patterns. While Sertoli cell cytoplasmic processes between adjacent cells display tensional forces, spermatogonia are engaged in oscillatory cell movements different from the nuclear rotation observed in meiotic prophase spermatocytes. Results of this study show that the proliferation of premeiotic cells and the differentiation of meiotic prophase cells do occur in vitro in association with Sertoli cells maintained in a medium that allows differentiated cell functions. Images PMID:6407012

  2. Losing Chlordimeform Use in Cotton Production. Its Effects on the Economy and Pest Resistance. Agricultural Economic Report Number 587.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteen, Craig; Suguiyama, Luis

    This report examines the economic implications of losing chlordimeform use on cotton and considers chlordimeform's role in managing the resistance of bollworms and tobacco budworms to synthetic pyrethroids. It estimates changes in prices, production, acreage, consumer expenditures, aggregate producer returns, regional crop effects, and returns to…

  3. Go for broke: The role of somatic states when asked to lose in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rebecca J; Rakow, Tim; Russo, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    The Somatic Marker Hypothesis (SMH) posits that somatic states develop and guide advantageous decision making by "marking" disadvantageous options (i.e., arousal increases when poor options are considered). This assumption was tested using the standard Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in which participants win/lose money by selecting among four decks of cards, and an alternative version, identical in both structure and payoffs, but with the aim changed to lose as much money as possible. This "lose" version of the IGT reverses which decks are advantageous/disadvantageous; and so reverses which decks should be marked by somatic responses - which we assessed via skin conductance (SC). Participants learned to pick advantageously in the original (Win) IGT and in the (new) Lose IGT. Using multilevel regression, some variability in anticipatory SC across blocks was found but no consistent effect of anticipatory SC on disadvantageous deck selections. Thus, while we successfully developed a new way to test the central claims of the SMH, we did not find consistent support for the SMH.

  4. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their…

  5. Associations of Trying to Lose Weight, Weight Control Behaviors, and Current Cigarette Use among US High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jonetta L.; Eaton, Danice K.; Pederson, Linda L.; Lowry, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-quarter of high school students currently use cigarettes. Previous research has suggested some youth use smoking as a method for losing weight. The purpose of this study was to describe the association of current cigarette use with specific healthy and unhealthy weight control practices among 9th-12th grade students…

  6. Why Do Secondary School Students Lose Their Interest in Science? Or Does It Never Emerge? A Possible and Overlooked Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderhag, Per; Wickman, Per-Olof; Bergqvist, Kerstin; Jakobson, Britt; Hamza, Karim Mikael; Säljö, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review research on how students' interest in science changes through the primary to secondary school transition. In the literature, the findings generally show that primary students enjoy science but come to lose interest during secondary school. As this claim is based mainly on interview and questionnaire data, that is on…

  7. Profound Reversible Hypogammaglobulinemia Caused by Celiac Disease in the Absence of Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Barker, Russell William; Steele, Richard Henderson; Deo, Maneka; Woon, See-Tarn; Yeong, Mee Ling; Koopmans, Wikke

    2015-08-01

    When patients with hypogammaglobulinemia are encountered, a vigorous search should be undertaken for secondary treatable causes. Here we describe the first case of a patient with severe asymptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia where the underlying cause was undiagnosed celiac disease. A strict gluten free diet resulted in resolution of her mild long-standing abdominal symptoms and correction of her hypogammaglobulinemia. There was corresponding improvement in her duodenal histology and normalisation of her celiac serology. Protein losing enteropathy was unlikely to have been the mechanism of her profound hypogammaglobulinemia, as her albumin was within the normal range and she had a normal fecal alpha 1 antitrypsin level. Application of the Ameratunga et al. (2013) diagnostic criteria was helpful in confirming this patient did not have Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorder (CVID). Celiac disease must now be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe hypogammaglobulinemia. There should be a low threshold for undertaking celiac serology in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia, even if they have minimal symptoms attributable to gut disease.

  8. Losing jobs and lighting up: Employment experiences and smoking in the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Golden, Shelley D; Perreira, Krista M

    2015-08-01

    The Great Recession produced the highest rates of unemployment observed in decades, in part due to particularly high rates of people losing work involuntarily. The impact of these job losses on health is unknown, due to the length of time required for most disease development, concerns about reverse causation, and limited data that covers this time period. We examine associations between job loss, employment status and smoking, the leading preventable cause of death, among 13,571 individuals participating in the 2001-2011 waves of the U.S.-based Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Results indicate that recent involuntary job loss is associated with an average 1.1 percentage point increase in smoking probability. This risk is strongest when people have returned to work, and appears reversed when they leave the labor market altogether. Although some job loss is associated with changes in household income and psychological distress levels, we find no evidence that these changes explain smoking behavior modifications. Smoking prevention programs and policies targeted at displaced workers or the newly employed may alleviate some negative health effects produced by joblessness during the Great Recession.

  9. Tactical metrics that discriminate winning, drawing and losing teams in UEFA Euro 2012®.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christian; Pfeiffer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this article are twofold: first, an innovative approach to notational analysis in football is outlined. By considering the important theoretical requirements for the analysis of sports games (like the interaction between two parties, the procedural sequence of action or the significance of tactical behaviour) the meaning of the introduced parameters, called tactical metrics, is illustrated. In a second step, the validity of this approach is tested using matches of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Euro 2012® to investigate a connection between these metrics and success. The results show that 11 tactical metrics model tactical behaviour in 4 different dimensions (game speed, transition play after ball recovery, transition play after ball loss and offence efficiency (OE)). Discriminant analysis based on the factor values leads to a correct classification of 64.8% identifying winners, losers and drawers. This successful discrimination reveals a connection between match success and the presented metrics. Especially, the transition play after losing the ball and the OE seem to be factors connected directly with the result of a match, since those were important values for a successful discrimination. Furthermore, the procedural description of tactical behaviour provides the opportunity to conduct meaningful recommendations for the training and coaching process.

  10. A prospect theory explanation of the disposition to trade losing investments for less than market price.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, D J

    2002-06-01

    Investors have a proven general reluctance to realize losses. The theory of "mental accounting" suggests that losses are easier to accept when mentally integrated with either preceding losses or with compensatory gains. Mental integration is made easier when a failed asset is exchanged against a new, apparently profitable, acquisition. The alternative is to sell the existing asset on the open market before re-investing the proceeds as desired. This is emotionally less appealing than "rolling over" a losing investment into a new venture by way of an asset trade. The psychological benefits of exchanging rather than selling a failed asset come at a cost. It is typical of trade-in arrangements, e.g., where one trades an old car against a new one, that the effective sale price of the existing asset is less than current market value. Acceptance of this low price adds to the investor's total monetary loss on the existing asset but is essential to an overall package deal apart from which that asset would often remain belatedly unsold.

  11. Win-stay, lose-shift in language learning from peers.

    PubMed

    Matsen, Frederick A; Nowak, Martin A

    2004-12-28

    Traditional language learning theory explores an idealized interaction between a teacher and a learner. The teacher provides sentences from a language, while the learner has to infer the underlying grammar. Here, we study a new approach by considering a population of individuals that learn from each other. There is no designated teacher. We are inspired by the observation that children grow up to speak the language of their peers, not of their parents. Our goal is to characterize learning strategies that generate "linguistic coherence," which means that most individuals use the same language. We model the resulting learning dynamics as a random walk of a population on a graph. Each vertex represents a candidate language. We find that a simple strategy using a certain aspiration level with the principle of win-stay, lose-shift does extremely well: stay with your current language, if at least three others use that language; otherwise, shift to an adjacent language on the graph. This strategy guarantees linguistic coherence on all nearly regular graphs, in the relevant limit where the number of candidate languages is much greater than the population size. Moreover, for many graphs, it is sufficient to have an aspiration level demanding only two other individuals to use the same language.

  12. Use of diet pills and amphetamines to lose weight among smoking and nonsmoking high school seniors.

    PubMed

    Gritz, E R; Crane, L A

    1991-01-01

    Used data on 3,305 high school seniors collected as part of the 1984 Monitoring the Future project to examine the relationships among cigarette use, diet pill use, and use of amphetamines for weight loss. Results indicate that females were more likely than males to report use of all three substances. In addition, Whites were more likely than Blacks to use all three substances. Both female and male smokers were more likely than nonsmokers to use diet pills. Amphetamine use for weight loss was positively related to smoking among females, but not among males. The relationships between smoking and diet pill use, and smoking and amphetamine use to lose weight, were maintained when race, sex, and other drug use were controlled simultaneously. Two explanations for these relationships are considered. The first is that smoking is related to the use of most other licit and illicit drugs. The second explanation is that there is a greater preoccupation with weight among smokers, with weight concerns potentially motivating the initiation of smoking.

  13. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  14. Losing jobs and lighting up: Employment experiences and smoking in the Great Recession

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Shelley D.; Perreira, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Recession produced the highest rates of unemployment observed in decades, in part due to particularly high rates of people losing work involuntarily. The impact of these job losses on health is unknown, due to the length of time required for most disease development, concerns about reverse causation, and limited data that covers this time period. We examine associations between job loss, employment status and smoking, the leading preventable cause of death, among 13,571 individuals participating in the 2001-2011 waves of the U.S.-based Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Results indicate that recent involuntary job loss is associated with an average 1.1 percentage point increase in smoking probability. This risk is strongest when people have returned to work, and appears reversed when they leave the labor market altogether. Although some job loss is associated with changes in household income and psychological distress levels, we find no evidence that these changes explain smoking behavior modifications. Smoking prevention programs and policies targeted at displaced workers or the newly employed may alleviate some negative health effects produced by joblessness during the Great Recession. PMID:26079992

  15. Stochastic win-stay-lose-shift strategy with dynamic aspirations in evolutionary social dilemmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Marco A.; Wardil, Lucas; Perc, Matjaž; da Silva, Jafferson K. L.

    2016-09-01

    In times of plenty expectations rise, just as in times of crisis they fall. This can be mathematically described as a win-stay-lose-shift strategy with dynamic aspiration levels, where individuals aspire to be as wealthy as their average neighbor. Here we investigate this model in the realm of evolutionary social dilemmas on the square lattice and scale-free networks. By using the master equation and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that cooperators coexist with defectors in the whole phase diagram, even at high temptations to defect. We study the microscopic mechanism that is responsible for the striking persistence of cooperative behavior and find that cooperation spreads through second-order neighbors, rather than by means of network reciprocity that dominates in imitation-based models. For the square lattice the master equation can be solved analytically in the large temperature limit of the Fermi function, while for other cases the resulting differential equations must be solved numerically. Either way, we find good qualitative agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation results. Our analysis also reveals that the evolutionary outcomes are to a large degree independent of the network topology, including the number of neighbors that are considered for payoff determination on lattices, which further corroborates the local character of the microscopic dynamics. Unlike large-scale spatial patterns that typically emerge due to network reciprocity, here local checkerboard-like patterns remain virtually unaffected by differences in the macroscopic properties of the interaction network.

  16. Use of vertical electrical resistivity profiles to characterize the riverbed of losing-disconnected rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Sebastien; Davis, Aaron; Crosbie, Russell; Taylor, Andrew; Munday, Tim

    2014-05-01

    There are few field techniques available to estimate infiltration rates from losing-disconnected rivers, where infiltration rates are often constrained by the presence of clay layers with a low hydraulic conductivity. It is hypothesized that, in this environment, the bulk of the infiltration would occur in 'hotspots' where the clay layer is thin or absent. Infiltration was estimated over a 2 km section of Billabong Creek (Murray-Darling Basin, Australia) using vertical electrical sounding (VES) resistivity to characterize the continuity and thickness of the riverbed clay layer. Both a towed in-river survey over the whole study reach and three fixed array measurements at the shoreline at selected areas were used. Using locations with measured high and low resistivity, the resistivity profiles were constrained by coring the riverbed to measure vertical variations in riverbed texture, porewater content and porewater salinity. The VES showed that the clay layer was continuous along the study reach and varied in thickness between 1 m and >4 m. Using a simple steady-state model, infiltration rates along the study reach were estimated to vary between 1700 and 7800 m3 km-1 year-1, with an average of 3400 m3 km-1 year-1. This methodology can provide independent estimates of infiltration rates at a scale suitable for the calibration of regional groundwater models.

  17. No Time To Lose - High Throughput Screening To Assess Nanomaterial Safety

    PubMed Central

    Damoiseaux, R; George, S; Li, M; Pokhrel, S; Ji, Z; France, B; Xia, T; Suarez, E; Rallo, R; Mädler, L; Cohen, Y; Hoek, EMV; Nel, A

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials hold great promise for medical, technological and economical benefits. Knowledge concerning the toxicological properties of these novel materials is typically lacking. At the same time, it is becoming evident that some nanomaterials could have a toxic potential in humans and the environment. Animal based systems lack the needed capacity to cope with the abundance of novel nanomaterials being produced, and thus we have to employ in vitro methods with high throughput to manage the rush logistically and use high content readouts wherever needed in order to gain more depth of information. Towards this end, high throughput screening (HTS) and high content screening (HCS) approaches can be used to speed up the safety analysis on a scale that commensurate with the rate of expansion of new materials and new properties. The insights gained from HTS/HCS should aid in our understanding of the tenets of nanomaterial hazard at biological level as well as asset the development of safe-by-design approaches. This review aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the HTS/HCS methodology employed for safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including data analysis and prediction of potentially hazardous material properties. Given the current pace of nanomaterial development, HTS/HCS is a potentially effective means of keeping up with the rapid progress in this field – we have literally no time to lose. PMID:21301704

  18. Dry heat loses of newborn baby in infant care bed: use of a thermal manikin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Ziemowit; Rojczyk, Marek; Szczygieł, Ireneusz; Łaszczyk, Joanna; Nowak, Andrzej J.

    2016-09-01

    The energy balance and heat exchange for newborn baby in infant care bed environment (radiant warmer) are considered. The present study was performed to assess the body dry heat loss from an infant in radiant warmer, using copper cast anthropomorphic thermal manikin and controlled climate chamber laboratory setup. The total body dry heat losses were measured for varying manikin surface temperatures (nine levels between 32.5oC and 40.1oC) and ambient air temperatures (five levels between 23.5oC and 29.7oC). Radiant heat losses were estimated based on measured climate chamber wall temperatures. After subtracting radiant part, resulting convective heat loses are compared with computed ones, based on Nu correlations for common geometries. Simplified geometry of newborn baby was represented as: (a) single cylinder and (b) weighted sum of 5 cylinders and sphere. The computed values are significantly overestimated relative to measured ones by: 28.8% (23.5%) for (a) and 40.9% (25.2%) for (b). This shows that use of adopted general purpose correlations for approximation of convective heat losses of newborn baby can lead to substantial errors, hence approximation formula is proposed. The thermal manikin appears to provide a precise method for the noninvasive assessment of thermal conditions in neonatal care.

  19. Which skills and factors better predict winning and losing in high-level men's volleyball?

    PubMed

    Peña, Javier; Rodríguez-Guerra, Jorge; Buscà, Bernat; Serra, Núria

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which skills and factors better predicted the outcomes of regular season volleyball matches in the Spanish "Superliga" and were significant for obtaining positive results in the game. The study sample consisted of 125 matches played during the 2010-11 Spanish men's first division volleyball championship. Matches were played by 12 teams composed of 148 players from 17 different nations from October 2010 to March 2011. The variables analyzed were the result of the game, team category, home/away court factors, points obtained in the break point phase, number of service errors, number of service aces, number of reception errors, percentage of positive receptions, percentage of perfect receptions, reception efficiency, number of attack errors, number of blocked attacks, attack points, percentage of attack points, attack efficiency, and number of blocks performed by both teams participating in the match. The results showed that the variables of team category, points obtained in the break point phase, number of reception errors, and number of blocked attacks by the opponent were significant predictors of winning or losing the matches. Odds ratios indicated that the odds of winning a volleyball match were 6.7 times greater for the teams belonging to higher rankings and that every additional point in Complex II increased the odds of winning a match by 1.5 times. Every reception and blocked ball error decreased the possibility of winning by 0.6 and 0.7 times, respectively.

  20. Instilling a soul in your organization without losing yours to it.

    PubMed

    Stegall, M Scott

    2002-01-01

    Health-care professionals are accustomed to struggling with ethical considerations brought about by advances in the medical sciences. How aware are these professionals of the ethical dilemmas created by advances in the management sciences? Deeply embedded in organizational and departmental changes are theories, paradigms, and philosophies that often are understood poorly even by their promoters. Although these system changes can occur at glacial speed, they also can be glacial in their effects on an organization's culture. Are individuals aware that the latest implemented management fad is changing their behaviors? By becoming mindful of the potential ramifications of change, individuals increase their ability to behave in a civil manner--that is, ethically choosing to embrace or resist the change. By acting within their own sphere of influence, civil individuals at all levels of the organization collectively instill a soul in their organization rather than losing their own souls to it. This article is adapted from a commencement speech presented to graduates of an executive health-care administration program. Most of these graduates were a mixture of hospital department heads, middle managers, and a few medical and hospital executives. Each year, I distribute my current version of this teaching note or mini-lecture to students completing my leadership class in hope that it will help them put in perspective the appropriate use of the management sciences they intensely study.

  1. Gaining pounds by losing pounds: preferences for lifestyle interventions to reduce obesity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Yi, Deokhee; Avenell, Alison; Douglas, Flora; Aucott, Lorna; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Vale, Luke

    2015-04-01

    While there is evidence that weight-loss interventions reduce morbidity, indications of their acceptability are limited. Understanding preferences for lifestyle interventions will help policymakers design interventions. We used a discrete choice experiment to investigate preferences for lifestyle interventions to reduce adult obesity. Attributes focused on: the components of the programme; weight change; short-term and longer-term health gains; time spent on the intervention and financial costs incurred. Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire, with 504 UK adults responding. Despite evidence that dietary interventions are the most effective way to lose weight, respondents preferred lifestyle interventions involving physical activity. While the evidence suggests that behaviour change support improves effectiveness of interventions, its value to participants was limited. A general preference to maintain current lifestyles, together with the sensitivity of take up to financial costs, suggests financial incentives could be used to help maximise uptake of healthy lifestyle interventions. An important target group for change, men, required more compensation to take up healthier lifestyles. Those of normal weight, who will increase in weight over time if they do not change their lifestyle, required the highest compensation. Policymakers face challenges in inducing people to change their behaviour and adopt healthy lifestyles.

  2. Prefrontal neurons represent winning and losing during competitive video shooting games between monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Masataka

    2012-05-30

    Humans and animals must work to support their survival and reproductive needs. Because resources are limited in the natural environment, competition is inevitable, and competing successfully is vitally important. However, the neuronal mechanisms of competitive behavior are poorly studied. We examined whether neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) showed response sensitivity related to a competitive game. In this study, monkeys played a video shooting game, either competing with another monkey or the computer, or playing alone without a rival. Monkeys performed more quickly and more accurately in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games, indicating that they were more motivated in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games. LPFC neurons showed differential activity between the competitive and noncompetitive games showing winning- and losing-related activity. Furthermore, activities of prefrontal neurons differed depending on whether the competition was between monkeys or between the monkey and the computer. These results indicate that LPFC neurons may play an important role in monitoring the outcome of competition and enabling animals to adapt their behavior to increase their chances of obtaining a reward in a socially interactive environment.

  3. Reciprocal localization of transcription factors YY1 and CP2c in spermatogonial stem cells and their putative roles during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sook; Chae, Ji Hyung; Cheon, Yong-Pil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2016-09-01

    Maintaining stemness and permitting differentiation mediated by combinations of transcription factors (TFs) are key aspects of mammalian spermatogenesis. It has been established that yin yang 1 (YY1), a target factor of mammalian polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and a regulator of stemness, is involved in the stable maintenance of prophase stage spermatocytes. Recently, we have demonstrated that the TF CP2c partners with YY1 in some cells to antagonistically regulate the other protein's function. To date, the functional roles of YY1 and CP2c in spermatogonial stem cells and their derived germ cells remain unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of YY1 and CP2c in mouse gonocytes and germ cells using tissue immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses. At E14.5, both YY1 and CP2c were stained in gonocytes and Sertoli cells in testicular cords, showing different proportion and density of immunoreactivity. However, in adult testes, YY1 was localized in the nuclei of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatocytes, but not in spermatozoa. It was also detected in spermatogonia and spermatids in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenic cycle. CP2c could be detected mostly in the cytoplasm of spermatocytes but not at all in spermatogonial stem cells, indicating mutually exclusive expression of CP2c and YY1. Interestingly, however, CP2c was stained in the cytoplasm and nucleus of spermatogonia at elongation and release stages, and co-localized with YY1 in the nucleus at grouping, maturation, and releasing stages. Neither YY1 nor CP2c was expressed in spermatozoa. Our data indicate that YY1 strongly localizes in the spermatogonial stem cells and co-localizes heterogeneously with CP2c to permit spermatogenesis, and also suggest that YY1 is essential for stemness of spermatogonial stem cells (SCs) whereas CP2c is critical for the commitment of spermatogonia and during the progression of spermatogonia to spermatids. This evaluation expands our understanding of

  4. Smurf-mediated differential proteolysis generates dynamic BMP signaling in germline stem cells during Drosophila testis development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Jie; Pi, Haiwei; Hsieh, Chang-Che; Fuller, Margaret T

    2013-11-01

    Germline stem cells (GSCs) produce gametes throughout the reproductive life of many animals, and intensive studies have revealed critical roles of BMP signaling to maintain GSC self-renewal in Drospophila adult gonads. Here, we show that BMP signaling is downregulated as testes develop and this regulation controls testis growth, stem cell number, and the number of spermatogonia divisions. Phosphorylated Mad (pMad), the activated Drosophila Smad in germ cells, was restricted from anterior germ cells to GSCs and hub-proximal cells during early larval development. pMad levels in GSCs were then dramatically downregulated from early third larval instar (L3) to late L3, and maintained at low levels in pupal and adult GSCs. The spatial restriction and temporal down-regulation of pMad, reflecting the germ cell response to BMP signaling activity, required action in germ cells of E3 ligase activity of HECT domain protein Smurf. Analyses of Smurf mutant testes and dosage-dependent genetic interaction between Smurf and mad indicated that pMad downregulation was required for both the normal decrease in stem cell number during testis maturation in the pupal stage, and for normal limit of four rounds of spermatogonia cell division for control of germ cell numbers and testis size. Smurf protein was expressed at a constant low level in GSCs and spermatogonia during development. Rescue experiments showed that expression of exogenous Smurf protein in early germ cells promoted pMad downregulation in GSCs in a stage-dependent but concentration-independent manner, suggesting that the competence of Smurf to attenuate response to BMP signaling may be regulated during development. Taken together, our work reveals a critical role for differential attenuation of the response to BMP signaling in GSCs and early germ cells for control of germ cell number and gonad growth during development.

  5. In Vitro Derivation and Propagation of Spermatogonial Stem Cell Activity from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Yukiko; Yabuta, Yukihiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Tomonori; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Shirane, Kenjiro; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori

    2016-12-06

    The in vitro derivation and propagation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a key goal in reproductive science. We show here that when aggregated with embryonic testicular somatic cells (reconstituted testes), primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs) induced from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiate into spermatogonia-like cells in vitro and are expandable as cells that resemble germline stem cells (GSCs), a primary cell line with SSC activity. Remarkably, GSC-like cells (GSCLCs), but not PGCLCs, colonize adult testes and, albeit less effectively than GSCs, contribute to spermatogenesis and fertile offspring. Whole-genome analyses reveal that GSCLCs exhibit aberrant methylation at vulnerable regulatory elements, including those critical for spermatogenesis, which may restrain their spermatogenic potential. Our study establishes a strategy for the in vitro derivation of SSC activity from PSCs, which, we propose, relies on faithful epigenomic regulation.

  6. Crowding in the city: losing and winning competitors of an invasive bird.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Brito, Dailos; Carrete, Martina; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Ibáñez, Carlos; Tella, José L

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species can take advantage of resources unexploited by natives (opportunism hypothesis) or they can exploit the same resources but more aggressively or efficiently (competition hypothesis), thus impacting native species. However, invasive species tend to exploit anthropogenic habitats that are inefficiently used by natives such as urban environments. Focusing on the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri), one of the most invasive birds worldwide, we combined observations of interspecific aggressions, species-specific cavity-nest preferences and the spatial distribution of the native cavity-nesting vertebrate community to determine the invasion process as well as its potential impacts on native species in a Mediterranean city. Our results support the competition hypothesis, suggesting that ring-necked parakeets are outcompeting native species sharing nest-site preferences. Parakeets initiated and won most interspecific aggressions, which were directed towards competitors but also towards predators. This behaviour could explain the spatial arrangement of natives, with most bird species breeding close to parakeets possibly to take advantage of their effective antipredatory behaviour. However, temporal and spatial patterns of segregation suggest that a threatened bat species is negatively affected by parakeets. This demonstrates that common species gain benefits and threatened ones (in this study, a bat and possibly a falcon) lose nest sites due to invaders. Therefore, the conservation status of the native species that pay the costs of competition with invaders should be considered. This scenario of winners and losers may, however, shift towards more losers if the ring-necked parakeet population continues to grow, thus requiring close monitoring and control/eradication programs to avoid further impacts.

  7. Tropical nature reserves are losing their buffer zones, but leakage is not to blame.

    PubMed

    Lui, Gillian V; Coomes, David A

    2016-05-01

    Tropical forests provide important ecosystem services to humanity, yet are threatened by habitat loss resulting from deforestation and land-use change. Although reserves are considered the cornerstones of conservation efforts in the tropics, their efficacy remains equivocal. One question that remains unresolved is whether leakage - the unanticipated displacement of deforestation from inside reserves into the unrestricted zones just beyond a reserve's administrative boundary - is common around tropical forest reserves, or whether the zones are acting as buffers between the protected area and the outside world. To resolve this question, we used the Landsat-derived Global Forest Change dataset to estimate deforestation rates between 2000 and 2012 inside and outside of 60 nature reserves spread across the tropics. Deforestation rates inside reserves (within 5km of the administrative boundary) were generally lower than those immediately outside the reserves (i.e. in buffer zones 0-10km from the boundary), suggesting that reserves are effective at protecting forests. We hypothesised that leakage would result in greater deforestation rates in reserve buffer zones than in the broader reserve landscapes, but such a pattern was observed in only five African sites, suggesting that leakage does not often occur on the edge of established reserves. However, roughly 80% of reserves experienced deforestation rates that increased gradually from their interiors to the outer periphery of their buffer zones. Thus, while leakage may not be a pervasive phenomenon around tropical reserves worldwide, tropical reserves are often losing their buffer zones, resulting in increased isolation that could have ramifications for ecosystem services provisioning and tropical conservation strategies.

  8. Crowding in the City: Losing and Winning Competitors of an Invasive Bird

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Brito, Dailos; Carrete, Martina; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.; Ibáñez, Carlos; Tella, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species can take advantage of resources unexploited by natives (opportunism hypothesis) or they can exploit the same resources but more aggressively or efficiently (competition hypothesis), thus impacting native species. However, invasive species tend to exploit anthropogenic habitats that are inefficiently used by natives such as urban environments. Focusing on the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri), one of the most invasive birds worldwide, we combined observations of interspecific aggressions, species-specific cavity-nest preferences and the spatial distribution of the native cavity-nesting vertebrate community to determine the invasion process as well as its potential impacts on native species in a Mediterranean city. Our results support the competition hypothesis, suggesting that ring-necked parakeets are outcompeting native species sharing nest-site preferences. Parakeets initiated and won most interspecific aggressions, which were directed towards competitors but also towards predators. This behaviour could explain the spatial arrangement of natives, with most bird species breeding close to parakeets possibly to take advantage of their effective antipredatory behaviour. However, temporal and spatial patterns of segregation suggest that a threatened bat species is negatively affected by parakeets. This demonstrates that common species gain benefits and threatened ones (in this study, a bat and possibly a falcon) lose nest sites due to invaders. Therefore, the conservation status of the native species that pay the costs of competition with invaders should be considered. This scenario of winners and losers may, however, shift towards more losers if the ring-necked parakeet population continues to grow, thus requiring close monitoring and control/eradication programs to avoid further impacts. PMID:24945439

  9. Nitrate dynamics within the Pajaro River, a nutrient-rich, losing stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruehl, C.R.; Fisher, A.T.; Los, Huertos M.; Wankel, Scott D.; Wheat, C.G.; Kendall, C.; Hatch, C.E.; Shennan, C.

    2007-01-01

    The major ion chemistry of water from an 11.42-km reach of the Pajaro River, a losing stream in central coastal California, shows a consistent pattern of higher concentrations during the 2nd (dry) half of the water year. Most solutes are conserved during flow along the reach, but [NO 3-] decreases by ???30% and is accompanied by net loss of channel discharge and extensive surface-subsurface exchange. The corresponding net NO3- uptake length is 37 ?? 13 km (42 ?? 12 km when normalized to the conservative solute Cl-), and the areal NO3- uptake rate is 0.5 ??mol m -2 s-1. The observed reduction in [NO3-] along the reach results from one or more internal sinks, not dilution by ground water, hill-slope water, or other water inputs. Observed reductions in [NO3-] and channel discharge along the experimental reach result in a net loss of 200-400 kg/d of NO3--N, ???50% of the input load. High-resolution (temporal and spatial) sampling indicates that most of the NO3- loss occurs along the lower part of the reach, where there is the greatest seepage loss and surface-subsurface exchange of water. Stable isotopes of NO 3-, total dissolved P concentrations, and streambed chemical profiles suggest that denitrification is the most significant NO 3- sink along the reach. Denitrification efficiency, as expressed through downstream enrichment in 15N-NO3-, varies considerably during the water year. When discharge is greater (typically earlier in the water year), denitrification is least efficient and downstream enrichment in 15N-NO3- is greatest. When discharge is lower, denitrification in the streambed appears to occur with greater efficiency, resulting in lower downstream enrichment in 15N-NO3-. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  10. Galactic mass-losing AGB stars probed with the IRTS. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bertre, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2003-06-01

    We are using the 2002 data-release from the Japanese space experiment IRTS to investigate the spatial distribution of galactic mass-losing (>2x 10-8 Msund) AGB stars and the relative contribution of C-rich and O-rich ones to the replenishment of the ISM. Our sample contains 126 C-rich and 563 O-rich sources which are sorted on the basis of the molecular bands observed in the range 1.4-4.0 mu m, and for which we estimate distances and mass loss rates from near-infrared photometry (K and L'). There is a clear dependence on galactocentric distance, with O-rich sources outnumbering C-rich ones for rGC< 8 kpc, and the reverse for rGC> 10 kpc. The contribution to the replenishment of the ISM by O-rich AGB stars relative to C-rich ones follows the same trend. Although they are rare ( ~ 10% in our sample), sources with 10-6 Msund < dot {M} < 10-5 Msund dominate the replenishment of the ISM by contributing to ~ 50% of the total of the complete sample. We find 2 carbon stars at more than 1 kpc from the Galactic Plane, that probably belong to the halo of our Galaxy. The complete Tables \\ref{tab_C-rich} and \\ref{tab_O-rich} are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/943}

  11. Thermic effect and substrate oxidation in response to intravenous nutrition in cancer patients who lose weight.

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, L; Bennegård, K; Edén, E; Svaninger, G; Ternell, M; Lundholm, K

    1986-01-01

    This study examined oxidative metabolism and thermogenesis in the acute response to controlled intravenous nutrition in seven cancer patients who lost weight. Six weight-losing and malnourished patients without cancer served as controls. Indirect calorimetry was used and measurements of arterial concentrations of various substrates, metabolic end products, and insulin were performed. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured after an overnight fast. The resting energy need was calculated for each patient according to REE. The nutrition program consisted of glucose and lipids (Intralipid KabiVitrum AB, Stockholm, Sweden) each as 50% of nonprotein calories and amino acids (6.9 mg N/kcal). These substrates were infused simultaneously at rates equivalent to one, two, and three times REE, over periods of 6.5 hours on 3 consecutive days after a 12-hour fast. Arterial substrate levels and energy expenditure were measured between 6 and 6.5 hours after the start of the infusion. The cancer patients had well-recognized metabolic changes in the fasted state, such as elevated plasma levels of glycerol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and lactate, and higher energy expenditure than predicted. The cancer patients responded to strictly defined substrate challenge in a similar way as the malnourished patients without cancer. Whole body oxidative capacity and the proportion of infused glucose and lipids that were oxidized at different levels of infusion rates were not decreased in cancer patients compared with control patients. Similar arterial substrate concentrations among the groups during infusions argues for a maintained plasma clearance of the substrate in the cancer patients. This study supports the suggestion that cachectic cancer patients can generate and conserve energy normally in response to intravenous nutrition. This refers to cancer patients with a history of weight loss up to 15% of their normal body weight. Therefore, weight loss due to altered tumor

  12. Changes in the morphology and protein expression of germ cells and Sertoli cells in plateau pikas testes during non-breeding season

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Cao, Guangming; Zhang, Yanming; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Wei; Wan, Xinrong; Li, Yu-xia; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Yan-ling; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Plateau pikas are seasonally breeding small herbivores that inhabit the meadow ecosystem of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Testis regression in plateau pikas begins in early June, and the male pikas are completely infertile, with a dramatically reduced testis size, in late July. In this study, a decreased germ cell number in the testes was first noted in early June. By late June, only Sertoli cells and a small number of spermatogonia remained. Interestingly, large gonocyte-like germ cells were observed in early July. In late July, the number of gonocyte-like cells per tubule increased significantly, and most of the Sertoli cell nuclei moved to and clustered in the center of the seminiferous tubules. The gonocyte-like germ cells and Sertoli cells began to express AP-2γ and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) proteins, which were detected in the germ cells and Sertoli cells of juvenile pikas but not in adult testes. Simultaneously, LC3 puncta dramatically increased in the seminiferous tubules of the pikas’ testes during the non-breeding season. Our study found that spermatogonia and Sertoli cells in non-breeding adult pikas morphologically resembled those in juvenile pikas and expressed specific markers, indicating that de-differentiation-like transitions may occur during this process. PMID:26939551

  13. From fan to fat? Vicarious losing increases unhealthy eating, but self-affirmation is an effective remedy.

    PubMed

    Cornil, Yann; Chandon, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Using archival and experimental data, we showed that vicarious defeats experienced by fans when their favorite football team loses lead them to consume less healthy food. On the Mondays following a Sunday National Football League (NFL) game, saturated-fat and food-calorie intake increase significantly in cities with losing teams, decrease in cities with winning teams, and remain at their usual levels in comparable cities without an NFL team or with an NFL team that did not play. These effects are greater in cities with the most committed fans, when the opponents are more evenly matched, and when the defeats are narrow. We found similar results when measuring the actual or intended food consumption of French soccer fans who had previously been asked to write about or watch highlights from victories or defeats of soccer teams. However, these unhealthy consequences of vicarious defeats disappear when supporters spontaneously self-affirm or are given the opportunity to do so.

  14. The spermatogonial stem cell niche in the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Campos-Junior, Paulo Henrique A; Costa, Guilherme M J; Lacerda, Samyra M S N; Rezende-Neto, José V; de Paula, Ana M; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; de França, Luiz R

    2012-05-01

    In the seminiferous epithelium, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are located in a particular environment called the "niche" that is controlled by the basement membrane, key testis somatic cells, and factors originating from the vascular network. However, the role of Leydig cells (LCs) as a niche component is not yet clearly elucidated. Recent studies showed that peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) present a peculiar LC cytoarchitecture in which these cells are located around the seminiferous tubule lobes, making the peccary a unique model for investigating the SSC niche. This peculiarity allowed us to subdivide the seminiferous tubule cross-sections in three different testis parenchyma regions (tubule-tubule, tubule-interstitium, and tubule-LC contact). Our aims were to characterize the different spermatogonial cell types and to determine the location and/or distribution of the SSCs along the seminiferous tubules. Compared to differentiating spermatogonia, undifferentiated spermatogonia (A(und)) presented a noticeably higher nuclear volume (P < 0.05), allowing an accurate evaluation of their distribution. Immunostaining analysis demonstrated that approximately 93% of A(und) were GDNF receptor alpha 1 positive (GFRA1(+)), and these cells were preferentially located adjacent to the interstitial compartment without LCs (P < 0.05). The expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 was observed in LCs and peritubular myoid cells (PMCs), whereas its receptor was present in LCs and in GFRA1(+) A(und). Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that LCs, different from PMCs, might play a minor role in the SSC niche and physiology and that these steroidogenic cells are probably involved in the differentiation of A(und) toward type A(1) spermatogonia.

  15. Immunochemical Detection of Metallothionein in Specific Epithelial Cells of Rat Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Keith G.; Ohi, Seigo; Huang, P. C.

    1982-04-01

    The distribution of a heavy metal binding protein, metallothionein, was studied immunocytochemically by using antimetallothionein antibody and the immunoperoxidase staining technique on histological sections of liver, kidney, intestine, lung, and testis from cadmium-treated rats. These tissues either accumulate heavy metals (e.g., liver, kidney, and testis) or are exposed to metal by ingestion or inhalation (intestine and lung). Staining for metallothionein was observed intracellularly in epithelial parenchymal cells of the liver and kidney; all hepatocytes and most renal tubular cells stained for the protein. Accumulation of metallothionein was not seen in connective tissue cells surrounding either blood vessels or renal tubules. Extracellular localization of metallothionein was also observed in the liver sinusoids and within the lumina of the renal tubules, suggesting a metal transport or excretory function for this protein. Surface columnar epithelial cells of the intestinal villi indicated the presence of metallothionein but connective tissue cells of the lamina propria were negative for the protein. The granular secretory Paneth cells of the small intestine also stained strongly for metallothionein as did respiratory epithelial cells of the lung. In the testis, metallothionein was detected in the Sertoli cells and interstitial cells but not within the spermatogonia. Sertoli cells are closely associated with the developing spermatogonia and appear to serve a nutritive role in spermatogenesis. Because of the secretory, absorptive, or nutritive function of the metallothionein-localizing cells in the organs studied, we suggest that metallothionein may be involved in metal storage or transport in addition to its commonly proposed detoxification role.

  16. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) increases milk yield without losing body weight in lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Joo, Young-Kuk; Lee, Jin-Woo; Ha, Young-Joo; Yeo, Joon-Mo; Kim, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the performance of lactating sows and piglets as well as the immunity of piglets suckling from sows fed CLA. Eighteen multiparous Duroc sows with an average body weight (BW) of 232.0 ± 6.38 kg were randomly selected and assigned to two dietary treatments (n = 9 for each treatment), control (no CLA addition) and 1% CLA supplementation. For the control diet, CLA was replaced with soybean oil. Experimental diets were fed to sows during a 28-day lactation period. Litter size for each sow was standardized to nine piglets by cross-fostering within 24 hours after birth. Sow milk and blood samples were taken from sows and piglets after 21 and 27 days of lactation, respectively. Loss of BW was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed control diet compared to sows fed CLA diet. Piglet weights at weaning and weight gain during suckling were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed CLA compared to sows fed control diet. Serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. IgG concentrations of the groups supplemented with CLA increased by 49% in sow serum (p < 0.0001), 23% in milk (p < 0.05), and 35% in piglet serum (p < 0.05) compared with the control group. Sows fed CLA showed an increase of 10% in milk yield compared with sows fed soybean oil (p < 0.05), even though there was no difference in daily feed intake between the treatments. Milk fat content was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. Solid-not-fat yield was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows supplemented with CLA than in sows fed control diet and also protein-to-fat ratio in milk was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed CLA compared with the control group. The results show that CLA supplementation to sows increased milk yield without losing BW during

  17. A comparison of enzyme activity mutation frequencies in germ cells of mice (Mus musculus) and golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) after exposure to 2 + 2 Gy gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pretsch, W; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Favor, J

    2000-01-01

    The radiation-induced germ cell mutation rate has been investigated in two species of mammals. Mice and golden hamsters of both sexes were exposed to 2 + 2 Gy gamma-irradiation with a 24 h fractionation interval and mated to untreated partners. In mice, specific locus mutations were examined as positive controls and the obtained mutation rates (per locus and gamete x10(-5)) were 51.4, 10.1, 13.6 and 17.4 for irradiated post-spermatogonia, spermatogonia and 1-7 and >7 days post-treatment oocytes, respectively. Offspring of mice and golden hamsters were screened for activity alterations of 10 erythrocyte enzymes coded by at least 14 loci. The observed mutation rates per locus per gamete x10(-5) for treated post-spermatogonial stages, spermatogonia and oocytes 1-7 and >7 days post-treatment were 6.5, 1.5, 8.8 and 7.0, respectively, for mice and 16.7, 0, 7.6 and 0, respectively, for golden hamsters. There is a significant difference for mutation rates in mouse oocytes 1-7 days post-treatment compared with the control. No differences in the frequencies of mutations in the various germ cell stages could be observed between mice and golden hamsters. A critical assumption for the extrapolation of experimental mutagenesis studies to humans is that no species effects exist in sensitivity to mutation induction by irradiation. Our results do not contradict this assumption.

  18. Cryopreservation of putative pre-pubertal bovine spermatogonial stem cells by slow freezing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jung; Lee, Yong-An; Kim, Bang-Jin; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Byung-Gak; Kang, Hyun-Gu; Jung, Sang-Eun; Choi, Sun-Ho; Schmidt, Jonathan A; Ryu, Buom-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Development of techniques for the preservation of mammalian spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is a critical step in commercial application of SSC based technologies, including species preservation, amplification of agriculturally valuable germ lines, and human fertility preservations. The objective of this study was to develop an efficient cryopreservation protocol for preservation of bovine SSCs using a slow freezing technique. To maximize the efficiency of SSC cryopreservation, the effects of various methods (tissue vs. cell freezing) and cryoprotective agents (trehalose, sucrose, and polyethylene glycol [PEG]) were tested. Following thawing, cells were enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia by differential plating and evaluated for recovery rate, proliferation capacity, and apoptosis. Additionally, putative stem cell activity was assessed using SSC xenotransplantation. The recovery rate, and proliferation capacity of undifferentiated spermatogonia were significantly greater for germ cells frozen using tissue freezing methods compared to cell freezing methods. Cryopreservation in the presence of 200 mM trehalose resulted in significantly greater recovery rate, proliferation capacity, and apoptosis of germ cells compared to control. Furthermore, cryopreservation using the tissue freezing method in the presence of 200 mM trehalose resulted in the production of colonies of donor-derived germ cells after xenotransplantation into recipient mouse testes, indicating putative stem cell function. Collectively, these data indicate that cryopreservation using tissue freezing methods in the presence of 200 mM trehalose is an efficient cryopreservation protocol for bovine SSCs.

  19. The actin-binding protein profilin is required for germline stem cell maintenance and germ cell enclosure by somatic cyst cells.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alicia R; Spence, Allyson C; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Davies, Erin L; Fuller, Margaret T

    2014-01-01

    Specialized microenvironments, or niches, provide signaling cues that regulate stem cell behavior. In the Drosophila testis, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway regulates germline stem cell (GSC) attachment to the apical hub and somatic cyst stem cell (CySC) identity. Here, we demonstrate that chickadee, the Drosophila gene that encodes profilin, is required cell autonomously to maintain GSCs, possibly facilitating localization or maintenance of E-cadherin to the GSC-hub cell interface. Germline specific overexpression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli 2 (APC2) rescued GSC loss in chic hypomorphs, suggesting an additive role of APC2 and F-actin in maintaining the adherens junctions that anchor GSCs to the niche. In addition, loss of chic function in the soma resulted in failure of somatic cyst cells to maintain germ cell enclosure and overproliferation of transit-amplifying spermatogonia.

  20. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila germline stem cells and their differentiating progeny.

    PubMed

    White-Cooper, Helen; Caporilli, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we will concentrate on the transcriptional and translational regulations that govern the development and differentiation of male germline cells. Our focus will be on the processes that occur during differentiation, that distinguish the differentiating population of cells from their stem cell parents. We discuss how these defining features are established as cells transit from a stem cell character to that of a fully committed differentiating cell. The focus will be on how GSCs differentiate, via spermatogonia, to spermatocytes. We will achieve this by first describing the transcriptional activity in the differentiating spermatocytes, cataloguing the known transcriptional regulators in these cells and then investigating how the transcription programme is set up by processes in the progentior cells. This process is particularly interesting to study from a stem cell perspective as the male GSCs are unipotent, so lineage decisions in differentiating progeny of stem cells, which occurs in many other stem cell systems, do not impinge on the behaviour of these cells.

  1. Congenital chloride-losing diarrhea in a Mexican child with the novel homozygous SLC26A3 mutation G393W

    PubMed Central

    Reimold, Fabian R.; Balasubramanian, Savithri; Doroquez, David B.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Saslowsky, David; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Villalpando-Carrion, Salvador; Alper, Seth L.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the intestinal lumenal membrane Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger, SLC26A3. We report here the novel SLC26A3 mutation G393W in a Mexican child, the first such report in a patient from Central America. SLC26A3 G393W expression in Xenopus oocytes exhibits a mild hypomorphic phenotype, with normal surface expression and moderately reduced anion transport function. However, expression of HA-SLC26A3 in HEK-293 cells reveals intracellular retention and greatly decreased steady-state levels of the mutant polypeptide, in contrast to peripheral membrane expression of the wildtype protein. Whereas wildtype HA-SLC26A3 is apically localized in polarized monolayers of filter-grown MDCK cells and Caco2 cells, mutant HA-SLC26A3 G393W exhibits decreased total polypeptide abundance, with reduced or absent surface expression and sparse punctate (or absent) intracellular distribution. The WT protein is similarly localized in LLC-PK1 cells, but the mutant fails to accumulate to detectable levels. We conclude that the chloride-losing diarrhea phenotype associated with homozygous expression of SLC26A3 G393W likely reflects lack of apical surface expression in enterocytes, secondary to combined abnormalities in polypeptide trafficking and stability. Future progress in development of general or target-specific folding chaperonins and correctors may hold promise for pharmacological rescue of this and similar genetic defects in membrane protein targeting. PMID:26157392

  2. [Protein losing gastroenteropathy and possible relationship to cytomegalovirus infection: Ménétrier disease in a child].

    PubMed

    Hillman, María M; Meinarde, Leonardo L; Furnes, Raquel A; Daruich, María L; Riva, Verónica; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    Ménétrier's disease is a childhood protein-losing gastroenteropathy characterized by hypertrophy of the gastric mucosa, of unknown etiology, although most of reported cases have been associated with viral infections. Clinical manifestation is edema and biochemically there are hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. This disease is very rare in children and they have a benign and self-limiting course in contrast to adults where tend to be chronic and occasionally to become malignant. We present a child with Ménétrier disease with edema and ascites possibly associated with a cytomegalovirus infection.

  3. Effect of extracellular matrix on bovine spermatogonial stem cells and gene expression of niche factors regulating their development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akbarinejad, V; Tajik, P; Movahedin, M; Youssefi, R; Shafiei, S; Mazaheri, Z

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) could influence cells function through providing structural and functional networks facilitating the cellular interactions. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of culture on ECM versus plastic on bovine spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and growth factors regulating their development. Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured on ECM-coated or uncoated (control) plates for 12 days. The colonization of SSCs was assessed by inverted microscope and the gene expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The colonization rate was greater in ECM than the control group (P<0.05). The expression of markers of undifferentiated spermatogonia increased in response to conventional culture (P<0.05). Conversely, the expression of ckit as a marker for differentiated spermatogonia was reduced following culture in the control and ECM groups (P<0.05), but this decrease was less in ECM group (P<0.05). Accordingly, while cells cultured on uncoated plates had greater expression of markers of undifferentiated spermatogonia (P<0.05), cells cultured on ECM-coated plates showed higher expression of ckit (P<0.05). Moreover, culture on ECM resulted in higher expression of kit ligand (Kitlg; P<0.05), whereas culture on plastic led to greater expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf; P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study revealed that the permissive effect of ECM on bovine SSCs differentiation in vitro, which was probably mediated through upregulation of KITLG expression. Moreover, the results imply that GDNF might contribute to germ cells self-renewal during conventional culture.

  4. Titanium particles that have undergone phagocytosis by macrophages lose the ability to activate other macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhiqing; Schwab, Luciana P; Alley, Carie F; Hasty, Karen A; Smith, Richard A

    2008-04-01

    Titanium particles derived from the wear of the orthopaedic implant surfaces can activate macrophages to secrete cytokines and stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption, causing osteolysis around orthopaedic implants. However, what happens to the titanium particles after being phagocytosed by macrophages is not known. We prepared titanium particles (as received, clean, and LPS-coated), and exposed them to macrophages in culture. Free particles were washed away after 24 h and the intracellular particles were kept in culture for additional 48 h until being harvested by lysing the cells. Particles that had been cell treated or noncell treated were examined by scanning electronic microscopy to analyze the shape, size, and concentration of the particles. The cell treated and noncell treated particles were exposed to macrophages in culture with a particle to cell ratio of 300:1. After 18 h, the levels of TNF-alpha in culture medium and the viability of the cells were examined. Clean particles did not stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages, while LPS-coated particles dramatically increased that response. Phagocytosis by macrophages did not change the shape and size of the particles, but depleted the ability of the particles to stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages. This indicates that macrophages are capable of rendering titanium particles inactive without degrading the particles, possibly by altering the surface chemistry of the particles.

  5. Use it or lose it: how neurogenesis keeps the brain fit for learning.

    PubMed

    Shors, T J; Anderson, M L; Curlik, D M; Nokia, M S

    2012-02-14

    The presence of new neurons in the adult hippocampus indicates that this structure incorporates new neurons into its circuitry and uses them for some function related to learning and/or related thought processes. Their generation depends on a variety of factors ranging from age to aerobic exercise to sexual behavior to alcohol consumption. However, most of the cells will die unless the animal engages in some kind of effortful learning experience when the cells are about one week of age. If learning does occur, the new cells become incorporated into brain circuits used for learning. In turn, some processes of learning and mental activity appear to depend on their presence. In this review, we discuss the now rather extensive literature showing that new neurons are kept alive by effortful learning, a process that involves concentration in the present moment of experience over some extended period of time. As these thought processes occur, endogenous patterns of rhythmic electrophysiological activity engage the new cells with cell networks that already exist in the hippocampus and at efferent locations. Concurrent and synchronous activity provides a mechanism whereby the new neurons become integrated with the other neurons. This integration allows the present experience to become integrated with memories from the recent past in order to learn and predict when events will occur in the near future. In this way, neurogenesis and learning interact to maintain a fit brain.

  6. Seasonal spermatogenic cycle and morphology of germ cells in the viviparous lizard Mabuya brachypoda (Squamata, Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Franyutti, Arlette; Uribe, Mari Carmen

    2012-11-01

    We describe seasonal variations of the histology of the seminiferous tubules and efferent ducts of the tropical, viviparous skink, Mabuya brachypoda, throughout the year. The specimens were collected monthly, in Nacajuca, Tabasco state, Mexico. The results revealed strong annual variations in testicular volume, stages of the germ cells, and diameter and height of the epithelia of seminiferous tubules and efferent ducts. Recrudescence was detected from November to December, when initial mitotic activity of spermatogonia in the seminiferous tubules were observed, coinciding with the decrease of temperature, photoperiod and rainy season. From January to February, early spermatogenesis continued and early primary and secondary spermatocytes were developing within the seminiferous epithelium. From March through April, numerous spermatids in metamorphosis were observed. Spermiogenesis was completed from May through July, which coincided with an increase in temperature, photoperiod, and rainfall. Regression occurred from August through September when testicular volume and spermatogenic activity decreased. During this time, the seminiferous epithelium decreased in thickness, and germ cell recruitment ceased, only Sertoli cells and spermatogonia were present in the epithelium. Throughout testicular regression spermatocytes and spermatids disappeared and the presence of cellular debris, and scattered spermatozoa were observed in the lumen. The regressed testes presented the total suspension of spermatogenesis. During October, the seminiferous tubules contained only spermatogonia and Sertoli cells, and the size of the lumen was reduced, giving the appearance that it was occluded. In concert with testis development, the efferent ducts were packed with spermatozoa from May through August. The epididymis was devoid of spermatozoa by September. M. brachypoda exhibited a prenuptial pattern, in which spermatogenesis preceded the mating season. The seasonal cycle variations of

  7. Vasa expression in spermatogenic cells during the reproductive-cycle phases of Podarcis sicula (Reptilia, Lacertidae).

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella

    2015-07-01

    The vasa gene encodes a DEAD-box ATP-dependent RNA helicase that regulates the translation of multiple mRNAs involved in germ line differentiation. This protein has been deeply studied in many animals, but few data are available to date on reptiles. In this work, we sequenced a portion of Podarcis sicula vasa gene (Ps-vasa), developed a specific antibody and verified its specificity. Using anti-Ps-Vasa and confocal microscopy, we studied Vasa expression in male germ cells during the reproductive cycle of P. sicula: during full gonadal activity (spring), during regression of gonadal activity (summer) and during slow autumnal recrudescence. We also analyzed Vasa expression in young testes when the walls of the seminiferous tubules were forming. The aim was to verify if Vasa is involved in the process of male germ cell differentiation in all phases of the reproductive cycle. In adult testes, during full gonadal activity and during recrudescence, Vasa staining was detected from spermatogonia to spermatids. Vasa spots were also observed in the nucleus of germ cells supporting its function in different cellular compartments. No Vasa staining was observed in mature spermatozoa during the spring and mid-late November. The seminiferous epithelium analyzed in the summer appeared reduced with only spermatogonia, all Vasa-immunostained, some in division to replace germ cells. In immature testes, the seminiferous epithelium contained only spermatogonia and spermatocytes. The clear immunostaining in their cytoplasm revealed that Vasa is already expressed in juvenile male gonads, suggesting a role in the differentiation process since P. sicula early developmental stages.

  8. A strategy of win-stay, lose-shift that outperforms tit-for-tat in the Prisoner's Dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Martin; Sigmund, Karl

    1993-07-01

    THE Prisoner's Dilemma is the leading metaphor for the evolution of cooperative behaviour in populations of selfish agents, especially since the well-known computer tournaments of Axelrod1 and their application to biological communities2,3. In Axelrod's simulations, the simple strategy tit-for-tat did outstandingly well and subsequently became the major paradigm for reciprocal altruism4 12. Here we present extended evolutionary simulations of heterogeneous ensembles of probabilistic strategies including mutation and selection, and report the unexpected success of another protagonist: Pavlov. This strategy is as simple as tit-for-tat and embodies the fundamental behavioural mechanism win-stay, lose-shift, which seems to be a widespread rule13. Pavlov's success is based on two important advantages over tit-for-tat: it can correct occasional mistakes and exploit unconditional cooperators. This second feature prevents Pavlov populations from being undermined by unconditional cooperators, which in turn invite defectors. Pavlov seems to be more robust than tit-for-tat, suggesting that cooperative behaviour in natural situations may often be based on win-stay, lose-shift.

  9. Loss of Gata4 in Sertoli cells impairs the spermatogonial stem cell niche and causes germ cell exhaustion by attenuating chemokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Jin, Cheng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Shou-Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli cells, the primary somatic cell in the seminiferous epithelium, provide the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) microenvironment (niche) through physical support and the expression of paracrine factors. However, the regulatory mechanisms within the SSC niche, which is primarily controlled by Sertoli cells, remain largely unknown. GATA4 is a Sertoli cell marker, involved in genital ridge initiation, sex determination and differentiation during the embryonic stage. Here, we showed that neonatal mice with a targeted disruption of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (Gata4flox/flox; Amh-Cre; hereafter termed Gata4 cKO) displayed a loss of the establishment and maintenance of the SSC pool and apoptosis of both gonocyte-derived differentiating spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, progressive germ cell depletion and a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome were observed as early as the first wave of murine spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from postnatal day 5 (P5) Gata4 cKO mice into KitW/W-v recipient seminiferous tubules restored spermatogenesis. In addition, microarray analyses of P5 Gata4 cKO mouse testes showed alterations in chemokine signaling factors, including Cxcl12, Ccl3, Cxcr4 (CXCL12 receptor), Ccr1 (CCL3 receptor), Ccl9, Xcl1 and Ccrl2. Deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells markedly attenuated Sertoli cell chemotaxis, which guides SSCs or prospermatogonia to the stem cell niche. Finally, we showed that GATA4 transcriptionally regulated Cxcl12 and Ccl9, and the addition of CXCL12 and CCL9 to an in vitro testis tissue culture system increased the number of PLZF+ undifferentiated spermatogonia within Gata4 cKO testes. Together, these results reveal a novel role for GATA4 in controlling the SSC niche via the transcriptional regulation of chemokine signaling shortly after birth. PMID:26473289

  10. Loss of Gata4 in Sertoli cells impairs the spermatogonial stem cell niche and causes germ cell exhaustion by attenuating chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, Ji-Xin; Cheng, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Jin, Cheng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Shou-Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-11-10

    Sertoli cells, the primary somatic cell in the seminiferous epithelium, provide the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) microenvironment (niche) through physical support and the expression of paracrine factors. However, the regulatory mechanisms within the SSC niche, which is primarily controlled by Sertoli cells, remain largely unknown. GATA4 is a Sertoli cell marker, involved in genital ridge initiation, sex determination and differentiation during the embryonic stage. Here, we showed that neonatal mice with a targeted disruption of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (Gata4(flox/flox); Amh-Cre; hereafter termed Gata4 cKO) displayed a loss of the establishment and maintenance of the SSC pool and apoptosis of both gonocyte-derived differentiating spermatogonia and meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, progressive germ cell depletion and a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome were observed as early as the first wave of murine spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from postnatal day 5 (P5) Gata4 cKO mice into Kit(W/W-v) recipient seminiferous tubules restored spermatogenesis. In addition, microarray analyses of P5 Gata4 cKO mouse testes showed alterations in chemokine signaling factors, including Cxcl12, Ccl3, Cxcr4 (CXCL12 receptor), Ccr1 (CCL3 receptor), Ccl9, Xcl1 and Ccrl2. Deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells markedly attenuated Sertoli cell chemotaxis, which guides SSCs or prospermatogonia to the stem cell niche. Finally, we showed that GATA4 transcriptionally regulated Cxcl12 and Ccl9, and the addition of CXCL12 and CCL9 to an in vitro testis tissue culture system increased the number of PLZF+ undifferentiated spermatogonia within Gata4 cKO testes. Together, these results reveal a novel role for GATA4 in controlling the SSC niche via the transcriptional regulation of chemokine signaling shortly after birth.

  11. Germ cell comparative Drosophila mutagenesis: sensitivity and mutation pattern in chemically treated stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, S.; Houtchens, K.; Li Jia, X.; Foureman, P.

    1983-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies on Drosophila oogonial cells with methylnitrosourea, dimethylnitrosamine, and diethylnitrosamine revealed unexpectedly high rates of sex-linked recessive lethals relative to other male and female germ cell stages. Indeed, the oogonial mutation rates with chemicals are higher than with massive x-ray or neutron exposures of oogonia. Analysis of the distribution of lethals per treated female suggests most of the mutations recovered are of independent origin, with very small levels of clustering of identical mutations. In the male stem cell population (spermatogonia) on the other hand, the distribution of lethals is primarily nonrandom and highly clustered. The nature of the mutational endpoint and the different pattern of germ cell development in the two sexes are the probable causes of this difference. The oogonial sensitivity to chemical mutagens may have important bearing on strategies for assessing human hazard.

  12. Gaining myocytes or losing fibroblasts: Challenges in cardiac fibroblast reprogramming for infarct repair.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Raghu S; Safi, Hamza A; Czubryt, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most somatic tissues, the heart possesses a very limited inherent ability to repair itself following damage. Attempts to therapeutically salvage the myocardium after infarction, either by sparing surviving myocytes or by injection of exogenous cells of varied provenance, have met with limited success. Cardiac fibroblasts are numerous, resistant to hypoxia, and amenable to phenotype reprogramming to cardiomyocytes - a potential panacea to an intractable problem. However, the long-term effects of mass conversion of fibroblasts are as-yet unknown. Since fibroblasts play key roles in normal cardiac function, treating these cells as a ready source of replacements for myocytes may have the effect of swapping one problem for another. This review briefly examines the roles of cardiac fibroblasts, recaps the strides made so far in their reprogramming to cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and discusses the potential ramifications of large-scale cellular identity swapping. While such therapy offers great promise, the potential repercussions require consideration and careful study.

  13. Enhanced Genetic Integrity in Mouse Germ Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Murphey, Patricia; McLean, Derek J.; McMahan, C. Alex; Walter, Christi A.; McCarrey, John R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetically based diseases constitute a major human health burden, and de novo germline mutations represent a source of heritable genetic alterations that can cause such disorders in offspring. The availability of transgenic rodent systems with recoverable, mutation reporter genes has been used to assess the occurrence of spontaneous point mutations in germline cells. Previous studies using the lacI mutation reporter transgenic mouse system showed that the frequency of spontaneous mutations is significantly lower in advanced male germ cells than in somatic cell types from the same individuals. Here we used this same mutation reporter transgene system to show that female germ cells also display a mutation frequency that is lower than that in corresponding somatic cells and similar to that seen in male germ cells, indicating this is a common feature of germ cells in both sexes. In addition, we showed that statistically significant differences in mutation frequencies are evident between germ cells and somatic cells in both sexes as early as mid-fetal stages in the mouse. Finally, a comparison of the mutation frequency in a general population of early type A spermatogonia with that in a population enriched for Thy-1-positive spermatogonia suggests there is heterogeneity among the early spermatogonial population such that a subset of these cells are predestined to form true spermatogonial stem cells. Taken together, these results support the disposable soma theory, which posits that genetic integrity is normally maintained more stringently in the germ line than in the soma and suggests that this is achieved by minimizing the initial occurrence of mutations in early germline cells and their subsequent gametogenic progeny relative to that in somatic cells. PMID:23153565

  14. Shrink it or lose it: balancing loss of function with shrinking genomes in the microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Patrick J; Corradi, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites that have evolved an elaborate mechanism for invading animal host cells, but which have otherwise greatly reduced biological complexity. In particular, microsporidia possess the smallest autonomous nuclear genomes known (as opposed to nucleus derived organelles, or nucleomorphs), and their 'anaerobic' core carbon metabolism is severely limited. Here we compare the extremes to which these two characteristics have evolved, and contrast how their reduction has either proceeded within the constraints of an unchanging set of functions, or has reduced the functional capabilities of the cell. Specifically, we review how the smallest known nuclear genome, the 2.3 Mbp genome of Encephalitozoon intestinalis, has arrived at this diminutive form without significantly affecting its protein-coding complexity in comparison with closely related, larger genomes. In contrast to this, Enterocytozoon bieneusi has a relatively large genome, and yet has lost all enzymes necessary to synthesize ATP from sugar - imposing a major limitation on the functional capabilities of the cell. The extremity of this reduction demands a re-evaluation of metabolic processes in other microsporidia: although pathways such as glycolysis are present, comparative genomic data suggest they may not play the cellular role that they are generally assumed to play.

  15. Chub mackerel gonads support colonization, survival, and proliferation of intraperitoneally transplanted xenogenic germ cells.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Ryosuke; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Higuchi, Kentaro; Yatabe, Takashi; Kabeya, Naoki; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2010-05-01

    The production of xenogenic gametes from large-bodied, commercially important marine fish species in closely related smaller host fish species with short generation times may enable rapid and simple seed production of the target species. As a first step toward this goal, we assessed the suitability of chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus, as a small-bodied recipient species for xenogenic spermatogonial transplantation. Histological observation of the early gonadal development of chub mackerel larvae and transplantation of fluorescent-labeled spermatogonia from Nibe croaker, Nibea mitsukurii, revealed that 5.3-mm chub mackerel larvae were suitable recipients for successful transplantation. Intraperitoneally transplanted xenogenic spermatogonia efficiently colonized the gonads of these recipient larvae, and donor-derived Nibe croaker germ cells proliferated rapidly soon after colonization. Moreover, gonadal soma-derived growth factor (gsdf) mRNA, a gonadal somatic cell marker, was expressed in recipient-derived cells surrounding the incorporated donor-derived germ cells, suggesting that donor-derived germ cells had settled at an appropriate location in the recipient gonad. Our data show that xenogenic spermatogonial transplantation was successful in chub mackerel and that the somatic microenvironment of the chub mackerel gonad can support the colonization, survival, and proliferation of intraperitoneally transplanted xenogenic germ cells derived from a donor species of a different taxonomic family.

  16. Factors Associated With Weight Change in Online Weight Management Communities: A Case Study in the LoseIt Reddit Community

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Antonio; Couto Silva, Ana Paula; Meira Jr, Wagner

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown that of the 72% of American Internet users who have looked for health information online, 22% have searched for help to lose or control weight. This demand for information has given rise to many online weight management communities, where users support one another throughout their weight loss process. Whether and how user engagement in online communities relates to weight change is not totally understood. Objective We investigated the activity behavior and analyze the semantic content of the messages of active users in LoseIt (r/loseit), a weight management community of the online social network Reddit. We then explored whether these features are associated with weight loss in this online social network. Methods A data collection tool was used to collect English posts, comments, and other public metadata of active users (ie, users with at least one post or comment) on LoseIt from August 2010 to November 2014. Analyses of frequency and intensity of user interaction in the community were performed together with a semantic analysis of the messages, done by a latent Dirichlet allocation method. The association between weight loss and online user activity patterns, the semantics of the messages, and real-world variables was found by a linear regression model using 30-day weight change as the dependent variable. Results We collected posts and comments of 107,886 unique users. Among these, 101,003 (93.62%) wrote at least one comment and 38,981 (36.13%) wrote at least one post. Median percentage of days online was 3.81 (IQR 9.51). The 10 most-discussed semantic topics on posts were related to healthy food, clothing, calorie counting, workouts, looks, habits, support, and unhealthy food. In the subset of 754 users who had gender, age, and 30-day weight change data available, women were predominant and 92.9% (701/754) lost weight. Female gender, body mass index (BMI) at baseline, high levels of online activity, the number of upvotes

  17. Effects of Consecutive Basketball Games on the Game-Related Statistics that Discriminate Winner and Losing Teams

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Sergio J.; García, Javier; Feu, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Alberto; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the game-related statistics that discriminated basketball winning and losing teams in each of the three consecutive games played in a condensed tournament format. The data were obtained from the Spanish Basketball Federation and included game-related statistics from the Under-20 league (2005-2006 and 2006-2007 seasons). A total of 223 games were analyzed with the following game-related statistics: two and three-point field goal (made and missed), free-throws (made and missed), offensive and defensive rebounds, assists, steals, turnovers, blocks (made and received), fouls committed, ball possessions and offensive rating. Results showed that winning teams in this competition had better values in all game-related statistics, with the exception of three point field goals made, free-throws missed and turnovers (p ≥ 0.05). The main effect of game number was only identified in turnovers, with a statistical significant decrease between the second and third game. No interaction was found in the analysed variables. A discriminant analysis allowed identifying the two-point field goals made, the defensive rebounds and the assists as discriminators between winning and losing teams in all three games. Additionally to these, only the three-point field goals made contributed to discriminate teams in game three, suggesting a moderate effect of fatigue. Coaches may benefit from being aware of this variation in game determinant related statistics and, also, from using offensive and defensive strategies in the third game, allowing to explore or hide the three point field-goals performance. Key points Overall team performances along the three consecutive games were very similar, not confirming an accumulated fatigue effect. The results from the three-point field goals in the third game suggested that winning teams were able to shoot better from longer distances and this could be the result of exhibiting higher conditioning status and

  18. Effects of Consecutive Basketball Games on the Game-Related Statistics that Discriminate Winner and Losing Teams.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Sergio J; García, Javier; Feu, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Alberto; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the game-related statistics that discriminated basketball winning and losing teams in each of the three consecutive games played in a condensed tournament format. The data were obtained from the Spanish Basketball Federation and included game-related statistics from the Under-20 league (2005-2006 and 2006-2007 seasons). A total of 223 games were analyzed with the following game-related statistics: two and three-point field goal (made and missed), free-throws (made and missed), offensive and defensive rebounds, assists, steals, turnovers, blocks (made and received), fouls committed, ball possessions and offensive rating. Results showed that winning teams in this competition had better values in all game-related statistics, with the exception of three point field goals made, free-throws missed and turnovers (p ≥ 0.05). The main effect of game number was only identified in turnovers, with a statistical significant decrease between the second and third game. No interaction was found in the analysed variables. A discriminant analysis allowed identifying the two-point field goals made, the defensive rebounds and the assists as discriminators between winning and losing teams in all three games. Additionally to these, only the three-point field goals made contributed to discriminate teams in game three, suggesting a moderate effect of fatigue. Coaches may benefit from being aware of this variation in game determinant related statistics and, also, from using offensive and defensive strategies in the third game, allowing to explore or hide the three point field-goals performance. Key pointsOverall team performances along the three consecutive games were very similar, not confirming an accumulated fatigue effect.The results from the three-point field goals in the third game suggested that winning teams were able to shoot better from longer distances and this could be the result of exhibiting higher conditioning status and/or the

  19. Germ cell toxicity: significance in genetic and fertility effects of radiation and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Oakberg, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the male and female to radiation and chemicals is different. Any loss of oocytes in the female cannot be replaced, and if severe enough, will result in a shortening of the reproductive span. In the male, a temporary sterile period may be induced owing to destruction of the differentiating spermatogonia, but the stem cells are the most resistant spermatogonial type, are capable of repopulating the seminiferous epithelium, and fertility usually returns. The response of both the male and female changes with development of the embryonic to the adult gonad, and with differentiation and maturation in the adult. The primordial germ cells, early oocytes, and differentiating spermatogonia of the adult male are unusually sensitive to the cytotoxic action of noxious agents, but each agent elicits a specific response owing to the intricate biochemical and physiological changes associated with development and maturation of the gametes. The relationship of germ cell killing to fertility is direct, and long-term fertility effects can be predicted from histological analysis of the gonads. The relationship to genetic effects, on the other hand, is indirect, and acts primarily by limiting the cell stages available for testing, by affecting the distribution of mitotically active stem cells among the different stages of the mitotic cycle, and thereby, changing both the type and frequency of genetic effects observed. 100 references, 38 figures, 7 tables.

  20. The Memory Trace Supporting Lose-Shift Responding Decays Rapidly after Reward Omission and Is Distinct from Other Learning Mechanisms in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The propensity of animals to shift choices immediately after unexpectedly poor reinforcement outcomes is a pervasive strategy across species and tasks. We report here that the memory supporting such lose-shift responding in rats rapidly decays during the intertrial interval and persists throughout training and testing on a binary choice task, despite being a suboptimal strategy. Lose-shift responding is not positively correlated with the prevalence and temporal dependence of win-stay responding, and it is inconsistent with predictions of reinforcement learning on the task. These data provide further evidence that win-stay and lose-shift are mediated by dissociated neural mechanisms and indicate that lose-shift responding presents a potential confound for the study of choice in the many operant choice tasks with short intertrial intervals. We propose that this immediate lose-shift responding is an intrinsic feature of the brain’s choice mechanisms that is engaged as a choice reflex and works in parallel with reinforcement learning and other control mechanisms to guide action selection. PMID:27896312

  1. Constraining Water Fluxes Through the Streambed of a Semi-arid Losing Stream Using Natural Tracers: Heat and Radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, M. S.; Rau, G. C.; McCallum, A. M.; Meredith, K.; Acworth, I.

    2011-12-01

    Natural physical and chemical tracers of flow have different advantages and shortfalls based on their properties and the uncertainty related to variability in their source concentration. Each tracer integrates over a characteristic spatial-temporal scale depending on its decay or production rate and the flow velocity of the system. For instance heat tracing using diurnal temperature fluctuations will, at best, provide information about flow in the upper 1-2 m of the streambed before the signal is dampened below measurement resolution (Constantz et al. 2003). Conversely, radioisotopes used as tracers will integrate over increasing spatio-temporal scales for decreasing decay constants. Radioisotopes with comparatively slow decay rates will be less sensitive for resolving flow conditions on short spatio-temporal scales. Therefore, it is difficult to use these tracers in the streambed of losing systems because the radioactive decay is not discernible against the variability. Consequently, employing a combination of different tracers provides information on different parts of a given flow system. Comparing flow velocities derived from tracers integrating over different scales allows for separating the local hyporheic exchange from the regional groundwater recharge. A field experiment was carried out in a perennial section of the mostly ephemeral Maules Creek in NSW, Australia. Streambed temperature profiles were monitored at three sites along a 400 m stretch of the perennial reach. Streambed temperatures were recorded at 4 depths within one meter below the streambed. Water samples were collected from surface water, streambed and groundwater and analysed for stable water isotopes (18O and 2H) and radioisotopes (222Rn and 3H). The streambed heat profiles provided time series of surface water/groundwater exchange. Using this method it was found that the conditions were losing at all three sites with recharge rates varying between 0 and 0.4 m/d. 222Rn measurements in the

  2. Losing a loved one to homicide: prevalence and mental health correlates in a national sample of young adults.

    PubMed

    Zinzow, Heidi M; Rheingold, Alyssa A; Hawkins, Alesia O; Saunders, Benjamin E; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2009-02-01

    The present study examined the prevalence, demographic distribution, and mental health correlates of losing a loved one to homicide. A national sample of 1,753 young adults completed structured telephone interviews measuring violence exposure, mental health diagnoses, and loss of a family member or close friend to a drunk driving accident (vehicular homicide) or murder (criminal homicide). The prevalence of homicide survivorship was 15%. African Americans were more highly represented among criminal homicide survivors. Logistic regression analyses found that homicide survivors were at risk for past year posttraumatic stress disorder (OR = 1.88), major depressive episode (OR = 1.64), and drug abuse/dependence (OR = 1.77). These findings highlight the significant mental health needs of homicide survivors.

  3. Dieting to lose weight and occurrence of neural tube defects in offspring of Mexican-American women.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Lucina; Felkner, Marilyn; Brender, Jean D; Canfield, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Lowered maternal weight gain and reduction in early pregnancy have been associated with risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. We examined the association of self-reported maternal dieting behaviors on the occurrence of NTDs. We conducted a population based case-control study among Mexican-American women who were residents of the 14 Texas counties bordering Mexico. Case women had an NTD-affected pregnancy identified at birth or prenatally and had deliveries during the years 1995-2000. Control women were those who delivered live born infants without an apparent congenital malformation, randomly selected and frequency-matched to cases by year and facility. One hundred eighty-four case women and 225 control women were asked in person about the use of nutritional supplements, dieting to lose weight, and type of weight reduction supplements used during the 3 months before conception. Women who reported being on a diet to lose weight during the 3 months before conception had an NTD odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1, 3.3) compared with those not reporting being on a diet. Neither consuming vitamin drinks (OR = 1.2) nor using diet pills (OR = 1.6) during the 3 months before conception had ORs that were different from the null, when compared to women not reporting those behaviors. The risk effect for dieting did not differ markedly among normal or underweight (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 0.7, 5.6), overweight (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 0.7, 5.0), or obese women (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.6, 4.0). No effect was seen among dieting women who were consuming at least 1.0 mg/day of folate (OR = 1.1, CI = 0.3, 4.5). Maternal dieting prior to conception may increase the risk of NTDs in offspring.

  4. Canine distemper viruses expressing a hemagglutinin without N-glycans lose virulence but retain immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-03-01

    Paramyxovirus glycoproteins are posttranslationally modified by the addition of N-linked glycans, which are often necessary for correct folding, processing, and cell surface expression. To establish the contribution of N glycosylation to morbillivirus attachment (H) protein function and overall virulence, we first determined the use of the potential N-glycosylation sites in the canine distemper virus (CDV) H proteins. Biochemical characterization revealed that the three sites conserved in all strains were N glycosylated, whereas only two of the up to five additional sites present in wild-type strains are used. A wild-type virus with an H protein reproducing the vaccine strain N-glycosylation pattern remained lethal in ferrets but with a prolonged course of disease. In contrast, introduction of the vaccine H protein in the wild-type context resulted in complete attenuation. To further characterize the role of N glycosylation in CDV pathogenesis, the N-glycosylation sites of wild-type H proteins were successively deleted, including a nonstandard site, to ultimately generate a nonglycosylated H protein. Despite reduced expression levels, this protein remained fully functional. Recombinant viruses expressing N-glycan-deficient H proteins no longer caused disease, even though their immunosuppressive capacities were retained, indicating that reduced N glycosylation contributes to attenuation without affecting immunosuppression.

  5. LOSING THE SUGAR COATING: POTENTIAL IMPACT OF PERINEURONAL NET ABNORMALITIES ON INTERNEURONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Markota, Matej; Brown, Christopher; Batzianouli, Eleni T.

    2015-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) were shown to be markedly altered in subjects with schizophrenia. In particular, decreases of PNNs have been detected in the amygdala, entorhinal cortex and prefrontal cortex. The formation of these specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) aggregates during postnatal development, their functions and association with distinct populations of GABAergic interneurons, bear great relevance to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PNNs gradually mature in an experience-dependent manner during late stages of postnatal development, overlapping with the prodromal period/age of onset of schizophrenia. Throughout adulthood, PNNs regulate neuronal properties, including synaptic remodeling, cell membrane compartmentalization and subsequent regulation of glutamate receptors and calcium channels, and susceptibility to oxidative stress. With the present paper, we discuss evidence for PNN abnormalities in schizophrenia, the potential functional impact of such abnormalities on inhibitory circuits and, in turn, cognitive and emotion processing. We integrate these considerations with results from recent genetic studies showing genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia associated with genes encoding for PNN components, matrix-regulating molecules and immune system factors. Notably, the composition of PNNs is regulated dynamically in response to factors such as fear, reward, stress, and immune response. This regulation occurs through families of matrix metalloproteinases that cleave ECM components, altering their functions and affecting plasticity. Several metalloproteinases have been proposed as vulnerability factors for schizophrenia. We speculate that the physiological process of PNN remodeling may be disrupted in schizophrenia as a result of interactions between matrix remodeling processes and immune system dysregulation. In turn, these mechanisms may contribute to dysfunction of GABAergic neurons. PMID:25601362

  6. The induction of recessive mutations in mouse primordial germ cells with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, T; Murota, T; Horiya, N; Matsuda, H; Hara, T

    1993-12-01

    A specific-locus test was carried out to examine the mutagenic activity of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) on mouse primordial germ cells (PGC). Embryos of C3H/He mice were treated transplacentally with 30 or 50 mg ENU per kg of maternal body weight on day 8.5, 10.5, or 13.5 of gestation (G8.5 day, G10.5 day, or G13.5 day). Male and female mice that had been treated with ENU in embryonic stages were mated with female or male tester PW mice to detect recessive mutations induced in PGC. ENU induced recessive mutations at a relatively high rate in PGC at these developmental stages. The most sensitive stage was G10.5 day. On G8.5 day, the induced mutation rate in males and females was not significantly different. Cluster mutations, which originate from the limited number of PGC and cell killing, were more frequently induced at an earlier developmental stage. The induced mutation rate per unit dose of ENU (1 mg/kg) was higher in G8.5 and G10.5 day PGC than in stem-cell spermatogonia. It can be concluded that mouse PGC are more sensitive than stem-cell spermatogonia to the induction of recessive mutations by ENU.

  7. Stirred suspension bioreactors as a novel method to enrich germ cells from pre-pubertal pig testis

    PubMed Central

    Dores, Camila; Rancourt, Derrick; Dobrinski, Ina

    2015-01-01

    To study spermatogonial stem cells the heterogeneous testicular cell population first needs to be enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia, which contain the stem cell population. When working with non-rodent models, this step requires working with large numbers of cells. Available cell separation methods rely on differential properties of testicular cell types such as expression of specific cell surface proteins, size, density or differential adhesion to substrates to separate germ cells from somatic cells. The objective of this study was to develop an approach that allowed germ cell enrichment while providing efficiency of handling large cell numbers. Here we report the use of stirred suspension bioreactors to exploit the adhesion properties of Sertoli cells to enrich cells obtained from pre-pubertal porcine testes for undifferentiated spermatogonia. We also compared the bioreactor approach with an established differential plating method and the combination of both: stirred suspension bioreactor followed by differential plating. After 66 hours of culture, germ cell enrichment in stirred suspension bioreactors provided 7.3±1.0 fold (n=9), differential plating 9.8±2.4 fold (n=6) and combination of both methods resulted in 9.1±0.3 fold enrichment of germ cells from the initial germ cell population (n=3). To document functionality of cells recovered from the bioreactor, we demonstrated that cells retained their functional ability to reassemble seminiferous tubules de novo after grafting to mouse hosts and to support spermatogenesis. These results demonstrate that the stirred suspension bioreactor allows enrichment of germ cells in a controlled and scalable environment providing an efficient method when handling large cell numbers while reducing variability due to handling. PMID:25877677

  8. Influence of germ cells upon Sertoli cells during continuous low-dose rate gamma-irradiation of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Pinon-Lataillade, G; Vélez de la Calle, J F; Viguier-Martinez, M C; Garnier, D H; Folliot, R; Maas, J; Jégou, B

    1988-07-01

    The effects of continuous gamma-irradiation of adult rats at two low-dose rates (7 cGy and 12 cGy/day; up to a total dose of 9.1 Gy and 10.69 Gy 60Co gamma-ray, respectively) were investigated. Over a period of 3-131 days of irradiation, groups of experimental and control animals were killed. Body weight, testis, epididymis, prostate and seminal vesicle weights, the number of germ cells and Sertoli cells, tubular ultrastructure, epididymal and testicular levels of biologically active androgen-binding protein (ABP), and the plasma concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were monitored. Irradiation had no effect on body weight, whereas testicular and epididymal weight began to decrease following 35 and 50 days of irradiation at 7 and 12 cGy, respectively. At 7 cGy the target cells of the gamma-rays were essentially A spermatogonia, whereas at 12 cGy A spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes were primarily affected. This resulted in a progressive and sequential dose-related reduction in the number of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids and late spermatids (LS). Under both irradiation procedures the Sertoli cell number remained unchanged whereas partial (7 cGy) or no change (12 cGy) was seen at the Leydig cell level. Whatever the irradiation protocol, from the time LS numbers decreased, vacuolisation of the Sertoli cell cytoplasm progressively occurred, followed by thickening and folding of the peritubular tissue. Moreover, in parallel to the drop in the number of these germ cell types, ABP production fell whereas FSH levels rose. A highly significant positive correlation was found between LS numbers and these Sertoli cell parameters. This study supports our previous concept of a control of certain important aspects of Sertoli cell function by late spermatids in the adult rat.

  9. Characterization of the testicular cell types present in the rat by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    van der Grond, J.; Van Pelt, A.M.; van Echteld, C.J.; Dijkstra, G.; Grootegoed, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.; Mali, W.P. )

    1991-07-01

    Testes of vitamin A-deficient Wistar rats before and after vitamin A replacement, of rats irradiated in utero, and of control rats were investigated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. The testicular phosphomonoester/ATP (PM/ATP) ratio ranged from 0.79 {plus minus} 0.05 for testes that contained only interstitial tissue and Sertoli cells to 1.64 {plus minus} 0.04 for testes in which spermatocytes were the most advanced cell types present. When new generations of spermatids entered the seminiferous epithelium, this ratio decreased. The testicular phosphodiester/ATP (PD/ATP) ratio amounted to 0.16 {plus minus} 0.06 for testes in which Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, or spermatocytes were the most advanced cell type present. When new generations of spermatids entered the seminiferous epithelium, the PD/ATP ratio rapidly increased and finally reached a value of 0.71 {plus minus} 0.06 for fully developed testes. Taken together, specific patterns of the PM/ATP ratio, the PD/ATP ratio, and pH were obtained that were correlated to the presence of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids, and elongated spermatids or to the absence of spermatogenic cells. Hence, a good impression of the status of the seminiferous epithelium in the rat can be obtained by in vivo 31P MR spectroscopy.

  10. Differential expression of sex-linked and autosomal germ-cell-specific genes during spermatogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, P Jeremy; Page, David C; McCarrey, John R

    2005-10-01

    We have examined expression during spermatogenesis in the mouse of three Y-linked genes, 11 X-linked genes and 22 autosomal genes, all previously shown to be germ-cell-specific and expressed in premeiotic spermatogonia, plus another 21 germ-cell-specific autosomal genes that initiate expression in meiotic spermatocytes. Our data demonstrate that, like sex-linked housekeeping genes, germ-cell-specific sex-linked genes are subject to meiotic sex-chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Although all the sex-linked genes we investigated underwent MSCI, 14 of the 22 autosomal genes expressed in spermatogonia showed no decrease in expression in meiotic spermatocytes. This along with our observation that an additional 21 germ-cell-specific autosomal genes initiate or significantly up-regulate expression in spermatocytes confirms that MSCI is indeed a sex-chromosome-specific effect. Our results further demonstrate that the chromosome-wide repression imposed by MSCI is limited to meiotic spermatocytes and that postmeiotic expression of sex-linked genes is variable. Thus, 13 of the 14 sex-linked genes we examined showed some degree of postmeiotic reactivation. The extent of postmeiotic reactivation of germ-cell-specific X-linked genes did not correlate with proximity to the X inactivation center or the Xist gene locus. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to differential gene regulation and the function of MSCI during spermatogenesis, including epigenetic programming of the future paternal genome during spermatogenesis.

  11. SKAP, an outer kinetochore protein, is required for mouse germ cell development

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Corinne; Espeut, Julien; Ametsitsi, Rachel; Kumar, Rajeev; Luksza, Malgorzata; Brun, Christine; Verlhac, Marie-Hélene; Suja, José Angél; de Massy, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In sexually reproducing organisms, accurate gametogenesis is crucial for the transmission of genetic material from one generation to the next. This requires the faithful segregation of chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic divisions. One of the main players in this process is the kinetochore, a large multi-protein complex that forms at the interface of centromeres and microtubules. Here, we analyzed the expression profile and function of small kinetochore-associated protein (SKAP) in the mouse. We found that two distinct SKAP isoforms are specifically expressed in the germline: a smaller isoform, which is detected in spermatogonia and spermatocytes and localized in the outer mitotic and meiotic kinetochores from metaphase to telophase, and a larger isoform, which is expressed in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. We generated SKAP-deficient mice and found that testis size and sperm production were severely reduced in mutant males. This phenotype was partially caused by defects during spermatogonia proliferation before entry into meiosis. We conclude that mouse SKAP, while being dispensable for somatic cell divisions, has an important role in the successful outcome of male gametogenesis. In germ cells, analogous to what has been suggested in studies using immortalized cells, SKAP most likely stabilizes the interaction between kinetochores and microtubules, where it might be needed as an extra safeguard to ensure the correct segregation of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. PMID:26667018

  12. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  13. Behavioural and neural modulation of win-stay but not lose-shift strategies as a function of outcome value in Rock, Paper, Scissors.

    PubMed

    Forder, Lewis; Dyson, Benjamin James

    2016-09-23

    Competitive environments in which individuals compete for mutually-exclusive outcomes require rational decision making in order to maximize gains but often result in poor quality heuristics. Reasons for the greater reliance on lose-shift relative to win-stay behaviour shown in previous studies were explored using the game of Rock, Paper, Scissors and by manipulating the value of winning and losing. Decision-making following a loss was characterized as relatively fast and relatively inflexible both in terms of the failure to modulate the magnitude of lose-shift strategy and the lack of significant neural modulation. In contrast, decision-making following a win was characterized as relatively slow and relatively flexible both in terms of a behavioural increase in the magnitude of win-stay strategy and a neural modulation of feedback-related negativity (FRN) and stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN) following outcome value modulation. The win-stay/lose-shift heuristic appears not to be a unified mechanism, with the former relying on System 2 processes and the latter relying on System 1 processes. Our ability to play rationally appears more likely when the outcome is positive and when the value of wins are low, highlighting how vulnerable we can be when trying to succeed during competition.

  14. Behavioural and neural modulation of win-stay but not lose-shift strategies as a function of outcome value in Rock, Paper, Scissors

    PubMed Central

    Forder, Lewis; Dyson, Benjamin James

    2016-01-01

    Competitive environments in which individuals compete for mutually-exclusive outcomes require rational decision making in order to maximize gains but often result in poor quality heuristics. Reasons for the greater reliance on lose-shift relative to win-stay behaviour shown in previous studies were explored using the game of Rock, Paper, Scissors and by manipulating the value of winning and losing. Decision-making following a loss was characterized as relatively fast and relatively inflexible both in terms of the failure to modulate the magnitude of lose-shift strategy and the lack of significant neural modulation. In contrast, decision-making following a win was characterized as relatively slow and relatively flexible both in terms of a behavioural increase in the magnitude of win-stay strategy and a neural modulation of feedback-related negativity (FRN) and stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN) following outcome value modulation. The win-stay/lose-shift heuristic appears not to be a unified mechanism, with the former relying on System 2 processes and the latter relying on System 1 processes. Our ability to play rationally appears more likely when the outcome is positive and when the value of wins are low, highlighting how vulnerable we can be when trying to succeed during competition. PMID:27658703

  15. A Patient with a Large Gastric Tumor and Protein-Losing Gastroenteropathy Successfully Treated with Neoadjuvant TS-1 Combined with CDDP Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yuichi; Shibata, Ryosuke; Satou, Keisuke; Yamana, Ippei; Maki, Kenji; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer with protein-losing gastroenteropathy is relatively rare worldwide. The most important problem for the treatment of these patients is their low nutritional status and protein level, which can cause severe postoperative complications. We report a 49-year-old Japanese female with a large gastric tumor and protein-losing gastroenteropathy successfully treated with neoadjuvant TS-1 combined with CDDP therapy. She had a type 5 tumor with partially cauliflower-like appearance. Her blood chemistry revealed low serum total protein (3.3 g/dl) and low albumin (1.7 g/dl). She was additionally diagnosed with protein-losing gastroenteropathy based on 99mTc-human serum albumin scintigraphy. Initial neoadjuvant chemotherapy decreased the size of the tumor and led to a marked improvement in her serum protein levels. She then underwent a total gastrectomy and lymph node dissection (D2) with a combined resection of the spleen and gallbladder. Therefore, neoadjuvant chemotherapy may provide a safe treatment before definitive surgery for gastric cancer with protein-losing gastroenteropathy. PMID:25722665

  16. Judgments of Nonverbal Behaviour by Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Can They Detect Signs of Winning and Losing from Brief Video Clips?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Christian; Furley, Philip; Mulhall, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Typically developing children are able to judge who is winning or losing from very short clips of video footage of behaviour between active match play across a number of sports. Inferences from "thin slices" (short video clips) allow participants to make complex judgments about the meaning of posture, gesture and body language. This…

  17. Dilemmas in the process of weight reduction: Exploring how women experience training as a means of losing weight

    PubMed Central

    Groven, Karen Synne; Engelsrud, Gunn

    2010-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with obesity are usually offered group-based behavior interventions which include dietary advice and exercise programs. In particular, high-intensity training—combining weight lifting with aerobic exercising—has been proven effective for losing weight. Moreover, recent studies have shown that persons participating in high-intensity training are more likely to maintain their weight loss compared to persons with lower levels of physical activity. However, most of the research in the field has made use of quantitative methods focusing on the measurable effect of such interventions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to show how the training is experienced from a first-person perspective, namely the patients themselves. Our hope was to shed some new light on the process of weight loss that concerns more than the measurable “impacts” of the training. A qualitative approach was used based on interviews with five women selected from a primary healthcare clinic in Norway. Our results show that experiences of training are connected to the participants' general experience of being overweight. Both relationships to other people and earlier experiences are important for how the training is carried out and perceived. Five themes were identified supporting this line of argument: (1) the gaze of others; (2) a common ground; (3) dependence of close-follow up; (4) bodily discomfort as painful; and (5) aiming for results—an ambivalent experience. The results highlight the importance of finding the proper context and support for each patient's needs. PMID:20640017

  18. Recovery of graft steatosis and protein-losing enteropathy after biliary diversion in a PFIC 1 liver transplanted child.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Stephenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Fusaro, Fabio; de Magnée, Catherine; Reding, Raymond; Sokal, Etienne M

    2012-08-01

    PFIC 1 is a genetic disorder characterized by hepatic and gastrointestinal disease, often requiring LT during childhood. Extrahepatic symptoms, such as diarrhea and malabsorption, do not improve or may be aggravated after LT, as graft steatosis or steatohepatitis as consequences of the interaction between transplanted liver and native bowel. We describe a patient with PFIC 1 who presented with cholestasis in infancy, who developed intractable pruritus and liver fibrosis. The child underwent living donor LT at 3.6 yr of age, and he early developed severe refractory diarrhea, secondary malabsorption with protein-losing enteropathy, and an early fatty liver disease trough graft steatohepatitis. As the response to cholestyramine was unsatisfactory, we decided to perform an EBD by using the jejunal loop used for the cholangiojejunostomy. Diarrhea resolved rapidly after surgery. He remained well after six months following biliary diversion, with normal stool output and no protein loss. We documented a dramatic improvement of graft steatosis at histology as well as normalization of liver function test. EBD can be considered a valuable treatment option to avoid organ disfunction and loss in PFIC 1 transplanted patients who develop graft steatohepatitis.

  19. Salt-losing nephropathy associated with inappropriate secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide--a new clinical syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Soriano, J; Vallo, A

    1997-10-01

    A state of normokalemic renal sodium wasting associated with an apparently inappropriate secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has not been previously recognized. We here report an 11-year-old boy who presented with a chronic "salt-losing" nephropathy manifested by normonatremic or mildly hyponatremic extracellular fluid volume depletion, hypodipsia, absence of salt appetite, normokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hyper-reninemic hyperaldosteronism, hypertrophy of the juxtaglomerular apparatus, and highly conserved capacities for concentrating diluting the urine. Plasma ANP values were paradoxically elevated (between 10 and 47 fmol/ml), despite the coexistence of intravascular volume depletion and increased plasma levels of renin and aldosterone. Although the patient had some clinical similarities to Bartter's syndrome, fractional sodium chloride (NaCl) reabsorption during hypotonic saline diuresis was normal and no clinical amelioration was observed while on indomethacin therapy. Neither a tumor nor cardiac or cerebral abnormalities, which could be responsible for the increased ANP secretion, were detected. These clinical, biochemical, and histological features have not been previously described together and may represent a new clinical syndrome. The pathophysiology of this entity remains unknown, but an attractive, although unproven, hypothesis is that the renal defect in NaCl reabsorption in this patient could be related to an inappropriate and unregulated secretion of ANP.

  20. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage: Dynamics of Gaining and Losing Coverage over the Life-Course.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Heeju

    2017-04-01

    Health insurance coverage varies substantially between racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, African Americans and people of Hispanic origin had persistently lower insurance coverage rates at all ages. This article describes age- and group-specific dynamics of insurance gain and loss that contribute to inequalities found in traditional cross-sectional studies. It uses the longitudinal 2008 Panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (N=114,345) to describe age-specific patterns of disparity prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A formal decomposition on increment-decrement life-tables of insurance gain and loss shows that coverage disparities are predominately driven by minority groups' greater propensity to lose the insurance that they already have. Uninsured African Americans were faster to gain insurance than non-Hispanic whites but their high rates of insurance loss more than negated this advantage. Disparities from greater rates of loss among minority groups emerge rapidly at the end of childhood and persist throughout adulthood. This is especially true for African Americans and Hispanics and their relative disadvantages again heighten in their 40s and 50s.

  1. Barriers to Lose Weight from the Perspective of Children with Overweight/Obesity and Their Parents: A Sociocultural Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Ventura, Ana Lilia; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris; Sámano-Sámano, Reyna; Jimenez-Gutierrez, Carlos; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. There are not enough studies about the barriers to lose weight from the perspective of children and their parents. Methods. Children and adolescents diagnosed with overweight/obesity in the Department of Endocrinology and their parents were invited to participate in a series of focus group discussions (FGD). Twenty-nine children 10–16 years old and 22 parents participated in 7 focus groups; 2 mothers and 2 adolescents participated in depth interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed through grounded theory. Results. Parents went to the hospital only when their children presented any obesity complication; for them, overweight was not a health problem. Parents referred to lack of time to supervise about a healthy diet and exercise; besides, the same parents, relatives, friends, and the mass media encourage the consumption of junk food. Children accepted eating a lot, not doing exercise, skipping meals, and not understanding overweight consequences. Both, parents and children, demanded support to do the time recommended for exercise inside the schools. They also suggested getting information from schools and mass media (TV) about overweight consequences, exercise, and healthy food by health workers; they recommended prohibiting announcements about junk food and its sale. Conclusions. The barriers detected were lack of perception of being overweight, its identification as a disease and its consequences, lack of time to supervise a healthy lifestyle, and a big social influence to eat junk food. PMID:25371816

  2. Losing Baby Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... it's on the move. Low-fat dairy Milk, yogurt and cheese are all major sources of protein, ... of whole milk. Exercise Exercise is a key component of a healthy lifestyle before, during and after ...

  3. Losing forward momentum holographically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Koushik; Herzog, Christopher P.

    2014-06-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving Einstein’s Equations in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and an event horizon with planar topology. Our scheme allows for the introduction of a particular metric source at the conformal boundary. Such a spacetime has a dual holographic description in terms of a strongly interacting quantum field theory at nonzero temperature. By introducing a sinusoidal static metric source that breaks translation invariance, we study momentum relaxation in the field theory. In the long wavelength limit, our results are consistent with the fluid-gravity correspondence and relativistic hydrodynamics. In the small amplitude limit, our results are consistent with the memory function prediction for the momentum relaxation rate. Our numerical scheme allows us to study momentum relaxation outside these two limits as well.

  4. On the Losing End

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nealy, Michelle J.

    2008-01-01

    How well a particular industry fares during any given time has an impact on countless other industries and consumers. Case in point--rising gas prices are affecting everything from airfares to the price of getting a pizza delivered. This article describes a similar situation that is happening with the wave of home foreclosures as the subprime…

  5. No Time to Lose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Alexandria, Ed.; And Others

    This report outlines the highlights of the New York State Special Summit on Black and Hispanic Children. One hundred selected leaders from government, private industry, foundations, academia, the religious community, advocacy organizations and voluntary agencies heard presentations from national and state experts and developed recommendations for…

  6. Lose the Recipe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Theresa A.; Martin, Chanda

    2011-01-01

    When learning about plants, elementary students are typically given set directions on how to plant seeds and make their plants grow. To enable their class of first-grade students to build their own knowledge and encourage constructivism, the authors decided to take this set of prescribe activities and make them more inquiry-based. In traditional…

  7. Losing Our Favorite Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Howard Zinn was a brilliant teacher, a passionate activist, and a warm and generous friend. His most influential work, "A People's History of the United States," was a gift to teachers everywhere--an eloquent anti-textbook that pointed the way to an approach to the past that was at once angry, passionate, and hopeful. Corporate textbooks…

  8. Insurers lose court battle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-09-28

    Recent court disputes concerning insurance coverage of Superfund costs have resulted in the retrial of a proinsurer ruling on environmental cleanup costs for potentially responsible parties. The court rejected the insurance industry`s pollution exclusion clause by Aetna and two nonchemical companies. Supposedly this is good news for the chemical industry, because there will be more access to insurance money in Superfund cleanups.

  9. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library of Medicine Let Us Hear From You! We want your feedback on ... Stay Connected! Keep up with MedlinePlus and the National Library of ... information. Join us online, and please spread the word! MedlinePlus and ...

  10. Equality. Losing their religion.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Louise

    2009-07-23

    Some occasions of health employees' religious beliefs influencing their actions in the workplace have raised controversy in recent years. Despite religion and belief guidance published in January many areas remain hazy. Dress code rules to help combat infection control are raising concerns among some healthcare staff.

  11. Losing Sleep over Tuition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2009-01-01

    With two children already in college and three more in the wings, the Nwanguma family knows about sacrifice. The annual tuition bill for Prince George's Community College typically comes to between $3,500 and $4,000 for the oldest son, Chuka. To afford it, Chuma Nwanguma, a Nigerian immigrant, often works overtime in addition to his regular night…

  12. A Losing Strategy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Anne K.

    2006-01-01

    State appropriations often fail to keep up with the growth of colleges' budgets, forcing institutions to raise tuition for out-of-state students to fill budget gaps. However, the strategy could backfire if too many of these students look elsewhere, leaving colleges with even less tuition revenue than before the raises were put in place.

  13. A long non-coding RNA interacts with Gfra1 and maintains survival of mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Wang, M; Wang, M; Wu, X; Geng, L; Xue, Y; Wei, X; Jia, Y; Wu, X

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are unique male germline stem cells that support spermatogenesis and male fertility. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have been identified as key regulators of stem cell fate; however, their role in SSCs has not been explored. Here, we report that a novel spermatogonia-specific lncRNA (lncRNA033862) is essential for the survival of murine SSCs. LncRNA033862 is expressed in early spermatogonia including SSC and was among 805 lncRNAs identified by global expression profiling as responsive to glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a growth factor required for SSC self-renewal and survival. LncRNA033862 is an antisense transcript of the GDNF receptor alpha1 (Gfra1) that lacks protein coding potential and regulates Gfra1 expression levels by interacting with Gfra1 chromatin. Importantly, lncRNA033862 knockdown severely impairs SSC survival and their capacity to repopulate recipient testes in a transplantation assay. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate SSC fate. PMID:26962690

  14. Morphological characterization of testicular cells, spermatogenesis and formation of spermatophores in a fish ectoparasite Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951 (Crustacea: Branchiura).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Manna, Subha; Saha, Samar Kumar

    2014-02-01

    The present study has been carried out to describe the cell morphology of the developing male gametes in a fish ectoparasite, Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951. With respect to cell volume and nucleoplasmic index, spermatogonia are the smallest and primary spermatocytes are the largest in this lineage. The spermatogonia and the differentiating spermatogenic cells are in separate niches and confined to different enclaves within each testicular lobe. Spermiogenesis occurs within the inner enclave of each testicular lobe. During this process the nucleus becomes streamlined; an acrosome is formed, axoneme is originated, and residual cytoplasm is discarded through the flagellum. The sperm cell morphology displays a general pattern comprising head, mid-piece, and a full length flagellum. In the axoneme 9+2 arrangement of the microtubule is conserved. In addition to the axoneme, some more singlet microtubules are found surrounding a fiber sheath and around one of the mitochondria adjacent to the axoneme. This arrangement indicates a close phylogenetic relationship with pentastomida. In the present study, structure and formation of spermatophore are described in this branchiuran parasite.

  15. Ghrelin modulates testicular germ cells apoptosis and proliferation in adult normal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, Arash; Dezfoulian, Omid; Alirezaei, Masoud; Rasoulian, Bahram

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous studies have documented the direct action of ghrelin in the modulation of apoptosis in different cell types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be considered as a modulator of spermatogenesis in normal adult rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be potentially implicated for abnormal spermatogenesis in some testicular germ cell tumors. -- Abstract: Under normal condition in the most mammals, spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to determine the effects of ghrelin treatment on in vivo quality and quantity expression of apoptosis and proliferation specific indices in rat testicular germ cells. Twenty eight adult normal rats were subdivided into equal control and treatment groups. Treatment group received 3 nmol of ghrelin as subcutaneous injection for 30 consecutive days or vehicle to the control animals. The rats from each group (n = 7) were killed on days 10 and 30 and their testes were taken for immunocytochemical evaluation and caspase-3 assay. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the accumulations of Bax and PCNA peptides are generally more prominent in spermatocytes and spermatogonia of both groups. Likewise, the mean percentage of immunoreactive spermatocytes against Bax increased (P < 0.01) in the ghrelin-treated group on day 10, while despite of 30% increment in the Bax level of spermatocytes in the treated rats on day 30, however, it was not statistically significant. During the experimental period, only a few spermatogonia represented Bax expression and the changes of Bax immunolabling cells were negligible upon ghrelin treatment. Likewise, there were immunostaining cells against Bcl-2 in each germ cell neither in the control nor in the treated animals. In fact

  16. BMP4-induced differentiation of a rat spermatogonial stem cell line causes changes in its cell adhesion properties.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Gianfranco; van Bragt, Maaike P A; Korver, Cindy M; Repping, Sjoerd; de Rooij, Dirk G; van Pelt, Ans M M

    2010-11-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are at the basis of the spermatogenic process and are essential for the continuous lifelong production of spermatozoa. Although several factors that govern SSC self-renewal and differentiation have been investigated, the direct effect of such factors on SSCs has not yet been studied, mainly because of the absence of markers to identify SSCs and the lack of effective methods to obtain and culture a pure population of SSCs. We now have used a previously established rat SSC cell line (GC-6spg) to elucidate the role of BMP4 in SSC differentiation. We found that GC-6spg cells cultured in the presence of BMP4 upregulate KIT expression, which is an early marker for differentiating spermatogonia. GC-6spg cells were found to express three BMP4 receptors and the downstream SMAD1/5/8 proteins were phosphorylated during BMP4-induced differentiation. A time-course DNA micro-array analysis revealed a total of 529 differentially regulated transcripts (≥2-fold), including several known downstream targets of BMP4 such as Id2 and Gata2. Pathway analysis revealed that the most affected pathways were those involved in adherens junctions, focal junctions, gap junctions, cell adhesion molecules, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, among the genes belonging to the most strongly affected adhesion pathways was Cdh1 (known as E-cadherin), an adhesion molecule known to be expressed by a subpopulation of spermatogonia including SSCs. Overall, our results suggest that BMP4 induces early differentiation of SSCs in a direct manner by affecting cell adhesion pathways.

  17. Treatment of Children with Protein – Losing Enteropathy After Fontan and Other Complex Congenital Heart Disease Procedures in Condition with Limited Human and Technical Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It’s relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. Aim of presentation is to describe single centre experience in diagnosis, evaluation, management and treatment of children with protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan and other CCHD procedures in the current era and in centre with limited human and technical resources, follows with a comprehensive review of protein-losing enteropathy publications, and concludes with suggestions for prevention and treatment. Material and methodology Retrospectively we analyzed patients with CCHD and protein-losing enteropathy in our institution, starting from January 2000 to December 2012. The including criteria were age between two and 17 years, to have a complex congenital heart disease and available complete documentation of cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Results Of all patients we evaluated 18 cases with protein-losing enteropathy, aged 6 to 19 years (mean 14±9); there were three children who had undergone screening procedure for D-transposition, one Tetralogy of Fallot, and remaining 14 patients had undergone Fontan procedures; (anatomic diagnosis are: six with tricuspid atresia, seven with d-transposition, double outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia and two with hypoplastic left heart syndrome). The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy was made at median age of 5.6 years, ranging from 13 months to 15 years. Diagnosis was made using alpha 1-antitrypsin as a gold marker in stool. By physical examination in 14 patients edema was found, in three ascites, and six patients had pleural effusion. Laboratory findings

  18. CIP2A Promotes Proliferation of Spermatogonial Progenitor Cells and Spermatogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Juho-Antti; Hobbs, Robin M.; Mannermaa, Leni; Kallajoki, Markku; Chan, Edward K.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Toppari, Jorma; Westermarck, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a critical regulator of protein serine/threonine phosphorylation. However, the physiological and developmental roles of different PP2A complexes are very poorly understood. Here, we show that a newly characterized PP2A inhibitory protein CIP2A is co-expressed with ki-67 and with self-renewal protein PLZF in the spermatogonial progenitor cell (SPC) population in the testis. CIP2A and PLZF expression was shown also to correlate Ki-67 expression in human testicular spermatogonia. Functionally, CIP2A mutant mouse testes exhibited smaller number of PLZF-positive SPCs and reduced sperm counts. Moreover, seminiferous tubuli cells isolated from CIP2A mutant mice showed reduced expression of Plzf and other renewal genes Oct-4 and Nanog at mRNA level. However, PLZF-deficient testes did not show altered CIP2A expression. Importantly, spermatogonia-specific restoration of CIP2A expression rescued PLZF expression and sperm production defects observed in CIP2A mutant mice. Taken together, these results reveal first physiological function for an emerging human oncoprotein CIP2A, and provide insights into maintenance of PLZF-positive progenitors. Moreover, demonstration that CIP2A expression can be systematically inhibited without severe consequences to normal mouse development and viability may have clinical relevance regarding targeting of oncogenic CIP2A for future cancer therapies. PMID:22461891

  19. Market Imitation and Win-Stay Lose-Shift Strategies Emerge as Unintended Patterns in Market Direction Guesses.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Roig, Mario; Segura, Carlota; Duch, Jordi; Perelló, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Decisions made in our everyday lives are based on a wide variety of information so it is generally very difficult to assess what are the strategies that guide us. Stock market provides a rich environment to study how people make decisions since responding to market uncertainty needs a constant update of these strategies. For this purpose, we run a lab-in-the-field experiment where volunteers are given a controlled set of financial information -based on real data from worldwide financial indices- and they are required to guess whether the market price would go "up" or "down" in each situation. From the data collected we explore basic statistical traits, behavioural biases and emerging strategies. In particular, we detect unintended patterns of behavior through consistent actions, which can be interpreted as Market Imitation and Win-Stay Lose-Shift emerging strategies, with Market Imitation being the most dominant. We also observe that these strategies are affected by external factors: the expert advice, the lack of information or an information overload reinforce the use of these intuitive strategies, while the probability to follow them significantly decreases when subjects spends more time to make a decision. The cohort analysis shows that women and children are more prone to use such strategies although their performance is not undermined. Our results are of interest for better handling clients expectations of trading companies, to avoid behavioural anomalies in financial analysts decisions and to improve not only the design of markets but also the trading digital interfaces where information is set down. Strategies and behavioural biases observed can also be translated into new agent based modelling or stochastic price dynamics to better understand financial bubbles or the effects of asymmetric risk perception to price drops.

  20. Women's water polo world championships: technical and tactical aspects of winning and losing teams in close and unbalanced games.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Corrado; Condello, Giancarlo; Capranica, Laura; Tessitore, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the technical and tactical aspects between winning and losing teams in close (i.e., 1-3 goals of difference) and unbalanced (i.e., >3 goals of difference) elite women's water polo games. A notational analysis was performed on 45 games to evaluate occurrence of action, mean duration, action outcome, origin and execution of shot, offensive and defensive role, and arrangement of even, counterattack, power play, and transition situations. Independent 2-sided t-tests were applied to show differences (p < 0.05) between teams. Regarding close games, effects emerged for action outcome (counterattack: lost possessions; power play: goals, no goal shots), origin (even: zone 1, zone 4; counterattack: zone 1, zone 5) and execution (even: off-the-water shots; counterattack: shots after > than 2 fakes; power play: drive shots) of shots, offensive even arrangements (6 vs. 6/5 vs. 5; 2 vs. 2/1 vs. 1), and role. Regarding unbalanced games, differences emerged for the occurrence of action (even, counterattack), duration (even; power play), action outcome (even: goals, penalties; counterattack: goals, no goal shots, penalties; power play: goals, no goal shots; transition: lost possessions), origin (even: zone 2, zone 4; counterattack: zone 5) and execution (even: free throws, drive shots; counterattack: drive shots, shots after > 2 fakes; power play: drive shots, shots after 1 fake) of shots; offensive even arrangements (2 vs. 2/1 vs. 1), and role; and defensive even arrangements (pressing, zones 1-2, zone M, zones 2-3-4). Differences between close and unbalanced games underlining that water polo performance should be analyzed in relation to specific margins of victory. Therefore, water polo coaches and physical trainers can plan a sound training session according to the most important aspects of close (opponent's exclusion, center forward play, and power play actions) and unbalanced (defensive skills) games.

  1. Market Imitation and Win-Stay Lose-Shift Strategies Emerge as Unintended Patterns in Market Direction Guesses

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Carlota; Duch, Jordi; Perelló, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Decisions made in our everyday lives are based on a wide variety of information so it is generally very difficult to assess what are the strategies that guide us. Stock market provides a rich environment to study how people make decisions since responding to market uncertainty needs a constant update of these strategies. For this purpose, we run a lab-in-the-field experiment where volunteers are given a controlled set of financial information -based on real data from worldwide financial indices- and they are required to guess whether the market price would go “up” or “down” in each situation. From the data collected we explore basic statistical traits, behavioural biases and emerging strategies. In particular, we detect unintended patterns of behavior through consistent actions, which can be interpreted as Market Imitation and Win-Stay Lose-Shift emerging strategies, with Market Imitation being the most dominant. We also observe that these strategies are affected by external factors: the expert advice, the lack of information or an information overload reinforce the use of these intuitive strategies, while the probability to follow them significantly decreases when subjects spends more time to make a decision. The cohort analysis shows that women and children are more prone to use such strategies although their performance is not undermined. Our results are of interest for better handling clients expectations of trading companies, to avoid behavioural anomalies in financial analysts decisions and to improve not only the design of markets but also the trading digital interfaces where information is set down. Strategies and behavioural biases observed can also be translated into new agent based modelling or stochastic price dynamics to better understand financial bubbles or the effects of asymmetric risk perception to price drops. PMID:27532219

  2. Cytotoxic effects of benzene on mouse germ cells determined by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spano, M.; Pacchierotti, F.; Ucelli, R.; Amendola, R.; Bartoleschi, C. )

    1989-01-01

    Flow cytometric (FCM) DNA content measurements were performed on testicular monocellular suspensions obtained from mice exposed per os to 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 7 ml/kg body weight of benzene in order to investigate its cytotoxic action on gem cells. The effects of benzene were measured 7, 14, 21, 28, and 70 d after treatment. Benzene had no effect on testis weight, but FCM analysis showed the relative percentages of some cell subpopulations (tetraploid and haploid cells) to be different from the control pattern, indicating the occurrence of some cytotoxic damage to differentiating spermatogonia. These data demonstrate that spermatogenesis is sensitive to benzene single exposures as evidenced by an altered cell ratio of testicular cell types.

  3. Differential response of mouse male germ-cell stages to radiation-induced specific-locus and dominant mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, W L; Bangham, J W; Russell, L B

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to provide a systematic assessment of the frequency and nature of mutations induced in successive stages of spermato- and spermiogenesis, X-irradiated male mice were re-mated at weekly intervals, and large samples of progeny, observed from birth onward, were scored and genetically tested for recessive mutations at seven specific loci and for externally recognizable dominant mutations. Productivity findings provided a rough measure of induced dominant-lethal frequencies. A qualitative assessment of specific-locus mutations (which include deletions and other rearrangements) was made on the basis of homozygosity test results, as well as from information derived from more recent complementation studies and molecular analyses. Both recessive and dominant visibles revealed clear distinctions between spermatogonia and postspermatogonial stages. In addition, differences for both of these endpoints, as well as for presumed dominant lethals, were found among various postspermatogonial stages. It may be concluded that radiation produces its maximum rates of genetic damage in germ-cell stages ranging from midpachytene spermatocytes through early spermatids, a pattern unlike any of those that have been defined for chemicals; further, the frequency peaks for radiation are lower and broader. The difference between post-stem-cell stages overall and stem-cell spermatogonia was smaller than is generally found with chemicals, not only with respect to the frequency but also the nature of mutations. PMID:9560376

  4. Differential response of mouse male germ-cell stages to radiation-induced specific-locus and dominant mutations.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L; Bangham, J W; Russell, L B

    1998-04-01

    In an attempt to provide a systematic assessment of the frequency and nature of mutations induced in successive stages of spermato- and spermiogenesis, X-irradiated male mice were re-mated at weekly intervals, and large samples of progeny, observed from birth onward, were scored and genetically tested for recessive mutations at seven specific loci and for externally recognizable dominant mutations. Productivity findings provided a rough measure of induced dominant-lethal frequencies. A qualitative assessment of specific-locus mutations (which include deletions and other rearrangements) was made on the basis of homozygosity test results, as well as from information derived from more recent complementation studies and molecular analyses. Both recessive and dominant visibles revealed clear distinctions between spermatogonia and postspermatogonial stages. In addition, differences for both of these endpoints, as well as for presumed dominant lethals, were found among various postspermatogonial stages. It may be concluded that radiation produces its maximum rates of genetic damage in germ-cell stages ranging from midpachytene spermatocytes through early spermatids, a pattern unlike any of those that have been defined for chemicals; further, the frequency peaks for radiation are lower and broader. The difference between post-stem-cell stages overall and stem-cell spermatogonia was smaller than is generally found with chemicals, not only with respect to the frequency but also the nature of mutations.

  5. The fate of spermatogonial stem cells in the cryptorchid testes of RXFP2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lydia; How, Javier J; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2013-01-01

    The environmental niche of the spermatogonial stem cell pool is critical to ensure the continued generation of the germ cell population. To study the consequences of an aberrant testicular environment in cryptorchidism we used a mouse model with a deletion of Rxfp2 gene resulting in a high intra-abdominal testicular position. Mutant males were infertile with the gross morphology of the cryptorchid testis progressively deteriorating with age. Few spermatogonia were identifiable in 12 month old cryptorchid testes. Gene expression analysis showed no difference between mutant and control testes at postnatal day 10. In three month old males a decrease in expression of spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) markers Id4, Nanos2, and Ret was shown. The direct counting of ID4+ cells supported a significant decrease of SSCs. In contrast, the expression of Plzf, a marker for undifferentiated and differentiating spermatogonia was not reduced, and the number of PLZF+ cells in the cryptorchid testis was higher in three month old testes, but equal to control in six month old mutants. The PLZF+ cells did not show a higher rate of apoptosis in cryptorchid testis. The expression of the Sertoli cell FGF2 gene required for SSC maintenance was significantly reduced in mutant testis. Based on these findings we propose that the deregulation of somatic and germ cell genes in the cryptorchid testis, directs the SSCs towards the differentiation pathway. This leads to a depletion of the SSC pool and an increase in the number of PLZF+ spermatogonial cells, which too, eventually decreases with the exhaustion of the stem cell pool. Such a dynamic suggests that an early correction of cryptorchidism is critical for the retention of the SSC pool.

  6. Cryptogenia multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis: an entity on its own as a cause of abdominal pain, iron deficiency anemia and protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guisado Vasco, P; Fraile Rodríguez, G

    2014-01-01

    We studied a patient with edema secondary to protein losing enteropathy, and recurrent bouts of bloating and abdominal pain secondary to intestinal subocclusion episodes. After the clinical study, the patient was diagnosed of cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis (CMUSE), that is a rare disease, probably caused by mutations in the gene PLA2G4A, and characterized by multiple short stenosis of the small bowel with superficial ulcers, which do not exceed the submucosa layer. Inflammatory bowel disease (Chron's disease), intestinal tuberculosis and intestinal ulcers secondary to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the main differential diagnosis. To sum up, physicians should included CMUSE in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain, iron deficiency anaemia, occult intestinal bleeding, edema and protein losing enteropathy.

  7. "Lose the Tube": A Choosing Wisely initiative to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitalist-led inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyung J; Khalil, Steve; Poeran, Jashvant; Mazumdar, Madhu; Bravo, Nathaniel; Wallach, Fran; Markoff, Brian; Lee, Nathan; Dunn, Andrew S

    2017-03-01

    We developed a multidisciplinary initiative, "Lose the Tube," focused on a Choosing Wisely recommendation to decrease catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates and catheter days. Through an electronic health record catheter identification tool, daily interdisciplinary query, and clinician education, our multifaceted intervention reduced mean per-person catheter days from 3.3 to 2.9, decreased CAUTI rates from 2.85 to 0.32 per 1,000 catheter days, and reduced cost by $32,245.

  8. Losing fat, gaining treatments: the use of biomedicine as a cure for folk illnesses in the Andes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article explores how people in the Andes incorporate beliefs from both biomedical and ethnomedical systems in treating folk illnesses that often involve spiritual beings. The article focuses on the kharisiri—one who is believed to steal fat and blood from unsuspecting humans to make exchanges with the devil. The kharisiri in turn is rewarded with good fortune. Victims of kharisiris, however, fall ill and may die if untreated. Historically, kharisiri victims relied on ethnomedicine for treatment, but it appears biomedical pills are now perceived by some as an effective treatment. By drawing on participants’ attitudes towards biomedicine, and how people in the Andes conceptualize health, this article theorizes as to why biomedical pills are sought to treat kharisiri attacks but not for other folk illnesses. Methods Fieldwork was conducted in Arequipa and Yunguyo among market vendors, who make up a significant portion of Peru’s working population. This type of work increases the risk of different illnesses due to work conditions like exposure to extreme temperatures, long-distance travel, and social dynamics. Biomedical and ethnomedical products are often sold in and around marketplaces, making vendors a compelling group for exploring issues relating to treatment systems. Qualitative data was collected in 2011 with a follow-up visit in 2013. Participant observation, informal conversations, and unstructured interviews with 29 participants informed the study. Results Participants unanimously reported that biomedical pills are not capable of treating folk illnesses such as susto and mal de ojo. Several participants reported that pharmaceutical pills can cure kharisiri victims. Conclusions In comparison to other folk illnesses that involve spiritual beings, those who fall ill from a kharisiri attack lose physical elements (fat and blood) rather than their soul (ánimo) or becoming ill due to a misbalance in reciprocal relations—either with humans

  9. Large and forgotten in rural Australia: assessment, attitudes and possible approaches to losing weight in young adult males

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Young Adult Males (YAMs) in rural Australia are poorly studied with respect to overweight and obesity. Firstly, we explored the feasibility of recruiting 17–25 year old YAMs to obtain baseline data on overweight and obesity rates, socio-demographics, nutrition, exercise and mobile phone usage. Secondly, we explored the views of YAMs with a waist measurement over 94 cm about using mobile phone text messages to promote weight loss and incentives to promote healthy lifestyles. Methods A two-staged, mixed-methods approach was used to study obesity and overweight issues in Dubbo, a regional city in New South Wales, Australia. In Phase I, socio-demographic, health behaviour and mobile phone usage data were collected using a questionnaire and anthropometric data collected by direct measurement. In Phase II, YAMs’ views were explored by focus group discussion using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results Phase I (145 participants): mean Body Mass Index (BMI) 25.06 ± 5.01; mean waist circumference 87.4 ± 15.4 cm. In total, 39.3% were obese (12.4%) or overweight (26.9%) and 24.1% had an increased risk of metabolic complications associated with obesity. 135 (93.1%) owned a mobile phone and sent on average 17 ± 25 text messages per day and received 18 ± 24. Phase II (30 participants): YAMs acknowledged that overweight and obesity was a growing societal concern with many health related implications, but didn’t feel this was something that affected them personally at this stage of their lives. Motivation was therefore an issue. YAMs admitted that they would only be concerned about losing weight if something drastic occurred in their lives. Text messages would encourage and motivate them to adopt a healthy lifestyle if they were individually tailored. Gym memberships, not cash payments, seem to be the most favoured incentive. Conclusion There is a clear need for an effective health promotion strategy for the almost 40% overweight or obese

  10. Losing water in temporary streams on a Mediterranean island: Effects of climate and land-cover changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Celso; Amengual, Arnau; Homar, Víctor; Zamora, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Mediterranean region. We highlight the ecological implications of losing water in temporary streams across Mallorca, and we argue the urgent need for conservation plans to protect them from present and future changes and challenges.

  11. Development of interspecies testicular germ-cell transplantation in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarini, Tiziana; Sarasquete, Carmen; Cabrita, Elsa

    2014-06-01

    Interspecific testicular germ cell (TGC) transplantation was investigated in two commercial flatfish species. Testes from donor species (Senegalese sole) were evaluated using classical histological techniques (haematoxylin-eosin staining and haematoxylin-light green-orange G-acid fuchsine staining), in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical analysis. Both Ssvasa1-2 mRNAs and SsVasa protein allowed the characterisation of TGCs, confirming the usefulness of the vasa gene in the detection of Senegalese sole TGCs. Xenogenic transplants were carried out using TGCs from one-year-old Senegalese sole into turbot larvae. Propidium iodide-SYBR-14 and 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining showed that 87.98% of the extracted testicular cells were viable for microinjection and that 15.63% of the total recovered cells were spermatogonia. The vasa gene was characterised in turbot recipients using cDNA cloning. Smvasa mRNA was confirmed as a germ cell-specific molecular marker in this species. Smvasa expression analysis during turbot ontogeny was carried out before Senegalese sole TGC transplants into turbot larvae. Turbot larvae at 18 days after hatching (DAH) proved to be susceptible to manipulation procedures. High survival rates (83.75±15.90-100%) were obtained for turbot larvae at 27, 34 and 42 DAH. These data highlight the huge potential of this species for transplantation studies. Quantitative PCR was employed to detect Senegalese sole vasa mRNAs (Ssvasa1-2) in the recipient turbot larvae. The Ssvasa mRNAs showed a significant increase in relative expression in 42-DAH microinjected larvae three weeks after treatment, showing the proliferation of Senegalese sole spermatogonia in transplanted turbot larvae.

  12. Effect of Removal of Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) from In Vitro Culture on Gene Expression of Niche Factors in Bovine

    PubMed Central

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Niche cells, regulating Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) fate are believed to have a reciprocal communication with SSCs. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of SSC elimination on the gene expression of Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) and Kit Ligand (KITLG), which are the main growth factors regulating SSCs development and secreted by niche cells, primarily Sertoli cells. Methods: Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured for 12 days on extracellular matrix-coated plates. In the germ cell-removed group, the SSCs were removed from the in vitro culture using differential plating; however, in the control group, no intervention in the culture was performed. Colony formation of SSCs was evaluated using an inverted microscope. The gene expression of growth factors and spermatogonia markers were assessed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: SSCs colonies were developed in the control group but they were rarely observed in the germ cell-removed group; moreover, the expression of spermatogonia markers was detected in the control group while it was not observed in the germ cell-removed group, substantiating the success of SSCs removal. The expression of Gdnf and Fgf2 was greater in the germ cell-removed than control group (p<0.05), whereas the expression of Kitlg was lower in the germ cell-removed than control group (p< 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, the results revealed that niche cells respond to SSCs removal by upregulation of GDNF and FGF2, and downregulation of KITLG in order to stimulate self-renewal and arrest differentiation. PMID:27563426

  13. Derivation of male germ cells from ram bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by three different methods and evaluation of their fate after transplantation into the testis.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh-Hasankolaei, Mohammad; Eslaminejad, Mohammadreza Baghaban; Sedighi-Gilani, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into germ cells (GCs). This research, for the first time, has evaluated the fate of in vitro MSC-derived GCs generated by three different induction methods and compared them after transplantation into the testes of rams. Passage-3 ram bone marrow (BM)-MSCs were divided into three treatment groups: (1) 14-d treatment with 10 μM retinoic acid (RA; RA14), (2) 21-d treatment with 10 μM RA (RA21), and (3) 21-d treatment with 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFb1). After confirmation of the existence of germ-like cells in the culture, the treated cells were labeled and transplanted into the testes of ram lambs. After 2 mo, we conducted histological evaluations of the rams' testes. Results showed that in vitro-derived GCs from all treatment groups survived in the testes. Some of these GCs homed at the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules and formed colonies. The homed cells and cell colonies were similar to testicular native spermatogonia and expressed PGP9.5. TGFb1 exhibited the highest efficiency for in vitro production of GCs as well as the highest capability for homing and colony formation in the testes. RA21 was less efficient than TGFb1, particularly in colony formation. RA14 was the weakest group. No further differentiation of the transplanted GCs was observed. From our results, it could be concluded that a 21-d treatment period of BM-MSCs with TGFb1 is the most efficient method for in vitro generation of spermatogonia-like cells that survive, home, and form colonies in the testes.

  14. Retinoic acid metabolism links the periodical differentiation of germ cells with the cycle of Sertoli cells in mouse seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ryo; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Yoshida, Shosei

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of tissues relies on the regulated differentiation of stem cells. In the epithelium of mouse seminiferous tubules, the differentiation process from undifferentiated spermatogonia (A(undiff)), which harbor the stem cell functions, to sperm occurs in a periodical manner, known as the "seminiferous epithelial cycle". To identify the mechanism underlying this periodic differentiation, we investigated the roles of Sertoli cells (the somatic supporting cells) and retinoic acid (RA) in the seminiferous epithelial cycle. Sertoli cells cyclically change their functions in a coordinated manner with germ cell differentiation and support the entire process of spermatogenesis. RA is known to play essential roles in this periodic differentiation, but its precise mode of action and its regulation remains largely obscure. We showed that an experimental increase in RA signaling was capable of both inducing A(undiff) differentiation and resetting the Sertoli cell cycle to the appropriate stage. However, these actions of exogenous RA signaling on A(undiff) and Sertoli cells were strongly interfered by the differentiating germ cells of intimate location. Based on the expression of RA metabolism-related genes among multiple cell types - including germ and Sertoli cells - and their regulation by RA signaling, we propose here that differentiating germ cells play a primary role in modulating the local RA metabolism, which results in the timed differentiation of A(undiff) and the appropriate cycling of Sertoli cells. Similar regulation by differentiating progeny through the modulation of local environment could also be involved in other stem cell systems.

  15. Losing the Quality Battle in Australian Education for Librarianship: A Decade on. (An Update on the Original Article by Ross Harvey, "Losing the Quality Battle in Australian Education for Librarianship". "The Australian Library Journal", 50 No. 1, 2001: 15-22.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Ross

    2011-01-01

    The Editor of "ALJ" has invited me to comment on my 2001 article "Losing the quality battle in Australian education for librarianship" (Harvey 2001). The article was prompted by a period I spent as a visiting professor in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA (the University of California Los Angeles) and was written while I was there.…

  16. Immunolocalization of the telomerase-1 component in cells of the regenerating tail, testis, and intestine of lizards.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    Using an antibody against a lizard telomerase-1 component the presence of telomerase has been detected in regenerating lizard tails where numerous cells are proliferating. Immunoblots showed telomerase positive bands at 75-80 kDa in normal tissues and at 50, 75, and 90 kDa in those regenerating. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunolocalization showed telomerase-immunoreactivity in sparCe (few/diluted) mesenchymal cells of the blastema, early regenerating muscles, perichondrium of the cartilaginous tube, ependyma of the spinal cord, and in the regenerating epidermis. Clusters of gold particles were detected in condensing chromosomes of few mesenchymal and epithelial cells in the regenerating tail, but a low to undetectable labeling in interphase cells. Telomerase-immunoreactivity was intense in the nucleus and sparCe (few/diluted) in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes and drastically decreased in early spermatids where some nuclear labeling remains. Some intense immunoreactivity was seen in few cells near the basal membrane of intestinal enterocytes or in leukocytes (likely lymphocytes) of the intestine mucosa. In spermatogonia, spermatids and in enterocytes part of the nuclear labeling formed cluster of gold particles in dense areas identified as Cajal Bodies, suggesting that telomerase is a marker for these stem cells. This therefore suggests that also the sparCe (few/diluted) telomerase positive cells detected in the regenerating tail may represent sparCe (few/diluted) stem cells localized in regenerating tissues where transit amplifying cells are instead preponderant to allow for tail growth. This observation supports previous studies indicating that few stem cells are present in the stump after tail amputation and give rise to transit amplifying cells for tail regeneration.

  17. Identification of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled cells during mouse spermatogenesis by heat-induced antigen retrieval in lectin staining and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakata, Hiroki; Kumchantuek, Tewarat; Gewaily, Mahmoud Saad; Iseki, Shoichi

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication occurs during S-phase in spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes during spermatogenesis. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is incorporated into synthesized DNA and is detectable in the nucleus by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To identify BrdU-labeled spermatogenic cells, the spermatogenic stages must be determined by visualizing acrosomes and detecting cell type-specific marker molecules in the seminiferous tubules. However, the antibody reaction with BrdU routinely requires denaturation of the DNA, which is achieved by pretreating tissue sections with hydrochloric acid; however, this commonly interferes with further histochemical approaches. Therefore, we examined optimal methods for pretreating paraffin sections of the mouse testis to detect incorporated BrdU by an antibody and, at the same time, visualize acrosomes with peanut agglutinin (PNA) or detect several marker molecules with antibodies. We found that the use of heat-induced antigen retrieval (HIAR), which consisted of heating at 95C in 20 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0) for 15 min, was superior to the use of 2 N hydrochloric acid for 90 min at room temperature in terms of the quality of subsequent PNA-lectin histochemistry with double IHC for BrdU and an appropriate stage marker protein. With this method, we identified BrdU-labeled spermatogenic cells during mouse spermatogenesis as A1 spermatogonia through to preleptotene spermatocytes.

  18. Development of quantitative microscopy-based assays for evaluating dynamics of living cultures of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, Crystal N; Fanslow, Danielle A; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2012-10-01

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) self-renewal and differentiation are required for continuous production of spermatozoa and long-term fertility. Studying SSCs in vivo remains challenging because SSCs are rare cells and definitive molecular markers for their identification are lacking. The development of a method for propagating SSCs in vitro greatly facilitated analysis of SSCs. The cultured cells grow as clusters of a dynamic mixture of "true" stem cells and differentiating progenitor cells. Cells in the stem/progenitor culture system share many properties with spermatogonia in vivo; however, to fully exploit it as a model for spermatogonial development, new assays are needed that account for the dynamic heterogeneity inherent in the culture system. Here, assays were developed for quantifying dynamics of cultures of stem/progenitor cells that expressed histone-green fluorescent protein (GFP). First, we built on published results showing that cluster formation in vitro reliably predicts the relative number of SSCs. The GFP-based in vitro cluster assay allows quantification of SSCs with significantly fewer resources than a transplantation assay. Second, we compared the dynamics of differentiation in two experimental paradigms by imaging over a 17-day time frame. Finally, we performed short-term live imaging and observed cell migration, coordinated cell proliferation, and cell death resembling that of spermatogonia in the testes. The methods that we present provide a foundation for the use of fluorescent reporters in future microscopy-based high-throughput screens by using living spermatogonial stem/progenitor cultures applicable to toxicology, contraceptive discovery, and identification of regulators of self-renewal and differentiation.

  19. Live imaging of the Drosophila spermatogonial stem cell niche reveals novel mechanisms regulating germline stem cell output.

    PubMed

    Sheng, X Rebecca; Matunis, Erika

    2011-08-01

    Adult stem cells modulate their output by varying between symmetric and asymmetric divisions, but have rarely been observed in living intact tissues. Germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila testis are anchored to somatic hub cells and were thought to exclusively undergo oriented asymmetric divisions, producing one stem cell that remains hub-anchored and one daughter cell displaced out of the stem cell-maintaining micro-environment (niche). We developed extended live imaging of the Drosophila testis niche, allowing us to track individual germline cells. Surprisingly, new wild-type GSCs are generated in the niche during steady-state tissue maintenance by a previously undetected event we term 'symmetric renewal', where interconnected GSC-daughter cell pairs swivel such that both cells contact the hub. We also captured GSCs undergoing direct differentiation by detaching from the hub. Following starvation-induced GSC loss, GSC numbers are restored by symmetric renewals. Furthermore, upon more severe (genetically induced) GSC loss, both symmetric renewal and de-differentiation (where interconnected spermatogonia fragment into pairs while moving towards then establishing contact with the hub) occur simultaneously to replenish the GSC pool. Thus, stereotypically oriented stem cell divisions are not always correlated with an asymmetric outcome in cell fate, and changes in stem cell output are governed by altered signals in response to tissue requirements.

  20. Cancer testis antigen expression in testicular germ cell tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Peter K; Thielken, Andrea; Brandt, Simone; Barghorn, André; Lohe, Bernd; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2014-06-01

    Cancer testis antigens are encoded by germ line-associated genes that are present in normal germ cells of testis and ovary but not in differentiated tissues. Their expression in various human cancer types has been interpreted as 're-expression' or as intratumoral progenitor cell signature. Cancer testis antigen expression patterns have not yet been studied in germ cell tumorigenesis with specific emphasis on intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified as a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors. Immunohistochemistry was used to study MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, GAGE1 and CTAG1B expression in 325 primary testicular germ cell tumors, including 94 mixed germ cell tumors. Seminomatous and non-seminomatous components were separately arranged and evaluated on tissue microarrays. Spermatogonia in the normal testis were positive, whereas intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified was negative for all five CT antigens. Cancer testis antigen expression was only found in 3% (CTAG1B), 10% (GAGE1, MAGEA4), 33% (MAGEA3) and 40% (MAGEC1) of classic seminoma but not in non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumors. In contrast, all spermatocytic seminomas were positive for cancer testis antigens. These data are consistent with a different cell origin in spermatocytic seminoma compared with classic seminoma and support a progression model with loss of cancer testis antigens in early tumorigenesis of testicular germ cell tumors and later re-expression in a subset of seminomas.

  1. Yangjing Capsule Extract Promotes Proliferation of GC-1 Spg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Jin, Baofang; Zhang, Xindong; Cui, Yugui; Sun, Dalin; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of Yangjing Capsule (YC) extract on proliferation of GC-1 spermatogonia (spg) cells and the mechanism. Methods. GC-1 spg cells were treated with 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/mL YC extract. MTT assay was performed to detect the cell viability. Flow cytometry was used to measure the cell cycle and apoptosis of GC-1 spg cells. Real-time PCR and western blot were applied to determine the mRNA and protein expression of Oct-4 and Plzf. Gfrα1 knockdown and LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) were applied to explore the underlying mechanism. Results. After 48 h treatment of YC, the viability of GC-1 spg cells increased significantly and the ratio of apoptotic cells reduced significantly. The increased mRNA and protein expression of Oct-4 and Plzf suggested YC promoted self-renewal of GC-1 spg cells. Both Gfrα1 siRNAs and LY294002 treatments held back YC extract's stimulation effects on mRNA and protein expression of Oct-4 and Plzf and consequently inhibited the proliferation of GC-1 spg cells induced by YC extract. Conclusion. YC extract could stimulate the proliferation of GC-1 spg cells. Partly via Gfrα1, YC extract is able to trigger the activation of PI3K pathway and finally lead to self-renewal of GC-1 spg cells. PMID:24817900

  2. The use of low-calorie sweeteners is associated with self-reported prior intent to lose weight in a representative sample of US adults

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, A; Rehm, C D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low-calorie sweeteners (LCSs) are said to be a risk factor for obesity and diabetes. Reverse causality may be an alternative explanation. Methods: Data on LCS use, from a single 24-h dietary recall, for a representative sample of 22 231 adults were obtained from 5 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008 NHANES). Retrospective data on intent to lose or maintain weight during the prior 12-months and 10-year weight history were obtained from the weight history questionnaire. Objectively measured heights and weights were obtained from the examination. Primary analyses evaluated the association between intent to lose/maintain weight and use of LCSs and specific LCS product types using survey-weighted generalized linear models. We further evaluated whether body mass index (BMI) may mediate the association between weight loss intent and use of LCSs. The association between 10-year weight history and current LCS use was evaluated using restricted cubic splines. Results: In cross-sectional analyses, LCS use was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Adults who tried to lose weight during the previous 12 months were more likely to consume LCS beverages (prevalence ratio=1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54–1.75), tabletop LCS (prevalence ratio=1.68, 95% CI 1.47–1.91) and LCS foods (prevalence ratio=1.93, 95% CI 1.60–2.33) as compared with those who did not. In mediation analyses, BMI only partially mediated the association between weight control history and the use of LCS beverages, tabletop LCS, but not LCS foods. Current LCS use was further associated with a history of prior weight change (for example, weight loss and gain). Conclusions: LCS use was associated with self-reported intent to lose weight during the previous 12 months. This association was only partially mediated by differences in BMI. Any inference of causality between attempts at weight control and LCS use is tempered by the

  3. Probabilistic risk assessment of the Space Shuttle. Phase 3: A study of the potential of losing the vehicle during nominal operation. Volume 2: Integrated loss of vehicle model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragola, Joseph R.; Maggio, Gaspare; Frank, Michael V.; Gerez, Luis; Mcfadden, Richard H.; Collins, Erin P.; Ballesio, Jorge; Appignani, Peter L.; Karns, James J.

    1995-01-01

    The application of the probabilistic risk assessment methodology to a Space Shuttle environment, particularly to the potential of losing the Shuttle during nominal operation is addressed. The different related concerns are identified and combined to determine overall program risks. A fault tree model is used to allocate system probabilities to the subsystem level. The loss of the vehicle due to failure to contain energetic gas and debris, to maintain proper propulsion and configuration is analyzed, along with the loss due to Orbiter, external tank failure, and landing failure or error.

  4. Cell polarity proteins and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Mruk, Dolores; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-11-01

    When the cross-section of a seminiferous tubule from an adult rat testes is examined microscopically, Sertoli cells and germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium are notably polarized cells. For instance, Sertoli cell nuclei are found near the basement membrane. On the other hand, tight junction (TJ), basal ectoplasmic specialization (basal ES, a testis-specific actin-rich anchoring junction), gap junction (GJ) and desmosome that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) are also located near the basement membrane. The BTB, in turn, divides the epithelium into the basal and the adluminal (apical) compartments. Within the epithelium, undifferentiated spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes restrictively reside in the basal compartment whereas spermatocytes and post-meiotic spermatids reside in the adluminal compartment. Furthermore, the heads of elongating/elongated spermatids point toward the basement membrane with their elongating tails toward the tubule lumen. However, the involvement of polarity proteins in this unique cellular organization, in particular the underlying molecular mechanism(s) by which polarity proteins confer cellular polarity in the seminiferous epithelium is virtually unknown until recent years. Herein, we discuss latest findings regarding the role of different polarity protein complexes or modules and how these protein complexes are working in concert to modulate Sertoli cell and spermatid polarity. These findings also illustrate polarity proteins exert their effects through the actin-based cytoskeleton mediated by actin binding and regulatory proteins, which in turn modulate adhesion protein complexes at the cell-cell interface since TJ, basal ES and GJ utilize F-actin for attachment. We also propose a hypothetical model which illustrates the antagonistic effects of these polarity proteins. This in turn provides a unique mechanism to modulate junction remodeling in the testis to support germ cell transport across the epithelium in

  5. Repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium of the rhesus monkey after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1988-03-01

    Repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium became evident from Day 75 postirradiation onward after doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy of X rays. Cell counts in cross sections of seminiferous tubules revealed that during this repopulation the numbers of Apale (Ap) spermatogonia, Adark (Ad) spermatogonia, and B spermatogonia increased simultaneously. After 0.5 Gy the number of spermatogonia increased from approximately 10% of the control level at Day 44 to 90% at Day 200. After 1.0 and 2.0 Gy the numbers of spermatogonia increased from less than 5% at Day 44 to 70% at Days 200 and 370. The number of Ad and B spermatogonia, which are considered to be resting and differentiating spermatogonia, respectively, already had increased when the number of proliferating Ap spermatogonia was still very low. This early inactivation and differentiation of a large part of the population of Ap spermatogonia slows down repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium of the primates. By studying repopulating colonies in whole mounts of seminiferous tubules various types of colonies were found. In colonies consisting of only A spermatogonia, 40% of the A spermatogonia were found to be of the Ad type, which indicates that even before the colony had differentiated, 40% of the A spermatogonia were inactivated into Ad. Differentiating colonies were also found in which one or two generations of germ cells were missing. In some of those colonies it was found that the Ap spermatogonia did not form any B spermatogonia during one or two cycles of the seminiferous epithelium, while in other colonies all Ap spermatogonia present had differentiated into B spermatogonia. This indicates that the differentiation of Ap into B spermatogonia is a stochastic process.

  6. Genomic Landscape of Developing Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2010-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly orchestrated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific gene products whose expressions are strictly regulated. In the past decade the advent of high-throughput gene expression analytical techniques has made functional genomic studies of this process, particularly in model animals such as mice and rats, feasible and practical. These studies have just begun to reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of the developing male germ cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. Among transcripts present in germ cells, 40% – 60% are uncharacterized. A number of genes, and consequently their associated biological pathways, are differentially expressed at different stages of spermatogenesis. Developing male germ cells present a rich repertoire of genetic processes. Tissue-specific as well as spermatogenesis stage-specific alternative splicing of genes exemplifies the complexity of genome expression. In addition to this layer of control, discoveries of abundant presence of antisense transcripts, expressed psuedogenes, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) including long ncRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and retrogenes all point to the presence of multiple layers of expression and functional regulation in male germ cells. It is anticipated that application of systems biology approaches will further our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of spermatogenesis.† PMID:19306351

  7. Structural differences between specific-locus mutations induced by different exposure regimes in mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Rinchik, E M

    1993-08-01

    It was first shown by W.L. Russell (1962), and confirmed by him and others, that a 24-h interval between dose fractions (but not shorter or longer ones) elevates the rate of radiation-induced spermatogonial specific-locus mutations to levels considerably above the linear extrapolation made from lower-dose results. We have now analyzed the nature of mutations induced either in previously undisturbed or in "sensitized" spermatogonial stem cells, i.e., those that received a challenging dose of X-rays 24 h following a priming dose. Results are based on molecular studies of a large set of viable albino mutations [using probes derived from the tyrosinase (c) gene and from the regions surrounding c], and on retrospective classifications of mutations at c and two additional loci into LL (large lesions), IG (intragenic mutations), and OL (other lesions), utilizing criteria developed earlier. A significant difference (P = 0.016) was found between previously undisturbed and sensitized stem-cell spermatogonia; the latter have a higher LL/IG ratio, similar to the ratio observed for mutations induced in poststem-cell stages. This finding of a qualitative difference indicates that the additional mutations produced by a 24-h fractionated treatment are the result of the second (challenging) dose. The qualitative difference, further, indicates that the mutation-rate-augmenting effects of 24-h fractionation are not due, merely, to an increase (caused by the priming dose) of a normally responsive component of the spermatogonial population. The finding that the additional mutations that are produced by the challenging dose are primarily large DNA lesions suggests that the nuclear state of sensitized stem-cell spermatogonia may be different from the state of previously undisturbed spermatogonia. This state, which appears to be similar to that of postspermatonial stages, may be conducive to the formation of LLs, even by agents that are not LL inducers in other systems. The results

  8. Expression of cubilin in mouse testes and Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Seo, J T; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2016-04-01

    Cubilin (cubn) is a receptor for vitamins and various protein ligands. Cubn lacks a transmembrane domain but anchors to apical membranes by forming complexes with Amnionless or Megalin. In an effort to better understand the uptake of nutrients in testis, we analysed cubn expression in the developing mice testes. In testes, cubn mRNA increased from birth to adulthood. In the inter-stitium and isolated seminiferous tubules, neonatal increase in cubn mRNA until 14 days post-partum (pp) was followed by a marked increase at puberty (28 days pp). Cubn was found in the gonocytes, spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testes. In adult testes, strong Cubn immunoreactivity was found in the elongating spermatids, suggesting the role of Cubn in endocytosis during early spermiogenesis. In Sertoli cells and peritubular cells, Cubn immunoreactivity was weak throughout the testis development. In the inter-stitium, Cubn immunoreactivity was found in foetal Leydig cells, was weak to negligible in the stem cells and progenitor Leydig cells and was strong in immature and adult Leydig cells, demonstrating a positive association between Cubn and steroidogenic activity of Leydig cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Cubn may participate in the endocytotic uptake of nutrients in germ cells and somatic cells, supporting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in mouse testes.

  9. Over Expression of NANOS3 and DAZL in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Panula, Sarita; Reda, Ahmed; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Ramathal, Cyril; Sukhwani, Meena; Albalushi, Halima; Edsgärd, Daniel; Nakamura, Michiko; Söder, Olle; Orwig, Kyle E.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Reijo Pera, Renee A.; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying human germ cell development are largely unknown, partly due to the scarcity of primordial germ cells and the inaccessibility of the human germline to genetic analysis. Human embryonic stem cells can differentiate to germ cells in vitro and can be genetically modified to study the genetic requirements for germ cell development. Here, we studied NANOS3 and DAZL, which have critical roles in germ cell development in several species, via their over expression in human embryonic stem cells using global transcriptional analysis, in vitro germ cell differentiation, and in vivo germ cell formation assay by xenotransplantation. We found that NANOS3 over expression prolonged pluripotency and delayed differentiation. In addition, we observed a possible connection of NANOS3 with inhibition of apoptosis. For DAZL, our results suggest a post-transcriptional regulation mechanism in hES cells. In addition, we found that DAZL suppressed the translation of OCT4, and affected the transcription of several genes associated with germ cells, cell cycle arrest, and cell migration. Furthermore, DAZL over expressed cells formed spermatogonia-like colonies in a rare instance upon xenotransplantation. These data can be used to further elucidate the role of NANOS3 and DAZL in germ cell development both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27768780

  10. Postnatal testis development, Sertoli cell proliferation and number of different spermatogonial types in C57BL/6J mice made transiently hypo- and hyperthyroidic during the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Auharek, Sarah Alves; de França, Luiz Renato

    2010-05-01

    The role of thyroid hormones in testis structure and function has been fairly well studied in laboratory rodents. However, there are no comprehensive data in the literature for mice regarding the effects of transiently induced neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on testis and spermatogonial cell development from birth to adulthood. Our goals were to evaluate the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) and triidothyronine (T3) on Sertoli cell proliferation/differentiation and to correlate these events with the evolution of the spermatogenic process, tubular lumen formation, blood vessel volume density, and size and number of different spermatogonial types. Although Sertoli cell maturation was accelerated or delayed, respectively, in T3- and PTU-treated mice, the pace of the germ cell maturation was only slightly altered before puberty and the period of Sertoli cell proliferation was apparently not affected by the treatments. However, compared with controls, the total number of Sertoli cells per testis from 10 days of age to adulthood was significantly increased and decreased in PTU- and T3-treated mice, respectively. In comparison to all other spermatogonia, type A(2) was the largest cell in all ages and groups investigated. The PTU-treated mice had a significantly increased total number of undifferentiated spermatogonia as well as volume and percentage of vessels/capillaries, probably due to the higher number of Sertoli cells, particularly at 10 days of age. Taken together, our results suggest that neonatal hypothyroidism may be a valuable tool for studying spermatogonial biology as well as a means for providing more spermatogonial stem cells that could potentially be used for spermatogonial transplantation, thereby optimizing the efficiency of this technique when young mice are used as donors.

  11. Periodic retinoic acid-STRA8 signaling intersects with periodic germ-cell competencies to regulate spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tsutomu; Romer, Katherine A; Anderson, Ericka L; Baltus, Andrew E; de Rooij, Dirk G; Page, David C

    2015-05-05

    Mammalian spermatogenesis--the transformation of stem cells into millions of haploid spermatozoa--is elaborately organized in time and space. We explored the underlying regulatory mechanisms by genetically and chemically perturbing spermatogenesis in vivo, focusing on spermatogonial differentiation, which begins a series of amplifying divisions, and meiotic initiation, which ends these divisions. We first found that, in mice lacking the retinoic acid (RA) target gene Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), undifferentiated spermatogonia accumulated in unusually high numbers as early as 10 d after birth, whereas differentiating spermatogonia were depleted. We thus conclude that Stra8, previously shown to be required for meiotic initiation, also promotes (but is not strictly required for) spermatogonial differentiation. Second, we found that injection of RA into wild-type adult males induced, independently, precocious spermatogonial differentiation and precocious meiotic initiation; thus, RA acts instructively on germ cells at both transitions. Third, the competencies of germ cells to undergo spermatogonial differentiation or meiotic initiation in response to RA were found to be distinct, periodic, and limited to particular seminiferous stages. Competencies for both transitions begin while RA levels are low, so that the germ cells respond as soon as RA levels rise. Together with other findings, our results demonstrate that periodic RA-STRA8 signaling intersects with periodic germ-cell competencies to regulate two distinct, cell-type-specific responses: spermatogonial differentiation and meiotic initiation. This simple mechanism, with one signal both starting and ending the amplifying divisions, contributes to the prodigious output of spermatozoa and to the elaborate organization of spermatogenesis.

  12. Apoptosis and autophagy as mechanisms of dinoflagellate symbiont release during cnidarian bleaching: every which way you lose.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Simon R; Schnitzler, Christine E; Weis, Virginia M

    2007-12-22

    Cnidarian bleaching results from the breakdown in the symbiosis between the host cnidarian and its dinoflagellate symbiont. Coral bleaching in recent years has increasingly caused degradation and mortality of coral reefs on a global scale. Although much is understood about the environmental causes of bleaching, the underlying cellular mechanisms of symbiont release that drive the process are just beginning to be described. In this study, we investigated the roles of two cellular pathways, host cell apoptosis and autophagy, in the bleaching process of the symbiotic anemone Aiptasia pallida. Host cell apoptosis was experimentally manipulated using gene knockdown of an anemone caspase by RNA interference, chemical inhibition of caspase using ZVAD-fmk and an apoptosis-inducer wortmannin. Autophagy was manipulated by chemical inhibition using wortmannin or induction using rapamycin. The applications of multiple single treatments resulted in some increased bleaching in anemones under control conditions but no significant drop in bleaching in individuals subjected to a hyperthermic stress. These results indicated that no single pathway is responsible for symbiont release during bleaching. However, when multiple inhibitors were applied simultaneously to block both apoptosis and autophagy, there was a significant reduction in bleaching in heat-stressed anemones. Our results allow us to formulate a model for cellular processes involved in the control of cnidarian bleaching where apoptosis and autophagy act together in a see-saw mechanism such that if one is inhibited the other is induced. Similar interconnectivity between apoptosis and autophagy has previously been shown in vertebrates including involvement in an innate immune response to pathogens and parasites. This suggests that the bleaching response could be a modified immune response that recognizes and removes dysfunctional symbionts.

  13. Severe Salt-Losing Syndrome and Hyperkalemia Induced by Adult Nephron-Specific Knockout of the Epithelial Sodium Channel α-Subunit.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Romain; Boscardin, Emilie; Malsure, Sumedha; Sergi, Chloé; Maillard, Marc P; Loffing, Johannes; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Sørensen, Mads Vaarby; Koesters, Robert; Rossier, Bernard C; Frateschi, Simona; Hummler, Edith

    2016-08-01

    Systemic pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-1) is a severe salt-losing syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and characterized by neonatal life-threatening hypovolemia and hyperkalemia. The very high plasma aldosterone levels detected under hypovolemic or hyperkalemic challenge can lead to increased or decreased sodium reabsorption, respectively, through the Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). However, the role of ENaC deficiency remains incompletely defined, because constitutive inactivation of individual ENaC subunits is neonatally lethal in mice. We generated adult inducible nephron-specific αENaC-knockout mice (Scnn1a(Pax8/LC1)) that exhibit hyperkalemia and body weight loss when kept on a regular-salt diet, thus mimicking PHA-1. Compared with control mice fed a regular-salt diet, knockout mice fed a regular-salt diet exhibited downregulated expression and phosphorylation of NCC protein, despite high plasma aldosterone levels. In knockout mice fed a high-sodium and reduced-potassium diet (rescue diet), although plasma aldosterone levels remained significantly increased, NCC expression returned to control levels, and body weight, plasma and urinary electrolyte concentrations, and excretion normalized. Finally, shift to a regular diet after the rescue diet reinstated the symptoms of severe PHA-1 syndrome and significantly reduced NCC phosphorylation. In conclusion, lack of ENaC-mediated sodium transport along the nephron cannot be compensated for by other sodium channels and/or transporters, only by a high-sodium and reduced-potassium diet. We further conclude that hyperkalemia becomes the determining factor in regulating NCC activity, regardless of sodium loss, in the ENaC-mediated salt-losing PHA-1 phenotype.

  14. Candida and candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: where commensalism, opportunistic behavior and frank pathogenicity lose their borders.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Antonio; Cauda, Roberto

    2012-07-31

    In this era of efficacious antiretroviral therapy and consequent immune reconstitution, oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis (OPC and OEC) still remain two clinically relevant presentations in the global HIV setting. Both diseases are predominantly caused by Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus which is a commensal microbe in the healthy individual but can become an aggressive pathogen in a debilitated host. Actually, C. albicans commensalism is not the result of a benign behavior of one of the many components of human microbiota, but rather the result of host's potent innate and adaptive immune responses that restrict the growth of a potentially dangerous microrganism on the epithelia. An important asset guarding against the fungus is the Th17 functional subset of T helper cells. The selective loss of these cells with the progression of HIV infection causes the decay of fungal containment on the oral epithelium and allows C. albicans to express its pathogenic potential. An important part of this potential is represented by mechanisms to evade host immunity and enhance inflammation and immunoactivation. In C. albicans, these mechanisms are mostly incorporated into and expressed by characteristic morphogenic transitions such as the yeast-to-hyphal growth and the white-to-opaque switch. In addition, HIV infection generates an 'environment' selecting for overexpression of the virulence potential by the fungus, particularly concerning the secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps). These enzymes can degrade critical host defense components such as complement and epithelial defensive proteins such as histatin-5 and E-cadherin. It appears that part of this enhanced Candida virulence could be induced by the binding of the fungus to HIV and/or induced by HIV proteins such as GP160 and tat. Both OPC and OEC can be controlled by old and new antimycotics, but in the absence of host collaboration, anticandidal therapy may become ineffective in the long run. For these reasons

  15. Immunolocalization of aromatase in stallion Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules.

    PubMed

    Sipahutar, Herbert; Sourdaine, Pascal; Moslemi, Safa; Plainfossé, Bruno; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2003-03-01

    High levels of plasma estrogens constitute an endocrine peculiarity of the adult stallion. This is mostly due to testicular cytochrome p450 aromatase, the only irreversible enzyme responsible for the bioconversion of androgens into estrogens. To identify more precisely the testicular aromatase synthesis sites in the stallion, testes from nine horses (2-5 years) were obtained during winter or spring. Paraplast-embedded sections were processed using rabbit anti-equine aromatase, followed by biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibodies, and amplified with a streptavidin-peroxidase complex. Immunoreactivity was detected with diaminobenzidine. Immunofluorescence detection, using fluoroisothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies, was also applied. Specific aromatase immunoreactivity was observed intensely in Leydig cells but also for the first time, to a lesser extent, in the cytoplasm surrounding germ cells at the junction with Sertoli cells. Interestingly, the immunoreactivity in Sertoli cells appears to vary with the spermatogenic stages in the basal compartment (with spermatogonia) as well as in the adluminal one (with spermatids). Relative staining intensity in Leydig and Sertoli cells and testicular microsomal aromatase activity increased with age. The present study in stallions indicates that in addition to Leydig cells, Sertoli cells also appear to participate in estrogen synthesis, and this could play a paracrine role in the regulation of spermatogenesis.

  16. Cell Polarity As A Regulator of Cancer Cell Behavior Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Senthil K; Xue, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is an evolutionarily conserved process that facilitates asymmetric distribution of organelles and proteins, is an evolutionarily conserved property that is modified dynamically during physiological processes such as cell division, migration, and morphogenesis. The plasticity with which cells change their behavior and phenotype in response to cell intrinsic and extrinsic cues is an essential feature of normal physiology. In disease states such as cancer, cells lose their ability to behave normally in response to physiological cues. A molecular understanding of mechanisms that alter the behavior of cancer cells is limited. Cell polarity proteins are an recognized class of molecules that can receive and interpret both intrinsic and extrinsic signals to modulate cell behavior. In this review, we discuss how cell polarity proteins regulate a diverse array of biological processes and how they can contribute to alterations in the behavior of cancer cells. PMID:22881459

  17. Insights into female germ cell biology: from in vivo development to in vitro derivations

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dajung; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of human germ cell biology is important for developing infertility treatments. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate human gametogenesis due to the difficulties in collecting samples, especially germ cells during fetal development. In contrast to the mitotic arrest of spermatogonia stem cells in the fetal testis, female germ cells proceed into meiosis and began folliculogenesis in fetal ovaries. Regulations of these developmental events, including the initiation of meiosis and the endowment of primordial follicles, remain an enigma. Studying the molecular mechanisms of female germ cell biology in the human ovary has been mostly limited to spatiotemporal characterizations of genes or proteins. Recent efforts in utilizing in vitro differentiation system of stem cells to derive germ cells have allowed researchers to begin studying molecular mechanisms during human germ cell development. Meanwhile, the possibility of isolating female germline stem cells in adult ovaries also excites researchers and generates many debates. This review will mainly focus on presenting and discussing recent in vivo and in vitro studies on female germ cell biology in human. The topics will highlight the progress made in understanding the three main stages of germ cell developments: namely, primordial germ cell formation, meiotic initiation, and folliculogenesis. PMID:25652637

  18. Insights into female germ cell biology: from in vivo development to in vitro derivations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dajung; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of human germ cell biology is important for developing infertility treatments. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate human gametogenesis due to the difficulties in collecting samples, especially germ cells during fetal development. In contrast to the mitotic arrest of spermatogonia stem cells in the fetal testis, female germ cells proceed into meiosis and began folliculogenesis in fetal ovaries. Regulations of these developmental events, including the initiation of meiosis and the endowment of primordial follicles, remain an enigma. Studying the molecular mechanisms of female germ cell biology in the human ovary has been mostly limited to spatiotemporal characterizations of genes or proteins. Recent efforts in utilizing in vitro differentiation system of stem cells to derive germ cells have allowed researchers to begin studying molecular mechanisms during human germ cell development. Meanwhile, the possibility of isolating female germline stem cells in adult ovaries also excites researchers and generates many debates. This review will mainly focus on presenting and discussing recent in vivo and in vitro studies on female germ cell biology in human. The topics will highlight the progress made in understanding the three main stages of germ cell developments: namely, primordial germ cell formation, meiotic initiation, and folliculogenesis.

  19. Colony-forming cell assay for human hematopoietic progenitor cells harvested by a novel continuous-flow cell separation method.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Chen, Hong Miao; Okada, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichiro

    2007-06-01

    In order to prove the functional potentiality of cells separated according to their densities by a novel continuous-flow cell separation method, the colony-forming cell (CFC) assay was performed on the harvested cells from peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood. The number of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, erythroid, macrophage, megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM), which are considered to be stem cells, was approximately 3% of colonies developed from the peripheral blood and approximately 4% of colonies from the umbilical cord blood. It appears that this new method could allow us for harvesting of hematopoietic progenitor cells without losing their native ability to proliferate.

  20. Effect of an acute exposure of rat testes to gamma rays on germ cells and on Sertoli and Leydig cell functions.

    PubMed

    Pinon-Lataillade, G; Viguier-Martinez, M C; Touzalin, A M; Maas, J; Jégou, B

    1991-01-01

    Germ cells and Sertoli and Leydig cell functions were studied from 7 to 180 days after an acute exposure of 2-month-old rat testes to 9 Gy of gamma rays. Body weight, testis and epididymal weights were recorded. Sertoli cell parameters (androgen-binding protein, ABP, in caput epididymis and plasma follicle stimulating hormone, FSH) and Leydig cell parameters (plasma luteinizing hormone, LH, testosterone and prostate and seminal vesicle weights) were determined together with the number of germ cells and Sertoli cells. Irradiation did not affect body weight but significantly reduced testicular and epididymal weights from day 7 and day 15 post-irradiation respectively. The cells killed by irradiation were mainly spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes engaged in replicating their DNA at the time of exposure, but all spermatocytes seemed damaged as they gave abnormal descendent cells. By day 34, only elongated spermatids remained in a few tubules and thereafter very little regeneration of the seminiferous epithelium occurred, except for one rat which showed a better regeneration. Levels of ABP decreased by day 15 when the germ cell depletion had reached the pachytene spermatocytes, whereas FSH and LH levels rose when the number of elongated spermatids decreased. Levels of testosterone and the weight of the seminal vesicles did not change; occasionally, the prostate weight was slightly reduced. These results support our hypothesis that pachytene spermatocytes and elongated spermatids are involved in influencing some aspects of Sertoli cell function in the adult rat.

  1. Regulatory influence of germ cells on sertoli cell function in the pre-pubertal rat after acute irradiation of the testis.

    PubMed

    Guitton, N; Touzalin, A M; Sharpe, R M; Cheng, C Y; Pinon-Lataillade, G; Méritte, H; Chenal, C; Jégou, B

    2000-12-01

    While germ cell regulation of Sertoli cells has been extensively explored in adult rats in vivo, in contrast, very little is known about germ cell influence on Sertoli cell function at the time when spermatogenesis begins and develops. In the present study various Sertoli cell parameters (number, testicular androgen binding protein (ABP) and testin, serum inhibin-B and, indirectly, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)) were investigated after the exposure of 19-day-old rats to a low dose of 3 Grays of gamma-rays. Differentiated spermatogonia were the primary testicular targets of the gamma-rays, which resulted in progressive maturation depletion, sequentially and reversibly affecting all germ cell classes. Testicular weight declined to a nadir when pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids were depleted from the seminiferous epithelium and complete or near complete recovery of spermatogenesis and testicular weight was observed at the end of the experiment. Blood levels of FSH and ABP were normal during the first 11 days after irradiation, when spermatogonia and early spermatocytes were depleted. While the number of Sertoli cells was not significantly affected by the irradiation, from days 11-66 after gamma-irradiation, ABP production declined and FSH levels increased when pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids were depleted and the recovery of these parameters was only observed when spermatogenesis was fully restored. Comparison of the pattern of change in serum levels of inhibin-B and testicular levels of testin and of germ cell numbers strongly suggest a relationship between the disappearance of spermatocytes and spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium and the decrease in levels of inhibin-B and increase in levels of testin from 7 to 36 days post-irradiation. Levels of testin and inhibin-B were restored before spermatogenesis had totally returned to normal. In conclusion, this in vivo study shows that pre-pubertal Sertoli cell function is under the complex control

  2. Germ cell DNA quantification shortly after IR laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, D; Carrasco, F; Diaz, F; Perez-de-Vargas, I

    1991-01-01

    The immediate effect of IR laser radiation on rat germ cells was studied by cytophotometric quantification of the nuclear DNA content in testicular sections. Two different levels of radiation were studied: one according to clinical application (28.05 J/cm2) and another known to increase the germ cell number (46.80 J/cm2). The laser beam induced changes in the germ cell DNA content depending on the cell type, the cell cycle phase and the doses of radiation energy applied. Following irradiation at both doses the percentage of spermatogonia showing a 4c DNA content was increased, while the percentage of these with a 2c DNA content was decreased. Likewise, the percentages of primary spermatocytes with a DNA content equal to 4c (at 28.05 J/cm2), between 2c and 4c (at 46.80 J/cm2) and higher than 4c (at both doses) were increased. No change in the mean spermatid DNA content was observed. Nevertheless, at 46.80 J/cm2 the percentages of elongated spermatids with a c or 2c DNA content differed from the controls. Data show that, even at laser radiation doses used in therapy, the germ cell DNA content is increased shortly after IR laser radiation.

  3. Biology and identity of fish spermatogonial stem cell.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Samyra Maria dos Santos Nassif; Costa, Guilherme Mattos Jardim; de França, Luiz Renato

    2014-10-01

    Although present at relatively low number in the testis, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are crucial for the establishment and maintenance of spermatogenesis in eukaryotes and, until recently, those cells were investigated in fish using morphological criteria. The isolation and characterization of these cells in fish have been so far limited by the lack of specific molecular markers, hampering the high SSCs biotechnological potential for aquaculture. However, some highly conserved vertebrate molecular markers, such as Gfra1 and Pou5f1/Oct4, are now available representing important candidates for studies evaluating the regulation of SSCs in fish and even functional investigations using germ cells transplantation. A technique already used to demonstrate that, different from mammals, fish germ stem cells (spermatogonia and oogonia) present high sexual plasticity that is determined by the somatic microenvironment. As relatively well established in mammals, and demonstrated in zebrafish and dogfish, this somatic environment is very important for the preferential location and regulation of SSCs. Importantly, a long-term in vitro culture system for SSCs has been now established for some fish species. Therefore, besides the aforementioned possibilities, such culture system would allow the development of strategies to in vitro investigate key regulatory and functional aspects of germline stem cells (ex: self-renewal and/or differentiation) or to amplify SSCs of rare, endangered, or commercially valuable fish species, representing an important tool for transgenesis and the development of new biotechnologies in fish production.

  4. Potential spermatogenesis recovery with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in an azoospermic rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deying; Liu, Xing; Peng, Jinpu; He, Dawei; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Jing; Li, Xuliang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Guanghui

    2014-07-24

    Non-obstructive azoospermia is the most challenging type of male infertility. Stem cell based therapy provides the potential to enhance the recovery of spermatogenesis following cancer therapy. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) possess the potential to differentiate or trans-differentiate into multi-lineage cells, secrete paracrine factors to recruit the resident stem cells to participate in tissue regeneration, or fuse with the local cells in the affected region. In this study, we tested whether spermatogenically-induced BMSCs can restore spermatogenesis after administration of an anticancer drug. Allogeneic BMSCs were co-cultured in conditioned media derived from cultured testicular Sertoli cells in vitro, and then induced stem cells were transplanted into the seminiferous tubules of a busulfan-induced azoospermatic rat model for 8 weeks. The in vitro induced BMSCs exhibited specific spermatogonic gene and protein markers, and after implantation the donor cells survived and located at the basement membranes of the recipient seminiferous tubules, in accordance with what are considered the unique biological characteristics of spermatogenic stem cells. Molecular markers of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogonia (Vasa, Stella, SMAD1, Dazl, GCNF, HSP90α, integrinβ1, and c-kit) were expressed in the recipient testis tissue. No tumor mass, immune response, or inflammatory reaction developed. In conclusion, BMSCs might provide the potential to trans-differentiate into spermatogenic-like-cells, enhancing endogenous fertility recovery. The present study indicates that BMSCs might offer alternative treatment for the patients with azoospermatic infertility after cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Effects of male germ-cell stage on the frequency, nature, and spectrum of induced specific-locus mutations in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B

    2004-09-01

    By means of the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) with visible markers, which is capable of detecting intragenic mutations as well as larger lesions, about 20 mutagens have been studied comparatively across arrays of male germ-cell stages. In addition, a very large historical control, accumulated over decades, provides data on spontaneous mutations in males. Each mutagen has a characteristic germ-cell-stage sensitivity pattern. Although most chemicals yield their maximum numbers of mutations following exposure of spermatozoa and late spermatids, mutagens have now been identified that peak in each of the major stages of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis, including those in which effects on recombination can also be induced. Stem-cell spermatogonia have yielded positive results with only five of 15 mutagenic chemicals. In postspermatogonial stages, all chemicals, as well as radiations, induce primarily large lesions (LL). By contrast, in spermatogonia (either stem-cell or differentiating) all chemicals except one (bleomycin) produce very few such lesions. The spectrum of relative mutation frequencies at the seven loci of the SLT is characteristic for treated germ-cell stage and mutagen. Treatments that induce primarily LL are characterized by a great preponderance of s (Ednrb)-locus mutations (possibly due to a paucity of haplo-insufficient genes in the surrounding region); and those that induce very few, if any, LL by a great preponderance of p-locus mutations. Spontaneous locus-spectra differ from both types of treatment-induced spectra; moreover, there are two distinct types of spontaneous spectra, depending on whether mutations occurred in mitotic cells or during the perigametic interval.

  6. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  7. Multispecies Purification of Testicular Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana C; Jung, Min; Rusch, Jannette; Usmani, Abul; Lopes, Alexandra; Conrad, Donald F

    2016-08-24

    Advanced methods of cellular purification are required to apply genome technology to the study of spermatogenesis. One approach, based on flow cytometry of murine testicular cells stained with Hoechst-33342 (Ho-FACS), has been extensively optimized and currently allows the isolation of 9 germ cell types. This staining technique is straightforward to implement, highly effective at purifying specific germ cell types and yields sufficient cell numbers for high throughput studies. Ho-FACS is a technique that does not require species-specific markers, but whose applicability to other species is largely unexplored. We hypothesized that, due to the similar cell physiology of spermatogenesis across mammals, Ho-FACS could be used to produce highly purified subpopulations of germ cells in mammals other than mouse. To test this hypothesis, we applied Ho-FACS to 4 mammalian species that are widely used in testis research - Rattus norvegicus, Cavia porcellus, Canis familiaris and Sus scrofa domesticus We successfully isolated 4 germ cell populations from these species with average purity of 79% for spermatocytes, and 90% for spermatids and 66% for spermatogonia. Additionally, we compare the performance of mechanical and chemical dissociation for each species, and propose an optimized gating strategy to better discriminate round and elongating spermatids in the mouse, which can potentially be applied to other species. Our work indicates that spermatogenesis may be uniquely accessible among mammalian developmental systems, as a single set of reagents may be sufficient to isolate germ cell populations from many different mammalian species, opening new avenues in the fields of development and male reproductive biology.

  8. Revealing Transcriptome Landscape of Mouse Spermatogonial Cells by Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap.; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Spermatogenesis is a highly regulated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific events through tightly regulated gene expression programs. In the past decade the advent of microarray technologies has allowed functional genomic studies of male germ cell development, resulting in the identification of genes governing various processes. A major limitation with conventional gene expression microarray is that there is a bias from gene probe design. The gene probes for expression microarrays are usually represented by a small number probes located at the 3’ end of a transcirpt. Tiling microarrays eliminate such issue by interrogating the genome in an unbiased fashion through probes tiled for the entire genome. These arrays provide a higher genomic resolution and allow identification of novel transcripts. To reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of developing male germ cells, we applied tiling microarray to evaluate the transcriptome in spermatogonial cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. More than 47% of transcripts are uncharacterized. The results suggested the transcription machinery in spermaotogonial cells are more complex than previously envisioned. PMID:22144238

  9. Cell Division Drives Epithelial Cell Rearrangements during Gastrulation in Chick.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Joao; Rocancourt, Didier; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Moreau, Chloe; Gros, Jerome

    2016-02-08

    During early embryonic development, cells are organized as cohesive epithelial sheets that are continuously growing and remodeled without losing their integrity, giving rise to a wide array of tissue shapes. Here, using live imaging in chick embryo, we investigate how epithelial cells rearrange during gastrulation. We find that cell division is a major rearrangement driver that powers dramatic epithelial cell intercalation events. We show that these cell division-mediated intercalations, which represent the majority of epithelial rearrangements within the early embryo, are absolutely necessary for the spatial patterning of gastrulation movements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these intercalation events result from overall low cortical actomyosin accumulation within the epithelial cells of the embryo, which enables dividing cells to remodel junctions in their vicinity. These findings uncover a role for cell division as coordinator of epithelial growth and remodeling that might underlie various developmental, homeostatic, or pathological processes in amniotes.

  10. A Comparison Model of Reinforcement-Learning and Win-Stay-Lose-Shift Decision-Making Processes: A Tribute to W.K. Estes.

    PubMed

    Worthy, Darrell A; Maddox, W Todd

    2014-04-01

    W.K. Estes often championed an approach to model development whereby an existing model was augmented by the addition of one or more free parameters, and a comparison between the simple and more complex, augmented model determined whether the additions were justified. Following this same approach we utilized Estes' (1950) own augmented learning equations to improve the fit and plausibility of a win-stay-lose-shift (WSLS) model that we have used in much of our recent work. Estes also championed models that assumed a comparison between multiple concurrent cognitive processes. In line with this, we develop a WSLS-Reinforcement Learning (RL) model that assumes that the output of a WSLS process that provides a probability of staying or switching to a different option based on the last two decision outcomes is compared with the output of an RL process that determines a probability of selecting each option based on a comparison of the expected value of each option. Fits to data from three different decision-making experiments suggest that the augmentations to the WSLS and RL models lead to a better account of decision-making behavior. Our results also support the assertion that human participants weigh the output of WSLS and RL processes during decision-making.

  11. Psychological and social consequences of losing a child in a natural or human-made disaster: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Herrman, Helen; Tsutsumi, Atsuro; Fisher, Jane

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to natural and human-made disasters is associated with long-term health consequences, including for mental health. Parents who have lost children, particularly their only children, in any circumstances are also at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The aim of this study was to review the available evidence about the psychological and social consequences for parents who had faced these circumstances simultaneously through losing children in a disaster. Systematic searching of the English and Chinese language literatures about the psychological and social functioning of bereaved parents after disasters revealed that a small number of studies met inclusion criteria. The results showed that bereaved parents had more mental health problems than bereaved spouses and non-bereaved parents, and mothers appeared to be more vulnerable to mental health problems than fathers. Potential protective factors for bereaved parents' mental health included having psychological interventions, having adequate social support, seeing their children's bodies and having a subsequent baby. Although the literature was modest and methodologically diverse, there was a consistent finding that parents who have lost children in disasters were at high risk of suffering mental health problems, especially bereaved mothers. As there was little evidence, further studies are needed to understand the best advice and interventions to offer bereaved parents and provide enhanced mental health care of such bereaved populations after disasters.

  12. A Comparison Model of Reinforcement-Learning and Win-Stay-Lose-Shift Decision-Making Processes: A Tribute to W.K. Estes

    PubMed Central

    Worthy, Darrell A.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2013-01-01

    W.K. Estes often championed an approach to model development whereby an existing model was augmented by the addition of one or more free parameters, and a comparison between the simple and more complex, augmented model determined whether the additions were justified. Following this same approach we utilized Estes’ (1950) own augmented learning equations to improve the fit and plausibility of a win-stay-lose-shift (WSLS) model that we have used in much of our recent work. Estes also championed models that assumed a comparison between multiple concurrent cognitive processes. In line with this, we develop a WSLS-Reinforcement Learning (RL) model that assumes that the output of a WSLS process that provides a probability of staying or switching to a different option based on the last two decision outcomes is compared with the output of an RL process that determines a probability of selecting each option based on a comparison of the expected value of each option. Fits to data from three different decision-making experiments suggest that the augmentations to the WSLS and RL models lead to a better account of decision-making behavior. Our results also support the assertion that human participants weigh the output of WSLS and RL processes during decision-making. PMID:25214675

  13. Heterogeneity of strategy use in the Iowa gambling task: a comparison of win-stay/lose-shift and reinforcement learning models.

    PubMed

    Worthy, Darrell A; Hawthorne, Melissa J; Otto, A Ross

    2013-04-01

    The Iowa gambling task (IGT) has been used in numerous studies, often to examine decision-making performance in different clinical populations. Reinforcement learning (RL) models such as the expectancy valence (EV) model have often been used to characterize choice behavior in this work, and accordingly, parameter differences from these models have been used to examine differences in decision-making processes between different populations. These RL models assume a strategy whereby participants incrementally update the expected rewards for each option and probabilistically select options with higher expected rewards. Here we show that a formal model that assumes a win-stay/lose-shift (WSLS) strategy--which is sensitive only to the outcome of the previous choice--provides the best fit to IGT data from about half of our sample of healthy young adults, and that a prospect valence learning (PVL) model that utilizes a decay reinforcement learning rule provides the best fit to the other half of the data. Further analyses suggested that the better fits of the WSLS model to many participants' data were not due to an enhanced ability of the WSLS model to mimic the RL strategy assumed by the PVL and EV models. These results suggest that WSLS is a common strategy in the IGT and that both heuristic-based and RL-based models should be used to inform decision-making behavior in the IGT and similar choice tasks.

  14. Losing Sleep over Student Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, France A.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past year, a number of journals have reprised many of the questions plaguing higher education--providing a full year's worth of sleepless nights. While each of these issues justifies considerable dialogue and attention, the one issue on which parents, students, the public, and educators can agree is the importance--and the challenge--of…

  15. Why Should I Lose Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... high in added sugars, saturated and trans fats, sodium and calories. • Avoid pastries, sugar-sweetened beverages, candy bars, pies and cakes. (continued) ANSWERS by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction Fitness + Weight Management • Drink lots of water. • Limit alcohol and other ...

  16. Environmental science: Oceans lose oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen is essential to most life in the ocean. An analysis shows that oxygen levels have declined by 2% in the global ocean over the past five decades, probably causing habitat loss for many fish and invertebrate species. See Letter p.335

  17. Use it or lose it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatheway, Alson E.

    2014-11-01

    Brutus to Cassius in Julius Caesar: "There is a tide in the affairs of men which taken at the flood leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries." - W. Shakespeare

  18. When Directors Lose Their Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2011-01-01

    Directors of early childhood programs are an amazing lot! There's so much dedication, such hard work and creative problem solving. But then that inevitable undertow of deadlines, crises, and illness begins to suck directors down. With crisis management becoming a way of life, they don't even recognize their vital signs slipping away. The author…

  19. How to Lose Your Charter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    In this scholarly commentary, the author examines the major reasons U.S. charter schools have closed since 1992. The commentary provides examples of charter school failures in high-frequency areas, such as financial and organizational mismanagement, and academic underperformance; it further identifies two subcategories of academic risk:…

  20. A role of KIT receptor signaling for proliferation and differentiation of rat stem Leydig cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiwen; Chen, Xiaomin; Wang, Yiyan; Li, Linxi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Chen, Haolin; Guo, Jingjing; Lin, Han; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2017-03-15

    In the testis, KIT ligand (KITL, also called stem cell factor) is expressed by Sertoli cells and its receptor (c-kit, KIT) is expressed by spermatogonia and Leydig cells. Although KITL-KIT signaling is critical for the spermatogenesis, its roles in Leydig cell development during puberty are not clear. In the present study, we investigated effects of KITL on stem Leydig cell proliferation and differentiation. Using an in vitro culture system of seminiferous tubules from Leydig cell-depleted testis, we found that KITL increased the proliferation activity of putative stem Leydig cells at higher concentration (10 and 100 ng/ml). Low concentration (1 ng/ml) of KITL significantly induced the differentiation of stem Leydig cells via increasing the expression level of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star). In contrast, higher concentration (100 ng/ml) of KITL inhibited the differentiation of stem Leydig cells via inhibiting the steroidogenic enzyme (Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1, and Hsd17b3) expression levels. We cultured rat progenitor Leydig cells with KITL for 48 h and did not find any influence of KITL on the proliferation and androgen production of these cells. In conclusion, KITL is a growth factor that regulates the development of the stem Leydig cell.

  1. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Zarkower, David

    2016-01-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  2. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2016-09-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion.

  3. Proliferation in culture of primordial germ cells derived from embryonic stem cell: induction by retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Makoolati, Zohreh; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Forouzandeh-Moghadam, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    An in vitro system that supports primordial germ cells (PGCs) survival and proliferation is useful for enhancement of these cells and efficient transplantation in infertility disorders. One approach is cultivation of PGCs under proper conditions that allow self-renewal and proliferation of PGCs. For this purpose, we compared the effects of different concentrations of retinoic acid (RA), and the effect of PGCs co-culture (Co-C) with SIM mouse embryo-derived thioguanine- and ouabain-resistant (STO) cells on the proliferation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-derived PGCs. One-day-old embryoid body (EB) was cultured for 4 days in simple culture system in the presence of 5 ng/ml bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) (SCB group) for PGC induction. For PGC enrichment, ESCs-derived germ cells were cultured for 7 days in the presence of different doses (0–5  μM) of RA, both in the simple and STO Co-C systems. At the end of the culture period, viability and proliferation rates were assessed and expression of mouse vasa homologue (Mvh),  α6 integrin,  β1 integrin, stimulated by retinoic acid 8 (Stra8) and piwi (Drosophila)-like 2 (Piwil2) was evaluated using quantitative PCR. Also, the inductive effects were investigated immunocytochemically with Mvh and cadherin1 (CDH1) on the selected groups. Immunocytochemistry/PCR results showed higher expression of Mvh, the PGC-specific marker, in 3  μM RA concentrations on the top of the STO feeder layer. Meanwhile, assessment of the Stra8 mRNA and CDH1 protein, the specific makers for spermatogonia, showed no significant differences between groups. Based on the results, it seems that in the presence of 3 μM RA on top of the STO feeder layer cells, the majority of the cells transdifferentiated into germ cells were PGCs. PMID:27834666

  4. Cell-specific occupancy of an extended repertoire of CREM and CREB binding loci in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CREB and CREM are closely related factors that regulate transcription in response to various stress, metabolic and developmental signals. The CREMτ activator isoform is selectively expressed in haploid spermatids and plays an essential role in murine spermiogenesis. Results We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to sequencing (ChIP-seq) to map CREM and CREB target loci in round spermatids from adult mouse testis and spermatogonia derived GC1-spg cells respectively. We identify more than 9000 genomic loci most of which are cell-specifically occupied. Despite the fact that round spermatids correspond to a highly specialised differentiated state, our results show that they have a remarkably accessible chromatin environment as CREM occupies more than 6700 target loci corresponding not only to the promoters of genes selectively expressed in spermiogenesis, but also of genes involved in functions specific to other cell types. The expression of only a small subset of these target genes are affected in the round spermatids of CREM knockout animals. We also identify a set of intergenic binding loci some of which are associated with H3K4 trimethylation and elongating RNA polymerase II suggesting the existence of novel CREB and CREM regulated transcripts. Conclusions We demonstrate that CREM and CREB occupy a large number of promoters in highly cell specific manner. This is the first study of CREM target promoters directly in a physiologically relevant tissue in vivo and represents the most comprehensive experimental analysis of CREB/CREM regulatory potential to date. PMID:20920259

  5. Mouse testis cell sorting according to DNA and mitochondrial changes during spermatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, J.M.; Ratinaud, M.H.; Cordelli, E.; Spano, M.; Julien, R.

    1995-04-01

    Flow cytometry can measure variations in DNA content and chromatin structure as well as dramatic changes in the mitochondria of germ cells during maturation from spermatogonia to elongated spermatids. Using 10-N nonyl acridine orange (NAO), an inner mitochondrial membrane dye, it is easy to follow mitochondria rearrangements. Mouse testis cells stained with the DNA fluorescent probe propidium iodide (PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry can be discriminated on the basis of their ploidy levels into five main regions corresponding to elongated spermatids, round spermatids, diploid, S-phase, and tetraploid cells. The simultaneous use of PI and NAO demonstrated the presence of cells having low and high mitochondrial content in the haploid, diploid, and tetraploid compartments. Eleven sorting windows were selected from the bivariate analysis (PI/NAO) and the corresponding cells were identified by microscopic observation. Cells were also discriminated by two parameter analysis of DNA content vs. cell diameter. The definition of seven different regions allowed us to determine NAO or rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) uptakes in each compartment. We observed that the ratio (Rh 123/NAO) dramatically changed according to the progression of cell differentiation which occurs during spermatogenesis. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shi-Fu; Yan, Jie; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Ling

    2012-10-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point.

  7. Losing without Fighting - Simple Aversive Stimulation Induces Submissiveness Typical for Social Defeat via the Action of Nitric Oxide, but Only When Preceded by an Aggression Priming Stimulus.

    PubMed

    Rillich, Jan; Stevenson, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Losing a fight (social defeat) induces submissiveness and behavioral depression in many animals, but the mechanisms are unclear. Here we investigate how the social defeat syndrome can be established as a result of experiencing aversive stimuli and the roles of neuromodulators in the process. While biogenic amines and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with reduced aggression in mammals and insects, their specific actions during conflict are unknown. Although the social defeat syndrome normally results from complex interactions, we could induce it in male crickets simply by applying aversive stimuli (AS) in an aggressive context. Aggressive crickets became immediately submissive and behaved like losers after experiencing two brief AS (light wind puffs to the cerci), but only when preceded by a priming stimulus (PS, stroking the antenna with another male antenna). Notably, submissiveness was not induced when the PS preceded the AS by more than 1 min, or when the PS followed the AS, or using a female antenna as the preceding stimulus. These findings suggest that any potentially detrimental stimulus can acquire the attribute of an aversive agonistic signal when experienced in an aggressive context. Crickets, it seems, need only to evaluate their net sensory impact rather than the qualities of a variety of complex agonistic signals. Selective drug treatments revealed that NO, but not serotonin, dopamine or octopamine, is necessary to establish the submissive status following pairing of the priming and aversive stimuli. Moreover, treatment with an NO donor also induced the social defeat syndrome, but only when combined with the PS. This confirms our hypothesis that aversive agonistic experiences accumulated by crickets during fighting invoke social defeat via the action of NO and illustrates that a relatively simple mechanism underlies the seemingly complex social decision to flee. The simple stimulus regime described here for inducing social defeat opens new avenues for

  8. Losing without Fighting - Simple Aversive Stimulation Induces Submissiveness Typical for Social Defeat via the Action of Nitric Oxide, but Only When Preceded by an Aggression Priming Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Rillich, Jan; Stevenson, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Losing a fight (social defeat) induces submissiveness and behavioral depression in many animals, but the mechanisms are unclear. Here we investigate how the social defeat syndrome can be established as a result of experiencing aversive stimuli and the roles of neuromodulators in the process. While biogenic amines and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with reduced aggression in mammals and insects, their specific actions during conflict are unknown. Although the social defeat syndrome normally results from complex interactions, we could induce it in male crickets simply by applying aversive stimuli (AS) in an aggressive context. Aggressive crickets became immediately submissive and behaved like losers after experiencing two brief AS (light wind puffs to the cerci), but only when preceded by a priming stimulus (PS, stroking the antenna with another male antenna). Notably, submissiveness was not induced when the PS preceded the AS by more than 1 min, or when the PS followed the AS, or using a female antenna as the preceding stimulus. These findings suggest that any potentially detrimental stimulus can acquire the attribute of an aversive agonistic signal when experienced in an aggressive context. Crickets, it seems, need only to evaluate their net sensory impact rather than the qualities of a variety of complex agonistic signals. Selective drug treatments revealed that NO, but not serotonin, dopamine or octopamine, is necessary to establish the submissive status following pairing of the priming and aversive stimuli. Moreover, treatment with an NO donor also induced the social defeat syndrome, but only when combined with the PS. This confirms our hypothesis that aversive agonistic experiences accumulated by crickets during fighting invoke social defeat via the action of NO and illustrates that a relatively simple mechanism underlies the seemingly complex social decision to flee. The simple stimulus regime described here for inducing social defeat opens new avenues for

  9. Does the “Silver Bullet” Lose its Shine Over the Time? Assessment of Loss of Lithium Response in a Preliminary Sample of Bipolar Disorder Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, M.; Stubbs, B.; De Berardis, D.; Iasevoli, F.; Solmi, M.; Veronese, N.; Carano, A.; Perna, G.; De Bartolomeis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though often perceived as a “silver bullet” treatment for bipolar disorder (BD), lithium has seldom reported to lose its efficacy over the time. Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess cases of refractoriness toward restarted lithium in BD patients who failed to preserve maintenance. Method: Treatment trajectories associated with re-instituted lithium following loss of achieved lithium-based maintenance in BD were retrospectively reviewed for 37 BD-I patients (median age 52 years; F:M=17:20 or 46% of the total) over an 8.1-month period on average. Results: In our sample only 4 cases (roughly 11% of the total, of whom F:M=2:2) developed refractoriness towards lithium after its discontinuation. Thirty-three controls (F:M=15:18) maintained lithium response at the time of re-institution. No statistically significant difference between cases and controls was observed with respect to a number of demographic and clinical features but for time spent before first trial ever with lithium in life (8.5 vs. 3 years; U=24.5, Z=-2.048, p=.041) and length of lithium discontinuation until new therapeutic attempt (5.5 vs. 2 years; U=8, Z=-2.927, p=.003) between cases vs. controls respectively. Tapering off of lithium was significantly faster among cases vs. controls (1 vs. 7 days; U=22, Z=-2.187), though both subgroups had worrisome high rates of poor adherence overall. Conclusion: Although intrinsic limitations of the present preliminary assessment hamper the validity and generalizability of overall results, stating the clinical relevance of the topic further prospective research is warranted. The eventual occurrence of lithium refractoriness may indeed be associated with peculiar course trajectories and therapeutic outcomes ultimately urging the prescribing clinicians to put efforts in preserving maintenance of BD in the absence of any conclusive research insight on the matter. PMID:28217142

  10. Protein synthesis and degradation are essential to regulate germline stem cell homeostasis in Drosophila testes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Lan, Xiang; Chen, Xia; Yu, Chao; Xu, Yiwen; Liu, Yujuan; Xu, Lingna; Fan, Heng-Yu; Tong, Chao

    2016-08-15

    The homeostasis of self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells is controlled by intrinsic signals and their niche. We conducted a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila testes and identified 221 genes required for germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance or differentiation. Knockdown of these genes in transit-amplifying spermatogonia and cyst cells further revealed various phenotypes. Complex analysis uncovered that many of the identified genes are involved in key steps of protein synthesis and degradation. A group of genes that are required for mRNA splicing and protein translation contributes to both GSC self-renewal and early germ cell differentiation. Loss of genes in the protein degradation pathway in cyst cells leads to testis tumors consisting of overproliferated germ cells. Importantly, in the Cullin 4-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) complex, we identified multiple proteins that are crucial to GSC self-renewal: pic/DDB1, a CRL4 linker protein, is not only required for GSC self-renewal in flies but also for maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in mice.

  11. Differentiation of zebrafish spermatogonial stem cells to functional sperm in culture.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Siegfried, Kellee R; Sakai, Noriyoshi

    2016-02-15

    Molecular dissection and chemical screening on a complex process such as spermatogenesis could be facilitated by cell culture approaches that allow easy access for experimental manipulation and live imaging of specific molecules; however, technical limitations have thus far prevented the complete reconstruction of spermatogenic events in cell culture. Here, we describe the production of functional sperm from self-renewing spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in cell culture conditions, using zebrafish testicular hyperplasia cells that accumulate early stage spermatogonia. By serially transplanting hyperplasias into immunodeficient rag1 mutant zebrafish, we succeeded in long-term maintenance and efficient production of starting material for SSC culture. Through improvements of culture conditions, we achieved efficient propagation of SSCs derived from the hyperplasia. When SSCs that underwent the SSC-propagating step for 1 month were transferred onto Sertoli feeder cells, they differentiated into functional sperm that gave rise to offspring. Oxygen at the concentration of air proved to be detrimental for sperm differentiation from SSCs, but not for propagation of SSCs. These results indicate that the whole spermatogenic process can be represented in cell culture in zebrafish, facilitating analyses of the molecular mechanisms of spermatogenesis in vertebrates.

  12. Plasticity of male germline stem cells and their applications in reproductive and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), also known as male germline stem cells, are a small subpopulation of type A spermatogonia with the potential of self-renewal to maintain stem cell pool and differentiation into spermatids in mammalian testis. SSCs are previously regarded as the unipotent stem cells since they can only give rise to sperm within the seminiferous tubules. However, this concept has recently been challenged because numerous studies have demonstrated that SSCs cultured with growth factors can acquire pluripotency to become embryonic stem-like cells. The in vivo and in vitro studies from peers and us have clearly revealed that SSCs can directly transdifferentiate into morphologic, phenotypic, and functional cells of other lineages. Direct conversion to the cells of other tissues has important significance for regenerative medicine. SSCs from azoospermia patients could be induced to differentiate into spermatids with fertilization and developmental potentials. As such, SSCs could have significant applications in both reproductive and regenerative medicine due to their unique and great potentials. In this review, we address the important plasticity of SSCs, with focuses on their self-renewal, differentiation, dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and translational medicine studies.

  13. DAZ Family Proteins, Key Players for Germ Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Wang, Lin-Qing; Yin, Shen; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    DAZ family proteins are found almost exclusively in germ cells in distant animal species. Deletion or mutations of their encoding genes usually severely impair either oogenesis or spermatogenesis or both. The family includes Boule (or Boll), Dazl (or Dazla) and DAZ genes. Boule and Dazl are situated on autosomes while DAZ, exclusive of higher primates, is located on the Y chromosome. Deletion of DAZ gene is the most common causes of infertility in humans. These genes, encoding for RNA binding proteins, contain a highly conserved RNA recognition motif and at least one DAZ repeat encoding for a 24 amino acids sequence able to bind other mRNA binding proteins. Basically, Daz family proteins function as adaptors for target mRNA transport and activators of their translation. In some invertebrate species, BOULE protein play a pivotal role in germline specification and a conserved regulatory role in meiosis. Depending on the species, DAZL is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and/or pre-meiotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes. Daz is found in fetal gonocytes, spermatogonia and spermatocytes of adult testes. Here we discuss DAZ family genes in a phylogenic perspective, focusing on the common and distinct features of these genes, and their pivotal roles during gametogenesis evolved during evolution.

  14. Separation of spermatogenic cell types using STA-PUT velocity sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jessica M; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L; Dang, Vanessa M; Berger, Shelley L; Meyer, Ralph G

    2013-10-09

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that occurs in several stages in the seminiferous tubules of the testes. Currently, there is no reliable cell culture system allowing for spermatogenic differentiation in vitro, and most biological studies of spermatogenic cells require tissue harvest from animal models like the mouse and rat. Because the testis contains numerous cell types--both non-spermatogenic (Leydig, Sertoli, myeloid, and epithelial cells) and spermatogenic (spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids, condensing spermatids and spermatozoa)--studies of the biological mechanisms involved in spermatogenesis require the isolation and enrichment of these different cell types. The STA-PUT method allows for the separation of a heterogeneous population of cells--in this case, from the testes--through a linear BSA gradient. Individual cell types sediment with different sedimentation velocity according to cell size, and fractions enriched for different cell types can be collected and utilized in further analyses. While the STA-PUT method does not result in highly pure fractions of cell types, e.g. as can be obtained with certain cell sorting methods, it does provide a much higher yield of total cells in each fraction (~1 x 10(8) cells/spermatogenic cell type from a starting population of 7-8 x 10(8) cells). This high yield method requires only specialized glassware and can be performed in any cold room or large refrigerator, making it an ideal method for labs that have limited access to specialized equipment like a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) or elutriator.

  15. Elucidating the identity and behavior of spermatogenic stem cells in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosei

    2012-09-01

    Spermatogenesis in mice and other mammalians is supported by a robust stem cell system. Stem cells maintain themselves and continue to produce progeny that will differentiate into sperm over a long period. The pioneering studies conducted from the 1950s to the 1970s, which were based largely on extensive morphological analyses, have established the fundamentals of mammalian spermatogenesis and its stem cells. The prevailing so-called A(single) (A(s)) model, which was originally established in 1971, proposes that singly isolated A(s) spermatogonia are in fact the stem cells. In 1994, the first functional stem cell assay was established based on the formation of repopulating colonies after transplantation in germ cell-depleted host testes, which substantially accelerated the understanding of spermatogenic stem cells. However, because testicular tissues are dissociated into single-cell suspension before transplantation, it was impossible to evaluate the A(s) and other classical models solely by this technique. From 2007 onwards, functional assessment of stem cells without destroying the tissue architecture has become feasible by means of pulse-labeling and live-imaging strategies. Results obtained from these experiments have been challenging the classical thought of stem cells, in which stem cells are a limited number of specialized cells undergoing asymmetric division to produce one self-renewing and one differentiating daughter cells. In contrast, the emerging data suggest that an extended and heterogeneous population of cells exhibiting different degrees of self-renewing and differentiating probabilities forms a reversible, flexible, and stochastic stem cell system as a population. These features may lead to establishment of a more universal principle on stem cells that is shared by other systems.

  16. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  17. Effects of mercury on spermatogenesis studied by velocity sedimentation cell separation and serial mating.

    PubMed

    Lee, I P; Dixon, R L

    1975-07-01

    Recently the potential toxicity of environmental mercury has become a major concern. Human tissues contain mercury due to daily environmental exposure. Nearly all of the mercury contaminating food is in the form of methylmercury complexes, due to the biotransformation of inorganic mercury. This report compares the reproductive effects of methylmercury hydroxide and mercuric chloride in male mice. The mercuric compounds were administered intraperitoneally once at a dose of 1 mg/kg (based on Hg++ concentration), or spermatogenic cells were exposed in vitro to Hg+ concentrations ranging from 10(-3) to 10(-8)M. Spermatogenic cells were separated for biochemical studies using the velocity sedimentation technique, and in vivo serial mating was used to assess fertility. The effects of CH3Hg+ or Hg++ on the uptake of 3H-thymidine by spermatogonia, 3H-uridine by early elongated spermatids, and 3H-L-leucine by late elongated spermatids were studied. These in vitro experiments indicated that at 1-(-3) m CH2HgOH reduced thymidine incorporation by spermatogonia by 40%, uridine incorporation by elongated spermatids by 39% and L-leucine incorporation by late elongated spermatids by 40%. Results obtained with HgCl2 were similar but of lesser magnitude. In vivo administration of CH3HgOH and HgCl2 significantly inhibited the uptake of thymidine, uridine and L-leucine by their respective spermatogenic cells. Fertility profiles obtained from serial mating studies indicated that the primary effect of CH3HgOH was on spermatogonial cells, premeiotic spermatocytes and early elongated spermatids, with no apparent effect on spermatozoa in testis, peididymis or vas deferentia. HgCl2 also primarily affected spermatogonial and premeiotic cells, but the effect was less than that seen with CH3HgOH. Statistical analysis indicated significant antifertility effects. Inhibition of uptake of thymidine and uridine was well correlated with the functionality of these cells as reflected in the fertility

  18. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells.

    PubMed

    Otozai, Shinji; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Oda, Shoji; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Ryo, Haruko; Sato, Ayuko; Nomura, Taisei; Mitani, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Tohru; Inohara, Hidenori; Todo, Takeshi

    2014-02-01

    Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2(-/-) males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2(-/-) and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53(-/-) fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2(-/-) fish, but negligible levels in p53(-/-) fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  19. Localization of early germ cells in a stony coral, Euphyllia ancora: potential implications for a germline stem cell system in coral gametogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikina, Shinya; Chung, Yi-Jou; Wang, Hsiang-Ming; Chiu, Yi-Ling; Shao, Zih-Fang; Lee, Yan-Horn; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2015-06-01

    Most corals exhibit annual or multiple gametogenic cycles. Thus far, coral gametogenesis has been studied in many species and locations during the past three decades; however, currently, only a few papers exist that describe the origin of germ cells, such as germline stem cells (GSCs), which support the continuous production of gametes in every reproductive cycle. To address this issue, in this study, we focused on and identified piwi gene, which has been used as a marker of germline cells, including GSCs, in various metazoans, in a scleractinian coral, Euphyllia ancora. Reverse-transcription PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that E. ancora piwi-like ( Eapiwi) is expressed in mesentery tissues where the sites of gametogenesis are located for both sexes. Immunohistochemistry with a specific antibody against Eapiwi revealed strong immunoreactivity in the spermatogonia in males and in the oogonia and early oocytes in females, demonstrating that Eapiwi could be used as an early germ cell marker in E. ancora. Subsequent immunohistochemical analyses regarding the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of early germ cells in mesentery tissues revealed that early germ cells were present throughout the year in the mesentery tissue we examined, regardless of the sexual reproductive cycle. In particular, small numbers of early germ cells were observed in specific sites of mesentery tissues with fully matured gonads in both sexes. These early germ cells were not released together with mature gametes during the spawning period and remained in the mesentery tissues. These results suggested that these early germ cells most likely serve as a reservoir of germline cells and that some of these cells would produce differentiated germ cells for the upcoming sexual reproduction period; hence, these cells would function as GSCs. Our data provide new information for understanding continuous gamete production in corals.

  20. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the fetal mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de; Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of prenatal X irradiation on postnatal development of the CBA/P mouse testis was studied. At days 14, 15 and 18 post coitus pregnant female mice were exposed to single doses of X rays ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy. Higher doses resulted in extensive loss of fetal mice. In the male offspring, at days 3 and 31 post partum, the numbers of gonocytes, type A spermatogonia and Sertoli cells per testis were determined using the disector method. Furthermore, after irradiation at day 15 post coitus, the numbers of Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelial cells and perivascular cells per testis were also determined at days 3 and 31 post partum. At day 3 post partum, the number of germ cells was decreased after irradiation at days 14 and 15 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.7 Gy was determined for the radiosensitivity of the gonocytes at day 14 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.8 Gy was determined for the gonocytes at day 15 post coitus which, however, seems to be less accurate. No accurate D{sub o} value could be determined for the gonocytes at day 18 post coitus. At day 31 post partum, the repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium as well as testis weights and tubular diameters were more affected by irradiation with increasing age of the mice at the time of irradiation. The percentage of tubular cross sections showing spermatids decreased with increasing dose after irradiation at days 15 and 18 post coitus, but not after irradiation at day 14 post coitus. Furthermore, in tubular cross sections showing spermatids, exposure of testes to 1.25 and 1.5 Gy at day 18 post coitus resulted in significantly lower numbers of spermatids per cross section when compared to those testes exposed to the same doses at day 15 post coitus. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of 4-octylphenol on germ cell number in cultured human fetal gonads.

    PubMed

    Bendsen, E; Laursen, S; Olesen, C; Westergaard, L; Andersen, C; Byskov, A

    2001-02-01

    This study evaluates whether a hormone disruptor found in environment, 4-octylphenol, affects the rate of proliferation of germ cells from human fetal gonads during a 3 week culture period. Five testis and five ovaries were obtained from fetuses of women undergoing legal abortions between the 6th and 9th week of fetal life, representing the period where early gonadal differentiation takes place. Each gonad was divided into equal sized test and control tissue. The test tissue was exposed to a continued presence of 10 micromol/l 4-octylphenol in the culture medium. The cultures were terminated by fixation of the tissues, which where then processed for histology and serially sectioned. The mitotic index of the germ cells (i.e. number of mitosis per 100 germ cells) and the number of germ cells per area was determined. Each of the five testes cultured in 4-octylphenol exhibited a significantly reduced mitotic index and number of pre-spermatogonia compared to the control, whereas none of the five ovaries exposed to 4-octylphenol revealed any difference compared to the control. It is concluded that 4-octylphenol exerts a sex-specific effect on male germ cells.

  2. Cell population indexes of spermatogenic yield and testicular sperm reserves in adult jaguars (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Maria Helena Ferreira; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto da; Fonseca, Cláudio César; da Costa, Eduardo Paulino; Costa, Deiler Sampaio; Peixoto, Juliano Vogas

    2010-03-01

    The intrinsic yield of spermatogenesis and supporting capacity of Sertoli cells are the desirable indicators of sperm production in a species. The objective of the present study was to quantify intrinsic yield and the Sertoli cell index in the spermatogenic process and estimate testicular sperm reserves by histological assessment of fragments obtained by testicular biopsy of five adult jaguars in captivity. The testicular fragments were fixed in 4% glutaric aldehyde, dehydrated at increasing alcohol concentrations, included into hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and were cut into 4 microm thickness. In the seminiferous epithelium of the jaguar, 9.2 primary spermatocytes in pre-leptotene were produced by "A" spermatogonia. During the meiotic divisions only 3.2 spermatids were produced by a primary spermatocyte. The general spermatogenic yield of the jaguar was about 23.4 cells and each Sertoli cell was able to maintain about 19.2 germ cells, 11 of them were round spermatids. In each seminiferous epithelium cycle about 166 million spermatozoa were produced by each gram of testicular tissue. In adult jaguars, the general spermatogenic yield was similar to the yield observed in pumas, greater than that observed for the domestic cat, but less compared to most domestic animals.

  3. Sertoli cell index and spermatic reserves in adult captive African lions (Panthera leo, Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    de Barros, João Bosco Gonçalves; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; Fonseca, Cláudio César; Leite, Flaviana Lima Guião; Rossi Jr, João Luiz; de Oliveira, Priscila Carvalho; da Costa, Eduardo Paulino

    2007-12-01

    The intrinsic yield of spermatogenesis and the supporting indexes of the Sertoli cells are the best indicators for the spermatic production capacity in a species. The aim of the present study was to quantify the intrinsic yield of the spermatogenetic process, as well as the Sertoli cell index and spermatic reserves. Testicular fragments of five adult African lions was fixed in 4% glutaric aldehyde, dehydrated at increasing alcohol concentrations, included into hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and were cut into 4 microm thickness. In the seminiferous epithelium of the African lions, 10.3 primary spermatocytes at pre-leptotene phase are produced by the type-A spermatogonia. During meiotic divisions, only 2.7 spermatids were produced from the primary spermatocytes. The general spermatogenesis production in the African lions was approximately 22.1 cells, and each Sertoli cell was able to sustain and maintain approximately 14.9 cells of the germinative line, from which 7.9 are round spermatids. A total of 103x10(6) spermatozoa are produced by each testis gram at each cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. The spermatic reserve of lion is below the amplitude observed in mammals.

  4. Radiofrequency radiation (900 MHz)-induced DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in testicular germ cells in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Neelam; Giri, Sarbani; Das, Samrat; Upadhaya, Puja

    2016-10-13

    Even though there are contradictory reports regarding the cellular and molecular changes induced by mobile phone emitted radiofrequency radiation (RFR), the possibility of any biological effect cannot be ruled out. In view of a widespread and extensive use of mobile phones, this study evaluates alterations in male germ cell transformation kinetics following RFR exposure and after recovery. Swiss albino mice were exposed to RFR (900 MHz) for 4 h and 8 h duration per day for 35 days. One group of animals was terminated after the exposure period, while others were kept for an additional 35 days post-exposure. RFR exposure caused depolarization of mitochondrial membranes resulting in destabilized cellular redox homeostasis. Statistically significant increases in the damage index in germ cells and sperm head defects were noted in RFR-exposed animals. Flow cytometric estimation of germ cell subtypes in mice testis revealed 2.5-fold increases in spermatogonial populations with significant decreases in spermatids. Almost fourfold reduction in spermatogonia to spermatid turnover (1C:2C) and three times reduction in primary spermatocyte to spermatid turnover (1C:4C) was found indicating arrest in the premeiotic stage of spermatogenesis, which resulted in loss of post-meiotic germ cells apparent from testis histology and low sperm count in RFR-exposed animals. Histological alterations such as sloughing of immature germ cells into the seminiferous tubule lumen, epithelium depletion and maturation arrest were also observed. However, all these changes showed recovery to varied degrees following the post-exposure period indicating that the adverse effects of RFR on mice germ cells are detrimental but reversible. To conclude, RFR exposure-induced oxidative stress causes DNA damage in germ cells, which alters cell cycle progression leading to low sperm count in mice.

  5. The stellate cell system (vitamin A-storing cell system).

    PubMed

    Senoo, Haruki; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Mutsunori

    2017-03-15

    Past, present, and future research into hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, also called vitamin A-storing cells, lipocytes, interstitial cells, fat-storing cells, or Ito cells) are summarized and discussed in this review. Kupffer discovered black-stained cells in the liver using the gold chloride method and named them stellate cells (Sternzellen in German) in 1876. Wake rediscovered the cells in 1971 using the same gold chloride method and various modern histological techniques including electron microscopy. Between their discovery and rediscovery, HSCs disappeared from the research history. Their identification, the establishment of cell isolation and culture methods, and the development of cellular and molecular biological techniques promoted HSC research after their rediscovery. In mammals, HSCs exist in the space between liver parenchymal cells (PCs) or hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) of the hepatic lobule, and store 50-80% of all vitamin A in the body as retinyl ester in lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. SCs also exist in extrahepatic organs such as pancreas, lung, and kidney. Hepatic (HSCs) and extrahepatic stellate cells (EHSCs) form the stellate cell (SC) system or SC family; the main storage site of vitamin A in the body is HSCs in the liver. In pathological conditions such as liver fibrosis, HSCs lose vitamin A, and synthesize a large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen, proteoglycan, glycosaminoglycan, and adhesive glycoproteins. The morphology of these cells also changes from the star-shaped HSCs to that of fibroblasts or myofibroblasts.

  6. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  7. pHMA, a pH-sensitive GFP reporter for cell engulfment, in Drosophila embryos, tissues, and cells.

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Minden, Jonathan S

    2010-02-01

    Engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytosis ensures the removal of unwanted and defective cells. We developed a genetically encoded marker for cell engulfment, pHMA, which consists of the pH-Sensitive derivative of GFP, pHluorin, fused to the actin-binding domain of Moesin. In healthy cells of Drosophila embryos and cultured cells, pHMA resides at the cell cortex. In dying cells, pHMA loses its cortical localization and reports a modest decrease in pH. In embryos, the dying cells lose their apical contacts, then move basally and are ultimately engulfed by neighboring cells or macrophages. The cell corpse material is strongly acidified soon after engulfment and persists in the phagocytic cell for several hours. Changes in the pHMA signal correlate well with increases or decreases in apoptosis. These data show that pHMA is a useful reporter for cell engulfment and can be used in screening for mutations that affect cell engulfment.

  8. Evaluation of the Cell Population of the Seminiferous Epithelium and Spermatic Indexes of the Bat Sturnira lilium (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Danielle B.; Barros, Mirlaine S.; Paula, Tarcízio A. R.; Freitas, Mariella B. D.; Gomes, Marcos L. M.; Matta, Sérgio L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of information about patterns of spermatogenesis in bats, this study aimed to provide information on the testicular activity of the bat Sturnira lilium along the annual seasons. Thus, a series of morphometrical and stereological analyses were made using the testes of adult S. lilium in order to achieve a better understanding of the sperm production dynamics. Light and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed in testicular fragments of animals captured during dry and rainy seasons. The testes followed the pattern of organization described for other mammals, and there were no morphological differences between organs collected either in dry or in rainy seasons. Each tubular cross-section in stage 1 was made of 0.5 type-A spermatogonia, 4.4 primary spermatocytes in preleptotene/leptotene, 3.7 in zygotene, 11.9 in pachytene, 35.6 round spermatids and 8.5 Sertoli cells. The mitotic and meiotic indexes were 15.4 and 2.9 cells, respectively, while the spermatogenesis yield was 68.7 cells. The testicular sperm reserves was 37.61×106 cells, and daily sperm production per gram of testis averaged 209.68×106 cells, both highest averages occurring in the rainy season. S. lilium male bats have a continuous reproductive pattern, high spermatogenesis yield and low support capacity by the Sertoli cells. PMID:25003782

  9. Temporal germ cell development strategy during spermatogenesis within the testis of the Ground Skink, Scincella lateralis (Sauria: Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Rheubert, J L; McHugh, H H; Collier, M H; Sever, D M; Gribbins, K M

    2009-07-01

    Ground Skink (Scincella lateralis) testes were examined histologically to determine the testicular organization and germ cell development strategy employed during spermatogenesis. Testicular tissues were collected from 19 ground skinks from Aiken County, South Carolina during the months of March-June, August, and October. The testes consisted of seminiferous tubules lined with germinal epithelia in which germ cells matured in close association with Sertoli cells. As germ cells matured, they migrated away from the basal lamina of the epithelia towards the lumina of the seminiferous tubules. The testes were spermatogenically active during the months of March, April, May, June, and October (largest seminiferous tubule diameters and epithelial heights), but entered a quiescent period in August (smallest seminiferous tubule diameter and epithelial height) where only spermatogonia type A and B and early spermatocytes were present in low numbers within the seminiferous epithelium. Although the testicular organization was similar to other amniotes, a temporal germ cell development strategy was employed during spermatogenesis within Ground Skinks, similar to that of anamniotes. Thus, this skink's germ cell development strategy, which also has been recently reported in all other major reptilian clades, may represent an evolutionary intermediate in terms of testicular organization between anamniotes and birds and mammals.

  10. Reduction of germ cells in the Odysseus null mutant causes male fertility defect in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ya-Jen; Fang, Shu; Tsaur, Shun-Chern; Chen, Yi-Ling; Fu, Hua-Wen; Patel, Nipam H; Ting, Chau-Ti

    2012-01-01

    Odysseus (OdsH) has been identified as a hybrid male sterility gene between Drosophila mauritiana and D. simulans with accelerated evolutionary rate in both expression and DNA sequence. Loss of a testis-specific expression of OdsH causes male fertility defect in D. melanogaster. Yet, the underlying mechanisms at the cellular level are unknown. In an attempt to identify the possible mechanisms and functional roles of OdsH in spermatogenesis, the cell numbers at different developmental stages during spermatogenesis between the OdsH null mutant and wild-type flies were compared. The results showed that the early developing germ cells, including spermatogonia and spermatocytes, were reduced in the OdsH mutant males. In addition, the number of germline stem cells in aged males was also reduced, presumably due to the disruption of germline stem cell maintenance, which resulted in more severe fertility defect. These results suggest that the function of the enhancement of sperm production by OdsH acted across males of all ages.

  11. Transmitted mutational events induced in mouse germ cells following acrylamide or glycidamide exposure.

    PubMed

    Favor, Jack; Shelby, Michael D

    2005-02-07

    An increase in the germ line mutation rate in humans will result in an increase in the incidence of genetically determined diseases in subsequent generations. Thus, it is important to identify those agents that are mutagenic in mammalian germ cells. Acrylamide is water soluble, absorbed and distributed in the body, chemically reactive with nucleophilic sites, and there are known sources of human exposure. Here we review all seven published studies that assessed the effectiveness of acrylamide or its active metabolite, glycidamide, in inducing transmitted reciprocal translocations or gene mutations in the mouse. Major conclusions were (a) acrylamide is mutagenic in spermatozoa and spermatid stages of the male germ line; (b) in these spermatogenic stages acrylamide is mainly or exclusively a clastogen; (c) per unit dose, i.p. exposure is more effective than dermal exposure; and (d) per unit dose, glycidamide is more effective than acrylamide. Since stem cell spermatogonia persist and may accumulate mutations throughout the reproductive life of males, assessment of induced mutations in this germ cell stage is critical for the assessment of genetic risk associated with exposure to a mutagen. The two specific-locus mutation experiments which studied the stem cell spermatogonial stage yielded conflicting results. This discrepancy should be resolved. Finally, it is noted that no experiments have studied the mutagenic potential of acrylamide to increase the frequency of transmitted mutational events following exposure in the female germ line.

  12. From adult stem cells to cancer stem cells: Oct-4 Gene, cell-cell communication, and hormones during tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2006-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is characterized by "initiation," "promotion," and "progression" phases. The "stem cell theory" and "de-differentiation" theories are used to explain the origin of cancer. Growth control for stem cells, which lack functional gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), involves negative soluble or niche factors, while for progenitor cells, it involves GJIC. Tumor promoters, hormones, and growth factors inhibit GJIC reversibly. Oncogenes stably inhibit GJIC. Cancer cells, which lack growth control and the ability to terminally differentiate and to apoptose, lack GJIC. The Oct3/4 gene, a POU (Pit-Oct-Unc) family of transcription factors was thought to be expressed only in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells. With the availability of normal adult human stem cells, tests for the expression of Oct3/4 gene and the stem cell theory in human carcinogenesis became possible. Human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme, and gastric stem cells, HeLa and MCF-7 cells, and canine tumors were tested with antibodies and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for Oct3/4. Adult human breast stem cells, immortalized nontumorigenic and tumor cell lines, but not the normal differentiated cells, expressed Oct3/4. Adult human differentiated cells lose their Oct-4 expression. Oct3/4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that normal adult stem cells and cancer stem cells maintain expression of Oct3/4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis. These Oct-4 positive cells might represent the "cancer stem cells." A strategy to target "cancer stem cells" is to suppress the Oct-4 gene in order to cause the cells to differentiate.

  13. Properly Substituted Analogues of BIX-01294 Lose Inhibition of G9a Histone Methyltransferase and Gain Selective Anti-DNA Methyltransferase 3A Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Marrocco, Biagina; Gros, Christina; Masson, Véronique; Poughon, Valérie; Ausseil, Fréderic; Chang, Yanqi; Labella, Donatella; Cosconati, Sandro; Di Maro, Salvatore; Novellino, Ettore; Schnekenburger, Michael; Grandjenette, Cindy; Bouvy, Celine; Diederich, Marc; Cheng, Xiaodong; Arimondo, Paola B.; Mai, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    Chemical manipulations performed on the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases (G9a/GLP) inhibitor BIX-01294 afforded novel desmethoxyquinazolines able to inhibit the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A at low micromolar levels without any significant inhibition of DNMT1 and G9a. In KG-1 cells such compounds, when tested at sub-toxic doses, induced the luciferase re-expression in a stable construct controlled by a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter silenced by methylation (CMV-luc assay). Finally, in human lymphoma U-937 and RAJI cells, the N-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)quinazolin-4-amine induced the highest proliferation arrest and cell death induction starting from 10 µM, in agreement with its DNMT3A inhibitory potency. PMID:24810902

  14. Niche signaling promotes stem cell survival in the Drosophila testis via the JAK-STAT target DIAP1.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Salman; Hétié, Phylis; Matunis, Erika L

    2015-08-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells are thought to resist environmental insults better than their differentiating progeny, but this resistance varies from one tissue to another, and the underlying mechanisms are not well-understood. Here, we use the Drosophila testis as a model system to study the regulation of cell death within an intact niche. This niche contains sperm-producing germline stem cells (GSCs) and accompanying somatic cyst stem cells (or CySCs). Although many signals are known to promote stem cell self-renewal in this tissue, including the highly conserved JAK-STAT pathway, the response of these stem cells to potential death-inducing signals, and factors promoting stem cell survival, have not been characterized. Here we find that both GSCs and CySCs resist cell death better than their differentiating progeny, under normal laboratory conditions and in response to potential death-inducing stimuli such as irradiation or starvation. To ask what might be promoting stem cell survival, we characterized the role of the anti-apoptotic gene Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (diap1) in testis stem cells. DIAP1 protein is enriched in the GSCs and CySCs and is a JAK-STAT target. diap1 is necessary for survival of both GSCs and CySCs, and ectopic up-regulation of DIAP1 in somatic cyst cells is sufficient to non-autonomously rescue stress-induced cell death in adjacent differentiating germ cells (spermatogonia). Altogether, our results show that niche signals can promote stem cell survival by up-regulation of highly conserved anti-apoptotic proteins, and suggest that this strategy may underlie the ability of stem cells to resist death more generally.

  15. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  16. [Functional morphology of the adrenal cortex and incretory kidney structures in the salt-losing form of adrenogenital syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Tsibel', B N; Padalko, N L

    1986-01-01

    The adrenals and kidney incretory structures (the juxtaglomerular apparatuses and renomedullary interstitial cells) were studied in 12 cases of a desalinization form of the adrenogenital syndrome in children who died at the age of 1-6 mos of acute water-electrolytic disturbances in order to assess function of the structures involved in the regulation of the water-salt equilibrium. The adrenals and kidneys from 7 children of the same age who died of mechanical asphyxia, were taken as controls. The depth of adrenocortical zones, volumes of nuclei and nucleoli in different cortical zones were determined; the juxtaglomerular index, cell count (including vacuolized cells), the area of the juxtaglomerular apparatus and mesangium were determined in the juxtaglomerular apparatus. The amount of cell lipid granules (the interstitial-cellular index), the mean granule volume and the total granule volume were counted in renomedullary interstitial cells. The results were statistically processed, and a paired correlation analysis of all the studied parameters was performed. In the desalinization form of the adrenogenital syndrome morphometric investigation of the glomerular and fascicular zones revealed compensatory processes, not of hyperplastic nature but mainly of hypertrophic nature; morphological and morphometric characteristics of the kidney incretory structures indicated tension of the renin-angiotensin system and probably a decrease in prostaglandin synthesis in salt and water loss. In the control group parameters of structures related to the regulation of the water-salt equilibrium, especially in the adrenal cortex, showed good correlation. In the desalinization form of the adrenogenital syndrome some other relationships between these structures developed.

  17. Microbead-based biomimetic synthetic neighbors enhance survival and function of rat pancreatic β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Lee, Samuel; Ma, Minglin; Kim, Soo Min; Guye, Patrick; Pancoast, James R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Weiss, Ron; Lee, Richard T.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is caused by the loss or dysfunction of insulin-secreting β-cells in the pancreas. β-cells reduce their mass and lose insulin-producing ability in vitro, likely due to insufficient cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions as β-cells lose their native microenvironment. Herein, we built an ex-vivo cell microenvironment by culturing primary β-cells in direct contact with `synthetic neighbors', cell-sized soft polymer microbeads that were modified with cell-cell signaling factors as well as components from pancreatic-tissue-specific ECMs. This biomimetic 3D microenvironment was able to promote native cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. We obtained sustained maintenance of β-cell function in vitro enhanced cell viability from the few days usually observed in 2D culture to periods exceeding three weeks, with enhanced β-cell stability and insulin production. Our approach can be extended to create a general 3D culture platform for other cell types.

  18. Potential Spermatogenesis Recovery with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Azoospermic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deying; Liu, Xing; Peng, Jinpu; He, Dawei; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Jing; Li, Xuliang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia is the most challenging type of male infertility. Stem cell based therapy provides the potential to enhance the recovery of spermatogenesis following cancer therapy. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) possess the potential to differentiate or trans-differentiate into multi-lineage cells, secrete paracrine factors to recruit the resident stem cells to participate in tissue regeneration, or fuse with the local cells in the affected region. In this study, we tested whether spermatogenically-induced BMSCs can restore spermatogenesis after administration of an anticancer drug. Allogeneic BMSCs were co-cultured in conditioned media derived from cultured testicular Sertoli cells in vitro, and then induced stem cells were transplanted into the seminiferous tubules of a busulfan-induced azoospermatic rat model for 8 weeks. The in vitro induced BMSCs exhibited specific spermatogonic gene and protein markers, and after implantation the donor cells survived and located at the basement membranes of the recipient seminiferous tubules, in accordance with what are considered the unique biological characteristics of spermatogenic stem cells. Molecular markers of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogonia (Vasa, Stella, SMAD1, Dazl, GCNF, HSP90α, integrinβ1, and c-kit) were expressed in the recipient testis tissue. No tumor mass, immune response, or inflammatory reaction developed. In conclusion, BMSCs might provide the potential to trans-differentiate into spermatogenic-like-cells, enhancing endogenous fertility recovery. The present study indicates that BMSCs might offer alternative treatment for the patients with azoospermatic infertility after cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25062349

  19. The Trp53-Trp53inp1-Tnfrsf10b Pathway Regulates the Radiation Response of Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kei; Ishiai, Masamichi; Morimoto, Hiroko; Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Niwa, Ohtsura; Takata, Minoru; Shinohara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Germ cells are thought to exhibit a unique DNA damage response that differs from that of somatic stem cells, and previous studies suggested that Trp53 is not involved in the survival of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) after irradiation. Here, we report a critical role for the Trp53-Trp53inp1-Tnfrsf10b pathway during radiation-induced SSC apoptosis. Spermatogonial transplantation revealed that Trp53 deficiency increased the survival of SSCs after irradiation. Although Bbc3, a member of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, was implicated in apoptosis of germ and somatic stem cells, Bbc3 depletion inhibited apoptosis in committed spermatogonia, but not in SSCs. In contrast, inhibition of Tnfrsf10b, an extrinsic apoptosis regulator, rescued SSCs. Tnfrsf10b, whose deficiency protected SSCs, was upregulated by Trp53inp1 upon irradiation. These results suggest that the Trp53-Trp53inp1-Tnfrsf10b pathway responds to genotoxic damage in SSCs and that stem and progenitor cells exhibit distinct DNA damage responses in self-renewing tissue. PMID:25358794

  20. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a product of Sertoli and germ cells in rat testes which is localized at the Sertoli-Sertoli and Sertoli-germ cell interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Claire Q F; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2007-04-15

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a putative cell-cell adhesion molecule, has attracted wide interest due to its importance in viral pathogenesis and in mediating adenoviral gene delivery. However, the distribution pattern and physiological function of CAR in the testis is still not clear. Here, we identified CAR in Sertoli cells and germ cells of rats. In vivo studies have shown that CAR resides at the blood-testis barrier as well as at the ectoplasmic specialization. The persistent expression of CAR in rat testes from neonatal period throughout adulthood implicates its role in spermatogenesis. Using primary Sertoli cell cultures, we observed a significant induction of CAR during the formation of Sertoli cell epithelium. Furthermore, CAR was seen to be concentrated at inter-Sertoli cell junctions, co-localizing with tight junction protein marker ZO-1 and adherens junction protein N-cadherin. CAR was also found to be associated with proteins of Src kinase family and its protein level declined after TNFalpha treatment in Sertoli cell cultures. Immunofluorescent staining of isolated germ cells has revealed the presence of CAR on spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids and elongate spermatids. Taken together, we propose that CAR functions as an adhesion molecule in maintaining the inter-Sertoli cell junctions at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. In addition, CAR may confer adhesion between Sertoli and germ cells at the Sertoli-germ cell interface. It is possible that the receptor utilized by viral pathogens to breakthrough the epithelial barrier was also employed by developing germ cells to migrate through the inter-Sertoli cell junctions.

  1. MILI, a PIWI-interacting RNA-binding protein, is required for germ line stem cell self-renewal and appears to positively regulate translation.

    PubMed

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Hao, Yi; Beyret, Ergin; Yin, Hang; Kuramochi-Miyagawa, Satomi; Nakano, Toru; Lin, Haifan

    2009-03-06

    The Argonaute/PIWI protein family consists of Argonaute and PIWI subfamilies. Argonautes function in RNA interference and micro-RNA pathways; whereas PIWIs bind to PIWI-interacting RNAs and regulate germ line development, stem cell maintenance, epigenetic regulation, and transposition. However, the role of PIWIs in mammalian stem cells has not been demonstrated, and molecular mechanisms mediated by PIWIs remain elusive. Here we show that MILI, a murine PIWI protein, is expressed in the cytoplasm of testicular germ line stem cells, spermatogonia, and early spermatocytes, where it is enriched in chromatoid bodies. MILI is essential for the self-renewing division and differentiation of germ line stem cells but does not affect initial establishment of the germ line stem cell population at 7 days postpartum. Furthermore, MILI forms a stable RNA-independent complex with eIF3a and associates with the eIF4E- and eIF4G-containing m7G cap-binding complex. In isolated 7 days postpartum seminiferous tubules containing mostly germ line stem cells, the mili mutation has no effect on the cellular mRNA level yet significantly reduces the rate of protein synthesis. These observations indicate that MILI may positively regulate translation and that such regulation is required for germ line stem cell self-renewal.

  2. Identification and IVC of spermatogonial stem cells in prepubertal buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Riaz, Hasan; Dong, Ping; Chong, Zhenlu; Luo, Xuan; Liang, Aixin; Yang, Liguo

    2014-06-01

    Development of suitable selective marker for buffalo spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), optimization of long-term IVC conditions, and their pluripotent retention capacity in buffaloes can be of prime importance in selective genetic modifications of this species. In the present study, we identified CDH1 as a specific marker for buffalo SSCs and revealed that it existed in two protein isoforms (large [135 kDa] and small [90 kDa] subunits) in the buffalo testis; furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CDH1 expression was present in spermatogonia but absent in the somatic cells of 4-month-old buffalo testis. After 7 days of enrichment, expression of CDH1 was also detectable in IVC colonies (∼53% enrichment efficiency by Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)). For long-term culture of SSCs, proliferation studies with different factors showed that combination of 20 ng/mL GDNF, 10 ng/mL FGF2, and 1000 U/mL LIF could significantly promote number of colonies (∼two folds) and proliferation of buffalo SSCs (∼three folds) compared with those of control or single-treatment groups; furthermore, addition of these combination growth factors significantly upregulated the messenger RNA level of spermatogonial-specific and pluripotency-related markers (BCL6B, GFRA1, and POU5F1), whereas downregulated receptor tyrosine kinase (KIT). For confirmation of their stem cell potential, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin-stained cells were identified in the basal membrane of seminiferous tubules of xenotransplanted mice testis. These findings indicate the identification of a new buffalo SSCs marker; furthermore, it may help in establishing long-term culture that would assist in genetic modification of these buffaloes.

  3. Reactive oxygen species mediate Terbufos-induced apoptosis in mouse testicular cell lines via the modulation of cell cycle and pro-apoptotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Chen, Chia-Yun; Omar, Hany A; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Tsao, Che-Chia; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Po-Han; Teng, Yen-Ni

    2015-09-15

    Terbufos (S-t-butylthiomethyl-O,O-diethyl phosphorodithioate) is a highly toxic organophosphate which is extensively used as an insecticide and nematicide. Chronic exposure to terbufos causes neuronal injury and predisposes to neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence has shown that the exposure to terbufos, as an occupational risk factor, may also cause reproductive disorders. However, the exact mechanisms of reproductive toxicity remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the toxic effect of terbufos on testicular cells and to explore the mechanism of toxicity on a cellular level. The cytotoxic effects of terbufos on mouse immortalized spermatogonia (GC-1), spermatocytes (GC-2), Leydig (TM3), and Sertoli (TM4) cell lines were assessed by MTT assays, caspase activation, flow cytometry, TUNEL assay, Western blot, and cell cycle analysis. The exposure to different concentrations of terbufos ranging from 50 to 800 μM for 6 h caused significant death in all the used testicular cell lines. Terbufos increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, and initiated apoptosis, which was confirmed by a dose-dependent increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells. Blocking ROS production by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) protected GC-1 cells from terbufos-induced cell death. The results demonstrated that terbufos induces ROS, apoptosis, and DNA damage in testicular cell lines and it should be considered potentially hazardous to testis. Together, this study provided potential molecular mechanisms of terbufos-induced toxicity in testicular cells and suggests a possible protective measure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  4. Development of Stainless Steel Laminate Li-Ion Pouch Cell for Space Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooto, Hiroki; Koide, Kazuya; Ohira, Kenji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Abe, Hidetoshi; Toyota, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takanobu; Takahashi, Yu; Hirose, Kazuyuki

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the development of stainless steel laminate Li-ion pouch battery cells for space application. Currently, the cells have a high specific energy of 118 Wh/kg for 10-Ah cells at the moment. Unlike conventional Li-ion pouch cells for terrestrial use, where the casing is made of aluminum laminate, Li-ion pouch cells made with stainless steel laminate neither expand nor lose their capacity after charge/discharge cycles in vacuum. The results of a mechanical environment test show that the cell also meet the requirements for vibration and pyroshock tolerance during launch.

  5. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years. PMID:26788065

  6. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years.

  7. Spermatogenesis in Platynereis massiliensis (Polychaeta: Nereidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücht, Joachim; Pfannenstiel, Hans-Dieter

    1989-03-01

    Stage 1 of spermatogenesis in the protandrous polychaete Platynereis massiliensis is represented by clusters of about 60 spermatogonia which appear in the coelomic cavity. There are no testes in P. massiliensis. The origin of the spermatogonial clusters is not known. Subclusters of approximately 20 primary spermatocytes each represent stage 2. The appearance of synaptonemal figures in the spermatocyte nuclei marks the beginning of stage 3. Cells tend to lose their tight packing during stage 3 but interdigitate with cellular processes. Then very small subclusters of 4 to 8 spermatocytes appear. Meiosis is completed during stage 4, giving rise to secondary spermatocytes and then to spermatid tetrads. Spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes are interconnected by structurally specialized fusomes while secondary spermatocytes and spermatids, which are also in cytoplasmic continuity, show rather simple cell bridges. Synthesis of acrosomal material starts during stage 2. During spermiogenesis the proacrosomal vesicles of Golgi origin travel from the posterior part of the cell to its anterior part to form the acrosome proper. Acrosome formation, nuclear condensation, shaping of the long and slender sperm nucleus, and development of the sperm tail are the main events during spermiogenesis. Sperm morphology is briefly discussed wity respect to its phylogenetic bearings.

  8. Intratubular germ cell neoplasia of the human testis: heterogeneous protein expression and relation to invasive potential.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rod T; E Camacho-Moll, Maria; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A; Kelnar, Christopher J H; O'Donnell, Marie; Sharpe, Richard M; Smith, Lee B; Grigor, Ken M; Wallace, W Hamish B; Stoop, Hans; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P; Donat, Roland; Saunders, Philippa Tk; Looijenga, Leendert Hj

    2014-09-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer develops from premalignant intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified cells that are believed to arise from failure of normal maturation of fetal germ cells from gonocytes (OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(-)) into pre-spermatogonia (OCT4(-)/MAGEA4(+)). Intratubular germ cell neoplasia cell subpopulations based on stage of germ cell differentiation have been described, however the importance of these subpopulations in terms of invasive potential has not been reported. We hypothesized that cells expressing an immature (OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(-)) germ cell profile would exhibit an increased proliferation rate compared with those with a mature profile (OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(+)). Therefore, we performed triple immunofluorescence and stereology to quantify the different intratubular germ cell neoplasia cell subpopulations, based on expression of germ cell (OCT4, PLAP, AP2γ, MAGEA4, VASA) and proliferation (Ki67) markers, in testis sections from patients with preinvasive disease, seminoma, and non-seminoma. We compared these subpopulations with normal human fetal testis and with seminoma cells. Heterogeneity of protein expression was demonstrated in intratubular germ cell neoplasia cells with respect to gonocyte and spermatogonial markers. It included an embryonic/fetal germ cell subpopulation lacking expression of the definitive intratubular germ cell neoplasia marker OCT4, that did not correspond to a physiological (fetal) germ cell subpopulation. OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(-) cells showed a significantly increased rate of proliferation compared with the OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(+) population (12.8 versus 3.4%, P<0.0001) irrespective of histological tumor type, reflected in the predominance of OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(-) cells in the invasive tumor component. Surprisingly, OCT4(+)/MAGEA4(-) cells in patients with preinvasive disease showed significantly higher proliferation compared to those with seminoma or non-seminoma (18.1 versus 10.2 versus 7.2%, P<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, this study

  9. Expression of the c-Kit receptor in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium in rats with hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Misiakiewicz, Kamila; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Kondarewicz, Anna; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Wiszniewska, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of pharmacologically induced hormonal imbalance in adult male rats treated with letrozole and rats exposed to soya isoflavones on the testicular morphology and c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) expression in germ cells. The study was conducted during all developmental periods: prenatal period, lactation, youth, and sexual maturity. Morphological and morphometrical analyses were performed on testicular section, and c-Kit-R was identified using immunohistochemistry. In addition, concentration of circulating steroids was measured in mature rats exposed to soya isoflavones. A significant reduction in testosterone level in rats exposed to soya isoflavones, and the sloughing of the premature germ cells into the lumen of the seminiferous tubules in the testes of both groups of rats were observed. Immunohistochemistry showed a decrease in c-Kit-R expression in germ cells of both experimental groups. Morphometric analysis indicated a decreased thickness of the layers occupied by c-Kit-R-positive spermatogonia, and a decreased diameter of the seminiferous tubules in the testes of both experimental groups of animals. In conclusion, the pharmacologically induced reduction of the estradiol level in adult rats and the diminished level of testosterone in rats exposed to soya isoflavones during the prenatal period, lactation and up to maturity caused similar morphological and functional changes associated with the decreased c-Kit-R expression in germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium. These findings demonstrate the importance of the estrogen/androgen balance for normal testicular morphology and spermatogenesis.

  10. Successful xenogeneic germ cell transplantation from Jundia catfish (Rhamdia quelen) into adult Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) testes.

    PubMed

    Silva, M A; Costa, G M J; Lacerda, S M S N; Brandão-Dias, P F P; Kalapothakis, E; Silva Júnior, A F; Alvarenga, E R; França, L R

    2016-05-01

    Fish germ cell transplantation presents several important potential applications for aquaculture, including the preservation of germplasm from endangered fish species with high genetic and commercial values. Using this technique in studies developed in our laboratory with adult male Nile tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus), all the necessary procedures were successfully established, allowing the production of functional sperm and healthy progeny approximately 2months after allogeneic transplantation. In the present study, we evaluated the viability of the adult Nile tilapia testis to generate sperm after xenogeneic transplant of germ cells from sexually mature Jundia catfish (Rhamdia quelen) that belong to a different taxonomic order. Therefore, in order to investigate at different time-periods post-transplantation, the presence and development of donor PKH26 labeled catfish germ cells were followed in the tilapia seminiferous tubules. From 7 to 20days post-transplantation, only PKH26 labeled spermatogonia were observed, whereas spermatocytes at different stages of development were found at 70days. Germ cell transplantation success and progression of spermatogenesis were indicated by the presence of labeled PKH26 spermatids and sperm on days 90 and 120 post-transplantation, respectively. Confirming the presence of the catfish genetic material in the tilapia testis, all recipient tilapias evaluated (n=8) showed the genetic markers evaluated. Therefore, we demonstrated for the first time that the adult Nile tilapia testis offers the functional conditions for development of spermatogenesis with sperm production from a fish species belonging to a different order, which provides an important new venue for aquaculture advancement.

  11. The role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) in differentiation of bovine spermatogonial stem cells (SCC)

    PubMed Central

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The receptors 1 and 2 of fibroblast growth factor (FGFR1 and FGFR2, respectively) have been observed in all types of testicular cells. Culture on extracellular matrix (ECM) has been observed to lead to initiation of differentiation in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). The present study was carried out to investigate whether FGFR1 and FGFR2 play a role in SSCs differentiation. Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured on ECM-coated or uncoated (control) plates for 12 days. The gene expression of THY1, cKIT, FGFR1 and FGFR2 was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results related to the gene expression of markers of with undifferentiated (THY1) and differentiated (cKIT) spermatogonia implicated stimulation of self-renewal and differentiation in cells cultured on ECM-coated and uncoated plates, respectively (p < 0.05). Concomitantly, the expression of FGFR2 increased during culture in the ECM group (p < 0.05), whereas it did not change in the control group (p > 0.05). As a result, the gene expression of FGFR2 was greater in the ECM than control group (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, FGFR1 expression did not change during culture in the control and ECM groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study revealed the potential role of FGFR2 in differentiation of SSCs during culture on ECM. PMID:27482360

  12. Evidence that active demethylation mechanisms maintain the genome of carcinoma in situ cells hypomethylated in the adult testis

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, D G; Nielsen, J E; Jørgensen, A; Skakkebæk, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Almstrup, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Developmental arrest of fetal germ cells may lead to neoplastic transformation and formation of germ cell tumours via carcinoma in situ (CIS) cells. Normal fetal germ cell development requires complete erasure and re-establishment of DNA methylation. In contrast to normal spermatogonia, the genome of CIS cells remains unmethylated in the adult testis. We here investigated the possible active and passive pathways that can sustain the CIS genome hypomethylated in the adult testis. Methods: The levels of 5-methyl-cytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine (5hmC) in DNA from micro-dissected CIS cells were assessed by quantitative measurements. The expression of TET1, TET2, APOBEC1, MBD4, APEX1, PARP1, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and DNMT3L in adult testis specimens with CIS and in human fetal testis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results: DNA from micro-dissected CIS cells contained very low levels of 5hmC produced by ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes. CIS cells and fetal germ cells expressed the suggested initiator of active demethylation, APOBEC1, and the base excision repair proteins MBD4, APEX1 and PARP1, whereas TETs – the alternative initiators were absent. Both maintenance and de novo methyltransferases were detected in CIS cells. Conclusion: The data are consistent with the presence of an active DNA de-methylation pathway in CIS cells. The hypomethylated genome of CIS cells may contribute to phenotypic plasticity and invasive capabilities of this testicular cancer precursor. PMID:24292451

  13. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML.

  14. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs), spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages. PMID:26624996

  15. A Functional Mitotic Spindle Prepared from Mammalian Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cande, W. Zacheus; Snyder, Judith; Smith, Diana; Summers, Keith; McIntosh, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Mitotic cells lysed into solutions of polymerizable microtubule protein contain a spindle which is similar to the living spindle in two respects: it will lose and gain birefringence when cooled and warmed, and it will move anaphase chromosomes to the opposite ends of the cell. Early anaphase cells lysed into buffers containing high molecular weight polyethylene glycol and nucleotide triphosphates will continue chromosome motion and spindle elongation in the absence of exogenous spindle subunits. These results suggest that while spindle growth requires microtubule polymerization, anaphase motions do not. Images PMID:4524659

  16. Ionomycin Treatment Renders NK Cells Hyporesponsive

    PubMed Central

    Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Thomas, L. Michael; Lopez-Cobo, Sheila; García-Cuesta, Eva M.; Long, Eric O.; Reyburn, Hugh T.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes important in immune responses to cancer and multiple pathogens. However, chronic activation of NK cells can induce a hyporesponsive state. The molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of this hyporesponsive condition are unknown, thus an easy and reproducible mechanism able to induce hyporesponsiveness on human NK cells would be very useful to gain understanding of this process. Human NK cells treated with ionomycin lose their ability to degranulate and secrete IFN-γ in response to a variety of stimuli, but IL-2 stimulation can compensate these defects. Apart from reductions in the expression of CD11a/CD18, no great changes were observed in the activating and inhibitory receptors expressed by these NK cells, however their transcriptional signature is different to that described for other hyporesponsive lymphocytes. PMID:27007115

  17. Proteomic analysis of the spermatogonial stem cell compartment in dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula L.

    PubMed

    Loppion, Géraldine; Lavigne, Régis; Pineau, Charles; Auvray, Pierrïck; Sourdaine, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    In the dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula L.) the testicular germinative zone (GZ), composed of large isolated spermatogonia surrounded by elongating pre-Sertoli cells, is located between the albuginea and the ventrolateral intratesticular vessel. During the spermatogenic wave, cysts radiate in maturational order forming distinct testicular zones. In this study, soluble proteins of the GZ and of the zone containing cysts with spermatocytes were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Gel images were matched and then evaluated for GZ-specific proteins. From the1400 protein spots identified, 680 were found to be apparently specific to this zone. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, de novo sequences were obtained for 33 proteins out of the 169 selected for identification by mass spectrometry, but only 16 of these 169 proteins were identified. One of them, proteasome subunit alpha-6, was analyzed further by immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates the utility of the dogfish as a model for proteome analysis of the spermatogonial stem cell niche, even if it remains restricted by the lack of genomic data available on Elasmobranchs.

  18. Effects of X-irradiation on mouse testicular cells and sperm chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, B.L.; Jost, L.K.; Erickson, K.R.; Tajiran, M.A.; Evenson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The testicular regions of male mice were exposed to x-ray doses ranging from 0 to 400 rads. Forty days after exposure the mice were killed and the testes and cauda epididymal sperm removed surgically. Flow cytometric measurements of acridine orange stained testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular cell types following x-ray killing of stem cells. Cauda epididymal sperm were analyzed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), a flow cytometric measurement of the susceptibility of the sperm nuclear DNA to in situ acid denaturation. The SCSA detected increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ after 12.5 rads of x-ray exposure, with significant increases following 25 rads. Abnormal sperm head morphology was not significantly increased until the testes were exposed to 60 rads of x-rays. These data suggest that the SCSA is currently the most sensitive, noninvasive method of detecting x-ray damage to testicular stem spermatogonia. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  20. A quantitative study of seminiferous tubular cells in the developing Murrah buffalo testis.

    PubMed

    Rana, B K; Bilaspuri, G S

    2004-01-01

    We report here a systematic quantitative study of the seminiferous tubular cells of Murrah buffaloes. The most advanced germ cell types in the different age groups (months) were A(0) spermatogonia (SG) (1 and 3), early pachytene (6 and 9), late pachytene (12), secondary spermatocytes (15 and 18), elongating spermatids (21 and 24), elongated spermatids attached to Sertoli cells (30), elongated spermatids detached from Sertoli cells (36) and spermatozoa (42 and 48). Central primitive Sertoli cells (CPSC) and basal primitive Sertoli cells (BPSC) were present in the sex cord of one-month-old calves, while Sertoli cells (SC) were first seen in nine-month-old calves. The number of gonocytes were maximal at six months but they were not seen after this time. Prespermatogonia (PSG) and SG were at a maximum at nine months of age but PSG were not seen after 36 months. The number of SG decreased significantly after nine months up to 36 months of age. Although spermatocytes and spermatids appeared in earlier developmental stages, a rapid increase in their number was recorded after 36 months. The number of SC was maximal in 18-month-old animals. BPSC predominated in the sex cord of animals aged one to six months, SG at 9-12 months of age, primary spermatocytes from 15-30 months and spermatids from 36 to 72 months and in older animals. We concluded that a decrease in the number of SG in buffalo calves after nine months of age might be responsible for a delay in sexual maturity. Moreover, the small number of spermatocytes and spermatids present before 36 months of age may be associated with the low yield of different germ cell divisions and with the cellular degeneration. A rapid increase in the number of spermatocytes and spermatids after 36 months resulted in sexual maturity between 42 and 48 months.

  1. Role of selenium in spermatogenesis: differential expression of cjun and cfos in tubular cells of mice testis.

    PubMed

    Shalini, Sonia; Bansal, Mohinder P

    2006-11-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential dietary trace element, involved in the process of male reproduction. Best known as an antioxidant, it acts through various selenoproteins viz. glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase and selenoprotein P. The aim of the present study was to identify the underlying molecular mechanism of Se in regulating spermatogenesis. Different Se status: deficient, adequate and excess Se, were generated in male Balb/c mice by feeding yeast based Se deficient diet, and deficient diet supplemented with Se as sodium selenite (0.2 and 1 ppm Se) respectively for a period of 4 and 8 weeks. Se levels and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity were significantly reduced in the Se deficient mice and enhanced in Se supplemented group. Reduction in the number of post-meiotic germ cells viz. spermatids and spermatozoa, were observed in the deficient groups indicating loss in fertility and reproductive ability. cjun and cfos (components of transcription factor AP1) regulate cellular growth and differentiation and also exert a regulatory role in steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis. Changes in the mRNA expression of cjun and cfos were observed. Concomitant with this, western blot revealed that the protein expression profile for both these genes was significantly altered in the Se deficient and Se excess groups. Further immunohistochemical analysis showed that, both these genes had identical cellular localization indicating that they do not work alone but act synergistically as AP1. cjun and cfos expression was greater in the early mitotic stages-spermatogonia and spermatocytes in the Se adequate controls. It decreased in the meiotic stages and then again peaked around the later stages-elongating spermatids and spermatozoa. However in the Se deficient mice, weaker expression was observed in the spermatogonia with a complete absence of expression near the lumen. No visible changes in cjun/cfos expression and immunohistochemical localization were observed in

  2. Fatty acid degradation plays an essential role in proliferation of mouse female primordial germ cells via the p53-dependent cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Hui; Sui, Xuesong; Zhou, Cheng; Shen, Cong; Yang, Ye; Zhang, Pang; Guo, Xuejiang; Huo, Ran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are embryonic founders of germ cells that ultimately differentiate into oocytes and spermatogonia. Embryonic proliferation of PGCs starting from E11.5 ensures the presence of germ cells in adulthood, especially in female mammals whose total number of oocytes declines after this initial proliferation period. To better understand mechanisms underlying PGC proliferation in female mice, we constructed a proteome profile of female mouse gonads at E11.5. Subsequent KEGG pathway analysis of the 3,662 proteins profiled showed significant enrichment of pathways involved in fatty acid degradation. Further, the number of PGCs found in in vitro cultured fetal gonads significantly decreased with application of etomoxir, an inhibitor of the key rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid degradation carnitine acyltransferase I (CPT1). Decrease in PGCs was further determined to be the result of reduced proliferation rather than apoptosis. The inhibition of fatty acid degradation by etomoxir has the potential to activate the Ca2+/CamKII/5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway; while as an upstream activator, activated AMPK can function as activator of p53 to induce cell cycle arrest. Thus, we detected the expressional level of AMPK, phosphorylated AMPK (P-AMPK), phosphorylated p53 (P-p53) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21) by Western blots, the results showed increased expression of them after treatment with etomoxir, suggested the activation of p53 pathway was the reason for reduced proliferation of PGCs. Finally, the involvement of p53-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest in defective proliferation of PGCs was verified by rescue experiments. Our results demonstrate that fatty acid degradation plays an important role in proliferation of female PGCs via the p53-dependent cell cycle regulation. PMID:26716399

  3. Alternative generation of CNS neural stem cells and PNS derivatives from neural crest-derived peripheral stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marlen; Apostolova, Galina; Widera, Darius; Mittelbronn, Michel; Dechant, Georg; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Rohrer, Hermann

    2015-02-01

    Neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) from the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) can be reprogrammed in neurosphere (NS) culture to rNCSCs that produce central nervous system (CNS) progeny, including myelinating oligodendrocytes. Using global gene expression analysis we now demonstrate that rNCSCs completely lose their previous PNS characteristics and acquire the identity of neural stem cells derived from embryonic spinal cord. Reprogramming proceeds rapidly and results in a homogenous population of Olig2-, Sox3-, and Lex-positive CNS stem cells. Low-level expression of pluripotency inducing genes Oct4, Nanog, and Klf4 argues against a transient pluripotent state during reprogramming. The acquisition of CNS properties is prevented in the presence of BMP4 (BMP NCSCs) as shown by marker gene expression and the potential to produce PNS neurons and glia. In addition, genes characteristic for mesenchymal and perivascular progenitors are expressed, which suggests that BMP NCSCs are directed toward a pericyte progenitor/mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate. Adult NCSCs from mouse palate, an easily accessible source of adult NCSCs, display strikingly similar properties. They do not generate cells with CNS characteristics but lose the neural crest markers Sox10 and p75 and produce MSC-like cells. These findings show that embryonic NCSCs acquire a full CNS identity in NS culture. In contrast, MSC-like cells are generated from BMP NCSCs and pNCSCs, which reveals that postmigratory NCSCs are a source for MSC-like cells up to the adult stage.

  4. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Domestic Cat (Felis catus) Spermatogonial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Powell, Robin H; Galiguis, Jason; Biancardi, Monica N; Pope, C Earle; Leibo, Stanley P; Wang, Guoshun; Gómez, Martha C

    2016-07-01

    In many mammalian species, surface markers have been used to obtain enriched populations of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) for assisted reproduction and other applications; however, little is known about the expression patterns of feline SSCs. In this study, we assessed expression of the SSC surface markers commonly used in other species, KIT, ITGA6, CD9, GFRalpha1, ADGRA3, and THY1, in addition to the less frequently used pluripotent markers TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, SSEA-1, and SSEA-4 in SSCs of both prepubertal and adult domestic cats (Felis catus). To further characterize cat SSCs, we sorted cells using SSC-specific markers and evaluated the expression of the pluripotent transcription factors NANOG, POU5F1, and SOX2 and the proto-oncogene MYC within these populations. We concluded that SSC surface markers used in other mammalian species were not specific for identifying cat SSCs. However, the pluripotent markers we evaluated were more specific to cat spermatogonia, and the presence of SSEA-1 and SSEA-4 in fewer and primarily individual cells suggests that these two markers may be used for enrichment of cat SSCs. The expression of pluripotent transcription factors at mRNA level by single-stained cells positive for SSEA-4 and by dual-stained cells positive for both GFRalpha1 and SSEA-4 reflects the undifferentiated stage of cat SSCs. The absence of transcription factors in double-stained cells positive for only one marker implies the loss of the stem cell-like identity with the loss of either GFRalpha1 or SSEA-4. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the biological characteristics of these spermatogonial subpopulations.

  5. Ex-vivo assessment of chronic toxicity of low levels of cadmium on testicular meiotic cells.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy-Siraudin, Cendrine; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, Rahma; Ali, Sazan; Chaspoul, Florence; Lanteaume, André; Achard, Vincent; Gallice, Philippe; Durand, Philippe; Guichaoua, Marie-Roberte

    2012-08-01

    Using a validated model of culture of rat seminiferous tubules, we assessed the effects of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L cadmium (Cd) on spermatogenic cells over a 2-week culture period. With concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/L in the culture medium, the Cd concentration in the cells, determined by ICP-MS, increased with concentration in the medium and the day of culture. Flow cytometric analysis enabled us to evaluate changes in the number of Sertoli cells and germ cells during the culture period. The number of Sertoli cells did not appear to be affected by Cd. By contrast, spermatogonia and meiotic cells were decreased by 1 and 10 μg/L Cd in a time and dose dependent manner. Stage distribution of the meiotic prophase I and qualitative study of the synaptonemal complexes (SC) at the pachytene stage were performed by immunocytochemistry with an anti SCP3 antibody. Cd caused a time-and-dose-dependent increase of total abnormalities, of fragmented SC and of asynapsis from concentration of 0.1 μg/L. Additionally, we observed a new SC abnormality, the "motheaten" SC. This abnormality is frequently associated with asynapsis and SC widening which increased with both the Cd concentration and the duration of exposure. This abnormality suggests that Cd disrupts the structure and function of proteins involved in pairing and/or meiotic recombination. These results show that Cd induces dose-and-time-dependent alterations of the meiotic process of spermatogenesis ex-vivo, and that the lowest metal concentration, which induces an adverse effect, may vary with the cell parameter studied.

  6. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Burton, M. D.; Fashena, D. S.; Naeger, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  7. CHES-1-like, the ortholog of a non-obstructive azoospermia-associated gene, blocks germline stem cell differentiation by upregulating Dpp expression in Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Liu, Yujuan; Lan, Xiang; Wu, Hao; Wen, Yang; Zhou, Zuomin; Hu, Zhibin; Sha, Jiahao; Guo, Xuejiang; Tong, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Azoospermia is a high risk factor for testicular germ cell tumors, whose underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In a genome-wide association study to identify novel loci associated with human non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), we uncovered a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1887102, P=2.60 ×10−7) in a human gene FOXN3. FOXN3 is an evolutionarily conserved gene. We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to test whether CHES-1-like, the Drosophila FOXN3 ortholog, is required for male fertility. CHES-1-like knockout flies are viable and fertile, and show no defects in spermatogenesis. However, ectopic expression of CHES-1-like in germ cells significantly reduced male fertility. With CHES-1-like overexpression, spermatogonia fail to differentiate after four rounds of mitotic division, but continue to divide to form tumor like structures. In these testes, expression levels of differentiation factor, Bam, were reduced, but the expression region of Bam was expanded. Further reduced Bam expression in CHES-1-like expressing testes exhibited enhanced tumor-like structure formation. The expression of daughters against dpp (dad), a downstream gene of dpp signaling, was upregulated by CHES-1-like expression in testes. We found that CHES-1-like could directly bind to the dpp promoter. We propose a model that CHES-1-like overexpression in germ cells activates dpp expression, inhibits spermatocyte differentiation, and finally leads to germ cell tumors. PMID:27281616

  8. Effects of oxalate on IMCD cells: a line of mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Chandhoke, Paramjit S; Koul, Hari K

    2004-12-01

    Oxalate, a metabolic end product and a major constituent of the majority of renal stones, has been shown to be toxic to renal epithelial cells of cortical origin. However, it is unknown whether inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells that are physiologically exposed to higher concentrations of oxalate also behave in a similar manner. In the present study, we examined the effects of oxalate on IMCD cells. IMCD cells from the mouse were maintained in DMEM/F12 media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and antibiotics. Exposure of IMCD cells to oxalate produced time- and concentration-dependent changes in the light microscopic appearance of the cells. Long-term exposure to oxalate resulted in alterations in cell viability, with net cell loss after exposure to concentrations of 2 mM or greater. The production of free radicals was directly related to the exposure time and the concentration of oxalate. Crystal formation occurred in less than 1 h and cells in proximity to crystals would lose membrane integrity. Compared with IMCD cells, LLC-PK1 cells as well as HK-2 cells showed significant toxicity starting at lower oxalate concentrations (0.4 mM or greater). These results provide the first direct demonstration of toxic effects of oxalate in IMCD cells, a line of renal epithelial cells of the inner medullary collecting duct, and suggest that the cells lining the collecting duct are relatively resistant to oxalate toxicity.

  9. The phagocytic function of Sertoli cells: a morphological, biochemical, and endocrinological study of lysosomes and acid phosphatase localization in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Chemes, H

    1986-10-01

    The lysosomal population of the seminiferous tubules of the rat was studied by conventional electron microscopy and electron microscopic histochemistry. Biochemical determinations of acid phosphatase were carried out in whole cell suspensions of seminiferous tubular cells or in different cell populations purified by sedimentation in albumin gradients. Lysosomes were rarely found in spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes. Young spermatids showed up to six lysosomes per section, and this number increased as spermatid maturation proceeded. Residual bodies had a very heterogeneous lysosomal content. Sertoli cells showed cyclical variations in their lysosomes. These were present in small numbers from stages I-IV of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium and progressively increased to be numerous in Sertoli cells at stages VI-VIII. After spermiation, their rapidly decreased. Acid phosphatase contents were (nanomoles of nitrophenol formed per mg protein/min): whole cell suspension, 67.5 +/- 7.8; pachytene spermatocytes (72% purity), 76.5 +/- 10.6; round spermatids (73% purity), 95.0 +/- 2.8; residual bodies (88% purity), 96.0 +/- 14.2; and Sertoli cell-enriched fraction, 278.5 +/- 75.7. In a group of rats, endogenous LH and testosterone were lowered by administration of anti-LH antibodies. There was an intense degeneration of meiotic spermatocytes, which were phagocytized and digested by these immature testosterone-depleted Sertoli cells. It is concluded that lysosomes of the seminiferous epithelium show cyclical variations, with an increase toward the time of spermiation and a decrease after the residual bodies have been digested; the acid phosphatase and lysosomal contents of Sertoli cells are higher than those of germ cells, residual body disposal is probably initiated by autophagy and completed by Sertoli cell phagocytosis; and the phagocytic function of Sertoli cells is not hormone (testosterone) dependent.

  10. Induction of specific-locus mutations in male germ cells of the mouse by acrylamide monomer.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Generoso, W M

    1991-02-01

    Acrylamide monomer (AA), injected into male mice at the maximum tolerated dose of 5 x 50 mg/kg (24-h intervals), significantly increased the specific-locus mutation rate in certain poststem-cell stages of spermatogenesis, but not in spermatogonial stem cells. Germ-cell stages in which the treatment induced dominant lethals--namely, exposed spermatozoa and late spermatids (number of surviving offspring only 3% and 27%, respectively, of those in concurrent controls)--jointly yielded the highest frequency of specific-locus mutations. AA thus conforms to Pattern 1 in our earlier classification of chemicals according to the spermatogenic stage at which they elicit maximum response (Russell et al., 1990). No specific-locus mutations were observed among 17,112 offspring derived from exposed spermatogonial stem cells, a result which rules out (at the 5% significance level) an induced mutation rate greater than 2.3 times the historical control rate. A sustained high productivity in matings made for several months following week 3 indicates that there is no significant spermatogonial killing and that cell selection is presumably not the explanation for the negative result. On the basis of genetic and/or cytogenetic evidence, the mutations induced postmeiotically by AA were 'large lesions' (multi-locus), while one of 2 recovered from exposure of differentiating spermatogonia is probably a small lesion. An earlier survey of mammalian mutagenesis results led us to conclude that, regardless of the classification of a chemical according to the stage at which it elicits its maximum response, the nature of mutations is determined by the germ-cell stage in which they are induced (Russell et al., 1990). The AA results on lesion size and on distribution of mutations among the loci fit the general pattern.

  11. Prox1 postmitotically defines dentate gyrus cells by specifying granule cell identity over CA3 pyramidal cell fate in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Iwano, Tomohiko; Masuda, Aki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Hideki; Matsuzaki, Fumio

    2012-08-01

    The brain is composed of diverse types of neurons that fulfill distinct roles in neuronal circuits, as manifested by the hippocampus, where pyramidal neurons and granule cells constitute functionally distinct domains: cornu ammonis (CA) and dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Little is known about how these two types of neuron differentiate during hippocampal development, although a set of transcription factors that is expressed in progenitor cells is known to be required for the survival of granule cells. Here, we demonstrate in mice that Prox1, a transcription factor constitutively expressed in the granule cell lineage, postmitotically functions to specify DG granule cell identity. Postmitotic elimination of Prox1 caused immature DG neurons to lose the granule cell identity and in turn terminally differentiate into the pyramidal cell type manifesting CA3 neuronal identity. By contrast, Prox1 overexpression caused opposing effects on presumptive hippocampal pyramidal cells. These results indicate that the immature DG cell has the potential to become a granule cell or a pyramidal cell, and Prox1 defines the granule cell identity. This bi-potency is lost in mature DG cells, although Prox1 is still required for correct gene expression in DG granule cells. Thus, our data indicate that Prox1 acts as a postmitotic cell fate determinant for DG granule cells over the CA3 pyramidal cell fate and is crucial for maintenance of the granule cell identity throughout the life.

  12. Transitional B cells: step by step towards immune competence.

    PubMed

    Chung, James B; Silverman, Michael; Monroe, John G

    2003-06-01

    Transitional B cells mark the crucial link between bone-marrow (BM) immature and peripheral mature B cells. Examination reveals unexpected heterogeneity, consisting of contiguous subsets with phenotypic and functional differences. Data point to the late transitional B-cell stage as a crucial juncture at which developing B cells gain access to splenic follicles, become responsive to T-cell help and lose sensitivity to negative selection, characterizing the immature B-cell response to B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling in vitro and in vivo. The biological and molecular processes directing maturation through this stage are becoming clearer through biochemical studies and murine models deficient in various components of the BCR signaling pathway.

  13. Chaotic Synchronization between Coupled Pancreatic β-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lading, B.; Mosekilde, E.; Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Y.

    The paper first describes the main bifurcation structure for a typical model of an insulin producing pancreatic β-cell. Considering a system of two coupled identical and chaotically spiking β-cells, the paper continues to examine the bifurcations through which low periodic orbits embedded in the synchronized chaotic state lose their transverse stability and produce the characteristic picture of locally and globally riddled basins of attraction. We discuss the different types of riddled basins with the associated phenomena of attractor bubbling and on-off intermittency.

  14. Attenuation of Cell Mechanosensitivity in Colon Cancer Cells during In Vitro Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Wen, Qi; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.; Janmey, Paul A.; Saif, Taher A.

    2012-01-01

    Human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells show a stable transition from low to high metastatic state when cultured on appropriately soft substrates (21 kPa). Initially epithelial (E) in nature, the HCT-8 cells become rounded (R) after seven days of culture on soft substrate. R cells show a number of metastatic hallmarks [1]. Here, we use gradient stiffness substrates, a bio-MEMS force sensor,