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Sample records for spg13 compromises chaperonin

  1. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial matrix proteases Lon and ClpP in cells from a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG13).

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Corydon, T J; Palmfeldt, J; Dürr, A; Fontaine, B; Nielsen, M N; Christensen, J H; Gregersen, N; Bross, P

    2008-05-02

    The mitochondrial chaperonin heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) assists the folding of a subset of proteins localized in mitochondria and is an essential component of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. Mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes Hsp60 have been identified in patients with an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG13), a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive paraparesis of the lower limbs. The disease-associated Hsp60-(p.Val98Ile) protein, encoded by the c.292G>A HSPD1 allele, has reduced chaperonin activity, but how its expression affects mitochondrial functions has not been investigated. We have studied mitochondrial function and expression of genes encoding mitochondrial chaperones and proteases in a human lymphoblastoid cell line and fibroblast cells from a patient who is heterozygous for the c.292G>A HSPD1 allele. We found that both the c.292G>A RNA transcript and the corresponding Hsp60-(p.Val98Ile) protein were present at comparable levels to their wild-type counterparts in SPG13 patient cells. Compared with control cells, we found no significant cellular or mitochondrial dysfunctions in SPG13 patient cells by assessing the mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, and sensitivity toward oxidative stress. However, a decreased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control proteases Lon and ClpP, both at the RNA and protein level, was demonstrated in SPG13 patient cells. We propose that decreased levels of mitochondrial proteases Lon and ClpP may allow Hsp60 substrate proteins to go through more folding attempts instead of being prematurely degraded, thereby supporting productive folding in cells with reduced Hsp60 chaperonin activity. In conclusion, our studies with SPG13 patient cells expressing the functionally impaired mutant Hsp60 chaperonin suggest that reduction of the degradative activity of the protein quality control system may represent a previously

  2. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings. PMID:27493521

  3. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  4. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  5. Ordered Nanostructures Made Using Chaperonin Polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan; McMillan, Robert; Paavola, Chad; Mogul, Rakesh; Kagawa, Hiromi

    2004-01-01

    A recently invented method of fabricating periodic or otherwise ordered nanostructures involves the use of chaperonin polypeptides. The method is intended to serve as a potentially superior and less expensive alternative to conventional lithographic methods for use in the patterning steps of the fabrication of diverse objects characterized by features of the order of nanometers. Typical examples of such objects include arrays of quantum dots that would serve as the functional building blocks of future advanced electronic and photonic devices. A chaperonin is a double-ring protein structure having a molecular weight of about 60 plus or minus 5 kilodaltons. In nature, chaperonins are ubiquitous, essential, subcellular structures. Each natural chaperonin molecule comprises 14, 16, or 18 protein subunits, arranged as two stacked rings approximately 16 to 18 nm tall by approximately 15 to 17 nm wide, the exact dimensions depending on the biological species in which it originates. The natural role of chaperonins is unknown, but they are believed to aid in the correct folding of other proteins, by enclosing unfolded proteins and preventing nonspecific aggregation during assembly. What makes chaperonins useful for the purpose of the present method is that under the proper conditions, chaperonin rings assemble themselves into higher-order structures. This method exploits such higher-order structures to define nanoscale devices. The higher-order structures are tailored partly by choice of chemical and physical conditions for assembly and partly by using chaperonins that have been mutated. The mutations are made by established biochemical techniques. The assembly of chaperonin polypeptides into such structures as rings, tubes, filaments, and sheets (two-dimensional crystals) can be regulated chemically. Rings, tubes, and filaments of some chaperonin polypeptides can, for example, function as nano vessels if they are able to absorb, retain, protect, and release gases or

  6. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  7. Thermostable chaperonin from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Cross, S J; Ciruela, A; Poomputsa, K; Romaniec, M P; Freedman, R B

    1996-06-01

    Homologues of the chaperonins Cpn60 and Cpn10 have been purified from the Gram-positive cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. The Cpn60 protein was purified by ATP-affinity chromatography and the Cpn10 protein was purified by gel-filtration, ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. The identities of the proteins were confirmed by N-terminal sequence analysis and antigenic cross-reactivity. The Cpn60 homologue is a weak, thermostable ATPase (t1/2 at 70 decrees C more than 90 min) with optimum activity (Kcat 0.07 S-1) between 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C. The ATPase activity of the authentic Cpn60 was inhibited by Escherichia coli GroES. The catalytic properties of a recombinant C. thermocellum Cpn60 purified from a GST-Cpn60 fusion protein expressed in E. coli [Ciruela (1995) Ph.D. Thesis, University of Kent] were identical with those of the authentic C. thermocellum Cpn60. Gel-filtration studies show that at room temperature the Cpn60 migrates mainly as a heptamer. Electron microscopy confirms the presence of complexes showing 7-fold rotational symmetry and also reveals a small number of particles that seem to be tetradecamers with a similar structure to E. coli GroEL complexes.

  8. The interaction network of the chaperonin CCT.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Carien; Stirling, Peter C; McCormack, Elizabeth A; Filmore, Heather; Paul, Angela; Brost, Renee L; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Leroux, Michel R; Willison, Keith R

    2008-07-09

    The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) has an important function in maintaining cellular homoeostasis by assisting the folding of many proteins, including the cytoskeletal components actin and tubulin. Yet the nature of the proteins and cellular pathways dependent on CCT function has not been established globally. Here, we use proteomic and genomic approaches to define CCT interaction networks involving 136 proteins/genes that include links to the nuclear pore complex, chromatin remodelling, and protein degradation. Our study also identifies a third eukaryotic cytoskeletal system connected with CCT: the septin ring complex, which is essential for cytokinesis. CCT interactions with septins are ATP dependent, and disrupting the function of the chaperonin in yeast leads to loss of CCT-septin interaction and aberrant septin ring assembly. Our results therefore provide a rich framework for understanding the function of CCT in several essential cellular processes, including epigenetics and cell division.

  9. Dynamics, flexibility, and allostery in molecular chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Skjærven, Lars; Cuellar, Jorge; Martinez, Aurora; Valpuesta, José María

    2015-09-14

    The chaperonins are a family of molecular chaperones present in all three kingdoms of life. They are classified into Group I and Group II. Group I consists of the bacterial variants (GroEL) and the eukaryotic ones from mitochondria and chloroplasts (Hsp60), while Group II consists of the archaeal (thermosomes) and eukaryotic cytosolic variants (CCT or TRiC). Both groups assemble into a dual ring structure, with each ring providing a protective folding chamber for nascent and denatured proteins. Their functional cycle is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis, which drives a series of structural rearrangements that enable encapsulation and subsequent release of the substrate protein. Chaperonins have elaborate allosteric mechanisms to regulate their functional cycle. Long-range negative cooperativity between the two rings ensures alternation of the folding chambers. Positive intra-ring cooperativity, which facilitates concerted conformational transitions within the protein subunits of one ring, has only been demonstrated for Group I chaperonins. In this review, we describe our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms and the structure-function relationships in these complex protein systems with a particular focus on the structural dynamics, allostery, and associated conformational rearrangements.

  10. Potential for Modulation of the Hydrophobic Effect Inside Chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    England, Jeremy L.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the spontaneity of some in vitro protein-folding reactions, native folding in vivo often requires the participation of barrel-shaped multimeric complexes known as chaperonins. Although it has long been known that chaperonin substrates fold upon sequestration inside the chaperonin barrel, the precise mechanism by which confinement within this space facilitates folding remains unknown. We examine the possibility that the chaperonin mediates a favorable reorganization of the solvent for the folding reaction. We discuss the effect of electrostatic charge on solvent-mediated hydrophobic forces in an aqueous environment. Based on these physical arguments, we construct a simple, phenomenological theory for the thermodynamics of density and hydrogen-bond order fluctuations in liquid water. Within the framework of this model, we investigate the effect of confinement inside a chaperonin-like cavity on the configurational free energy of water by calculating solvent free energies for cavities corresponding to the different conformational states in the ATP-driven catalytic cycle of the prokaryotic chaperonin GroEL. Our findings suggest that one function of chaperonins may involve trapping unfolded proteins and subsequently exposing them to a microenvironment in which the hydrophobic effect, a crucial thermodynamic driving force for folding, is enhanced. PMID:18599630

  11. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  12. The Molecular Basis of Hyperthermophily: The Role of HSP60/Chaperonins In Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kagawa, Hiromi

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we aim to understand how S. shibatae copes with high temperatures. In particular, we investigated the role of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60 or chaperonin) with the hypothesis that chaperonin stabilizes the cell membrane under stressful conditions. To prove the hypothesis, this year two questions were addressed: (1) Is the chaperonin localized in the cytoplasm or on the cell membrane? (2) Does the chaperonin show affinity to lipid in vivo? In addition to those, we intensively studied newly discovered chaperonin-related protein, gamma, to understand how it influenced the function of the other components of chaperonin and how their combined activities contributed to hyperthermophily.

  13. Cpn20: siamese twins of the chaperonin world.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Celeste; Bonshtien, Anat; Farchi-Pisanty, Odelia; Vitlin, Anna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-02-01

    The chloroplast cpn20 protein is a functional homolog of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, but its gene consists of two cpn10-like units joined head-to-tail by a short chain of amino acids. This double protein is unique to plastids and was shown to exist in plants as well plastid-containing parasites. In vitro assays showed that this cpn20 co-chaperonin is a functional homolog of cpn10. In terms of structure, existing data indicate that the oligomer is tetrameric, yet it interacts with a heptameric cpn60 partner. Thus, the functional oligomeric structure remains a mystery. In this review, we summarize what is known about this distinctive chaperonin and use a bioinformatics approach to examine the expression of cpn20 in Arabidopsis thaliana relative to other chaperonin genes in this species. In addition, we examine the primary structure of the two homologous domains for similarities and differences, in comparison with cpn10 from other species. Lastly, we hypothesize as to the oligomeric structure and raison d'être of this unusual co-chaperonin homolog.

  14. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  15. Dynamic Complexes in the Chaperonin-Mediated Protein Folding Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Celeste; Jebara, Fady; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam

    2016-01-01

    The GroEL–GroES chaperonin system is probably one of the most studied chaperone systems at the level of the molecular mechanism. Since the first reports of a bacterial gene involved in phage morphogenesis in 1972, these proteins have stimulated intensive research for over 40 years. During this time, detailed structural and functional studies have yielded constantly evolving concepts of the chaperonin mechanism of action. Despite of almost three decades of research on this oligomeric protein, certain aspects of its function remain controversial. In this review, we highlight one central aspect of its function, namely, the active intermediates of its reaction cycle, and present how research to this day continues to change our understanding of chaperonin-mediated protein folding. PMID:28008398

  16. Evolution of Chaperonin Gene Duplication in Stigonematalean Cyanobacteria (Subsection V)

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbach, Julia; Ilhan, Judith; Hülter, Nils; Stucken, Karina; Dagan, Tal

    2017-01-01

    Chaperonins promote protein folding and are known to play a role in the maintenance of cellular stability under stress conditions. The group I bacterial chaperonin complex comprises GroEL, that forms a barrel-like oligomer, and GroES that forms the lid. In most eubacteria the GroES/GroEL chaperonin is encoded by a single-copy bicistronic operon, whereas in cyanobacteria up to three groES/groEL paralogs have been documented. Here we study the evolution and functional diversification of chaperonin paralogs in the heterocystous, multi-seriate filament forming cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 6912. The genome of C. fritschii encodes two groES/groEL operons (groESL1, groESL1.2) and a monocistronic groEL gene (groEL2). A phylogenetic reconstruction reveals that the groEL2 duplication is as ancient as cyanobacteria, whereas the groESL1.2 duplication occurred at the ancestor of heterocystous cyanobacteria. A comparison of the groEL paralogs transcription levels under different growth conditions shows that they have adapted distinct transcriptional regulation. Our results reveal that groEL1 and groEL1.2 are upregulated during diazotrophic conditions and the localization of their promoter activity points towards a role in heterocyst differentiation. Furthermore, protein–protein interaction assays suggest that paralogs encoded in the two operons assemble into hybrid complexes. The monocistronic encoded GroEL2 is not forming oligomers nor does it interact with the co-chaperonins. Interaction between GroES1.2 and GroEL1.2 could not be documented, suggesting that the groESL1.2 operon does not encode a functional chaperonin complex. Functional complementation experiments in Escherichia coli show that only GroES1/GroEL1 and GroES1/GroEL1.2 can substitute the native operon. In summary, the evolutionary consequences of chaperonin duplication in cyanobacteria include the retention of groESL1 as a housekeeping gene, subfunctionalization of groESL1.2 and

  17. Evolution of Chaperonin Gene Duplication in Stigonematalean Cyanobacteria (Subsection V).

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Julia; Ilhan, Judith; Bogumil, David; Hülter, Nils; Stucken, Karina; Dagan, Tal

    2017-01-12

    Chaperonins promote protein folding and are known to play a role in the maintenance of cellular stability under stress conditions. The group I bacterial chaperonin complex comprises GroEL, that forms a barrel-like oligomer, and GroES that forms the lid. In most eubacteria the GroES/GroEL chaperonin is encoded by a single-copy bicistronic operon, whereas in cyanobacteria up to three groES/groEL paralogs have been documented. Here we study the evolution and functional diversification of chaperonin paralogs in the heterocystous, multi-seriate filament forming cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 6912. The genome of C. fritschii encodes two groES/groEL operons (groESL1, groESL1.2) and a monocistronic groEL gene (groEL2). A phylogenetic reconstruction reveals that the groEL2 duplication is as ancient as cyanobacteria, whereas the groESL1.2 duplication occurred at the ancestor of heterocystous cyanobacteria. A comparison of the groEL paralogs transcription levels under different growth conditions shows that they have adapted distinct transcriptional regulation. Our results reveal that groEL1 and groEL1.2 are upregulated during diazotrophic conditions and the localization of their promoter activity points towards a role in heterocyst differentiation. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction assays suggest that paralogs encoded in the two operons assemble into hybrid complexes. The monocistronic GroEL2 is not forming oligomers nor does it interact with the co-chaperonins. Interaction between GroES1.2 and GroEL1.2 could not be documented, suggesting that the groESL1.2 operon does not encode a functional chaperonin complex. Functional complementation experiments in Escherichia coli show that only GroES1/GroEL1 and GroES1/GroEL1.2 can substitute the native operon. In summary, the evolutionary consequences of chaperonin duplication in cyanobacteria include the retention of groESL1 as a housekeeping gene, subfunctionalization of groESL1.2 and neofunctionalization of the

  18. Versatile platform for nanotechnology based on circular permutations of chaperonin protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); Chan, Suzanne L. (Inventor); Li, Yi-Fen (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides chaperonin polypeptides which are modified to include N-terminal and C-terminal ends that are relocated from the central pore region to various different positions in the polypeptide which are located on the exterior of the folded modified chaperonin polypeptide. In the modified chaperonin polypeptide, the naturally-occurring N-terminal and C-terminal ends are joined together directly or with an intervening linker peptide sequence. The relocated N-terminal or C-terminal ends can be covalently joined to, or bound with another molecule such as a nucleic acid molecule, a lipid, a carbohydrate, a second polypeptide, or a nanoparticle. The modified chaperonin polypeptides can assemble into double-ringed chaperonin structures. Further, the chaperonin structures can organize into higher order structures such as nanofilaments or nanoarrays which can be used to produce nanodevices and nanocoatings.

  19. Mechanism of folding chamber closure in a group II chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Baker, Matthew L; Schröder, Gunnar F; Douglas, Nicholai R; Reissmann, Stefanie; Jakana, Joanita; Dougherty, Matthew; Fu, Caroline J; Levitt, Michael; Ludtke, Steven J; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-21

    Group II chaperonins are essential mediators of cellular protein folding in eukaryotes and archaea. These oligomeric protein machines, approximately 1 megadalton, consist of two back-to-back rings encompassing a central cavity that accommodates polypeptide substrates. Chaperonin-mediated protein folding is critically dependent on the closure of a built-in lid, which is triggered by ATP hydrolysis. The structural rearrangements and molecular events leading to lid closure are still unknown. Here we report four single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of Mm-cpn, an archaeal group II chaperonin, in the nucleotide-free (open) and nucleotide-induced (closed) states. The 4.3 A resolution of the closed conformation allowed building of the first ever atomic model directly from the single particle cryo-EM density map, in which we were able to visualize the nucleotide and more than 70% of the side chains. The model of the open conformation was obtained by using the deformable elastic network modelling with the 8 A resolution open-state cryo-EM density restraints. Together, the open and closed structures show how local conformational changes triggered by ATP hydrolysis lead to an alteration of intersubunit contacts within and across the rings, ultimately causing a rocking motion that closes the ring. Our analyses show that there is an intricate and unforeseen set of interactions controlling allosteric communication and inter-ring signalling, driving the conformational cycle of group II chaperonins. Beyond this, we anticipate that our methodology of combining single particle cryo-EM and computational modelling will become a powerful tool in the determination of atomic details involved in the dynamic processes of macromolecular machines in solution.

  20. Mechanism of nucleotide sensing in group II chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose H; Ralston, Corie Y; Douglas, Nicholai R; Kumar, Ramya; Lopez, Tom; McAndrew, Ryan P; Knee, Kelly M; King, Jonathan A; Frydman, Judith; Adams, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    Group II chaperonins mediate protein folding in an ATP-dependent manner in eukaryotes and archaea. The binding of ATP and subsequent hydrolysis promotes the closure of the multi-subunit rings where protein folding occurs. The mechanism by which local changes in the nucleotide-binding site are communicated between individual subunits is unknown. The crystal structure of the archaeal chaperonin from Methanococcus maripaludis in several nucleotides bound states reveals the local conformational changes associated with ATP hydrolysis. Residue Lys-161, which is extremely conserved among group II chaperonins, forms interactions with the γ-phosphate of ATP but shows a different orientation in the presence of ADP. The loss of the ATP γ-phosphate interaction with Lys-161 in the ADP state promotes a significant rearrangement of a loop consisting of residues 160–169. We propose that Lys-161 functions as an ATP sensor and that 160–169 constitutes a nucleotide-sensing loop (NSL) that monitors the presence of the γ-phosphate. Functional analysis using NSL mutants shows a significant decrease in ATPase activity, suggesting that the NSL is involved in timing of the protein folding cycle. PMID:22193720

  1. Essential role of the chaperonin folding compartment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yun-Chi; Chang, Hung-Chun; Chakraborty, Kausik; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2008-01-01

    The GroEL/GroES chaperonin system of Escherichia coli forms a nano-cage allowing single protein molecules to fold in isolation. However, as the chaperonin can also mediate folding independently of substrate encapsulation, it remained unclear whether the folding cage is essential in vivo. To address this question, we replaced wild-type GroEL with mutants of GroEL having either a reduced cage volume or altered charge properties of the cage wall. A stepwise reduction in cage size resulted in a gradual loss of cell viability, although the mutants bound non-native protein efficiently. Strikingly, a mild reduction in cage size increased the yield and the apparent rate of green fluorescent protein folding, consistent with the view that an effect of steric confinement can accelerate folding. As shown in vitro, the observed acceleration of folding was dependent on protein encapsulation by GroES but independent of GroES cycling regulated by the GroEL ATPase. Altering the net-negative charge of the GroEL cage wall also strongly affected chaperonin function. Based on these findings, the GroEL/GroES compartment is essential for protein folding in vivo. PMID:18418386

  2. A mobile loop order–disorder transition modulates the speed of chaperonin cycling

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Frank; Kerner, Michael J.; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Klein, Gracjana; Georgopoulos, Costa; Landry, Samuel J.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular machines order and disorder polypeptides as they form and dissolve large intermolecular interfaces, but the biological significance of coupled ordering and binding has been established in few, if any, macromolecular systems. The ordering and binding of GroES co-chaperonin mobile loops accompany an ATP-dependent conformational change in the GroEL chaperonin that promotes client protein folding. Following ATP hydrolysis, disordering of the mobile loops accompanies co-chaperonin dissociation, reversal of the GroEL conformational change, and release of the client protein. “High-affinity” GroEL mutants were identified by their compatibility with “low-affinity” co-chaperonin mutants and incompatibility with high-affinity co-chaperonin mutants. Analysis of binding kinetics using the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan-containing co-chaperonin variants revealed that excessive affinity causes the chaperonin to stall in a conformation that forms in the presence of ATP. Destabilizing the β-hairpins formed by the mobile loops restores the normal rate of dissociation. Thus, the free energy of mobile-loop ordering and disordering acts like the inertia of an engine’s flywheel by modulating the speed of chaperonin conformational changes. PMID:15238634

  3. Functionality and Evolutionary History of the Chaperonins in Thermophilic Archaea. A Bioinformatical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlin, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    We used bioinformatics methods to study phylogenetic relations and differentiation patterns of the archaeal chaperonin 60 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP60) genes in support of the study of differential expression patterns of the three chaperonin genes encoded in Sulfolobus shibatae.

  4. Mechanism of lid closure in the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT.

    PubMed

    Booth, Christopher R; Meyer, Anne S; Cong, Yao; Topf, Maya; Sali, Andrej; Ludtke, Steven J; Chiu, Wah; Frydman, Judith

    2008-07-01

    All chaperonins mediate ATP-dependent polypeptide folding by confining substrates within a central chamber. Intriguingly, the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC (also called CCT) uses a built-in lid to close the chamber, whereas prokaryotic chaperonins use a detachable lid. Here we determine the mechanism of lid closure in TRiC using single-particle cryo-EM and comparative protein modeling. Comparison of TRiC in its open, nucleotide-free, and closed, nucleotide-induced states reveals that the interdomain motions leading to lid closure in TRiC are radically different from those of prokaryotic chaperonins, despite their overall structural similarity. We propose that domain movements in TRiC are coordinated through unique interdomain contacts within each subunit and, further, these contacts are absent in prokaryotic chaperonins. Our findings show how different mechanical switches can evolve from a common structural framework through modification of allosteric networks.

  5. Comparative cell signalling activity of ultrapure recombinant chaperonin 60 proteins from prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Maria; Poole, Stephen; Coates, Anthony R M; Tormay, Peter; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline; Henderson, Brian

    2005-06-01

    Heat-shock protein (hsp)60/chaperonin 60 is a potent immunogen which has recently been claimed to have cell-signalling actions upon myeloid and vascular endothelial cells. The literature is controversial with different chaperonin 60 proteins producing different patterns of cellular activation and the ever-present criticism that activity is the result of bacterial contaminants. To clarify the situation we have cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity the chaperonin 60 proteins from Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and the human mitochondrion. These highly purified proteins were compared for their ability to stimulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine synthesis and vascular endothelial cell adhesion protein expression. In spite of their significant sequence homology, the H. pylori protein was the most potent PBMC activator with the human protein the least potent. PBMC activation by C. pneumoniae and human, but not H. pylori, chaperonin 60 was blocked by antibody neutralization of Toll-like receptor-4. The C. pneumoniae chaperonin 60 was the most potent endothelial cell activator, with the human protein being significantly less active than bacterial chaperonin 60 proteins. These results have implications for the role of chaperonin 60 proteins as pathological factors in autoimmune and cardiovascular disease, and raise the possibility that each of these proteins may result in different pathological effects in such diseases.

  6. Expression and Functional Characterization of the First Bacteriophage-Encoded Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Orlov, Victor N.; Robben, Johan; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2012-01-01

    Chaperonins promote protein folding in vivo and are ubiquitously found in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. The first viral chaperonin GroEL ortholog, gene product 146 (gp146), whose gene was earlier identified in the genome of bacteriophage EL, has been shown to be synthesized during phage propagation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The recombinant gp146 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized by different physicochemical methods for the first time. Using serum against the recombinant protein, gp146's native substrate, the phage endolysin gp188, has been immunoprecipitated from the lysate of EL-infected bacteria and identified by mass spectrometry. In vitro experiments have shown that gp146 has a protective effect against endolysin thermal inactivation and aggregation, providing evidence of its chaperonin function. The phage chaperonin has been found to have the architecture and some properties similar to those of GroEL but not to require cochaperonin for its functional activity. PMID:22787217

  7. Ring Separation Highlights the Protein-Folding Mechanism Used by the Phage EL-Encoded Chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Morgan, David Gene; Sherman, Michael B; He, Lilin; Georgopoulos, Costa; Sernova, Natalia V; Kurochkina, Lidia P; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2016-04-05

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous, ATP-dependent protein-folding molecular machines that are essential for all forms of life. Bacteriophage φEL encodes its own chaperonin to presumably fold exceedingly large viral proteins via profoundly different nucleotide-binding conformations. Our structural investigations indicate that ATP likely binds to both rings simultaneously and that a misfolded substrate acts as the trigger for ATP hydrolysis. More importantly, the φEL complex dissociates into two single rings resulting from an evolutionarily altered residue in the highly conserved ATP-binding pocket. Conformational changes also more than double the volume of the single-ring internal chamber such that larger viral proteins are accommodated. This is illustrated by the fact that φEL is capable of folding β-galactosidase, a 116-kDa protein. Collectively, the architecture and protein-folding mechanism of the φEL chaperonin are significantly different from those observed in group I and II chaperonins.

  8. The chaperonin CCT8 facilitates spread of tobamovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fichtenbauer, Daniela; Xu, Xianfeng Morgan; Jackson, Dave; Kragler, Friedrich

    2012-03-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor KNOTTED1 (KN1) functions in shoot meristem maintenance and is thought to move from cell to cell in a similar fashion as viral movement proteins. Both types of transported proteins bind to RNA, and associate with intercellular bridges formed by plasmodesmata. In a mutant screen for KN1 transport deficiency, a component of a type II chaperonin complex, CCT8, was identified, and found to interact with non-cell-autonomous proteins. The cct8 mutants are characterized by limited functionality of non-cell-autonomous proteins after their movement, and a phenotype resembling lack of homeodomain protein activity. Evidence suggests that CCT8 functions in post-translocational refolding of transported proteins. Here we show that spread of tobamovirus infection is reduced in a cct8 mutant. This suggests that similar to KN1, viral movement proteins are unfolded and refolded during transport to gain functionality in the receiving cells.

  9. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Role of CCT chaperonin in the disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaisari, Sharon; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2017-01-31

    The mitotic checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis and thus ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. When this checkpoint is active, a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, Bub3, and Cdc20, is assembled. MCC inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), whose action is necessary for anaphase initiation. When the checkpoint signal is turned off, MCC is disassembled, a process required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. Different moieties of MCC are disassembled by different ATP-requiring processes. Previous work showed that Mad2 is released from MCC by the joint action of the TRIP13 AAA-ATPase and the Mad2-binding protein p31(comet) Now we have isolated from extracts of HeLa cells an ATP-dependent factor that releases Cdc20 from MCC and identified it as chaperonin containing TCP1 or TCP1-Ring complex (CCT/TRiC chaperonin), a complex known to function in protein folding. Bacterially expressed CCT5 chaperonin subunits, which form biologically active homooligomers [Sergeeva, et al. (2013) J Biol Chem 288(24):17734-17744], also promote the disassembly of MCC. CCT chaperonin further binds and disassembles subcomplexes of MCC that lack Mad2. Thus, the combined action of CCT chaperonin with that of TRIP13 ATPase promotes the complete disassembly of MCC, necessary for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint.

  11. ATP Dependent Rotational Motion of Group II Chaperonin Observed by X-ray Single Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Ayumi; Moriya, Kazuki; Makabe, Koki; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Sato, Tokushi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Yohda, Masafumi; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2013-01-01

    Group II chaperonins play important roles in protein homeostasis in the eukaryotic cytosol and in Archaea. These proteins assist in the folding of nascent polypeptides and also refold unfolded proteins in an ATP-dependent manner. Chaperonin-mediated protein folding is dependent on the closure and opening of a built-in lid, which is controlled by the ATP hydrolysis cycle. Recent structural studies suggest that the ring structure of the chaperonin twists to seal off the central cavity. In this study, we demonstrate ATP-dependent dynamics of a group II chaperonin at the single-molecule level with highly accurate rotational axes views by diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT). A UV light-triggered DXT study with caged-ATP and stopped-flow fluorometry revealed that the lid partially closed within 1 s of ATP binding, the closed ring subsequently twisted counterclockwise within 2–6 s, as viewed from the top to bottom of the chaperonin, and the twisted ring reverted to the original open-state with a clockwise motion. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that the biphasic lid-closure process occurs with unsynchronized closure and a synchronized counterclockwise twisting motion. PMID:23734192

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein folding in a chaperonin cage

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Hoffmann, Armin; Streich, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are known to be essential for avoiding protein aggregation in vivo, but it is still unclear how they affect protein folding mechanisms. We use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to follow the folding of a protein inside the GroEL/GroES chaperonin cavity over a time range from milliseconds to hours. Our results show that confinement in the chaperonin decelerates the folding of the C-terminal domain in the substrate protein rhodanese, but leaves the folding rate of the N-terminal domain unaffected. Microfluidic mixing experiments indicate that strong interactions of the substrate with the cavity walls impede the folding process, but the folding hierarchy is preserved. Our results imply that no universal chaperonin mechanism exists. Rather, a competition between intra- and intermolecular interactions determines the folding rates and mechanisms of a substrate inside the GroEL/GroES cage. PMID:20547872

  13. Origin and evolution of eukaryotic chaperonins: phylogenetic evidence for ancient duplications in CCT genes.

    PubMed

    Archibald, J M; Logsdon, J M; Doolittle, W F

    2000-10-01

    Chaperonins are oligomeric protein-folding complexes which are divided into two distantly related structural classes. Group I chaperonins (called GroEL/cpn60/hsp60) are found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles, while group II chaperonins are present in archaea and the cytoplasm of eukaryotes (called CCT/TriC). While archaea possess one to three chaperonin subunit-encoding genes, eight distinct CCT gene families (paralogs) have been characterized in eukaryotes. We are interested in determining when during eukaryotic evolution the multiple gene duplications producing the CCT subunits occurred. We describe the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of five CCT genes from TRICHOMONAS: vaginalis and seven from GIARDIA: lamblia, representatives of amitochondriate protist lineages thought to have diverged early from other eukaryotes. Our data show that the gene duplications producing the eight CCT paralogs took place prior to the organismal divergence of TRICHOMONAS: and GIARDIA: from other eukaryotes. Thus, these divergent protists likely possess completely hetero-oligomeric CCT complexes like those in yeast and mammalian cells. No close phylogenetic relationship between the archaeal chaperonins and specific CCT subunits was observed, suggesting that none of the CCT gene duplications predate the divergence of archaea and eukaryotes. The duplications producing the CCTdelta and CCTepsilon subunits, as well as CCTalpha, CCTbeta, and CCTeta, are the most recent in the CCT gene family. Our analyses show significant differences in the rates of evolution of archaeal chaperonins compared with the eukaryotic CCTs, as well as among the different CCT subunits themselves. We discuss these results in light of current views on the origin, evolution, and function of CCT complexes.

  14. Nucleotide-dependent protein folding in the type II chaperonin from the mesophilic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed Central

    Kusmierczyk, Andrew R; Martin, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of the first chaperonin (Mm-cpn) from a mesophilic archaeon, Methanococcus maripaludis. The single gene was cloned from genomic DNA and expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a recombinant protein of 543 amino acids. In contrast with other known archaeal chaperonins, Mm-cpn is fully functional in all respects under physiological conditions of 37 degrees C. The complex has Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activity and can prevent the aggregation of citrate synthase. It promotes a high-yield refolding of guanidinium-chloride-denatured rhodanese in a nucleotide-dependent manner. ATP binding is sufficient to effect folding, but ATP hydrolysis is not essential. PMID:12628000

  15. Isolation and characterization of a Paracentrotus lividus cDNA encoding a stress-inducible chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Antonietta Ragusa, Maria; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Liegro, Italia Di; Rinaldi, Anna Maria

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous proteins that facilitate protein folding in an adenosine triphosphate–dependent manner. Here we report the isolation of a sea urchin cDNA (Plhsp60) coding for mitochondrial chaperonin (Cpn60), whose basal expression is further enhanced by heat shock. The described cDNA corresponds to a full-length mRNA encoding a protein of 582 amino acids, the first 32 of which constitute a putative mitochondrial targeting leader sequence. Comparative analysis has demonstrated that this protein is highly conserved in evolution. PMID:11147969

  16. P. falciparum cpn20 Is a Bona Fide Co-Chaperonin That Can Replace GroES in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Zizelski, Gal; Parnas, Avital; Dzikowski, Ron; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum. PMID:23326533

  17. Chaperonin-enhanced Escherichia coli cell-free expression of functional CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2016-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases and disorders. Obtaining milligram quantities of functional receptors through the development of robust production methods are highly demanded to probe GPCR structure and functions. In this study, we analyzed synergies of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL-GroES and cell-free expression for the production of functionally folded C-X-C chemokine GPCR type 4 (CXCR4). The yield of soluble CXCR4 in the presence of detergent Brij-35 reached ∼1.1mg/ml. The chaperonin complex added was found to significantly enhance the productive folding of newly synthesized CXCR4, by increasing both the rate (∼30-fold) and the yield (∼1.3-fold) of folding over its spontaneous behavior. Meanwhile, the structural stability of CXCR4 was also improved with supplied GroEL-GroES, as was the soluble expression of biologically active CXCR4 with a ∼1.4-fold increase. The improved stability together with the higher ligand binding affinity suggests more efficient folding. The essential chaperonin GroEL was shown to be partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both GroEL and its co-chaperonin GroES were necessary. The method reported here should prove generally useful for cell-free production of large amounts of natively folded GPCRs, and even other classes of membrane proteins.

  18. Reversible denaturation of oligomeric human chaperonin 10: denatured state depends on chemical denaturant.

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, J. J.; Moczygemba, C. K.; Steede, N. K.; Landry, S. J.; Wittung-Stafshede, P.

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins cpn60/cpn10 (GroEL/GroES in Escherichia coli) assist folding of nonnative polypeptides. Folding of the chaperonins themselves is distinct in that it entails assembly of a sevenfold symmetrical structure. We have characterized denaturation and renaturation of the recombinant human chaperonin 10 (cpn10), which forms a heptamer. Denaturation induced by chemical denaturants urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) as well as by heat was monitored by tyrosine fluorescence, far-ultraviolet circular dichroism, and cross-linking; all denaturation reactions were reversible. GuHCl-induced denaturation was found to be cpn10 concentration dependent, in accord with a native heptamer to denatured monomer transition. In contrast, urea-induced denaturation was not cpn10 concentration dependent, suggesting that under these conditions cpn10 heptamers denature without dissociation. There were no indications of equilibrium intermediates, such as folded monomers, in either denaturant. The different cpn10 denatured states observed in high [GuHCl] and high [urea] were supported by cross-linking experiments. Thermal denaturation revealed that monomer and heptamer reactions display the same enthalpy change (per monomer), whereas the entropy-increase is significantly larger for the heptamer. A thermodynamic cycle for oligomeric cpn10, combining chemical denaturation with the dissociation constant in absence of denaturant, shows that dissociated monomers are only marginally stable (3 kJ/mol). The thermodynamics for co-chaperonin stability appears conserved; therefore, instability of the monomer could be necessary to specify the native heptameric structure. PMID:11152122

  19. Three conformations of an Archaeal chaperonin, TF55 from Sulfolobus shibatae.

    SciTech Connect

    Schoehn, G.; Quaite-Randall, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Saibil, H. R.; Biosciences Division; Birkbeck Coll.

    2000-02-25

    Chaperonins are cylindrical, oligomeric complexes, essential for viability and required for the folding of other proteins. The GroE (group I) subfamily, found in eubacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, have 7-fold symmetry and provide an enclosed chamber for protein subunit folding. The central cavity is transiently closed by interaction with the co-protein, GroES. The most prominent feature specific to the group II subfamily, found in archaea and in the eukaryotic cytosol, is a long insertion in the substrate-binding region. In the archaeal complex, this forms an extended structure acting as a built-in lid, obviating the need for a GroES-like co-factor. This extension occludes a site known to bind non-native polypeptides in GroEL. The site and nature of substrate interaction are not known for the group II subfamily. The atomic structure of the thermosome, an archaeal group II chaperonin, has been determined in a fully closed form, but the entry and exit of protein substrates requires transient opening. Although an open form has been investigated by electron microscopy, conformational changes in group II chaperonins are not well characterized. Using electron cryo-microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction, we describe three conformations of a group II chaperonin, including an asymmetric, bullet-shaped form, revealing the range of domain movements in this subfamily.

  20. Separation of E. coli chaperonin groEL from β-galactosidase without denaturation.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Li, Jihui; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2015-12-15

    Chaperonins are a class of ubiquitous proteins that assist and accelerate protein folding in the cell. The Escherichia coli groEL is the best known and forms a complex with its co-chaperonin groES in the presence of ATP and assists in the folding of nascent and misfolded substrate proteins. The purification of recombinant groEL results in a nearly homogeneous sample that consistently co-purifies with the major contaminant E. coli β-galactosidase. Removal of β-galactosidase using column chromatography alone is exceedingly difficult. This is due to the fact that the overall size, surface charge, isoelectric point and hydrophobicity of groEL and β-galactosidase are very similar. Therefore purification of groEL chaperonin to homogeneity requires denaturation of the complex into monomers with urea for separating the groEL from contaminating β-galactosidase followed by reassembly of the chaperonin complex. Here, we present a simple procedure for separating β-galactosidase along with many other impurities from groEL preparations under non-denaturing conditions. The groEL is first salted out with 50% ammonium sulfate. This step also precipitates β-galactosidase but this is then salted out by the addition of magnesium chloride which leaves groEL in solution. All remaining contaminants are removed by column chromatography.

  1. Prokaryotic Chaperonins as Experimental Models for Elucidating Structure-Function Abnormalities of Human Pathogenic Mutant Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Conway de Macario, Everly; Robb, Frank T.; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2017-01-01

    All archaea have a chaperonin of Group II (thermosome) in their cytoplasm and some have also a chaperonin of Group I (GroEL; Cpn60; Hsp60). Conversely, all bacteria have GroEL, some in various copies, but only a few have, in addition, a chaperonin (tentatively designated Group III chaperonin) very similar to that occurring in all archaea, i.e., the thermosome subunit, and in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, named CCT. Thus, nature offers a range of prokaryotic organisms that are potentially useful as experimental models to study the human CCT and its abnormalities. This is important because many diseases, the chaperonopathies, have been identified in which abnormal chaperones, including mutant CCT, are determinant etiologic-pathogenic factors and, therefore, research is needed to elucidate their pathologic features at the molecular level. Such research should lead to the clarification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathologic lesions observed in the tissues and organs of patients with chaperonopathies. Information on these key issues is necessary to make progress in diagnosis and treatment. Some of the archaeal organisms as well as some of the bacterial models suitable for studying molecular aspects pertinent to human mutant chaperones are discussed here, focusing on CCT. Results obtained with the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus model to investigate the impact of a pathogenic CCT5 mutation on molecular properties and chaperoning functions are reviewed. The pathogenic mutation examined weakens the ability of the chaperonin subunit to form stable hexadecamers and as a consequence, the chaperoning functions of the complex are impaired. The future prospect is to find means for stabilizing the hexadecamer, which should lead to a recovering of chaperone function and the improving of lesions and clinical condition. PMID:28119916

  2. On the role of the chaperonin CCT in the just-in-time assembly process of APC/CCdc20.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Carien

    2010-02-05

    The just-in-time hypothesis relates to the assembly of large multi-protein complexes and their regulation of activation in the cell. Here I postulate that chaperonins may contribute to the timely assembly and activation of such complexes. For the case of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome(Cdc20) assembly by the eukaryotic chaperonin chaperonin containing Tcp1 it is shown that just-in-time synthesis and chaperone-assisted folding can synergise to generate a highly regulated assembly process of a protein complex that is vital for cell cycle progression. Once dependency has been established transcriptional regulation and chaperonin-dependency may have co-evolved to safeguard the timely activation of important multi-protein complexes.

  3. Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein: Biophysics and Application to Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad; Chan, Suzanne; Li, Yi-Fen; McMillan, R. Andrew; Trent, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We have designed five circular permutants of a chaperonin protein derived from the hyperthermophilic organism Sulfolobus shibatae. These permuted proteins were expressed in E. coli and are well-folded. Furthermore, all the permutants assemble into 18-mer double rings of the same form as the wild-type protein. We characterized the thermodynamics of folding for each permutant by both guanidine denaturation and differential scanning calorimetry. We also examined the assembly of chaperonin rings into higher order structures that may be used as nanoscale templates. The results show that circular permutation can be used to tune the thermodynamic properties of a protein template as well as facilitating the fusion of peptides, binding proteins or enzymes onto nanostructured templates.

  4. Human chaperonin 60 (Hsp60) stimulates bone resorption: structure/function relationships.

    PubMed

    Meghji, S; Lillicrap, M; Maguire, M; Tabona, P; Gaston, J S H; Poole, S; Henderson, B

    2003-09-01

    It is established that the molecular chaperone, chaperonin 60, from various bacteria and from Homo sapiens has cell-cell signalling activity and is able to induce proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. We previously reported that chaperonin 60 proteins from Gram-negative bacteria, but not mycobacteria, have the capacity to resorb cultured murine calvarial bone. We now report that lipopolysaccharide-low human recombinant chaperonin 60 (Hsp60) is a relatively weak cytokine-inducing agonist but is a potent stimulator of murine calvarial bone resorption. The osteolytic activity of Hsp60 was significantly inhibited by indomethacin, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and osteoprotegerin, but 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors were less effective. Analysis of Hsp60 truncation mutants revealed that N-terminal mutants (Delta1-137, Delta1-358, and Delta1-465) retained bone resorbing activity. In contrast, a C-terminal truncation mutant (Delta1-26 + Delta466-573) was inactive. This suggests that the active domain in this protein is found within residues 466-573. It is now established that Hsp60 is present in the blood of the majority of the population with the normal range encompassing levels able to activate bone cells. The possibility exists that this protein could play a role in bone remodelling.

  5. A Versatile Platform for Nanotechnology Based on Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad; McMillan, Andrew; Trent, Jonathan; Chan, Suzanne; Mazzarella, Kellen; Li, Yi-Fen

    2004-01-01

    A number of protein complexes have been developed as nanoscale templates. These templates can be functionalized using the peptide sequences that bind inorganic materials. However, it is difficult to integrate peptides into a specific position within a protein template. Integrating intact proteins with desirable binding or catalytic activities is an even greater challenge. We present a general method for modifying protein templates using circular permutation so that additional peptide sequence can be added in a wide variety of specific locations. Circular permutation is a reordering of the polypeptide chain such that the original termini are joined and new termini are created elsewhere in the protein. New sequence can be joined to the protein termini without perturbing the protein structure and with minimal limitation on the size and conformation of the added sequence. We have used this approach to modify a chaperonin protein template, placing termini at five different locations distributed across the surface of the protein complex. These permutants are competent to form the double-ring structures typical of chaperonin proteins. The permuted double-rings also form the same assemblies as the unmodified protein. We fused a fluorescent protein to two representative permutants and demonstrated that it assumes its active structure and does not interfere with assembly of chaperonin double-rings.

  6. Cryo-EM structure of a group II chaperonin in the prehydrolysis ATP-bound state leading to lid closure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Ma, Boxue; DiMaio, Frank; Douglas, Nicholai R; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Baker, David; Frydman, Judith; Levitt, Michael; Chiu, Wah

    2011-05-11

    Chaperonins are large ATP-driven molecular machines that mediate cellular protein folding. Group II chaperonins use their "built-in lid" to close their central folding chamber. Here we report the structure of an archaeal group II chaperonin in its prehydrolysis ATP-bound state at subnanometer resolution using single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural comparison of Mm-cpn in ATP-free, ATP-bound, and ATP-hydrolysis states reveals that ATP binding alone causes the chaperonin to close slightly with a ∼45° counterclockwise rotation of the apical domain. The subsequent ATP hydrolysis drives each subunit to rock toward the folding chamber and to close the lid completely. These motions are attributable to the local interactions of specific active site residues with the nucleotide, the tight couplings between the apical and intermediate domains within the subunit, and the aligned interactions between two subunits across the rings. This mechanism of structural changes in response to ATP is entirely different from those found in group I chaperonins.

  7. The eukaryote chaperonin CCT is a cold shock protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Somer, Lilach; Shmulman, Oshrit; Dror, Tali; Hashmueli, Sharon; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2002-01-01

    The eukaryotic Hsp60 cytoplasmic chaperonin CCT (chaperonin containing the T-complex polypeptide–1) is essential for growth in budding yeast, and mutations in individual CCT subunits have been shown to affect assembly of tubulin and actin. The present research focused mainly on the expression of the CCT subunits, CCTα and CCTβ, in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Previous studies showed that, unlike most other chaperones, CCT in yeast does not undergo induction following heat shock. In this study, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein levels of CCT subunits following exposure to low temperatures, were examined. The Northern blot analysis indicated a 3- to 4-fold increase in mRNA levels of CCTα and CCTβ genes after cold shock at 4°C. Interestingly, Western blot analysis showed that cold shock induces an increase in the CCTα protein, which is expressed at 10°C, but not at 4°C. Transfer of 4°C cold-shocked cells to 10°C induced a 5-fold increase in the CCTα protein level. By means of fluorescent immunostaining and confocal microscopy, we found CCTα to be localized in the cortex and the cell cytoplasm of S. cerevisiae. Localization of CCTα was not affected at low temperatures. Co-localization of CCT and filaments of actin and tubulin was not observed by microscopy. The induction pattern of the CCTα protein suggests that expression of the chaperonin may be primarily important during the recovery from low temperatures and the transition to growth at higher temperatures, as found for other Hsps during the recovery phase from heat shock. PMID:11892987

  8. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76 degrees C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92 degrees C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface.

  9. Versatile roles of the chaperonin GroEL in microorganism-insect interactions.

    PubMed

    Kupper, Maria; Gupta, Shishir K; Feldhaar, Heike; Gross, Roy

    2014-04-01

    The chaperonin 60 (Cpn60) is present in all three kingdoms of life and is one of the most conserved proteins in living organisms. The Escherichia coli Cpn60 (GroEL) is the best studied representative of the huge Cpn60 family. It is an essential protein because in conjunction with the chaperonin 10 (Cpn10 or GroES) it forms a protein-folding machine required for correct folding of many proteins and for recycling of misfolded proteins. As many other chaperones, GroEL and GroES are also known as heat-shock proteins (HSPs), since heat stress leads to a strong induction of their expression, a measure to counteract the increase in misfolded proteins as a result of a high nonphysiological temperature. A large amount of literature is available which is dedicated to the elucidation of how protein folding is assisted by this molecular chaperone. However, apart from this primary task, additional so-called 'moonlighting' functions of GroEL proteins unrelated to their folding activity have emerged in the past years. In fact, it becomes apparent that GroEL proteins have diverse functions in particular in mutualistic and pathogenic microorganism-host interactions. In this brief review, we describe some of these recent findings focusing on the importance of GroEL for microorganism-insect interactions.

  10. A Chaperonin Subunit with Unique Structures Is Essential for Folding of a Specific Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lianwei; Fukao, Yoichiro; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Motohashi, Reiko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Type I chaperonins are large, double-ring complexes present in bacteria (GroEL), mitochondria (Hsp60), and chloroplasts (Cpn60), which are involved in mediating the folding of newly synthesized, translocated, or stress-denatured proteins. In Escherichia coli, GroEL comprises 14 identical subunits and has been exquisitely optimized to fold its broad range of substrates. However, multiple Cpn60 subunits with different expression profiles have evolved in chloroplasts. Here, we show that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, the minor subunit Cpn60β4 forms a heterooligomeric Cpn60 complex with Cpn60α1 and Cpn60β1–β3 and is specifically required for the folding of NdhH, a subunit of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH). Other Cpn60β subunits cannot complement the function of Cpn60β4. Furthermore, the unique C-terminus of Cpn60β4 is required for the full activity of the unique Cpn60 complex containing Cpn60β4 for folding of NdhH. Our findings suggest that this unusual kind of subunit enables the Cpn60 complex to assist the folding of some particular substrates, whereas other dominant Cpn60 subunits maintain a housekeeping chaperonin function by facilitating the folding of other obligate substrates. PMID:21483722

  11. Probing Water Density and Dynamics in the Chaperonin GroEL Cavity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent binding of the chaperonin GroEL to its cofactor GroES forms a cavity in which encapsulated substrate proteins can fold in isolation from bulk solution. It has been suggested that folding in the cavity may differ from that in bulk solution owing to steric confinement, interactions with the cavity walls, and differences between the properties of cavity-confined and bulk water. However, experimental data regarding the cavity-confined water are lacking. Here, we report measurements of water density and diffusion dynamics in the vicinity of a spin label attached to a cysteine in the Tyr71 → Cys GroES mutant obtained using two magnetic resonance techniques: electron-spin echo envelope modulation and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. Residue 71 in GroES is fully exposed to bulk water in free GroES and to confined water within the cavity of the GroEL–GroES complex. Our data show that water density and translational dynamics in the vicinity of the label do not change upon complex formation, thus indicating that bulk water-exposed and cavity-confined GroES surface water share similar properties. Interestingly, the diffusion dynamics of water near the GroES surface are found to be unusually fast relative to other protein surfaces studied. The implications of these findings for chaperonin-assisted folding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24888581

  12. Crystal Structures of a Group II Chaperonin Reveal the Open and Closed States Associated with the Protein Folding Cycle*♦

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose H.; Ralston, Corie Y.; Douglas, Nicholai R.; Meyer, Daniel; Knee, Kelly M.; Goulet, Daniel R.; King, Jonathan A.; Frydman, Judith; Adams, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Chaperonins are large protein complexes consisting of two stacked multisubunit rings, which open and close in an ATP-dependent manner to create a protected environment for protein folding. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a group II chaperonin in an open conformation. We have obtained structures of the archaeal chaperonin from Methanococcus maripaludis in both a peptide acceptor (open) state and a protein folding (closed) state. In contrast with group I chaperonins, in which the equatorial domains share a similar conformation between the open and closed states and the largest motions occurs at the intermediate and apical domains, the three domains of the archaeal chaperonin subunit reorient as a single rigid body. The large rotation observed from the open state to the closed state results in a 65% decrease of the folding chamber volume and creates a highly hydrophilic surface inside the cage. These results suggest a completely distinct closing mechanism in the group II chaperonins as compared with the group I chaperonins. PMID:20573955

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of chaperonin-60 from Paracoccus denitrificans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Takaaki A.; Takasuga, Yoshio; Sumi, Masato; Yohda, Masafumi; Yoshida, Masasuke; Miki, Kunio

    1996-10-01

    Chaperonin-60 (cpn60) from Paracoccus denitrificans has been crystallized using polyethyleneglycol(PEG) 6000 and LiCl as precipitants. The crystals diffract up to 3.0 Å resolution by using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the tetragonal space group P4 22 12 with unit cell parameters of a = b = 284 Å, c = 152 Å. Seven subunit molecules of cpn60 seem to exist in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. A complete diffraction data set was collected using a Weissenberg camera system attached to the synchrotron radiation source and merged up to 3.2 Å resolution. Self-rotation functions calculated show the existence of a local 7-fold axis, suggesting the 7-fold symmetry ring assembly.

  14. Role of denatured-state properties in chaperonin action probed by single-molecule spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Delley, Cyrille; Hoffmann, Armin; Pfeil, Shawn H; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-12-16

    The bacterial chaperonin GroEL/GroES assists folding of a broad spectrum of denatured and misfolded proteins. Here, we explore the limits of this remarkable promiscuity by mapping two denatured proteins with very different conformational properties, rhodanese and cyclophilin A, during binding and encapsulation by GroEL/GroES with single-molecule spectroscopy, microfluidic mixing, and ensemble kinetics. We find that both proteins bind to GroEL with high affinity in a reaction involving substantial conformational adaptation. However, whereas the compact denatured state of rhodanese is encapsulated efficiently upon addition of GroES and ATP, the more expanded and unstructured denatured cyclophilin A is not encapsulated but is expelled into solution. The origin of this surprising disparity is the weaker interactions of cyclophilin A with a transiently formed GroEL-GroES complex, which may serve as a crucial checkpoint for substrate discrimination.

  15. Role of Denatured-State Properties in Chaperonin Action Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Delley, Cyrille; Hoffmann, Armin; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial chaperonin GroEL/GroES assists folding of a broad spectrum of denatured and misfolded proteins. Here, we explore the limits of this remarkable promiscuity by mapping two denatured proteins with very different conformational properties, rhodanese and cyclophilin A, during binding and encapsulation by GroEL/GroES with single-molecule spectroscopy, microfluidic mixing, and ensemble kinetics. We find that both proteins bind to GroEL with high affinity in a reaction involving substantial conformational adaptation. However, whereas the compact denatured state of rhodanese is encapsulated efficiently upon addition of GroES and ATP, the more expanded and unstructured denatured cyclophilin A is not encapsulated but is expelled into solution. The origin of this surprising disparity is the weaker interactions of cyclophilin A with a transiently formed GroEL-GroES complex, which may serve as a crucial checkpoint for substrate discrimination. PMID:25517154

  16. Monomer-heptamer equilibrium of the Escherichia coli chaperonin GroES.

    PubMed

    Zondlo, J; Fisher, K E; Lin, Z; Ducote, K R; Eisenstein, E

    1995-08-22

    In an effort to clarify the role of GroES in chaperonin-facilitated protein folding, a plasmid-encoding expression system for GroES incorporating a histidine-tagged, thrombin-cleavable, N-terminal sequence was constructed. This approach facilitated the rapid purification of native-like, histidine-cleaved GroES (HC-GroES). The addition of NaSCN to purification buffers to mildly promote subunit dissociation enabled the complete separation of chromosomally encoded, wild-type GroES chains from recombinant chains, allowing the production of homogeneous mutant variants of GroES. A substitution of histidine-7 to tryptophan in GroES was used to demonstrate the concentration-dependent modulation of the heptameric quaternary structure of the chaperonin. Fluorescence and light scattering studies of this mutant suggest that GroES heptamers dissociate to monomers upon dilution with half-times of 2-4 min. Sedimentation equilibrium experiments using either wild-type or HC-GroES can best be described by a monomer--heptamer equilibrium, yielding dissociation constants of 1 x 10(-38) M6 for native GroES and 2 x 10(-32) M6 for HC-GroES. These results are supported by subunit exchange experiments using mixtures of native or HC-GroES and GroES containing the complete N-terminal histidine tail. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrates that these mixtures form an eight-membered hybrid set within minutes. The studies described here suggest a dynamic equilibrium for the quaternary structure of GroES, which may be an important feature for its role in GroEL-mediated protein folding reactions.

  17. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  18. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  19. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  20. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  1. 22 CFR 309.20 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Compromise. 309.20 Section 309.20 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 309.20 Compromise. Peace Corps may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS (31 CFR part 902)....

  2. 22 CFR 34.19 - Compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise. 34.19 Section 34.19 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAIMS AND STOLEN PROPERTY DEBT COLLECTION Collection Adjustments § 34.19 Compromise. STATE may attempt to effect compromise in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS,...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the XoGroEL chaperonin from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Pham, Tan Viet; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Hong, Myoung Ki; Kim, Jeong Gu; Lee, Sang Hee; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Kang, Lin Woo

    2014-05-01

    Along with the co-chaperonin GroES, the chaperonin GroEL plays an essential role in enhancing protein folding or refolding and in protecting proteins against misfolding and aggregation in the cellular environment. The XoGroEL gene (XOO_4288) from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae was cloned and the protein was expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified XoGroEL protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a crystal diffracted to a resolution of 3.4 Å. The crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with 14 monomers in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.7 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 54.5%.

  4. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  5. Forensic Analysis of Compromised Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Directory Tree Analysis File Generator is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script that simplifies and automates the collection of information for forensic analysis of compromised computer systems. During such an analysis, it is sometimes necessary to collect and analyze information about files on a specific directory tree. Directory Tree Analysis File Generator collects information of this type (except information about directories) and writes it to a text file. In particular, the script asks the user for the root of the directory tree to be processed, the name of the output file, and the number of subtree levels to process. The script then processes the directory tree and puts out the aforementioned text file. The format of the text file is designed to enable the submission of the file as input to a spreadsheet program, wherein the forensic analysis is performed. The analysis usually consists of sorting files and examination of such characteristics of files as ownership, time of creation, and time of most recent access, all of which characteristics are among the data included in the text file.

  6. Chaperonin Cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of Green Algae and Plants Function as Hetero-oligomeric Ring Complexes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-01-01

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor “heptamers” interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α7β7. It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins. PMID:22518837

  7. Conversion of a Chaperonin GroEL-independent Protein into an Obligate Substrate*

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Takuya; Fujiwara, Kei; Niwa, Tatsuya; Taguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones assist protein folding by preventing unproductive protein aggregation in the cell. In Escherichia coli, chaperonin GroEL/GroES (GroE) is the only indispensable chaperone and is absolutely required for the de novo folding of at least ∼60 proteins. We previously found that several orthologs of the obligate GroE substrates in Ureaplasma urealyticum, which lacks the groE gene in the genome, are E. coli GroE-independent folders, despite their significant sequence identities. Here, we investigated the key features that define the GroE dependence. Chimera or random mutagenesis analyses revealed that independent multiple point mutations, and even single mutations, were sufficient to confer GroE dependence on the Ureaplasma MetK. Strikingly, the GroE dependence was well correlated with the propensity to form protein aggregates during folding. The results reveal the delicate balance between GroE dependence and independence. The function of GroE to buffering the aggregation-prone mutations plays a role in maintaining higher genetic diversity of proteins. PMID:25288795

  8. Physiological effects of unassembled chaperonin Cct subunits in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M Anaul; Kaminska, Joanna; Segel, George B; Bethlendy, Gabor; Lin, Paul; Della Seta, Flavio; Blegen, Casey; Swiderek, Kristine M; Zoładek, Teresa; Arndt, Kim T; Sherman, Fred

    2005-02-01

    Eukaryotic chaperonins, the Cct complexes, are assembled into two rings, each of which is composed of a stoichiometric array of eight different subunits, which are denoted Cct1p-Cct8p. Overexpression of a single CCT gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes an increase of the corresponding Cct subunit, but not of the Cct complex. Nevertheless, overexpression of certain Cct subunits, especially CCT6, suppresses a wide range of abnormal phenotypes, including those caused by the diverse types of conditional mutations tor2-21, lst8-2 and rsp5-9 and those caused by the concomitant overexpression of Sit4p and Sap155p. The examination of 73 altered forms of Cct6p revealed that the cct6-24 mutation, containing GDGTT --> AAAAA replacements of the conserved ATP-binding motif, was unable to suppress any of these traits, although the cct6-24 allele was completely functional for growth. These results provide evidence for functional differences among Cct subunits and for physiological properties of unassembled subunits. We suggest that the suppression is due to the competition of specific Cct subunits for activities that normally modify various cellular components. Furthermore, we also suggest that the Cct subunits can act as suppressors only in certain states, such as when associated with ATP.

  9. CCT chaperonin complex is required for the biogenesis of functional Plk1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Lin, Chin-Yo; Lei, Ming; Yan, Shi; Zhou, Tianhua; Erikson, Raymond L

    2005-06-01

    Experiments from several different organisms have demonstrated that polo-like kinases are involved in many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. Here, we provide evidence to show that Plk1 associates with chaperonin-containing TCP1 complex (CCT) both in vitro and in vivo. Silencing of CCT by use of RNA interference (RNAi) in mammalian cells inhibits cell proliferation, decreases cell viability, causes cell cycle arrest with 4N DNA content, and leads to apoptosis. Depletion of CCT in well-synchronized HeLa cells causes cell cycle arrest at G(2), as demonstrated by a low mitotic index and Cdc2 activity. Complete depletion of Plk1 in well-synchronized cells also leads to G(2) block, suggesting that misfolded Plk1 might be responsible for the failure of CCT-depleted cells to enter mitosis. Moreover, partial depletion of CCT or Plk1 leads to mitotic arrest. Finally, the CCT-depleted cells reenter the cell cycle upon reintroduction of the purified constitutively active form of Plk1, indicating that Plk1 might be a CCT substrate.

  10. Beyond Antibodies: Development of a Novel Protein Scaffold Based on Human Chaperonin 10

    PubMed Central

    Alsultan, Abdulkarim M.; Chin, David Y.; Howard, Christopher B.; de Bakker, Christopher J.; Jones, Martina L.; Mahler, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Human Chaperonin 10 (hCpn10) was utilised as a novel scaffold for presenting peptides of therapeutic and diagnostic significance. Molecular dynamic simulations and protein sizing analyses identified a peptide linker (P1) optimal for the formation of the quarternary hCpn10 heptamer structure. hCpn10 scaffold displaying peptides targeting Factor VIIa (CE76-P1) and CD44 (CP7) were expressed in E. coli. Functional studies of CE76-P1 indicated nanomolar affinity for Factor VIIa (3 nM) similar to the E-76 peptide (6 nM), with undetectable binding to Factor X. CE76-P1 was a potent inhibitor of FX activity (via inhibition of Factor VIIa) and prolonged clot formation 4 times longer than achieved by E-76 peptide as determined by prothrombin time (PT) assays. This improvement in clotting function by CE76-P1, highlights the advantages of a heptamer-based scaffold for improving avidity by multiple peptide presentation. In another example of hCPn10 utility as a scaffold, CP7 bound to native CD44 overexpressed on cancer cells and bound rCD44 with high affinity (KD 9.6 nM). The ability to present various peptides through substitution of the hCpn10 mobile loop demonstrates its utility as a novel protein scaffold. PMID:27874025

  11. Allosteric Transitions of Supramolecular Systems Explored by Network Models: Application to Chaperonin GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zheng; Májek, Peter; Bahar, Ivet

    2009-01-01

    Identification of pathways involved in the structural transitions of biomolecular systems is often complicated by the transient nature of the conformations visited across energy barriers and the multiplicity of paths accessible in the multidimensional energy landscape. This task becomes even more challenging in exploring molecular systems on the order of megadaltons. Coarse-grained models that lend themselves to analytical solutions appear to be the only possible means of approaching such cases. Motivated by the utility of elastic network models for describing the collective dynamics of biomolecular systems and by the growing theoretical and experimental evidence in support of the intrinsic accessibility of functional substates, we introduce a new method, adaptive anisotropic network model (aANM), for exploring functional transitions. Application to bacterial chaperonin GroEL and comparisons with experimental data, results from action minimization algorithm, and previous simulations support the utility of aANM as a computationally efficient, yet physically plausible, tool for unraveling potential transition pathways sampled by large complexes/assemblies. An important outcome is the assessment of the critical inter-residue interactions formed/broken near the transition state(s), most of which involve conserved residues. PMID:19381265

  12. Identifying natural substrates for chaperonins using a sequence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Stan, George; Brooks, Bernard R.; Lorimer, George H.; Thirumalai, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin machinery, GroEL, assists the folding of a number of proteins. We describe a sequence-based approach to identify the natural substrate proteins (SPs) for GroEL. Our method is based on the hypothesis that natural SPs are those that contain patterns of residues similar to those found in either GroES mobile loop and/or strongly binding peptide in complex with GroEL. The method is validated by comparing the predicted results with experimentally determined natural SPs for GroEL. We have searched for such patterns in five genomes. In the E. coli genome, we identify 1422 (about one-third) sequences that are putative natural SPs. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 2885 (32%) of sequences can be natural substrates for Hsp60, which is the analog of GroEL. The precise number of natural SPs is shown to be a function of the number of contacts an SP makes with the apical domain (NC) and the number of binding sites (NB) in the oligomer with which it interacts. For known SPs for GroEL, we find ~4 < NC < 5 and 2 ≤ NB ≤ 4. A limited analysis of the predicted binding sequences shows that they do not adopt any preferred secondary structure. Our method also predicts the putative binding regions in the identified SPs. The results of our study show that a variety of SPs, associated with diverse functions, can interact with GroEL. PMID:15576562

  13. A zinc-binding site by negative selection induces metallodrug susceptibility in an essential chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Cun, Shujian; Sun, Hongzhe

    2010-01-01

    GroES is an indispensable chaperonin virtually found throughout all life forms. Consequently, mutations of this protein must be critically scrutinized by natural selection. Nevertheless, the homolog from a potentially virulent gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, strikingly features a histidine/cysteine-rich C terminus that shares no significant homology with other family members. Additionally, three more (H45, C51, and C53) are uniquely present in its apical domain. The statistical analyses show that these residues may have originated from negative selection, presumably driven by either dependent or independent amino acid mutations. In the absence of the C-terminal metal-binding domain, the mutant protein still exhibits a substantial capacity for zinc binding in vivo. The biochemical properties of site-directed mutants indicate that H45, C51, and C53 make up an oxidation-sensitive zinc-binding site that may donate the bound metal to a zinc acceptor. Of interest, bismuth antiulcer drugs strongly bind at this site (Kd of approximately 7 × 10-26 M), replacing the bound zinc and consequently inducing the disruption of the quaternary structure. Because biological features by negative selection are usually inert to change during evolution, this study sheds light on a promising field whereby medicines can be designed or improved to specifically target the residues that uniquely evolved in pathogenic proteins so as to retard the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:20194796

  14. Ancient allelism at the cytosolic chaperonin-alpha-encoding gene of the zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Figueroa, F; Mayer, W E; Klein, J

    2000-01-01

    The T-complex protein 1, TCP1, gene codes for the CCT-alpha subunit of the group II chaperonins. The gene was first described in the house mouse, in which it is closely linked to the T locus at a distance of approximately 11 cM from the Mhc. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in which the T homolog is linked to the class I Mhc loci, the TCP1 locus segregates independently of both the T and the Mhc loci. Despite its conservation between species, the zebrafish TCP1 locus is highly polymorphic. In a sample of 15 individuals and the screening of a cDNA library, 12 different alleles were found, and some of the allelic pairs were found to differ by up to nine nucleotides in a 275-bp-long stretch of sequence. The substitutions occur in both translated and untranslated regions, but in the former they occur predominantly at synonymous codon sites. Phylogenetically, the alleles fall into two groups distinguished also by the presence or absence of a 10-bp insertion/deletion in the 3' untranslated region. The two groups may have diverged as long as 3.5 mya, and the polymorphic differences may have accumulated by genetic drift in geographically isolated populations. PMID:10628990

  15. The htpAB operon of Legionella pneumophila cannot be deleted in the presence of the groE chaperonin operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Gagnon, Elizabeth; Orton, Dennis J; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    HtpB, the chaperonin of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila , displays several virulence-related functions in vitro. To confirm HtpB's role in vivo, host infections with an htpB deletion mutant would be required. However, we previously reported that the htpAB operon (encoding co-chaperonin and chaperonin) is essential. We attempted here to delete htpAB in a L. pneumophila strain carrying the groE operon (encoding the Escherichia coli co-chaperonin and chaperonin). The groE operon was inserted into the chromosome of L. pneumophila Lp02, and then allelic replacement of htpAB with a gentamicin resistance cassette was attempted. Although numerous potential postallelic replacement transformants showed a correct selection phenotype, we still detected htpAB by PCR and full-size HtpB by immunoblot. Southern blot and PCR analysis indicated that the gentamicin resistance cassette had apparently integrated in a duplicated htpAB region. However, we showed by Southern blot that strain Lp02, and the Lp02 derivative carrying the groE operon, have only one copy of htpAB. These results confirmed that the htpAB operon cannot be deleted, not even in the presence of the groE operon, and suggested that attempts to delete htpAB under strong phenotypic selection result in aberrant genetic recombinations that could involve duplication of the htpAB locus.

  16. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  17. 26 CFR 301.7122-1 - Compromises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for taxes, interest, or penalties. Unless the terms of the offer and acceptance expressly provide otherwise, acceptance of an offer to compromise a civil liability does not remit a criminal liability, nor does acceptance of an offer to compromise a criminal liability remit a civil liability. (b) Grounds...

  18. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  19. Clayton's compromises and the assisted dying debate.

    PubMed

    Parker, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Richard Huxtable has recently argued that while assisted dying has been both repeatedly condemned and commended, a compromise resolution is possible. Following critique of other purported solutions, he argues for a new legal offence of "compassionate killing" as a plausible compromise between supporters and opponents of legalised assisted dying, because it offers something of significance to both sides. However, it turns out that "compassionate killing" would leave both sides with insufficient net benefit for the proposal to qualify as a compromise between them. By analogy with another apparently intractable bioethical debate, concerning destructive embryo research, this column rejects Huxtable's solution as another "Clayton's compromise". True compromise is not possible in bioethical debates involving divisions over deeply held values and world views. Resolving such debates inevitably involves the substitution of one dominant world view with another.

  20. Nucleotide binding-promoted conformational changes release a nonnative polypeptide from the Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Eisenstein, E

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonins GroEL and GroES facilitate the refolding of polypeptide chains in an ATP hydrolysis-dependent reaction. The elementary steps in the binding and release of polypeptide substrates to GroEL were investigated in surface plasmon resonance studies to measure the rates of binding and dissociation of a normative variant of subtilisin. The rate constants determined for GroEL association with and dissociation from this variant yielded a micromolar dissociation constant, in agreement with independent calorimetric estimates. The rate of GroEL dissociation from the nonnative chain was increased significantly in the presence of 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), ADP, and ATP, yielding maximal values between 0.04 and 0.22 s(-1). The sigmoidal dependence of the dissociation rate on the concentration of AMP-PNP and ADP indicated that polypeptide dissociation is limited by a concerted conformational change that occurs after nucleotide binding. The dependence of the rate of release on ATP exhibited two sigmoidal transitions attributable to nucleotide binding to the distal and proximal toroid of a GroEL-polypeptide chain complex. The addition of GroES resulted in a marked increase in the rate of nonnative polypeptide release from GroEL, indicating that the cochaperonin binds more rapidly than the dissociation of polypeptides. These data demonstrate the importance of nucleotide binding-promoted concerted conformational changes for the release of chains from GroEL, which correlate with the sigmoidal hydrolysis of ATP by the chaperonin. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of a working hypothesis for a single cycle of chaperonin action. PMID:8700870

  1. Identification, characterization, and expression of the BiP endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperonins in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Stedman, T T; Buck, G A

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated, characterized, and examined the expression of the genes encoding BiP endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperonins responsible for transport, maturation, and proper folding of membrane and secreted proteins from two divergent strains of Pneumocystis carinii. The BiP genes, Pcbip and Prbip, from the P. c. carinii (prototype) strain and the P. c. rattus (variant) strain, respectively, are single-copy genes that reside on chromosomes of approximately 330 and approximately 350 kbp. Both genes encode approximately 72.5-kDa proteins that are most homologous to BiP genes from other organisms and exhibit the amino-terminal signal peptides and carboxyl-terminal ER retention sequences that are hallmarks of BiP proteins. We established short-term P. carinii cultures to examine expression and induction of Pcbip in response to heat shock, glucose starvation, inhibition of protein transport or N-linked glycosylation, and other conditions known to affect proper transport, glycosylation, and maturation of membrane and secreted proteins. These studies indicated that Pcbip mRNA is constitutively expressed but induced under conditions known to induce BiP expression in other organisms. In contrast to mammalian BiP genes but like other fungal BiP genes, P. carinii BiP mRNA levels are induced by heat shock. Finally, the Prbip and Pcbip coding sequences surprisingly exhibit only approximately 83% DNA and approximately 90% amino acid sequence identity and show only limited conservation in noncoding flanking and intron sequences. Analyses of the P. carinii BiP gene sequences support inclusion of P. carinii among the fungi but suggest a large divergence and possible speciation among P. carinii strains infecting a given host. PMID:8890193

  2. Chaperonins GroEL and GroES: views from atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Mou, J; Sheng, S; Ho, R; Shao, Z

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonins, GroEL and GroES, as well as their complexes in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable nucleotide AMP-PNP, have been imaged with the atomic force microscope (AFM). We demonstrate that both GroEL and GroES that have been adsorbed to a mica surface can be resolved directly by the AFM in aqueous solution at room temperature. However, with glutaraldehyde fixation of already adsorbed molecules, the resolution of both GroEL and GroES was further improved, as all seven subunits were well resolved without any image processing. We also found that chemical fixation was necessary for the contact mode AFM to image GroEL/ES complexes, and in the AFM images. GroEL with GroES bound can be clearly distinguished from those without. The GroEL/ES complex was about 5 nm higher than GroEL alone, indicating a 2 nm upward movement of the apical domains of GroEL. Using a slightly larger probe force, unfixed GroEL could be dissected: the upper heptamer was removed to expose the contact surface of the two heptamers. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of cross-linking agents for the determination of molecular structures with the AFM. They also pave the way for using the AFM to study the structural basis for the function of GroE system and other molecular chaperones. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8889197

  3. Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164282.html Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success Results similar ... over 35, so it's unclear if more severe obesity might increase the risk of meniscal repair failure, ...

  4. Chaperonin 20 might be an iron chaperone for superoxide dismutase in activating iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs) is aided by Cu incorporation and disulfide isomerization by Cu chaperone of SOD (CCS). As well, an Fe-S cluster scaffold protein, ISU, might alter the incorporation of Fe or Mn into yeast MnSOD (ySOD2), thus leading to active or inactive ySOD2. However, metallochaperones involved in the activation of FeSODs are unknown. Recently, we found that a chloroplastic chaperonin cofactor, CPN20, could mediate FeSOD activity. To investigate whether Fe incorporation in FeSOD is affected by CPN20, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to analyze the ability of CPN20 to bind Fe. CPN20 could bind Fe, and the Fe binding to FeSOD was increased with CPN20 incubation. Thus, CPN20 might be an Fe chaperone for FeSOD activation, a role independent of its well-known co-chaperonin activity. PMID:23299425

  5. Structural Mechanisms of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation Suppression by the Synthetic Chaperonin-like CCT5 Complex Explained by Cryoelectron Tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Michele C.; Sergeeva, Oksana A.; Isas, Jose M.; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G.; King, Jonathan A.; Langen, Ralf; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by functional deficits and loss of striatal neurons, is linked to an expanded and unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT). This DNA sequence translates to a polyglutamine repeat in the protein product, leading to mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein aggregation. The aggregation of mHTT is inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) chaperonin. Recently, a novel complex comprised of a single type of TRiC subunit has been reported to inhibit mHTT aggregation. Specifically, the purified CCT5 homo-oligomer complex, when compared with TRiC, has a similar structure, ATP use, and substrate refolding activity, and, importantly, it also inhibits mHTT aggregation. Using an aggregation suppression assay and cryoelectron tomography coupled with a novel computational classification method, we uncover the interactions between the synthetic CCT5 complex (∼1 MDa) and aggregates of mutant huntingtin exon 1 containing 46 glutamines (mHTTQ46-Ex1). We find that, in a similar fashion to TRiC, synthetic CCT5 complex caps mHTT fibrils at their tips and encapsulates mHTT oligomers, providing a structural description of the inhibition of mHTTQ46-Ex1 by CCT5 complex and a shared mechanism of mHTT inhibition between TRiC chaperonin and the CCT5 complex: cap and contain. PMID:25995452

  6. Regulation and sequence of the Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 groESL operon, encoding a cyanobacterial chaperonin.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R; Reddy, K J; Sherman, L A

    1990-01-01

    The molecular chaperonins such as GroEL are now widely regarded as essential components for the stabilization of integral membrane or secretory proteins before membrane insertion or translocation, as well as for the assembly of macromolecular complexes such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase. The groESL operon of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was cloned as two independent lacZ-groEL translational fusions by immunoscreening a lambda ZAP genomic expression library and then sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences of the GroES and GroEL proteins demonstrated very high levels of amino acid identity with cognate chaperonins from bacteria and chloroplasts. The bicistronic 2.4-kilobase transcript from this operon, barely detectable in RNA preparations from cells grown at 30 degrees C, accumulated approximately 120-fold in preparations from cells grown for 20 min at 45 degrees C. Under these conditions, GroEL protein accumulated to 10-fold-higher levels. Primer extension analysis was used to identify a cyanobacterial heat shock promoter located at -81 base pairs from the groES initiation codon. The transcriptional -10 and -35 sequences differ slightly from Escherichia coli consensus heat shock promoter sequences. Images PMID:1975581

  7. CCT chaperonin complex is required for efficient delivery of anthrax toxin into the cytosol of host cells

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Louise H.; Hett, Erik C.; Clatworthy, Anne E.; Mark, Kevin G.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial toxins have evolved successful strategies for coopting host proteins to access the cytosol of host cells. Anthrax lethal factor (LF) enters the cytosol through pores in the endosomal membrane formed by anthrax protective antigen. Although in vitro models using planar lipid bilayers have shown that translocation can occur in the absence of cellular factors, recent studies using intact endosomes indicate that host factors are required for translocation in the cellular environment. In this study, we describe a high-throughput shRNA screen to identify host factors required for anthrax lethal toxin-induced cell death. The cytosolic chaperonin complex chaperonin containing t-complex protein 1 (CCT) was identified, and subsequent studies showed that CCT is required for efficient delivery of LF and related fusion proteins into the cytosol. We further show that knockdown of CCT inhibits the acid-induced delivery of LF and the fusion protein LFN-Bla (N terminal domain of LF fused to β-lactamase) across the plasma membrane of intact cells. Together, these results suggest that CCT is required for efficient delivery of enzymatically active toxin to the cytosol and are consistent with a direct role for CCT in translocation of LF through the protective antigen pore. PMID:23716698

  8. The chaperonin CCT inhibits assembly of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils by a specific, conformation-dependent interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sot, Begoña; Rubio-Muñoz, Alejandra; Leal-Quintero, Ahudrey; Martínez-Sabando, Javier; Marcilla, Miguel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Valpuesta, José M.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic chaperonin CCT (chaperonin containing TCP-1) uses cavities built into its double-ring structure to encapsulate and to assist folding of a large subset of proteins. CCT can inhibit amyloid fibre assembly and toxicity of the polyQ extended mutant of huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington’s disease. This raises the possibility that CCT modulates other amyloidopathies, a still-unaddressed question. We show here that CCT inhibits amyloid fibre assembly of α-synuclein A53T, one of the mutants responsible for Parkinson’s disease. We evaluated fibrillation blockade in α-synuclein A53T deletion mutants and CCT interactions of full-length A53T in distinct oligomeric states to define an inhibition mechanism specific for α-synuclein. CCT interferes with fibre assembly by interaction of its CCTζ and CCTγ subunits with the A53T central hydrophobic region (NAC). This interaction is specific to NAC conformation, as it is produced once soluble α-synuclein A53T oligomers form and blocks the reaction before fibres begin to grow. Finally, we show that this association inhibits α-synuclein A53T oligomer toxicity in neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our results and those for huntingtin suggest that CCT is a general modulator of amyloidogenesis via a specific mechanism. PMID:28102321

  9. Asp-52 in combination with Asp-398 plays a critical role in ATP hydrolysis of chaperonin GroEL.

    PubMed

    Koike-Takeshita, Ayumi; Mitsuoka, Kaoru; Taguchi, Hideki

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL is a double-ring chaperone that assists protein folding with the aid of GroES and ATP. Asp-398 in GroEL is known as one of the critical residues on ATP hydrolysis because GroEL(D398A) mutant is deficient in ATP hydrolysis (<2% of the wild type) but not in ATP binding. In the archaeal Group II chaperonin, another aspartate residue, Asp-52 in the corresponding E. coli GroEL, in addition to Asp-398 is also important for ATP hydrolysis. We investigated the role of Asp-52 in GroEL and found that ATPase activity of GroEL(D52A) and GroEL(D52A/D398A) mutants was ∼ 20% and <0.01% of wild-type GroEL, respectively, indicating that Asp-52 in E. coli GroEL is also involved in the ATP hydrolysis. GroEL(D52A/D398A) formed a symmetric football-shaped GroEL-GroES complex in the presence of ATP, again confirming the importance of the symmetric complex during the GroEL ATPase cycle. Notably, the symmetric complex of GroEL(D52A/D398A) was extremely stable, with a half-time of ∼ 150 h (∼ 6 days), providing a good model to characterize the football-shaped complex.

  10. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  11. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  12. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  13. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.22 Bases for compromise. (a) Compromise. The Secretary may compromise a debt if the full...

  14. The Cpn10(1) Co-Chaperonin of A. thaliana Functions Only as a Hetero-Oligomer with Cpn20

    PubMed Central

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Zizelski, Gal; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2) and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1) forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1) is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1). The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins. PMID:25419702

  15. Vascular Compromise from Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Shannon; Carruthers, Jean D.A.; Carruthers, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of soft tissue fillers is, in part, due to their favorable side-effect profile. However, serious complications can occur. The authors describe their extensive clinical experience with soft-tissue augmentation and the rare complication of vascular compromise, which can lead to necrosis and scarring. Over a 10-year period between January 2003 and January 2013, the authors observed a total of 12 cases of vascular compromise. Eight patients in their clinical practice showed evidence of vascular compromise out of a total of 14,355 filler injections (0.05%). In addition, four patients treated with an experimental particulate filler had vascular complications. All cases were examined for filler type, location of complication, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes. Although treatment plans differed for each patient in their series, all cases of vascular compromise resolved fully. The authors believe that an office-based protocol for both immediate and ongoing care—including a thorough individualized assessment and treatment plan for each patient—is critical to timely and effective resolution of side effects. They propose key recommendations for the prevention and management of vascular compromise to improve patient outcomes and reduce the risk of permanent complications. PMID:25276276

  16. The interaction of the chaperonin tailless complex polypeptide 1 (TCP1) ring complex (TRiC) with ribosome-bound nascent chains examined using photo-cross-linking.

    PubMed

    McCallum, C D; Do, H; Johnson, A E; Frydman, J

    2000-05-01

    The eukaryotic chaperonin tailless complex polypeptide 1 (TCP1) ring complex (TRiC) (also called chaperonin containing TCP1 [CCT]) is a hetero-oligomeric complex that facilitates the proper folding of many cellular proteins. To better understand the manner in which TRiC interacts with newly translated polypeptides, we examined its association with nascent chains using a photo-cross-linking approach. To this end, a series of ribosome-bound nascent chains of defined lengths was prepared using truncated mRNAs. Photoactivatable probes were incorporated into these (35)S- labeled nascent chains during translation. Upon photolysis, TRiC was cross-linked to ribosome-bound polypeptides exposing at least 50-90 amino acids outside the ribosomal exit channel, indicating that the chaperonin associates with much shorter nascent chains than indicated by previous studies. Cross-links were observed for nascent chains of the cytosolic proteins actin, luciferase, and enolase, but not to ribosome-bound preprolactin. The pattern of cross-links became more complex as the nascent chain increased in length. These results suggest a chain length-dependent increase in the number of TRiC subunits involved in the interaction that is consistent with the idea that the substrate participates in subunit-specific contacts with the chaperonin. Both ribosome isolation by centrifugation through sucrose cushions and immunoprecipitation with anti-puromycin antibodies demonstrated that the photoadducts form on ribosome-bound polypeptides. Our results indicate that TRiC/CCT associates with the translating polypeptide shortly after it emerges from the ribosome and suggest a close association between the chaperonin and the translational apparatus.

  17. Chaperonins induce an amyloid-like transformation of ovine prion protein: the fundamental difference in action between eukaryotic TRiC and bacterial GroEL.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Georgy G; Naletova, Irina N; Sheval, Evgeny V; Stroylova, Yulia Y; Schmalhausen, Elena V; Haertlé, Thomas; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2011-12-01

    Molecular chaperones have been shown to be involved in the processes taking place during the pathogenesis of various amyloid neurodegenerative diseases. However, contradictory literature reports suggest that different molecular chaperones can either stimulate or prevent the formation of amyloid structures from distinct amyloidogenic proteins. In the present work, we concentrated on the effects caused by two molecular chaperonins, ovine TRiC and bacterial GroEL, on the aggregation and conformational state of ovine PrP. Both chaperonins were shown to bind native PrP and to produce amyloid-like forms of ovine PrP enriched with beta-structures but, while GroEL acted in an ATP-dependent manner, TRiC was shown to cause the same effect only in the absence of Mg-ATP (i.e. in the inactive form). In the presence of chaperonin GroEL, ovine PrP was shown to form micellar particles, approximately 100-200nm in diameter, which were observed both by dynamic light scattering assay and by electron microscopy. The content of these particles was significantly higher in the presence of Mg-ATP and, only under these conditions, GroEL produced amyloid-like species enriched with beta-structures. TRiC was shown to induce the formation of amyloid fibrils observed by electron microscopy, but only in the absence of Mg-ATP. This study suggests the important role of the cytosolic chaperonin TRiC in the propagation of amyloid structures in vivo during the development of amyloid diseases and the possible role of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL, located in the intestinal microflora, in the induction of these diseases.

  18. The theory of compromised eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Furman, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry was to develop substantive theory that describes the social process that influences the eating behavior of hospitalized older adults. Undernutrition contributes to negative health outcomes, such as increased morbidity and mortality in hospitalized older adults. Despite the availability of vast nutritional resources within the hospital environment, hospitalized older adults often have inadequate dietary intake. A grounded theory methodology was used to explore this phenomenon. The Theory of Compromised Eating Behavior describes the process of compromise that older adults experience related to eating behavior while hospitalized. The theory has four stages: self-indication, joint action, negotiation, and action. The meaning of hospital food and mealtimes differs from at-home food and mealtimes for the older adult, resulting in compromise. Intervention, which enhances the meaning of food and mealtimes for the older adult during hospitalization, may improve dietary intake and nutritional outcomes.

  19. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  20. Political Compromise Makes the World Go 'Round

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Compromise in any context is often hard to accept. It feels like a person is giving up on his or her ideals. This is especially true in dealing with politics. Legislative and congressional bills can be written with the highest of ideals in mind. By the time the bill progresses through committees and the floor debate process, it can look like a…

  1. Funhaler spacer: improving adherence without compromising delivery

    PubMed Central

    Watt, P; Clements, B; Devadason, S; Chaney, G

    2003-01-01

    A novel asthma spacer device, the "Funhaler", incorporates incentive toys which are isolated from the main inspiratory circuit by a valve. Here we show that its use does not compromise drug delivery. Improved adherence combined with satisfactory delivery characteristics suggest that the Funhaler may be useful for management of young asthmatics. PMID:12818901

  2. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins. PMID:26585937

  3. Chaperonin-containing TCP-1 complex directly binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the LOX-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bakthavatsalam, Deenadayalan; Soung, Roh Hun; Tweardy, David J; Chiu, Wah; Dixon, Richard A F; Woodside, Darren G

    2014-06-13

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor that binds oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and has a role in atherosclerosis development. The N-terminus intracellular region (cytoplasmic domain) of LOX-1 mediates receptor internalization and trafficking, potentially through intracellular protein interactions. Using affinity isolation, we identified 6 of the 8 components of the chaperonin-containing TCP-1 (CCT) complex bound to LOX-1 cytoplasmic domain, which we verified by coimmunoprecipitation and immunostaining in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We found that the interaction between CCT and LOX-1 is direct and ATP-dependent and that OxLDL suppressed this interaction. Understanding the association between LOX-1 and the CCT complex may facilitate the design of novel therapies for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  5. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES.

    PubMed

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-20

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  6. The GroE chaperonin machine is a major modulator of the CIRCE heat shock regulon of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Mogk, A; Homuth, G; Scholz, C; Kim, L; Schmid, F X; Schumann, W

    1997-01-01

    Class I heat-inducible genes in Bacillus subtilis consist of the heptacistronic dnaK and the bicistronic groE operon and form the CIRCE regulon. Both operons are negatively regulated at the level of transcription by the HrcA repressor interacting with its operator, the CIRCE element. Here, we demonstrate that the DnaK chaperone machine is not involved in the regulation of HrcA and that the GroE chaperonin exerts a negative effect in the post-transcriptional control of HrcA. When expression of the groE operon was turned off, the dnaK operon was significantly activated and large amounts of apparently inactive HrcA repressor were produced. Overproduction of GroEL, on the other hand, resulted in decreased expression of the dnaK operon. Introduction of the hrcA gene and its operator into Escherichia coli was sufficient to elicit a transient heat shock response, indicating that no additional Bacillus-specific gene(s) was needed. As in B. subtilis, the groEL gene of E. coli negatively influenced the activity of HrcA. HrcA could be overproduced in E. coli, but formed inclusion bodies which could be dissolved in 8 M urea. Upon removal of urea, HrcA had a strong tendency to aggregate, but aggregation could be suppressed significantly by the addition of GroEL. Purified HrcA repressor was able specifically to retard a DNA fragment containing the CIRCE element, and the amount of retarded DNA was increased significantly in the presence of GroEL. These results suggest that the GroE chaperonin machine modulates the activity of the HrcA repressor and therefore point to a novel function of GroE as a modulator of the heat shock response. PMID:9303302

  7. 19 CFR 171.32 - Acceptance of offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance of offers in compromise. 171.32 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FINES, PENALTIES, AND FORFEITURES Offers in Compromise § 171.32 Acceptance of offers in compromise. An offer in compromise will be considered accepted only when the...

  8. 19 CFR 172.33 - Acceptance of offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance of offers in compromise. 172.33 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) CLAIMS FOR LIQUIDATED DAMAGES; PENALTIES SECURED BY BONDS Offers in Compromise § 172.33 Acceptance of offers in compromise. An offer in compromise will be considered...

  9. Radiosurgical planning of meningiomas: compromises with conformity.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jeremy G; Walton, Lee; Vaughan, Paul; Malik, Irfan; Radatz, Matthias; Kemeny, Andras

    2004-01-01

    The radiosurgical planning of meningiomas frequently necessitates compromises between irradiating tumour and risking damage to adjacent structures. In selected cases, we resolved this by excluding part of the tumour from the prescription isodose volume. Most of these compromises or 'suboptimal' plans achieved growth control. Growth control could not be related to conformity indices or to various measures of the radiation dose received by the meningioma. Examining recurrences, 75% arose from dura outside the original treatment field. These findings are discussed in terms of dose prescription protocols and the use of conformity indices in planning. The importance of the dural origin of meningiomas is well established in surgical practice, as reflected by Simpson's grades, but may be equally significant in radiosurgical practice.

  10. Compromises in career-related decisions: examining the role of compromise severity.

    PubMed

    Wee, Serena

    2014-10-01

    This study tested L. S. Gottfredson's (1996) revised compromise theory by examining whether the relative importance of job sex type, job prestige, and person-job interest congruence for predicting job choice changed as the level of compromise required changed. The fully within-persons design had participants engage in a simulated occupational choice task where job sex type and job prestige were manipulated to be experimentally independent. Participants 1st categorized jobs as unacceptable, acceptable, or preferred. Then, within each category, they made further pairwise choices among jobs in that category. In Study 1, participants were 168 college seniors (124 women, 44 men) from a large Midwestern university. In Study 2, participants were 262 (146 women, 116 men) individuals residing in the United States and recruited via Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform. Across both studies, job sex type predicted choice when large compromises were required. Across both studies, job prestige did not predict choice when moderate compromises were required. In Study 2 but not Study 1, person-job interest congruence predicted choice when minimal compromises were required.

  11. Expression Profiles and Physiological Roles of Two Types of Molecular Chaperonins from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Aki, Ryohei; Yoshida, Masaya; Higashibata, Hiroki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fukuda, Wakao

    2008-01-01

    Thermococcus kodakarensis possesses two chaperonins, CpkA and CpkB, and their expression is induced by the downshift and upshift, respectively, of the cell cultivation temperature. The expression levels of the chaperonins were examined by using specific antibodies at various cell growth temperatures in the logarithmic and stationary phases. At 60°C, CpkA was highly expressed in both the logarithmic and stationary phases; however, CpkB was not expressed in either phase. At 85°C, CpkA and CpkB were expressed in both phases; however, the CpkA level was decreased in the stationary phase. At 93°C, CpkA was expressed only in the logarithmic phase and not in the stationary phase. In contrast, CpkB was highly expressed in both phases. The results of reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed the same growth phase- and temperature-dependent profiles as observed in immunoblot analyses, indicating that the expression of cpkA and cpkB is regulated at the mRNA level. The cpkA or cpkB gene disruptant was then constructed, and its growth profile was monitored. The cpkA disruptant showed poor cell growth at 60°C but no significant defects at 85°C and 93°C. On the other hand, cpkB disruption led to growth defects at 93°C but no significant defects at 60°C and 85°C. These data indicate that CpkA and CpkB are necessary for cell growth at lower and higher temperatures, respectively. The logarithmic-phase-dependent expression of CpkA at 93°C suggested that CpkA participates in initial cell growth in addition to lower-temperature adaptation. Promoter mapping and quantitative analyses using the Phr (Pyrococcus heat-shock regulator) gene disruptant revealed that temperature-dependent expression was achieved in a Phr-independent manner. PMID:18835998

  12. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  13. The dental management of medically compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Goss, A N

    1984-12-01

    There is an increasing population of apparently well, but in fact medically compromised people in the community. Most will require dental treatment at some stage and will usually seek it away from a hospital environment. In a recent survey of a general dental practice in Australia it was found that up to 55 per cent of some age groups had concurrent medical problems. Thus there is a real risk that adverse interactions between medical conditions and dental treatment may occur--on some occasions, even fatal ones. It is not possible for any one individual to know the details of all medical conditions, their treatment and the possible interactions with dental treatment. However, by the application of some sound general principles the risks of any potential interactions can be evaluated. The essential steps are: knowledge of the medical history of all patients; knowledge of the potential interactions; and knowledge of the management of medical emergencies. These principles will be discussed and illustrated by examples of medically compromised patients who may experience common or potentially serious sequelae as a result of dental treatment.

  14. Mitochondrial Hsp60 Chaperonopathy Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Neurodegenerative Disorder Linked to Brain Hypomyelination and Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Daniella; Georgopoulos, Costa; Bross, Peter; Ang, Debbie; Segev, Yardena; Goldsher, Dorit; Nemirovski, Alexandra; Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Luder, Anthony; Heno, Bayan; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Skorecki, Karl; Mandel, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) are disorders involving aberrant myelin formation. The prototype of primary HMLs is the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by mutations in PLP1. Recently, homozygous mutations in GJA12 encoding connexin 47 were found in patients with autosomal-recessive Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD). However, many patients of both genders with PMLD carry neither PLP1 nor GJA12 mutations. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD, in which linkage to PLP1 and GJA12 was excluded. Using homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation (D29G) not previously described in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) in all affected individuals. The D29G mutation completely segregates with the disease-associated phenotype. The pathogenic effect of D29G on Hsp60-chaperonin activity was verified by an in vivo E. coli complementation assay, which demonstrated compromised ability of the D29G-Hsp60 mutant protein to support E. coli survival, especially at high temperatures. The disorder, which we have termed MitCHAP-60 disease, can be distinguished from spastic paraplegia 13 (SPG13), another Hsp60-associated autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, by its autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern, as well as by its early-onset, profound cerebral involvement and lethality. Our findings suggest that Hsp60 defects can cause neurodegenerative pathologies of varying severity, not previously suspected on the basis of the SPG13 phenotype. These findings should help to clarify the important role of Hsp60 in myelinogenesis and neurodegeneration. PMID:18571143

  15. 40 CFR 13.26 - Payment of compromised claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... will be required to execute a confess-judgment agreement which accelerates payment of the balance due... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment of compromised claims. 13.26... STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.26 Payment of compromised claims. The Administrator normally will...

  16. 40 CFR 13.26 - Payment of compromised claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... will be required to execute a confess-judgment agreement which accelerates payment of the balance due... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of compromised claims. 13.26... STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.26 Payment of compromised claims. The Administrator normally will...

  17. Interactions between a luteovirus and the GroEL chaperonin protein of the symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola of aphids.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; Boonham, Neil; Douglas, Angela E

    2011-06-01

    Luteoviruses and poleroviruses are important plant viruses transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner via the aphid haemolymph. A chaperonin protein, GroEL, synthesized in aphids by a symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola, is hypothesized to bind to virus particles in the haemolymph, thereby promoting transmission. To investigate this hypothesis, the GroEL-binding site for barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) was determined in vitro, and the abundance of GroEL protein in different aphid tissues was investigated. Virus binding to a peptide library representing the full GroEL molecule revealed a single binding site that coincides with the site that anchors two GroEL rings to form the native GroEL tetradecamer. In the functional form of the GroEL protein, virus binding would compete with the formation of the two GroEL rings. Using a mAb raised against a Buchnera-specific GroEL epitope, GroEL was detected in Buchnera cells by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, but not in the aphid haemolymph, fat body or gut. From the prediction here that GroEL-virus interactions are probably severely limited by competition with other GroEL molecules, and the evidence that GroEL is not available to interact with virus particles in vivo, it is concluded that GroEL-virus interactions are unlikely to contribute to virus transmission by aphids.

  18. Morgellons: contested illness, diagnostic compromise and medicalisation.

    PubMed

    Fair, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The case of Morgellons illustrates how the emergence of a new medically contested illness intersected with and impacted on the diagnostic processes of an existing uncontested psychiatric condition, Delusional Parasitosis (DP). More specifically, the sociopolitical processes at play in the contested illness, Morgellons, dubiously reflect patient empowerment, as well the resilience and power of medical jurisdiction. This research offers insights into the contested illness and medicalisation literatures, and aims to bridge these two approaches towards the relationship between patient empowerment and medical authority, which I do through the notion of doctor-patient compromise. The data for this research come from a comprehensive qualitative analysis of Morgellons discourse through four key sources: the pro-Morgellons website Morgellons.org; the anti-Morgellons website Morgellonswatch.com; the popular media's portrayal of Morgellons; and the DP and Morgellons articles published in peer-reviewed medical journals, as made available on PubMed.

  19. Compromised natural killer cells in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qiang; Shen, Yuqin; Song, Haoming; Gong, Zhu; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The high morbidity, mortality and misdiagnosis rate render pulmonary embolism (PE) as a worldwide health problem. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease have not been well characterized. Increasing studies indicate infection and immunity play a crucial role in PE. Natural killer (NK) cells act as a bridge between the innate immune and acquired immune. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of NK cells in PE. Methods: Human cDNA microarray analysis was employed to detect genes associated with NK cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Random variance model corrected t-test was used for statistical analysis of differential gene expression. Flow cytometry was performed to detect the CD16+CD56+ NK cells. Results: In the present study, based on gene expression microarray analysis, we showed four inhibitory receptors (KLRB1, KLRD1, KLRF1, KLRG1) and four activating receptors (KLRC1, KLRC3, KLRK1 and NCR1) on NK cells were remarkably down-regulated and the cytological experiment demonstrated the proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells among PBMCs decreased in the PE group. Conclusions: We confirmed the presence of reduced expression of critical activating as well as inhibitory NK cell receptors and low proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells in PE. The consistence between genomic and cytological examination suggests compromised NK cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:26339393

  20. Morphine induces albuminuria by compromising podocyte integrity.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiqian; Rai, Partab; Chandel, Nirupama; Cheng, Kang; Lederman, Rivka; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Husain, Mohammad; Crosson, John T; Gupta, Kalpna; Malhotra, Ashwani; Singhal, Pravin C

    2013-01-01

    Morphine has been reported to accelerate the progression of chronic kidney disease. However, whether morphine affects slit diaphragm (SD), the major constituent of glomerular filtration barrier, is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine on glomerular filtration barrier in general and podocyte integrity in particular. Mice were administered either normal saline or morphine for 72 h, then urine samples were collected and kidneys were subsequently isolated for immunohistochemical studies and Western blot. For in vitro studies, human podocytes were treated with morphine and then probed for the molecular markers of slit diaphragm. Morphine-receiving mice displayed a significant increase in albuminuria and showed effacement of podocyte foot processes. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, the expression of synaptopodin, a molecular marker for podocyte integrity, and the slit diaphragm constituting molecules (SDCM), such as nephrin, podocin, and CD2-associated protein (CD2AP), were decreased in morphine-treated podocytes. In vitro studies indicated that morphine modulated podocyte expression of SDCM through opiate mu (MOR) and kappa (KOR) receptors. Since morphine also enhanced podocyte oxidative stress, the latter seems to contribute to decreased SDCM expression. In addition, AKT, p38, and JNK pathways were involved in morphine-induced down regulation of SDCM in human podocytes. These findings demonstrate that morphine has the potential to alter the glomerular filtration barrier by compromising the integrity of podocytes.

  1. Female genital alteration: a compromise solution.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Jacobs, Allan J

    2016-03-01

    Despite 30 years of advocacy, the prevalence of non-therapeutic female genital alteration (FGA) in minors is stable in many countries. Educational efforts have minimally changed the prevalence of this procedure in regions where it has been widely practiced. In order to better protect female children from the serious and long-term harms of some types of non-therapeutic FGA, we must adopt a more nuanced position that acknowledges a wide spectrum of procedures that alter female genitalia. We offer a revised categorisation for non-therapeutic FGA that groups procedures by effect and not by process. Acceptance of de minimis procedures that generally do not carry long-term medical risks is culturally sensitive, does not discriminate on the basis of gender, and does not violate human rights. More morbid procedures should not be performed. However, accepting de minimis non-therapeutic f FGA procedures enhances the effort of compassionate practitioners searching for a compromise position that respects cultural differences but protects the health of their patients.

  2. Fitness Trade-Offs Determine the Role of the Molecular Chaperonin GroEL in Buffering Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Prats-Escriche, Maria; Montagud-Martínez, Roser; López-Cerdán, Adolfo; Toft, Christina; Aguilar-Rodríguez, José; Wagner, Andreas; Fares, Mario A

    2015-10-01

    Molecular chaperones fold many proteins and their mutated versions in a cell and can sometimes buffer the phenotypic effect of mutations that affect protein folding. Unanswered questions about this buffering include the nature of its mechanism, its influence on the genetic variation of a population, the fitness trade-offs constraining this mechanism, and its role in expediting evolution. Answering these questions is fundamental to understand the contribution of buffering to increase genetic variation and ecological diversification. Here, we performed experimental evolution, genome resequencing, and computational analyses to determine the trade-offs and evolutionary trajectories of Escherichia coli expressing high levels of the essential chaperonin GroEL. GroEL is abundantly present in bacteria, particularly in bacteria with large loads of deleterious mutations, suggesting its role in mutational buffering. We show that groEL overexpression is costly to large populations evolving in the laboratory, leading to groE expression decline within 66 generations. In contrast, populations evolving under the strong genetic drift characteristic of endosymbiotic bacteria avoid extinction or can be rescued in the presence of abundant GroEL. Genomes resequenced from cells evolved under strong genetic drift exhibited significantly higher tolerance to deleterious mutations at high GroEL levels than at native levels, revealing that GroEL is buffering mutations in these cells. GroEL buffered mutations in a highly diverse set of proteins that interact with the environment, including substrate and ion membrane transporters, hinting at its role in ecological diversification. Our results reveal the fitness trade-offs of mutational buffering and how genetic variation is maintained in populations.

  3. Specific cross-reactivity of antibodies raised against two major stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60, in diverse species

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, B.M.; Martin, L.S.; Nakagawa, P.A. ); Hunter, D.A. . Biologisk Inst.); Miller, S. ); Ullrich, S.J. . National Cancer Inst.)

    1994-08-01

    Immunoblot analysis using several antibodies raised against two major families of stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60 (cpn60), which are highly conserved in mammals, was carried out in diverse species often used in environmental research, including molluscs, annelids, crustaceans, echinoderms, and fish. The study revealed surprisingly different patterns of antibody cross-reactivity among species. The monoclonal anti-stress 70 antibody (mAb) C92 was the least cross-reactive for all species tested. The mAbs anti-stress 70 N27, BRM-22, and 3a3 were more broadly cross-reactive, but their binding specifities to stress 70 isoforms in the diverse species tested did not correlate with one another or follow taxonomic lines. The polyclonal anti-stress 70 antibody reacted to proteins in the 70 to 74 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. When a polyclonal antibody (pAb) raised against cpn60 from a moth was used as a probe, specific binding was observed with proteins in the 60 to 64 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. However, the size and number of isoforms that reacted with the pAb were species specific. These data suggest that these two major stress protein families are less highly conserved in invertebrates and fish than in mammals. Therefore, to minimize misinterpretation when using antibodies in heterologous assays with species in which the stress response has not been well characterized, it is important to determine which isoforms of stress 70 react with a particular antibody and to take into account the differential regulation of each member of this multigene family.

  4. Chaperonin GroEL a Brucella immunodominant antigen identified using Nanobody and MALDI-TOF-MS technologies.

    PubMed

    Abbady, A Q; Al-Daoude, A; Al-Mariri, A; Zarkawi, M; Muyldermans, S

    2012-05-15

    The deployment of today's antibodies that are able to distinguish Brucella from the closely similar pathogens, such as Yersinia, is still considered a great challenge since both pathogens share identical LPS (lipopolysaccharide) O-ring epitopes. In addition, because of the great impact of Brucella on health and economy in many countries including Syria, much effort is going to the development of next generation vaccines, mainly on the identification of new immunogenic proteins of this pathogen. In this context, Brucella-specific nanobodies (Nbs), camel genetic engineered heavy-chain antibody fragments, could be of great value. Previously, a large Nb library was constructed from a camel immunized with heat-killed Brucella. Phage display panning of this 'immune' library with Brucella total lysate resulted in a remarkable fast enrichment for a Nb referred to as NbBruc02. In the present work, we investigated the main characteristics of this Nb that can efficiently distinguish under well-defined conditions the Brucella from other bacteria including Yersinia. NbBruc02 showed a strong and specific interaction with its antigen within the crude lysate as tested by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor and it was also able to pull down its cognate antigen from such lysate by immuno-capturing. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), NbBruc02 specific antigen was identified as chaperonin GroEL, also known as heat shock protein of 60 kDa (HSP-60), which represents a Brucella immunodominant antigen responsible of maintaining proteins folding during stress conditions. Interestingly, the antigen recognition by NbBruc02 was found to be affected by the state of GroEL folding. Thus, the Nb technology applied in the field of infectious diseases, e.g. brucellosis, yields two outcomes: (1) it generates specific binders that can be used for diagnosis, and perhaps treatment, and (2) it identifies the immunogenic candidate

  5. OsCpn60α1, Encoding the Plastid Chaperonin 60α Subunit, Is Essential for Folding of rbcL

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Ryul; Yang, Jung-Il; An, Gynheung

    2013-01-01

    Chaperonins are involved in protein-folding. The rice genome encodes six plastid chaperonin subunits (Cpn60) - three α and three β. Our study showed that they were differentially expressed during normal plant development. Moreover, five were induced by heat stress (42°C) but not by cold (10°C). The oscpn60α1 mutant had a pale-green phenotype at the seedling stage and development ceased after the fourth leaf appeared. Transiently expressed OsCpn60α1:GFP fusion protein was localized to the chloroplast stroma. Immuno-blot analysis indicated that the level of Rubisco large subunit (rbcL) was severely reduced in the mutant while levels were unchanged for some imported proteins, e.g., stromal heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and chlorophyll a/b binding protein 1 (Lhcb1). This demonstrated that OsCpn60α1 is required for the folding of rbcL and that failure of that process is seedling-lethal. PMID:23620301

  6. A yeast two-hybrid screen reveals a strong interaction between the Legionella chaperonin Hsp60 and the host cell small heat shock protein Hsp10.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2015-06-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium that replicates inside a membrane-bound vacuole called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), where it plentifully liberates its HtpB chaperonin. From LCV, HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm, where it interacts with SAMDC, a cytoplasmic protein required for synthesis of host polyamines that are important for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Additionally, cytoplasmic expression of HtpB in S. cerevisiae induces pseudohyphal growth, and in mammalian cells recruits mitochondria to LCV, and modifies actin microfilaments organization. This led us to hypothesize here that HtpB recruits a protein(s) from eukaryotic cells that is involved in the emergence of the aforementioned phenotypes. To identify this protein, a commercially available HeLa cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid system. Approximately 5×10(6) yeast clones carrying HeLa cDNA library plasmid were screened. Twenty-one positive clones were identified. DNA sequence analysis revealed that all of these positive clones encoded the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp10. Based on the fact that chaperonions are required to interact with co-chaperonins to function properly in protein folding, we believe that HtpB recruits the host cell Hsp10 to appropriately interact with SAMDC and to induce the multifunction phenotypes deemed important in L. pneumophila pathogenesis.

  7. Silencing of chaperonin 21, that was differentially expressed in inflorescence of seedless and seeded grapes, promoted seed abortion in tobacco and tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Hanania, Uri; Velcheva, Margarita; Or, Etti; Flaishman, Moshe; Sahar, Nachman; Perl, Avihai

    2007-08-01

    Vitis vinifera L. cv. 'Thompson Seedless' presents a type of stenospermocarpy in grape where fertilization occurs but seeds abort and fail to develop. To unravel the molecular basis for stenospermocarpy in grapes, subtractive hybridization was carried out in order to isolate differentially regulated genes that participate in the seedlessness machinery. Two 'Thompson' lines, a seeded and a seedless, were screened during different flower developmental stages. One of the genes, that was differentially expressed between the seeded and seedless lines, was the chloroplast chaperonin 21 (ch-Cpn21). ch-Cpn21 is a 21-kDa co-chaperonin polypeptide formed by two GroES-like domains fused together in tandem. Silencing of ch-Cpn21 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants resulted in leaf stunting, chlorosis, as well as ovary necrogenesis leading to seed abortion. Moreover, organ-specific silencing of ch-Cpn21 only in Lycopersicum esculentum fruits resulted in the development of seedless tomatoes. These results suggest that ch-Cpn21 may play a role in seed abortion in stenospermocarpic grapes.

  8. Isolation of a gene encoding a chaperonin-like protein by complementation of yeast amino acid transport mutants with human cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Segel, G B; Boal, T R; Cardillo, T S; Murant, F G; Lichtman, M A; Sherman, F

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA library in lambda-yes plasmid was used to transform a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in histidine biosynthesis (his4-401) and histidine permease (hip1-614) and with the general amino acid permease (GAP) repressed by excess ammonium. We investigated three plasmids complementing the transport defect on a medium with a low concentration of histidine. Inserts in these plasmids hybridized with human genomic but not yeast genomic DNA, indicating their human origin. mRNA corresponding to the human DNA insert was produced by each yeast transformant. Complementation of the histidine transport defect was confirmed by direct measurement of histidine uptake, which was increased 15- to 65-fold in the transformants as compared with the parental strain. Competitive inhibition studies, measurement of citrulline uptake, and lack of complementation in gap1- strains indicated that the human cDNA genes code for proteins that prevent GAP repression by ammonium. The amino acid sequence encoded by one of the cDNA clones is related to T-complex proteins, which suggests a "chaperonin"-like function. We suggest that the human chaperonin-like protein stabilizes the NPR1 gene product and prevents inactivation of GAP. Images PMID:1352881

  9. Identification of in vivo substrates of the yeast mitochondrial chaperonins reveals overlapping but non-identical requirement for hsp60 and hsp10.

    PubMed Central

    Dubaquié, Y; Looser, R; Fünfschilling, U; Jenö, P; Rospert, S

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of chaperonin-assisted protein folding has been mostly analyzed in vitro using non-homologous substrate proteins. In order to understand the relative importance of hsp60 and hsp10 in the living cell, homologous substrate proteins need to be identified and analyzed. We have devised a novel screen to test the folding of a large variety of homologous substrates in the mitochondrial matrix in the absence or presence of functional hsp60 or hsp10. The identified substrates have an Mr of 15-90 kDa and fall into three groups: (i) proteins that require both hsp60 and hsp10 for correct folding; (ii) proteins that completely fail to fold after inactivation of hsp60 but are unaffected by the inactivation of hsp10; and (iii) newly imported hsp60 itself, which is more severely affected by inactivation of hsp10 than by inactivation of pre-existing hsp60. The majority of the identified substrates are group I proteins. For these, the lack of hsp60 function has a more pronounced effect than inactivation of hsp10. We suggest that homologous substrate proteins have differential chaperonin requirements, indicating that hsp60 and hsp10 do not always act as a single functional unit in vivo. PMID:9774331

  10. 32 CFR 757.19 - Waiver and compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Medical Care Recovery Act (MCRA) Claims and Claims Asserted Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 1095 § 757.19 Waiver and compromise. (a) General. OJAG Code 15 (Claims and Tort Litigation) may authorize waiver or... with Code 15 approval. (b) Waiver and compromise. The JAG designee may waive the Federal...

  11. 19 CFR 161.5 - Compromise of Government claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compromise of Government claims. 161.5 Section 161... Government claims. (a) Offer. An offer made pursuant to section 617, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1617), in compromise of a Government claim arising under the Customs laws and the terms upon which...

  12. 41 CFR 105-55.020 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... risks involved, GSA will consider the probable amount of court costs and attorney fees pursuant to the... for repayment in the manner set forth in § 105-55.015. (g) To assess the merits of a compromise offer... financial information to assess compromise offers. GSA may use their own financial information form or...

  13. 38 CFR 1.970 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Committee respecting acceptance or rejection of a compromise offer shall be in conformity with the standards in §§ 1.930 through 1.936. In loan guaranty cases the offer of a veteran or other obligor to effect a... shall be reviewed by the Committee. An offer to effect a compromise may be accepted if it is...

  14. 26 CFR 300.3 - Offer to compromise fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... taxpayer if the offer is accepted, rejected, withdrawn, or returned as nonprocessable after acceptance for... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offer to compromise fee. 300.3 Section 300.3... ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.3 Offer to compromise fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to...

  15. Implant surgery in healthy compromised patients-review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, IM; Stoian, IM

    2014-01-01

    Systemic diseases are of major importance in terms of prosthetic restorations supported by dental implants in healthy compromised patients. Each treatment stage from conception of the treatment plan to the long-term monitoring is under the necessity of the interdisciplinary approach to the underlying disease. Abbreviations: healthy compromised patients = HCP PMID:25870664

  16. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 1312.30 Section 1312.30 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION... Classified Information § 1312.30 Loss or possible compromise. Any person who has knowledge of the loss...

  17. 38 CFR 42.46 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise and settlement. 42.46 Section 42.46 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.46 Compromise and settlement. (a)...

  18. 38 CFR 42.46 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compromise and settlement. 42.46 Section 42.46 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.46 Compromise and settlement. (a)...

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis chaperonin 60.1 inhibits leukocyte diapedesis in a murine model of allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Coates, Anthony R M; Page, Clive P; Spina, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    Chaperonin 60.1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis suppressed allergic lung inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in mice by a mechanism that is yet to be clarified. To investigate the possible antiinflammatory mechanism(s) of action of Cpn60.1 in a model of allergic lung inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-allergic mice were pretreated with Cpn60.1 intranasally 20 minutes before each OVA aerosol challenge in a total of three treatments. Readouts were performed 24 hours after last challenge. Pretreatment with Cpn60.1 (1.0-0.001 μg) significantly inhibited the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (OVA, 49.2 ± 12.3 versus Cpn60.1 [1 μg dose], 90.4 ± 2.3 × 10(4) cells/ml) and IL-5 release (OVA, 43 ± 8.5 versus Cpn60.1 [1 μg dose], 3 ± 11 pg/ml) but increased IL-12 levels (OVA, 50 ± 24 versus Cpn60.1 [1 μg dose], 103 ± 13 pg/ml). The effect of Cpn60.1 on cell recruitment and IL-5, but not IL-12, release was abolished in TLR-4 knockout mice. Intravital microscopy demonstrated that Cpn60.1 reduced chemokine-mediated leukocyte rolling and transmigration across the vessel wall (rolling cells: eotaxin, 11.7 ± 1.1 versus Cpn60.1 [1 μg dose], 2.8 ± 1 cells in 30 s). Similarly, Cpn60.1 reduced eotaxin-induced leukocyte migration in vitro (eotaxin, 17.3 ± 3.3 versus Cpn60.1 [0.1 μg dose], 3.3 ± 0.4 cells × 10(4)/ml). Immunostaining demonstrated that Cpn60.1 inhibits VCAM-1 and increases vascular endothelial-cadherin expression in lung vascular tissue, suggesting that the antiinflammatory effect of Cpn60.1 is partly mediated by altering the expression of adhesion molecules. This study shows that Cpn60.1 inhibits leukocyte diapedesis by a TLR-4 and an adhesion molecule-dependent mechanism in allergic inflammation in mice.

  20. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  1. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  2. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  3. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  4. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  5. 22 CFR 213.25 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other evidentiary data required to support the Government's claim. In determining the litigative risks.... (d) To assess the merits of a compromise offer, USAID may obtain a current financial statement...

  6. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measures taken to negate or minimize any adverse effect of the compromise. (b) The Security Officer shall initiate an inquiry to: (1) Determine cause, (2) Place responsibility, and (3) Take corrective measures...

  7. Primary structure of a human mitochondrial protein homologous to the bacterial and plant chaperonins and to the 65-kilodalton mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, S; Dudani, A K; Singh, B; Harley, C B; Gupta, R S

    1989-01-01

    The complete cDNA for a human mitochondrial protein designated P1, which was previously identified as a microtubule-related protein, has been cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of P1 shows strong homology (40 to 50% identical residues and an additional 20% conservative replacements) to the 65-kilodalton major antigen of mycobacteria, to the GroEL protein of Escherichia coli, and to the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (rubisco) subunit binding protein of plant chloroplasts. Similar to the case with the latter two proteins, which have been shown to act as chaperonins in the posttranslational assembly of oligomeric protein structures, it is suggested that P1 may play a similar role in mammalian cells. The observed high degree of homology between human P1 and mycobacterial antigen also suggests the possible involvement of this protein in certain autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:2568584

  8. Compromising positions: emergent neo-Fordisms and embedded gender contracts.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, H

    2000-06-01

    This paper adopts a regulation framework to chart the emergence of neo-Fordism as a flexible accumulation regime and mode of social regulation. Neo-Fordism relies on old Fordist principles as well as incorporating new models of emergent post-Fordisms; old and new social relationships, in their particular combination, specify the trajectory of national variants. I argue that Fordist bargains institutionalized the terms of a compromise between labour, capital and the state. These bargains embedded a male-breadwinner gender contract compromising women's positions and standardizing employment contracts around the needs, interests and authority of men. A focus on compromises and contracts makes visible the differentiated gender effects of work transformation in each country.

  9. The acute abdomen in the immune compromised host

    PubMed Central

    Power, Niall

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in transplantation, oncology and AIDS therapy have greatly increased life expectancies of patients diagnosed with malignancy, auto-immune disorders and organ failure. However, as this immune compromised population grows, complications of such therapies have become a major source of morbidity and mortality. Classical clinical and laboratory evidence of intra-abdominal pathology may be absent in the immune compromised host. Consequently, the radiologist is increasingly called upon to diagnose acute intra-abdominal complications associated with immunodeficiency. This review explores the aetiology of the acute abdomen in the immune compromised host. The typical radiological appearances of the commonest conditions are illustrated. The challenges and limitations in the radiological diagnosis of these conditions are discussed. PMID:18442955

  10. Alchemy or Science? Compromising Archaeology in the Deep Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    In the torrid debate between archaeology and treasure hunting, compromise is often suggested as the pragmatic solution, especially for archaeology carried out either in deep water or beyond the constraints that commonly regulate such activities in territorial seas. Both the wisdom and the need for such compromise have even been advocated by some archaeologists, particularly in forums such as the internet and conferences. This paper argues that such a compromise is impossible, not in order to fuel confrontation but simply because of the nature of any academic discipline. We can define what archaeology is in terms of its aims, theories, methods and ethics, so combining it with an activity founded on opposing principles must transform it into something else. The way forward for archaeology in the deep sea does not lie in a contradictory realignment of archaeology’s goals but in collaborative research designed to mesh with emerging national and regional research and management plans.

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Compromised Graft or Flap

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Ashish; Baynosa, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Tissue grafts and flaps are used to reconstruct wounds from trauma, chronic disease, tumor extirpation, burns, and infection. Despite careful surgical planning and execution, reconstructive failure can occur due to poor wound beds, radiation, random flap necrosis, vascular insufficiency, or ischemia–reperfusion (IR). Traumatic avulsions and amputated composite tissues—compromised tissue—may fail from crush injury and excessively large sizes. While never intended, these complications result in tissue loss, additional surgery, accrued costs, and negative psychosocial patient effects. Recent Advances: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has demonstrated utility in the salvage of compromised grafts/flaps. It can increase the likelihood and effective size of composite graft survival, improve skin graft outcomes, and enhance flap survival. Mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects include increased oxygenation, improved fibroblast function, neovascularization, and amelioration of IR injury. Critical Issues: Common strategies for the compromised graft or flap include local wound care, surgical debridement, and repeated reconstruction. These modalities are associated with added costs, time, need for reoperation, morbidity, and psychosocial effects. Preservation of the amputated/avulsed tissues minimizes morbidity and maximizes the reconstructive outcome by salvaging the compromised tissue and obviating additional surgery. HBO is often overlooked as a potential tool that can limit these issues. Future Directions: Animal studies demonstrate a benefit of HBO in the treatment of compromised tissues. Clinical studies support these findings, but are limited to case reports and series. Further research is needed to provide multicenter prospective clinical studies and cost analyses comparing HBO to other adjunctive therapies in the treatment of compromised grafts/flaps. PMID:28116225

  12. Critical appraisal. Reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2012-10-01

    Bleaching with peroxide agents compromises the adhesion of resin-based materials to enamel and dentin. The problem is likely caused by delayed release of oxygen from the teeth that inhibits resin polymerization at the interface. The typical method for avoiding problems with bonding to bleached teeth is simply to delay the bonding procedure for a week or two after bleaching. However, there is evidence that bonding can be done immediately if bleaching is followed by the application of an antioxidant. This Critical Appraisal reviews some of the published reports on the reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching via the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate.

  13. Fuzzy compromise: An effective way to solve hierarchical design problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. K.; Krishnamachari, R. S.; Masetta, J.; Pearce, D.; Rigby, D.; Mistree, F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for modeling design problems using a compromise decision support problem (DSP) incorporating the principles embodied in fuzzy set theory. Specifically, the fuzzy compromise decision support problem is used to study hierarchical design problems. This approach has the advantage that although the system modeled has an element of uncertainty associated with it, the solution obtained is crisp and precise. The efficacy of incorporating fuzzy sets into the solution process is discussed in the context of results obtained for a portal frame.

  14. Codeswitching and Compromise Strategies: Implications for Lexical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jake, Janice L.; Myers-Scotton, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Deals with two compromise strategies: (1) embedded language islands (EL Islands), and (2) "bare forms" in code switching (CS) within the projection of complementizer. These elements are discussed within the framework of the Matrix Language Frame Model. Shows how this model provides an explanatory account for the occurrence of both EL…

  15. 42 CFR 401.613 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise of claims. 401.613 Section 401.613 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... claim must— (1) Bear a reasonable relation to the amount of the claim; and (2) Be recoverable...

  16. 45 CFR 30.22 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bases for compromise. 30.22 Section 30.22 Public... an amount that bears a reasonable relation to the amount that can be recovered by enforced collection... amount claimed, either because of the legal issues involved or because of a bona fide dispute as to...

  17. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    PubMed

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants.

  18. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... weight should be given to the probable amount of court costs and attorney fees pursuant to the Equal... the settlement of small claims, but normally will not carry great weight in the settlement of...

  19. 41 CFR 105-70.046 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise or settlement. 105-70.046 Section 105-70.046 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General...

  20. 32 CFR 310.50 - Lost, stolen, or compromised information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.50 Lost, stolen, or compromised... reported to: (1) The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US CERT) within one hour of...., computer incident, theft, loss of material, etc.) shall continue to be reported in accordance...

  1. 32 CFR 310.50 - Lost, stolen, or compromised information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.50 Lost, stolen, or compromised... reported to: (1) The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US CERT) within one hour of...., computer incident, theft, loss of material, etc.) shall continue to be reported in accordance...

  2. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  3. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  4. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  5. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  6. Whatever It Takes: Health Compromising Behaviors in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Jennifer J.; Krane, Vikki

    2005-01-01

    The power and performance model of sport stresses a sport ethic of doing "whatever it takes" to win (Coakley, 2004). Uncritical acceptance of this model may lead to various health-compromising behaviors. Employing achievement goal theory, we examine why female athletes may adopt the power and performance approach. An ego motivational climate and a…

  7. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  8. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  9. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... consent agreement to the Chief Counsel. If the Chief Counsel accepts the agreement, he issues an order...

  10. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... consent agreement to the Chief Counsel. If the Chief Counsel accepts the agreement, he issues an order...

  11. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... consent agreement to the Chief Counsel. If the Chief Counsel accepts the agreement, he issues an order...

  12. 17 CFR 143.5 - Collection by compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection by compromise. 143.5 Section 143.5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES ARISING FROM ACTIVITIES UNDER THE COMMISSION'S JURISDICTION...

  13. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Justice. NASA should evaluate the offer, using the factors set forth in paragraphs (c) through (f) of this... offer of compromise which is substantial in amount and the agency is uncertain as to whether the offer should be accepted, it may refer the offer, the supporting data, and particulars concerning the claim...

  14. 22 CFR 213.25 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proceedings. In evaluating the acceptability of the offer, the CFO may consider, among other factors, the... applicable exemptions available to the debtor under State and Federal law in determining the Government's ability to enforce collection. (b) USAID may compromise a claim, or recommend acceptance of a...

  15. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intactcompromised skin.

  16. A mitochondrial-like chaperonin 60 gene in Giardia lamblia: evidence that diplomonads once harbored an endosymbiont related to the progenitor of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Roger, A J; Svärd, S G; Tovar, J; Clark, C G; Smith, M W; Gillin, F D; Sogin, M L

    1998-01-06

    Diplomonads, parabasalids, as represented by trichomonads, and microsporidia are three protist lineages lacking mitochondria that branch earlier than all other eukaryotes in small subunit rRNA and elongation factor phylogenies. The absence of mitochondria and plastids in these organisms suggested that they diverged before the origin of these organelles. However, recent discoveries of mitochondrial-like heat shock protein 70 and/or chaperonin 60 (cpn60) genes in trichomonads and microsporidia imply that the ancestors of these two groups once harbored mitochondria or their endosymbiotic progenitors. In this report, we describe a mitochondrial-like cpn60 homolog from the diplomonad parasite Giardia lamblia. Northern and Western blots reveal that the expression of cpn60 is independent of cellular stress and, except during excystation, occurs throughout the G. lamblia life cycle. Phylogenetic analyses position the G. lamblia cpn60 in a clade that includes mitochondrial and hydrogenosomal cpn60 proteins. The most parsimonious interpretation of these data is that the cpn60 gene was transferred from the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria to the nucleus early in eukaryotic evolution, before the divergence of the diplomonads and trichomonads from other extant eukaryotic lineages. A more complicated explanation requires that these genes originated from distinct alpha-proteobacterial endosymbioses that formed transiently within these protist lineages.

  17. Heat shock in Escherichia coli alters the protein-binding properties of the chaperonin groEL by inducing its phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sherman MYu; Goldberg, A L

    1992-05-14

    When bacterial or eukaryotic cells are exposed to high temperatures or other harsh conditions, they respond by synthesis of a specific set of heat-shock proteins. Certain heat-shock proteins such as groEL, called 'chaperonins', can prevent misfolding and promote the refolding and proper assembly of unfolded polypeptides generated under harmful conditions. We report here a new aspect of the heat-shock response in Escherichia coli: at high temperatures a fraction of groEL becomes modified covalently, altering its interaction with unfolded proteins. The heat-modified form can be eluted with ATP from an unfolded protein more easily than normal groEL. The critical heat-induced modification seems to be phosphorylation, which is reversed on return to low temperature. Treatment of the modified groEL with phosphatases caused its apparent size, charge and binding properties to resemble those of the unmodified form. Thus during heat shock some groEL is reversibly phosphorylated, which allows its ATP-dependent release from protein substrates in the absence of its usual cofactor (groES), and probably promotes the repair of damaged polypeptides.

  18. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the co-chaperonin XoGroES from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thanh Thi Ngoc; Natarajan, Sampath; Song, Na-Hyun; Kim, Jisun; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Kim, Seung-hwan; Viet, Pham Tan; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial blight (BB), a devastating disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), causes serious production losses of rice in Asian countries. Protein misfolding may interfere with the function of proteins in all living cells and must be prevented to avoid cellular disaster. All cells naturally contain molecular chaperones that assist the unfolded proteins in folding into the native structure. One of the well characterized chaperone complexes is GroEL-GroES. GroEL, which consists of two chambers, captures misfolded proteins and refolds them. GroES is a co-chaperonin protein that assists the GroEL protein as a lid that temporarily closes the chamber during the folding process. Xoo4289, the GroES gene from Xoo, was cloned and expressed for X-ray crystallographic study. The purified protein (XoGroES) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a crystal diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P6(1), with unit-cell parameters a=64.4, c=36.5 Å. The crystal contains a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.05 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 39.9%.

  19. Chaperonins as potential gene regulatory factors. In vitro interaction and solubilization of NifA, the nif transcriptional activator, with GroEL.

    PubMed

    Govezensky, D; Bochkareva, E S; Zamir, A; Girshovich, A S

    1994-05-13

    A previous study (Govezensky, D., Greener, T., and Zamir, A. (1991) J. Bacteriol. 20, 6339-6346) indicated that the chaperonin GroEL was required for maximal expression from nif promoters in Klebsiella pneumoniae and nif-transformed Escherichia coli. That this requirement stemmed from the ability of GroEL to properly fold NifA, the nif transcriptional activator, was first supported by co-immunoprecipitation of NifA in K. pneumoniae extracts with anti-GroEL antibodies. In the present in vitro study, NifA, partially purified from E. coli overexpressing the protein, was diluted from a 6 M urea solution into a refolding buffer in the presence or absence of GroEL. Dilution in the absence of GroEL caused the complete precipitation of NifA. When present in the dilution buffer, GroEL bound NifA and maintained it in a soluble state. GroEL was also found to bind NifA newly synthesized in an in vitro translation system. For both NifA preparations, cochaperonin GroES and ATP promoted release of NifA from GroEL. These results provide evidence for the association of NifA with GroEL and for the role of both GroEL and GroES in the solubilization and thereby folding of the nif transcriptional activator.

  20. Interaction of the CD43 Sialomucin with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cpn60.2 Chaperonin Leads to Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production.

    PubMed

    Torres-Huerta, Alvaro; Villaseñor, Tomás; Flores-Alcantar, Angel; Parada, Cristina; Alemán-Navarro, Estefanía; Espitia, Clara; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causal agent of tuberculosis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secreted by activated macrophages and lymphocytes are considered essential to contain Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The CD43 sialomucin has been reported to act as a receptor for bacilli through its interaction with the chaperonin Cpn60.2, facilitating mycobacterium-macrophage contact. We report here that Cpn60.2 induces both human THP-1 cells and mouse-derived bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) to produce TNF-α and that this production is CD43 dependent. In addition, we present evidence that the signaling pathway leading to TNF-α production upon interaction with Cpn60.2 requires active Src family kinases, phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), p38, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), both in BMMs and in THP-1 cells. Our data highlight the role of CD43 and Cpn60.2 in TNF-α production and underscore an important role for CD43 in the host-mycobacterium interaction.

  1. Securing Single Points of Compromise (SPoC)

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-06-25

    Securing the Single Points of Compromise that provide central services to the institution’s environment is paramount to success when trying to protect the business. (Fisk, 2014) Time Based Security mandates protection (erecting and ensuring effective controls) that last longer than the time to detect and react to a compromise. When enterprise protections fail, providing additional layered controls for these central services provides more time to detect and react. While guidance is readily available for securing the individual critical asset, protecting these assets as a group is not often discussed. Using best business practices to protect these resources as individual assets while leveraging holistic defenses for the group increases the opportunity to maximize protection time, allowing detection and reaction time for the SPoCs that is commensurate with the inherent risk of these centralized services.

  2. Creating clones, kids & chimera: liberal democratic compromise at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan A

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to find middle ground between the supporters and opponents of biotechnology by perpetuating the existing legal compromise pertaining to the complete range of health and welfare doctrines relevant to the biotechnological industry. The author aspires neither to add to nor detract from this liberal democratic consensus, but to preserve its constitutive balance between positivism and natural law and over-regulation and under-regulation in the hopes of stabilizing new political fault lines developing around the few biotechnological innovations already grabbing headlines. The most feasible solution is to extend the existing liberal democratic compromise with respect to equal protection, reproductive rights, the First Amendment, human subject experimentation, patent law, and parental rights. This includes banning or monopolizing certain biotechnologies and extending substantive special respect to the ex vivo living human embryo. Biotechnology must not be left to regulate itself.

  3. The ethics of moral compromise for stem cell research policy.

    PubMed

    Master, Zubin; Crozier, G K D

    2012-03-01

    In the US, stem cell research is at a moral impasse-many see this research as ethically mandated due to its potential for ameliorating major diseases, while others see this research as ethically impermissible because it typically involves the destruction of embryos and use of ova from women. Because their creation does not require embryos or ova, induced pluripotent stem cells offer the most promising path for addressing the main ethical objections to stem cell research; however, this technology is still in development. In order for scientists to advance induced pluripotent stem cell research to a point of translational readiness, they must continue to use ova and embryos in the interim. How then are we to ethically move forward with stem cell research? We argue that there is personal integrity and value in adopting a 'moral compromise' as a means for moving past the moral impasse in stem cell research. In a moral compromise, each party concedes part of their desired outcome in order to engage in a process that respects the values and desires of all parties equitably. Whereas some contend that moral compromise in stem cell research necessarily involves self-contradiction or loss of personal integrity, we argue that in the US context, stem cell research satisfies many of the key pre-conditions of an effective moral compromise. To illustrate our point, we offer a model solution wherein eggs and embryos are temporarily used until non-egg and non-embryonic sources of pluripotent stem cells are developed to a state of translational readiness.

  4. Placental angiogenesis in sheep models of compromised pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lawrence P; Borowicz, Pawel P; Vonnahme, Kimberly A; Johnson, Mary Lynn; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T; Redmer, Dale A; Caton, Joel S

    2005-01-01

    Because the placenta is the organ that transports nutrients, respiratory gases and wastes between the maternal and fetal systems, development of its vascular beds is essential to normal placental function, and thus in supporting normal fetal growth. Compromised fetal growth and development have adverse health consequences during the neonatal period and throughout adult life. To establish the role of placental angiogenesis in compromised pregnancies, we first evaluated the pattern of placental angiogenesis and expression of angiogenic factors throughout normal pregnancy. In addition, we and others have established a variety of sheep models to evaluate the effects on fetal growth of various factors including maternal nutrient excess or deprivation and specific nutrients, maternal age, maternal and fetal genotype, increased numbers of fetuses, environmental thermal stress, and high altitude (hypobaric) conditions. Although placental angiogenesis is altered in each of these models in which fetal growth is adversely affected, the specific effect on placental angiogenesis depends on the type of ‘stress’ to which the pregnancy is subjected, and also differs between the fetal and maternal systems and between genotypes. We believe that the models of compromised pregnancy and the methods described in this review will enable us to develop a much better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for alterations in placental vascular development. PMID:15760944

  5. Potential Soviet compromise on ballistic missile defense. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.P.

    1989-11-01

    The body of this research memorandum was written before the Baker-Shevardnadze meeting in Wyoming. It presented evidence suggesting that the Soviet Union might agree to a compromise at the Wyoming meeting that defers the issue of ballistic missile defense (BMD) negotiations to a later stage in arms reductions, thus facilitating a first-stage cut in offensive arms without an explicit Soviet endorsement of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Through this compromise, offensive arms reductions should first be delinked from an agreement on BMD, and then be relinked during the second stage of deeper cuts. Therefore, negotiations on limiting BMD systems, though deterred, are deemed inevitable if the U.S. persists in deploying a strategic defense system (SDS). Moreover, some Soviet arms controllers already look beyond the first stage to the prospect of negotiated transition into a strategic defense environment (i.e., a reliance on defensive deterrence). In this approach, Wyoming, then, was expected to be only a first move in the Soviet negotiating strategy for a grand compromise on strategic defense. As explained in the afterword added to the paper, the actual events at Wyoming seem consistent with that interpretation.

  6. Compromise - An effective approach for conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mistree, Farrokh; Marinopoulos, Stergios; Jackson, david; Shupe, Jon

    1987-01-01

    The Decision Support Problem (DSP) technique for aircraft design is presently demonstrated through the development of a compromise DSP template for the conceptual design of subsonic transport aircraft. System variables are wing span and area, fuselage diameter and length, takeoff weight, and installed thrust. Such system constraints as range and wing loading are represented algebraically using standard subsonic aircraft theory, and economic efficiency is modeled in terms of rates-of-return. The DSP template thus obtained has been tested and validated using the known mission requirements and design constants of the B 727-200 airliner.

  7. [Cat-scratch disease with bone compromise: atypical manifestation].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez C, Magdalena; Giachetto L, Gustavo; Cuneo E, Alejandro; Gutiérrez B, María del C; Shimchack R, Mario; Pírez G, M Catalina

    2009-08-01

    Fever, headache, myalgias and lymphadenopathy are characteristic manifestations of cat-scratch disease but other less common findings are described in 2 to 10% of cases. We report two children that presented with hepatosplenic abscesses and bone involvement. One child, had multiple areas of increased uptake in the bone scintigram with a positive serology (IgG > 1/256, IgM slightly positive). The second child had destruction of the L2 vertebral body that compromised the channel and right foramen as visualized by MRI. In both cases, bacilli were observed in the bone biopsy by Warthing-Starry stain.

  8. Neonatal Airway Compromise by a Giant Cervicothoracic Venous Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Janardhan; Coutinho, Anita; Pai, Suresh; Rai, Santosh PV

    2017-01-01

    Haemangiomas are most common non-malignant vascular tumours of infancy. Here, we describe an antenatally detected mass over the neck causing compressive respiratory compromise at birth requiring resuscitative measures at birth. The mass showed increased vascularity on Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) with extension upto superior mediastinum. Surgical excision was required following failure to medical measures with steroids and propranolol. Histopathology confirmed it to be a venous haemangioma. This case highlights that these benign lesions may reach large sizes and antenatal detection may help in planning effective delivery and resuscitative measures. PMID:28384953

  9. Compromise budget gives extra funding for HIV programs.

    PubMed

    1999-06-25

    California lawmakers will vote soon on the proposed 1999-2000 State budget that would increase funding for HIV prevention, treatment, and housing programs by $16.9 million. The Senate and Assembly did not originally agree on the appropriation, but the Budget Conference Committee resolved the dispute. Details of the compromise are included. The plan must now go back to both chambers for final action, and the California HIV Advocacy Coalition is optimistic the budget measures will reach the governor's office intact. Governor Gray Davis has promised that the budget will be enacted by the start of the next fiscal year.

  10. Effects of a Mutation in the HSPE1 Gene Encoding the Mitochondrial Co-chaperonin HSP10 and Its Potential Association with a Neurological and Developmental Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Anne S.; Fernandez-Guerra, Paula; Birkler, Rune I. D.; Nisemblat, Shahar; Pelnena, Dita; Lu, Xinping; Deignan, Joshua L.; Lee, Hane; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Corydon, Thomas J.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Bivina, Liga; Azem, Abdussalam; Herman, Kristin; Bross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We here report molecular investigations of a missense mutation in the HSPE1 gene encoding the HSP10 subunit of the HSP60/ HSP10 chaperonin complex that assists protein folding in the mitochondrial matrix. The mutation was identified in an infant who came to clinical attention due to infantile spasms at 3 months of age. Clinical exome sequencing revealed heterozygosity for a HSPE1 NM_002157.2:c.217C>T de novo mutation causing replacement of leucine with phenylalanine at position 73 of the HSP10 protein. This variation has never been observed in public exome sequencing databases or the literature. To evaluate whether the mutation may be disease-associated we investigated its effects by in vitro and ex vivo studies. Our in vitro studies indicated that the purified mutant protein was functional, yet its thermal stability, spontaneous refolding propensity, and resistance to proteolytic treatment were profoundly impaired. Mass spectrometric analysis of patient fibroblasts revealed barely detectable levels of HSP10-p.Leu73Phe protein resulting in an almost 2-fold decrease of the ratio of HSP10 to HSP60 subunits. Amounts of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase SOD2, a protein whose folding is known to strongly depend on the HSP60/HSP10 complex, were decreased to approximately 20% in patient fibroblasts in spite of unchanged SOD2 transcript levels. As a likely consequence, mitochondrial superoxide levels were increased about 2-fold. Although, we cannot exclude other causative or contributing factors, our experimental data support the notion that the HSP10-p.Leu73Phe mutation could be the cause or a strong contributing factor for the disorder in the described patient. PMID:27774450

  11. Affinity chromatography of GroEL chaperonin based on denatured proteins: role of electrostatic interactions in regulation of GroEL affinity for protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kaĭsheva, A L; Kashparov, I A; Kotova, N V; Kaliman, P A; Semisotnov, G V

    2006-12-01

    The chaperonin GroEL of the heat shock protein family from Escherichia coli cells can bind various polypeptides lacking rigid tertiary structure and thus prevent their nonspecific association and provide for acquisition of native conformation. In the present work we studied the interaction of GroEL with six denatured proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, ribonuclease A, egg lysozyme in the presence of dithiothreitol, pepsin, beta-casein, and apocytochrome c) possessing negative or positive total charge at neutral pH values and different in hydrophobicity (affinity for a hydrophobic probe ANS). To prevent the influence of nonspecific association of non-native proteins on their interaction with GroEL and make easier the recording of the complexing, the proteins were covalently attached to BrCN-activated Sepharose. At low ionic strength (lower than 60 mM), tight binding of the negatively charged denatured proteins with GroEL (which is also negatively charged) needed relatively low concentrations (approximately 10 mM) of bivalent cations Mg2+ or Ca2+. At the high ionic strength (approximately 600 mM), a tight complex was produced also in the absence of bivalent cations. In contrast, positively charged denatured proteins tightly interacted with GroEL irrespectively of the presence of bivalent cations and ionic strength of the solution (from 20 to 600 mM). These features of GroEL interaction with positively and negatively charged denatured proteins were confirmed by polarized fluorescence (fluorescence anisotropy). The findings suggest that the affinity of GroEL for denatured proteins can be determined by the balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions.

  12. The Interactions of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin with a chaperonin group of unique receptor protein isolated from a bacterial endosymbiont of the mustard aphid.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Santanu; Hess, Daniel; Majumder, Pralay; Roy, Debjani; Das, Sampa

    2004-05-28

    The homopteran sucking insect, Lipaphis erysimi (mustard aphid) causes severe damage to various crops. This pest not only affects plants by sucking on the phloem, but it also transmits single-stranded RNA luteoviruses while feeding, which cause disease and damage in the crop. The mannose-binding Allium sativum (garlic) leaf lectin has been found to be a potent control agent of L. erysimi. The lectin receptor protein isolated from brush border membrane vesicle of insect gut was purified to determine the mechanism of lectin binding to the gut. Purified receptor was identified as an endosymbiotic chaperonin, symbionin, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Symbionin from endosymbionts of other aphid species have been reported to play a significant role in virus transmission by binding to the read-through domain of the viral coat protein. To understand the molecular interactions of the said lectin and this unique symbionin molecule, the model structures of both molecules were generated using the Modeller program. The interaction was confirmed through docking of the two molecules forming a complex. A surface accessibility test of these molecules demonstrated a significant reduction in the accessibility of the complex molecule compared with that of the free symbionin molecule. This reduction in surface accessibility may have an effect on other molecular interactive processes, including "symbionin virion recognition", which is essential for such symbionin-mediated virus transmission. Thus, garlic leaf lectin provides an important component of a crop management program by controlling, on one hand, aphid attack and on the other hand, symbionin-mediated luteovirus transmission.

  13. Voices of discontent? Conscience, compromise, and assisted dying.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Richard; Mullock, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    If some form of assisted dying is to be legalised, we are likely to hear voices of discontent, not least from the medical profession and some of its members, who might be expected to provide the service. The profession generally favours a position of opposition, premised on an ethic of 'caring not killing', which might be said to convey its 'professional conscience'. There will, of course, also be individual conscientious objectors. In this article, we initially explore the nature and sources of conscience and we argue that conscience does merit respect. We also recognise that professionals, qua professionals, are bound to serve their patients, some of whom will want (and may be entitled to) that which their doctors do not wish to provide. Reflecting on the different values in issue, we suggest that there is a case for principled compromise which would afford professionals a limited right to conscientiously object, while also protecting patients. We then relate these reflections to assisted dying specifically. In the absence of any definitive steer from the purported integrity of medicine, we suspect that the profession could adopt a neutral stance on this divisive issue. We nevertheless anticipate individual objections if the law does move to embrace assisted dying, and we argue that such objections should be respected, according to the terms of the compromise model we defend.

  14. Frontostriatal fiber bundle compromise in HIV infection without dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Rohlfing, Torsten; Kemper, Carol A.; Deresinski, Stanley; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative fiber tracking derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to determine whether white matter association, projection, or commissural tracts are affected in nondemented individuals with HIV infection and to identify the regional distribution of sparing and impairment of fiber systems. Methods DTI measured fractional anisotropy and diffusivity, quantified separately for longitudinal (λL) diffusivity (index of axonal injury) and transverse (λT) diffusivity (index of myelin injury), in 11 association and projection white matter tracts and six commissural tracts in 29 men and 13 women with HIV infection and 88 healthy, age-matched controls (42 men and 46 women). Results The total group of HIV-infected individuals had higher diffusivity (principally longitudinal) than controls in the posterior sectors of the corpus callosum, internal and external capsules, and superior cingulate bundles. High longitudinal diffusivity, indicative of axonal compromise, was especially prominent in posterior callosal sectors, fornix, and superior cingulate bundle in HIV with AIDS. Unmedicated patients had notably high transverse diffusivity, indicative of myelin compromise, in the occipital forceps, inferior cingulate bundle, and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Pontocerebellar projection fibers were resistant to HIV effects as were commissural fibers coursing through premotor and sensorimotor callosal sectors. Conclusion This quantitative survey of brain fiber tract integrity indicates that even nondemented HIV patients can have neuroradiological evidence for damage to association and commissural tracts. These abnormalities were vulnerable to exacerbation with AIDS and possibly mitigated by HAART. PMID:19730350

  15. Telomere shortening and metabolic compromise underlie dystrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alex Chia Yu; Ong, Sang-Ging; LaGory, Edward L.; Kraft, Peggy E.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Blau, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an incurable X-linked genetic disease that is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene and affects one in every 3,600 boys. We previously showed that long telomeres protect mice from the lethal cardiac disease seen in humans with the same genetic defect, dystrophin deficiency. By generating the mdx4cv/mTRG2 mouse model with “humanized” telomere lengths, the devastating dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype seen in patients with DMD was recapitulated. Here, we analyze the degenerative sequelae that culminate in heart failure and death in this mouse model. We report progressive telomere shortening in developing mouse cardiomyocytes after postnatal week 1, a time when the cells are no longer dividing. This proliferation-independent telomere shortening is accompanied by an induction of a DNA damage response, evident by p53 activation and increased expression of its target gene p21 in isolated cardiomyocytes. The consequent repression of Pgc1α/β leads to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, which, in conjunction with the high demands of contraction, leads to increased oxidative stress and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. As a result, cardiomyocyte respiration and ATP output are severely compromised. Importantly, treatment with a mitochondrial-specific antioxidant before the onset of cardiac dysfunction rescues the metabolic defects. These findings provide evidence for a link between short telomere length and metabolic compromise in the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD and identify a window of opportunity for preventive interventions. PMID:27799523

  16. 38 CFR 1.903 - Settlement, waiver, or compromise under other statutory or regulatory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compromise under other statutory or regulatory authority. 1.903 Section 1.903 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Collection, Compromise, Suspension... Settlement, waiver, or compromise under other statutory or regulatory authority. Nothing in §§ 1.900...

  17. Perceived Career Compromise, Affect and Work-Related Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Jome, LaRae

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of career compromise on positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and work-related satisfaction (WRS). Career compromise refers to the modification of occupational preferences under pressing external circumstances [Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). Circumscription and compromise: A…

  18. Compromises along the Way: Balancing Speed To Market with Sustainability while Delivering Knowledge Management Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Martha K.

    This paper will discuss some of the compromises, and the path to those compromises, that must be made while implementing a successful knowledge management program within a for-profit enterprise. Specifically the following compromises are addressed: (1) manage knowledge where it is created, but do that within a global system; (2) no single scope…

  19. 7 CFR 3.19 - Standards for the compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standards for the compromise of claims. 3.19 Section 3.19 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Standards for the Administrative Collection and Compromise of Claims § 3.19 Standards for the compromise of claims. An agency...

  20. 32 CFR 842.124 - Waiver and compromise of United States interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... damages. (c) A compromise can be made upon written request from the injured party or the injured party's... CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Hospital Recovery Claims (42 U.S.C. 2651-2653) § 842.124 Waiver and compromise of United States interest. Waivers and compromises of government claims can be...

  1. Protecting Privacy of Shared Epidemiologic Data without Compromising Analysis Potential

    PubMed Central

    Cologne, John; Grant, Eric J.; Nakashima, Eiji; Chen, Yun; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Katayama, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Ensuring privacy of research subjects when epidemiologic data are shared with outside collaborators involves masking (modifying) the data, but overmasking can compromise utility (analysis potential). Methods of statistical disclosure control for protecting privacy may be impractical for individual researchers involved in small-scale collaborations. Methods. We investigated a simple approach based on measures of disclosure risk and analytical utility that are straightforward for epidemiologic researchers to derive. The method is illustrated using data from the Japanese Atomic-bomb Survivor population. Results. Masking by modest rounding did not adequately enhance security but rounding to remove several digits of relative accuracy effectively reduced the risk of identification without substantially reducing utility. Grouping or adding random noise led to noticeable bias. Conclusions. When sharing epidemiologic data, it is recommended that masking be performed using rounding. Specific treatment should be determined separately in individual situations after consideration of the disclosure risks and analysis needs. PMID:22505949

  2. [Amputation or reconstruction of a circulatory compromised severely injured extremity?].

    PubMed

    Høiness, P; Røise, O

    1999-11-20

    18 patients treated with primary or secondary amputations after severe lower limb open fractures were studied. All limbs had clinical signs of a compromised circulation at the primary evaluation. The various injuries are described and discussed with respect to the general guidelines for primary amputation. The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and Nerve, Ischemia, Soft tissues, Skeletal, Shock, Age (NISSSA) scores were calculated. In view of the described injuries, primary amputation was indicated in ten patients according to the general recommendations, 11 patients according to NISSSA and 15 patients according to MESS. Delayed amputation leads t a significantly (p = 0.005) higher number of operative procedures than early amputation (9.2 vs. 2.9 treatments). The decision of whether to amputate or not should be based on sound clinical judgement, but injury scores such as MESS and NISSSA may be helpful.

  3. Food irradiation: Special solutions for the immuno-compromised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla

    2016-12-01

    Safety of food is particularly important for immuno-compromised patients, because these people are vulnerable to all sorts of infectious complications and foodborne pathogens as well, and even organisms normally considered non-pathogenic may cause problems. According to the guidelines published by the FDA, immunocompromised patients have to avoid high-risk foods, and advised to consume only pasteurized juice, milk or cheese, and well-cooked eggs, poultry, meat and fish. In the frame of an IAEA CRP the objective was to develop, in collaborations with the healthcare community, the use of irradiation to increase the variety, availability and acceptability of foods for immunocompromised, for example irradiated fresh produce (fruits, vegetables, salads) and ready-to-eat meals. Further aim was to widen the acceptance of irradiated foods by the healthcare and regulatory communities.

  4. Protecting Privacy of Shared Epidemiologic Data without Compromising Analysis Potential

    DOE PAGES

    Cologne, John; Grant, Eric J.; Nakashima, Eiji; ...

    2012-01-01

    Objective . Ensuring privacy of research subjects when epidemiologic data are shared with outside collaborators involves masking (modifying) the data, but overmasking can compromise utility (analysis potential). Methods of statistical disclosure control for protecting privacy may be impractical for individual researchers involved in small-scale collaborations. Methods . We investigated a simple approach based on measures of disclosure risk and analytical utility that are straightforward for epidemiologic researchers to derive. The method is illustrated using data from the Japanese Atomic-bomb Survivor population. Results . Masking by modest rounding did not adequately enhance security but rounding to remove several digits ofmore » relative accuracy effectively reduced the risk of identification without substantially reducing utility. Grouping or adding random noise led to noticeable bias. Conclusions . When sharing epidemiologic data, it is recommended that masking be performed using rounding. Specific treatment should be determined separately in individual situations after consideration of the disclosure risks and analysis needs.« less

  5. Thiamine absorption is not compromised in folate-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Walzem, R.L.; Clifford, A.J.

    1988-11-01

    Thiamine absorption and excretion were assessed in rats with severe folate deficiency (FD) by determining the fate of oral TH-labeled and intravenous UC-labeled thiamine over a 6-h test period. Thiamine status was evaluated in these same rats by measuring transketolase activity levels of blood before (TKA) and after (TPPE) addition of thiamine pyrophosphate to the incubation mixture of the assay procedure. Two additional experiments assessed active transport of thiamine and the effect of dietary succinylsulfathiazole (SST) on TKA and TPPE in rats with moderate FD. Intestinal absorption in general and thiamine absorption in particular and thiamine status were unaltered in rats with severe FD. Inanition associated with severe FD may impair thiamine status. Thiamine absorption by active transport was not compromised in FD, and dietary succinylsulfathiazole did not affect thiamine status.

  6. Neglecting legumes has compromised human health and sustainable food production.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Lam, Hon-Ming; Nguyen, Henry T; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Varshney, Rajeev K; Colmer, Timothy D; Cowling, Wallace; Bramley, Helen; Mori, Trevor A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Cooper, James W; Miller, Anthony J; Kunert, Karl; Vorster, Juan; Cullis, Christopher; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Liang, Yan; Shou, Huixia; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Fodor, Nandor; Kaiser, Brent N; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Valliyodan, Babu; Considine, Michael J

    2016-08-02

    The United Nations declared 2016 as the International Year of Pulses (grain legumes) under the banner 'nutritious seeds for a sustainable future'. A second green revolution is required to ensure food and nutritional security in the face of global climate change. Grain legumes provide an unparalleled solution to this problem because of their inherent capacity for symbiotic atmospheric nitrogen fixation, which provides economically sustainable advantages for farming. In addition, a legume-rich diet has health benefits for humans and livestock alike. However, grain legumes form only a minor part of most current human diets, and legume crops are greatly under-used. Food security and soil fertility could be significantly improved by greater grain legume usage and increased improvement of a range of grain legumes. The current lack of coordinated focus on grain legumes has compromised human health, nutritional security and sustainable food production.

  7. Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Cytomegalovirus and the Compromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Ryning, Frank W.; Mills, John

    1979-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii and Toxoplasma gondii are the two major parasitic protozoan pathogens in the immunocompromised host. Both organisms cause latent infection in humans and many animals. Cats are the definitive hosts for toxoplasmosis; the animal vector for pneumocystis (if any) has not been defined. Toxoplasma is an obligate intracellular parasite, whereas the available evidence suggests that Pneumocystis carinii exists primarily extracellularly. In compromised hosts, pneumocystis infection usually involves only lungs, whereas toxoplasma causes a generalized infection with encephalitis being the principal clinical manifestation. Both types of infection are treated with combinations of folate antagonists (trimethoprim or pyrimethamine with sulfonamide). Both parasites are associated with cytomegalovirus infection in immunosuppressed hosts, an association which may be due to symbiosis between parasites, or to an additive immunosuppressive effect of dual infection on the hosts. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:217182

  8. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C.; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells. PMID:24782776

  9. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals' is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients' indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  10. Treatment of Lung Cancer in Medically Compromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey; Wheatley-Price, Paul; Feliciano, Josephine Louella

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for patients with lung cancer have been improved substantially through the integration of surgery, radiation, and systemic therapy for patients with early-stage disease. Meanwhile, advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms have substantially advanced our treatment of patients with advanced lung cancer through the introduction of targeted therapies, immune approaches, improvements in chemotherapy, and better supportive care. However, the majority of these advances have occurred among patients with good functional status, normal organ function, and with the social and economic support systems to be able to benefit most from these treatments. The aim of this article is to bring greater attention to management of lung cancer in patients who are medically compromised, which remains a major barrier to care delivery. Impaired performance status is associated with poor outcomes and correlates with the high prevalence of cachexia among patients with advanced lung cancer. CT imaging is emerging as a research tool to quantify muscle loss in patients with cancer, and new therapeutics are on the horizon that may provide important adjunctive therapy in the future. The benefits of cancer therapy for patients with organ failure are poorly understood because of their exclusion from clinical trials. The availability of targeted therapy and immunotherapy may provide alternatives that may be easier to deliver in this population, but clinical trials of these new agents in this population are vital. Patients with lower socioeconomic status are disproportionately affected by lung cancer because of higher rates of tobacco addiction and the impact of socioeconomic status on delay in diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. For all patients who are medically compromised with lung cancer, multidisciplinary approaches are particularly needed to evaluate these patients and to incorporate rapidly changing therapeutics to improve outcomes.

  11. Cerebral autoregulation is compromised during simulated fluctuations in gravitational stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Clive M; Dütsch, Matthias; Ohring, Susanne; Neundörfer, Bernhard; Hilz, Max J

    2004-03-01

    Gravity places considerable stress on the cardiovascular system but cerebral autoregulation usually protects the cerebral blood vessels from fluctuations in blood pressure. However, in conditions such as those encountered on board a high-performance aircraft, the gravitational stress is constantly changing and might compromise cerebral autoregulation. In this study we assessed the effect of oscillating orthostatic stress on cerebral autoregulation. Sixteen (eight male) healthy subjects [aged 27 (1) years] were exposed to steady-state lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at -15 and -40 mmHg and then to oscillating LBNP at the same pressures. The oscillatory LBNP was applied at 0.1 and 0.2 Hz. We made continuous recordings of RR-interval, blood pressure, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), respiratory frequency and end-tidal CO(2). Oscillations in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and CBFV were assessed by autoregressive spectral analysis. Respiration was paced at 0.25 Hz to avoid interference from breathing. Steady-state LBNP at -40 mmHg significantly increased low-frequency (LF, 0.03-0.14 Hz) powers of MAP ( P<0.01) but not of CBFV. Oscillatory 0.1 Hz LBNP (0 to -40 mmHg) significantly increased the LF power of MAP to a similar level as steady-state LBNP but also resulted in a significant increase in the LF power of CBFV ( P<0.01). Oscillatory LBNP at 0.2 Hz induced oscillations in MAP and CBFV at 0.2 Hz. Cross-spectral analysis showed that the transfer of LBNP-induced oscillations in MAP onto the CBFV was significantly greater at 0.2 Hz than at 0.1 Hz ( P<0.01). These results show that the ability of the cerebral vessels to modulate fluctuations in blood pressure is compromised during oscillatory compared with constant gravitational stress. Furthermore, this effect seems to be more pronounced at higher frequencies of oscillatory stress.

  12. Mitigating Reptile Road Mortality: Fence Failures Compromise Ecopassage Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Baxter-Gilbert, James H.; Riley, Julia L.; Lesbarrères, David; Litzgus, Jacqueline D.

    2015-01-01

    Roadways pose serious threats to animal populations. The installation of roadway mitigation measures is becoming increasingly common, yet studies that rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of these conservation tools remain rare. A highway expansion project in Ontario, Canada included exclusion fencing and ecopassages as mitigation measures designed to offset detrimental effects to one of the most imperial groups of vertebrates, reptiles. Taking a multispecies approach, we used a Before-After-Control-Impact study design to compare reptile abundance on the highway before and after mitigation at an Impact site and a Control site from 1 May to 31 August in 2012 and 2013. During this time, radio telemetry, wildlife cameras, and an automated PIT-tag reading system were used to monitor reptile movements and use of ecopassages. Additionally, a willingness to utilize experiment was conducted to quantify turtle behavioral responses to ecopassages. We found no difference in abundance of turtles on the road between the un-mitigated and mitigated highways, and an increase in the percentage of both snakes and turtles detected dead on the road post-mitigation, suggesting that the fencing was not effective. Although ecopassages were used by reptiles, the number of crossings through ecopassages was lower than road-surface crossings. Furthermore, turtle willingness to use ecopassages was lower than that reported in previous arena studies, suggesting that effectiveness of ecopassages may be compromised when alternative crossing options are available (e.g., through holes in exclusion structures). Our rigorous evaluation of reptile roadway mitigation demonstrated that when exclusion structures fail, the effectiveness of population connectivity structures is compromised. Our project emphasizes the need to design mitigation measures with the biology and behavior of the target species in mind, to implement mitigation designs in a rigorous fashion, and quantitatively evaluate road

  13. Blood–Retinal Barrier Compromise and Endogenous Staphylococcus aureus Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Astley, Roger A.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that blood–retinal barrier compromise is associated with the development of endogenous Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis. Methods To compromise the blood–retinal barrier in vivo, streptozotocin-induced diabetes was induced in C57BL/6J mice for 1, 3, or 5 months. Diabetic and age-matched nondiabetic mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony-forming units (cfu) of S. aureus, a common cause of endogenous endophthalmitis in diabetics. After 4 days post infection, electroretinography, histology, and bacterial counts were performed. Staphylococcus aureus–induced alterations in in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell barrier structure and function were assessed by anti–ZO-1 immunohistochemistry, FITC-dextran conjugate diffusion, and bacterial transmigration assays. Results We observed one bilateral infection in a control, nondiabetic animal (mean = 1.54 × 103 ± 1.78 × 102 cfu/eye, 7% incidence). Among the 1-month diabetic mice, we observed culture-confirmed unilateral infections in two animals (mean = 5.54 × 102 ± 7.09 × 102 cfu/eye, 12% incidence). Among the 3-month diabetic mice, infections were observed in 11 animals, three with bilateral infections (mean = 2.67 × 102 ± 2.49 × 102 cfu/eye, 58% incidence). Among the 5-month diabetic mice, we observed infections in five animals (mean = 7.88 × 102 ± 1.08 × 103 cfu/eye, 33% incidence). In vitro, S. aureus infection reduced ZO-1 immunostaining and disrupted the barrier function of cultured RPE cells, resulting in diffusion of fluorophore-conjugated dextrans and transmigration of live bacteria across a permeabilized RPE barrier. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicated that S. aureus is capable of inducing blood–retinal barrier permeability and causing endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis in normal and diabetic animals. PMID:26559476

  14. A compromised liver alters polychlorinated biphenyl-mediated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, Banrida; Perkins, Jordan T; Petriello, Michael C; Hoffman, Jessie B; Stromberg, Arnold J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2017-02-02

    Exposure to environmental toxicants namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is correlated with multiple health disorders including liver and cardiovascular diseases. The liver is important for both xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. However, the responses of an injured liver to subsequent environmental insults has not been investigated. The current study aims to evaluate the role of a compromised liver in PCB-induced toxicity and define the implications on overall body homeostasis. Male C57Bl/6 mice were fed either an amino acid control diet (CD) or a methionine-choline deficient diet (MCD) during the 12-week study. Mice were subsequently exposed to either PCB126 (4.9mg/kg) or the PCB mixture, Arcolor1260 (20mg/kg) and analyzed for inflammatory, calorimetry and metabolic parameters. Consistent with the literature, MCD diet-fed mice demonstrated steatosis, indicative of a compromised liver. Mice fed the MCD-diet and subsequently exposed to PCB126 showed observable wasting syndrome leading to mortality. PCB126 and Aroclor1260 exposure worsened hepatic fibrosis exhibited by the MCD groups. Interestingly, PCB126 but not Aroclor1260 induced steatosis and inflammation in CD-fed mice. Mice with liver injury and subsequently exposed to PCBs also manifested metabolic disturbances due to alterations in hepatic gene expression. Furthermore, PCB exposure in MCD-fed mice led to extra-hepatic toxicity such as upregulated circulating inflammatory biomarkers, implicating endothelial cell dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that environmental pollution can exacerbate toxicity caused by diet-induced liver injury which may be partially due to dysfunctional energy homeostasis. This is relevant to PCB-exposed human cohorts who suffer from alcohol or diet-induced fatty liver diseases.

  15. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  16. Metabolic Stress and Compromised Identity of Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-01-01

    Beta cell failure is a central feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the molecular underpinnings of the process remain only partly understood. It has been suggested that beta cell failure in T2D involves massive cell death. Other studies ascribe beta cell failure to cell exhaustion, due to chronic oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to cellular dysfunction. More recently it was proposed that beta cells in T2D may lose their differentiated identity, possibly even gaining features of other islet cell types. The loss of beta cell identity appears to be driven by glucotoxicity inhibiting the activity of key beta cell transcription factors including Pdx1, Nkx6.1, MafA and Pax6, thereby silencing beta cell genes and derepressing alternative islet cell genes. The loss of beta cell identity is at least partly reversible upon normalization of glycemia, with implications for the reversibility of T2D, although it is not known if beta cell failure reaches eventually a point of no return. In this review we discuss current evidence for metabolism-driven compromised beta cell identity, key knowledge gaps and opportunities for utility in the treatment of T2D. PMID:28270834

  17. Tert-butylhydroquinone Compromises Survival in Murine Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiahong; Hu, Heng; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2 signaling pathway inducer that is widely used as a food additive in the U.S., prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. This study assesses the effects of tBHQ on ischemic stroke outcomes in mice. We measured infarct size, neurological deficits, and brain volume after tBHQ treatments in murine permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model in vivo. Further, we evaluated the regulation of tBHQ on mitochondrial function in cerebrovascular endothelial cells in vitro, which is critical to the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Our results demonstrated that tBHQ increased post-stroke mortality and worsened stroke outcomes. Mitochondrial function was suppressed by tBHQ treatment of cerebrovascular endothelial cells, and this suppression was potentiated by co-treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the bacterial mimic. These data indicate that tBHQ-exacerbated stroke damage might due to the compromised BBB permeability in permanent stroke. PMID:26827673

  18. Oviposition site selection in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera): constraints and compromises.

    PubMed

    Robertson, H G

    1987-10-01

    Oviposition by Cactoblastis cactorum on Opuntia ficus-indica and O. aurantiaca was assessed from the positioning of egg sticks on plants in the field. The number of egg sticks laid on O. ficus-indica plants was affected by: (1) plant size; (2) moth emergence near the plant; (3) cladode condition; and (4) plant conspicuousness. These factors contributed towards the clumping of egg sticks on plants. There was no apparent oviposition preference for one of the two host plant species despite the fact that egg predation was higher and fecundity lower on O. aurantiaca. The selection of a site for oviposition on the host plants was influenced by: (1) cladode condition; (2) height above ground; and (3) shelter from wind during oviposition. Succulent cladodes were the favoured sites for oviposition. The evidence suggests that in C. cactorum, oviposition site selection is largely the net result of a compromise between oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of juvenile survival and oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of laying the full complement of eggs. In addition, environmental and physiological factors such as wind and wing-loading, are thought to place constraints on the range of sites available for oviposition.

  19. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known β-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-ΔICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-ΔICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  20. Predicting early nonelective hospital readmission in nutritionally compromised older adults.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, J M; Jensen, G L; Smiciklas-Wright, H; McCamish, M A

    1997-06-01

    This study determined predictors of early nonelective hospital readmission in 92 (49 women and 43 men) nutritionally compromised Medicare patients. Subjects ranged in age from 65 to 92 y and represented patients hospitalized previously for medical or surgical services. The study used a repeated-measures design of multiple variables representing demographics, anthropometric and clinical values, and functional status. Data were collected during hospitalization and during home visits at 1 and 3 mo postdischarge. There were 26 readmissions, making the 4-mo nonelective readmission rate 26%. Subjects who were readmitted nonelectively were compared with those not readmitted. Univariate analyses suggested strong relations between readmission outcome and serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, change in weight, and change in white blood cell count. Sociodemographic variables were less useful in predicting readmission than were measurements of patients' clinical status. Measurements of change in clinical variables were generally more predictive of readmission than was any one single measurement. Multivariate-logistic-regression analyses suggested a model consisting of change in weight and change in serum albumin from hospitalization to 1 mo after discharge as being highly predictive of early nonelective readmission. Individuals with any amount of weight loss and no improvement in albumin concentrations during the first month after hospitalization were at a much higher risk of readmission than were those who maintained or increased their postdischarge weight and had repleted their serum albumin concentrations. More study is warranted to clarify whether routine monitoring of changes in weight and serum albumin after hospitalization is appropriate in older adults.

  1. Compromise and Synergy in High-Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tiejun; Liu, Yintu; Fu, Chenguang; Heremans, Joseph P; Snyder, Jeffrey G; Zhao, Xinbing

    2017-03-06

    The past two decades have witnessed the rapid growth of thermoelectric (TE) research. Novel concepts and paradigms are described here that have emerged, targeting superior TE materials and higher TE performance. These superior aspects include band convergence, "phonon-glass electron-crystal", multiscale phonon scattering, resonant states, anharmonicity, etc. Based on these concepts, some new TE materials with distinct features have been identified, including solids with high band degeneracy, with cages in which atoms rattle, with nanostructures at various length scales, etc. In addition, the performance of classical materials has been improved remarkably. However, the figure of merit zT of most TE materials is still lower than 2.0, generally around 1.0, due to interrelated TE properties. In order to realize an "overall zT > 2.0," it is imperative that the interrelated properties are decoupled more thoroughly, or new degrees of freedom are added to the overall optimization problem. The electrical and thermal transport must be synergistically optimized. Here, a detailed discussion about the commonly adopted strategies to optimize individual TE properties is presented. Then, four main compromises between the TE properties are elaborated from the point of view of the underlying mechanisms and decoupling strategies. Finally, some representative systems of synergistic optimization are also presented, which can serve as references for other TE materials. In conclusion, some of the newest ideas for the future are discussed.

  2. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity.

  3. Glutaric acid moderately compromises energy metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    da C Ferreira, Gustavo; Viegas, Carolina M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Latini, Alexandra; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2005-12-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of predominantly glutaric acid (GA). Affected patients present frontotemporal hypotrophy, as well as caudate and putamen injury following acute encephalopathic crises. Considering that the underlying mechanisms of basal ganglia damage in this disorder are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of glutaric acid (0.2-5mM) on critical enzyme activities of energy metabolism, namely the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in midbrain of developing rats. Glutaric acid significantly inhibited creatine kinase activity (up to 26%) even at the lowest dose used in the assays (0.2mM). We also observed that CK inhibition was prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of GA was possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex I-III and of succinate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by 20 and 30%, respectively, at the highest glutaric acid concentration tested (5mM). In contrast, complexes II-III and IV activities of the electron transport chain were not affected by the acid. The effect of glutaric acid on the rate of oxygen consumption in intact mitochondria from the rat cerebrum was also investigated. Glutaric acid (1mM) significantly lowered the respiratory control ratio (state III/state IV) up to 40% in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate or succinate. Moreover, state IV respiration linked to NAD and FAD substrates was significantly increased in GA-treated mitochondria while state III was significantly diminished. The results indicate that the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I moderately compromises brain energy metabolism in vitro.

  4. Zinc reduces epithelial barrier compromise induced by human seminal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, James M.; Diguilio, Katherine M.; Valenzano, Mary C.; Deis, Rachael; Thomas, Sunil; Zurbach, E. Peter; Abdulhaqq, Shaheed; Montaner, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Human semen has the potential to modulate the epithelial mucosal tissues it contacts, as seminal plasma (SP) is recognized to contain both pro- and anti-barrier components, yet its effects on epithelial barrier function are largely unknown. We addressed the role of human SP when exposed to the basal-lateral epithelial surface, a situation that would occur clinically with prior mechanical or disease-related injury of the human epithelial mucosal cell layers in contact with semen. The action of SP on claudins-2, -4, -5, and -7 expression, as well as on a target epithelium whose basolateral surface has been made accessible to SP, showed upregulation of claudins-4 and -5 in CACO-2 human epithelial cell layers, despite broad variance in SP-induced modulation of transepithelial electrical resistance and mannitol permeability. Upregulation of claudin-2 by SP also exhibited such variance by SP sample. We characterize individual effects on CACO-2 barrier function of nine factors known to be present abundantly in seminal plasma (zinc, EGF, citrate, spermine, fructose, urea, TGF, histone, inflammatory cytokines) to establish that zinc, spermine and fructose had significant potential to raise CACO-2 transepithelial resistance, whereas inflammatory cytokines and EGF decreased this measure of barrier function. The role of zinc as a dominant factor in determining higher levels of transepithelial resistance and lower levels of paracellular leak were confirmed by zinc chelation and exogenous zinc addition. As expected, SP presentation to the basolateral cell surface also caused a very dramatic yet transient elevation of pErk levels. Results suggest that increased zinc content in SP can compete against the barrier-compromising effect of negative modulators in SP when SP gains access to that epithelium’s basolateral surface. Prophylactic elevation of zinc in an epithelial cell layer prior to contact by SP may help to protect an epithelial barrier from invasion by SP-containing STD

  5. The muscle-mechanical compromise framework: Implications for the scaling of gait and posture

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, James Richard (Jim)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many aspects of animal and human gait and posture cannot be predicted from purely mechanical work minimization or entirely based on optimizing muscle efficiency. Here, the Muscle-Mechanical Compromise Framework is introduced as a conceptual paradigm for considering the interactions and compromises between these two objectives. Current assumptions in implementing the Framework are presented. Implications of the compromise are discussed and related to the scaling of running mechanics and animal posture. PMID:28149398

  6. Identification of Campylobacter spp. and discrimination from Helicobacter and Arcobacter spp. by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified cpn60 sequences and comparison to cpnDB, a chaperonin reference sequence database.

    PubMed

    Hill, Janet E; Paccagnella, Ana; Law, Kee; Melito, Pasquale L; Woodward, David L; Price, Lawrence; Leung, Amy H; Ng, Lai-King; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Goh, Swee Han

    2006-04-01

    A robust method for the identification of Campylobacter spp. based on direct sequencing of PCR-amplified partial cpn60 sequences and comparison of these to a reference database of cpn60 sequences is reported. A total of 53 Campylobacter isolates, representing 15 species, were identified and distinguished from phenotypically similar Helicobacter and Arcobacter strains. Pairwise cpn60 sequence identities between Campylobacter spp. ranged from 71 to 92 %, with most between 71 and 79 %, making discrimination of these species obvious. The method described overcomes limitations of existing PCR-based methods, which require time-consuming and complex post-amplification steps such as the cloning of amplification products. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for use of the reference chaperonin sequence database, cpnDB, as a tool for identification of bacterial isolates based on cpn60 sequences amplified with universal primers.

  7. Child mental health consultation with families of medically compromised infants.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Linda C

    2003-07-01

    behavioral and psychological interventions are integrated with the child's biomedical care. 5. Fostering a brief, or sometimes long-term, therapeutic relationship with the family or facilitating the family's finding such a relationship with another clinician. There will never be enough child and adolescent psychiatrists and psychologists to treat all families of medically compromised infants. Knowledge of normative responses has advanced to the point at which basic skills can be used by and transmitted to others who can provide basic services. There is much to be learned about the short- and long-term sequelae of such stressful situations on individuals and family systems with preexisting psychopathology. For such families, child mental health professionals are uniquely suited to play a further role in research and treatment.

  8. 10 CFR 15.41 - When a claim may be compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false When a claim may be compromised. 15.41 Section 15.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DEBT COLLECTION PROCEDURES Compromise of a Claim § 15.41 When a... principal balance of a debt, exclusive of interest, penalties, and administrative costs, exceeds $100,000...

  9. Compromise, Well-Being, and Action Behaviors in Young Adults in Career Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Blume, Kellie

    2013-01-01

    The authors surveyed 186 first-year university students and assessed their level of career compromise associated with making the transition to university. Compromise was operationalized as the discrepancy between the job characteristics of ideal and expected occupations. The authors also assessed career well-being (satisfaction, distress), action…

  10. 20 CFR 340.14 - Factors due to be considered in a compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Factors due to be considered in a compromise. 340.14 Section 340.14 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT RECOVERY OF BENEFITS § 340.14 Factors due to be considered in a compromise....

  11. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Y of... - Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Environment and Natural Resources Division Redelegation Of Authority To Initiate And To Compromise Environment and Natural Resources Division Cases This directive supersedes Land and Natural Resources Memorandum... with, and to compromise, Environment and Natural Resources Division cases: Section I—Authority...

  12. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Y of... - Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Environment and Natural Resources Division Redelegation Of Authority To Initiate And To Compromise Environment and Natural Resources Division Cases This directive supersedes Land and Natural Resources Memorandum... with, and to compromise, Environment and Natural Resources Division cases: Section I—Authority...

  13. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Y of... - Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Environment and Natural Resources Division Redelegation Of Authority To Initiate And To Compromise Environment and Natural Resources Division Cases This directive supersedes Land and Natural Resources Memorandum... with, and to compromise, Environment and Natural Resources Division cases: Section I—Authority...

  14. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Y of... - Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Environment and Natural Resources Division Redelegation Of Authority To Initiate And To Compromise Environment and Natural Resources Division Cases This directive supersedes Land and Natural Resources Memorandum... with, and to compromise, Environment and Natural Resources Division cases: Section I—Authority...

  15. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and...

  16. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and...

  17. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and...

  18. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and...

  19. 22 CFR 304.7 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims. 304.7 Section 304.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL... the Peace Corps retains authority to consider, ascertain, adjust, determine, compromise and...

  20. 48 CFR 239.7102-2 - Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7102-2 Compromising emanations—TEMPEST or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising emanations-TEMPEST or other standard. 239.7102-2 Section 239.7102-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  1. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure. 2001.48 Section 2001.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  2. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure. 2001.48 Section 2001.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  3. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure. 2001.48 Section 2001.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  4. 10 CFR 15.41 - When a claim may be compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... it has not been referred to DOJ for litigation. (b) Unless otherwise provided by law, when the... with the DOJ. The NRC will evaluate the compromise offer, using the factors set forth in this part. If an offer to compromise any debt in excess of $100,000 is acceptable to the NRC, the NRC shall...

  5. 27 CFR 70.484 - Offers in compromise of forfeiture liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proponent is notified of the acceptance or rejection of the offer. If the offer is rejected, the sum... is notified and the case is closed. Acceptance of an offer in compromise of civil liabilities does not remit criminal liabilities, nor does acceptance of an offer in compromise of criminal...

  6. [Guidelines for chagas disease: Part IV. Chagas disease in immune compromised patients].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    A summary of different kind of immune suppressed hosts and the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in this group of patients is presented. Then, most relevant aspects of immune compromised host-parasite interaction are analyzed such as the moment of acquiring the infection, immune compromise level, mechanisms of acquisition the infection and geographic region. Clinical features of primary infection and reactivation of infection in chronic Chagasic patients are described making special emphasis in solid organ transplant and BMT. Chagas disease in AIDS patients is discussed including its treatment, follow up, monitoring the immune compromise level and prophylaxis.

  7. 7 CFR 1956.68 - Compromise or adjustment without debtor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY... Loan Programs and Multi-Family Housing § 1956.68 Compromise or adjustment without debtor's...

  8. 32 CFR 2001.48 - Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... governments normally will not be advised of any security system vulnerabilities that contributed to the... INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Safeguarding § 2001.48 Loss, possible compromise or unauthorized disclosure....

  9. 45 CFR 608.2 - Collection, compromise, and use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CLAIMS COLLECTION AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFSET § 608.2 Collection, compromise, and... briefly describing the nature of the review performed and the conclusion reached shall be made....

  10. 45 CFR 608.2 - Collection, compromise, and use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CLAIMS COLLECTION AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFSET § 608.2 Collection, compromise, and... briefly describing the nature of the review performed and the conclusion reached shall be made....

  11. Combating QR-Code-Based Compromised Accounts in Mobile Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqi; Fu, Qiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cyber Physical Social Sensing makes mobile social networks (MSNs) popular with users. However, such attacks are rampant as malicious URLs are spread covertly through quick response (QR) codes to control compromised accounts in MSNs to propagate malicious messages. Currently, there are generally two types of methods to identify compromised accounts in MSNs: one type is to analyze the potential threats on wireless access points and the potential threats on handheld devices’ operation systems so as to stop compromised accounts from spreading malicious messages; the other type is to apply the method of detecting compromised accounts in online social networks to MSNs. The above types of methods above focus neither on the problems of MSNs themselves nor on the interaction of sensors’ messages, which leads to the restrictiveness of platforms and the simplification of methods. In order to stop the spreading of compromised accounts in MSNs effectively, the attacks have to be traced to their sources first. Through sensors, users exchange information in MSNs and acquire information by scanning QR codes. Therefore, analyzing the traces of sensor-related information helps to identify the compromised accounts in MSNs. This paper analyzes the diversity of information sending modes of compromised accounts and normal accounts, analyzes the regularity of GPS (Global Positioning System)-based location information, and introduces the concepts of entropy and conditional entropy so as to construct an entropy-based model based on machine learning strategies. To achieve the goal, about 500,000 accounts of Sina Weibo and about 100 million corresponding messages are collected. Through the validation, the accuracy rate of the model is proved to be as high as 87.6%, and the false positive rate is only 3.7%. Meanwhile, the comparative experiments of the feature sets prove that sensor-based location information can be applied to detect the compromised accounts in MSNs. PMID:27657071

  12. Combating QR-Code-Based Compromised Accounts in Mobile Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqi; Fu, Qiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-09-20

    Cyber Physical Social Sensing makes mobile social networks (MSNs) popular with users. However, such attacks are rampant as malicious URLs are spread covertly through quick response (QR) codes to control compromised accounts in MSNs to propagate malicious messages. Currently, there are generally two types of methods to identify compromised accounts in MSNs: one type is to analyze the potential threats on wireless access points and the potential threats on handheld devices' operation systems so as to stop compromised accounts from spreading malicious messages; the other type is to apply the method of detecting compromised accounts in online social networks to MSNs. The above types of methods above focus neither on the problems of MSNs themselves nor on the interaction of sensors' messages, which leads to the restrictiveness of platforms and the simplification of methods. In order to stop the spreading of compromised accounts in MSNs effectively, the attacks have to be traced to their sources first. Through sensors, users exchange information in MSNs and acquire information by scanning QR codes. Therefore, analyzing the traces of sensor-related information helps to identify the compromised accounts in MSNs. This paper analyzes the diversity of information sending modes of compromised accounts and normal accounts, analyzes the regularity of GPS (Global Positioning System)-based location information, and introduces the concepts of entropy and conditional entropy so as to construct an entropy-based model based on machine learning strategies. To achieve the goal, about 500,000 accounts of Sina Weibo and about 100 million corresponding messages are collected. Through the validation, the accuracy rate of the model is proved to be as high as 87.6%, and the false positive rate is only 3.7%. Meanwhile, the comparative experiments of the feature sets prove that sensor-based location information can be applied to detect the compromised accounts in MSNs.

  13. Recognizing and caring for the medically compromised child: 4. Children with other chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, S C; Barnard, K M; Harrison, V E

    1999-01-01

    This is the fourth and final part of a series on recognizing and caring for medically compromised children. In this article, an outline of appropriate dental management for children with other more commonly encountered chronic medical conditions is given, together with a description of the disorders and their significance in dentistry. This group includes children with physically handicapping conditions and children with learning difficulties, as well as those who are medically compromised.

  14. A one-appointment impression and centric relation record technique for compromised complete denture patients.

    PubMed

    Ansari, I H

    1997-09-01

    This article describes a two-in-one modified custom tray and record block system that is recommended for compromised elderly patients. Custom trays, which are made on primary casts and formed from a patient's functionally corrected old dentures, are used to make final impressions and centric jaw relation records in one clinical appointment. The clinical visits are reduced without compromising the quality of denture construction.

  15. Respiratory Compromise as a New Paradigm for the Care of Vulnerable Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Morris, Timothy A; Gay, Peter C; MacIntyre, Neil R; Hess, Dean R; Hanneman, Sandra K; Lamberti, James P; Doherty, Dennis E; Chang, Lydia; Seckel, Maureen A

    2017-04-01

    Acute respiratory compromise describes a deterioration in respiratory function with a high likelihood of rapid progression to respiratory failure and death. Identifying patients at risk for respiratory compromise coupled with monitoring of patients who have developed respiratory compromise might allow earlier interventions to prevent or mitigate further decompensation. The National Association for the Medical Direction of Respiratory Care (NAMDRC) organized a workshop meeting with representation from many national societies to address the unmet needs of respiratory compromise from a clinical practice perspective. Respiratory compromise may arise de novo or may complicate preexisting lung disease. The group identified distinct subsets of respiratory compromise that present similar opportunities for early detection and useful intervention to prevent respiratory failure. The subtypes were characterized by the pathophysiological mechanisms they had in common: impaired control of breathing, impaired airway protection, parenchymal lung disease, increased airway resistance, hydrostatic pulmonary edema, and right-ventricular failure. Classification of acutely ill respiratory patients into one or more of these categories may help in selecting the screening and monitoring strategies that are most appropriate for the patient's particular pathophysiology. Standardized screening and monitoring practices for patients with similar mechanisms of deterioration may enhance the ability to predict respiratory failure early and prevent its occurrence.

  16. Central nervous system compromise in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Villa, Luis A; Restrepo, Lucas; Molina, Jose F; Mantilla, Rubén D; Vargas, Sergio

    2002-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is poorly understood, and its frequency as well as its manifestations are subjects of controversy. The current study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and the clinical and immunogenetic characteristics of CNS compromise in a well defined group of patients with primary SS. In this retrospective study, patients fulfilled the European classification criteria. Among 120 patients with primary SS, 3 (2.5%) had CNS compromise (multiple sclerosis-like illness, complicated migraine, and optic neuritis with epilepsy). The CNS involvement coincided with the onset of sicca symptoms in 1 case. All 3 patients carried the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*0303 allele and tested positive for anti-Ro antibodies, but not for anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Although rare, CNS compromise in primary SS can be the presenting manifestation of the disease in a few cases, and may be severe and varied.

  17. Clinicopathologic subtypes and compromise of lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaime Jans, B; Nicolás Escudero, M; Dahiana Pulgar, B; Francisco Acevedo, C; César Sánchez, R; Camus, A Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is currently a heterogeneous disease with variations in clinical behaviour. Classification according to subtypes has allowed progress in the individualisation of treatment. The objective of this study is to evaluate the risk of axillary node compromise in patients with BC, according to clinicopathologic subtypes. Materials and methods are a retrospective, descriptive-analytical study. All patients that had undergone surgery for invasive BC were included, with the study of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) at Hospital Clínico de la Pontificia Universidad Católica, between May 1999 and December 2012. The results showed 632 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, with the median age being 55 years (range: 28–95), and 559 (88.4%) patients presented with estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor positive tumours. Luminal A: 246 patients (38.9%), luminal B: 243 (38.4%), luminal not otherwise specified: 70 (11.1%) triple negative (TN): 60 (9.5%) and over expression of epidermal growth factor type 2 receptor (HER2 positive): 13 (2.1%). Luminal tumours displayed a greater risk of metastasis in the SLNs, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.67). TN and HER2 positive tumours presented the greatest proportion of metastatic compromise in non-sentinel lymph nodes (non-SLNs) (57.1% and 50%, respectively). The presence of macrometastasis (MAM) in the SLN was associated with a greater risk of compromise of the non-SLN. Conclusions: Luminal tumours are the most frequent and present a greater proportion of axillary lymph node compromise, without being statistically significant. TN and HER2 positive tumours tend to have a higher axillary compromise; however, this was not statistically significant in either. Only the presence of MAM in SLNs displayed a statistically significantly association in the compromise of non-SLNs. PMID:25114720

  18. Compromise Approach-Based Genetic Algorithm for Constrained Multiobjective Portfolio Selection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun

    In this paper, fuzzy set theory is incorporated into a multiobjective portfolio selection model for investors’ taking into three criteria: return, risk and liquidity. The cardinality constraint, the buy-in threshold constraint and the round-lots constraints are considered in the proposed model. To overcome the difficulty of evaluation a large set of efficient solutions and selection of the best one on non-dominated surface, a compromise approach-based genetic algorithm is presented to obtain a compromised solution for the proposed constrained multiobjective portfolio selection model.

  19. 15 CFR 19.7 - When will Commerce entities compromise a Commerce debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When will Commerce entities compromise a Commerce debt? 19.7 Section 19.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce COMMERCE DEBT COLLECTION Procedures To Collect Commerce Debts § 19.7 When will Commerce entities...

  20. Unconsciously competing goals can collaborate or compromise as well as win or lose.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Peter

    2014-04-01

    This commentary offers a friendly extension of Huang & Bargh's (H&B's) account. Not only do active goals sometimes operate unconsciously to dominate or preempt others, but simultaneously active goals can also collaborate or compromise in shaping behavior. Because neither goal wins complete control of behavior, the result may be that each is only partly satisfied.

  1. Inadequate satellite cell replication compromises muscle regrowth following postnatal nutrient restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perinatal growth impairment permanently compromises skeletal muscle mass. The present study assessed the contribution of muscle satellite cell replicative capacity to this deficit. Mouse dams were fed either a low protein (LP, n=7) or control (C, n=6) diet during lactation. Pups were weaned at 21 d ...

  2. Using Emergence Theory-Based Curriculum to Teach Compromise Skills to Students with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Lance; Jones, Don

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the compromise skills that are taught to students diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and related social and communication deficits. A private school in the southeastern United States implemented an emergence theory-based curriculum to address these skills, yet no formal analysis was conducted to determine its…

  3. 31 CFR 5.7 - When will Treasury entities compromise a Treasury debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When will Treasury entities compromise a Treasury debt? 5.7 Section 5.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TREASURY DEBT COLLECTION Procedures To Collect Treasury Debts § 5.7 When will Treasury...

  4. 7 CFR 1956.66 - Compromise and adjustment of nonjudgment debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...'s essential family living expenses, and farm or business operation expenses necessary to continue... SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT... Programs and Multi-Family Housing § 1956.66 Compromise and adjustment of nonjudgment debts....

  5. 40 CFR 1620.6 - Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle. 1620.6 Section 1620.6 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.6 Authority to...

  6. Comments on James Q. Wilson's Compromise on Affirmative Action in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Charles; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides responses from a small group of conservative scholars concerning the compromise proposed by Dr. James Q. Wilson indicating that the nation will allow some affirmative action in the form of race-based preferential admissions at the undergraduate level, but not in graduate programs. (GR)

  7. 45 CFR 30.4 - Compromise, waiver, or disposition under other statutes not precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compromise, waiver, or disposition under other statutes not precluded. 30.4 Section 30.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... States Code and the Federal Claims Collection Standards, 31 CFR parts 900 through 904. Any statute...

  8. 45 CFR 30.4 - Compromise, waiver, or disposition under other statutes not precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise, waiver, or disposition under other statutes not precluded. 30.4 Section 30.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... States Code and the Federal Claims Collection Standards, 31 CFR parts 900 through 904. Any statute...

  9. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  10. 10 CFR 1015.104 - Compromise, waiver, or disposition under other statutes not precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compromise, waiver, or disposition under other statutes not precluded. 1015.104 Section 1015.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COLLECTION... applicable laws and regulations will generally take precedence over this part....

  11. TEMPORAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER IN HEALTHY AND CARDIOVASCULAR COMPROMISED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temporal association between pulmonary and systemic effects of particulate matter in healthy and cardiovascular compromised rats

    Urmila P. Kodavanti, Mette C. Schladweiler, Allen D. Ledbetter, Russ Hauser*, David C. Christiani*, John McGee, Judy R. Richards, Daniel L. Co...

  12. Happenstance and Compromise: A Gendered Analysis of Students' Computing Degree Course Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course…

  13. 13 CFR 108.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 108.1710 Section 108.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA Financial Assistance for NMVC Companies...

  14. 13 CFR 108.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 108.1710 Section 108.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA Financial Assistance for NMVC Companies...

  15. 13 CFR 108.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 108.1710 Section 108.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA Financial Assistance for NMVC Companies...

  16. 13 CFR 108.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 108.1710 Section 108.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA Financial Assistance for NMVC Companies...

  17. 13 CFR 108.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 108.1710 Section 108.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA Financial Assistance for NMVC Companies...

  18. 13 CFR 107.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 107.1710 Section 107.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage)...

  19. 13 CFR 107.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 107.1710 Section 107.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage)...

  20. 13 CFR 107.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 107.1710 Section 107.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage)...

  1. 13 CFR 107.1710 - SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SBA authority to collect or compromise its claims. 107.1710 Section 107.1710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage)...

  2. Fungemia and interstitial lung compromise caused by Malassezia sympodialis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Clarisa; Euliarte, Cristina; Finquelievich, Jorge; Sosa, María de los Ángeles; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    A case of fungemia with interstitial lung compromise caused by Malassezia sympodialis is reported in an obese pediatric patient on long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids for asthma. The patient was hospitalized due to a post-surgical complication of appendicitis. The patient was treated with amphotericin B for 3 weeks, with good clinical evolution and subsequent negative cultures.

  3. 28 CFR 71.54 - Collection and compromise of liabilities imposed by Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Collection and compromise of liabilities...) IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 Assignment of Responsibilities... and civil penalties imposed under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986, and, subsequent to...

  4. State, Labor, Capital: Institutionalizing Democratic Class Compromise in the Southern Cone.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    at promoting, in limited fashion, the structural bases of class compromise. 36La Voz Argentina, V.7, N 70 (December 1985), p. 1. 37C. Pareja , "Las...fiscal crisis. This per force changes the orientation of concertation, and complicates its mission. On concertation in the Southern Cone, see C. Pareja

  5. Effects of Warmth of Interaction, Accuracy of Understanding, and the Proposal of Compromises on Listener's Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David W.

    1971-01-01

    The results of this experiment demonstrate a causal relationship (a) between the expressed accuracy of understanding and the proposal of compromises and the induction of cooperation in a negotiation situation and (b) between the expressed warmth and degree of favorableness of interpersonal attitudes, thus giving support to the efficacy of Rogerian…

  6. 78 FR 53702 - User Fees for Processing Installment Agreements and Offers in Compromise

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...). The public hearing will be held in the IRS Auditorium beginning at 10 a.m. at the Internal Revenue... proposed fees balance the need to recover costs with the goals of encouraging the use of installment... proposed fee balances the need to recover costs with the goal of encouraging offers in compromise. The...

  7. Adolescent Occupational Aspirations: Test of Gottfredson's Theory of Circumscription and Compromise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Daria B.; Wang, Eugene W.; Stevenson, Sarah J.; Johnson, Leah E.; Crews, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between adolescent occupational aspirations and midlife career success. The model for adolescent occupational aspirations was derived from Gottfredson's (1981) theory of circumscription and compromise. The authors hypothesized that parental socioeconomic status (SES), ability, and gender predict adolescent…

  8. 32 CFR 310.14 - Notification when information is lost, stolen, or compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... purposes, such as identity theft, fraud, stalking, etc. The personal impact on the affected individual may... the Federal Trade Commission's public Web site on identity theft at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft... the individual of any loss, theft, or compromise (See also, § 310.50 for reporting of the breach...

  9. 32 CFR 310.14 - Notification when information is lost, stolen, or compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... purposes, such as identity theft, fraud, stalking, etc. The personal impact on the affected individual may... the Federal Trade Commission's public Web site on identity theft at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft... the individual of any loss, theft, or compromise (See also, § 310.50 for reporting of the breach...

  10. 32 CFR 310.14 - Notification when information is lost, stolen, or compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... purposes, such as identity theft, fraud, stalking, etc. The personal impact on the affected individual may... the Federal Trade Commission's public Web site on identity theft at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft... the individual of any loss, theft, or compromise (See also, § 310.50 for reporting of the breach...

  11. 32 CFR 310.14 - Notification when information is lost, stolen, or compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... purposes, such as identity theft, fraud, stalking, etc. The personal impact on the affected individual may... the Federal Trade Commission's public Web site on identity theft at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft... the individual of any loss, theft, or compromise (See also, § 310.50 for reporting of the breach...

  12. 32 CFR 310.14 - Notification when information is lost, stolen, or compromised.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... purposes, such as identity theft, fraud, stalking, etc. The personal impact on the affected individual may... the Federal Trade Commission's public Web site on identity theft at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft... the individual of any loss, theft, or compromise (See also, § 310.50 for reporting of the breach...

  13. 20 CFR 410.565 - Collection and compromise of claims for overpayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection and compromise of claims for overpayment. 410.565 Section 410.565 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits §...

  14. 20 CFR 410.565 - Collection and compromise of claims for overpayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Collection and compromise of claims for overpayment. 410.565 Section 410.565 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits §...

  15. Tragic Choices and Moral Compromise: The Ethics of Allocating Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmaster, Barry; Hooker, Cliff

    2013-01-01

    Context For almost a decade, the Kidney Transplantation Committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing has been striving to revise its approach to allocating kidneys from deceased donors for transplantation. Two fundamental values, equality and efficiency, are central to distributing this scarce resource. The prevailing approach gives primacy to equality in the temporal form of first-come, first-served, whereas the motivation for a new approach is to redeem efficiency by increasing the length of survival of transplanted kidneys and their recipients. But decision making about a better way of allocating kidneys flounders because it is constrained by the amorphous notion of “balancing” values. Methods This article develops a more fitting, productive approach to resolving the conflict between equality and efficiency by embedding the notion of compromise in the analysis of a tragic choice provided by Guido Calabresi and Philip Bobbitt. For Calabresi and Bobbitt, the goals of public policy with respect to tragic choices are to limit tragedy and to deal with the irreducible minimum of tragedy in the least offensive way. Satisfying the value of efficiency limits tragedy, and satisfying the value of equality deals with the irreducible minimum of tragedy in the least offensive way. But both values cannot be completely satisfied simultaneously. Compromise is occasioned when not all the several obligations that exist in a situation can be met and when neglecting some obligations entirely in order to fulfill others entirely is improper. Compromise is amalgamated with the notion of a tragic choice and then used to assess proposals for revising the allocation of kidneys considered by the Kidney Transplantation Committee. Findings Compromise takes two forms in allocating kidneys: it occurs within particular approaches to allocating kidneys because neither equality nor efficiency can be fully satisfied, and it occurs over the course of sequential approaches to allocating

  16. Influence of political opposition and compromise on conservation outcomes in the Tongass National Forest, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Beier, Colin M

    2008-12-01

    To understand how a highly contentious policy process influenced a major conservation effort, I examined the origins, compromises, and outcomes of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 (ANILCA) for the Tongass National Forest. Tongass wilderness designation was among the most controversial issues in the ANILCA debate, and it faced strong opposition from influential lawmakers, land managers, and Alaska residents. To investigate the influence of this opposition on Tongass conservation outcomes, I conducted a gap analysis of Tongass reserves and a policy analysis of the ANILCA debate and traced the influence of specific interests through the amendments, negotiations, and resulting compromises needed to enact ANILCA. Overall, I found that Tongass reserves comprise a broadly representative cross-section of ecosystems and species habitats in southeastern Alaska. Redrawn reserve boundaries, industry subsidies, and special access regulations reflected compromises to minimize the impact of wilderness conservation on mining, timber, and local stakeholder interests, respectively. Fragmentation of the Admiralty Island National Monument-the most ecologically valuable and politically controversial reserve-resulted from compromises with Alaskan Native (indigenous peoples of Alaska) corporations and timber interests. Despite language to accommodate "reasonable access" to wilderness reserves, ongoing access limitations highlight the concerns of Alaska residents that opposed ANILCA several decades ago. More broadly, the Tongass case suggests that early and ambitious conservation action may offset strong political opposition; compromises needed to establish key reserves often exacerbate development impacts in unprotected areas; and efforts to minimize social conflicts are needed to safeguard the long-term viability of conservation measures.

  17. Clinical outcomes of compromised side branch (stent jail) after coronary stenting with the NIR stent.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, B; Waksman, R; Lansky, A J; Kornowski, R; Mehran, R; Leon, M B

    2001-11-01

    Acute side-branch (SB) compromise or occlusion stent jail after native coronary stenting is a matter of concern. Attempts at maintaining SB patency can be a technical challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical impact of SB compromise or occlusion in patients undergoing stenting of parent vessel lesions. We evaluated in-hospital and long-term clinical outcomes (death, Q-wave myocardial infarction, and repeat revascularization rates at 6 months) in 318 consecutive patients undergoing NIR stent implantation across an SB. Based on independent angiographic analysis, 218 (68.6%) patients had no poststent SB compromise, 85 (26.7%) patients had narrowed SB (> 70% narrowing, without total occlusion), and 15 (4.7%) patients had an occluded SB after stent implantation. The baseline patient and lesion characteristics were similar between the groups. Procedural success was 100%. Patients with SB occlusion had a higher stents/lesion ratio (P < 0.006). Side-branch occlusion was associated with higher in-hospital ischemic complications (Q-wave myocardial infarction, 7%; non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, 20%; P < 0.05) compared to patients with SB compromise or normal SB. At 6-month follow-up, there was a trend for more myocardial infarctions in the group with SB occlusion during the index procedure (Q-wave myocardial infarction, 7% vs. 1% in the narrowed and 0% in normal SB; P = 0.09). However, late target lesion revascularization and mortality were similar in the three groups (P = 0.91). SB occlusion after parent vessel stenting is associated with more frequent in-hospital Q-wave and non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions. However, with the NIR stent, side-branch compromise or occlusion does not influence late (6 month) major adverse events, including death, myocardial infarction, or need for repeat revascularization.

  18. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise.

    PubMed

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-08-18

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority.

  19. Genomic imprinting effects in a compromised in utero environment: implications for a healthy pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, A L; Ferguson-Smith, A C

    2010-04-01

    Genomic imprinting in gametogenesis marks a subset of mammalian genes for parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic expression in the offspring. In mice, the identification and manipulation of individual imprinted genes has shown that the diverse products of these genes are largely devoted to controlling pre- and postnatal growth. Human syndromes with parental origin effects have been characterized both at the phenotypic and genotypic levels, allowing further elucidation of the function and regulation of imprinted genes. Evidence suggests that a compromised in utero environment influences fetal growth through the modulation of epigenetic states. However it is not known whether imprinted genes, by their nature, might be more or less susceptible to such environmental influences. Here we review the progress made in addressing the influence of a compromised in utero environment on the behavior of imprinted genes. We also examine whether these environmental influences may have an impact on the later development of human disease.

  20. Human Milk for Ill and Medically Compromised Infants: Strategies and Ongoing Innovation.

    PubMed

    DiLauro, Sara; Unger, Sharon; Stone, Debbie; O'Connor, Deborah L

    2016-08-01

    The use of human milk (mother's own milk and/or donor milk) in ill or medically compromised infants frequently requires some adaptation to address medical diagnoses and/or altered nutrition requirements. This tutorial describes the nutrition and immunological benefits of breast milk as well as provides evidence for the use of donor milk when mother's own milk is unavailable. Several strategies used to modify human milk to meet the medical and nutrition needs of an ill or medically compromised infant are reviewed. These strategies include (1) the standard fortification of human milk to support adequate growth, (2) the novel concept of target fortification in preterm infants, (3) instructions on how to alter maternal diet to address cow's milk protein intolerance and/or allergy in breast milk-fed infants, and (4) the removal and modification of the fat in breast milk used in infants diagnosed with chylothorax.

  1. Transient vascular compromise of the lunate after fracture-dislocation or dislocation of the carpus.

    PubMed

    White, R E; Omer, G E

    1984-03-01

    Although classic avascular necrosis of the lunate is rare after fracture-dislocation or dislocation of the carpus, these severe carpal injuries can compromise the vascular supply of the lunate. The lunate thus develops a relative increase in radiodensity. Our finding of an incidence of 12.5%--three of 24 cases--suggests a relatively frequent occurrence. The clinical course was transient with resolution of abnormal radiodensity and subjective findings. Moreover, none of the three cases progressed to classic avascular necrosis of the lunate, Kienböck's disease. The clinician should not confuse this transient vascular compromise of the lunate with Kienböck's disease, but should be aware of the entity and its benign, self-limited course and should treat it expectantly.

  2. Early Visual Deprivation Severely Compromises the Auditory Sense of Space in Congenitally Blind Children

    PubMed Central

    Vercillo, Tiziana; Burr, David; Gori, Monica

    2016-01-01

    A recent study has shown that congenitally blind adults, who have never had visual experience, are impaired on an auditory spatial bisection task (Gori, Sandini, Martinoli, & Burr, 2014). In this study we investigated how thresholds for auditory spatial bisection and auditory discrimination develop with age in sighted and congenitally blind children (9 to 14 years old). Children performed 2 spatial tasks (minimum audible angle and space bisection) and 1 temporal task (temporal bisection). There was no impairment in the temporal task for blind children but, like adults, they showed severely compromised thresholds for spatial bisection. Interestingly, the blind children also showed lower precision in judging minimum audible angle. These results confirm the adult study and go on to suggest that even simpler auditory spatial tasks are compromised in children, and that this capacity recovers over time. PMID:27228448

  3. Rescue of a periodontally compromised tooth by non-surgical treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a case of the successful non-surgical management of a periodontally compromised maxillary premolar. Methods A combination therapy, including root planing, occlusal adjustment, and tooth splinting, was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 16-month follow-up period. Results All periodontal parameters were improved. There were dramatic decreases (3–6 mm) in the probing pocket depth, tooth mobility, and marginal bone loss. Interestingly, gradual resolution of the periapical radiolucency and alveolar bone regeneration were observed in the radiographs, and the periodontal condition was maintained during the follow-up period. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, these results demonstrate the importance of natural tooth preservation through proper periodontal treatment and occlusal adjustment of the periodontally compromised tooth, which is typically targeted for tooth extraction and dental implantation. PMID:27127693

  4. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority. PMID:22907852

  5. Corporate corruption of the environment: sustainability as a process of compromise.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Daniel; Wright, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    A key response to environmental degradation, climate change and declining biodiversity has been the growing adoption of market principles in an effort to better value the social good of nature. Through concepts such as 'natural capitalism' and 'corporate environmentalism', nature is increasingly viewed as a domain of capitalist endeavour. In this article, we use convention theory and a pluralist understanding of social goods to investigate how the social good of the environment is usurped by the alternate social good of the market. Through analysis of interviews with sustainability managers and corporate documentation, we highlight how organizational actors employ compromise to temporally settle disputes between competing claims about environmental activities. Our findings contribute to an understanding of the processes of empirically grounded critique and the under-theorized concept of compromise between social goods. Rather than protecting the environment, the corporate promotion of sustainability facilitates the corruption of the social good of the environment and its conversion into a market commodity.

  6. Tail loss compromises immunity in the many-lined skink, Eutropis multifasciata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chi-Chien; Yao, Chiou-Ju; Lin, Te-En; Liu, Hsu-Che; Hsu, Yu-Cheng; Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Huang, Wen-San

    2013-04-01

    Tail autotomy incurs energetic costs, and thus, a trade-off in resource allocation may lead to compromised immunity in lizards. We tested the hypothesis that tailless lizards will favor constitutive innate immunity responses over an energetically costly inflammatory response. The influence of fasting and colorful ornamentation was also investigated. We experimentally induced tail autotomy in the lizard Eutropis multifasciata and found that inflammation was suppressed by tail loss, but not further affected by fasting; the suppressive effect of colorful ornamentation was manifested only in males, but not in females. Constitutive innate immunity was not affected by any of these factors. As expected, only costly inflammation was compromised, and a less expensive constitutive innate immunity might be favored as a competent first-line defense during energetically demanding periods. After considering conventional trade-offs among tail regeneration and reproduction, further extending these studies to incorporate disease risk and how this influences escape responses to predators and future reproduction would make worthwhile studies.

  7. Sterile diets for the immuno-compromised: Is there a need?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Joseph S.

    1995-02-01

    There is a general misunderstanding in the radiation processing industry about the use of sterile diets in the medical profession. Sterile diets are used on a limited basis in hospitals that specialize in cancer treatment and organ transplants. These patients are severely immuno-compromised. There are many other patients that are immuno-compromised that do not require sterile diets. These patients may require a diet that is pathogen-free and are aslo "low-microbial diets". Nosocomial infections have become a major issue in US hospitals. The "infection control committee" is the focus group responsible to assure nosocomial infections incidence are below the hospital goals. Application of ionizing radiation to sterilize diets has not been chosen because the product is not available at a reasonable total cost. This paper will discuss the hospitals views.

  8. Evidence for altered placental blood flow and vascularity in compromised pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lawrence P; Caton, Joel S; Redmer, Dale A; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T; Vonnahme, Kimberly A; Borowicz, Pawel P; Luther, Justin S; Wallace, Jacqueline M; Wu, Guoyao; Spencer, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    The placenta is the organ that transports nutrients, respiratory gases, and wastes between the maternal and fetal systems. Consequently, placental blood flow and vascular development are essential components of normal placental function and are critical to fetal growth and development. Normal fetal growth and development are important to ensure optimum health of offspring throughout their subsequent life course. In numerous sheep models of compromised pregnancy, in which fetal or placental growth, or both, are impaired, utero-placental blood flows are reduced. In the models that have been evaluated, placental vascular development also is altered. Recent studies found that treatments designed to increase placental blood flow can ‘rescue’ fetal growth that was reduced due to low maternal dietary intake. Placental blood flow and vascular development are thus potential therapeutic targets in compromised pregnancies. PMID:16469783

  9. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S. Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  10. The administration of probiotics and synbiotics in immune compromised adults: is it safe?

    PubMed

    Van den Nieuwboer, M; Brummer, R J; Guarner, F; Morelli, L; Cabana, M; Claasen, E

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate safety of probiotics and synbiotics in immune compromised adults (≥18 years). Safety was analysed using the Common Terminology Clinical Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.0) classification, thereby providing an update on previous reports using the most recent available clinical data (2008-2013). Safety aspects are represented and related to number of participants per probiotic strain/culture, study duration, dosage, clinical condition and selected afflictions. Analysis of 57 clinical studies indicates that probiotic and/or synbiotic administration in immune compromised adults is safe with regard to the current evaluated probiotic strains, dosages and duration. Individuals were considered immune compromised if HIV-infected, critically ill, underwent surgery or had an organ- or an autoimmune disease. There were no major safety concerns in the study, as none of the serious adverse events (AE)s were related, or suspected to be related, to the probiotic or synbiotic product and the study products were well tolerated. Overall, AEs occurred less frequent in immune compromised subjects receiving probiotics and/or synbiotics compared to the control group. In addition, the results demonstrated a flaw in precise reporting and classification of AE in most studies. Furthermore, generalisability of conclusions are greatly limited by the inconsistent, imprecise and potentially incomplete reporting as well as the variation in probiotic strains, dosages, administration regimes, study populations and reported outcomes. We argue that standardised reporting on adverse events (CTCAE) in 'food' studies should be obligatory, thereby improving reliability of data and re-enforcing the safety profile of probiotics.

  11. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  12. Pilot Analysis of Asbestos-induced Diffuse Pleural Thickening with Respiratory Compromise.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Daisuke; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Kato, Katsuya; Fuchimoto, Yasuko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical features of asbestos-induced diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) with severe respiratory compromise. We conducted a retrospective study of consecutive subjects with asbestos-induced DPT. Medical data such as initial symptoms, radiological findings, respiratory function test results, and clinical course were collected and analyzed. There were 24 patients between 2003 and 2012. All were men, and the median age at the development of DPT was 74 years. The top occupational category associated with asbestos exposure was dockyard workers. The median duration of asbestos exposure was 35.0 years, and the median latency from first exposure to the onset of DPT was 49.0 years. There were no significant differences in respiratory function test results between the higher and lower Brinkman index groups or between unilateral and bilateral DPT. Thirteen patients had a history of benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE), and the median duration from pleural fluid accumulation to DPT with severe respiratory compromise was 28.4 months. DPT with severe respiratory compromise can develop after a long latency following occupational asbestos exposure and a history of BAPE.

  13. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: Update

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María J.; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words “implant” AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication. Key words:Dental implants, medically compromised patient, systemic diseases. PMID:24608222

  14. Further development of an in vitro model for studying the penetration of chemicals through compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Davies, Diane J; Heylings, Jon R; Gayes, Heather; McCarthy, Timothy J; Mack, M Catherine

    2017-02-01

    A new in vitro model based on the electrical resistance properties of the skin barrier has been established in this laboratory. The model utilises a tape stripping procedure in dermatomed pig skin that removes a specific proportion of the stratum corneum, mimicking impaired barrier function observed in humans with damaged skin. The skin penetration and distribution of chemicals with differing physicochemical properties, namely; Benzoic acid, 3-Aminophenol, Caffeine and Sucrose has been assessed in this model. Although, skin penetration over 24h differed for each chemical, compromising the skin did not alter the shape of the time course profile, although absorption into receptor fluid was higher for each chemical. Systemic exposure (receptor fluid, epidermis and dermis), was marginally higher in compromised skin following exposure to the fast penetrant, Benzoic acid, and the slow penetrant Sucrose. The systemically available dose of 3-Aminophenol increased to a greater extent and the absorption of Caffeine was more than double in compromised skin, suggesting that Molecular Weight and Log Pow, are not the only determinants for assessing systemic exposure under these conditions. Although further investigations are required, this in vitro model may be useful for prediction of dermal route exposure under conditions where skin barrier is impaired.

  15. The appropriateness of referral of medically compromised dental patients to hospital.

    PubMed

    Absi, E G; Satterthwaite, J; Shepherd, J P; Thomas, D W

    1997-04-01

    Hospital departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery make a substantial contribution to both managing and treating medically-compromised dental patients. Contracting arrangements should take account of this. Demographic data suggest that the treatment of medically-compromised elderly dentate patients will become increasingly important in the General Dental Service (GDS). To determine the medical conditions and treatment requirements prompting referral of these patients to hospital, a prospective study was undertaken of 75 consecutive adults referred for hospital treatment specifically because of a medical condition which prevented delivery of routine dental care in the GDS. Patients (mean age: 56 years) were referred mainly from general medical (33%) and dental (62%) practitioners. Cardiovascular disease was the most frequently cited medical condition requiring referral (43%; n = 32 cases). Forty-eight patients (64%) were symptomatic on presentation and on average had attended on 2.3 occasions before definitive treatment was instituted. Fifty-two patients (70%) had no special treatment requirements other than those available in the GDS, 11 patients (15%) simply required antibiotic prophylaxis and 81% were treated by undergraduates or junior staff. These data suggest that many patients referred for dental hospital treatment because of underlying medical condition are not in fact medically-compromised and may be treated in the primary care setting.

  16. Loss of GSNOR1 Function Leads to Compromised Auxin Signaling and Polar Auxin Transport.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Da-Li; Wang, Chao; Culler, Angela Hendrickson; Kreiser, Molly A; Suresh, Jayanti; Cohen, Jerry D; Pan, Jianwei; Baker, Barbara; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cross talk between phytohormones, nitric oxide (NO), and auxin has been implicated in the control of plant growth and development. Two recent reports indicate that NO promoted auxin signaling but inhibited auxin transport probably through S-nitrosylation. However, genetic evidence for the effect of S-nitrosylation on auxin physiology has been lacking. In this study, we used a genetic approach to understand the broader role of S-nitrosylation in auxin physiology in Arabidopsis. We compared auxin signaling and transport in Col-0 and gsnor1-3, a loss-of-function GSNOR1 mutant defective in protein de-nitrosylation. Our results showed that auxin signaling was impaired in the gsnor1-3 mutant as revealed by significantly reduced DR5-GUS/DR5-GFP accumulation and compromised degradation of AXR3NT-GUS, a useful reporter in interrogating auxin-mediated degradation of Aux/IAA by auxin receptors. In addition, polar auxin transport was compromised in gsnor1-3, which was correlated with universally reduced levels of PIN or GFP-PIN proteins in the roots of the mutant in a manner independent of transcription and 26S proteasome degradation. Our results suggest that S-nitrosylation and GSNOR1-mediated de-nitrosylation contribute to auxin physiology, and impaired auxin signaling and compromised auxin transport are responsible for the auxin-related morphological phenotypes displayed by the gsnor1-3 mutant.

  17. Normal and Malignant Muscle Cell Transplantation into Immune Compromised Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John C.; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a powerful tool for assessing development, regeneration, and cancer. More recently, allograft cell transplantation protocols have been developed that permit engraftment of normal and malignant cells into irradiated, syngeneic, and immune compromised adult zebrafish. These models when coupled with optimized cell transplantation protocols allow for the rapid assessment of stem cell function, regeneration following injury, and cancer. Here, we present a method for cell transplantation of zebrafish adult skeletal muscle and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a pediatric sarcoma that shares features with embryonic muscle, into immune compromised adult rag2E450fs homozygous mutant zebrafish. Importantly, these animals lack T cells and have reduced B cell function, facilitating engraftment of a wide range of tissues from unrelated donor animals. Our optimized protocols show that fluorescently labeled muscle cell preparations from α-actin-RFP transgenic zebrafish engraft robustly when implanted into the dorsal musculature of rag2 homozygous mutant fish. We also demonstrate engraftment of fluorescent-transgenic ERMS where fluorescence is confined to cells based on differentiation status. Specifically, ERMS were created in AB-strain myf5-GFP; mylpfa-mCherry double transgenic animals and tumors injected into the peritoneum of adult immune compromised fish. The utility of these protocols extends to engraftment of a wide range of normal and malignant donor cells that can be implanted into dorsal musculature or peritoneum of adult zebrafish. PMID:25591079

  18. Live Attenuated S. Typhimurium Vaccine with Improved Safety in Immuno-Compromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Maier, Lisa; Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Slack, Emma; Kremer, Marcus; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; McClelland, Michael; Grant, Andrew J.; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are of great value for preventing infectious diseases. They represent a delicate compromise between sufficient colonization-mediated adaptive immunity and minimizing the risk for infection by the vaccine strain itself. Immune defects can predispose to vaccine strain infections. It has remained unclear whether vaccine safety could be improved via mutations attenuating a vaccine in immune-deficient individuals without compromising the vaccine's performance in the normal host. We have addressed this hypothesis using a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea and a live attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium strain (ssaV). Vaccination with this strain elicited protective immunity in wild type mice, but a fatal systemic infection in immune-deficient cybb−/−nos2−/− animals lacking NADPH oxidase and inducible NO synthase. In cybb−/−nos2−/− mice, we analyzed the attenuation of 35 ssaV strains carrying one additional mutation each. One strain, Z234 (ssaV SL1344_3093), was >1000-fold attenuated in cybb−/−nos2−/− mice and ≈100 fold attenuated in tnfr1−/− animals. However, in wt mice, Z234 was as efficient as ssaV with respect to host colonization and the elicitation of a protective, O-antigen specific mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) response. These data suggest that it is possible to engineer live attenuated vaccines which are specifically attenuated in immuno-compromised hosts. This might help to improve vaccine safety. PMID:23029007

  19. Risky Driving, Mental Health, and Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risk Clustering in Late Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Marilyn S.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Health-compromising behaviors in adolescents and adults co-occur. Because motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death and disability for these age groups, understanding the association between risky driving and other health compromising behaviors is critical. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for participants who screened positive for risky driving and problem drinking. Using baseline data, we examined relationships among conduct behavior problems before and after age 15, depressive symptoms, sleep, problem drinking, and risky driving (hostile, reckless and drinking and driving) in late adolescents ages 18–24 (n= 110) and adults ages 25–44 (n= 202). We developed a measurement model for the entire sample using confirmatory factor analysis, which was then specified as a multi-group structural equation model. Results Late adolescents and adults had some similar associations for pathways through problem drinking to drinking and driving; depression to reckless driving; and conduct behavior problems after 15 to hostile driving. Late adolescents, however, had more complex relationships: depressive symptoms and conduct behavior problems before 15 were associated with more risky driving behaviors through multiple pathways and males reported more risky driving. Conclusions Risky driving is associated with other health-compromising behaviors and mental health factors. It is a multidimensional phenomenon more pronounced in late adolescence than adulthood. In order to promote safe driving, the findings support the need to consider behaviors that are a health threat in the late adolescent population during driving training and licensure. PMID:24814717

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Osseointegrated Prosthetic Auricular Reconstruction in Patients With a Compromised Ipsilateral Temporoparietal Fascial Flap.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kevin J; Wilkes, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with major ear deformities and associated compromise of the superficial temporal artery are poor candidates for autogenous ear reconstruction because of a tenuous ipsilateral temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF). Osseointegrated prosthetic auricular reconstruction (OPAR) is an alternative to contralateral free TPFF microsurgical and autogenous reconstruction, but data on clinical outcomes are limited. The records of patients with ear loss or major deformity and a compromised ipsilateral TPFF who underwent OPAR from 1989 to 2013 were reviewed. Satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire based on a 5 point Likert scale. Thirty-two patients (8 women, 24 men) with mean age 43.0 years (range, 10-70 years) underwent OPAR. The ipsilateral TPFF was compromised due to major trauma (13 patients), cancer extirpation (9), burn injury (4), previous harvest (4), arteriovenous malformation (1), or infection (1). All but 2 patients had an associated craniofacial defect, such as soft tissue deformity (87.5%), hearing loss (46.9%), or bony deformity (31.3%). The overall implant success rate was 88.6% at mean follow-up time of 7.6 years post-OPAR. Prosthesis wear averaged 12.2 hours/day and 6.6 days/week (80.5 hours/week). All 5 patients who experienced implant failures had received prior head and neck irradiation. With their prosthesis, 76.2% (16 patients) stated that their self-consciousness and self-esteem were "better" or "much better," whereas 85.7% (18 patients) stated that their self-image was "better" or "much better." All patients declared that they would undergo the treatment again. Osseointegrated prosthetic auricular reconstruction is a reliable option in this challenging population with high patient satisfaction. Patients with prior radiotherapy may have a higher chance of implant failure and would benefit from extended annual follow-up.

  1. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  2. Compromised Bone Microarchitecture and Estimated Bone Strength in Young Adults With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Milliren, Carly E.; Derrico, Nicholas; Uluer, Ahmet; Sicilian, Leonard; Lapey, Allen; Sawicki, Gregory; Gordon, Catherine M.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Finkelstein, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk for low bone density and fractures, but the underlying alterations in bone microarchitecture that may contribute to their increased fracture risk are currently unknown. Objective: The main goal of this study was to use high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) to characterize the bone microarchitecture, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and estimated strength of the radius and tibia in young adults with CF compared with healthy volunteers. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study at an outpatient clinical research center within a tertiary academic medical center. Participants: Thirty young adults with CF, 18 to 40 years of age, were evaluated and compared with 60 healthy volunteers matched by age (±2 years), gender, and race. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcomes were HR-pQCT–derived cortical and trabecular vBMD, bone microarchitecture, and estimates of bone strength. Results: At the radius and tibia, young adults with CF had smaller bone cross-sectional area and lower vBMD. Cortical and trabecular microarchitecture were compromised at both sites, most notably involving the trabecular bone of the tibia. These differences translated into lower estimated bone strength both at the radius and tibia. After accounting for body mass index differences, young adults with CF had lower bone area and estimated bone strength at the radius and had compromised trabecular microarchitecture and lower total and trabecular vBMD and estimated bone strength at the tibia. Alterations in trabecular bone density and microarchitecture and estimated strength measures of the tibia were also greater than expected based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived areal BMD differences. Conclusions: Young adults with CF have compromised bone microarchitecture and lower estimated bone strength at both the radius and tibia, even after accounting for their smaller body size. These

  3. Compromise of Multiple Time-Resolved Transcriptomics Experiments Identifies Tightly Regulated Functions

    PubMed Central

    Klie, Sebastian; Caldana, Camila; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput technologies for data acquisition from different components (i.e., genes, proteins, and metabolites) of a given biological system, generation of hypotheses, and biological interpretations based on multivariate data sets become increasingly important. These technologies allow for simultaneous gathering of data from the same biological components under different perturbations, including genotypic variation and/or changes in conditions, resulting in so-called multiple data tables. Moreover, these data tables are obtained over a well-chosen time domain to capture the dynamics of the response of the biological system to the perturbation. The computational problem we address in this study is twofold: (1) derive a single data table, referred to as a compromise, which captures information common to the investigated set of multiple tables and (2) identify biological components which contribute most to the determined compromise. Here we argue that recent extensions to principle component analysis called STATIS and dual-STATIS can be used to determine the compromise on which classical techniques for data analysis, such as clustering and term over-enrichment, can be subsequently applied. In addition, we illustrate that STATIS and dual-STATIS facilitate interpretations of a publically available transcriptomics data set capturing the time-resolved response of Arabidopsis thaliana to changing light and/or temperature conditions. We demonstrate that STATIS and dual-STATIS can be used not only to identify the components of a biological system whose behavior is similarly affected due to the perturbation (e.g., in time or condition), but also to specify the extent to which each dimension of the data tables reflect the perturbation. These findings ultimately provide insights in the components and pathways which could be under tight control in plant systems. PMID:23162561

  4. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia as an Unusual Cause of Rapid Airway Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Ezzell, Erin E.; Renshaw, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in Western countries predominantly affecting adults over the age of 65. CLL is commonly indolent in nature but can present locally and aggressively at extranodal sites. Although CLL may commonly present with cervical lymphadenopathy, manifestation in nonlymphoid regions of the head and neck is not well described. CLL causing upper airway obstruction is even more uncommon. We describe a case of a patient with known history of CLL and stable lymphocytosis that developed an enlarging lymphoid base of tongue (BOT) mass resulting in rapid airway compromise.

  5. Demographic corrections appear to compromise classification accuracy for severely skewed cognitive tests.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Megan E; Tuokko, Holly; Kadlec, Helena

    2011-04-01

    Demographic corrections for cognitive tests should improve classification accuracy by reducing age or education biases, but empirical support has been equivocal. Using a simulation procedure, we show that creating moderate or extreme skewness in cognitive tests compromises the classification accuracy of demographic corrections, findings that appear replicated within clinical data for the few neuropsychological test scores with an extreme degree of skew. For most neuropsychological tests, the dementia classification accuracy of raw and demographically corrected scores was equivalent. These findings suggest that the dementia classification accuracy of demographic corrections is robust to slight degrees of skew (i.e., skewness <1.5).

  6. Immediate Implant Loading in Compromised Maxillary Partially Edentulous Arch- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sachhi; Patil, Veena; Jain, Anoop; Gaddale, Reetika

    2014-01-01

    As the aesthetic demands are increasing day by day, demand of immediate restoration or replacement of teeth is also increasing. Because of this, immediate implant placement, along with immediate loading of implant, is a favourite treatment option for patients as well as dentists. This case report discusses the immediate implant loading in compromised maxillary anterior region, in which patient got immediate restoration of edentulous area. More importantly, from the patients’ points of view, immediate loading can produce positive social and psychological effects. PMID:24959519

  7. Bioavailable transition metals in particulate matter mediate cardiopulmonary injury in healthy and compromised animal models.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, D L; Dreher, K L

    1997-01-01

    Many epidemiologic reports associate ambient levels of particulate matter (PM) with human mortality and morbidity, particularly in people with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infection, asthma). Because much ambient PM is derived from combustion sources, we tested the hypothesis that the health effects of PM arise from anthropogenic PM that contains bioavailable transition metals. The PM samples studied derived from three emission sources (two oil and one coal fly ash) and four ambient airsheds (St. Louis, MO; Washington; Dusseldorf, Germany; and Ottawa, Canada). PM was administered to rats by intratracheal instillation in equimass or equimetal doses to address directly the influence of PM mass versus metal content on acute lung injury and inflammation. Our results indicated that the lung dose of bioavailable transition metal, not instilled PM mass, was the primary determinant of the acute inflammatory response for both the combustion source and ambient PM samples. Residual oil fly ash, a combustion PM rich in bioavailable metal, was evaluated in a rat model of cardiopulmonary disease (pulmonary vasculitis/hypertension) to ascertain whether the disease state augmented sensitivity to that PM. Significant mortality and enhanced airway responsiveness were observed. Analysis of the lavaged lung fluids suggested that the milieu of the inflamed lung amplified metal-mediated oxidant chemistry to jeopardize the compromised cardiopulmonary system. We propose that soluble metals from PM mediate the array of PM-associated injuries to the cardiopulmonary system of the healthy and at-risk compromised host. PMID:9400700

  8. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: update.

    PubMed

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María-Jesús; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; López-Valverde-Centeno, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words "implant" AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication.

  9. Glucocorticoids may compromise the effect of gefitinib in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsian-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ling; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chao, Min-Wu; Lin, Su-I; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Cheng, Han-Chin; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Liu, Shih-Jen; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Hsu, John T.-A.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown remarkable benefits in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with drug-sensitive mutations in the EGFR gene. Responsive patients are usually continuously prescribed with TKIs until disease progression. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent homeostasis maintaining drugs and are frequently used in cancer patients to alleviate discomforts caused by anti-cancer therapies. Several previous studies reported that concomitant use of GCs may compromise the efficacy of chemo-therapeutics in patients with solid tumors. Little is known in the concomitant use of target therapy with GCs in treating NSCLC. In this study, we hypothesized that concomitant use of GCs in EGFR-TKI therapy may be detrimental and addressed this issue using cell cultures and xenograft studies followed by a retrospective population study based on data from the Taiwan national health insurance system. In cell cultures and xenograft studies, GCs were shown to unequally compromise the anti-cancer efficacy of TKIs in both PC9 and NCI-H1975 NSCLC cells models. In the retrospective population study, patients with similar disease status that were co-medicated with GCs had a significantly higher risk of disease progression. PMID:27835586

  10. Compromised Prefrontal Cognitive Control Over Emotional Interference in Adolescents with Internet Gaming Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghan; Lee, Seojung; Chun, Ji Won; Cho, Hyun; Kim, Dai-jin; Jung, Young-Chul

    2015-11-01

    Increased reports of impulsivity and aggression in male adolescents with Internet gaming might reflect their dysfunction in emotion regulation, particularly in suppression of negative emotions, which should affect the various stages of Internet gaming disorder. This study tested the hypothesis that adolescents with Internet gaming disorder would be more disturbed by the emotional interference and demonstrate compromised dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activation during a Stroop Match-to-Sample task. In addition, functional connectivity analysis was conducted to examine the interplays between neural correlates involved in emotional processing and how they were altered in adolescents with Internet gaming disorder. The Internet gaming disorder group demonstrated weaker dACC activation and stronger insular activations to interfering angry facial stimuli compared with the healthy control group. Negative functional connectivity between stronger insular activation and weaker dorsolateral prefrontal activation correlated with higher cognitive impulsivity in adolescents with Internet gaming disorder. These findings provide evidence of the compromised prefrontal cognitive control over emotional interference in adolescents with Internet gaming disorder.

  11. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Binding to Phospholipid Membranes Prompts Its Amyloid Aggregation and Compromises Bilayer Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anne; Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Jung-KC, Kunwar; Sauter, Alexander; Horvath, Istvan; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.; Martinez, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters and hormones, binds to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Binding to both large and giant unilamellar vesicles causes membrane permeabilization, as observed by efflux and influx of fluorescence dyes. Whereas the initial protein-membrane interaction involves the N-terminal tail that constitutes an extension of the regulatory ACT-domain, prolonged membrane binding induces misfolding and self-oligomerization of TH over time as shown by circular dichroism and Thioflavin T fluorescence. The gradual amyloid-like aggregation likely occurs through cross-β interactions involving aggregation-prone motives in the catalytic domains, consistent with the formation of chain and ring-like protofilaments observed by atomic force microscopy in monolayer-bound TH. PC12 cells treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine displayed increased TH levels in the mitochondrial fraction, while incubation of isolated mitochondria with TH led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, cell-substrate impedance and viability assays showed that supplementing the culture media with TH compromises cell viability over time. Our results revealed that the disruptive effect of TH on cell membranes may be a cytotoxic and pathogenic factor if the regulation and intracellular stability of TH is compromised. PMID:28004763

  12. Can Neglected Tropical Diseases Compromise Human Wellbeing in Sex-, Age-, and Trait-Specific Ways?

    PubMed Central

    Geary, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Traits that facilitate competition for reproductive resources or that influence mate choice have evolved to signal resilience to infectious disease and other stressors. As a result, the dynamics of competition and choice can, in theory, be used to generate predictions about sex-, age-, and trait-specific vulnerabilities for any sexually reproducing species, including humans. These dynamics and associated vulnerabilities are reviewed for nonhuman species, focusing on traits that are compromised by exposure to parasites. Using the same approach, sex-, age-, and trait-specific vulnerabilities to parasitic disease are illustrated for children’s and adolescent’s physical growth and fitness. Suggestions are then provided for widening the assessment of human vulnerabilities to include age-appropriate measures of behavioral (e.g., children’s play) and cognitive (e.g., language fluency) traits. These are traits that are likely to be compromised by infection in age- and sex-specific ways. Inclusion of these types of measures in studies of neglected tropic diseases has the potential to provide a more nuanced understanding of how these diseases undermine human wellbeing and may provide a useful means to study the efficacy of associated treatments. PMID:27077746

  13. Metabolic engineering of lipid catabolism increases microalgal lipid accumulation without compromising growth.

    PubMed

    Trentacoste, Emily M; Shrestha, Roshan P; Smith, Sarah R; Glé, Corine; Hartmann, Aaron C; Hildebrand, Mark; Gerwick, William H

    2013-12-03

    Biologically derived fuels are viable alternatives to traditional fossil fuels, and microalgae are a particularly promising source, but improvements are required throughout the production process to increase productivity and reduce cost. Metabolic engineering to increase yields of biofuel-relevant lipids in these organisms without compromising growth is an important aspect of advancing economic feasibility. We report that the targeted knockdown of a multifunctional lipase/phospholipase/acyltransferase increased lipid yields without affecting growth in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antisense-expressing knockdown strains 1A6 and 1B1 exhibited wild-type-like growth and increased lipid content under both continuous light and alternating light/dark conditions. Strains 1A6 and 1B1, respectively, contained 2.4- and 3.3-fold higher lipid content than wild-type during exponential growth, and 4.1- and 3.2-fold higher lipid content than wild-type after 40 h of silicon starvation. Analyses of fatty acids, lipid classes, and membrane stability in the transgenic strains suggest a role for this enzyme in membrane lipid turnover and lipid homeostasis. These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase lipid accumulation in eukaryotic microalgae without compromising growth.

  14. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for febrile episodes in immune-compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, E; Yaniv, I; Drucker, M; Hadad, S; Goshen, Y; Stein, J; Ash, S; Fisher, S; Zaizov, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of home intravenous antibiotic treatment (HIAT) for febrile episodes in immune-compromised (neutropenic, splenectomized), low-risk pediatric patients. Thirty hematology-oncology patients who presented to our emergency room from January 1993 to January 1995 and who suffered from a febrile episode and were considered at low risk for septic complications were immediately discharged on HIAT. Patients were followed for at least 3 weeks after recovery. Patients and parents were retrospectively questioned about adverse effects and about their degree of satisfaction with home treatment. Patients who required hospitalization during this period were considered unresponsive to HIAT and were analyzed for causes and adverse effects. Thirteen out of 60 (22%) febrile episodes, or eight out of 42 (19%) episodes of fever and neutropenia eventually led to hospitalization. Pseudomonas species infections were associated with the highest rate of unresponsiveness (88%). A central venous catheter infection developed in two cases following HIAT (two cases out of 640 days of therapy). No other complications were identified. No infection-related morbidity was observed. Patients and parents were highly satisfied with HIAT and wanted to use it again, if necessary. Immediate discharge on HIAT for low-risk pediatric immune-compromised patients suffering from a febrile episode is feasible, safe, and well accepted by patients and families. Patients who are found to have Pseudomonas infections should probably be hospitalized. Our results are preliminary and must be confirmed by a prospective, randomized trial before definite recommendations can be made.

  15. Designing and Operating Through Compromise: Architectural Analysis of CKMS for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Duren, Mike; Aldridge, Hal; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2013-01-01

    Compromises attributable to the Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) highlight the necessity for constant vigilance. The APT provides a new perspective on security metrics (e.g., statistics based cyber security) and quantitative risk assessments. We consider design principals and models/tools that provide high assurance for energy delivery systems (EDS) operations regardless of the state of compromise. Cryptographic keys must be securely exchanged, then held and protected on either end of a communications link. This is challenging for a utility with numerous substations that must secure the intelligent electronic devices (IEDs) that may comprise complex control system of systems. For example, distribution and management of keys among the millions of intelligent meters within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is being implemented as part of the National Smart Grid initiative. Without a means for a secure cryptographic key management system (CKMS) no cryptographic solution can be widely deployed to protect the EDS infrastructure from cyber-attack. We consider 1) how security modeling is applied to key management and cyber security concerns on a continuous basis from design through operation, 2) how trusted models and key management architectures greatly impact failure scenarios, and 3) how hardware-enabled trust is a critical element to detecting, surviving, and recovering from attack.

  16. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthias R.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53’s oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1MET(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  17. Focal cartilage defect compromises fluid-pressure dependent load support in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Yaghoub; Li, LePing

    2015-06-01

    A focal cartilage defect involves tissue loss or rupture. Altered mechanics in the affected joint may play an essential role in the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to determine the compromised load support in the human knee joint during defect progression from the cartilage surface to the cartilage-bone interface. Ten normal and defect cases were simulated with a previously tested 3D finite element model of the knee. The focal defects were considered in both condyles within high load-bearing regions. Fluid pressurization, anisotropic fibril-reinforcement, and depth-dependent mechanical properties were considered for the articular cartilages and menisci. The results showed that a small cartilage defect could cause 25% reduction in the load support of the knee joint due to a reduced capacity of fluid pressurization in the defect cartilage. A partial-thickness defect could cause a fluid pressure decrease or increase in the remaining underlying cartilage depending on the defect depth. A cartilage defect also increased the shear strain at the cartilage-bone interface, which was more significant with a full-thickness defect. The effect of cartilage defect on the fluid pressurization also depended on the defect sites and contact conditions. In conclusion, a focal cartilage defect causes a fluid-pressure dependent load reallocation and a compromised load support in the joint, which depend on the defect depth, site, and contact condition.

  18. Compromised epidermal barrier stimulates Harderian gland activity and hypertrophy in ACBP−/− mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Bek, Signe; Neess, Ditte; Dixen, Karen; Bloksgaard, Maria; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Chemnitz, John; Færgeman, Nils J.; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a small, ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein that binds C14-C22 acyl-CoA esters with very high affinity and specificity. We have recently shown that targeted disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a compromised epidermal barrier and that this causes delayed adaptation to weaning, including the induction of the hepatic lipogenic and cholesterogenic gene programs. Here we show that ACBP is highly expressed in the Harderian gland, a gland that is located behind the eyeball of rodents and involved in the production of fur lipids and lipids used for lubrication of the eye lid. We show that disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a significant enlargement of this gland with hypertrophy of the acinar cells and increased de novo synthesis of monoalkyl diacylglycerol, the main lipid species produced by the gland. Mice with conditional targeting of the Acbp gene in the epidermis recapitulate this phenotype, whereas generation of an artificial epidermal barrier during gland development reverses the phenotype. Our findings indicate that the Harderian gland is activated by the compromised epidermal barrier as an adaptive and protective mechanism to overcome the barrier defect. PMID:26142722

  19. Compromised epidermal barrier stimulates Harderian gland activity and hypertrophy in ACBP-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Bek, Signe; Neess, Ditte; Dixen, Karen; Bloksgaard, Maria; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Chemnitz, John; Færgeman, Nils J; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a small, ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein that binds C14-C22 acyl-CoA esters with very high affinity and specificity. We have recently shown that targeted disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a compromised epidermal barrier and that this causes delayed adaptation to weaning, including the induction of the hepatic lipogenic and cholesterogenic gene programs. Here we show that ACBP is highly expressed in the Harderian gland, a gland that is located behind the eyeball of rodents and involved in the production of fur lipids and lipids used for lubrication of the eye lid. We show that disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a significant enlargement of this gland with hypertrophy of the acinar cells and increased de novo synthesis of monoalkyl diacylglycerol, the main lipid species produced by the gland. Mice with conditional targeting of the Acbp gene in the epidermis recapitulate this phenotype, whereas generation of an artificial epidermal barrier during gland development reverses the phenotype. Our findings indicate that the Harderian gland is activated by the compromised epidermal barrier as an adaptive and protective mechanism to overcome the barrier defect.

  20. Metabolic engineering of lipid catabolism increases microalgal lipid accumulation without compromising growth

    PubMed Central

    Trentacoste, Emily M.; Shrestha, Roshan P.; Smith, Sarah R.; Glé, Corine; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Hildebrand, Mark; Gerwick, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Biologically derived fuels are viable alternatives to traditional fossil fuels, and microalgae are a particularly promising source, but improvements are required throughout the production process to increase productivity and reduce cost. Metabolic engineering to increase yields of biofuel-relevant lipids in these organisms without compromising growth is an important aspect of advancing economic feasibility. We report that the targeted knockdown of a multifunctional lipase/phospholipase/acyltransferase increased lipid yields without affecting growth in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antisense-expressing knockdown strains 1A6 and 1B1 exhibited wild-type–like growth and increased lipid content under both continuous light and alternating light/dark conditions. Strains 1A6 and 1B1, respectively, contained 2.4- and 3.3-fold higher lipid content than wild-type during exponential growth, and 4.1- and 3.2-fold higher lipid content than wild-type after 40 h of silicon starvation. Analyses of fatty acids, lipid classes, and membrane stability in the transgenic strains suggest a role for this enzyme in membrane lipid turnover and lipid homeostasis. These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase lipid accumulation in eukaryotic microalgae without compromising growth. PMID:24248374

  1. Natural Tooth Pontic: An Instant Esthetic Option for Periodontally Compromised Teeth—A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Rishi; Narayan, Ipshita; Gowda, Triveni Mavinakote; Mehta, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden tooth loss in the esthetic zone of the maxillary or mandibular anterior region can be due to trauma, periodontal disease, or endodontic failure. The treatment options for replacing the missing tooth can vary between removable prosthesis, tooth-supported prosthesis, and implant-supported prosthesis. Irrespective of the final treatment, the first line of management would be to provisionally restore the patient's esthetic appearance at the earliest, while functionally stabilizing the compromised arch. Using the patient's own natural tooth as a pontic offers the benefits of being the right size, shape, and color and provides exact repositioning in its original intraoral three-dimensional position. Additionally, using the patient's platelet concentrate (platelet rich fibrin) facilitates early wound healing and preservation of alveolar ridge shape following tooth extraction. The abutment teeth can also be preserved with minimal or no preparation, thus keeping the technique reversible, and can be completed at the chair side thereby avoiding laboratory costs. This helps the patient better tolerate the effect of tooth loss psychologically. The article describes a successful, immediate, and viable technique for rehabilitation of three different patients requiring replacement of a single periodontally compromised tooth in an esthetic region. PMID:27994892

  2. Can Neglected Tropical Diseases Compromise Human Wellbeing in Sex-, Age-, and Trait-Specific Ways?

    PubMed

    Geary, David C

    2016-04-01

    Traits that facilitate competition for reproductive resources or that influence mate choice have evolved to signal resilience to infectious disease and other stressors. As a result, the dynamics of competition and choice can, in theory, be used to generate predictions about sex-, age-, and trait-specific vulnerabilities for any sexually reproducing species, including humans. These dynamics and associated vulnerabilities are reviewed for nonhuman species, focusing on traits that are compromised by exposure to parasites. Using the same approach, sex-, age-, and trait-specific vulnerabilities to parasitic disease are illustrated for children's and adolescent's physical growth and fitness. Suggestions are then provided for widening the assessment of human vulnerabilities to include age-appropriate measures of behavioral (e.g., children's play) and cognitive (e.g., language fluency) traits. These are traits that are likely to be compromised by infection in age- and sex-specific ways. Inclusion of these types of measures in studies of neglected tropic diseases has the potential to provide a more nuanced understanding of how these diseases undermine human wellbeing and may provide a useful means to study the efficacy of associated treatments.

  3. Psychological stress compromises CD8+ T cell control of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Sheridan, Brian S; Bonneau, Robert H; Hendricks, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    Recurrent HSV-1 ocular disease results from reactivation of latent virus in trigeminal ganglia, often following immunosuppression or exposure to a variety of psychological or physical stressors. HSV-specific CD8+ T cells can block HSV-1 reactivation from latency in ex vivo trigeminal ganglia cultures through production of IFN-gamma. In this study, we establish that either CD8+ T cell depletion or exposure to restraint stress permit HSV-1 to transiently escape from latency in vivo. Restraint stress caused a reduction of TG-resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cells and a functional compromise of those cells that survive. Together, these effects of stress resulted in an approximate 65% reduction of cells capable of producing IFN-gamma in response to reactivating virus. Our findings demonstrate persistent in vivo regulation of latent HSV-1 by CD8+ T cells, and strongly support the concept that stress induces HSV-1 reactivation from latency at least in part by compromising CD8+ T cell surveillance of latently infected neurons.

  4. Hydraulic efficiency compromises compression strength perpendicular to the grain in Norway spruce trunkwood

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bending stiffness and compression strength perpendicular to the grain of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trunkwood with different anatomical and hydraulic properties. Hydraulically less safe mature sapwood had bigger hydraulic lumen diameters and higher specific hydraulic conductivities than hydraulically safer juvenile wood. Bending stiffness (MOE) was higher, whereas radial compression strength lower in mature than in juvenile wood. A density-based tradeoff between MOE and hydraulic efficiency was apparent in mature wood only. Across cambial age, bending stiffness did not compromise hydraulic efficiency due to variation in latewood percent and because of the structural demands of the tree top (e.g. high flexibility). Radial compression strength compromised, however, hydraulic efficiency because it was extremely dependent on the characteristics of the “weakest” wood part, the highly conductive earlywood. An increase in conduit wall reinforcement of earlywood tracheids would be too costly for the tree. Increasing radial compression strength by modification of microfibril angles or ray cell number could result in a decrease of MOE, which would negatively affect the trunk’s capability to support the crown. We propose that radial compression strength could be an easily assessable and highly predictive parameter for the resistance against implosion or vulnerability to cavitation across conifer species, which should be topic of further studies. PMID:22058609

  5. DMP-1-mediated Ghr gene recombination compromises skeletal development and impairs skeletal response to intermittent PTH

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongbo; Kennedy, Oran D.; Cardoso, Luis; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Partridge, Nicola C.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Yakar, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Bone minerals are acquired during growth and are key determinants of adult skeletal health. During puberty, the serum levels of growth hormone (GH) and its downstream effector IGF-1 increase and play critical roles in bone acquisition. The goal of the current study was to determine how bone cells integrate signals from the GH/IGF-1 to enhance skeletal mineralization and strength during pubertal growth. Osteocytes, the most abundant bone cells, were shown to orchestrate bone modeling during growth. We used dentin matrix protein (Dmp)-1-mediated Ghr knockout (DMP-GHRKO) mice to address the role of the GH/IGF axis in osteocytes. We found that DMP-GHRKO did not affect linear growth but compromised overall bone accrual. DMP-GHRKO mice exhibited reduced serum inorganic phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and decreased bone formation indices and were associated with an impaired response to intermittent PTH treatment. Using an osteocyte-like cell line along with in vivo studies, we found that PTH sensitized the response of bone to GH by increasing Janus kinase-2 and IGF-1R protein levels. We concluded that endogenously secreted PTH and GHR signaling in bone are necessary to establish radial bone growth and optimize mineral acquisition during growth.—Liu, Z., Kennedy, O. D., Cardoso, L., Basta-Pljakic, J., Partridge, N. C., Schaffler, M. B., Rosen, C. J., Yakar, S. DMP-1-mediated Ghr gene recombination compromises skeletal development and impairs skeletal response to intermittent PTH. PMID:26481310

  6. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  7. Glucocorticoids may compromise the effect of gefitinib in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsian-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ling; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chao, Min-Wu; Lin, Su-I; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Cheng, Han-Chin; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Liu, Shih-Jen; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Hsu, John T-A

    2016-12-27

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown remarkable benefits in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with drug-sensitive mutations in the EGFR gene. Responsive patients are usually continuously prescribed with TKIs until disease progression. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent homeostasis maintaining drugs and are frequently used in cancer patients to alleviate discomforts caused by anti-cancer therapies. Several previous studies reported that concomitant use of GCs may compromise the efficacy of chemo-therapeutics in patients with solid tumors. Little is known in the concomitant use of target therapy with GCs in treating NSCLC. In this study, we hypothesized that concomitant use of GCs in EGFR-TKI therapy may be detrimental and addressed this issue using cell cultures and xenograft studies followed by a retrospective population study based on data from the Taiwan national health insurance system. In cell cultures and xenograft studies, GCs were shown to unequally compromise the anti-cancer efficacy of TKIs in both PC9 and NCI-H1975 NSCLC cells models. In the retrospective population study, patients with similar disease status that were co-medicated with GCs had a significantly higher risk of disease progression.

  8. Immediate implants and immediate loading in periodontally compromised patients-a 3-year prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Celia Coutinho; Correia, Andre Ricardo; Neves, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    To avoid the necessity of a removable provisional prosthesis, and therefore preserve the patient's functional outcome, esthetics, and quality of life, a clinical protocol was developed to approach periodontally compromised patients presenting a full-arch irreversibly lost dentition: full-arch extraction and immediate replacement with a provisional acrylic resin implant-supported fixed partial denture (FPD). A total of 23 periodontally compromised patients (11 women, 12 men; 4 smokers, 4 controlled diabetics) were included in this study. Pretreatment casts were taken and vertical dimension of occlusion was determined. In most patients, 6 Straumann implants were distributed along the arch according to the surgical guide or bone availability, with the most distal ones in the maxilla slightly tilted so they could emerge more distally. A total of 168 implants (146 Straumann, 10 Nobel Biocare, 8 Biomet 3i, and 4 Lifecore) were placed (83 in the maxilla, 85 in the mandible). Of those in the maxilla, 74 were loaded immediately (implant stability quotient mentor [ISQm] > 70) and 9 placed with delayed loading (ISQm =/< 70). Of the 85 implants placed in the mandible, all were loaded immediately (ISQm > 70). If an FPD had not been fabricated already, impressions were taken during surgery to do so. The prosthesis was then adapted (cemented or screwed) to the 6 implants within the first 48 hours postsurgery. After 2 months, definitive impressions were taken, and a definitive porcelain-fused-to-metal implant-supported 12-element FPD was fabricated and cemented or screwed to all 6 implants. Of the 168 implants, 108 were immediate implants and 159 immediately loaded. Only 2 implants (1 in the mandible, 1 in the maxilla) did not osseointegrate. This yields a 3-year cumulative survival rate of 98.74% (98.65% in the maxilla, 98.82% in the mandible). From a total of 26 immediately loaded prostheses (12 in the maxilla, 14 in the mandible), 6 were cemented and 20 screw-retained. The 3

  9. 36 CFR 1201.20 - What is the extent of the Archivist's authority to compromise debts owed to NARA, or to suspend...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Archivist's authority to compromise debts owed to NARA, or to suspend or terminate collection action on such... Archivist's authority to compromise debts owed to NARA, or to suspend or terminate collection action on such debts? (a) The Archivist may compromise, suspend, or terminate collection action on those debts owed...

  10. 36 CFR 1201.20 - What is the extent of the Archivist's authority to compromise debts owed to NARA, or to suspend...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Archivist's authority to compromise debts owed to NARA, or to suspend or terminate collection action on such... Archivist's authority to compromise debts owed to NARA, or to suspend or terminate collection action on such debts? (a) The Archivist may compromise, suspend, or terminate collection action on those debts owed...

  11. Natural physical and biological processes compromise the long-term performance of compacted soil caps

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Compacted soil barriers are components of essentially all caps placed on closed waste disposal sites. The intended functions of soil barriers in waste facility caps include restricting infiltration of water and release of gases and vapors, either independently or in combination with synthetic membrane barriers, and protecting other manmade or natural barrier components. Review of the performance of installed soil barriers and of natural processes affecting their performance indicates that compacted soil caps may function effectively for relatively short periods (years to decades), but natural physical and biological processes can be expected to cause them to fail in the long term (decades to centuries). This paper addresses natural physical and biological processes that compromise the performance of compacted soil caps and suggests measures that may reduce the adverse consequences of these natural failure mechanisms.

  12. Better innovate than compromise: a novel hepatic outflow reconstruction technique in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cherian, P Thomas; Mishra, Ashish K; Bangaari, Ashish; Kota, Venugopal; Sathyanarayanan, Mohan; Raya, Ravichandra; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric LDLT using donors with unfavorable vascular anatomy is challenging in terms of donor safety, and complexity of reconstruction in the recipient. We describe an innovative technique of hepatic venous outflow reconstruction involving the recipient RHV, in the presence of a rudimentary RHV in the donor. The postoperative course of the donor and recipient was uneventful with satisfactory venous outflow in both. This technique avoided the use of prosthetic material, an important consideration given the recipient age and requirement for growth. This shows that donors previously considered unsuitable for donation can be utilized safely as long as principles of vascular anastomosis are adhered to. Moreover, it highlights that innovation is sometimes necessary to avoid compromise in donor safety.

  13. Nothing is safe: Intolerance of uncertainty is associated with compromised fear extinction learning.

    PubMed

    Morriss, Jayne; Christakou, Anastasia; van Reekum, Carien M

    2016-12-01

    Extinction-resistant fear is considered to be a central feature of pathological anxiety. Here we sought to determine if individual differences in Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU), a potential risk factor for anxiety disorders, underlies compromised fear extinction. We tested this hypothesis by recording electrodermal activity in 38 healthy participants during fear acquisition and extinction. We assessed the temporality of fear extinction, by examining early and late extinction learning. During early extinction, low IU was associated with larger skin conductance responses to learned threat vs. safety cues, whereas high IU was associated with skin conductance responding to both threat and safety cues, but no cue discrimination. During late extinction, low IU showed no difference in skin conductance between learned threat and safety cues, whilst high IU predicted continued fear expression to learned threat, indexed by larger skin conductance to threat vs. safety cues. These findings suggest a critical role of uncertainty-based mechanisms in the maintenance of learned fear.

  14. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-09-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans.

  15. A deletion in the bovine FANCI gene compromises fertility by causing fetal death and brachyspina.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Carole; Agerholm, Jorgen Steen; Coppieters, Wouter; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Li, Wanbo; de Jong, Gerben; Fasquelle, Corinne; Karim, Latifa; Cirera, Susanna; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naima; Mullaart, Erik; Georges, Michel; Fredholm, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Fertility is one of the most important traits in dairy cattle, and has been steadily declining over the last decades. We herein use state-of-the-art genomic tools, including high-throughput SNP genotyping and next-generation sequencing, to identify a 3.3 Kb deletion in the FANCI gene causing the brachyspina syndrome (BS), a rare recessive genetic defect in Holstein dairy cattle. We determine that despite the very low incidence of BS (<1/100,000), carrier frequency is as high as 7.4% in the Holstein breed. We demonstrate that this apparent discrepancy is likely due to the fact that a large proportion of homozygous mutant calves die during pregnancy. We postulate that several other embryonic lethals may segregate in livestock and significantly compromise fertility, and propose a genotype-driven screening strategy to detect the corresponding deleterious mutations.

  16. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as a strategy for targeting tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Fryknäs, Mårten; Hernlund, Emma; Fayad, Walid; De Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Dang, Long; Påhlman, Sven; Schughart, Leoni A Kunz; Rickardson, Linda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascularization of solid tumours results in the development of microenvironments deprived of oxygen and nutrients that harbour slowly growing and metabolically stressed cells. Such cells display enhanced resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents and repopulate tumours after therapy. Here we identify the small molecule VLX600 as a drug that is preferentially active against quiescent cells in colon cancer 3-D microtissues. The anticancer activity is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration, leading to bioenergetic catastrophe and tumour cell death. VLX600 shows enhanced cytotoxic activity under conditions of nutrient starvation. Importantly, VLX600 displays tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Our findings suggest that tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments have a limited ability to respond to decreased mitochondrial function, and suggest a strategy for targeting the quiescent populations of tumour cells for improved cancer treatment.

  17. Reexamining the Phosphorus-Protein Dilemma: Does Phosphorus Restriction Compromise Protein Status?

    PubMed

    St-Jules, David E; Woolf, Kathleen; Pompeii, Mary Lou; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2016-05-01

    Dietary phosphorus restriction is recommended to help control hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients, but many high-phosphorus foods are important sources of protein. In this review, we examine whether restricting dietary phosphorus compromises protein status in hemodialysis patients. Although dietary phosphorus and protein are highly correlated, phosphorus intakes can range up to 600 mg/day for a given energy and protein intake level. Furthermore, the collinearity of phosphorus and protein may be biased because the phosphorus burden of food depends on: (1) the presence of phosphate additives, (2) food preparation method, and (3) bioavailability of phosphorus, which are often unaccounted for in nutrition assessments. Ultimately, we argue that clinically relevant reductions in phosphorus intake can be made without limiting protein intake by avoiding phosphate additives in processed foods, using wet cooking methods such as boiling, and if needed, substituting high-phosphorus foods for nutritionally equivalent foods that are lower in bioavailable phosphorus.

  18. Compromised nutrition in gerbils infected by Cystoisospora felis detected through an animal performance analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; de Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues; Fiuza, Vagner Ricardo da Silva; Jiménez-Sanz, Amanda Lucía; Detmann, Edenio

    2011-01-01

    The impact of Cystoisospora felis infection on the nutritional efficiency of gerbils was studied. The variables weight gain and feed intake were measured during four weeks in 28 laboratory gerbils, of which 14 were inoculated with 3.5 × 10(5) sporulated oocysts of C. felis and the remaining 14 were controls. The animals from both groups were weighted, killed, eviscerated and had their carcasses and tissues weighted and compared. A modern tool designed for measuring nutritional performance of farm animals was applied. The results showed compromised nutritional efficiency of the infected animals within the first week after infection. The consequences of these results are discussed here, including the potential impact of infection on farm animals performance.

  19. Conflicts of interest in research: is clinical decision-making compromised? An opinion paper.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Shawn; Abidi, Shawn; Bebermeyer, Richard D

    2010-08-01

    Lack of transparency in funded research can compromise clinical decision-making in an evidence-based practice. Transparency can be defined as full disclosure of all financial assistance and support to authors and investigators. There is a perception that ethical principles are eroding and that research data can be biased due to conflicts of interest. These research outcomes biased or not, are used for clinical decision-making in the evidence-based practice. One suggested solution to this common ethical dilemma is to continue the dialogue on transparency in research and to create oversight bodies which include representatives from business and industry, private practice, academia, and research. There is increasing evidence of the need for more ethics education at all levels.

  20. Armc5 deletion causes developmental defects and compromises T-cell immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Lao, Linjiang; Mao, Jianning; Jin, Wei; Luo, Hongyu; Charpentier, Tania; Qi, Shijie; Peng, Junzheng; Hu, Bing; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw Martin; Lamarre, Alain; Wu, Jiangping

    2017-01-01

    Armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) is a cytosolic protein with no enzymatic activities. Little is known about its function and mechanisms of action, except that gene mutations are associated with risks of primary macronodular adrenal gland hyperplasia. Here we map Armc5 expression by in situ hybridization, and generate Armc5 knockout mice, which are small in body size. Armc5 knockout mice have compromised T-cell proliferation and differentiation into Th1 and Th17 cells, increased T-cell apoptosis, reduced severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis, and defective immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. These mice also develop adrenal gland hyperplasia in old age. Yeast 2-hybrid assays identify 16 ARMC5-binding partners. Together these data indicate that ARMC5 is crucial in fetal development, T-cell function and adrenal gland growth homeostasis, and that the functions of ARMC5 probably depend on interaction with multiple signalling pathways. PMID:28169274

  1. Radiation-treated ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken breast Adobo for immuno-compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Chitho P; De Guzman, Zenaida M; Tolentino, Levelyn Mitos M; Cobar, Maria Lucia C; Abrera, Gina B

    2014-11-15

    Usually in hospitals low-bacterial diets are served to immuno-compromised patients (ICPs). However, low-bacterial diets still pose a high risk of microbial infections and limit the food selection of the patients. Thus, pathogen-free dishes must be made available. This study presents the development of pathogen-free ready-to-eat (RTE) Filipino ethnic food chicken breast Adobo, sterilized by exposure to high-dose gamma rays (25 kGy) in combination with conventional treatments. Frozen vacuum-packed samples artificially inoculated with Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, were exposed to 25 kGy gamma radiation for complete sterilization. Microbial quality and sterility of the samples were analysed following 15, 30, and 60 days of storage at -4°C. The effects of high-dose gamma irradiation on the nutritional quality and sensory characteristics of RTE chicken breast Adobo were also evaluated.

  2. Artemisinin mimics calorie restriction to trigger mitochondrial biogenesis and compromise telomere shortening in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Ting; He, Jiang; Wu, Ming; Li, Si-Ming; Gao, Qian; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction is known to extend lifespan among organisms by a debating mechanism underlying nitric oxide-driven mitochondrial biogenesis. We report here that nitric oxide generators including artemisinin, sodium nitroprusside, and L-arginine mimics calorie restriction and resembles hydrogen peroxide to initiate the nitric oxide signaling cascades and elicit the global antioxidative responses in mice. The large quantities of antioxidant enzymes are correlated with the low levels of reactive oxygen species, which allow the down-regulation of tumor suppressors and accessory DNA repair partners, eventually leading to the compromise of telomere shortening. Accompanying with the up-regulation of signal transducers and respiratory chain signatures, mitochondrial biogenesis occurs with the elevation of adenosine triphosphate levels upon exposure of mouse skeletal muscles to the mimetics of calorie restriction. In conclusion, calorie restriction-triggered nitric oxide provides antioxidative protection and alleviates telomere attrition via mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby maintaining chromosomal stability and integrity, which are the hallmarks of longevity.

  3. Self-inflicted Cardiac Injury with Nail Gun Without Hemodynamic Compromise: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon; Feranec, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Pneumatically powered nail guns have been used in construction since 1959. Penetrating injuries to the heart with nail guns have a wide range of presentations from asymptomatic to cardiac tamponade and exsanguination. Mortality related to cardiac nail gun injuries is similar to knife injuries, estimated at 25%. Surgical exploration is the treatment of choice. We describe a case of self-inflicted nail gun injury to the chest without hemodynamic compromise in a 51-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) imaging confirmed nail penetrating the right ventricle, with the tip adjacent to but not violating the abdominal aorta. The patient was successfully treated with thoracotomy and foreign body removal. PMID:28191375

  4. Interdisciplinary treatment of a periodontally compromised adult patient with multiple missing posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sachin; Gupta, Sumita; Chugh, Vinay K; Jain, Eety; Valiathan, Ashima; Nanda, Ravindra

    2014-02-01

    This article reports the comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment of a 50-year-old periodontally compromised adult patient with multiple missing posterior teeth. After initial periodontal treatment, the maxillary first molars and right central incisor were intruded orthodontically. Miniscrews were used to intrude the maxillary first molars by 3 mm. The mandibular arch was restored with a tooth-supported overdenture. Root coverage of the maxillary right central incisor was performed using Alloderm (Biohorizons, Birmingham, Ala). At the end of the interdisciplinary therapy, the results were esthetically pleasing, with the patient's oral functions restored to the optimum. The emphasis of this report is to highlight the importance of integrating various specialties such as periodontics, orthodontics, endodontics, and restorative dentistry toward a common goal of improving the patient's oral health, function, and esthetics.

  5. Audiologic Management of Older Adults With Hearing Loss and Compromised Cognitive/Psychoacoustic Auditory Processing Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Kricos, Patricia B.

    2006-01-01

    The number and proportion of older adults in the United States population is increasing, and more clinical audiologists will be called upon to deliver hearing care to the approximately 35% to 50% of them who experience hearing difficulties. In recent years, the characteristics and sources of receptive communication difficulties in older individuals have been investigated by hearing scientists, cognitive psychologists, and audiologists. It is becoming increasingly apparent that cognitive compromises and psychoacoustic auditory processing disorders associated with aging may contribute to communication difficulties in this population. This paper presents an overview of best practices, based on our current knowledge base, for clinical management of older individuals with limitations in cognitive or psychoacoustic auditory processing capabilities, or both, that accompany aging. PMID:16528428

  6. Esthetic Rehabilitation of a Severely Compromised Anterior Area: Combined Periodontal and Restorative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Censi, Rachele; Vavassori, Virna; Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Re, Dino

    2014-01-01

    The complete oral rehabilitation of patients demanding a beautiful and attractive smile involves a multidisciplinary approach that includes the change of both the morphological aspect of the teeth and the architecture of gum tissues. This clinical report describes a successful interdisciplinary approach for the treatment of an esthetically compromised dentition. In a first phase, the periodontal plastic surgery was performed for root coverage and, in particular, it was decided for the execution of a coronally advanced flap for the treatment of multiple recession defects. Once complete healing of soft tissues was obtained, six lithium disilicate veneers were placed over the anterior maxillary teeth. Lithium disilicate is a glass-based ceramic which presents excellent aesthetics and allows the passage of light without creating unnatural reflections. This feature has made it possible to recreate a natural aspect of teeth that in combination with the harmonic architecture of soft tissue has permitted obtaining a beautiful and pleasant smile. PMID:24715999

  7. Is conceptual understanding compromised by a problem-solving emphasis in an introductory physics course?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenour, J.; Feldman, G.; Teodorescu, R.; Medsker, L.; Benmouna, N.

    2013-01-01

    Developing competency in problem solving and enhancing conceptual understanding are primary objectives in introductory physics, and many techniques and tools are available to help instructors achieve them. Pedagogically, we use an easy-to-implement intervention, the ACCESS protocol, to develop and assess problem-solving skills in our SCALE-UP classroom environment for algebra-based physics. Based on our research and teaching experience, an important question has emerged: while primarily targeting improvements in problem-solving and cognitive development, is it necessary that conceptual understanding be compromised? To address this question, we gathered and analyzed information about student abilities, backgrounds, and instructional preferences. We report on our progress and give insights into matching the instructional tools to student profiles in order to achieve optimal learning in group-based active learning. The ultimate goal of our work is to integrate individual student learning needs into a pedagogy that moves students closer to expert-like status in problem solving.

  8. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time compromise sleep and the rest-activity cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Tuuli A; Leppämäki, Sami; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of transition out of and into daylight saving time on the rest-activity cycles and sleep. Rest-activity cycles of nine healthy participants aged 20 to 40 years were measured around transitions out of and into daylight saving time on fall 2005 and spring 2006 respectively. Rest-activity cycles were measured using wrist-worn accelerometers. The participants filled in the Morningness-Eveningness and Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaires before starting the study and kept a sleep diary during the study. Results Fall transition was more disturbing for the more morning type and spring transition for the more evening type of persons. Individuals having a higher global seasonality score suffered more from the transitions. Conclusion Transitions out of and into daylight saving time enhanced night-time restlessness and thereby compromised the quality of sleep. PMID:18269740

  9. Clonal types of Toxoplasma gondii among immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Irene; Kwofie, Kofi Dadzie; Blay, Emmanuel Awusah; Osei, Joseph Harold Nyarko; Frempong, Kwadwo Kyeremeh; Koku, Roberta; Ghansah, Anita; Lartey, Margaret; Suzuki, Takashi; Boakye, Daniel Adjei; Koram, Kwadwo Ansah; Ohta, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    There are three major clonal lineages, types I, II, and III, of Toxoplasma gondii known to cause human toxoplasmosis worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii infections have, however, not been genotyped in Ghana. This study detected the clonal types infecting immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana. Blood samples were obtained from 148 HIV seropositive pre-antiretroviral therapy individuals (0 ≤ CD4(+) T-cell count/μl blood ≤ 200) at the Fevers Unit and 149 HIV seronegative apparently healthy blood donors at the blood bank, all of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Genomic DNA was extracted and multilocus genotyping conducted by nested PCR-RFLP analysis using GRA6, SAG3, and BTUB gene markers. Among the HIV seropositive participants, 54.7% (81/148) were T. gondii DNA positive for any of the markers. Out of the 81, 42.0% (34) were positive for SAG3 only, 30.9% (25) for GRA6 only, 24.7% (20) for both SAG3 and GRA6, and 2.5% (2) for SAG3, GRA6, and BTUB. Overall, 93.8% of the positives were of clonal type II, 1.2% type I, while 4.9% (4) were atypical or mixed types (I and II). In the healthy blood donors, prevalence of T. gondii DNA positivity was 3.4% (5/149) by SAG3 and/or GRA6; among them, 60.0% (3/5) were type I, and the remaining 40.0%, type II. This study showed a relatively high prevalence of active T. gondii infections in immune compromised patients and low prevalence in immune competent individuals in Accra. Type II was highly prevalent. Detection of T. gondii in blood donors raises public health concerns and screening for T. gondii should be considered.

  10. Processing of visual information compromises the ability of older adults to control novel fine motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Kwon, MinHyuk; Onushko, Tanya; Wright, David L; Corcos, Daniel M; Christou, Evangelos A

    2015-12-01

    We performed two experiments to determine whether amplified motor output variability and compromised processing of visual information in older adults impair short-term adaptations when learning novel fine motor tasks. In Experiment 1, 12 young and 12 older adults underwent training to learn how to accurately trace a sinusoidal position target with abduction-adduction of their index finger. They performed 48 trials, which included 8 blocks of 6 trials (the last trial of each block was performed without visual feedback). Afterward, subjects received an interference task (watched a movie) for 60 min. We tested retention by asking subjects to perform the sinusoidal task (5 trials) with and without visual feedback. In Experiment 2, 12 young and 10 older adults traced the same sinusoidal position target with their index finger and ankle at three distinct visual angles (0.25°, 1° and 5.4°). In Experiment 1, the movement error and variability were greater for older adults during the visual feedback trials when compared with young adults. In contrast, during the no-vision trials, age-associated differences in movement error and variability were ameliorated. Short-term adaptations in learning the sinusoidal task were similar for young and older adults. In Experiment 2, lower amount of visual feedback minimized the age-associated differences in movement variability for both the index finger and ankle movements. We demonstrate that although short-term adaptations are similar for young and older adults, older adults do not process visual information as well as young adults and that compromises their ability to control novel fine motor tasks during acquisition, which could influence long-term retention and transfer.

  11. The Bacterial Virulence Factor Lymphostatin Compromises Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Modulating Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Brian A.; Sasaki, Maiko; Gerner-Schmidt, Kirsten W.; Nusrat, Asma; Klapproth, Jan-Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocyte inhibitory factor A (lifA) in Citrobacter rodentium encodes the large toxin lymphostatin, which contains two enzymatic motifs associated with bacterial pathogenesis, a glucosyltransferase and a protease. Our aim was to determine the effects of each lymphostatin motif on intestinal epithelial-barrier function. In-frame mutations of C. rodentium lifA glucosyltransferase (CrGlM21) and protease (CrPrM5) were generated by homologous recombination. Infection of both model intestinal epithelial monolayers and mice with C. rodentium wild type resulted in compromised epithelial barrier function and mislocalization of key intercellular junction proteins in the tight junction and adherens junction. In contrast, CrGlM21 was impaired in its ability to reduce barrier function and influenced the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. CrPrM5 demonstrated decreased effects on the adherens junction proteins β-catenin and E-cadherin. Analysis of the mechanisms revealed that C. rodentium wild type differentially influenced Rho GTPase activation, suppressed Cdc42 activation, and induced Rho GTPase activation. CrGlM21 lost its suppressive effects on Cdc42 activation, whereas CrPrM5 was unable to activate Rho signaling. Rescue experiments using constitutively active Cdc42 or C3 exotoxin to inhibit Rho GTPase supported a role of Rho GTPases in the epithelial barrier compromise induced by C. rodentium. Taken together, our results suggest that lymphostatin is a bacterial virulence factor that contributes to the disruption of intestinal epithelial-barrier function via the modulation of Rho GTPase activities. PMID:19286565

  12. Compromising abnormalities of the brachial plexus as displayed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Collins, J D; Shaver, M L; Disher, A C; Miller, T Q

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of brachial plexus anatomy bilaterally, not possible by plain radiographs or CT, were presented to the Vascular Surgery, Neurology, and the Neurosurgery departments. Patients were requested for MRI of their brachial plexus. They were referred for imaging and the imaging results were presented to the faculty and housestaff. Our technique was accepted and adopted to begin referrals for MRI evaluation of brachial plexopathy. Over 175 patients have been studied. Eighty-five patients were imaged with the 1.5 Tesla magnet (Signa; General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) 3-D reconstruction MRI. Coronal, transverse (axial), oblique transverse, and sagittal plane T1-weighted and selected T2-weighted pulse sequences were obtained at 4-5 mm slice thickness, 40-45 full field of view, and a 512 x 256 size matrix. Saline water bags were used to enhance the signal between the neck and the thorax. Sites of brachial plexus compromise were demonstrated. Our technique with 3-D reconstruction increased the definition of brachial plexus pathology. The increased anatomical definition enabled the vascular surgeons and neurosurgeons to improve patient care. Brachial plexus in vivo anatomy as displayed by MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and 3-D reconstruction offered an opportunity to augment the teaching of clinical anatomy to medical students and health professionals. Selected case presentations (bodybuilder, anomalous muscle, fractured clavicle, thyroid goiter, silicone breast implant rupture, and cervical rib) demonstrated compromise of the brachial plexus displayed by MRI. The MRI and 3-D reconstruction techniques, demonstrating the bilateral landmark anatomy, increased the definition of the clinical anatomy and resulted in greater knowledge of patient care management.

  13. Assessing relocation strategies of urban air quality monitoring stations by GA-based compromise programming.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C C; Chang, N B

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents a GA-based compromise programming technique for assessing the relocation strategy of urban air quality monitoring network with respect to the multi-objective and multi-pollutant design criteria. While the impact of conservative, quasi-stable, and reactive pollutants are considered in the design principles via a simulation analysis, cost, effectiveness, and efficiency characteristics are postulated in the optimization process. Therefore, technical coverage for illustrating the needs of siting air quality monitoring stations (AQMS) includes both the air quality simulation and optimization modeling analyses in a two-stage analytical framework simultaneously. It starts from determining the spatial interrelationship among those candidate sites using various types of air quality simulation models as an integrated means. And the outputs drawn from the simulation models can then be used as the required inputs in the compromise programming model in order to screen all those siting alternatives that may satisfy the planning goals subject to the essential constraints throughout the multi-objective optimization process. For the illustrating purposes, a series of technical settings for finding the optimal relocation scenarios of AQMS were examined in the case study for the city of Kaohsiung in South Taiwan where the long-term violations of official standards of ozone and particulates turn out to be critical. It not only expresses the ideas of relocation strategy but also indicates how to utilize those alternatives in the decision-making process for improving the functionality of air quality monitoring in the urban environment. Experience gained in this study clearly indicates that the more the number of pollutants and objectives considered simultaneously, the higher the number of candidate sites to be selected in the relocation strategy.

  14. Ionoregulatory Aspects of the Osmorespiratory Compromise during Acute Environmental Hypoxia in 12 Tropical and Temperate Teleosts.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lisa M; Val, Adalberto Luis; Almeida-Val, Vera F; Wood, Chris M

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional osmorespiratory compromise, as seen in the hypoxia-intolerant freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the branchial modifications that occur to improve O2 uptake during hypoxia result in unfavorable increases in the fluxes of ions and water. However, at least one hypoxia-tolerant freshwater species, the Amazonian oscar (Astronotus ocellatus), shows exactly the opposite: decreased branchial flux rates of ions, water, and nitrogenous wastes during acute hypoxia. In order to find out whether the two strategies were widespread, we used a standard 2-h normoxia, 2-h hypoxia (20%-30% saturation), 2-h normoxic recovery protocol to survey 10 other phylogenetically diverse tropical and temperate species. Unidirectional influx and efflux rates of Na(+) and net flux rates of K(+), ammonia, and urea-N were measured. The flux reduction strategy was seen only in one additional species, the Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), which is similarly hypoxia tolerant and lives in the same ion-poor waters as the oscar. However, five other species exhibited evidence of the increased flux rates typical of the traditional osmorespiratory compromise in the trout: the rosaceu tetra (Hyphessobrycon bentosi rosaceus), the moenkhausia tetra (Moenkhausia diktyota), the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the zebra fish (Danio rerio), and the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Four other species exhibited no marked flux changes during hypoxia: the cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi), the hemigrammus tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus), the pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus), and the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Overall, a diversity of strategies exist; we speculate that these may be linked to differences in habitat and/or lifestyle.

  15. Do low-income lone mothers compromise their nutrition to feed their children?

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lynn; Glanville, N. Theresa; Raine, Kim D.; Dayle, Jutta B.; Anderson, Bonnie; Battaglia, Noreen

    2003-01-01

    Background Women who live in disadvantaged circumstances in Canada exhibit dietary intakes below recommended levels, but their children often do not. One reason for this difference may be that mothers modify their own food intake to spare their children nutritional deprivation. The objective of our study was to document whether or not low-income lone mothers compromise their own diets to feed their children. Methods We studied 141 low-income lone mothers with at least 2 children under the age of 14 years who lived in Atlantic Canada. Women were identified through community organizations using a variety of recruitment strategies. The women were asked weekly for 1 month to recall their food intake over the previous 24 hours; they also reported their children's (n = 333) food intake. Mothers also completed a questionnaire about “food insecurity,” that is, a lack of access to adequate, nutritious food through socially acceptable means, during each interview. Results Household food insecurity was reported by 78% of mothers during the study month. Mothers' dietary intakes and the adequacy of intake were consistently poorer than their children's intake overall and over the course of a month. The difference in adequacy of intake between mothers and children widened from Time 1, when the family had the most money to purchase food, to Time 4, when the family had the least money. The children experienced some improvement in nutritional intake at Time 3, which was possibly related to food purchases for them associated with receipt of the Child Tax Benefit Credit or the Goods and Services Tax Credit. Interpretation Our study demonstrates that low-income lone mothers compromise their own nutritional intake in order to preserve the adequacy of their children's diets. PMID:12642423

  16. HIV Infection and Compromised Mucosal Immunity: Oral Manifestations and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Samantha E.; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces account for the vast majority of HIV transmission. In adults, HIV transmission occurs mainly by vaginal and rectal routes but rarely via oral route. By contrast, pediatric HIV infections could be as the result of oral route by breastfeeding. As such mucosal surfaces play a crucial role in HIV acquisition, and spread of the virus depends on its ability to cross a mucosal barrier. HIV selectively infects, depletes, and/or dysregulates multiple arms of the human immune system particularly at the mucosal sites and causes substantial irreversible damage to the mucosal barriers. This leads to microbial products translocation and subsequently hyper-immune activation. Although introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to significant reduction in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients, viral replication persists. As a result, antigen presence and immune activation are linked to “inflammaging” that attributes to a pro-inflammatory environment and the accelerated aging process in HIV patients. HIV infection is also associated with the prevalence of oral mucosal infections and dysregulation of oral microbiota, both of which may compromise the oral mucosal immunity of HIV-infected individuals. In addition, impaired oral immunity in HIV infection may predispose the patients to periodontal diseases that are associated with systemic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to examine existing evidence regarding the role of innate and cellular components of the oral cavity in HIV infection and how HIV infection may drive systemic hyper-immune activation in these patients. We will also discuss current knowledge on HIV oral transmission, HIV immunosenescence in relation to the oral mucosal alterations during the course of HIV infection and periodontal disease. Finally, we discuss oral manifestations associated with HIV infection and how HIV infection and ART influence the oral microbiome

  17. Transient inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruoxing; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have unlimited capacity for self-renewal and can differentiate into various cell types when induced. They also have an unusual cell cycle control mechanism driven by constitutively active cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks). In mouse ESCs (mESCs). It is proposed that the rapid cell proliferation could be a necessary part of mechanisms that maintain mESC self-renewal and pluripotency, but this hypothesis is not in line with the finding in human ESCs (hESCs) that the length of the cell cycle is similar to differentiated cells. Therefore, whether rapid cell proliferation is essential for the maintenance of mESC state remains unclear. We provide insight into this uncertainty through chemical intervention of mESC cell cycle. We report here that inhibition of Cdks with olomoucine II can dramatically slow down cell proliferation of mESCs with concurrent down-regulation of cyclin A, B and E, and the activation of the Rb pathway. However, mESCs display can recover upon the removal of olomoucine II and are able to resume normal cell proliferation without losing self-renewal and pluripotency, as demonstrated by the expression of ESC markers, colony formation, embryoid body formation, and induced differentiation. We provide a mechanistic explanation for these observations by demonstrating that Oct4 and Nanog, two major transcription factors that play critical roles in the maintenance of ESC properties, are up-regulated via de novo protein synthesis when the cells are exposed to olomoucine II. Together, our data suggest that short-term inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise the basic properties of mESCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Cdks slows down mESCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mESCs display remarkable recovery capacity from short-term cell cycle interruption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short-term cell cycle interruption does not compromise mESC self-renewal. Black

  18. Differential pattern of hand-tapping compromise in vascular versus idiopathic parkinsonism: a study based on computerized movement analysis.

    PubMed

    Bäzner, Hansjörg; Schanz, Jurik; Blahak, Christian; Grips, Eva; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Hennerici, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We tested the characteristics and the differential pattern of upper extremity motor compromise, comparing hand tapping in patients with subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE; n = 18), idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; n = 18), and in healthy controls (n = 18). Both patient groups showed significant compromise in hand tapping compared with that in controls, with higher coefficients of variability (CV) regarding tapping amplitude and angular velocity, determined using a computerized movement analysis system. A differential tapping pattern in both patient groups could be demonstrated in that patients with PD showed lower tapping amplitudes than patients with SVE. Both patient groups displayed abnormalities in tapping rhythmicity compared with that in the control group.

  19. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S.; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  20. Protozoan predation in soil slurries compromises determination of contaminant mineralization potential.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Nora; Johnsen, Anders R; Brandt, Kristian K; Sørensen, Jan; Aamand, Jens

    2012-11-01

    Soil suspensions (slurries) are commonly used to estimate the potential of soil microbial communities to mineralize organic contaminants. The preparation of soil slurries disrupts soil structure, however, potentially affecting both the bacterial populations and their protozoan predators. We studied the importance of this "slurry effect" on mineralization of the herbicide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA, (14)C-labelled), focussing on the effects of protozoan predation. Mineralization of MCPA was studied in "intact" soil and soil slurries differing in soil:water ratio, both in the presence and absence of the protozoan activity inhibitor cycloheximide. Protozoan predation inhibited mineralization in dense slurry of subsoil (soil:water ratio 1:3), but only in the most dilute slurry of topsoil (soil:water ratio 1:100). Our results demonstrate that protozoan predation in soil slurries may compromise quantification of contaminant mineralization potential, especially when the initial density of degrader bacteria is low and their growth is controlled by predation during the incubation period.

  1. Siphon regeneration capacity is compromised during aging in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis has a short life span and powerful regeneration capacities. The regeneration of the oral siphon (OS) involves wound healing, blastema formation, cell proliferation, and replacement of 8 oral pigment organs (OPO), the latter via differentiation and migration of stem/precursor cells from localized niches in the siphon. The restoration of OPO pattern during OS regeneration occurs with a high degree of accuracy through three successive cycles of amputation. It is shown here that oral siphons of the largest and oldest members of a wild Ciona population do not completely regenerate their siphons after amputation. The loss of regeneration capacity was accompanied by reduced cell proliferation. In contrast to arrested OS outgrowth, the stem/precursor cells responsible for OPO replacement "over-differentiate" after OS amputation in the oldest animals, the typical number of OPO is increased from 8 to 12-16, and malformed OPO are produced. Also in contrast to younger animals, the oldest animals of the population show arrested OPO development after two consecutive cycles of amputation and regeneration. We conclude that there is a size and age threshold in Ciona after which the regenerative capacity of the OS is compromised due to effects of aging on cell proliferation.

  2. Increased Dynamic Effects in a Catalytically Compromised Variant of Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Isotopic substitution (15N, 13C, 2H) of a catalytically compromised variant of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase, EcDHFR-N23PP/S148A, has been used to investigate the effect of these mutations on catalysis. The reduction of the rate constant of the chemical step in the EcDHFR-N23PP/S148A catalyzed reaction is essentially a consequence of an increase of the quasi-classical free energy barrier and to a minor extent of an increased number of recrossing trajectories on the transition state dividing surface. Since the variant enzyme is less well set up to catalyze the reaction, a higher degree of active site reorganization is needed to reach the TS. Although millisecond active site motions are lost in the variant, there is greater flexibility on the femtosecond time scale. The “dynamic knockout” EcDHFR-N23PP/S148A is therefore a “dynamic knock-in” at the level of the chemical step, and the increased dynamic coupling to the chemical coordinate is in fact detrimental to catalysis. This finding is most likely applicable not just to hydrogen transfer in EcDHFR but also to other enzymatic systems. PMID:24252106

  3. Compromised fronto-striatal functioning in HIV: an fMRI investigation of semantic event sequencing.

    PubMed

    Melrose, Rebecca J; Tinaz, Sule; Castelo, J Mimi Boer; Courtney, Maureen G; Stern, Chantal E

    2008-04-09

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) damages fronto-striatal regions, and is associated with deficits in executive functioning. We recently developed a semantic event sequencing task based on the Picture Arrangement subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III for use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and found recruitment of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia in healthy participants. To assess the impact of HIV on the functioning of the basal ganglia and prefrontal cortex, we administered this task to 11 HIV+ and 11 Control participants matched for age and education. Neuropsychological evaluation demonstrated that the HIV+ group had mild impairment in memory retrieval and motor functioning, but was not demented. Morphometric measurements suggested no atrophy in basal ganglia regions. The results of the fMRI analysis revealed hypoactivation of the left caudate, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and bilateral ventral prefrontal cortex in the HIV+ group. Functional connectivity analysis demonstrated less functional connectivity between the caudate and prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia regions in the HIV+ group. In contrast, the HIV+ group demonstrated increased activation of right postcentral/supramarginal gyrus, and greater connectivity between the caudate and this same anterior parietal region. The results of this study extend previous investigations by demonstrating compromised function of the caudate and connected prefrontal regions in HIV during cognition. This disruption of fronto-striatal circuitry likely precedes the development of cognitive impairment in HIV.

  4. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  5. 3-bromopyruvate inhibits glycolysis, depletes cellular glutathione, and compromises the viability of cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ehrke, Eric; Arend, Christian; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an electrophilic alkylator that is considered a promising anticancer drug because it has been shown to kill cancer cells efficiently while having little toxic effect on nontumor cells. To test for potential adverse effects of 3-BP on brain cells, we exposed cultured primary rat astrocytes to 3-BP and investigated the effects of this compound on cell viability, glucose metabolism, and glutathione (GSH) content. The presence of 3-BP severely compromised cell viability and slowed cellular glucose consumption and lactate production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 100 µM 3-BP after 4 hr of incubation. The cellular hexokinase activity was not affected in 3-BP-treated astrocytes, whereas within 30 min after application of 3-BP the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was inhibited, and cellular GSH content was depleted in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 30 µM 3-BP. The depletion of cellular GSH after exposure to 100 µM 3-BP was not prevented by the presence of 10 mM of the monocarboxylates lactate or pyruvate, suggesting that 3-BP is not taken up into astrocytes predominantly by monocarboxylate transporters. The data suggest that inhibition of glycolysis by inactivation of GAPDH and GSH depletion contributes to the toxicity that was observed for 3-BP-treated cultured astrocytes.

  6. Diuretics prevent thiazolidinedione-induced cardiac hypertrophy without compromising insulin-sensitizing effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cherng-Shyang; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Li-Chun; Pandya, Kumar; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2014-02-01

    Much concern has arisen regarding critical adverse effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, on cardiac tissue. Although TZD-induced cardiac hypertrophy (CH) has been attributed to an increase in plasma volume or a change in cardiac nutrient preference, causative roles have not been established. To test the hypothesis that volume expansion directly mediates rosiglitazone-induced CH, mice were fed a high-fat diet with rosiglitazone, and cardiac and metabolic consequences were examined. Rosiglitazone treatment induced volume expansion and CH in wild-type and PPARγ heterozygous knockout (Pparg(+/-)) mice, but not in mice defective for ligand binding (Pparg(P465L/+)). Cotreatment with the diuretic furosemide in wild-type mice attenuated rosiglitazone-induced CH, hypertrophic gene reprogramming, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy-related signal activation, and left ventricular dysfunction. Similar changes were observed in mice treated with pioglitazone. The diuretics spironolactone and trichlormethiazide, but not amiloride, attenuated rosiglitazone effects on volume expansion and CH. Interestingly, expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in the heart was altered by rosiglitazone, but these changes were not attenuated by furosemide cotreatment. Importantly, rosiglitazone-mediated whole-body metabolic improvements were not affected by furosemide cotreatment. We conclude that releasing plasma volume reduces adverse effects of TZD-induced volume expansion and cardiac events without compromising TZD actions in metabolic switch in the heart and whole-body insulin sensitivity.

  7. Siphon Regeneration Capacity is Compromised During Aging in the Ascidian Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis has a short life span and powerful regeneration capacities. The regeneration of the oral siphon (OS) involves wound healing, blastema formation, cell proliferation, and replacement of eight oral pigment organs (OPO), the latter via differentiation and migration of stem/precursor cells from localized siphon niches in the siphon. The restoration of OPO pattern during OS regeneration occurs with a high degree of accuracy through three successive cycles of amputation. It is shown here that oral siphons of the largest and oldest members of a wild Ciona population do not completely regenerate their siphons after amputation. The loss of regeneration capacity was accompanied by reduced cell proliferation. In contrast to arrested OS outgrowth, the stem/precursor cells responsible for OPO replacement “over-differentiate” after OS amputation in the oldest animals, the typical number of OPO is increased from eight to twelve-sixteen, and malformed OPO are produced. Also in contrast to younger animals, the oldest animals of the population show arrested OPO development after two consecutive cycles of amputation and regeneration. We conclude that there is a size and age threshold in Ciona after which the regenerative capacity of the OS is compromised due to effects of aging on cell proliferation. PMID:22935550

  8. A Person-Centered Analysis of Risk Factors that Compromise Wellbeing in Emerging Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Newcomb-Anjo, Sarah E; Barker, Erin T; Howard, Andrea L

    2016-11-08

    The transition to adulthood is a major life course transition that can pose risk to wellbeing. Research is needed to identify patterns of risk for compromised wellbeing, in order to best identify supports for individuals during this potentially vulnerable transition. The purpose of this study was to identify profiles of risk in an emerging adulthood sample, and to relate these profiles to mental health and subjective and academic wellbeing. Undergraduate emerging adults (N = 903, 82 % female), aged 18-25 years (M = 21.14, SD = 1.75), completed a series of questionnaires about risk factors, mental health, and academic variables. Results from a latent profile analysis identified four distinct risk profiles: Low Risk (76 %), Low Social Support Risk (4 %), Financial Risk (11 %), and Multiple Risk (8 %). The risk profiles were subsequently related to mental health and subjective and academic wellbeing outcomes, using a pseudo-class draws approach. Analyses indicated that the risk-pattern profiles differed in several ways across outcomes. Implications for targeted interventions are discussed.

  9. Effect of low-level laser therapy on repair of the bone compromised by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Batista, Jonas D; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Dechichi, Paula; Rocha, Flaviana S; Pagnoncelli, Rogério M

    2014-11-01

    Radiotherapy (RDT) is commonly used for cancer treatment, but high doses of ionizing radiation can directly affect healthy tissues. Positive biological effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone repair have been demonstrated; however, this effect on surgical defects of bone previously compromised by radiotherapy has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of LLLT (λ = 830 nm) in femur repair after ionizing radiation. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control group (GC, n = 5) creation of bone defects (BDs) only; laser group (GL), with BD and LLLT (n = 5); radiotherapy group (GR), submitted to RDT and BD (n = 5); and radiotherapy and laser group (GRL), submitted to RDT, BD, and LLLT (n = 5). GL and GRL received punctual laser application (DE = 210 J/cm(2), P = 50 mW, t = 120 s, and beam diameter of 0.04 cm(2)) immediately after surgery, with 48-h interval during 7 days. Animals were euthanized at 7 days after surgery, and bone sections were evaluated morphometrically with conventional microscopy. Bone repair was only observed in nonirradiated bone, with significant improvement in GL in comparison to GC. GR and GRL did not present any bone neoformation. The result demonstrated a positive local biostimulative effect of LLLT in normal bone. However, LLLT was not able to revert the bone metabolic damage due to ionizing radiation.

  10. Inflammation-induced desmoglein-2 ectodomain shedding compromises the mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kamekura, Ryuta; Nava, Porfirio; Feng, Mingli; Quiros, Miguel; Nishio, Hikaru; Weber, Dominique A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomal cadherins mediate intercellular adhesion and control epithelial homeostasis. Recent studies show that proteinases play an important role in the pathobiology of cancer by targeting epithelial intercellular junction proteins such as cadherins. Here we describe the proinflammatory cytokine-induced activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain–containing protein 10, which promote the shedding of desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-2 (Dsg2) ectodomains in intestinal epithelial cells. Epithelial exposure to Dsg2 ectodomains compromises intercellular adhesion by promoting the relocalization of endogenous Dsg2 and E-cadherin from the plasma membrane while also promoting proliferation by activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/3 signaling. Cadherin ectodomains were detected in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of mice with colitis and patients with ulcerative colitis. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel response pathway in which inflammation-induced modification of columnar epithelial cell cadherins decreases intercellular adhesion while enhancing cellular proliferation, which may serve as a compensatory mechanism to promote repair. PMID:26224314

  11. Clavicle fracture with thoracic penetration and hemopneumothorax but without neurovascular compromise.

    PubMed

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Matzon, Jonas L; Williams, Gerald R

    2011-10-05

    Clavicle fractures are rarely associated with more severe neurologic or vascular injuries. When these associated injuries are encountered, prompt recognition and treatment are paramount to optimize outcome. The majority of fractures that result in neurovascular compromise are from high-energy trauma; however, a high index of suspicion should be present in all cases as low-energy trauma can also result in more catastrophic injury. This article describes a case of a low-energy clavicle fracture in a 28-year-old woman that resulted in intrathoracic penetration of the fracture fragment with hemopneumothorax. The patient underwent successful chest tube placement and open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture. A multidisciplinary team was used during surgery, including cardiothoracic, trauma, and orthopedic surgery. Two years postoperatively, the patient was back to normal activities with no neurologic, pulmonary, or vascular sequelae. This case highlights the importance of a comprehensive physical examination and inspection of all radiographs so that associated injuries are not missed.

  12. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients.

  13. Neural Evidence for Compromised Motor Imagery in Right Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    van Elk, Michiel; Crajé, Celine; Beeren, Manuela E. G. V.; Steenbergen, Bert; van Schie, Hein T.; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-01-01

    In the present event-related potential (ERP) study we investigated the neural and temporal dynamics of motor imagery in participants with right-sided hemiparetic cerebral palsy (HCP; n = 10) and in left-handed control participants (n = 10). A mental rotation task was used in which participants were required to judge the laterality of hand pictures. At a behavioral level participants with HCP were slower in making hand laterality judgments compared to control subjects, especially when presented with pictures representing the affected hand. At a neural level, individuals with HCP were characterized by a reduced rotation-related negativity (RRN) over parietal areas, that was delayed in onset with respect to control participants. Interestingly, participants that were relatively mildly impaired showed a stronger RRN for the rotation of right-hand stimuli than participants that were more strongly impaired in their motor function, suggesting a direct relation between the motor imagery process and the biomechanical constraints of the participant. Together, the results provide new insights in the relation between motor imagery and motor capabilities and indicate that participants with HCP may be characterized by a compromised ability to use motor imagery. PMID:21206766

  14. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza-Filho, Leopoldino; Borelli Barros, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters. PMID:24523969

  15. 'Compromise' in Echolocation Calls between Different Colonies of the Intermediate Leaf-Nosed Bat (Hipposideros larvatus).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Qi; Su, Qianqian; Sun, Yunxiao; Peng, Xingwen; He, Xiangyang; Zhang, Libiao

    2016-01-01

    Each animal population has its own acoustic signature which facilitates identification, communication and reproduction. The sonar signals of bats can convey social information, such as species identity and contextual information. The goal of this study was to determine whether bats adjust their echolocation call structures to mutually recognize and communicate when they encounter the bats from different colonies. We used the intermediate leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideros larvatus) as a case study to investigate the variations of echolocation calls when bats from one colony were introduced singly into the home cage of a new colony or two bats from different colonies were cohabitated together for one month. Our experiments showed that the single bat individual altered its peak frequency of echolocation calls to approach the call of new colony members and two bats from different colonies adjusted their call frequencies toward each other to a similar frequency after being chronically cohabitated. These results indicate that the 'compromise' in echolocation calls might be used to ensure effective mutual communication among bats.

  16. 2016 Rio Olympic Games: Can the schedule of events compromise athletes' performance?

    PubMed

    Rosa, João Paulo P; Rodrigues, Dayane F; Silva, Andressa; de Moura Simim, Mário Antônio; Costa, Varley T; Noce, Franco; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2016-01-01

    The organizing committee of the 2016 Rio Olympic Games recently announced that some of the preliminary and final competitions will be held at night. The present article discusses the potential harmful effects of these late-night competitions on sleep, circadian rhythms and athletic performance during the Olympic Games. Specifically, night-time competition could lead to injury and may compromise an athlete's decision-making, attentional, physiological and other processes. Consequently, these impacts could negatively affect the performance of athletes and their teams. Thus, it is suggested that technical commissions take special care when creating strategies to minimize harm to the athletes by considering factors such as light exposure, melatonin intake, sleep hygiene and scheduled naps, and training at local competition time. Furthermore, it is necessary for specialists in chronobiology and sleep to engage with members of the national teams to develop an activity schedule for physical, technical, tactical and psychological preparation that accounts for circadian rhythms, thereby creating the best possible environment for the athletes to achieve their ideal performance.

  17. A peptide-retrieval strategy enables significant improvement of quantitative performance without compromising confidence of identification.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Shen, Shichen; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu; Qu, Jun

    2017-01-30

    Reliable quantification of low-abundance proteins in complex proteomes is challenging largely owing to the limited number of spectra/peptides identified. In this study we developed a straightforward method to improve the quantitative accuracy and precision of proteins by strategically retrieving the less confident peptides that were previously filtered out using the standard target-decoy search strategy. The filtered-out MS/MS spectra matched to confidently-identified proteins were recovered, and the peptide-spectrum-match FDR were re-calculated and controlled at a confident level of FDR≤1%, while protein FDR maintained at ~1%. We evaluated the performance of this strategy in both spectral count- and ion current-based methods. >60% increase of total quantified spectra/peptides was respectively achieved for analyzing a spike-in sample set and a public dataset from CPTAC. Incorporating the peptide retrieval strategy significantly improved the quantitative accuracy and precision, especially for low-abundance proteins (e.g. one-hit proteins). Moreover, the capacity of confidently discovering significantly-altered proteins was also enhanced substantially, as demonstrated with two spike-in datasets. In summary, improved quantitative performance was achieved by this peptide recovery strategy without compromising confidence of protein identification, which can be readily implemented in a broad range of quantitative proteomics techniques including label-free or labeling approaches.

  18. Generation of DNA single-strand displacement by compromised nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Godon, Camille; Mourgues, Sophie; Nonnekens, Julie; Mourcet, Amandine; Coin, Fréderic; Vermeulen, Wim; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a precisely coordinated process essential to avoid DNA damage-induced cellular malfunction and mutagenesis. Here, we investigate the mechanistic details and effects of the NER machinery when it is compromised by a pathologically significant mutation in a subunit of the repair/transcription factor TFIIH, namely XPD. In contrast to previous studies, we find that no single- or double-strand DNA breaks are produced at early time points after UV irradiation of cells bearing a specific XPD mutation, despite the presence of a clear histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) signal in the UV-exposed areas. We show that the observed γH2AX signal can be explained by the presence of longer single-strand gaps possibly generated by strand displacement. Our in vivo measurements also indicate a strongly reduced TFIIH-XPG binding that could promote single-strand displacement at the site of UV lesions. This finding not only highlights the crucial role of XPG's interactions with TFIIH for proper NER, but also sheds new light on how a faulty DNA repair process can induce extreme genomic instability in human patients. PMID:22863773

  19. SEMA4D compromises blood-brain barrier, activates microglia, and inhibits remyelination in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ernest S; Jonason, Alan; Reilly, Christine; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Fisher, Terrence; Doherty, Michael; Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Mallow, Crystal; Cornelius, Chad; Leonard, John E; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Pham, Trinh; Seils, Jennifer; Bussler, Holm; Torno, Sebold; Kirk, Renee; Howell, Alan; Evans, Elizabeth E; Paris, Mark; Bowers, William J; John, Gareth; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neuroinflammatory disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of CNS, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, localized myelin destruction, and progressive neuronal degeneration. There exists a significant need to identify novel therapeutic targets and strategies that effectively and safely disrupt and even reverse disease pathophysiology. Signaling cascades initiated by semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) induce glial activation, neuronal process collapse, inhibit migration and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and disrupt endothelial tight junctions forming the BBB. To target SEMA4D, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognizes mouse, rat, monkey and human SEMA4D with high affinity and blocks interaction between SEMA4D and its cognate receptors. In vitro, anti-SEMA4D reverses the inhibitory effects of recombinant SEMA4D on OPC survival and differentiation. In vivo, anti-SEMA4D significantly attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in multiple rodent models by preserving BBB integrity and axonal myelination and can be shown to promote migration of OPC to the site of lesions and improve myelin status following chemically-induced demyelination. Our study underscores SEMA4D as a key factor in CNS disease and supports the further development of antibody-based inhibition of SEMA4D as a novel therapeutic strategy for MS and other neurologic diseases with evidence of demyelination and/or compromise to the neurovascular unit.

  20. Compromised virus-induced gene silencing in RDR6-deficient plants.

    PubMed

    Vaistij, Fabián E; Jones, Louise

    2009-03-01

    RNA silencing in plants serves as a potent antiviral defense mechanism through the action of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which direct RNA degradation. siRNAs can be derived directly from the viral genome or via the action of host-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs). Plant genomes encode multiple RDRs, and it has been demonstrated that plants defective for RDR6 hyperaccumulate several classes of virus. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in wild-type and RDR6-deficient Nicotiana benthamiana plants. For the potexvirus Potato virus X (PVX) and the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), the efficiency of both VIGS and RdDM were compromised in RDR6-defective plants despite accumulating high levels of viral siRNAs similar to infection of wild-type plants. The reduced efficiency of VIGS and RdDM was unrelated to the size class of siRNA produced and, at least for PVX, was not dependent on the presence of the virus-encoded silencing suppressor protein, 25K. We suggest that primary siRNAs produced from PVX and PPV in the absence of RDR6 may not be good effectors of silencing and that RDR6 is required to produce secondary siRNAs that drive a more effective antiviral response.

  1. Contralateral Abdominal Pocketing in Salvation of Replanted Fingertips with Compromised Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications. PMID:25379539

  2. Contralateral abdominal pocketing in salvation of replanted fingertips with compromised circulation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications.

  3. ["Need-driven-dementia-compromised-behavior" model and "gentle care" as answer to Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Gallese, Giulia; Stobbione, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a progressive cognitive, behavioural and functional decline which determines ability loss. With the gradual aging of the population, Alzheimer's disease is becoming a major health and social problem which involves not only the individuals but also their whole family. The aim of this study is to identify the most important needs of patients and to suggest interventions to manage it at home, according to the pattern of Gentle Care. Care needs of Alzheimer's disease patients have been investigated, through the use of semi-structured interview of caregivers who take care of loved ones at home. The survey has been carried out through the use of a data collection tool proposed in the conceptual model of nursing "Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behaviour Model", validated and tested in the United States. Data highlights an high degree of patient dependence from their caregiver for numerous activities of daily living. Interviews show a poor level of information and lack of support from professionals who can help caregivers in their everyday life. On the basis of the data gathered, a number of care interventions, which seams as the most appropriate in order to best take care of patients, were identified. Moreover, main needs of family caregivers were also identified, they need more information and support with respect to caregiving responsibilities.

  4. Reduction of tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Auge, Brian; Preminger, Glenn M.; Zhong, Pei

    2002-05-01

    To ameliorate vascular injury without compromising stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy, we have recently developed an in situ pulse superposition technique to suppress large intraluminal bubble expansion [Zhong and Zhou, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 3283-3291 (2001)]. This strategy was implemented using a simple modification of a HM-3 lithotripter reflector. In this work, further optimization of the reflector geometry was carried out based on theoretical analysis and in vitro pressure waveform measurements using a fiber optical hydrophone. Using the upgraded reflector, no rupture of a cellulose hollow fiber (i.d.=0.2 mm) vessel phantom could be observed around the lithotripter beam focus even after 200 shocks at 24 kV. In comparison, less than 50 shocks were needed to cause a rupture of the vessel phantom using the original reflector at 20 kV. At corresponding output settings, stone comminution is comparable between the two reflector configurations, although the size of the fragments produced by the upgraded reflector is slightly larger. In addition, preliminary results from animal studies have demonstrated a significant reduction in tissue injury using the upgraded reflector, which confirms the validity of this approach in vivo. [Work supported by NIH.

  5. Bioactive bilayered dressing for compromised epidermal tissue regeneration with sequential activity of complementary agents.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Cifuentes, Alberto; Rodríguez, Gema; Aguilar, María Rosa; González-Gómez, Álvaro; Solis, Raul; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Buján, Julia; García-Sanmartin, Josune; Martínez, Alfredo; Román, Julio San

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with the design, preparation, and evaluation of a new bilayered dressing for application in the healing of compromised wounds. The system is based on the sequential release of two complementary bioactive components to enhance the activation of the regeneration of dermal tissue. The internal layer is a highly hydrophilic and biodegradable film of gelatin and hyaluronic acid (HG), crosslinked with the natural compound genipin, which reacts with the amine groups of gelatin. This film is loaded with the proangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial peptide, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), that is released slowly in the wound site. The external layer, more stable and less hydrophilic, is constituted by a biodegradable polyurethane derived from poly(caprolactone) and pluronic L61. This layer is loaded with resorbable nanoparticles of bemiparin (a fractionated low molecular weight heparin), which promotes the activation of growth factors, FGF and VEGF, and provides a good biomechanical stability and controlled permeability of the bilayered dressing. Experiments carried out in mice demonstrate the excellent angiogenic effect of the HG film in the dermal tissue. Application of the bilayered dressing in the wound healing rabbit ear model shows an improved cicatrization of the wound in both ischemic and non-ischemic defects, favoring epithelialization and reducing noticeably the contraction and the inflammation.

  6. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) spermatozoon decondensation in vitro is not compromised by cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Rebecca E; Huang, Yan; Howard, Jo Gayle; Wang, Peng Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Zhang, Guiquan; Wildt, David E

    2006-01-01

    Natural breeding of giant pandas in captivity is compromised, making artificial insemination and spermatozoa cryopreservation essential for genetic management. This study examined the influence of freeze-thawing on traditional parameters such as motility and spermatozoon functionality, specifically decondensation in vitro. Giant panda spermatozoa were assessed before and after rapid cryopreservation (4 degrees C to -130 degrees C over 2 min) in liquid nitrogen vapour. Spermatozoa pre-incubated in medium for 6 h were co-incubated with cat zonae (2 zonae microL(-1)) for 30 min to effect capacitation and an acrosome reaction. Spermatozoa were then mixed with mature cat oocyte cytoplasm (2 cytoplasm microL(-1)) for 4 h and evaluated for decondensation. Frozen spermatozoa were less motile (P < 0.05) than fresh counterparts immediately post-thawing, but not after 6 h incubation. There were more (P < 0.05) spermatozoa with completely diffused chromatin post-thaw (10.4 +/- 1.3%; mean +/- s.e.m.) compared to fresh counterparts (5.1 +/- 1.0%). However, there was no overall difference (P > 0.05) in the incidence of decondensation between fresh (4 h, 69.8 +/- 5.9%) and thawed (4 h, 71.5 +/- 4.9%) spermatozoa after exposure to cat oocyte cytoplasm. It is concluded that the 'rapid' method now used to cryopreserve giant panda spermatozoa has little impact on spermatozoon decondensation.

  7. Food security: the challenge of increasing wheat yield and the importance of not compromising food safety

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, T; Halford, N G

    2014-01-01

    Current wheat yield and consumption is considered in the context of the historical development of wheat, from early domestication through to modern plant breeding, the Green Revolution and wheat’s place as one of the world’s most productive and important crops in the 21st Century. The need for further improvement in the yield potential of wheat in order to meet current and impending challenges is discussed, including rising consumption and the demand for grain for fuel as well as food. Research on the complex genetics underlying wheat yield is described, including the identification of quantitative trait loci and individual genes, and the prospects of biotechnology playing a role in wheat improvement in the future are discussed. The challenge of preparing wheat to meet the problems of drought, high temperature and increasing carbon dioxide concentration that are anticipated to come about as a result of climate change is also reviewed. Wheat yield must be increased while not compromising food safety, and the emerging problem of processing contaminants is reviewed, focussing in particular on acrylamide, a contaminant that forms from free asparagine and reducing sugars during high temperature cooking and processing. Wheat breeders are strongly encouraged to consider the contaminant issue when breeding for yield. PMID:25540461

  8. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  9. Alcohol Doesn’t Always Compromise Cognitive Function: Exploring Moderate Doses in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Lauren A.; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to clarify inconsistent findings regarding the acute cognitive effects of subintoxicating alcohol doses (i.e., <80 mg/dl) by controlling for and evaluating variables that might modulate dose-related outcomes. Method: The current study examined the effects of sex/gender and alcohol concentration on select cognitive functions in 94 individuals (49 men) between 25 and 35 years of age. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three dose conditions: target peak breath alcohol concentration of 0 mg/dl (placebo), 40 mg/dl (low), or 65 mg/dl (moderate). After beverage consumption, they completed tasks assessing psychomotor, set-shifting, and working memory ability. Results: Analyses revealed no significant effect of dose for any cognitive domain. A trend-level effect of dose on psychomotor performance was observed, with the low-dose group performing somewhat better than the moderate-dose and placebo groups. No sex main effects or interactions were revealed. Conclusions: Consistent with our previous studies, these data suggest that low and moderate doses of alcohol may not compromise cognitive ability in non–problem drinkers under certain task conditions. Given the outcomes, sex differences cannot be meaningfully addressed. Future consideration of potentially influential variables and assessment of similarly well-defined cohorts might yield a clearer interpretation of alcohol’s behavioral consequences. PMID:26562604

  10. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorder Is Not Necessarily Associated with a Compromised Endogenous Analgesic System

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Pauline H.; Sarlani, Eleni; Grace, Edward G.; Greenspan, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our previous work demonstrated that women with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) exhibit enhanced temporal summation of pain upon repetitive mechanical stimulation of the fingers, compared to healthy controls, suggestive of widespread up regulated central nociceptive processing in this patient population. The current study asks whether TMD case-control differences in Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM) exist, using a mechanically evoked Temporal Summation (TS) model. Methods A series of 10 repetitive, mildly noxious, mechanical stimuli were applied to the fingers of 30 TMD women and 30 age-matched healthy women. The subjects rated the pain intensity caused by the 1st, 5th and 10th stimulus in the train. To evaluate CPM, the same series of mechanical stimulations were applied with concomitant exposure of the other hand to a painfully cold water bath. Results Pain ratings increased significantly with stimulus repetition (p<0.01) and CPM significantly reduced TS of pain (p<0.01). Of particular note, both groups showed very similar degrees of CPM, with no significant group difference. Conclusion Painful TMD is not necessarily associated with a compromised ability to engage the endogenous analgesic system in an experimental setting. PMID:23630686

  11. Compromise-based Robust Prioritization of Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Watershed Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Chung, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    This study suggests a robust prioritization framework for climate change adaptation strategies under multiple climate change scenarios with a case study of selecting sites for reusing treated wastewater (TWW) in a Korean urban watershed. The framework utilizes various multi-criteria decision making techniques, including the VIKOR method and the Shannon entropy-based weights. In this case study, the sustainability of TWW use is quantified with indicator-based approaches with the DPSIR framework, which considers both hydro-environmental and socio-economic aspects of the watershed management. Under the various climate change scenarios, the hydro-environmental responses to reusing TWW in potential alternative sub-watersheds are determined using the Hydrologic Simulation Program in Fortran (HSPF). The socio-economic indicators are obtained from the statistical databases. Sustainability scores for multiple scenarios are estimated individually and then integrated with the proposed approach. At last, the suggested framework allows us to prioritize adaptation strategies in a robust manner with varying levels of compromise between utility-based and regret-based strategies.

  12. Reproductive investment compromises maternal health in three species of freshwater turtle.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anthony R; Scheelings, T Franciscus; Foley, Laura J; Johnstone, Christopher P; Reina, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that a trade-off in the allocation of resources between different physiological systems exists because resources are finite. As a result, females investing heavily in reproduction may compromise their future health. We used hematology, serum biochemistry, mass, and morphometric measurements as indicators of physiological health state to investigate whether reproductive investment altered subsequent maternal health in three Australian freshwater turtles: the oblong turtle (Chelodina oblonga; n = 12), the Macquarie turtle (Emydura macquarii; n = 9), and the eastern long-necked turtle (Chelodina longicollis; n = 8). Maternal health was impaired in turtles that produced larger and heavier eggs and clutches. In C. oblonga and E. macquarii, increased reproductive investment generally resulted in negative changes to the hematology and serum biochemistry profile of maternal blood. Generally, increases in heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, aspartate transaminase, creatine kinase, calcium/phosphorus ratio, and albumin/globulin ratio were observed following reproduction, in addition to a decrease in glucose and total protein. These findings agree with the physiological constraint hypothesis and highlight the connection between life-history evolution and animal physiology by documenting, for the first time, how measures of physiological health state relate to reproductive investment in Australian freshwater turtles. Additionally, our findings suggest that body condition, a readily used morphological biomarker, is a poor predictor of health in turtles. Our results emphasize the need to investigate how maternal health is influenced by the reproductive process in different species.

  13. Silencing GhNDR1 and GhMKK2 compromises cotton resistance to Verticillium wilt.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiquan; Wheeler, Terry; Li, Zhaohu; Kenerley, Charles M; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2011-04-01

    Cotton is an important cash crop worldwide, and is a significant source of fiber, feed, foodstuff, oil and biofuel products. Considerable effort has been expended to increase sustainable yield and quality through molecular breeding and genetic engineering of new cotton cultivars. Given the recent availability of the whole-genome sequence of cotton, it is necessary to develop molecular tools and resources for large-scale analysis of gene functions at the genome-wide level. We have successfully developed an Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay in several cotton cultivars with various genetic backgrounds. The genes of interest were potently and readily silenced within 2 weeks after inoculation at the seedling stage. Importantly, we showed that silencing GhNDR1 and GhMKK2 compromised cotton resistance to the infection by Verticillium dahliae, a fungal pathogen causing Verticillium wilt. Furthermore, we developed a cotton protoplast system for transient gene expression to study gene functions by a gain-of-function approach. The viable protoplasts were isolated from green cotyledons, etiolated cotyledons and true leaves, and responded to a wide range of pathogen elicitors and phytohormones. Remarkably, cotton plants possess conserved, but also distinct, MAP kinase activation with Arabidopsis upon bacterial elicitor flagellin perception. Thus, using gene silencing assays, we have shown that GhNDR1 and GhMKK2 are required for Verticillium resistance in cotton, and have developed high throughput loss-of-function and gain-of-function assays for functional genomic studies in cotton.

  14. Simulated Microgravity Using a Rotary Culture System Compromises the In Vitro Development of Mouse Preantral Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yonggen; Lin, Wei; Chen, Zaichong; Meng, Luhe; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Growing cells in simulated weightlessness condition might be a highly promising new technique to maintain or generate tissue constructs in a scaffold-free manner. There is limited evidence that microgravity condition may affect development of ovarian follicles. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simulated microgravity on the in vitro development of mouse preantral follicles. Methods and Results Ovarian tissue from 14-day-old mice, or preantral follicles mechanically isolated from 14-day-old mouse ovaries were cultured at a simulated microgravity condition generated using a rotating wall vessel apparatus. Follicle survival was assessed quantitatively using H&E staining. Follicle diameter and oocyte diameter were measured under an inverted microscope. Ultrastructure of oocytes was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. We observed that simulated microgravity compromised follicle survival in vitro, downregulated PCNA and GDF-9 expressions, and caused ultrastructural abnormalities in oocytes. Conclusion This study showed for the first time that three-dimensional culture condition generated by simulated microgravity is detrimental to the initial stage development of mouse preantral follicles in vitro. The experimental setup provides a model to further investigate the mechanisms involved in the in vitro developmental processes of oocytes/granulosa cells under the microgravity condition. PMID:26963099

  15. Oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast in hospitalised and medically compromised patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Otto L T; Bandara, H M H N; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W

    2012-03-01

    Yeast are major aetiological agents of localised oral mucosal lesions, and are also leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on the prevalence and incidence of these opportunistic oral pathogens in hospitalised and medically compromised patients. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast. Chlorhexidine delivered in a variety of oral hygiene products appeared to have some effect on oral yeast, although some studies found equivocal effects. Although a wide array of other compounds have also been investigated, their clinical effectiveness remains to be substantiated. Likewise, the utility of mechanical oral hygiene interventions and other oral health promotion measures such as topical application of salivary substitute, remains unsettled. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against oral yeast, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remains to be confirmed by further high-quality randomised controlled trials. This is pertinent, given the recent emergence of yeast resistance to conventional antifungal agents.

  16. The Munsell Color System: a scientific compromise from the world of art.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Color systems make accurate color specification and matching possible in science, art, and industry by defining a coordinate system for all possible color perceptions. The Munsell Color System, developed by the artist Albert Henry Munsell in the early twentieth century, has influenced color science to this day. I trace the development of the Munsell Color System from its origins in the art world to its acceptance in the scientific community. Munsell's system was the first to accurately and quantitatively describe the psychological experience of color. By considering the problems that color posed for Munsell's art community and examining his diaries and published material, I conclude that Munsell arrived at his results by remaining agnostic as to the scientific definition of color, while retaining faith that color perceptions could be objectively quantified. I argue that Munsell was able to interest the scientific community in his work because color had become a controversial topic between physicists and psychologists. Parts of Munsell's system appealed to each field, making it a workable compromise. For contrast, I suggest that three contemporary scientists with whom Munsell had contact--Wilhelm Ostwald, Ogden Rood, and Edward Titchener--did not reach the same conclusions in their color systems because they started from scientific assumptions about the nature of color.

  17. Gamma processing of Arabic bread for immune system-compromised cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grecz, N.; Brannon, R.; Jaw, R.; Al-Harithy, R.; Hahn, E.W.

    1985-12-01

    Arabic bread prepared from local Saudi flour contained a total of up to 105/sup 4/ organisms per g. Most of these were bacterial spores that survived the baking process (1.3 x 10/sup 2/ to 3.5 x 10/sup 3/) and a small number of yeasts and molds (10 to 40 cells per g). The organisms in Arabic bread appear to be harmless to healthy individuals. However, for immune system-compromised cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients, it is prudent to irradiate the bread to reduce microbial contamination. The decimal reduction doses (10% survival) for the most radiation-resistant organisms (spore formers) in bread were 0.11 to 0.15 Mrad. Accordingly, 0.6 Mrad was sufficient to reduce the number of spores in Arabic bread by a factor of 10,000, i.e., to <1/g. This treatment constitutes radiation pasteurization (radicidation), and to this extent, provides a margin of microbiological safety. Sensory evaluation by the nine-point hedonic scale showed no detectable loss of organoleptic quality of bread up to 0.6 Mrad, while irradiation to 2.5 Mrad induced unacceptable organoleptic changes.

  18. Sampling of prenatal and postnatal offspring from individual rat dams enhances animal use without compromising development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, J. R.; Burden, H. W.; Hawes, N.; Ronca, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    To assess prenatal and postnatal developmental status in the offspring of a group of animals, it is typical to examine fetuses from some of the dams as well as infants born to the remaining dams. Statistical limitations often arise, particularly when the animals are rare or especially precious, because all offspring of the dam represent only a single statistical observation; littermates are not independent observations (biologically or statistically). We describe a study in which pregnant laboratory rats were laparotomized on day 7 of gestation (GD7) to ascertain the number and distribution of uterine implantation sites and were subjected to a simulated experience on a 10-day space shuttle flight. After the simulated landing on GD18, rats were unilaterally hysterectomized, thus providing a sample of fetuses from 10 independent uteruses, followed by successful vaginal delivery on GD22, yielding postnatal samples from 10 uteruses. A broad profile of maternal and offspring morphologic and physiologic measures indicated that these novel sampling procedures did not compromise maternal well-being and maintained normal offspring development and function. Measures included maternal organ weights and hormone concentrations, offspring body size, growth, organ weights, sexual differentiation, and catecholamine concentrations.

  19. Just-in-Time Compound Pooling Increases Primary Screening Capacity without Compromising Screening Quality.

    PubMed

    Elkin, L L; Harden, D G; Saldanha, S; Ferguson, H; Cheney, D L; Pieniazek, S N; Maloney, D P; Zewinski, J; O'Connell, J; Banks, M

    2015-06-01

    Compound pooling, or multiplexing more than one compound per well during primary high-throughput screening (HTS), is a controversial approach with a long history of limited success. Many issues with this approach likely arise from long-term storage of library plates containing complex mixtures of compounds at high concentrations. Due to the historical difficulties with using multiplexed library plates, primary HTS often uses a one-compound-one-well approach. However, as compound collections grow, innovative strategies are required to increase the capacity of primary screening campaigns. Toward this goal, we have developed a novel compound pooling method that increases screening capacity without compromising data quality. This method circumvents issues related to the long-term storage of complex compound mixtures by using acoustic dispensing to enable "just-in-time" compound pooling directly in the assay well immediately prior to assay. Using this method, we can pool two compounds per well, effectively doubling the capacity of a primary screen. Here, we present data from pilot studies using just-in-time pooling, as well as data from a large >2-million-compound screen using this approach. These data suggest that, for many targets, this method can be used to vastly increase screening capacity without significant reduction in the ability to detect screening hits.

  20. Brief inhalation of asbestos compromises superoxide production in cells from bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed

    Petruska, J M; Marsh, J; Bergeron, M; Mossman, B T

    1990-02-01

    Production of superoxide (O-.2) was measured in alveolar macrophages (AM) exposed to asbestos in vitro and in cells obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of rats inhaling asbestos. Steady state levels of O-.2 released by AM in vitro were dose and time dependent in response to crocidolite, chrysotile, and opsonized zymosan, a particulate used to trigger O-.2 generation. In contrast, an inhalation exposure for 1 h to crocidolite or for 6 days to either crocidolite or chrysotile asbestos resulted in a decreased production of O-.2 by BAL cells. Likewise, BAL cells from rats inhaling chrysotile for 1 h or crocidolite for 9 days exhibited a diminished capacity to secrete O-.2 when challenged with the particulate opsonized zymosan. Diminished generation of O-.2 by asbestos occurred in BAL cell populations containing either significantly increased numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes (6- and 9-day exposures) or 99% AM (1-h exposure). Thus, these novel observations suggest that short-term inhalation of asbestos compromises the ability of BAL cells to produce O-.2 in the presence or absence of an additional phagocytic stimulus.

  1. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate collection of a debt? 30.70 Section 30.70 Education Office of... Debt or the Suspension or Termination of Collection Action? § 30.70 How does the Secretary...

  2. Left Ventricular Gene Expression Profile of Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models Used in Air Pollution Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The link between pollutant exposure and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has prompted mechanistic research with animal models of CVD. We hypothesized that the cardiac gene expression patterns of healthy and genetically compromised, CVD-prone rat models, with or without metabolic impa...

  3. 42 CFR 411.47 - Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of a workers' compensation claim. 411.47 Section 411.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.47 Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim....

  4. 42 CFR 411.47 - Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of a workers' compensation claim. 411.47 Section 411.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.47 Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim....

  5. 42 CFR 411.47 - Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of a workers' compensation claim. 411.47 Section 411.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.47 Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim....

  6. 42 CFR 411.47 - Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of a workers' compensation claim. 411.47 Section 411.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.47 Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim....

  7. Accomplishments and Compromises in Prediction Research for World Records and Best Performances in Track and Field and Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Paul, Stanley; Fu, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    The conductors of this study reviewed prediction research and studied the accomplishments and compromises in predicting world records and best performances in track and field and swimming. The results of the study showed that prediction research only promises to describe the historical trends in track and field and swimming performances, to study…

  8. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate collection of a debt? 30.70 Section 30.70 Education Office of... Debt or the Suspension or Termination of Collection Action? § 30.70 How does the Secretary...

  9. 42 CFR 411.47 - Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Apportionment of a lump-sum compromise settlement of a workers' compensation claim. 411.47 Section 411.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations...

  10. Intra- and Inter-Individual Variability in Location Data for Two U.S. Health-Compromised Elderly Cohorts

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study provides descriptive statistical data on daily time spent in three locations of exposure assessment interest for two panel studies of health-compromised elderly individuals > 65 y old having multi-days of human activity data. The panel studies include individuals livi...

  11. Conspiracies and Test Compromise: An Evaluation of the Resistance of Test Systems to Small-Scale Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Jing; Tay, Louis; Drasgow, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Test compromise is a concern in cognitive ability testing because such tests are widely used in employee selection and administered on a continuous basis. In this study, the resistance of cognitive tests, deployed in different test systems, to small-scale cheating conspiracies, was evaluated regarding the accuracy of ability estimation.…

  12. Tract-Specific Analyses of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Show Widespread White Matter Compromise in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla, Dinesh K.; Keehn, Brandon; Muller, Ralph-Axel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have shown white matter compromise in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may relate to reduced connectivity and impaired function of distributed networks. However, tract-specific evidence remains limited in ASD. We applied tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS)…

  13. Towards A Theory of Autonomous Reconstitution of Compromised Cyber-Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Coble, Jamie B.; Dixit, Mukul

    2013-11-12

    The ability to maintain mission-critical operations in cyber-systems in the face of disruptions is critical. Faults in cyber systems can come from accidental sources (e.g., natural failure of a component) or deliberate sources (e.g., an intelligent adversary). Natural and intentional manipulation of data, computing, or coordination are the most impactful ways that an attacker can prevent an infrastructure from realizing its mission goals. Under these conditions, the ability to reconstitute critical infrastructure becomes important. Specifically, the question is: Given an intelligent adversary, how can cyber systems respond to keep critical infrastructure operational? In cyber systems, the distributed nature of the system poses serious difficulties in maintaining operations, in part due to the fact that a centralized command and control apparatus is unlikely to provide a robust framework for resilience. Resilience in cyber-systems, in general, has several components, and requires the ability to anticipate and withstand attacks or faults, as well as recover from faults and evolve the system to improve future resilience. The recovery effort (and any subsequent evolution) may require significant reconfiguration of the system (at all levels – hardware, software, services, permissions, etc.) if the system is to be made resilient to further attack or faults. This is especially important in the case of ongoing attacks, where reconfiguration decisions must be taken with care to avoid further compromising the system while maintaining continuity of operations. Collectively, we will label this recovery and evolution process as “reconstitution”. Currently, reconstitution is performed manually, generally after-the-fact, and usually consists of either standing up redundant systems, check-points (rolling back the configuration to a “clean” state), or re-creating the system using “gold-standard” copies. For enterprise systems, such reconstitution may be performed

  14. Aspirations and Compromises: Changes in Homestead Space Relations of the Extreme Poor after Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Tahmina

    2011-01-01

    Background: Construction of houses in homesteads and their settings occur in the context of traditional perceptions and practices in the rural culture of Bangladesh. Functional spaces inside and around the house are produced according to need over time. Inhabitants construct their houses with locally available resources and knowledge. After devastating disasters houses are delivered as products by the development agencies to quickly cater to the needs of the sufferers. The extreme poor are the receivers and inhabitants of these new houses, which can cause significant changes in the physical and environmental characteristics of the neighborhood. In this regard the building and dwelling values of the inhabitants in relation with these houses may be changed or lost. But these values are otherwise inherent characters of the rural houses in the habitations that are shaped by the aspirations of the dwellers. Methods and Findings: This paper investigates how relief houses serve the needs of the extreme poor after disasters and how these houses gradually blend with the surrounding environment matching with the aspirations of the inhabitants. The methodology followed was observation of the backgrounds of the pre and post disaster situations, focus group discussions, drawings sessions and interviews with the inhabitants, craftsmen and locals, use of secondary sources, and visits to the houses during and after construction to understand the techniques and space value. Conclusions: The present practice of distribution of relief houses without involvement of the owners either in the information sharing or building processes and without understanding owners’ perceptions about dwellings, may compromise the compatibility and hence the sustainability of relief houses. Hence, houses may only be used as temporary or transitional shelters to sustain life in the disaster phase, and will not be used as “houses” long term. PMID:22101418

  15. Hippocampus Glutamate and N-Acetyl Aspartate Markers of Excitotoxic Neuronal Compromise in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Isabelle M; Crowley, David J; Silveri, Marisa M; Rauch, Scott L; Jensen, J Eric

    2017-03-08

    Hippocampus atrophy is implicated in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and may partly reflect stress-induced glutamate excitotoxicity that culminates in neuron injury and manifests as re-experiencing symptoms and other memory abnormalities. This study used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to determine whether PTSD is associated with lower hippocampus levels of the neuron marker N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), along with higher levels of glutamate (Glu) and Glu/NAA. We also predicted that metabolite levels would correlate with re-experiencing symptoms and lifetime trauma load. Twenty-four adult PTSD patients and 23 trauma-exposed normal controls (TENC) underwent 4T MRS of the left and right hippocampus. Participants received psychiatric interviews, and completed the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire to define lifetime trauma load. Relative to TENC participants, PTSD patients exhibited significantly lower NAA in right and left hippocampi, and significantly higher Glu and Glu/NAA in the right hippocampus. Re-experiencing symptoms were negatively correlated with left and right NAA, and positively correlated with right Glu and right Glu/NAA. Trauma load was positively correlated with right Glu/NAA in PTSD patients. When re-experiencing symptoms and trauma load were examined together in relation to right Glu/NAA, only re-experiencing symptoms remained a significant correlate. This represents the first report that PTSD is associated with MRS markers of hippocampus Glu excess, together with indices of compromised neuron integrity. Their robust associations with re-experiencing symptoms affirm that MRS indices of hippocampus neuron integrity and glutamate metabolism may reflect biomarkers of clinically significant disease variation in PTSD.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 8 March 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.32.

  16. Proteasome Dysfunction Associated to Oxidative Stress and Proteotoxicity in Adipocytes Compromises Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Moreno, Natalia R.; García-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Membrives, Antonio; Túnez, Isaac; El Bekay, Rajaa; Fernández-Real, José M.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Obesity is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammatory state and adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction, which predispose individuals to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic disease. However, a subset of obese individuals, referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals, are protected from obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities. Here, we aim at identifying molecular factors and pathways in adipocytes that are responsible for the progression from the insulin-sensitive to the insulin-resistant, metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO) phenotype. Results: Proteomic analysis of paired samples of adipocytes from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) human AT revealed that both types of cells are altered in the MUHO state. Specifically, the glutathione redox cycle and other antioxidant defense systems as well as the protein-folding machinery were dysregulated and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased in adipocytes from IR subjects. Moreover, proteasome activity was also compromised in adipocytes of MUHO individuals, which was associated with enhanced accumulation of oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in these cells. Proteasome activity was also impaired in adipocytes of diet-induced obese mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to palmitate. In line with these data, proteasome inhibition significantly impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Innovation: This study provides the first evidence of the occurrence of protein homeostasis deregulation in adipocytes in human obesity, which, together with oxidative damage, interferes with insulin signaling in these cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction and impaired proteostasis in adipocytes, resulting from protein oxidation and/or misfolding, constitute major pathogenic mechanisms in the development of IR in obesity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 597–612. PMID:25714483

  17. Normal aging delays and compromises early multifocal visual attention during object tracking.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-02-01

    Declines in selective attention are one of the sources contributing to age-related impairments in a broad range of cognitive functions. Most previous research on mechanisms underlying older adults' selection deficits has studied the deployment of visual attention to static objects and features. Here we investigate neural correlates of age-related differences in spatial attention to multiple objects as they move. We used a multiple object tracking task, in which younger and older adults were asked to keep track of moving target objects that moved randomly in the visual field among irrelevant distractor objects. By recording the brain's electrophysiological responses during the tracking period, we were able to delineate neural processing for targets and distractors at early stages of visual processing (~100-300 msec). Older adults showed less selective attentional modulation in the early phase of the visual P1 component (100-125 msec) than younger adults, indicating that early selection is compromised in old age. However, with a 25-msec delay relative to younger adults, older adults showed distinct processing of targets (125-150 msec), that is, a delayed yet intact attentional modulation. The magnitude of this delayed attentional modulation was related to tracking performance in older adults. The amplitude of the N1 component (175-210 msec) was smaller in older adults than in younger adults, and the target amplification effect of this component was also smaller in older relative to younger adults. Overall, these results indicate that normal aging affects the efficiency and timing of early visual processing during multiple object tracking.

  18. Cigarette smoke exposure exacerbates lung inflammation and compromises immunity to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Amit A; Bogner, Paul N; Thatcher, Thomas H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P; Thanavala, Yasmin

    2014-06-01

    The detrimental impact of tobacco on human health is clearly recognized, and despite aggressive efforts to prevent smoking, close to one billion individuals worldwide continue to smoke. People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are susceptible to recurrent respiratory infections with pathogens, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), yet the reasons for this increased susceptibility are poorly understood. Because mortality rapidly increases with multiple exacerbations, development of protective immunity is critical to improving patient survival. Acute NTHI infection has been studied in the context of cigarette smoke exposure, but this is the first study, to our knowledge, to investigate chronic infection and the generation of adaptive immune responses to NTHI after chronic smoke exposure. After chronic NTHI infection, mice that had previously been exposed to cigarette smoke developed increased lung inflammation and compromised adaptive immunity relative to air-exposed controls. Importantly, NTHI-specific T cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke produced lower levels of IFN-γ and IL-4, and B cells produced reduced levels of Abs against outer-membrane lipoprotein P6, with impaired IgG1, IgG2a, and IgA class switching. However, production of IL-17, which is associated with neutrophilic inflammation, was enhanced. Interestingly, cigarette smoke-exposed mice exhibited a similar defect in the generation of adaptive immunity after immunization with P6. Our study has conclusively demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure has a profound suppressive effect on the generation of adaptive immune responses to NTHI and suggests the mechanism by which prior cigarette smoke exposure predisposes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients to recurrent infections, leading to exacerbations and contributing to mortality.

  19. Postconcussional disorder and PTSD symptoms of military-related traumatic brain injury associated with compromised neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ping-Hong; Wang, Binquan; Oakes, Terrence R; French, Louis M; Pan, Hai; Graner, John; Liu, Wei; Riedy, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common combat injury, often through explosive blast, and produces heterogeneous brain changes due to various mechanisms of injury. It is unclear whether the vulnerability of white matter differs between blast and impact injury, and the consequences of microstructural changes on neuropsychological function are poorly understood in military TBI patients. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques were used to assess the neurocircuitry in 37 U.S. service members (29 mild, 7 moderate, 1 severe; 17 blast and 20 nonblast), who sustained a TBI while deployed, compared to 14 nondeployed, military controls. High-dimensional deformable registration of MRI diffusion tensor data was followed by fiber tracking and tract-specific analysis along with region-of-interest analysis. DTI results were examined in relation to post-concussion and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The most prominent white matter microstructural injury for both blast and nonblast patients was in the frontal fibers within the fronto-striatal (corona radiata, internal capsule) and fronto-limbic circuits (fornix, cingulum), the fronto-parieto-occipital association fibers, in brainstem fibers, and in callosal fibers. Subcortical superior-inferiorly oriented tracts were more vulnerable to blast injury than nonblast injury, while direct impact force had more detrimental effects on anterior-posteriorly oriented tracts, which tended to cause heterogeneous left and right hemispheric asymmetries of white matter connectivity. The tractography using diffusion anisotropy deficits revealed the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cerebellar-cortical (CSTCC) networks, where increased post-concussion and PTSD symptoms were associated with low fractional anisotropy in the major nodes of compromised CSTCC neurocircuitry, and the consequences on cognitive function were explored as well.

  20. Pulmonary transcriptional response to ozone in healthy and cardiovascular compromised rat models.

    PubMed

    Ward, William O; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2015-01-01

    The genetic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated metabolic impairments can influence the lung injury from inhaled pollutants. We hypothesized that comparative assessment of global pulmonary expression profile of healthy and CVD-prone rat models will provide mechanistic insights into susceptibility differences to ozone. The lung expression profiles of healthy Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), stroke-prone SH (SHSP), obese SH heart failure (SHHF) and obese, atherosclerosis-prone JCR rats were analyzed using Affymetrix platform immediately after 4-h air or 1 ppm ozone exposure. At baseline, the JCR exhibited the largest difference in the number of genes among all strains when compared with WKY. Interestingly, the number of genes affected by ozone was inversely correlated with genes different at baseline relative to WKY. A cluster of NFkB target genes involved in cell-adhesion, antioxidant response, inflammation and apoptosis was induced in all strains, albeit at different levels (JCR < WKY < SHHF < SH < SHSP). The lung metabolic syndrome gene cluster indicated expressions in opposite directions for SHHF and JCR suggesting different mechanisms for common disease phenotype and perhaps obesity-independent contribution to exacerbated lung disease. The differences in expression of adrenergic receptors and ion-channel genes suggested distinct mechanisms by which ozone might induce protein leakage in CVD models, especially SHHF and JCR. Thus, the pulmonary response to ozone in CVD strains was likely linked to the defining gene expression profiles. Differential transcriptional patterns between healthy and CVD rat strains at baseline, and after ozone suggests that lung inflammation and injury might be influenced by multiple biological pathways affecting inflammation gene signatures.

  1. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2014-08-15

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapid goal-directed task with ankle dorsiflexion and were tested 1 day later with elbow flexion (transfer). The rest did not perform any ankle practice and only performed the task with elbow flexion. The goal-directed task consisted of rapid movement (180 ms) to match a spatiotemporal target. For each limb, we recorded the EMG burst activity of the primary agonist and antagonist muscles. The rate of improvement during task acquisition (practice) was similar for young and older adults (P > 0.3). In contrast, only young adults were able to transfer the task to the upper limb. Specifically, young adults who practiced ankle dorsiflexion exhibited ∼30% (P < 0.05) lower movement error and ∼60% (P < 0.05) lower antagonist EMG burst activity compared with older adults who received equal practice and young adults who did not receive any ankle dorsiflexion practice. These results provide novel evidence that the deficient motor learning in older adults may be related to a differential activation of the antagonist muscle, which compromises their ability to acquire the task during practice.

  2. Aerobic exercise does not compromise muscle hypertrophy response to short-term resistance training.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Gustafsson, Thomas; Tesch, Per A

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that chronic aerobic and resistance exercise (AE+RE) would elicit greater muscle hypertrophy than resistance exercise only (RE). Ten men (25 ± 4 yr) performed 5 wk unilateral knee extensor AE+RE. The opposing limb was subjected to RE. AE completed 6 hr prior to RE consisted of ~45 min one-legged cycle ergometry. RE comprised 4 × 7 maximal concentric-eccentric knee extensions. Various indexes of in vivo knee extensor function were measured before and after training. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessed m. quadricep femoris (QF) cross-sectional area (CSA), volume, and signal intensity (SI). Biopsies obtained from m. vastus lateralis determined fiber CSA, enzyme levels, and gene expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, MuRF-1, PGC-1α, and VEGF. Increases (P < 0.05) in isometric strength and peak power, respectively, were comparable in AE+RE (9 and 29%) and RE (11 and 24%). AE+RE showed greater increase (14%; P < 0.05) in QF volume than RE (8%). Muscle fiber CSA increased 17% after AE+RE (P < 0.05) and 9% after RE (P > 0.05). QF SI increased (12%; P < 0.05) after AE+RE, but not RE. Neither AE+RE nor RE showed altered mRNA levels. Citrate synthase activity increased (P < 0.05) after AE+RE. The results suggest that the increased aerobic capacity shown with AE+RE was accompanied by a more robust increase in muscle size compared with RE. Although this response was not carried over to greater improvement in muscle function, it remains that intense AE can be executed prior to RE without compromising performance outcome.

  3. Biofouling of inlet pipes affects water quality in running seawater aquaria and compromises sponge cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin; Vermeij, Mark J.A.; van der Geest, Harm H.G.

    2015-01-01

    Marine organism are often kept, cultured, and experimented on in running seawater aquaria. However, surprisingly little attention is given to the nutrient composition of the water flowing through these systems, which is generally assumed to equal in situ conditions, but may change due to the presence of biofouling organisms. Significantly lower bacterial abundances and higher inorganic nitrogen species (nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium) were measured in aquarium water when biofouling organisms were present within a 7-year old inlet pipe feeding a tropical reef running seawater aquaria system, compared with aquarium water fed by a new, biofouling-free inlet pipe. These water quality changes are indicative of the feeding activity and waste production of the suspension- and filter-feeding communities found in the old pipe, which included sponges, bivalves, barnacles, and ascidians. To illustrate the physiological consequences of these water quality changes on a model organism kept in the aquaria system, we investigated the influence of the presence and absence of the biofouling community on the functioning of the filter-feeding sponge Halisarca caerulea, by determining its choanocyte (filter cell) proliferation rates. We found a 34% increase in choanocyte proliferation rates following the replacement of the inlet pipe (i.e., removal of the biofouling community). This indicates that the physiological functioning of the sponge was compromised due to suboptimal food conditions within the aquarium resulting from the presence of the biofouling organisms in the inlet pipe. This study has implications for the husbandry and performance of experiments with marine organisms in running seawater aquaria systems. Inlet pipes should be checked regularly, and replaced if necessary, in order to avoid excessive biofouling and to approach in situ water quality. PMID:26664799

  4. Environmentally persistent free radicals compromise left ventricular function during ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Burn, Brendan R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in airborne particulate matter (PM) are linked to increased mortality from myocardial ischemia. PM contains environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) that form as halogenated hydrocarbons chemisorb to transition metal oxide-coated particles, and are capable of sustained redox cycling. We hypothesized that exposure to the EPFR DCB230 would increase cardiac vulnerability to subsequent myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Rats were exposed to DCB230 or vehicle via nose-only inhalation (230 μg max/day) over 30 min/day for 7 days. MI/R or sham MI/R (sham) was initiated 24 h after the final exposure. Following 1 or 7 days of reperfusion, left ventricular (LV) function was assessed and infarct size measured. In vehicle-exposed rats, MI/R injury did not significantly reduce cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), stroke work (SW), end-diastolic volume (EDV), or end-systolic volume (ESV) after 1 day of reperfusion, despite significant reductions in end-systolic pressure (ESP). Preload-recruitable SW (PRSW; contractility) was elevated, presumably to maintain LV function. MI/R 1-day rats exposed to DCB230 also had similarly reduced ESP. Compared with vehicle controls, CO, SV, and SW were significantly reduced in DCB230-exposed MI/R 1-day rats; moreover, PRSW did not increase. DCB230’s effects on LV function dissipated within 8 days of exposure. These data show that inhalation of EPFRs can exacerbate the deficits in LV function produced by subsequent MI/R injury. Infarct size was not different between the MI/R groups. We conclude that inhalation of EPFRs can compromise cardiac function during MI/R injury and may help to explain the link between PM and MI/R-related mortality. PMID:25681431

  5. GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9orf72 compromises nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Freibaum, Brian D; Lu, Yubing; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Kim, Nam Chul; Almeida, Sandra; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Badders, Nisha; Valentine, Marc; Miller, Bruce L; Wong, Philip C; Petrucelli, Leonard; Kim, Hong Joo; Gao, Fen-Biao; Taylor, J Paul

    2015-09-03

    The GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9orf72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To elucidate the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a tractable genetic system, we generated transgenic fly lines expressing 8, 28 or 58 G4C2-repeat-containing transcripts that do not have a translation start site (AUG) but contain an open-reading frame for green fluorescent protein to detect repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. We show that these transgenic animals display dosage-dependent, repeat-length-dependent degeneration in neuronal tissues and RAN translation of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, as observed in patients with C9orf72-related disease. This model was used in a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen, ultimately leading to the identification of 18 genetic modifiers that encode components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), as well as the machinery that coordinates the export of nuclear RNA and the import of nuclear proteins. Consistent with these results, we found morphological abnormalities in the architecture of the nuclear envelope in cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified a substantial defect in RNA export resulting in retention of RNA in the nuclei of Drosophila cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats and also in mammalian cells, including aged induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived neurons from patients with C9orf72-related disease. These studies show that a primary consequence of G4C2 repeat expansion is the compromise of nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore, revealing a novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.

  6. The Influence on Stability Robustness of Compromising on the Zero Tracking Error Requirement in Repetitive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunde; Longman, Richard W.

    2012-06-01

    Repetitive control (RC) can be used to design active vibration isolation mounts that aim to cancel the influence of spacecraft vibrations on fine pointing equipment. It can cancel the influence of slight imbalance in momentum wheels, reaction wheels, and CMGs. Because RC aims for zero error, it requires reasonably accurate knowledge of the system dynamics all the way to Nyquist frequency. As a result, special methods are needed to establish robustness to model error. A series of publications have demonstrated a method of averaging a cost function over models to increase the robustness. A previous paper improves on this by adjusting the learning rate as a function of frequency to further improve robustness, but there is still a hard limit on phase error. This paper considers yet one more approach, and all three can be used simultaneously. Here we compromise on the zero tracking error requirement for frequencies that require extra robustness. This allows one to extend this hard limit making RC tolerate larger model errors. A quadratic cost is used that penalizes not just the rate of change of the input function, but also the size of the input function. We first establish how to do this for the sister field of iterative learning control, and then the frequency response characteristics are produced for design of repetitive control. The method can improve tracking error for a frequency interval above the frequency at which one would otherwise have to cut off the learning because of model error. Model uncertainty can be used directly in the design process to produce stable RC laws for any level of uncertainty. The design approach differs from typical earlier work that used a sharp frequency cutoff, and instead uses a minimal amount of attenuation needed to produce stability.

  7. Continued Endemic Wild Poliovirus Transmission in Security-Compromised Areas - Nigeria, 2016.

    PubMed

    Nnadi, Chimeremma; Damisa, Eunice; Esapa, Lisa; Braka, Fiona; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya; Siddique, Anisur; Jorba, Jaume; Nganda, Gatei Wa; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Bolu, Omotayo; Wiesen, Eric; Adamu, Usman

    2017-02-24

    On August 10, 2016, 2 years after the most recent wild poliovirus (WPV) case was reported in Nigeria (in July 2014) (1), two WPV cases were reported in the northeastern state of Borno, which has been severely affected by insurgency-related insecurity since 2013. On September 9 and 26, 2016, two additional WPV cases were reported in Borno in children whose families migrated from security-compromised, inaccessible areas of the state. All four cases were WPV serotype 1 (WPV1), with genetic differences indicating prolonged undetected transmission. A large-scale emergency response plan was developed and implemented. The plan initially called for vaccination of 815,791 children during August 15-18 in five local government areas (LGAs) in the immediate vicinity of the first two WPV cases. Subsequently, the plan was expanded to regionally synchronized supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), conducted during August 27-December 6 in five Lake Chad basin countries at increased risk for national and regional WPV1 transmission (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Niger, and Nigeria). In addition, retrospective searches for missed cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), enhanced environmental surveillance for polioviruses, and polio surveillance system reviews were conducted. Prolonged undetected WPV1 transmission in Borno State is a consequence of low population immunity and severe surveillance limitations associated with insurgency-related insecurity and highlights the risk for local and international WPV spread (2). Increasing polio vaccination coverage and implementing high-quality polio surveillance, especially among populations in newly secured and difficult-to-access areas in Borno and other Lake Chad basin areas are urgently needed.

  8. Foxi3 deficiency compromises hair follicle stem cell specification and activation

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C.; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2017-01-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ. Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary hair germ marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary hair germ activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. PMID:26992132

  9. Host lung immunity is severely compromised during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: role of lung eosinophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Aditi; Vishwakarma, Achchhe Lal; Agnihotri, Promod Kumar; Sharma, Sharad; Srivastava, Mrigank

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophils play a central role in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, a rare, but fatal, manifestation of filariasis. However, no exhaustive study has been done to identify the genes and proteins of eosinophils involved in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. In the present study, we established a mouse model of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia that mimicked filarial manifestations of human tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis and used flow cytometry-assisted cell sorting and real-time RT-PCR to study the gene expression profile of flow-sorted, lung eosinophils and lung macrophages during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis. Our results show that tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice exhibited increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, CCL5, and CCL11 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma along with elevated titers of IgE and IgG subtypes in the serum. Alveolar macrophages from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice displayed decreased phagocytosis, attenuated nitric oxide production, and reduced T-cell proliferation capacity, and FACS-sorted lung eosinophils from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice upregulated transcript levels of ficolin A and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2,but proapoptotic genes Bim and Bax were downregulated. Similarly, flow-sorted lung macrophages upregulated transcript levels of TLR-2, TLR-6, arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ-1 but downregulated nitric oxide synthase-2 levels, signifying their alternative activation. Taken together, we show that the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is marked by functional impairment of alveolar macrophages, alternative activation of lung macrophages, and upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes by eosinophils. These events combine together to cause severe lung inflammation and compromised lung immunity. Therapeutic interventions that can boost host immune response in the lungs might thus provide relief to patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

  10. Compromised oxygen uptake in speed skaters during treadmill in-line skating.

    PubMed

    Rundell, K W

    1996-01-01

    The "sitting" posture of speed skating may result in compromised blood flow to the working muscles, thus limiting oxygen uptake. To examine this metabolic problem, male (N = 7) short track speed skaters performed running (TR), in-line skating upright (US), and in-line skating in the "sitting" position (LS) on a motor driven treadmill on randomized days. Each test consisted of four 4-min stages at 2.24, 2.68, 3.13, and 3.58 m.s-1 (5, 6, 7, and 8 mph) at 5% incline. After a brief rest, athletes performed at 4.03 m.s-1 (9 mph) with elevation increasing 1% each minute to exhaustion. Two on-ice 1000-m time trials (TT) were performed to assess the relationship between performance and laboratory measurements. Peak VO2 was lower during LS (57.2 +/- 2.7, 62.3 +/- 4.0, and 64.3 +/- 1.6; for LS, US, and TR, respectively; P < 0.05). At equivalent speeds, submaximal O2 uptake was lower for LS and blood lactate was higher (P < 0.05). LS peak VO2 (ml.kg-1.min-1) was strongly related to TT (P < 0.05). The depressed VO2 and higher blood lactate during LS may be related to decreased knee or trunk angle. Peak VO2 values during skating did not approach values during running. Evaluation of speed skaters in a sports-specific test is congruent with performance and demonstrates potential in addressing the unique physiological demands of the sport.

  11. Establishment of Normal Gut Microbiota Is Compromised under Excessive Hygiene Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bettina; Mulder, Imke E.; Musk, Corran C.; Aminov, Rustam I.; Lewis, Marie; Stokes, Christopher R.; Bailey, Mick; Prosser, James I.; Gill, Bhupinder P.; Pluske, John R.; Kelly, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Background Early gut colonization events are purported to have a major impact on the incidence of infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in later life. Hence, factors which influence this process may have important implications for both human and animal health. Previously, we demonstrated strong influences of early-life environment on gut microbiota composition in adult pigs. Here, we sought to further investigate the impact of limiting microbial exposure during early life on the development of the pig gut microbiota. Methodology/Principal Findings Outdoor- and indoor-reared animals, exposed to the microbiota in their natural rearing environment for the first two days of life, were transferred to an isolator facility and adult gut microbial diversity was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From a total of 2,196 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences, 440 phylotypes were identified in the outdoor group and 431 phylotypes in the indoor group. The majority of clones were assigned to the four phyla Firmicutes (67.5% of all sequences), Proteobacteria (17.7%), Bacteroidetes (13.5%) and to a lesser extent, Actinobacteria (0.1%). Although the initial maternal and environmental microbial inoculum of isolator-reared animals was identical to that of their naturally-reared littermates, the microbial succession and stabilization events reported previously in naturally-reared outdoor animals did not occur. In contrast, the gut microbiota of isolator-reared animals remained highly diverse containing a large number of distinct phylotypes. Conclusions/Significance The results documented here indicate that establishment and development of the normal gut microbiota requires continuous microbial exposure during the early stages of life and this process is compromised under conditions of excessive hygiene. PMID:22164261

  12. Ocean acidification compromises recruitment success of the threatened Caribbean coral Acropora palmata.

    PubMed

    Albright, Rebecca; Mason, Benjamin; Miller, Margaret; Langdon, Chris

    2010-11-23

    Ocean acidification (OA) refers to the ongoing decline in oceanic pH resulting from the uptake of atmospheric CO(2). Mounting experimental evidence suggests that OA will have negative consequences for a variety of marine organisms. Whereas the effect of OA on the calcification of adult reef corals is increasingly well documented, effects on early life history stages are largely unknown. Coral recruitment, which necessitates successful fertilization, larval settlement, and postsettlement growth and survivorship, is critical to the persistence and resilience of coral reefs. To determine whether OA threatens successful sexual recruitment of reef-building corals, we tested fertilization, settlement, and postsettlement growth of Acropora palmata at pCO(2) levels that represent average ambient conditions during coral spawning (∼400 μatm) and the range of pCO(2) increases that are expected to occur in this century [∼560 μatm (mid-CO(2)) and ∼800 μatm (high-CO(2))]. Fertilization, settlement, and growth were all negatively impacted by increasing pCO(2), and impairment of fertilization was exacerbated at lower sperm concentrations. The cumulative impact of OA on fertilization and settlement success is an estimated 52% and 73% reduction in the number of larval settlers on the reef under pCO(2) conditions projected for the middle and the end of this century, respectively. Additional declines of 39% (mid-CO(2)) and 50% (high-CO(2)) were observed in postsettlement linear extension rates relative to controls. These results suggest that OA has the potential to impact multiple, sequential early life history stages, thereby severely compromising sexual recruitment and the ability of coral reefs to recover from disturbance.

  13. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  14. Bedouin in Lebanon: Social discrimination, political exclusion, and compromised health care.

    PubMed

    Chatty, Dawn; Mansour, Nisrine; Yassin, Nasser

    2013-04-01

    Global inequalities in health have long been associated with disparities between rich and poor nations. The middle-income countries of the Levant (Lebanon, Syria and Jordan) have developed models of health care delivery that mirror the often complex make-up of their states. In Lebanon, which is characterized by political clientelism and sectarian structures, access to health care is more contingent on ethnicity and religious affiliation than on poverty. This case study of the Bedouin of the Middle Bekaa Valley of Lebanon is based on interviews with policymakers, health care providers and the Bedouin as part of a study funded by the European Commission between 2006 and 2010. The study explores the importance of considering social discrimination and political exclusion in understanding compromised health care. Three decades after the Declaration of Alma Ata (1978), which declared that an acceptable level of health care for all should be attained by the year 2000, the Bedouin community of Lebanon remains largely invisible to the government and, thus, invisible to national health care policy and practice. They experience significant social discrimination from health practitioners and policymakers alike. Their unfair treatment under the health system is generally disassociated from issues of wealth or poverty; it is manifested in issues of access and use, discrimination, and resistance and agency. Overcoming their political exclusion and recognizing the social discrimination they face are steps that can be taken to protect and promote equal access to basic reproductive and child health care. This case study of the Bedouin in Lebanon is also relevant to the health needs of other marginalized populations in remote and rural areas.

  15. White matter fiber compromise contributes differentially to attention and emotion processing impairment in alcoholism, HIV-infection, and their comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Schulte, T; Müller-Oehring, E M; Sullivan, E V; Pfefferbaum, A

    2012-10-01

    Alcoholism (ALC) and HIV-1 infection (HIV) each affects emotional and attentional processes and integrity of brain white matter fibers likely contributing to functional compromise. The highly prevalent ALC+HIV comorbidity may exacerbate compromise. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and an emotional Stroop Match-to-Sample task in 19 ALC, 16 HIV, 15 ALC+HIV, and 15 control participants to investigate whether disruption of fiber system integrity accounts for compromised attentional and emotional processing. The task required matching a cue color to that of an emotional word with faces appearing between the color cue and the Stroop word in half of the trials. Nonmatched cue-word color pairs assessed selective attention, and face-word pairs assessed emotion. Relative to controls, DTI-based fiber tracking revealed lower inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ilf) integrity in HIV and ALC+HIV and lower uncinate fasciculus (uf) integrity in all three patient groups. Controls exhibited Stroop effects to positive face-word emotion, and greater interference was related to greater callosal, cingulum and ilf integrity. By contrast, HIV showed greater interference from negative Stroop words during color-nonmatch trials, correlating with greater uf compromise. For face trials, ALC and ALC+HIV showed greater Stroop-word interference, correlating with lower cingulate and callosal integrity. Thus, in HIV, conflict resolution was diminished when challenging conditions usurped resources needed to manage interference from negative emotion and to disengage attention from wrongly cued colors (nonmatch). In ALC and ALC+HIV, poorer callosal integrity was related to enhanced emotional interference suggesting curtailed interhemispheric exchange needed between preferentially right-hemispheric emotion and left-hemispheric Stroop-word functions.

  16. Health-compromising behaviors among young adults in the urban emergency department: opportunity for a teachable moment.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Marilyn S; Lyons, Michael S; Bohn, Chad M; Ribak, Judith H; Fargo, Jamison D

    2013-08-01

    Emergency departments (ED) are a point of care for many young adults and may provide a teachable moment leading to behavioral change. We determined the descriptive epidemiology of health-compromising behaviors in the young adult ED population by computing demographic-adjusted estimates of prevalence and frequency of hazardous drinking, risky driving, cigarette smoking, fast-food consumption, lack of exercise, and sleep deficit. We screened 8,815 young adults during an ED visit. Younger males had higher levels of fast-food and cigarette consumption. Non-Whites and females reported more days of little to no exercise. Whites and older individuals reported more nights of less sleep. Younger Whites reported consuming the most alcohol, with males consuming more than females. Risky driving was more frequent among younger males. Prevalence of health-compromising behaviors varied by demographics, but was higher than in the general population. Prevention strategies such as implementing a teachable moment in the ED may hold promise to reduce health-compromising behaviors.

  17. Compromised motor control in children with DCD: a deficit in the internal model?—A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Adams, Imke L J; Lust, Jessica M; Wilson, Peter H; Steenbergen, Bert

    2014-11-01

    A viable hypothesis to explain the compromised motor ability of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) suggests a fundamental deficit in their ability to utilize internal models for motor control. Dysfunction in this mode of control is thought to compromise their motor learning capabilities. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the available evidence for the internal modeling deficit (IMD) hypothesis. A systematic review using five databases identified 48 relevant articles. These studies were categorized according to the effector system involved in the evaluation of motor control and were evaluated for methodological quality. In most papers, DSM-IV-TR criteria for the classification of DCD were not completely fulfilled and possible attentional problems not accounted for. Results showed compromised control of overt and covert eye movements, dynamic postural control, manual control for tasks that vary in complexity, and for motor imagery of manual and whole-body postures. Importantly, this review shows support for general hypothesis that deficits of predictive control manifest in DCD across effector systems.

  18. Dysphagia and airway compromise as a result of retropharyngeal haematoma following undiagnosed odontoid peg fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wronka, K S; Sznerch, N; Davies, J

    2011-09-01

    Airway compromise following a cervical spine injury is an unusual cause of respiratory distress. We describe a patient who developed a retropharyngeal haematoma that caused dysphagia, dysarthria and acute airway compromise seven days following a fall, with no other signs of cervical spine injury. The patient was found to have a type 2 fracture through the junction of the odontoid peg and body of C2 with an associated prevertebral haematoma and soft tissue oedema. Later, the patient developed stridor and required an emergency orotracheal intubation and admission to the intensive care unit. As presented in this case report, cervical fracture can result in mechanical airway compromise with an associated retropharyngeal haematoma and prevertebral soft tissue oedema. In elderly patients with a minor history of falls one should always think of possible fractures and appropriate investigations should be carried out. Retropharyngeal haematomas secondary to cervical spine fractures require a prompt multidisciplinary approach and appropriate management of both the airway and cervical spine. Joint care from the orthopaedic, anaesthetic, and ear, nose and throat teams is necessary.

  19. Mutations Conferring a Noncytotoxic Phenotype on Chikungunya Virus Replicons Compromise Enzymatic Properties of Nonstructural Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Utt, Age; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Valeria; Lulla, Aleksei

    2014-01-01

    establishment of experimental systems that can be used to conduct virus replication studies at a lower biosafety level. We applied a functional selection approach to develop, for the first time, a noncytotoxic CHIKV replicon capable of persisting in human cell lines. We anticipate that this safe and efficient research tool will be valuable for screening CHIKV replication inhibitors and for identifying and analyzing host factors involved in viral replication. We also analyzed, from virological and protein biochemistry perspectives, the functional defects caused by mutations conferring noncytotoxic phenotypes; we found that all known enzymatic activities of CHIKV nsP2, as well as its RNA-binding capability, were compromised by these mutations, which led to a reduced capacity for replication. PMID:25552719

  20. Fatal systemic candidiasis of gastrointestinal origin: an experimental model in mice compromised by anti-cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sandovsky-Losica, H; Barr-Nea, L; Segal, E

    1992-01-01

    An experimental model of fatal systemic candidiasis originating from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of compromised mice is presented. ICR female mice were compromised by a single anti-cancer treatment: irradiation (4 or 6 Greys i.e. 400-600 rads), methotrexate (MTX) (3 mg per mouse, intraperitoneally) or 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg kg-1, intravenously). Three days later, compromised and non-treated control mice were exposed to Candida albicans administered orally. Morbidity and mortality due to candidiasis were monitored for 30 days post-candidal inoculation. Increased and longer GI colonization was noted among the MTX and 5FU treated mice, or 6 Greys irradiated mice (up to 92.3% for over 30 days in anti-cancer treated mice). The stomach was found to be the major part of the GI tract involved in fungal colonization. A significant number (53.8-83.3%) of the anti-cancer treated mice developed systemic candidiasis originating from the GI tract, which was fatal in 30-80% of the infected animals. In systemically infected animals, candidal antigen was demonstrated in the serum, and fungal abscesses containing C. albicans were observed in the liver, kidneys and spleen. C. albicans was isolated from the infected organs. The severity of the infection, as reflected by the number of fungi in visceral organs, and by mortality during the 30 days post-candidal inoculation, indicated differences in the course and nature of the infection among the three treatment groups (i.e. MTX, 5FU, 6 Greys).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Medial and Lateral Plantar Artery Angiosome Rotational Flaps for Transmetatarsal and Lisfranc Amputation in Patients With Compromised Plantar Tissue.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Waverly, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    Traditional incision techniques for midfoot amputation might not provide immediate soft tissue coverage of the underlying metatarsal and tarsal bones in the presence of a large plantar soft tissue defect. Patients undergoing transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation frequently have compromised plantar tissue in association with neuropathic ulcers, forefoot gangrene, and infection, necessitating wide resection as a part of the amputation procedure. Open amputation will routinely be performed under these circumstances, although secondary healing could be compromised owing to residual bone exposure. Alternatively, the surgeon might elect to perform a more proximal lower extremity amputation, which will allow better soft tissue coverage but compromises function of the lower extremity. A third option for this challenging situation is to modify the plantar flap incision design to incorporate a medial or lateral plantar artery angiosome-based rotational flap, which will provide immediate coverage of the forefoot and midfoot soft tissue defects without excessive shortening of the bone structure. A plantar medial soft tissue defect is treated with the lateral plantar artery angiosome flap, and a plantar lateral defect is treated with the medial plantar artery angiosome flap. Medial and lateral flaps can be combined to cover a central plantar wound defect. Incorporating large rotational flaps requires knowledge of the applicable angiosome anatomy and specific modifications to incision planning and dissection techniques to ensure adequate soft tissue coverage and preservation of the blood supply to the flap. A series of 4 cases with an average follow-up duration of 5.75 years is presented to demonstrate our patient selection criteria, flap design principles, dissection pearls, and surgical staging protocol.

  2. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    behavioral measures of learning and memory in adult offspring of rats treated with thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, propylthiouracil.Electrophysiological measures of 'memory' in form of plasticity model known as long term potentiation (LTP)Molecular changes induced by LTPThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Gilbert , M., K. Sanchez-Huerta, and C. Wood. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Make Rats. ENDOCRINOLOGY. Endocrine Society, 157(2): 774-87, (2016).

  3. HIV treatment as prevention: debate and commentary--will early infection compromise treatment-as-prevention strategies?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Dye, Christopher; Fraser, Christophe; Miller, William C; Powers, Kimberly A; Williams, Brian G

    2012-01-01

    Universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral therapy for infected individuals has been proposed as a way of reducing the transmission of HIV and thereby bringing the HIV epidemic under control. It is unclear whether transmission during early HIV infection--before individuals are likely to have been diagnosed with HIV and started on antiretroviral therapy--will compromise the effectiveness of treatment as prevention. This article presents two opposing viewpoints by Powers, Miller, and Cohen, and Williams and Dye, followed by a commentary by Fraser.

  4. Surgical Re-entry of an Intentionally Replanted Periodontally Compromised Tooth Treated with Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF): Hopeless to Hopeful

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Rashmi; Prakash, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    Intentional replantation is generally contraindicated in periodontally compromised teeth however, there are reports suggesting that it can be a successful treatment alternative for periodontally involved hopeless teeth. Currently there is dearth of evidence regarding the success of this therapy, especially evidence for the effectiveness of autologous platelet rich fibrin is lacking. We present a case report of a 23-year-old male patient with periodontally hopeless left maxillary central incisor having bone loss extending beyond root apex. The tooth was gently extracted and replanted utilizing root conditioning and combined regenerative therapy (Xenograft, PRF and Type I Collagen Membrane). Surgical re-entry at nine months revealed bone formation in the apical third of the tooth. At one year, 87% radiographic bone gain was accomplished. The improvement in the clinical and radiographic parameters reinforced by the re-entry surgery findings strongly suggest that intentional replantation may be a cost-effective substitute to implants and tooth supported prosthesis in situations where conventional periodontal therapy would yield compromised outcomes. PMID:27504421

  5. Mating strategies with genomic information reduce rates of inbreeding in animal breeding schemes without compromising genetic gain.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Henryon, M; Sørensen, A C

    2017-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that mating strategies with genomic information realise lower rates of inbreeding (∆F) than with pedigree information without compromising rates of genetic gain (∆G). We used stochastic simulation to compare ∆F and ∆G realised by two mating strategies with pedigree and genomic information in five breeding schemes. The two mating strategies were minimum-coancestry mating (MC) and minimising the covariance between ancestral genetic contributions (MCAC). We also simulated random mating (RAND) as a reference point. Generations were discrete. Animals were truncation-selected for a single trait that was controlled by 2000 quantitative trait loci, and the trait was observed for all selection candidates before selection. The criterion for selection was genomic-breeding values predicted by a ridge-regression model. Our results showed that MC and MCAC with genomic information realised 6% to 22% less ∆F than MC and MCAC with pedigree information without compromising ∆G across breeding schemes. MC and MCAC realised similar ∆F and ∆G. In turn, MC and MCAC with genomic information realised 28% to 44% less ∆F and up to 14% higher ∆G than RAND. These results indicated that MC and MCAC with genomic information are more effective than with pedigree information in controlling rates of inbreeding. This implies that genomic information should be applied to more than just prediction of breeding values in breeding schemes with truncation selection.

  6. Deficiency and Also Transgenic Overexpression of Timp-3 Both Lead to Compromised Bone Mass and Architecture In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Mark; Poulet, Blandine; Pollard, Andrea S.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Chang, Yu-Mei; Francis-West, Philippa; Bou-Gharios, George; Pitsillides, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) regulates extracellular matrix via its inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and membrane-bound sheddases. Timp-3 is expressed at multiple sites of extensive tissue remodelling. This extends to bone where its role, however, remains largely unresolved. In this study, we have used Micro-CT to assess bone mass and architecture, histological and histochemical evaluation to characterise the skeletal phenotype of Timp-3 KO mice and have complemented this by also examining similar indices in mice harbouring a Timp-3 transgene driven via a Col-2a-driven promoter to specifically target overexpression to chondrocytes. Our data show that Timp-3 deficiency compromises tibial bone mass and structure in both cortical and trabecular compartments, with corresponding increases in osteoclasts. Transgenic overexpression also generates defects in tibial structure predominantly in the cortical bone along the entire shaft without significant increases in osteoclasts. These alterations in cortical mass significantly compromise predicted tibial load-bearing resistance to torsion in both genotypes. Neither Timp-3 KO nor transgenic mouse growth plates are significantly affected. The impact of Timp-3 deficiency and of transgenic overexpression extends to produce modification in craniofacial bones of both endochondral and intramembranous origins. These data indicate that the levels of Timp-3 are crucial in the attainment of functionally-appropriate bone mass and architecture and that this arises from chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:27519049

  7. Depressive symptoms and compromised parenting in low-income mothers of infants and toddlers: distal and proximal risks.

    PubMed

    Beeber, Linda S; Schwartz, Todd A; Martinez, Maria I; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Bledsoe, Sarah E; Canuso, Regina; Lewis, Virginia S

    2014-08-01

    Low-income mothers develop depressive symptoms at higher rates than the general population, adding to the existing risk that economic hardship places on their infants and toddlers. Emphasizing a few key intervention targets, an approach that is especially relevant to mothers when depressive symptoms compromise their energy and concentration, can improve interventions with populations facing adversity. The goal of this study was to identify contextual risk factors that significantly contributed to depressive symptoms and that, in combination with depressive symptoms, were associated with compromised parenting. Using baseline data from 251 ethnically diverse mothers from six Early Head Start programs in the Northeastern and Southeastern US, who were recruited for a clinical trial of an in-home intervention, Belsky's ecological framework of distal to proximal levels of influence was used to organize risk factors for depressive symptoms in hierarchical regression models. Under stress, mothers of toddlers reported more severe depressive symptoms than mothers of infants, supporting the need for depressive symptom screening and monitoring past the immediate postpartum period. Multivariate models revealed intervention targets that can focus depression prevention and intervention efforts, including helping mothers reduce chronic day-to-day stressors and conflicts with significant others, and to effectively handle challenging toddler behaviors, especially in the face of regional disciplinary norms. Presence of a live-in partner was linked to more effective parenting, regardless of participants' depressive symptom severity.

  8. COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib prevents chronic morphine-induced promotion of angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis and mortality, without compromising analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, M; Li, Y; Rogers, T; Poonawala, T; Griffin, R J; Song, C W; Gupta, K

    2007-01-01

    Morphine and its congener opioids are the main therapy for severe pain in cancer. However, chronic morphine treatment stimulates angiogenesis and tumour growth in mice. We examined if celecoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor) prevents morphine-induced tumour growth without compromising analgesia. The effect of chronic treatment with celecoxib (by gavage) and/or morphine (subcutaneously), or PBS on tumour prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), COX-2, angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis, pain behaviour and survival was determined in a highly invasive SCK breast cancer model in A/J mice. Two weeks of chronic morphine treatment at clinically relevant doses stimulates COX-2 and PGE2 (4.5-fold compared to vehicle alone) and angiogenesis in breast tumours in mice. This is accompanied by increased tumour weight (∼35%) and increased metastasis and reduced survival. Co-administration of celecoxib prevents these morphine-induced effects. In addition, morphine and celecoxib together provided better analgesia than either agent alone. Celecoxib prevents morphine-induced stimulation of COX-2, PGE2, angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis and mortality without compromising analgesia in a murine breast cancer model. In fact, the combination provided significantly better analgesia than with morphine or celecoxib alone. Clinical trials of this combination for analgesia in chronic and severe pain in cancer are warranted. PMID:17971769

  9. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  10. A fair compromise to break the climate impasse. A major economies forum approach to emissions reductions budgeting

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, Marco; J. Roberts, Timmons

    2013-04-15

    Key messages of the study are: Given the stalemate in U.N. climate negotiations, the best arena to strike a workable deal is among the members the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF); The 13 MEF members—including the EU-27 (but not double-counting the four EU countries that are also individual members of the MEF)—account for 81.3 percent of all global emissions; This proposal devises a fair compromise to break the impasse to develop a science-based approach for fairly sharing the carbon budget in order to have a 75 percent chance of avoiding dangerous climate change; To increase the likelihood of a future climate agreement, carbon accounting must shift from production-based inventories to consumption-based ones; The shares of a carbon budget to stay below 2 deg C through 2050 are calculated by cumulative emissions since 1990, i.e. according to a short-horizon polluter pays principle, and national capability (income), and allocated to MEF members through emission rights. This proposed fair compromise addresses key concerns of major emitters; According to this accounting, no countries have negative carbon budgets, there is substantial time for greening major developing economies, and some developed countries need to institute very rapid reductions in emissions; and, To provide a 'green ladder' to developing countries and to ensure a fair global deal, it will be crucial to agree how to extend sufficient and predictable financial support and the rapid transfer of technology.

  11. Sustained NMDA receptor hypofunction induces compromised neural systems integration and schizophrenia-like alterations in functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Xiao, Xiaolin; McDonald, Martin; Higham, Desmond J; Morris, Brian J; Pratt, Judith A

    2014-02-01

    Compromised functional integration between cerebral subsystems and dysfunctional brain network organization may underlie the neurocognitive deficits seen in psychiatric disorders. Applying topological measures from network science to brain imaging data allows the quantification of complex brain network connectivity. While this approach has recently been used to further elucidate the nature of brain dysfunction in schizophrenia, the value of applying this approach in preclinical models of psychiatric disease has not been recognized. For the first time, we apply both established and recently derived algorithms from network science (graph theory) to functional brain imaging data from rats treated subchronically with the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). We show that subchronic PCP treatment induces alterations in the global properties of functional brain networks akin to those reported in schizophrenia. Furthermore, we show that subchronic PCP treatment induces compromised functional integration between distributed neural systems, including between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, that have established roles in cognition through, in part, the promotion of thalamic dysconnectivity. We also show that subchronic PCP treatment promotes the functional disintegration of discrete cerebral subsystems and also alters the connectivity of neurotransmitter systems strongly implicated in schizophrenia. Therefore, we propose that sustained NMDA receptor hypofunction contributes to the pathophysiology of dysfunctional brain network organization in schizophrenia.

  12. The non-pathogenic Henipavirus Cedar paramyxovirus phosphoprotein has a compromised ability to target STAT1 and STAT2.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Kim G; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Netter, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Immune evasion by the lethal henipaviruses, Hendra (HeV) and Nipah virus, is mediated by its interferon (IFN) antagonist P gene products, phosphoprotein (P), and the related V and W proteins, which can target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 proteins to inhibit IFN/STAT signaling. However, it is not clear if the recently identified non-pathogenic Henipavirus, Cedar paramyxovirus (CedPV), is also able to antagonize the STAT proteins. We performed comparative studies between the HeV P gene products (P/V/W) and CedPV-P (CedPV does not encode V or W) and demonstrate that differences exist in their ability to engage the STAT proteins using immunoprecipitation and quantitative confocal microscopic analysis. In contrast to HeV-P gene encoded proteins, the ability of CedPV-P to interact with and relocalize STAT1 or STAT2 is compromised, correlating with a reduced capacity to inhibit the mRNA synthesis of IFN-inducible gene MxA. Furthermore, infection studies with HeV and CedPV demonstrate that HeV is more potent than CedPV in inhibiting the IFN-α-mediated nuclear accumulation of STAT1. These results strongly suggest that the ability of CedPV to counteract the IFN/STAT response is compromised compared to HeV.

  13. The effects of connectedness on health-promoting and health-compromising behaviors in adolescents: evidence from a statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Tan, Kit-Aun; Cheng, Wendy J Y

    2014-02-01

    Using a social ecological perspective, we examined the effects of connectedness in multiple domains on health-promoting and health-compromising behaviors among Asian American (AA), Pacific Islander (PI), and Caucasian/White American (WA) adolescents in California. After adjusting for age, gender, and socioeconomic status, the following consistent results emerged across the three ethnic groups: (a) community connectedness increased the odds of physical activity; (b) internal, family, and school connectedness decreased, whereas friend connectedness increased, the odds of substance use; and (c) internal and family connectedness decreased the odds of violent behavior. We also found specific ethnic variations pertaining to the effects of connectedness. Friend connectedness increased the odds of violent behavior for AAs and WAs, but not for PIs. Meanwhile, community connectedness increased the odds of substance use and violent behavior for AAs and PIs, but decreased the odds of these behaviors for WAs. Findings for healthy dietary behavior were inconsistent across ethnic groups and connectedness domains. Our overall findings suggest that the effects of connectedness were more salient for health-compromising behaviors than for health-promoting behaviors. Health prevention and intervention efforts in adolescents could target the role of their connectedness to their multiple social domains.

  14. EFFECTS OF INHALATION OF METALLIC CONSTITUENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER AIR POLLUTION ON CARDIOPULMONARY AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN HEALTH AND COMPROMISED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INHALATION OF METALLIC CONSTITUENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER AIR POLLUTION ON CARDIOPULMONARY AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RATS. Watkinson, WP, Campen, MJ, Wichers, LB, Nolan, JP, Kodavanti, UP, Schladweiler, MCJ, Evansky, PA, Lappi, ER,...

  15. Healthy Eating Index-C is compromised among adolescents with body weight concerns, weight loss dieting, and meal skipping.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Sarah J; Hanning, Rhona M; Lambraki, Irene; Storey, Kate E; McCargar, Linda

    2008-12-01

    The objective was to describe weight concerns, dieting, and meal skipping of adolescents and to determine associations with the Healthy Eating Index-C (HEI-C). Data, that were collected using the Food Behaviour Questionnaire, revealed that participants (male=810, female=1016) in grades 9/10 reported weight concerns (n=518), dieting (n=364), and skipping breakfast (n=498), lunch (n=252), and/or dinner (n=129). Of those dieting or weight concerned (n=602), 61% were healthy weight and of those not dieting or weight concerned (n=1224), 13% were overweight/obese. The ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that HEI-C was likely to be rated lower among those weight concerned and dieting (p<.001), and among those that skipped the breakfast meal (p<.001). The current study identified inappropriate weight concerns and dieting that compromised diet quality and has implications for future intervention and policy development.

  16. Electrical aspects of the osmorespiratory compromise: TEP responses to hypoxia in the euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) in freshwater and seawater.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Grosell, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The osmorespiratory compromise, the trade-off between the requirements for respiratory and ionoregulatory homeostasis at the gills, becomes more intense during environmental hypoxia. One aspect that has been previously overlooked is possible change in transepithelial potential (TEP) caused by hypoxia, which will influence branchial ionic fluxes. Using the euryhaline killifish, we show that acute hypoxia reduces the TEP across the gills by approximately 10 mV in animals acclimated to both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW), with a higher PO2  threshold in the former. TEP becomes negative in FW, and less positive in SW. The effects are immediate, stable for at least 3 h, and reverse immediately upon return to normoxia. Hypoxia also blocks the normal increase in TEP that occurs upon transfer from FW to SW, but does not reduce the fall in TEP that occurs with transfer in the opposite direction. These effects may be beneficial in FW but not in SW.

  17. Ethical policies on animal experiments are not compromised by whether a journal is freely accessible or charges for publication.

    PubMed

    Rands, S A

    2009-11-01

    The advent of the open access (OA) movement in publishing has been instrumental in causing a shift in the accessibility of research findings published in academic journals. The adoption of OA and other online publication models means that the results of scientific research published in journals using a free access (FA) framework are now available, free of charge, to anyone with access to the Internet. FA journals typically require a payment from the authors of a manuscript, which has raised concerns about the quality of work published in them; accepting payment from an author may compromise a journal's acceptance criteria. This study addresses whether journal policy on the treatment of animals is influenced by whether a journal follows a FA publishing model, and whether a requirement to pay for publication has an influence. A random sample of 332 biomedical journals listed in the ISI Web of Knowledge and Directory of Open Access Journals databases were assessed for whether they had an ethical policy on publishing animal studies, and what form of publication framework they used (103 of the journals followed a FA framework; 101 charged in some way for publication). Only 135 (40.7%) of the journals surveyed demanded that submissions comply with a pre-defined ethical stance. FA journals are just as likely to have an ethical policy on the treatment and presentation of animal studies as 'traditional', non-FA journals (significance of there being a difference: P = 0.98), and there is no relationship between policy and whether an author is required to pay for publication (significance of there being a difference: P = 0.57). Older journals are more likely to have an ethical policy (P = 0.03). There is, therefore, no obvious compromise shown by FA journals in the explicit policies on reporting studies involving animals. However, since anyone can read published FA studies online, FA journals that do not have an explicit policy about publishing animal research are urged to

  18. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  19. Promoting physical activity for elders with compromised function: the lifestyle Interventions and Independence for elders (LIFE) study physical activity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rejeski, W Jack; Axtell, Robert; Fielding, Roger; Katula, Jeffrey; King, Abby C; Manini, Todd M; Marsh, Anthony P; Pahor, Marco; Rego, Alvito; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Newman, Mark; Walkup, Michael P; Miller, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study is a Phase III randomized controlled clinical trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01072500) that will provide definitive evidence regarding the effect of physical activity (PA) on major mobility disability in older adults (70–89 years old) who have compromised physical function. This paper describes the methods employed in the delivery of the LIFE Study PA intervention, providing insight into how we promoted adherence and monitored the fidelity of treatment. Data are presented on participants’ motives and self-perceptions at the onset of the trial along with accelerometry data on patterns of PA during exercise training. Prior to the onset of training, 31.4% of participants noted slight conflict with being able to meet the demands of the program and 6.4% indicated that the degree of conflict would be moderate. Accelerometry data collected during PA training revealed that the average intensity – 1,555 counts/minute for men and 1,237 counts/minute for women – was well below the cutoff point used to classify exercise as being of moderate intensity or higher for adults. Also, a sizable subgroup required one or more rest stops. These data illustrate that it is not feasible to have a single exercise prescription for older adults with compromised function. Moreover, the concept of what constitutes “moderate” exercise or an appropriate volume of work is dictated by the physical capacities of each individual and the level of comfort/stability in actually executing a specific prescription. PMID:24049442

  20. DYNC1H1 mutations associated with neurological diseases compromise processivity of dynein–dynactin–cargo adaptor complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ha Thi; Schlager, Max A.; Carter, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the human DYNC1H1 gene are associated with neurological diseases. DYNC1H1 encodes the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein-1, a 1.4-MDa motor complex that traffics organelles, vesicles, and macromolecules toward microtubule minus ends. The effects of the DYNC1H1 mutations on dynein motility, and consequently their links to neuropathology, are not understood. Here, we address this issue using a recombinant expression system for human dynein coupled to single-molecule resolution in vitro motility assays. We functionally characterize 14 DYNC1H1 mutations identified in humans diagnosed with malformations in cortical development (MCD) or spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMALED), as well as three mutations that cause motor and sensory defects in mice. Two of the human mutations, R1962C and H3822P, strongly interfere with dynein’s core mechanochemical properties. The remaining mutations selectively compromise the processive mode of dynein movement that is activated by binding to the accessory complex dynactin and the cargo adaptor Bicaudal-D2 (BICD2). Mutations with the strongest effects on dynein motility in vitro are associated with MCD. The vast majority of mutations do not affect binding of dynein to dynactin and BICD2 and are therefore expected to result in linkage of cargos to dynein–dynactin complexes that have defective long-range motility. This observation offers an explanation for the dominant effects of DYNC1H1 mutations in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that compromised processivity of cargo–motor assemblies contributes to human neurological disease and provide insight into the influence of different regions of the heavy chain on dynein motility. PMID:28196890

  1. Promoting physical activity for elders with compromised function: the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders (LIFE) study physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Rejeski, W Jack; Axtell, Robert; Fielding, Roger; Katula, Jeffrey; King, Abby C; Manini, Todd M; Marsh, Anthony P; Pahor, Marco; Rego, Alvito; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Newman, Mark; Walkup, Michael P; Miller, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study is a Phase III randomized controlled clinical trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01072500) that will provide definitive evidence regarding the effect of physical activity (PA) on major mobility disability in older adults (70-89 years old) who have compromised physical function. This paper describes the methods employed in the delivery of the LIFE Study PA intervention, providing insight into how we promoted adherence and monitored the fidelity of treatment. Data are presented on participants' motives and self-perceptions at the onset of the trial along with accelerometry data on patterns of PA during exercise training. Prior to the onset of training, 31.4% of participants noted slight conflict with being able to meet the demands of the program and 6.4% indicated that the degree of conflict would be moderate. Accelerometry data collected during PA training revealed that the average intensity - 1,555 counts/minute for men and 1,237 counts/minute for women - was well below the cutoff point used to classify exercise as being of moderate intensity or higher for adults. Also, a sizable subgroup required one or more rest stops. These data illustrate that it is not feasible to have a single exercise prescription for older adults with compromised function. Moreover, the concept of what constitutes "moderate" exercise or an appropriate volume of work is dictated by the physical capacities of each individual and the level of comfort/stability in actually executing a specific prescription.

  2. Identification of hemodynamically compromised regions by means of cerebral blood volume mapping utilizing computed tomography perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Akaji, Kazunori; Kimura, Hiroaki; Katano, Takehiro; Suzuki, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yoichi; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential role of computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging in identifying hemodynamically compromised regions in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Twelve patients diagnosed with either occlusion or severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery or the M1 portion of the middle cerebral artery underwent CTP imaging. The data was analyzed by an automated ROI-determining software. Patients were classified into two subgroups: an asymptomatic group consisting of three patients in whom perfusion pressure distal to the site of occlusion/stenosis (PPdis) could be maintained in spite of the arterial occlusion/stenosis, and a symptomatic group consisting of nine patients in whom PPdis could not be maintained enough to avoid watershed infarction. Four CTP-related parameters were independently compared between the two groups. Significant differences were determined using a two-sample t-test. When statistically significant differences were identified, cut-off points were calculated using ROC curves. Analysis revealed statistically significant differences between the asymptomatic and symptomatic subgroups only in the measure of relCBV (p=0.028). Higher relCBV values were observed in the symptomatic subgroup. ROC curve analysis revealed 1.059 to be the optimal relCBV cut-off value for distinguishing between the asymptomatic and symptomatic subgroups. The data revealed that, in patients whose PPdis is maintained, relCBV remains around 1.00. Conversely, in patients whose PPdis decreased, relCBV increased. From these findings, we conclude that elevation of relCBV as observed using CTP imaging accurately reflects the extent of compensatory vasodilatation involvement and can identify hemodynamically compromised regions.

  3. DYNC1H1 mutations associated with neurological diseases compromise processivity of dynein-dynactin-cargo adaptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ha Thi; Schlager, Max A; Carter, Andrew P; Bullock, Simon L

    2017-02-28

    Mutations in the human DYNC1H1 gene are associated with neurological diseases. DYNC1H1 encodes the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein-1, a 1.4-MDa motor complex that traffics organelles, vesicles, and macromolecules toward microtubule minus ends. The effects of the DYNC1H1 mutations on dynein motility, and consequently their links to neuropathology, are not understood. Here, we address this issue using a recombinant expression system for human dynein coupled to single-molecule resolution in vitro motility assays. We functionally characterize 14 DYNC1H1 mutations identified in humans diagnosed with malformations in cortical development (MCD) or spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMALED), as well as three mutations that cause motor and sensory defects in mice. Two of the human mutations, R1962C and H3822P, strongly interfere with dynein's core mechanochemical properties. The remaining mutations selectively compromise the processive mode of dynein movement that is activated by binding to the accessory complex dynactin and the cargo adaptor Bicaudal-D2 (BICD2). Mutations with the strongest effects on dynein motility in vitro are associated with MCD. The vast majority of mutations do not affect binding of dynein to dynactin and BICD2 and are therefore expected to result in linkage of cargos to dynein-dynactin complexes that have defective long-range motility. This observation offers an explanation for the dominant effects of DYNC1H1 mutations in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that compromised processivity of cargo-motor assemblies contributes to human neurological disease and provide insight into the influence of different regions of the heavy chain on dynein motility.

  4. Preexisting compensatory amino acids compromise fitness costs of a HIV-1 T cell escape mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Hora, Bhavna; Song, Hongshuo; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S.; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fitness costs and slower disease progression are associated with a cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutation T242N in Gag in HIV-1-infected individuals carrying HLA-B*57/5801 alleles. However, the impact of different context in diverse HIV-1 strains on the fitness costs due to the T242N mutation has not been well characterized. To better understand the extent of fitness costs of the T242N mutation and the repair of fitness loss through compensatory amino acids, we investigated its fitness impact in different transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Results: The T242N mutation resulted in various levels of fitness loss in four different T/F viruses. However, the fitness costs were significantly compromised by preexisting compensatory amino acids in (Isoleucine at position 247) or outside (glutamine at position 219) the CTL epitope. Moreover, the transmitted T242N escape mutant in subject CH131 was as fit as the revertant N242T mutant and the elimination of the compensatory amino acid I247 in the T/F viral genome resulted in significant fitness cost, suggesting the fitness loss caused by the T242N mutation had been fully repaired in the donor at transmission. Analysis of the global circulating HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database showed a high prevalence of compensatory amino acids for the T242N mutation and other T cell escape mutations. Conclusions: Our results show that the preexisting compensatory amino acids in the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains could significantly compromise the fitness loss due to CTL escape mutations and thus increase challenges for T cell based vaccines.

  5. Preexisting compensatory amino acids compromise fitness costs of a HIV-1 T cell escape mutation

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Hora, Bhavna; ...

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fitness costs and slower disease progression are associated with a cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutation T242N in Gag in HIV-1-infected individuals carrying HLA-B*57/5801 alleles. However, the impact of different context in diverse HIV-1 strains on the fitness costs due to the T242N mutation has not been well characterized. To better understand the extent of fitness costs of the T242N mutation and the repair of fitness loss through compensatory amino acids, we investigated its fitness impact in different transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Results: The T242N mutation resulted in various levels of fitness loss in four different T/F viruses. However, themore » fitness costs were significantly compromised by preexisting compensatory amino acids in (Isoleucine at position 247) or outside (glutamine at position 219) the CTL epitope. Moreover, the transmitted T242N escape mutant in subject CH131 was as fit as the revertant N242T mutant and the elimination of the compensatory amino acid I247 in the T/F viral genome resulted in significant fitness cost, suggesting the fitness loss caused by the T242N mutation had been fully repaired in the donor at transmission. Analysis of the global circulating HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database showed a high prevalence of compensatory amino acids for the T242N mutation and other T cell escape mutations. Conclusions: Our results show that the preexisting compensatory amino acids in the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains could significantly compromise the fitness loss due to CTL escape mutations and thus increase challenges for T cell based vaccines.« less

  6. Probabilistic Measures of Compromise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    at the net~.ork does in fact perfor m its int ended f u n c t i o ns . I f not , ut i i i :e the fa~ i I t — j ~ 01 at ion c apa h i I t v t o do t...Security error , fault mask , etc. . FAULT Normal fault Normal INTT Normal interrupt to processor NO ACTION H a l t NORMA L ACTI ON Norma l con trol action

  7. Development Wthout Environmental Compromise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disturbances to environmental structures and functions are among the greatest long term threats to human life. Some of thse disturbances are natural and beyond human control; whereas others are the product of land use change to meet human objectives. Although incrementally thes...

  8. The Dangers of Compromise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Paul

    1977-01-01

    Foresees some major problems in getting the N and F examinations off the ground. These replacements for A levels, accounted for in "Working Paper 60", are designed to broaden the sixth form curriculum to five subjects instead of three and allow students to defer specialization for as long as possible. (Author/RK)

  9. Compromised ventilation caused by tracheoesophageal fistula and gastrointestinal endoscope undergoing removal of disk battery on esophagus in pediatric patient -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jang Su; Choe, Won Joo; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Sangil

    2011-09-01

    Ingestion of disk batteries may have serious complications such as esophageal burn, perforation, and tracheoesophageal fistula, particularly when the battery is caught in the esophagus. Proper placement of the tracheal tube is critical when tracheoesophageal fistula was occurred from esophageal impaction the battery. Endoscopy of upper gastrointestinal tract in infants and children is an important and effective tool for the diagnosis and treatment of foreign body ingestion. But upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in infant and children has very high risk of tracheal compression and airway compromise. We present a case of ventilatory compromise during insertion of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in 16-month-old child with tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to disk battery ingestion.

  10. Integration of the Response Surface Methodology with the Compromise Decision Support Problem in Developing a General Robust Design Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei; Tsui, Kwok-Leung; Allen, Janet K.; Mistree, Farrokh

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a comprehensive and rigorous robust design procedure to overcome some limitations of the current approaches. A comprehensive approach is general enough to model the two major types of robust design applications, namely, robust design associated with the minimization of the deviation of performance caused by the deviation of noise factors (uncontrollable parameters), and robust design due to the minimization of the deviation of performance caused by the deviation of control factors (design variables). We achieve mathematical rigor by using, as a foundation, principles from the design of experiments and optimization. Specifically, we integrate the Response Surface Method (RSM) with the compromise Decision Support Problem (DSP). Our approach is especially useful for design problems where there are no closed-form solutions and system performance is computationally expensive to evaluate. The design of a solar powered irrigation system is used as an example. Our focus in this paper is on illustrating our approach rather than on the results per se.

  11. Neurological disease mutations of α3 Na(+),K(+)-ATPase: Structural and functional perspectives and rescue of compromised function.

    PubMed

    Holm, Rikke; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads S; Einholm, Anja P; Schack, Vivien R; Andersen, Jens P; Vilsen, Bente

    2016-11-01

    Na(+),K(+)-ATPase creates transmembrane ion gradients crucial to the function of the central nervous system. The α-subunit of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase exists as four isoforms (α1-α4). Several neurological phenotypes derive from α3 mutations. The effects of some of these mutations on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function have been studied in vitro. Here we discuss the α3 disease mutations as well as information derived from studies of corresponding mutations of α1 in the light of the high-resolution crystal structures of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. A high proportion of the α3 disease mutations occur in the transmembrane sector and nearby regions essential to Na(+) and K(+) binding. In several cases the compromised function can be traced to disturbance of the Na(+) specific binding site III. Recently, a secondary mutation was found to rescue the defective Na(+) binding caused by a disease mutation. A perspective is that it may be possible to develop an efficient pharmaceutical mimicking the rescuing effect.

  12. Melatonin attenuates (-)-epigallocatehin-3-gallate-triggered hepatotoxicity without compromising its downregulation of hepatic gluconeogenic and lipogenic genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxu; Wei, Yaqing; Wang, Taotao; Wan, Xiaochun; Yang, Chung S; Reiter, Russel J; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    (-)-Epigallocatehin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of green tea, can ameliorate metabolic syndrome at least in part through reducing gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Green tea extracts, of which EGCG is a key constituent, have been used for weight loss in humans. A potential adverse effect of high-dose EGCG or green tea extracts is hepatotoxicity. Melatonin, an endogenous antioxidant with a high safety profile, is effective in preventing various types of tissue damage. The current study investigated the influence of melatonin on EGCG-triggered hepatotoxicity and EGCG-downregulated hepatic genes responsible for gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis in mice. We found that (i) melatonin extended survival time of mice intoxicated with lethal doses of EGCG; (ii) melatonin ameliorated acute liver damage and associated hepatic Nrf2 suppression caused by a nonlethal toxic dose of EGCG; (iii) melatonin reduced subacute liver injury and hepatic Nrf2 activation caused by lower toxic doses of EGCG; and (iv) melatonin did not compromise the action of pharmacological doses of EGCG in downregulating a battery of hepatic genes responsible for gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, including G6Pc, PEPCK, FOXO1α, SCD1, Fasn, leptin, ACCα, ACCβ, GAPT, and Srebp-1. Taken together, these results suggest that the combination of EGCG and melatonin is an effective approach for preventing potential adverse effects of EGCG as a dietary supplement for metabolic syndrome alleviation and body weight reduction.

  13. Biophysical probes reveal a "compromise" nature of the methyl-lysine binding pocket in L3MBTL1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cen; Herold, J Martin; Kireev, Dmitri; Wigle, Tim; Norris, Jacqueline L; Frye, Stephen

    2011-04-13

    Histone lysine methylation (Kme) encodes essential information modulating many biological processes including gene expression and transcriptional regulation. However, the atomic-level recognition mechanisms of methylated histones by their respective adaptor proteins are still elusive. For instance, it is unclear how L3MBTL1, a methyl-lysine histone code reader, recognizes equally well both mono- and dimethyl marks but ignores unmodified and trimethylated lysine residues. We made use of molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy perturbation (FEP) techniques in order to investigate the energetics and dynamics of the methyl-lysine recognition. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to experimentally validate the computational findings. Both computational and experimental methods were applied to a set of designed "biophysical" probes that mimic the shape of a single lysine residue and reproduce the binding affinities of cognate histone peptides. Our results suggest that, besides forming favorable interactions, the L3MBTL1 binding pocket energetically penalizes both methylation states and has most probably evolved as a "compromise" that nonoptimally fits to both mono- and dimethyl-lysine marks.

  14. Surface Defection Reduces Cytotoxicity of Zn(2-methylimidazole)2 (ZIF-8) without Compromising its Drug Delivery Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shearier, Emily; Cheng, Peifu; Bao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Zn(2-methylimidazole)2 (ZIF-8), as one of the most important metal-organic framework (MOF) molecules, is a promising candidate for drug delivery due to its low-density structure, high surface area, and tunable frameworks. However, ZIF-8 exhibits a high cytotoxicity associated with its external hydrophobic surface, which significantly restricts its application in drug delivery and other biomedical applications. Commonly used chemical functionalization methods would convert the hydrophobic surface of ZIF-8 to hydrophilic, but the generated functional groups on its internal surface may reduce its pore sizes or even block its pores. Herein, a surface defection strategy was applied on the external surface of ZIF-8 to enhance its hydrophilicity without reducing or blocking the internal pores. In this approach, mechanical ball-milling was used to incur defects on the external surface of ZIF-8, leading to unsaturated Zn-sites and N-sites which subsequently bound H2O molecules in an aqueous environment. Furthermore, hydroxyurea delivery and cell cytotoxicity of ZIF-8 with and without the external surface treatment were evaluated. It was found that 5-min ball milling changed the hydrophobic–hydrophilic balance of ZIF-8, resulting in significantly higher cell viability without compromising its hydroxyurea loading and release capacity. Such a simple mechanical ball-milling followed by water-treatment provides a general technique for surface-modification of other MOF molecules, which will undoubtedly magnify their biomedical applications. PMID:26998256

  15. Spatial landmarks regulate a Cdc42-dependent MAPK pathway to control differentiation and the response to positional compromise

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sukanya; Vadaie, Nadia; Prabhakar, Aditi; Li, Boyang; Adhikari, Hema; Pitoniak, Andrew; Chow, Jacky; Chavel, Colin A.; Cullen, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental problem in cell biology is to understand how spatial information is recognized and integrated into morphogenetic responses. Budding yeast undergoes differentiation to filamentous growth, which involves changes in cell polarity through mechanisms that remain obscure. Here we define a regulatory input where spatial landmarks (bud-site–selection proteins) regulate the MAPK pathway that controls filamentous growth (fMAPK pathway). The bud-site GTPase Rsr1p regulated the fMAPK pathway through Cdc24p, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the polarity establishment GTPase Cdc42p. Positional landmarks that direct Rsr1p to bud sites conditionally regulated the fMAPK pathway, corresponding to their roles in regulating bud-site selection. Therefore, cell differentiation is achieved in part by the reorganization of polarity at bud sites. In line with this conclusion, dynamic changes in budding pattern during filamentous growth induced corresponding changes in fMAPK activity. Intrinsic compromise of bud-site selection also impacted fMAPK activity. Therefore, a surveillance mechanism monitors spatial position in response to extrinsic and intrinsic stress and modulates the response through a differentiation MAPK pathway. PMID:27001830

  16. Low-grade elastic compression regimen for venous leg ulcers--an effective compromise for patients requiring daily dressing changes.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Ganary; Hammerman, Scott; Carson, Polly; Falanga, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) affect millions of patients worldwide and are a tremendous financial burden on our health care system. The hallmark of venous disease of the lower extremities is venous hypertension, and compression is the current mainstay of treatment. However, many patients are non-compliant, partly because of the complexity of the dressings and the difficulties with application and removal. The aim of our study was to test an effective compression dressing regimen for patients with VLUs who require changing the ulcer primary dressing twice daily. We used two layers of a latex-free tubular elastic bandage for compression. The primary endpoint of our study was increased wound-healing rate and our secondary endpoint was complete wound closure. All active study subjects had positive healing rates at week 4 and week 8. Two subjects achieved complete wound closure by week 8. We conclude that compression with a latex-free tubular elastic bandage can be safely used in patients with VLUs requiring frequent dressing changes. This type of compression allows for daily inspection of wounds, dressing changes at home, flexibility in the context of clinical trials, and is a compromise for patients who are intolerant to compression dressings.

  17. Impact of treatment variability on survival in immuno-competent and immuno-compromised patients with primary central nervous lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Reem; Nabhan, Chadi; Petrich, Adam M; Raizer, Jeffrey; Peace, David; Lukas, Rimas; Gordon, Leo I; Basu, Sanjib; Chukkapalli, Vineela; Venugopal, Parameswaran

    2017-02-17

    Patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) treated in the 'real-world' setting do not represent those treated on clinical trials and might not be treated similarly. We studied characteristics and variability in care for 113 newly diagnosed PCNSL patients treated at 5 institutions in the Chicago area between 2000 and 2012. In 111 patients, single modality therapy with a high dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) regimen +/- rituximab, was most commonly employed (n = 65), and 34 underwent radiotherapy (+/- systemic therapy). Fifty-eight of 108 patients received rituximab. Twenty-nine of 110 patients (26%) received intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Overall response rate was 80% (47% complete responses). With a median follow-up of 18·7 months, median overall survival (OS) was 65·2 months. In univariate analysis, HD-MTX (median OS 72·7 vs. 2·7 months, P < 0·001) and rituximab (median not reached versus 28·4 months, P = 0·005) impacted OS favourably. This significance was sustained regardless of immune status and in multivariate analysis. Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) resulted in a trend for improved OS as compared with systemic therapy alone (P = 0·09), while ITC did not impact survival. Clinical practice has evolved to exclude WBRT and ITC while incorporating rituximab with clinical outcomes comparable in immuno-competent/compromised patients and similar to those achieved in recent clinical trials.

  18. Ablation of Dido3 compromises lineage commitment of stem cells in vitro and during early embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Fütterer, A; Raya, Á; Llorente, M; Izpisúa-Belmonte, J C; de la Pompa, J L; Klatt, P; Martínez-A, C

    2012-01-01

    The death inducer obliterator (Dido) locus encodes three protein isoforms, of which Dido3 is the largest and most broadly expressed. Dido3 is a nuclear protein that forms part of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and is necessary for correct chromosome segregation in somatic and germ cells. Here we report that specific ablation of Dido3 function in mice causes lethal developmental defects at the onset of gastrulation. Although these defects are associated with centrosome amplification, spindle malformation and a DNA damage response, we provide evidence that embryonic lethality of the Dido3 mutation cannot be explained by its impact on chromosome segregation alone. We show that loss of Dido3 expression compromises differentiation of embryonic stem cells in vitro and of epiblast cells in vivo, resulting in early embryonic death at around day 8.5 of gestation. Close analysis of Dido3 mutant embryoid bodies indicates that ablation of Dido3, rather than producing a generalized differentiation blockade, delays the onset of lineage commitment at the primitive endoderm specification stage. The dual role of Dido3 in chromosome segregation and stem cell differentiation supports the implication of SAC components in stem cell fate decisions. PMID:21660050

  19. Does UV disinfection compromise sutures? An evaluation of tissue response and suture retention in salmon surgically implanted with transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Eppard, M. B.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2013-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can be used as a tool to disinfect surgery tools used for implanting transmitters into fish. However, the use of UVR could possibly degrade monofilament suture material used to close surgical incisions. This research examined the effect of UVR on monofilament sutures to determine if they were compromised and negatively influenced tag and suture retention, incision openness, or tissue reaction. Eighty juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were surgically implanted with an acoustic transmitter and a passive integrated transponder. The incision was closed with a single stitch of either a suture exposed to 20 doses of UV radiation (5 minute duration per dose) or a new, sterile suture. Fish were then held for 28 d and examined under a microscope at day 7, 14, 21 and 28 for incision openness, ulceration, redness, and the presence of water mold. There was no significant difference between treatments for incision openness, redness, ulceration or the presence of water mold on any examination day. On day 28 post-surgery, there were no lost sutures; however, 2 fish lost their transmitters (one from each treatment). The results of this study do not show any differences in negative influences such as tissue response, suture retention or tag retention between a new sterile suture and a suture disinfected with UVR.

  20. Low Grade Elastic Compression Regimen for Venous Leg Ulcers-An Effective Compromise for Patients Requiring Daily Dressing Changes

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Hammerman, Scott; Falanga, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers affect millions of patients worldwide and are a tremendous financial burden on our healthcare system. The hallmark of venous disease of the lower extremities is venous hypertension, and compression is the current mainstay of treatment. However, many patients are noncompliant, in part because of the complexity of the dressings and the difficulties with application and removal. The aim of our study was to determine an effective compression dressing regimen for patients with venous leg ulcers who require changing the ulcer primary dressing twice daily. We used two layers of a latex free tubular elastic bandage for compression. The primary endpoint of our study was increased wound healing rate and our secondary endpoint was complete wound closure. All active study subjects had positive healing rates at week 4 and week 8. Two subjects achieved complete wound closure by week 8. We conclude that compression with a latex-free tubular elastic bandage can be safely used in patients with venous leg ulcers requiring frequent dressing changes. This type of compression allows for daily inspection of wounds, dressing changes at home, flexibility in the context of clinical trials, and is a compromise for patients that are intolerant to compression dressings. PMID:24267477