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Sample records for sphaeroides ii extended

  1. AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Schotz, S.; Calkins, J.; Gockel, B.; Ortiz, C.; Peter, R.

    2012-12-01

    AWIPS II Technology Infusion is a multiphase program. The first phase is the migration of the Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and River Forecast Centers (RFCs) AWIPS I capabilities into a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), referred to as AWIPS II. AWIPS II is currently being deployed to Operational Test and Evaluation (OTE) and other select deployment sites. The subsequent phases of AWIPS Technology Infusion, known as AWIPS II Extended, include several projects that will improve technological capabilities of AWIPS II in order to enhance the NWS enterprise and improve services to partners. This paper summarizes AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery project and reports on its status. Data Delivery enables AWIPS II users to discover, subscribe and access web-enabled data provider systems including the capability to subset datasets by space, time and parameter.

  2. Characteristics of light-harvesting complex II mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with alterations at the transmembrane helices of beta-subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanneng; Hu, Zongli; Li, Jinzhe; Chen, Xuqing; Chen, Guoping

    2009-07-01

    The peripheral light-harvesting complex II (LHII) is an important component of the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In this study, genetic, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches were applied to investigate the spectral properties and functions of LHII in which two amino acid residues Phe32 and Leu42 in the transmembrane helix domain of pucB-encoded beta-apoprotein were replaced by Leu and Pro. The mutated LHII complex showed blue shift of absorbance peaks in the near infrared region at approximately 801-845 nm in R. sphaeroides. It should be noted that the B800 peak was much lower than that of the native LHII, and transfer energy was efficient from the B800 to the B850 pigments in the LHII complex. The results suggest that the mutated pucB could be expressed in R. sphaeroides, and the functional LHII was assembled into the membrane of R. sphaeroides notwithstanding with the different spectral properties. These mutated residues were indeed critical for the modulation of characteristics and function of LHII complex.

  3. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5' Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5' UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5' UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5' UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5' UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae.

  4. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5’ Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5’ UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5’ UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5’ UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5’ UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. PMID:27802301

  5. Cytochrome aa3 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides as a model for mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. The coxII/coxIII operon codes for structural and assembly proteins homologous to those in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Hosler, J; Shapleigh, J; Revzin, A; Ferguson-Miller, S

    1992-12-05

    The coxII/coxIII operon of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase has been sequenced and characterized by insertional inactivation/complementation analysis. The organization of the genes in this locus (coxII.orf1.orf3.coxIII) is the same as that of the equivalent operon of Paracoccus denitrificans (ctaC.ctaB.ctaG.ctaE), but unlike that of other bacteria whose cytochrome oxidase genes have been characterized so far. The predicted amino acid sequence homology with eukaryotic oxidases is also higher for Rb. sphaeroides (and P. denitrificans) than for other bacterial versions of the enzyme. The inactivation of coxII results in loss of the characteristic cytochrome oxidase spectrum from membranes of the mutant strain. Full recovery requires introduction into the bacterium of the complete operon containing coxII.orf1.orf3.coxIII; partial complementation yielding a spectrally altered enzyme is achieved with a plasmid containing coxII or coxII.orf1.orf3. These results indicate that the peptides ORF1, ORF3, and COXIII are all required for assembly of native cytochrome c oxidase, suggesting an oxidase-specific assembly or chaperonin function for the ORFs in Rb. sphaeroides similar to that observed for the homologous gene products in yeast, COX10 and COX11.

  6. From Ultracompact to Extended H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Franco, Jose

    1996-09-01

    The dynamical evolution of H II regions and wind-driven bubbles in dense clouds is studied. In particular, we address two different issues: (1) the conditions under which ultracompact H II (UCHII) regions can reach pressure equilibrium with their surrounding medium (and thereby stall their expansion) and (2) the appearance of a powerful dynamic instability in expanding H II regions. At pressure equilibrium, the ionized regions become static, and as long as the ionization sources and the ambient gas densities remain about constant, the resulting UCHII regions are stable and long-lived. The equilibrium sizes and densities, Rs,eq ˜3 X 10-2F⅓48T⅔H II, 4P-⅔7 pc and ni,eq ˜4 × 104P7T-1H II, 4 cm-3 (where Fβ8 is the photoionizing flux in units of 1048 s-11, P7 is the pressure in units of 10-7 dyne cm-2, and TH II,4 is the ion temperature in units of 104 K), are similar to those actually observed in UCHII regions. Similarly, ultra- compact wind-driven bubbles can reach pressure equilibrium, and the resulting final sizes are similar to those of UCHII'S. The same is true for a combined ultracompact structure consisting of an interior wind- driven cavity and an external H II region. For nonmoving stars in a constant-density medium, the lifetimes for all types of ultracompact objects only depend on the stellar lifetimes. For cases with a density gradient, depending on the core size and slope of the density distribution, some regions never reach the static equilibrium condition. A powerful dynamic instability appears when cooling is included in the neutral gas swept up by an H II region or a combined wind-H II region structure. This instability was first studied by Giuliani and is associated with the thin-shell instability described by Vishniac. The internal ionization front exacerbates the growth of the thin-shell instability, creating a rapid shell fragmentation, and our numerical simulations confirm the linear analysis of Giuliani. The fragments tend to merge as

  7. Phosphoribulokinase mediates nitrogenase-induced carbon dioxide fixation gene repression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    In many organisms there is a balance between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. These observations extend to the nitrogen-fixing, nonsulfur purple bacteria, which have the classic family of P(II) regulators that coordinate signals of carbon and nitrogen status to regulate nitrogen metabolism. Curiously, these organisms also possess a reverse mechanism to regulate carbon metabolism based on cellular nitrogen status. In this work, studies in Rhodobacter sphaeroides firmly established that the activity of the enzyme that catalyses nitrogen fixation, nitrogenase, induces a signal that leads to repression of genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway. Additionally, genetic and metabolomic experiments revealed that NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase is an intermediate in the signalling pathway. Thus, nitrogenase activity appears to be linked to cbb gene repression through phosphoribulokinase. PMID:26306848

  8. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  9. Heat transfer through an extended surface containing He II

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1999-02-01

    A semi-analytic solution for the heat transfer process between a He II pressurized bath and a saturated tube-type heat exchanger is presented. The problem is modeled with an extended surface heat transfer formulation analogous to that in conventional conduction. The process is governed by Kapitza conductance and counterflow within the bulk fluid in the tube. The resulting nonlinear differential equation may be integrated for the special case of constant properties, yielding a simple solution applicable to design and analysis of practical heat exchangers.

  10. Galactic Cepheids with Spitzer. II. Search for Extended Infrared Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmby, P.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Bono, G.; Huelsman, D.; Su, K. Y. L.; Welch, D. L.; Fazio, G. G.

    2011-02-01

    A deep and detailed examination of 29 classical Cepheids with the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed three stars with strong nearby extended emission detected in multiple bands which appears to be physically associated with the stars. RS Pup was already known to possess extended infrared emission, while the extended emission around the other two stars (S Mus and δ Cep) is newly discovered in our observations. Four other stars (GH Lup, ell Car, T Mon, and X Cyg) show tentative evidence for extended infrared emission. An unusual elongated extended object next to SZ Tau appears to be a background or foreground object in a chance alignment with the Cepheid. The inferred mass-loss rate upper limits for S Mus and δ Cep are in the range from 10-9 to 10-8 M sun yr-1, with the upper limit for RS Pup as high as 10-6 M sun yr-1. Mass loss during post-main-sequence evolution has been proposed as a resolution to the discrepancy between pulsational and dynamical masses of Cepheid variable stars: dust in the lost material would make itself known by the presence of an infrared bright nebula or unresolved infrared excess. The observed frequency of infrared circumstellar emission (<24%) and the mass-loss rate we estimate for our sources show that dusty mass loss can only account for part of the Cepheid mass-loss discrepancy. Nevertheless, our direct evidence that mass loss is active during the Cepheid phase is an important confirmation that these processes need to be included in evolutionary and pulsation models of these stars and should be taken into account in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  11. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  12. The architecture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores.

    PubMed

    Scheuring, Simon; Nevo, Reinat; Liu, Lu-Ning; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Charuvi, Dana; Boudier, Thomas; Prima, Valerie; Hubert, Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Reich, Ziv

    2014-08-01

    The chromatophores of Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides represent a minimal bio-energetic system, which efficiently converts light energy into usable chemical energy. Despite extensive studies, several issues pertaining to the morphology and molecular architecture of this elemental energy conversion system remain controversial or unknown. To tackle these issues, we combined electron microscope tomography, immuno-electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We found that the intracellular Rb. sphaeroides chromatophores form a continuous reticulum rather than existing as discrete vesicles. We also found that the cytochrome bc1 complex localizes to fragile chromatophore regions, which most likely constitute the tubular structures that interconnect the vesicles in the reticulum. In contrast, the peripheral light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) is preferentially hexagonally packed within the convex vesicular regions of the membrane network. Based on these observations, we propose that the bc1 complexes are in the inter-vesicular regions and surrounded by reaction center (RC) core complexes, which in turn are bounded by arrays of peripheral antenna complexes. This arrangement affords rapid cycling of electrons between the core and bc1 complexes while maintaining efficient excitation energy transfer from LH2 domains to the RCs.

  13. Aromatic versus heteroradialene character in extended thiophloroglucinol ligands and their trinuclear nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Feldscher, Bastian; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Glaser, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Extended phloroglucinol ligands and complexes are best described as nonaromatic heteroradialenes. Herein, the electronic structures of extended thiophloroglucinol ligands and their Ni(II) 3 complexes are evaluated by comparison to their phloroglucinol analogs by means of NMR, FTIR, UV/Vis, and structural parameters. To provide a full set of compounds for this comparison of S versus O substitution, a new triplesalen ligand, its Ni(II) 3 complex, and a new thiophloroglucinol were synthesized. (1) H and (15) N NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants prove that the thiophloroglucinol ligands exist as the N-protonated and not the O-protonated tautomer. (13) C and (15) N NMR chemical shifts and structural parameters further demonstrated that the extended thiophloroglucinol ligands must be described with a predominant thione-enamine (heteroradialene) character despite the participation of a CS double bond. In the Ni(II) 3 complexes, this heteroradialene character is reduced but still predominant.

  14. Ultraviolet-illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micron emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Van Der Werf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have made a large-scale map of the 158 micrometers C(+) line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud. The map covers a approximately 35 min x 45 min area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula. Emission in the (C II) line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the (C II) flux. Over this approximately 1.5 x 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas-phase carbon in the form of C(+) is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the (C II) distribution, implies that (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the (C II) emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the (C II) emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines, but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in (C II) and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the (C II) emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the radio of the (C II) and CO J = 1 goes to 0 intensities. Models of photon-dominated regions can explain the relation between (C II) and CO intensities only if one considers the cloud edges and cloud interior separately. We propose a method for using (C II) and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon-dominated regions.

  15. Ultraviolet illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micrometer emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Vanderwerf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    The construction of a large scale map of the 158 micrometer C+ line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud, covering an approximately 35' by 45' area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta-Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula, is reported. Emission in the C II line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 0.0001 erg/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the C II flux. Over this approximately 1.5 by 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas phase carbon in the form of C+ is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the C II distribution implies that C II emission arises on the surface of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the C II emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the C II emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in C II and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the C II emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the ratio of the C II and J = 1 towards 0 intensities. Models of photon dominated regions can explain the relation between C II and CO intensities only if the cloud edges and cloud interior are considered separately. A method for using C II and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon dominated regions is proposed.

  16. C60 Recognition from Extended Tetrathiafulvalene Bis-acetylide Platinum(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Guillaume; Dron, Paul I; Vincent, Manon; Canevet, David; Allain, Magali; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2016-11-18

    The favorable spatial organization imposed by the square planar 4,4'-di(tert-butyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (dbbpy) platinum(II) complex associated with the electronic and shape complementarity of π-extended tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (exTTF) toward fullerenes is usefully exploited to construct molecular tweezers, which display good affinities for C60.

  17. Bioremediation of lead contaminated soil with Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Weihua; Jia, Yingying; Lu, Lin; Fan, Wenhong

    2016-08-01

    Bioremediation with microorganisms is a promising technique for heavy metal contaminated soil. Rhodobacter sphaeroides was previously isolated from oil field injection water and used for bioremediation of lead (Pb) contaminated soil in the present study. Based on the investigation of the optimum culturing conditions and the tolerance to Pb, we employed the microorganism for the remediation of Pb contaminated soil simulated at different contamination levels. It was found that the optimum temperature, pH, and inoculum size for R. sphaeroides is 30-35 °C, 7, and 2 × 10(8) mL(-1), respectively. Rhodobacter sphaeroides did not remove the Pb from soil but did change its speciation. During the bioremediation process, more available fractions were transformed to less accessible and inert fractions; in particular, the exchangeable phase was dramatically decreased while the residual phase was substantially increased. A wheat seedling growing experiment showed that Pb phytoavailability was reduced in amended soils. Results inferred that the main mechanism by which R. sphaeroides treats Pb contaminated soil is the precipitation formation of inert compounds, including lead sulfate and lead sulfide. Although the Pb bioremediation efficiency on wheat was not very high (14.78% root and 24.01% in leaf), R. sphaeroides remains a promising alternative for Pb remediation in contaminated soil.

  18. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shuang C; Mothersole, David J; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J; Jackson, Philip J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C

    2015-02-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N=10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated CC bonds; N=15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N=9; 94%), spheroidene (N=10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N=11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N=11; 64%), rhodopin (N=11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N=13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the energy transfer dynamics of carotenoids in bacterial photosynthesis.

  19. Embryonic, larval, and early juvenile development of the tropical sea urchin, Salmacis sphaeroides (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Arshad, A; Shamsudin, Mariana Nor; Amin, S M N

    2012-01-01

    Salmacis sphaeroides (Linnaeus, 1758) is one of the regular echinoids, occuring in the warm Indo-West Pacific, including Johor Straits, between Malaysia and Singapore. In order to investigate the developmental basis of morphological changes in embryos and larvae, we documented the ontogeny of S. sphaeroides in laboratory condition. Gametes were obtained from adult individuals by 0.5 M KCl injection into the coelomic cavity. Fertilization rate at limited sperm concentration (10(-5) dilution) was 96.6 ± 1.4% and the resulting embryos were reared at 24°C. First cleavage (2-cell), 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell, 32-cell, and multicell (Morulla) stages were achieved 01.12, 02.03, 02.28, 02.51, 03.12, and 03.32 h postfertilization. Ciliated blastulae with a mean length of 174.72 ± 4.43 μm hatched 08.45 h after sperm entry. The gastrulae formed 16.15 h postfertilization and the archenteron elongated constantly while ectodermal red-pigmented cells migrated synchronously to the apical plate. Pluteus larva started to feed unicellular algae in 2 d, grew continuously, and finally attained metamorphic competence in 35 d after fertilization. Metamorphosis took approximately 1 h 30 min from attachment to the complete resorption of larval tissues and the development of complete juvenile structure with adult spines, extended tubefeet and well-developed pedicellaria, the whole event of which usually took place within 1 d postsettlement. This study represents the first successful investigation on embryonic, larval, and early juvenile development of S. sphaeroides. The findings would greatly be helpful towards the understanding of ontogeny and life-history strategies, which will facilitate us to develop the breeding, seed production, and culture techniques of sea urchins in captive condition.

  20. PSP-I/PSP-II spermadhesin exert a decapacitation effect on highly extended boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ignacio; Vazquez, Juan M; Mayor, Gloria M; Almiñana, Carmen; Calvete, Juan J; Sanz, Libia; Roca, Jordi; Martinez, Emilio A

    2009-10-01

    PSP-I/PSP-II heterodimer is a major protein of boar seminal plasma that is able to preserve, in vitro, the viability, motility and mitochondrial activity of highly-extended boar spermatozoa. However, a relationship between the protective effects of the heterodimer and sperm capacitation is still unclear. The present study investigated the effect of the PSP-I/PSP-II (1.5 mg/mL) on membrane stability, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](I)) and plasma membrane and acrosome integrity of highly extended boar spermatozoa. Boar spermatozoa were diluted to 1 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL and incubated at 38 degrees C in Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for 10, 30, 60, 120 and 300 min or in modified Tris-buffered medium (mTBM) for 10, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min. After each incubation time, the membrane stability (using Merocyanine-540/Yo-Pro-1), elevation of [Ca(2+)](I) (using Fluo-3-AM/PI) and the sperm plasma membrane and acrosome integrity (using SYBR-14/PI/PE-PNA) were evaluated by flow cytometry. As expected, exposure of the spermatozoa to the PSP-I/PSP-II preserved the plasma membrane and acrosome integrity compared to non-exposed spermatozoa in both media PBS and mTBM (p < .01). The evaluation of membrane stability showed no differences in the percentages of viable sperm with instable plasma membrane in the presence of the PSP-I/PSP-II compared to controls irrespective of the dilution media. The evaluation of the [Ca(2+)](I) levels showed that while spermatozoa incubated in mTBM and exposed to PSP-I/PSP-II had lower [Ca(2+)](I) than controls (39.08% vs. 47.97%, respectively; p < .05), no differences were observed in those samples incubated in PBS. However, a temporal evaluation of the samples showed that a similar proportion of live spermatozoa were able to achieve high levels of [Ca(2+)](I) and membrane instability independent of the presence of PSP-I/PSP-II. In conclusion, PSP-I/PSP-II exert a non-permanent decapacitation effect on highly extended boar spermatozoa

  1. Definition of the extended substrate specificity determinants for beta-tryptases I and II.

    PubMed

    Harris, J L; Niles, A; Burdick, K; Maffitt, M; Backes, B J; Ellman, J A; Kuntz, I; Haak-Frendscho, M; Craik, C S

    2001-09-14

    Tryptases betaI and betaII were heterologously expressed and purified in yeast to functionally characterize the substrate specificity of each enzyme. Three positional scanning combinatorial tetrapeptide substrate libraries were used to determine the primary and extended substrate specificity of the proteases. Both enzymes have a strict primary preference for cleavage after the basic amino acids, lysine and arginine, with only a slight preference for lysine over arginine. betaI and betaII tryptase share similar extended substrate specificity, with preference for proline at P4, preference for arginine or lysine at P3, and P2 showing a slight preference for asparagine. Measurement of kinetic constants with multiple substrates designed for beta-tryptases reveal that selectivity is highly dependent on ground state substrate binding. Coupled with the functional determinants, structural determinants of tryptase substrate specificity were identified. Molecular docking of the preferred substrate sequence to the three-dimensional tetrameric tryptase structure reveals a novel extended substrate binding mode that involves interactions from two adjacent protomers, including P4 Thr-96', P3 Asp-60B' and Glu-217, and P1 Asp-189. Based on the determined substrate information, a mechanism-based tetrapeptide-chloromethylketone inhibitor was designed and shown to be a potent tryptase inhibitor. Finally, the cleavage sites of several physiologically relevant substrates of beta-tryptases show consistency with the specificity data presented here.

  2. EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM OF SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    We have made new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 2850-37900 Å with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 2 m Fourier transform spectrometer. These data extend our previously reported observations in the near-ultra-violet region. We present a comprehensive list of more than 5300 Cr II lines classified as transitions among 456 even and 457 odd levels, 179 of which are newly located in this work. Using highly excited levels of the 3d {sup 4}({sup 5} D)5g, 3d {sup 4}({sup 5} D)6g, and 3d {sup 4}({sup 5}D)6h configurations, we derive an improved ionization energy of 132971.02 ± 0.12 cm{sup –1} (16.486305 ± 0.000015 eV)

  3. Extended Analysis of the Spectrum of Singly Ionized Chromium (Cr II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    We have made new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 2850-37900 Å with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 2 m Fourier transform spectrometer. These data extend our previously reported observations in the near-ultra-violet region. We present a comprehensive list of more than 5300 Cr II lines classified as transitions among 456 even and 457 odd levels, 179 of which are newly located in this work. Using highly excited levels of the 3d 4(5 D)5g, 3d 4(5 D)6g, and 3d 4(5D)6h configurations, we derive an improved ionization energy of 132971.02 ± 0.12 cm-1 (16.486305 ± 0.000015 eV).

  4. Local structure studies of some cobalt (II) complexes using extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Trivedi, Apurva

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis of Cobalt (II) complex as a ligand of 2 -methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]-3H-l,5 benzodiazepine for finding local structure using conventional method .The Co(II) complexes were prepared by chemical root method. The EXAFS spectra were recorded at Cobalt K-edge i.e.; 7709 eV using Dispersive EXFAS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source(SRS) at RRCAT, Indore, India. The recorded EXAFS data were analysed using the computer software Athena for determine the nearest neighbouring distances (bond lengths) of these complexes with conventional methods and it compared with Fourier transform(FT) analysis. The Fourier Transform convert EXAFS data signal into r-space or k-space. This is useful for visualizing the major contributions to the EXAFS spectrum.

  5. Electron transport-dependent taxis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Gauden, D E; Armitage, J P

    1995-10-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides showed chemotaxis to the terminal electron acceptors oxygen and dimethyl sulfoxide, and the responses to these effectors were shown to be influenced by the relative activities of the different electron transport pathways. R. sphaeroides cells tethered by their flagella showed a step-down response to a decrease in the oxygen or dimethyl sulfoxide concentration when using them as terminal acceptors. Bacteria using photosynthetic electron transport, however, showed a step-down response to oxygen addition. Addition of the proton ionophore carbonyl cyanide 4-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone did not cause a transient behavioral response, although it decreased the electrochemical proton gradient (delta p) and increased the rate of electron transport. However, removal of the ionophore, which caused an increase in delta p and a decrease in the electron transport rate, resulted in a step-down response. Together, these data suggest that behavioral responses of R. sphaeroides to electron transport effectors are caused by changes in the rate of electron transport rather than changes in delta p.

  6. [Study of phototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides cell morphology of wild-type and ipt-transformant by atomic force and electron microscopy].

    PubMed

    Machulin, A V; Smolygina, L D; Suzina, N E; Serdiuk, O P

    2012-01-01

    A comparative study of phototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides cell morphology of wild-type and ipt-transformant was done by atomic force and electron microscopy. It was shown that transformation led to a decrease in the number or total disappearance of the flagella, as well as to changes in the structure of the outer membrane of the bacteria cell wall. On the wild-type cell surface phage-like structures were found, and in transformed cells at their places hollows were identified. This study significantly extends an understanding of the changes occurring in the ipt-transformants of phototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This investigation not only confirmed earlier obtained data about the differences in the wild-type and ipt-transformant phototrophic purple bacteria cell wall, but also showed fine changes in the structure of its outer membrane.

  7. Type II GaSb/GaAs quantum rings with extended photoresponse for efficient solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, P. J.; Montesdeoca, D.; Fujita, H.; James, J.; Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Krier, A.

    2016-09-01

    The introduction of GaSb quantum dots (QDs) within a GaAs single junction solar cell is attracting increasing interest as a means of absorbing long wavelength photons to extend the photoresponse and increase the short-circuit current. The band alignment in this system is type-II, such that holes are localized within the GaSb QDs but there is no electron confinement. Compared to InAs QDs this produces a red-shift of the photoresponse which could increase the short-circuit current and improve carrier extraction. GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) tend to preferentially form quantum rings (QRs) which are less strained and contain fewer defects than the GaSb QDs, which means that they are more suitable for dense stacking in the active region of a solar cell to reduce the accumulation of internal strain and enhance light absorption. Here, we report the growth and fabrication of GaAs based p-i-n solar cells containing ten layers of GaSb QRs. They show extended long wavelength photoresponse into the near-IR up to 1400 nm and enhanced short-circuit current compared to the GaAs control cell due to absorption of low energy photons. Although enhancement of the short-circuit current was observed, the thermionic emission of holes was found to be insufficient for ideal operation at room temperature.

  8. The mechanisms of protection of antioxidants on Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.

    UV radiation is one of space harmful factor for earth organisms in space exploration In the present work we studied on the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides K u tz Cyanobacteria and the effects of exogenous antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation It was found that UV-B radiation decreased the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacterium but promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II PSII and exogenous antioxidant sodium nitroprusside SNP N-acetylcysteine NAC had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation The activity of SOD Superoxide Dismutase EC 1 15 1 1 CAT Catalase EC 1 11 1 6 POD Peroxidase EC 1 11 1 7 and content of MDA and ASC were improved by 0 5mM and 1mM SNP but 0 1mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxide system Exogenous NAC addition decreased the activity of SOD POD CAT and the content MDA and ASC but exogenous NAC addition increased the content of GSH The results suggested that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms in which SNP maybe play double roles as sources of reactive free radicals or ROS scavengers in formation of algae s protection of PSII under UV-B radiation while NAC does function as antioxidant reagent or precursor of glutathione which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation Keyword antioxidant system exogenous or endogenous antioxidant Nostoc sphaeroides photosynthesis UV-B radiation

  9. Immunolocalization and possible functional role of PSP-I/PSP-II heterodimer in highly extended boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ignacio; Vázquez, Juan M; García, Eva M; Roca, Jordi; Martínez, Emilio A; Calvete, Juan J; Sanz, Libia; Ekwall, Hans; Rodríguez-Martínez, Heriberto

    2006-01-01

    PSP-I/PSP-II heterodimer is a major protein of boar seminal plasma which is able to preserve, in vitro, the viability, motility, and mitochondrial activity of highly extended boar spermatozoa for at least 5 hours. However, little is known about the binding pattern of the heterodimer to the sperm plasma membrane and its eventual relation with the maintenance of the sperm functionality. The present study investigated the effect of exposing highly extended boar spermatozoa (1 million/mL) to 1.5 mg/mL of PSP-I/PSP-II for 0.5, 5, and 10 hours at 38 degrees C on sperm characteristics and the changes in PSP-I/PSP-II localization as a result of both the addition of PSP-I/PSP-II to the extender and the incubation time. Exposure of the spermatozoa to PSP-I/PSP-II preserved sperm viability, motility, and mitochondrial activity when compared to nonexposed spermatozoa. This protective effect lasted for 10 hours (P < .05). After immunolabeling of highly extended semen with rabbit monospecific polyclonal antibody against PSP-I/PSP-II, the percentage of immunopositive spermatozoa declines over time from 71% (0.5 hours) to 49% (10 hours). However, more than 80% of spermatozoa remained labeled during the 10-hour incubation period if PSP-I/PSP-II was added. Scanning electron microscopy revealed 4 different binding patterns. The heterodimer was mainly localized to the acrosomal area, being redistributed to the postacrosomal area or lost during in vitro incubation. In conclusion, the protective effect of the heterodimer appears to be related to its adhesion to the acrosomal area, and the loss of this protective effect coincides with a stepwise redistribution of PSP-I/PSP-II during incubation.

  10. DegS and RseP Homologous Proteases Are Involved in Singlet Oxygen Dependent Activation of RpoE in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Nuss, Aaron M.; Adnan, Fazal; Weber, Lennart; Berghoff, Bork A.; Glaeser, Jens; Klug, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the main agent of photooxidative stress and is generated by photosensitizers as (bacterio)chlorophylls. It leads to the damage of cellular macromolecules and therefore photosynthetic organisms have to mount an adaptive response to 1O2 formation. A major player of the photooxidative stress response in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the alternative sigma factor RpoE, which is inactivated under non-stress conditions by its cognate anti-sigma factor ChrR. By using random mutagenesis we identified RSP_1090 to be required for full activation of the RpoE response under 1O2 stress, but not under organic peroxide stress. In this study we show that both RSP_1090 and RSP_1091 are required for full resistance towards 1O2. Moreover, we revealed that the DegS and RseP homologs RSP_3242 and RSP_2710 contribute to 1O2 resistance and promote ChrR proteolysis. The RpoE signaling pathway in R. sphaeroides is therefore highly similar to that of Escherichia coli, although very different anti-sigma factors control RpoE activity. Based on the acquired results, the current model for RpoE activation in response to 1O2 exposure in R. sphaeroides was extended. PMID:24223961

  11. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  12. Reversible inactivation and characterization of purified inactivated form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Tabita, F R

    1992-06-01

    Form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is inactivated upon the addition of organic acids to photolithoautotrophically grown cultures. Activity recovers after the dissipation of the organic acid from the culture. The inactivation process depends on both the concentration of the organic compound and the nitrogen status of the cells. The inactivated RubisCO has been purified and was shown to exhibit mobility on both nondenaturing and sodium dodecyl sulfate gels different from that of the active enzyme prepared from cells not treated with organic acids. However, the Michaelis constants for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate and CO2 or O2 were not dramatically altered. Purified inactivated RubisCO could be activated in vitro by increasing the temperature or the levels of Mg(II), and this activation was accompanied by changes in the electrophoretic mobility of the protein. When foreign bacterial RubisCO genes were expressed in an R. sphaeroides host strain lacking the ability to synthesize endogenous RubisCO, only slight inactivation of RubisCO activity was attained.

  13. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 under intense irradiation.

    PubMed

    Krujatz, Felix; Härtel, Paul; Helbig, Karsten; Haufe, Nora; Thierfelder, Simone; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal hydrogen production conditions using growing cultures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 the effects of varying the reactor's volumetric power input (0.01-1.4kWm(-3)) and irradiation intensity (5-2500Wm(-2)) were investigated in batch and continuous production modes. Irradiation intensity had a greater effect on hydrogen production than volumetric power input. Hydrogen production and photofermentative biomass formation were maximized by irradiation at 2250Wm(-2) with a volumetric power input of 0.55kWm(-3). The bacterial dry weight (2.64gL(-1)) and rate of hydrogen production (195mLL(-1)h(-1)) achieved under these conditions were greater than any that have previously been reported for batch-mode hydrogen production by R. sphaeroides. Continuous mode experiments (D=0.1h(-1)) yielded a bacterial dry weight, hydrogen production rate, productivity and hydrogen yield of 2.35±0.18gL(-1), 165±6.2mLL(-1)h(-1), 3.96LL(-1)d(-1) and 36.6%, respectively.

  14. Extended X-ray absorption studies of copper (II) dibenzoyal methane diquinoline complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Sharma, P.; Malviya, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    X-ray K-absorption spectroscopic studies have been carried out on copper (II) mixed-ligand complexes. Copper is a transition metal, which in the zero oxidation state has an electron configuration of [Ar] 4s24p63d9. Copper is found in three different oxidation states: Cu(I), Cu(II), and Cu(III). In the copper (II) oxidation state, the metal has 9 d electrons. Jahn-Teller distortion causes a splitting of eg and t2g orbitals. Most Cu(II) complexes are square planar for this reason. In a series of those compounds, we have prepared copper (II) complexes containing two nitrato ligands and a 2,2'-dipyridylamine(dpa) derivative ligand. The 2,2' - dipyridylamine and its derivatives have been widely used for metal complexes because of their good chelating property, structural flexibility. we have estimated the average metalligand bond distances from the fine structure data. We have determined the bond lengths for the copper (II) complexes with the help of Levy's, LSS, Fourier transform, Lytle's Methods.

  15. Extended study of the Surface Heterogeneity of candidate dwarf-planets (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Emery, Joshua; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2016-08-01

    We propose to continue with our investigation of the volatile activity and migration of volatiles on dwarf-planets (DP) and some candidates to dwarf-planets (CDP). We also extend this study to cover the list of targets for the Kuiper Extended Mission (KEM, second phase of New horizons mission submitted by the New Horizons Team to NASA for extension, and yet to be approved) and extend our continuous monitoring of Pluto's surface. Surface heterogeneity on these bodies can be indicative of the presence of an atmosphere, and active collisional history, or even cometary activity. In cycle 12 we were awarded with ~ 38hr to study three DPs and three CDPs. Five of these objects have been announced in 2016 as targets of the KEM. On cycle 13 we ask for 145.5 hours to study 11 CDP plus five targets of the KEM (one object belongs to both lists but will be observed only once) plus Pluto. By using the proven capability of Spitzer to detect and map the presence of volatile ices, complex organics and silicates on the surface of these distant bodies, we will 1) test the hypothesis that KBOs on the scale of >450 km in diameter could retain a higher content of volatiles than the smaller and more abundant KBOs; 2) characterize the distribution of silicates/organics/ices on the surface of these bodies. These points are key to understanding chemical and dynamical history of the outer Solar System, which acts as a model for the new systems discovered around other stars. Our study will be be of special interest in the eve of James Webb Telescope operation, in 2019 and will pave the road for a detailed characterization of the targets of the Kuiper Extended Mission (if approved).

  16. Biohydrogen Production from Tofu Wastewater with Glutamine Auxotrophic Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G. H.; Kang, Z. H.; Qian, Y. F.; Wang, L.; Zhou, Q.; Zhu, H. G.

    2008-02-01

    Hydrogen production from organic wastewater by photo-bacteria has been attracted more attention, not only because hydrogen is a clean energy, but also because it can be a process for organic wastewater pre-treatment. However NH4+, which normally is the integrant in organic wastewater, is the inhibitor to hydrogen production with photo-bacteria. In this study, the NH4+ effect on biohydrogen generation and nitrogenase activity of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria-Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied. Biohydrogen generation with wild-type R. sphaeroides was found to be more sensitive to NH4+ due to the obvious inhibition of NH4+ to its nitrogenase. For avoiding inhibition of NH4+ to biohydrogen generation of R. sphaeroides, a glutamine auxotrophic mutant R. sphaeroides AR-3 was obtained by EMS treatment. The mutant could generate biohydrogen efficiently in the medium with higher NH4+ concentration. Under suitable conditions, AR-3 produced biohydrogen from tofu wastewater with an average generation rate of 14.2 ml L-1h-1, it was increased by more than 100% compared with that from wild-type R. sphaeroides.

  17. Purification and characterization of the cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Gennis, R B; Casey, R P; Azzi, A; Ludwig, B

    1982-06-15

    When grown aerobically in the dark, Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides develops a respiratory chain similar to that in mitochondria and the photosynthetic apparatus is suppressed. The aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Rps. sphaeroides has been purified in Triton X-100 by affinity chromatography with Sepharose 4B coupled to yeast cytochrome c. The oxidase contains 14 nmol heme a/mg protein and is composed of three polypeptide subunits with relative molecular masses of 45000, 37000 and 35000. The enzyme is highly active in the presence of detergents, with a maximal velocity of 300 s-1/mol oxidase using either yeast or horse-heart cytochrome c. The Rps. sphaeroides oxidase is cross-reactive with antibodies directed against the oxidases from Paracoccus denitrificans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A particularly close relationship is indicated in the case of P. denitrificans. The Rps. sphaeroides oxidase has been incorporated into phospholipid vesicles. The resulting oxidase in these vesicles demonstrates high enzymatic activity and a respiratory control ratio of 5. Using these vesicles, no evidence for proton extrusion accompanying cytochrome c oxidation was observed. The data suggest that the Rps. sphaeroides oxidase does not function as a proton pump.

  18. Inhibited growth of Clostridium butyricum in efficient H2-producing co-culture with Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Laurinavichene, Tatyana; Laurinavichius, Kestutis; Shastik, Evgeny; Tsygankov, Anatoly

    2016-12-01

    Cell number of Clostridium butyricum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides in co-culture was measured using q-PCR approach. During efficient H2 photoproduction from starch (6.2 mol H2/mol glucose), Clostridia growth and starch-hydrolyzing activity was partly suppressed. Apparently, the effect of R. sphaeroides towards C. butyricum was not attributed to altered Eh or pH values in the presence of purple bacteria. Further, disk-diffusion test proved that R. sphaeroides was capable of producing inhibitors against another purple bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum, but not against C. butyricum. We suggested that at initial cell number ratio C. butyricum:R. sphaeroides 1:1 purple bacteria outcompeted C. butyricum for yeast extract at its low concentration (80 mg/L). Under these conditions, the H2 yield was rather high (5.7 mol/mol). When the yeast extract concentration increased to 320 mg/L, this process was replaced by the low-yield H2 production (1.8 mol/mol) characteristic of Clostridia. However, increased percentage of purple bacteria in inoculum under these conditions prevented this shift. The outcome of competition depended on both the yeast extract concentration and cell number ratio. Apparently, the competition for yeast extract helped to maintain balance between fast-growing C. butyricum and slower-growing R. sphaeroides for efficient H2 photoproduction.

  19. Photo dynamics of BLUF domain mutant H44R of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Hegemann, P.; Mathes, T.

    2007-05-01

    The photo-cycle dynamics of the H44R mutant of the BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA (AppA-H44R) from the non-sulfur anoxyphototropic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is studied in order to gain information on the involvement of His44 in the photo-cyclic mechanism of the AppA BLUF domain and to add information to the involved processes. The amino acid residue histidine at position 44 is replaced by arginine. A 12 nm red-shifted signalling state is formed upon blue-light excitation, while in wild-type AppA (AppA-wt) the red-shift is 16 nm. The recovery to the receptor dark state is approximately a factor of 2.5 faster ( τrec ≈ 6.5 min) than the recovery of the wild-type counterpart. Extended light exposure of the mutant causes photo-degradation of flavin (mainly free flavin conversion to lumichrome and re-equilibration between free and non-covalently bound flavin) and protein aggregation (showing up as light scattering). No photo-degradation was observed for AppA-wt. The quantum efficiency of signalling-state formation determined by intensity dependent absorption measurements is found to be ϕs ≈ 0.3 (for AppA-wt: ϕs ≈ 0.24). A two-component single-exponential fluorescence relaxation was observed, which is interpreted as fast fluorescence quenching to an equilibrium value by photo-induced electron transfer followed by slower fluorescence decay due to charge recombination. Based on the experimental findings, an extended photo-cycle model for BLUF domains is proposed.

  20. Structural Characterization of the Fla2 Flagellum of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    de la Mora, Javier; Uchida, Kaoru; del Campo, Ana Martínez; Camarena, Laura; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a free-living alphaproteobacterium that contains two clusters of functional flagellar genes in its genome: one acquired by horizontal gene transfer (fla1) and one that is endogenous (fla2). We have shown that the Fla2 system is normally quiescent and under certain conditions produces polar flagella, while the Fla1 system is always active and produces a single flagellum at a nonpolar position. In this work we purified and characterized the structure and analyzed the composition of the Fla2 flagellum. The number of polar filaments per cell is 4.6 on average. By comparison with the Fla1 flagellum, the prominent features of the ultra structure of the Fla2 HBB are the absence of an H ring, thick and long hooks, and a smoother zone at the hook-filament junction. The Fla2 helical filaments have a pitch of 2.64 μm and a diameter of 1.4 μm, which are smaller than those of the Fla1 filaments. Fla2 filaments undergo polymorphic transitions in vitro and showed two polymorphs: curly (right-handed) and coiled. However, in vivo in free-swimming cells, we observed only a bundle of filaments, which should probably be left-handed. Together, our results indicate that Fla2 cell produces multiple right-handed polar flagella, which are not conventional but exceptional. IMPORTANCE R. sphaeroides possesses two functional sets of flagellar genes. The fla1 genes are normally expressed in the laboratory and were acquired by horizontal transfer. The fla2 genes are endogenous and are expressed in a Fla1− mutant grown phototrophically and in the absence of organic acids. The Fla1 system produces a single lateral or subpolar flagellum, and the Fla2 system produces multiple polar flagella. The two kinds of flagella are never expressed simultaneously, and both are used for swimming in liquid media. The two sets of genes are certainly ready for responding to specific environmental conditions. The characterization of the Fla2 system will help us to understand

  1. Extended analysis of the system of even configurations of Ta II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowska, E.; Dembczyński, J.; Windholz, L.; Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a parametric study of the fine (fs) and hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of ionized tantalum (Ta II) using improved experimental fs and hfs data for 88 levels. A multi-configuration fitting procedure was performed for 47 configurations taking into account second-order perturbation theory including the effects of closed to open shell excitations. The fs and hfs parameters were calculated. Predicted values of level energies up to 86 000cm-1 are given, as well as gJ-Landé factors, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure constants A and B, when no experimental values are available.

  2. The extended ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II) II. Construction and properties of the survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, H.; Chon, G.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.; Nowak, N.; Bobrovskyi, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. Therefore X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters are one of the best ways to obtain a statistical census of the galaxy cluster population. Aims: In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s cm (0.1-2.4 keV). Methods: We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. Results: The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is z = 0.102. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 90% complete with a contamination less than 10%. Conclusions: With this publication we give a comprehensive statistical description of the REFLEX II survey and provide all the complementary information necessary for a proper modeling of the survey for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory La Silla, ChileFull Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A30

  3. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  4. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of cbbR, a positive regulator of the Calvin cycle operons of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J L; Tabita, F R

    1993-01-01

    Structural genes encoding Calvin cycle enzymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides are duplicated and organized within two physically distinct transcriptional units, the form I and form II cbb operons. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region upstream of the form I operon revealed a divergently transcribed open reading frame, cbbR, that showed significant similarity to the LysR family of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Mutants containing an insertionally inactivated cbbR gene were impaired in photoheterotrophic growth and completely unable to grow photolithoautotrophically with CO2 as the sole carbon source. In the cbbR strain, expression of genes within the form I operon was completely abolished and that of the form II operon was reduced to about 30% of the wild-type level. The cloned cbbR gene complemented the mutant for wild-type growth characteristics, and normal levels of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) were observed. However, rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed that the wild-type level of RubisCO was due to overexpression of the form II enzyme, whereas expression of the form I RubisCO was 10% of that of the wild-type strain. The cbbR insertional inactivation did not appear to affect aerobic expression of either CO2 fixation operon, but preliminary evidence suggests that the constitutive expression of the form II operon observed in the cbbR strain may be subject to repression during aerobic growth. PMID:8376325

  5. Extended Hamiltonian Formalism of the Pure Space-Like Axial Gauge Schwinger Model. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakawaki, Y.; McCartor, G.

    2004-06-01

    Canonical methods are not sufficient to properly quantize space-like axial gauges. In this paper, we obtain guiding principles that allow for the construction of an extended Hamiltonian formalism for pure space-like axial gauge fields. To do so, we clarify the general role that residual gauge fields play in the space-like axial gauge Schwinger model. In all the calculations, we fix the gauge using the rule n•A=0, where n is a space-like constant vector, and we refer to its direction as x-. Then, to begin with, we construct a formulation in which the quantization surface is space-like but not parallel to the direction of n. The quantization surface has a parameter that allows us to rotate it, but when we do so, we keep the gauge fixing direction fixed. In that formulation, we can use canonical methods. We bosonize the model to simplify the investigation. We find that the inverse differentiation, (∂-)-1, is ill-defined whatever quantization coordinates we use, as long as the direction of n is space-like. We find that the physical part of the dipole ghost field includes infrared divergences. However, we also find that if we introduce residual gauge fields in such a way that the dipole ghost field satisfies the canonical commutation relations, then the residual gauge fields are determined so as to regularize the infrared divergences contained in the physical part. The propagators then take the form prescribed by Mandelstam and Leibbrandt. We make use of these properties to develop guiding principles that allow us to construct consistent operator solutions in the pure space-like case, in which the quantization surface is parallel to the direction of n, and canonical methods do not suffice.

  6. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA. II. EXTENDED DATA SET

    SciTech Connect

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Padovani, M.; Beltran, M. T.; Sanchez-Monge, A.; Busquet, G.; Morata, O.; Masque, J. M.; Estalella, R.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.

    2012-11-01

    The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is therefore a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived an A {sub V} to N{sub H{sub 2}} factor of (1.27 {+-} 0.12) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} mag cm{sup 2} and a background visual extinction of {approx}6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of {approx}0.08 pc, density of {approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and mass of {approx}1.7 M {sub Sun }. Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (1) the diameter seems to shrink, (2) the mass seems to increase, and (3) the chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large-scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. We also used the IRAM 30 m telescope to extend the previous molecular survey at 1 and 3 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward the same five new Pipe nebula starless cores, and analyzed the normalized intensities of the detected molecular transitions. We confirmed the chemical differentiation toward the sample and increased the number of molecular transitions of the 'diffuse' (e.g., the 'ubiquitous' CO, C{sub 2}H, and CS), 'oxo-sulfurated' (e.g., SO and

  7. The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey. II. Further results and analysis of the full sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Cuciti, V.; Macario, G.; Athreya, R.

    2015-07-01

    The intra-cluster medium contains cosmic rays and magnetic fields that are manifested through the large scale synchrotron sources, termed radio haloes, relics, and mini-haloes. The Extended Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS) is an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS) designed to search for radio haloes using GMRT 610/235 MHz observations. The GRHS and EGRHS consists of 64 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4 that have an X-ray luminosity larger than 5 × 1044 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band and declination, δ > -31° in the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray cluster catalogues. In this second paper in the series, GMRT 610/235 MHz data on the last batch of 11 galaxy clusters and the statistical analysis of the full sample are presented. A new mini-halo in RX J2129.6+0005 and candidate diffuse sources in Z5247, A2552, and Z1953 have been discovered. A unique feature of this survey are the upper limits on the detections of 1 Mpc sized radio haloes; 4 new are presented here, making a total of 31 in the survey. Of the sample, 58 clusters with adequately sensitive radio information were used to obtain the most accurate occurrence fractions so far. The occurrence fractions of radio haloes, mini-haloes and relics in our sample are ~22%, ~16% and ~5%, respectively. The P1.4 GHz-LX diagrams for the radio haloes and mini-haloes are presented. The morphological estimators - centroid shift (w), concentration parameter (c), and power ratios (P3/P0) derived from the Chandra X-ray images - are used as proxies for the dynamical states of the GRHS and EGRHS clusters. The clusters with radio haloes and mini-haloes occupy distinct quadrants in the c-w, c-P3/P0 and w-P3/P0 planes, corresponding to the more and less morphological disturbance, respectively. The non-detections span both the quadrants. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. The two photocycles of photoactive yellow protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Haker, Andrea; Hendriks, Johnny; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Heberle, Joachim; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Crielaard, Wim; Gensch, Thomas

    2003-03-07

    The absorption spectrum of the photoactive yellow protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R-PYP) shows two maxima, absorbing at 360 nm (R-PYP(360)) and 446 nm (R-PYP(446)), respectively. Both forms are photoactive and part of a temperature- and pH-dependent equilibrium (Haker, A., Hendriks, J., Gensch, T., Hellingwerf, K. J., and Crielaard, W. (2000) FEBS Lett. 486, 52-56). At 20 degrees C, for PYP characteristic, the 446-nm absorbance band displays a photocycle, in which the depletion of the 446-nm ground state absorption occurs in at least three phases, with time constants of <30 ns, 0.5 micros, and 17 micros. Intermediates with both blue- and red-shifted absorption maxima are transiently formed, before a blue-shifted intermediate (pB(360), lambda(max) = 360 nm) is established. The photocycle is completed with a monophasic recovery of the ground state with a time constant of 2.5 ms. At 7 degrees C these photocycle transitions are slowed down 2- to 3-fold. Upon excitation of R-PYP(360) with a UV-flash (330 +/- 50 nm) a species with a difference absorption maximum at approximately 435 nm is observed that returns to R-PYP(360) on a minute time scale. Recovery can be accelerated by a blue light flash (450 nm). R-PYP(360) and R-PYP(446) differ in their overall protein conformation, as well as in the isomerization and protonation state of the chromophore, as determined with the fluorescent polarity probe Nile Red and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, respectively.

  9. Growth kinetics of 1-2 mm and 3-4 mm colonies of Nostoc sphaeroides (Cyanophyta) in outdoor culture.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhongyang; Yan, Chunlan; Lu, Fan; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Zhengyu

    2008-10-01

    Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing was cultivated in paddlewheel-driven raceway ponds and the growth kinetics of 1-2 mm and 3-4 mm colonies of N. sphaeroides was studied. The biomass productivities in 2.5 m(2) raceway ponds inoculated with 1-2 mm and 3-4 mm colonies were 5.2 and 0.25 g dry wt m(-2) d(-1), respectively. Furthermore, differently sized colonies showed different relative water content, total soluble carbohydrates, chlorophyll a content and density of filaments. This is the first report on mass culture of N. sphaeroides under outdoor conditions.

  10. Modifying the endogenous electron fluxes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 for improved electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Man Tung; Cheng, Danhui; Wang, Ri; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-05-01

    The purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides serve as a promising biocatalyst in the photo-microbial fuel cell system (photo-MFC). This gram-negative species performs highly efficient anoxygenic photosynthesis that ensures an anaerobic environment in the anode compartment. Previous studies incorporating R. sphaeroides into photo-MFC were conducted using platinum as the anode electrode. In this study, we detected a steady current generation of R. sphaeroides in a bioelectrochemical system where glassy carbon was the working electrode and a typical growth medium was the electrolyte. The bioelectricity generation synchronized with the supplementation of reduced carbon source and showed immediate response to illumination, which strongly indicated the correlation between the observed current and the cytoplasmic quinone activity. Modifications of the endogenous electron flows mediated by quinone pool are shown to have significantly enhanced the bioelectricity generation. We anticipate that the findings in this study would advance future optimization of R. sphaeroides as an anode strain, as well as facilitate the study of bioenergetics in photosynthetic bacteria.

  11. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  12. Three separate proteins constitute the magnesium chelatase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Willows, R D; Gibson, L C; Kanangara, C G; Hunter, C N; von Wettstein, D

    1996-01-15

    The insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX is the first step unique to chlorophyll production and is catalyzed by magnesium chelatase. The Rhodobacter sphaeroides genes, bchI and bchD together, and bchH alone, were cloned and expressed with the pET3a vector in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The 40-kDa BchI protein was synthesized in greater abundance compared to the 70-kDa BchD protein when both were expressed together from the same plasmid. The production of large amounts of the 140-kDa BchH protein in E. coli was accompanied by an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. The accumulated protoporphyrin IX was bound specifically to BchH in an approximate molar ratio of 1:1. All three recombinant proteins were soluble; BchH was monomeric, Bchl was dimeric, while BchD appeared to be polymeric with a molecular mass of approximately 550 kDa. The BchH and BchI proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity while BchD was separated from BchI and partially purified. Magnesium was inserted into protoporphyrin IX and deuteroporphyrin by combining these three proteins in the presence of ATP. One monomer of BchH to one dimer of BchI gave the optimal magnesium chelatase activity and the activity was dependent on the amount of partially purified BchD added to the assay at the optimum BchH:BchI ratio. The reaction was dissected into two parts with an activation step requiring BchI, BchD, and Mg2+-ATP, and a metal-insertion step which in addition requires Mg2+, protoporphyrin IX, and BchH. The stoichiometric binding of protoporphyrin IX to BchH in vitro is direct evidence for BchH carrying out such a role in vivo whereas the other two proteins are involved in ATP activation and magnesium insertion.

  13. Novel Ru(II) sensitizers bearing an unsymmetrical pyridine-quinoline hybrid ligand with extended π-conjugation: synthesis and application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Vougioukalakis, Georgios C; Stergiopoulos, Thomas; Kontos, Athanassios G; Pefkianakis, Eleftherios K; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos; Falaras, Polycarpos

    2013-05-14

    Heteroleptic ruthenium(II) sensitizers DV42 and DV51, encompassing a novel unsymmetrical pyridine-quinoline hybrid ligand with extended π-conjugation, were synthesized, characterized, and utilized in nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells. Due to the extended conjugation of DV42 and DV51, the absorption of the corresponding sensitized TiO2 films extends into the red spectral range, shifted by 30-40 nm relative to the absorption of TiO2 films sensitized with the standard Z907 ruthenium(II) dye. Contact angle measurements of DV42- and DV51-sensitized TiO2 films suggest that these films are hydrophilic with contact angle values commonly observed upon sensitization with the standard N3 ruthenium(II) dye. Electrochemical studies of the novel ruthenium(II) dyes show that their first oxidation potentials lie well below the I(-)/I3(-) redox potential allowing easy regeneration. The excited-state oxidation potentials of both dyes lie above the TiO2 conduction band, permitting efficient electron injection from the excited dye molecules into the semiconductor conduction band. Liquid electrolyte dye-sensitized solar cells incorporating DV42- or DV51-sensitized TiO2 photoelectrodes afford overall power conversion efficiencies of 3.24 or 4.36% respectively. These efficiencies are up to 56% of the power conversion efficiencies attained by TiO2 photoelectrodes sensitized by the benchmark Z907 ruthenium(II) dye under similar experimental conditions.

  14. Equatorial π-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended π-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)ṡ4THF, 1ṡ4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)ṡ3THF, 2ṡ3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)ṡMeOHṡH2O, 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended π-systems present, two of the complexes, 2ṡ3THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, display extensive π-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1ṡ4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1ṡ4THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

  15. Effect of ligands with extended π-system on the photophysical properties of Ru(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujie; El Ojaimi, Maya; Hammitt, Richard; Thummel, Randolph P; Turro, Claudia

    2010-11-18

    Density functional theory calculations were performed on a series of six ruthenium complexes possessing tridentate ligands: [Ru(tpy)(2)](2+) (1; tpy = [2,2';6',2'']-terpyridine), [Ru(tpy)(pydppx)](2+) (2; pydppx = 3-(pyrid-2'-yl)-11,12-dimethyldipyrido[3,2-a: 2',3'-c]phenazine), [Ru(pydppx)(2)](2+) (3), [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+) (4; pydppn = 3-(pyrid-2'-yl)-4,5,9,16-tetraazadibenzo[a,c]naphthacene), [Ru(pydppn)(2)](2+) (5), and [Ru(tpy)(pydbn)](+) (6; pyHdbn = 3-pyrid-2'-yl-4,9,16-triazadibenzo[a,c]naphthacene). The calculations were compared to experimental data, including electrochemistry and electronic absorption spectra. The theoretical results reveal that the lowest-lying singlet and triplet states in 4 and 5 are pydppn-based ππ* in character, which are remarkably different from the lowest-lying metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states in 1-3. The calculated lowest triplet states in 4 and 5 are consistent with the (3)ππ* states observed experimentally. However, although the extended π-system of pydbn(-) is similar to that of pydppn, the HOMO of 6 lies above those of 4 and 5, resulting in strikingly different spectroscopic properties. Calculations show that the lowest triplet excited state of 6 is a combination of (3)MLCT and (3)ππ*. This work demonstrates that the electronic structure of the tridentate ligand has a pronounced effect on the photophysical properties of ruthenium(II) complexes and that DFT and TD-DFT methods are a useful tool that can be used to predict photophysical and redox properties of transition metal complexes.

  16. [High-order derivative spectroscopy of infrared absorption spectra of the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of reduced and chemically oxidized reaction center preparations from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated by means of high-order derivative spectroscopy. The model Gaussian band with a maximum at 810 nm and a half-band of 15 nm found in the absorption spectrum of the reduced reaction center preparation is eliminated after the oxidation of photoactive bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P). This band was related to the absorption of the P(+)y excitonic band of P. On the basis of experimental results, it was concluded that the bleaching of the P(+)y absorption band at 810 nm in the oxidized reaction center preparations gives the main contribution to the blue shift of the 800 nm absorption band of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers.

  17. Effect of changes in the composition of cellular fatty acids on membrane fluidity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Jin; Lee, Jeong K

    2015-02-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition is important for metabolic plasticity in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We explored the effects of changing the cellular ratio of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) to saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in R. sphaeroides by overexpressing several key fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes through the use of expression plasmid pRK415. Bacteria containing the plasmid pRKfabI1 with the fabI1 gene that encodes enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase showed a reduction in the cellular UFA to SFA ratio from 4 (80% UFA) to 2 (65% UFA) and had decreased membrane fluidity and reduced cell growth. Additionally, the ratio of UFA to SFA of the chromatophore vesicles from pRKfabI1 -containing cells was similarly lowered, and the cell had decreased levels of light-harvesting complexes, but no change in intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) content or photosynthetic (PS) gene expression. Both inhibition of enoyl- ACP reductase with diazaborine and addition of exogenous UFA restored membrane fluidity, cell growth, and the UFA to SFA ratio to wild-type levels in this strain. R. sphaeroides containing the pRKfabB plasmid with the fabB gene that encodes the enzyme β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase I exhibited an increased UFA to SFA ratio from 4 (80% UFA) to 9 (90% UFA), but showed no change in membrane fluidity or growth rate relative to control cells. Thus, membrane fluidity in R. sphaeroides remains fairly unchanged when membrane UFA levels are between 80% and 90%, whereas membrane fluidity, cell growth, and cellular composition are affected when UFA levels are below 80%.

  18. Wheat straw degradation and production of alternative substrates for nitrogenase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Dziga, Dariusz; Jagiełło-Flasińska, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a major component of plant biomass and could be applied in the production of biofuels, especially bioethanol. An alternative approach is production of a clean fuel - hydrogen from cellulosic biomass. In this paper an innovatory model of cellulosic waste degradation has been proposed to verify the possibility of utilization of cellulose derivatives by purple non-sulfur bacteria. The concept is based on a two-step process of wheat straw conversion by bacteria in order to obtain an organic acid mixture. In the next stage such products are consumed by Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the known producer of hydrogen. It has been documented that Cellulomonas uda expresses cellulolytic activity in the presence of wheat straw as an only source of carbon. R. sphaeroides applied in this research can effectively consume organic acids released from straw by C. uda and Lactobacillus rhamnosus and is able to grow in the presence of these substrates. Additionally, an increased nitrogenase activity of R. sphaeroides has been indicated when bacteria were cultivated in the presence of cellulose derivatives which suggests that hydrogen production occurs.

  19. Response kinetics of tethered Rhodobacter sphaeroides to changes in light intensity.

    PubMed

    Berry, R M; Armitage, J P

    2000-03-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides can swim toward a wide range of attractants (a process known as taxis), propelled by a single rotating flagellum. The reversals of motor direction that cause tumbles in Eschericia coli taxis are replaced by brief motor stops, and taxis is controlled by a complex sensory system with multiple homologues of the E. coli sensory proteins. We tethered photosynthetically grown cells of R. sphaeroides by their flagella and measured the response of the flagellar motor to changes in light intensity. The unstimulated bias (probability of not being stopped) was significantly larger than the bias of tethered E. coli but similar to the probability of not tumbling in swimming E. coli. Otherwise, the step and impulse responses were the same as those of tethered E. coli to chemical attractants. This indicates that the single motor and multiple sensory signaling pathways in R. sphaeroides generate the same swimming response as several motors and a single pathway in E. coli, and that the response of the single motor is directly observable in the swimming pattern. Photo-responses were larger in the presence of cyanide or the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 4-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), consistent with the photo-response being detected via changes in the rate of electron transport.

  20. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathway for sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol in the purple bacterium R. sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The membrane lipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQD) can be found in all photosynthetically active membranes studied. In a green leaf, about 50% of the organic sulfur is bound in SQD. Therefore, this sulfolipid constitutes a major component of the global sulfur cycle. However, since the discovery of SQD, very little progress has been made towards the elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway. For a genetical analysis of the pathway of SQD, we selected the photosynthetic purple-nonsulfur bacterium R. sphaeroides, as our model system. We have been able to isolate several classes of mutants, which show reduced levels of SQD. Some of the mutants accumulate {sup 35}S-labeled, water soluble compounds. We expect that these compounds are related to precursors or are precursors, which accumulate due to a specific block in the biosynthetic pathway of SQD. To study the possible precursor function of these compounds, we developed an in vitro SQD biosynthesis system using cell free extracts from R. sphaeroides. In addition, we have been able to isolate cosmids prepared from WT DNA, which complement three classes of SQD mutants in R. sphaeroides. The analysis and expression of the genes encoded by these cosmids should facilitate the characterization of the proteins involved in SQD biosynthesis.

  1. Rhodobacter sphaeroides LexA has dual activity: optimising and repressing recA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Angels; Fernández, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Barbé, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides recA promoter (PrecA) is induced upon DNA damage in a lexA-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that LexA protein represses and might also activate transcription of PrecA. Purified R.sphaeroides LexA protein specifically binds the SOS boxes located within the PrecA region. In vitro transcription analysis, using Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP), indicated that the presence of LexA may stimulate and repress transcription of PrecA. EMSA and DNase I footprinting experiments show that LexA and RNAP can bind simultaneously to PrecA. At low LexA concentrations it enhances RNAP binding to PrecA, stimulates open complex formation and strand separation beyond the transcription start site. At high LexA concentrations, however, RNAP-promoted strand separation is not observed beyond the +5 region. LexA might repress transcription by interfering with the clearance process instead of blocking the access of RNAP to the promoter region. Based on these findings we propose that the R.sphaeroides LexA protein performs fine tuning of the SOS response, which might provide a physiological advantage by enhancing transcription of SOS genes and delaying full activation of the response. PMID:11917014

  2. Coenzyme Q10 production in a 150-l reactor by a mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kien, Nguyen Ba; Kong, In-Soo; Lee, Min-Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2010-05-01

    For the commercial production of CoQ(10), batch-type fermentations were attempted in a 150-l fermenter using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides. Optimum temperature and initial aeration rate were found to be 30 degrees C and 2 vvm, respectively. Under optimum fermentation conditions, the maximum value of specific CoQ(10) content was achieved reproducibly as 6.34 mg/g DCW after 24 h, with 3.02 g/l of DCW. During the fermentation, aeration shift (from the adequate aeration at the early growth phase to the limited aeration in active cellular metabolism) was a key factor in CoQ(10) production for scale-up. A higher value of the specific CoQ(10) content (8.12 mg/g DCW) was achieved in fed-batch fermentation and comparable to those produced by the pilot-scale fed-batch fermentations of A. tumefaciens, which indicated that the mutant strain of R. sphaeroides used in this study was a potential high CoQ(10) producer. This is the first detailed study to demonstrate a pilot-scale production of CoQ(10) using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides.

  3. Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing, an excellent candidate producer for CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zongjie; Li, Dunhai; Li, Yanhui; Wang, Zhicong; Xiao, Yuan; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding; Hu, Chunxiang; Liu, Qifang

    2011-11-01

    Some phytoplankton can be regarded as possible candidates in the establishment of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for some intrinsic characteristics, the first characteristic is that they should grow rapidly, secondly, they should be able to endure some stress factors and develop some corresponding adaptive strategies; also it is very important that they could provide food rich in nutritious protein and vitamins for the crew; the last but not the least is they can also fulfill the other main functions of CELSS, including supplying oxygen, removing carbon dioxide and recycling the metabolic waste. According to these characteristics, Nostoc sphaeroides, a potential healthy food in China, was selected as the potential producer in CELSS. It was found that the oxygen average evolution rate of this algae is about 150 μmol O 2 mg -1 h -1, and the size of them are ranged from 2 to 20 mm. Also it can be cultured with high population density, which indicated that the potential productivity of Nostoc sphaeroides is higher than other algae in limited volume. We measured the nutrient contents of the cyanobacterium and concluded it was a good food for the crew. Based on above advantages, Nostoc sphaeroides was assumed to a suitable phytoplankton for the establishment of Controlled Ecological Life Support System. We plan to develop suitable bioreactor with the cyanobacterium for supplying oxygen and food in future space missions.

  4. Dimerization of core complexes as an efficient strategy for energy trapping in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Chenchiliyan, Manoop; Timpmann, Kõu; Jalviste, Erko; Adams, Peter G; Hunter, C Neil; Freiberg, Arvi

    2016-06-01

    In the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, light harvesting LH2 complexes transfer absorbed solar energy to RC-LH1-PufX core complexes, which are mainly found in the dimeric state. Many other purple phototrophs have monomeric core complexes and the basis for requiring dimeric cores is not fully established, so we analysed strains of Rba. sphaeroides that contain either native dimeric core complexes or altered monomeric cores harbouring a deletion of the first 12 residues from the N-terminus of PufX, which retains the PufX polypeptide but removes the major determinant of core complex dimerization. Membranes were purified from strains with dimeric or monomeric cores, and with either high or low levels of the LH2 complex. Samples were interrogated with absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence kinetic spectroscopies to reveal their light-harvesting and energy trapping properties. We find that under saturating excitation light intensity the photosynthetic membranes containing LH2 and monomeric core complexes have fluorescence lifetimes nearly twice that of membranes with LH2 plus dimeric core complexes. This trend of increased lifetime is maintained with RCs in the open state as well, and for two different levels of LH2 content. Thus, energy trapping is more efficient when photosynthetic membranes of Rba. sphaeroides consist of RC-LH1-PufX dimers and LH2 complexes.

  5. Conformational lability in the class II MHC 310 helix and adjacent extended strand dictate HLA-DM susceptibility and peptide exchange

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Corrie A.; Negroni, Maria P.; Kellersberger, Katherine A.; Zavala-Ruiz, Zarixia; Evans, James E.; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    HLA-DM is required for efficient peptide exchange on class II MHC molecules, but its mechanism of action is controversial. We trapped an intermediate state of class II MHC HLA-DR1 by substitution of αF54, resulting in a protein with increased HLA-DM binding affinity, weakened MHC-peptide hydrogen bonding as measured by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and increased susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Structural analysis revealed a set of concerted conformational alterations at the N-terminal end of the peptide-binding site. These results suggest that interaction with HLA-DM is driven by a conformational change of the MHC II protein in the region of the α-subunit 310 helix and adjacent extended strand region, and provide a model for the mechanism of DM-mediated peptide exchange. PMID:22084083

  6. Conformational lability in the class II MHC 310 helix and adjacent extended strand dictate HLA-DM susceptibility and peptide exchange.

    PubMed

    Painter, Corrie A; Negroni, Maria P; Kellersberger, Katherine A; Zavala-Ruiz, Zarixia; Evans, James E; Stern, Lawrence J

    2011-11-29

    HLA-DM is required for efficient peptide exchange on class II MHC molecules, but its mechanism of action is controversial. We trapped an intermediate state of class II MHC HLA-DR1 by substitution of αF54, resulting in a protein with increased HLA-DM binding affinity, weakened MHC-peptide hydrogen bonding as measured by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and increased susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Structural analysis revealed a set of concerted conformational alterations at the N-terminal end of the peptide-binding site. These results suggest that interaction with HLA-DM is driven by a conformational change of the MHC II protein in the region of the α-subunit 3(10) helix and adjacent extended strand region, and provide a model for the mechanism of DM-mediated peptide exchange.

  7. Nearest-neighbor nitrogen and oxygen distances in the iron(II)-DNA complex studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Bertoncini, Clelia R A; Meneghini, Rogerio; Tolentino, Helio

    2010-11-01

    In mammalian cells, DNA-bound Fe(II) reacts with H₂O₂ producing the highly reactive hydroxyl radical (OH) in situ. Since ·OH attacks nearby DNA residue generating oxidative DNA damage, many questions have arisen regarding iron-DNA complex formations and their implication in pre-malignant mutations and aging. In this work, a solid sample of Fe(II)-DNA complex containing one Fe(II) per 10 nucleotides was analyzed from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra collected in a synchrotron radiation light source. Best fitting parameters of the EXAFS signal for the first two shells provide evidence of five oxygen atoms at 1.99 ± 0.02 Å and one nitrogen atom at 2.20 ± 0.02 Å in the inner coordination sphere of the Fe(II)-DNA complex. Considering that both purine base moieties bearing nitrogen atoms are prone to chelate iron, these results are consistent with the previously observed lower levels of DNA damage in cytosine nucleotides relative to adenine and guanine sites in cells under more physiological conditions of Fe(II) Fenton reaction.

  8. Skin Anti-Aging Activities of Bacteriochlorophyll a from Photosynthetic Bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Young; Yim, Tae Bin; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the anti-aging skin effects of bacteriochlorophyll a isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides are first reported, with notably low cytotoxicity in the range of 1% to 14% in adding 0.00078 (% (w/w)) of the extracts, compared with the normal growth of both human dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte cells without any treatment as a control. The highest production of procollagen from human fibroblast cells (CCD-986sk) was observed as 221.7 ng/ml with 0.001 (% (w/w)) of bacteriochlorophyll a, whereas 150 and 200 ng/ml of procollagen production resulted from addition of 0.001 (% (w/w)) of the photosynthetic bacteria. The bacteriochlorophylla- induced TNF-α production increased to 63.8%, which was lower secretion from HaCaT cells than that from addition of 0.00005 (% (w/w)) of bacteriochlorophyll a. Additionally, bacteriochlorophyll a upregulated the expression of genes related to skin anti-aging (i.e., keratin 10, involucrin, transglutaminase-1, and MMPs), by up to 4-15 times those of the control. However, crude extracts from R. sphaeroides did not enhance the expression level of these genes. Bacteriochlorophyll a showed higher antioxidant activity of 63.8% in DPPH free radical scavenging than those of water, ethanol, and 70% ethanol extracts (14.0%, 57.2%, and 12.6%, respectively). It was also shown that the high antioxidant activity could be attributed to the skin anti-aging effect of bacteriochlorophyll a, although R. sphaeroides itself would not exhibit significant anti-aging activities.

  9. Photophysical and Electrochemical Studies of Multinuclear Complexes of Iron(II) with Acetate and Extended Conjugated N-Donor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Roslan, Muhamad Faris; Azil, Afiq; Nordin, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    A dimeric iron(II) complex, trans-[Fe2(CH3COO)4(L1)2] (1), and a trinuclear iron(II) complex, [Fe3(CH3COO)4(H2O)4(L2)] (2), were studied as potential dye-sensitised solar cell materials. The structures of both complexes were deduced by a combination of instrumental analyses and molecular modelling. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data suggested that 1 was made up of 56.8% high-spin (HS) and 43.2% low-spin (LS) Fe(II) atoms at 294 K and has a moderate antiferromagnetic interaction (J = −81.2 cm−1) between the two Fe(II) centres, while 2 was made up of 27.7% HS and 72.3% LS Fe(II) atoms at 300 K. The optical band gaps (Eo) for 1 were 1.9 eV (from absorption spectrum) and 2.2 eV (from fluorescence spectrum), electrochemical bandgap (Ee) was 0.83 eV, excited state lifetime (τ) was 0.67 ns, and formal redox potential (E′(FeIII/FeII)) was +0.63 V. The corresponding values for 2 were 3.5 eV (from absorption spectrum), 1.8 eV (from fluorescence spectrum), 0.69 eV, 2.8 ns, and +0.41 V. PMID:25879076

  10. The response of antioxidant systems in Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation and the protective effects of exogenous antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hu, Chunxiang; Li, Dunhai; Zhang, Delu; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Kun; Liu, Yongding

    UV radiation is one of many harmful factors found in space that are detrimental to organisms on earth in space exploration. In the present work, we examined the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz (Cyanobacterium) and the effects of exogenously applied antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation. It was found that UV-B radiation promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II (PSII) and exogenously applied antioxidant: sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) and content of MDA (malondialdehyde) and ASC (ascorbate) were improved by 0.5 mM and 1 mM SNP, but 0.1 mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxidant system. Addition of exogenous NAC decreased the activity of SOD, POD, CAT and the content MDA and ASC. In contrast, exogenously applied NAC increased GSH content. The results suggest that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms: SNP may play double roles as both sources of reactive free radicals as well as ROS scavengers in mediating the protective role of PSII on algae under UV-B radiation. On the other hand, NAC functions as an antioxidant or precursor of glutathione, which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation.

  11. Absorbance changes accompanying the fast fluorescence induction in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Bína, David; Litvín, Radek; Vácha, Frantisek

    2010-08-01

    The authors present a study of the fluorescence and absorbance transients occurring in whole cells of purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides on the millisecond timescale under pulsed actinic illumination. The fluorescence induction curve is interpreted in terms of combination of effects of redox changes in the reaction center and the membrane potential. The results of this study support the view that the membrane potential act predominantly to increase the fluorescence yield. Advantages of the pulsed actinic illumination for study of the operation of the electron transport chain in vivo are discussed.

  12. Evidence for the purely electronic character of primary electron transfer in purple bacteria Rh. Sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, I. O.; Poddubnyy, V. V.; Eremin, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A quantum-chemical calculation of the excited electronic states of a Rh. Sphaeroides reaction centre was performed. We discovered a new excited electronic state which can participate in electron transfer (ET). The energy gradient calculations showed that photoexcitation activates only high-frequency vibrational modes. This contradicts the widely accepted picture of ET resulting from vibrational wave packet motion. An alternative model is suggested where ET has a purely dissipative character and occurs only due to pigment--protein interaction. With this model, we demonstrate that oscillations in the femtosecond spectra can be caused by the new electronic state and non-Markovian character of dissipative dynamics.

  13. Interaction of Product Analogues With the Active Site of Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Nelson, K.J.; Harris, H.H.; Doonan, C.J.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; /Saskatchewan U. /Duke U. /Sydney U.

    2007-07-09

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The similarity of the trimethylarsine and dimethylsulfide complexes suggests in turn that the dimethylsulfide reduced enzyme possesses a classical coordination of DMSO with no special elongation of the S-O bond, as previously suggested.

  14. 77 FR 30173 - Amendment of Americans With Disabilities Act Title II and Title III Regulations To Extend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... accommodations, there were some comments from title II entities. Organizations representing the hotel industry and individual owners and operators of hotels and campgrounds provided the largest number of comments... extension would require them to continue to pay full price for a hotel room during the extension...

  15. Treatment of stage i and ii mediastinal Hodgkin disease: a comparison of involved fields, extended fields, and involved fields followed by MOPP in patients stage by laparotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemeister, F.B.; Fuller, L.M.; Sullivan, J.A.; North, L.; Velasquez, W.; Conrad, F.G.; McLaughlin, P.; Butter, J.J.; Shullenberger, C.C.

    1981-12-01

    Three treatment programs for Stage I and II mediastinal Hodgkin disease (established by laparotomy) were compared. Involved-field radiotherapy + MOPP gave a disease-free survival rate of 97%, significantly different from 62% and 55% for involved and extended fields, respectively. Corresponding survival figures of 97%, 88%, and 84% were not signiticantly different statistically due to salvage with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Among patients given radiotherapy alone, the survival figure of 94% for limited mediastinal disease was significantly better than 63% for extensive mediastinal and hilar disease; corresponding disease-free figures of 72% and 35% were also significantly different. Constitutional symptoms were an important prognostic factor in disease-free survival following the use of involved fields; hilar disease was important only with large mediastinal masses. Most relapses were intrathoracic; MOPP alone salvaged only 47%. Treatment of State I and II Hodgkin disease should be based on symptoms, extent of mediastinal disease, and hilar involvement.

  16. Polarized Range-Extended X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oriented Photosystem II Membranes in the S[subscript 1] State

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Glatzel, Pieter; Messinger, Johannes; Lewis, Azul; Sauer, Kenneth; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-11-13

    Detailed information about the orientation of particular Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca vectors in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the Photosystem II in the S1 state provide a critical starting point for the analysis of the structural changes in the OEC along the catalytic S{sub i}-state cycle. The method of polarized range-extended EXAFS is an important technical development, that allows: (i) resolution of the 2.7 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} Mn-Mn interactions; (ii) resolution of 3.2 {angstrom} Mn-Mn and 3.4 {angstrom} Mn-Ca; (iii) determination of 2.7 {angstrom}, 2.8 {angstrom}, 3.2 {angstrom} Mn-Mn and 3.4 {angstrom} Mn-Ca vectors orientation relative to the membrane normal.

  17. First Insights into the Genome Sequence of the Strictly Anaerobic Homoacetogenic Sporomusa sphaeroides Strain E (DSM 2875)

    PubMed Central

    Villamizar, Genis Andrés Castillo; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Sporomusa sphaeroides strain E (DSM 2875), a strict anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium. It is able to grow autotrophically on different one-carbon compounds. The strain possesses several genes of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a single chromosome (4.98 Mb). PMID:28336590

  18. Observation of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling in 1-D and 2-D extended structures of copper(II) terephthalates

    SciTech Connect

    Deakin, L.; Arif, A.M.; Miller, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    The reaction between CuCl{sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}2H{sub 2}O and disodium terephthalate, Na{sub 2}tp, in aqueous solution simultaneously produces chain, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O:{kappa}O{prime})]copper(II), monohydrate, Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}H{sub 2}O (1), and layered, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O)]copper(II), Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2} (2), structured materials. 1 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 7}) belongs to the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 space group [a = 6.3015(4) {angstrom}, b = 6.8743(4) {angstrom}, c = 22.9972(14) {angstrom}, and Z = 4] and incorporates tp in a bridging bis-monodentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. 2 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 6}) which belongs to the orthorhombic Pmc2{sub 1} space group [a = 10.7421(8) {angstrom}, b = 7.2339(10) {angstrom}, c = 5.7143(13) {angstrom}, and Z = 2] incorporates tp in a mono-bidentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a distorted square pyramid. 1 and 2 exhibit axial X-band powder EPR spectra with G{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.08, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (1) and g{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.07, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (2) at 300 K. 1 obeys the Curie-Weiss law at high temperatures ({theta} = {minus}7.2 K) and at low temperatures behaves as 1-D magnetic chains with an exchange-coupling constant of J/k{sub B} = {minus}9.15 K (H = {minus}2JS{sub 1}{center{underscore}dot}S{sub 2}). This material displays a spontaneous moment below 2 K under small applied magnetic fields, consistent with the presence of spin canting. 2 exhibits ferromagnetic interactions with {theta} = +0.8 K. Along the 1-D chain where coordinated water forms the bridge between metal centers, the coupling between Cu(II) is J/k{sub B} = +0.6 K. The fit of the magnetic susceptibility for 2 using a molecular field correction, which takes into consideration antiferromagnetic interactions between chains via the tp ligand, yields J{prime}/k{sub B} = {minus}0.13 K.

  19. SOFIA-EXES Mid-IR Observations of [Fe II] Emission from the Extended Atmosphere of Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, G. M.; DeWitt, C.; Richter, M. J.; Greathouse, T. K.; Ryde, N.; Guinan, E. F.; O’Gorman, E.; Vacca, W. D.

    2017-02-01

    We present a NASA-DLR SOFIA-Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) and NASA Infrared Telescope Facility-Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) mid-IR R≃ {{50,000}} spectral study of forbidden Fe ii transitions in the early-type M supergiants, Betelgeuse (α Ori: M2 Iab) and Antares (α Sco: M1 Iab + B3 V). With EXES, we spectrally resolve the ground term [Fe ii] 25.99 μm (a{}6{D}J=7/2{--9/2}: {E}{up}=540 K) emission from Betelgeuse. We find a small centroid blueshift of 1.9 ± 0.4 {km} {{{s}}}-1 that is a significant fraction (20%) of the current epoch wind speed, with a FWHM of 14.3 ± 0.1 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The TEXES observations of [Fe ii] 17.94 μm (a{}4{F}J=7/2-9/2: {E}{up}={{3400}} K) show a broader FWHM of 19.1 ± 0.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1, consistent with previous observations, and a small redshift of 1.6 ± 0.6 {km} {{{s}}}-1 with respect to the adopted stellar center-of-mass velocity of {V}{CoM}=20.9+/- 0.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1. To produce [Fe ii] 25.99 μm blueshifts of 20% wind speed requires that the emission arises closer to the star than existing thermal models for α Ori’s circumstellar envelope predict. This implies a more rapid wind cooling to below 500 K within 10{R}* ({θ }* =44 mas, dist = 200 pc) of the star, where the wind has also reached a significant fraction of the maximum wind speed. The line width is consistent with the turbulence in the outflow being close to the hydrogen sound speed. EXES observations of [Fe ii] 22.90 μm (a{}4{D}J=5/2{--7/2}: {E}{up}={{11,700}} K) reveal no emission from either star. These findings confirm the dominance of cool plasma in the mixed region where hot chromospheric plasma emits copiously in the UV, and they also constrain the wind heating produced by the poorly understood mechanisms that drive stellar outflows from these low variability and weak-dust signature stars.

  20. Comparison of aerobic and photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Dominguez, Migual; Tavano, Christine; Monroe, Matthew E.; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-07-05

    Proteomes from aerobic and photosynthetic grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 cell cultures were characterized using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with an accurate mass and elution time (AMT) tag approach. Roughly 8000 high quality peptides were detected that represented 1,445 gene products and 34% of the predicted proteins. The identified proteins corresponded primarily to open reading frames (ORFs) contained within the two chromosomal elements of this bacterium, but a significant number were also observed from ORFs associated with 5 naturally occurring plasmids. Data mining of peptides revealed a number of proteins uniquely detected within the photosynthetic cell culture. Proteins observed in both aerobic respiratory and photosynthetic grown cultures were analyzed semi-quantitatively by comparing their estimated abundances to provide insights into bioenergetic models for aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. Additional emphasis was placed on gene products annotated as hypothetical to gain information as to their potential roles within these two growth conditions. Where possible, transcriptome data for R. sphaeroides obtained under the same culture conditions were compared with these results. This comparative study demonstrated the applicability of the AMT tag approach for high-throughput proteomic analyses of pathways associated with the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  1. Color-sensitive motility and methanol release responses in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kort, R; Crielaard, W; Spudich, J L; Hellingwerf, K J

    2000-06-01

    Blue-light-induced repellent and demethylation responses, characteristic of behavioral adaptation, were observed in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. They were analyzed by computer-assisted motion analysis and through the release of volatile tritiated compounds from [methyl-(3)H]methionine-labeled cells, respectively. Increases in the stop frequency and the rate of methanol release were induced by exposure of cells to repellent light signals, such as an increase in blue- and a decrease in infrared-light intensity. At a lambda of >500 nm the amplitude of the methanol release response followed the absorbance spectrum of the photosynthetic pigments, suggesting that they function as photosensors for this response. In contrast to the previously reported motility response to a decrease in infrared light, the blue-light response reported here does not depend on the number of photosynthetic pigments per cell, suggesting that it is mediated by a separate sensor. Therefore, color discrimination in taxis responses in R. sphaeroides involves two photosensing systems: the photosynthetic pigments and an additional photosensor, responding to blue light. The signal generated by the former system could result in the migration of cells to a light climate beneficial for photosynthesis, while the blue-light system could allow cells to avoid too-high intensities of (harmful) blue light.

  2. Kinetic analysis of N-acylphosphatidylserine accumulation and implications for membrane assembly in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Cain, B D; Donohue, T J; Kaplan, S

    1982-01-01

    The accumulation of N-acylphosphatidylserine (NAPS) in response to the inclusion of Tris in the growth medium of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides strain M29-5 has been examined. In the accompanying paper (Donohue et al., J. Bacteriol. 152:000--000, 1982), we show that in response to Tris, NAPS accumulated to as much as 40% of the total cellular phospholipid content. NAPS accumulation began immediately upon addition of Tris and was reflected as an abrupt 12-fold increase in the apparent rate of NAPS accumulation. We suggest that Tris altered the flow of metabolites through a preexisting and previously unknown metabolic pathway. NAPS accumulation ceased immediately upon the removal of Tris; however, accumulated NAPS remained largely metabolically stable. Importantly, under conditions in which NAPS was not accumulated, the intracytoplasmic membrane was shown to be virtually devoid of newly synthesized NAPS. The significance of this observation is discussed in terms of its physiological implications on phospholipid transfer and membrane biogenesis in R. sphaeroides. PMID:6982265

  3. Phototrophic utilization of taurine by the purple nonsulfur bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Novak, Ryan T; Gritzer, Rachel F; Leadbetter, Edward R; Godchaux, Walter

    2004-06-01

    Taurine metabolism by two phototrophically grown purple nonsulfur bacteria enrichment isolates has been examined. Rhodopseudomonas palustris (strain Tau1) grows with taurine as a sole electron donor, sulfur and nitrogen source during photoautotrophic growth. Rhodobacter sphaeroides (strain Tau3) grows on the compound as sole electron donor, sulfur and nitrogen source, and partial carbon source, in the presence of CO(2) during photoheterotrophic growth. Both organisms utilize an inducible taurine-pyruvate aminotransferase and a sulfoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase. The products of this metabolism are bisulfite and acetyl phosphate. Bisulfite ultimately was oxidized to sulfate, but this was not an adequate source of electrons for photometabolism. Experiments using either [U-(14)C]taurine or (14)CO(2) demonstrated that Rb. sphaeroides Tau3 assimilated the carbon from approximately equimolar amounts of taurine and exogenous CO(2). The taurine-carbon assimilation was not diminished by excess non-radioactive bicarbonate. Malate synthase (but not isocitrate lyase) was induced in these taurine-grown cells. It is concluded that assimilation of taurine carbon occurs through an intermediate other than CO(2). Similar labelling experiments with Rp. palustris Tau1 determined that taurine is utilized only as an electron donor for the reduction of CO(2), which contributes all the cell carbon. Photoautotrophic metabolism was confirmed in this organism by the absence of either malate synthase or isocitrate lyase in taurine+CO(2)-grown cells. Culture collection strains of these two bacteria did not utilize taurine in these fashions.

  4. A cryptochrome-like protein is involved in the regulation of photosynthesis genes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hendrischk, Anne-Kathrin; Frühwirth, Sebastian Walter; Moldt, Julia; Pokorny, Richard; Metz, Sebastian; Kaiser, Gebhard; Jäger, Andreas; Batschauer, Alfred; Klug, Gabriele

    2009-11-01

    Blue light receptors belonging to the cryptochrome/photolyase family are found in all kingdoms of life. The functions of photolyases in repair of UV-damaged DNA as well as of cryptochromes in the light-dependent regulation of photomorphogenetic processes and in the circadian clock in plants and animals are well analysed. In prokaryotes, the only role of members of this protein family that could be demonstrated is DNA repair. Recently, we identified a gene for a cryptochrome-like protein (CryB) in the alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The protein lacks the typical C-terminal extension of cryptochromes, and is not related to the Cry DASH family. Here we demonstrate that CryB binds flavin adenine dinucleotide that can be photoreduced by blue light. CryB binds single-stranded DNA with very high affinity (K(d) approximately 10(-8) M) but double-stranded DNA and single-stranded RNA with far lower affinity (K(d) approximately 10(-6) M). Despite of that, no in vitro repair activity for pyrimidine dimers in single-stranded DNA could be detected. However, we show that CryB clearly affects the expression of genes for pigment-binding proteins and consequently the amount of photosynthetic complexes in R. sphaeroides. Thus, for the first time a role of a bacterial cryptochrome in gene regulation together with a biological function is demonstrated.

  5. Cytotoxic activities of extracts and compounds from Viscum coloratum and its transformation products by Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guan-E; Chen, Bainian; Zhang, Zhaoming; Gong, Jun; Bai, Hongjun; Li, Jiankuan; Wang, Yufen; Li, Baozhen

    2009-03-01

    The bioassay-oriented fractionation of mistletoe crude extracts (MCEE) using 75% ethanol and culture products of mistletoe transformed by Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a photosynthetic bacterium (PSBT), revealed that the high cytotoxic activities were due to the petroleum ether extracts (PEs) and the acid-precipitated proteins from the aqueous extracts (AQs) of MCEE and PSBT. The isolated triterpenes may account for the activities of the PEs of MCEE and PSBT, respectively. Extraction of MCEE using petroleum ether led to the isolation of 3-epi-betulinic acid (1), betulonic acid (2), oleanolic acid (3), and beta-amyrin acetate (4), while petroleum ether extraction of PSBT led to the isolation of 1,3,4,betulinic acid (5), erythrodiol (6), and (3beta)-olean-12-ene-3,23-diol (7). The PE of PSBT exerted higher cytotoxicity than the PE of MCEE, which was due to the different triterpene contents of these two extracts. The cytotoxic activities of all compounds were tested, and the results revealed that compounds 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 contributed significantly to the cytotoxicities of both PEs. The AQ of the PSBT exerted almost the same cytotoxic activity and lower toxicity compared to the AQ of the MCEE. These findings indicate that mistletoe products biotransformed by R. sphaeroides could be used to treat cancers, since they have lower toxicities and higher antitumor activities compared to standard treatments.

  6. Extended Cahill-Glauber formalism for finite-dimensional spaces. II. Applications in quantum tomography and quantum teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Marchiolli, Marcelo A.; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Galetti, Diogenes

    2005-10-15

    By means of a mod(N)-invariant operator basis, s-parametrized phase-space functions associated with bounded operators in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space are introduced in the context of the extended Cahill-Glauber formalism, and their properties are discussed in details. The discrete Glauber-Sudarshan, Wigner, and Husimi functions emerge from this formalism as specific cases of s-parametrized phase-space functions where, in particular, a hierarchical process among them is promptly established. In addition, a phase-space description of quantum tomography and quantum teleportation is presented and new results are obtained.

  7. Image-spectroscopy--II. The removal of plural scattering from extended energy-filtered series by Fourier deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P J; Midgley, P A

    2001-08-01

    The increased spectral information obtained by acquiring an EFTEM image-series over several hundred eV allows plural scattering to be removed from loss images using standard deconvolution techniques developed for the quantification of EEL spectra. In this work, both Fourier-log and Fourier-ratio deconvolution techniques have been applied successfully to such image-series. Application of the Fourier-log technique over an energy-loss range of several hundred eV has been achieved by implementation of a novel method that extends the effective dynamic range of EFTEM image-series acquisition by over four orders of magnitude. Experimental results show that the removal of plural scattering from EFTEM image-series gives a significant improvement in quantification for thicker specimen regions. Further, the recovery of the single-scattering distribution using the Fourier-log technique over an extended energy-loss range is shown to result in an increase in both the ionisation-edge jump-ratio and the signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Stochastic dynamics of extended objects in driven systems II: Current quantization in the low-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Michael J.; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; Klein, John R.

    2016-12-01

    Driven Langevin processes have appeared in a variety of fields due to the relevance of natural phenomena having both deterministic and stochastic effects. The stochastic currents and fluxes in these systems provide a convenient set of observables to describe their non-equilibrium steady states. Here we consider stochastic motion of a (k - 1) -dimensional object, which sweeps out a k-dimensional trajectory, and gives rise to a higher k-dimensional current. By employing the low-temperature (low-noise) limit, we reduce the problem to a discrete Markov chain model on a CW complex, a topological construction which generalizes the notion of a graph. This reduction allows the mean fluxes and currents of the process to be expressed in terms of solutions to the discrete Supersymmetric Fokker-Planck (SFP) equation. Taking the adiabatic limit, we show that generic driving leads to rational quantization of the generated higher dimensional current. The latter is achieved by implementing the recently developed tools, coined the higher-dimensional Kirchhoff tree and co-tree theorems. This extends the study of motion of extended objects in the continuous setting performed in the prequel (Catanzaro et al.) to this manuscript.

  9. Tyre-road grip coefficient assessment - Part II: online estimation using instrumented vehicle, extended Kalman filter, and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Pablo; Mántaras, Daniel A.; Fidalgo, Eloy; Álvarez, Javier; Riva, Paolo; Girón, Pablo; Compadre, Diego; Ferran, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the limit of safe driving conditions by identifying the maximal friction coefficient in a real vehicle. The study will focus on finding a method to determine this limit before reaching the skid, which is valuable information in the context of traffic safety. Since it is not possible to measure the friction coefficient directly, it will be estimated using the appropriate tools in order to get the most accurate information. A real vehicle is instrumented to collect information of general kinematics and steering tie-rod forces. A real-time algorithm is developed to estimate forces and aligning torque in the tyres using an extended Kalman filter and neural networks techniques. The methodology is based on determining the aligning torque; this variable allows evaluation of the behaviour of the tyre. It transmits interesting information from the tyre-road contact and can be used to predict the maximal tyre grip and safety margin. The maximal grip coefficient is estimated according to a knowledge base, extracted from computer simulation of a high detailed three-dimensional model, using Adams® software. The proposed methodology is validated and applied to real driving conditions, in which maximal grip and safety margin are properly estimated.

  10. Extended Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Analyses at the Shuttle Landing Facility: Phase II Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A seven year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. A PC-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) tool was created to display the data quickly.

  11. Moko Disease-Causing Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from Brazil Extend Known Diversity in Paraphyletic Phylotype II.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Greecy M R; Santos, Liliana A; Felix, Kátia C S; Rollemberg, Christtianno L; Silva, Adriano M F; Souza, Elineide B; Cellier, Gilles; Prior, Philippe; Mariano, Rosa L R

    2014-11-01

    The epidemic situation of Moko disease-causing strains in Latin America and Brazil is unclear. Thirty-seven Ralstonia solanacearum strains from Brazil that cause the Moko disease on banana and heliconia plants were sampled and phylogenetically typed using the endoglucanase (egl) and DNA repair (mutS) genes according to the phylotype and sequevar classification. All of the strains belonged to phylotype II and a portion of the strains was typed as the Moko disease-related sequevars IIA-6 and IIA-24. Nevertheless, two unsuspected sequevars also harbored the Moko disease-causing strains IIA-41 and IIB-25, and a new sequevar was described and named IIA-53. All of the strains were pathogenic to banana and some of the strains of sequevars IIA-6, IIA-24, and IIA-41 were also pathogenic to tomato. The Moko disease-causing strains from sequevar IIB-25 were pathogenic to potato but not to tomato. These results highlight the high diversity of strains of Moko in Brazil, reinforce the efficiency of the egl gene to reveal relationships among these strains, and contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of paraphyletic Moko disease-causing strains of the R. solanacearum species complex, where the following seven distinct genetic clusters have been described: IIA-6, IIA-24, IIA-41, IIA-53, IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIB-25.

  12. Labile ruthenium(ii) complexes with extended phenyl-substituted terpyridyl ligands: synthesis, aquation and anticancer evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-09-21

    Ruthenium complexes have been considered as promising substitutes for cisplatin in cancer chemotherapy. However, novel ruthenium-based therapies are faced with some limitations, such as unimpressive cytotoxicity toward solid tumors. Herein, we designed and synthesized phenyl-substituted terpyridyl ruthenium(ii) complexes ([Ru(tpy)(bpy)Cl](+) (Ru1), [Ru(phtpy)(bpy)Cl](+) (Ru2) and [Ru(biphtpy)(bpy)Cl](+) (Ru3)) which exhibited distinctly different anticancer activity. Ru1-Ru3 all underwent moderate aquation in buffer solution and this process was significantly inhibited by high chloride concentration. Cancer cells were found to readily uptake the relatively hydrophobic Ru3, as quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Ru1 was found to be non-cytotoxic (IC50 > 100 μM) while Ru3 exhibited very promising cytotoxicity on both two-dimensional (2D) cancer cell monolayers and 3D MCTSs. An antiproliferative assay revealed that Ru3 significantly inhibited cellular DNA replication which ultimately induced apoptosis of cancer cells.

  13. Planck's Dusty GEMS. II. Extended [CII] emission and absorption in the Garnet at z = 3.4 seen with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N.; Kneissl, R.; Cañameras, R.; Boone, F.; Falgarone, E.; Frye, B.; Gerin, M.; Koenig, S.; Lagache, G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Malhotra, S.; Scott, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present spatially resolved ALMA [CII] observations of the bright (flux density S350 = 400 mJy at 350 μm), gravitationally lensed, starburst galaxy PLCK G045.1+61.1 at z = 3.427, the "Garnet". This source is part of our set of "Planck's Dusty GEMS", discovered with the Planck's all-sky survey. Two emission-line clouds with a relative velocity offset of ~600 km s-1 extend towards north-east and south-west, respectively, of a small, intensely star-forming clump with a star-formation intensity of 220 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, akin to maximal starbursts. [CII] is also seen in absorption, with a redshift of +350 km s-1 relative to the brightest CO component. [CII] absorption has previously only been found in the Milky Way along sightlines toward bright high-mass star-forming regions, and this is the first detection in another galaxy. Similar to Galactic environments, the [CII] absorption feature is associated with [CI] emission, implying that this is diffuse gas shielded from the UV radiation of the clump, and likely at large distances from the clump. Since absorption can only be seen in front of a continuum source, the gas in this structure can definitely be attributed to gas flowing towards the clump. The absorber could be part of a cosmic filament or merger debris being accreted onto the galaxy. We discuss our results also in light of the on-going debate of the origin of the [CII] deficit in dusty star-forming galaxies. Based on data obtained with ALMA in program 2013.1.01230.S, and with EMIR on the IRAM 30 m telescope in program 223-13.

  14. Review of behavior of mixed-oxide fuel elements in extended overpower transient tests in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.; Nagai, S.; Nakae, N.

    1994-10-01

    From a series of five tests conducted in EBR-II, a substantial data base has been established on the performance of mixed-oxide fuel elements in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor under slow-ramp transient overpower conditions. Each test contained 19 preirradiated fuel elements with varying design and prior operating histories. Elements with aggressive design features, such as high fuel smear density and/or thin cladding, were included to accentuate transient effects. The ramp rates were either 0.1 or 10% {Delta}P/P/s and the overpowers ranged between {approx}60 and 100% of the elements` prior power ratings. Six elements breached during the tests, all with aggressive design parameters. The other elements, including all those with moderate design features for the reference or advanced long-life drivers for PNC`s prototype fast reactor Monju, maintained their cladding integrity during the tests. Posttest examination results indicated that fuel/cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI) was the most significant mechanism causing the cladding strain and breach. In contrast, pressure loading from the fission gas in the element plenum was less important, even in high-burnup elements. During an overpower transient, FCMI arises from fuel/cladding differential thermal expansion, transient fuel swelling, and, significantly, the gas pressure in the sealed central cavity of elements with substantial centerline fuel melting. Fuel performance data from these tests, including cladding breaching margin and transient cladding strain, are correlatable with fuel-element design and operating parameters. These correlations are being incorporated into fuel-element behavior codes. At the two tested ramp rates, fuel element behavior appears to be insensitive to transient ramp rate and there appears to be no particular vulnerability to slow ramp transients as previously perceived.

  15. Changes in morphology, cell wall composition and soluble proteome in Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells exposed to chromate.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Francesca; Rinalducci, Sara; Agostiano, Angela; Zolla, Lello; De Leo, Francesca; Ceci, Luigi R; Trotta, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    The response of the carotenoidless Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutant R26 to chromate stress under photosynthetic conditions is investigated by biochemical and spectroscopic measurements, proteomic analysis and cell imaging. Cell cultures were found able to reduce chromate within 3-4 days. Chromate induces marked changes in the cellular dimension and morphology, as revealed by atomic force microscopy, along with compositional changes in the cell wall revealed by infrared spectroscopy. These effects are accompanied by significant changes in the level of several proteins: 15 proteins were found up-regulated and 15 down-regulated. The protein content found in chromate exposed cells is in good agreement with the biochemical, spectroscopic and microscopic results. Moreover at the present stage no specific chromate-reductase could be found in the soluble proteome, indicating that detoxification of the pollutant proceeds via aspecific reductants.

  16. Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides between 1000 and 1800 cm-1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, P; Zurek, M; Mäntele, W; Meyer, M; Scheer, H; Zinth, W

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe experiments of reaction centers of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R26) in the mid-IR region between 1000 and 1800 cm-1 are recorded with a time resolution of 300-400 fs. The difference spectra of the states P*, P+HA-, and P+QA- with respect to the ground state P predominantly reflect changes of the special pair. They show positive and negative bands due to changes of distinct vibrational modes superimposed on a broad background of enhanced absorption. A number of certain bands can be assigned to the special pair P, to the bacteriopheophytin HA, and to the quinone QA. The temporal evolution of the IR absorbance changes is well described by the time constants known from femtosecond spectroscopy of the electronic states. Differences occur only at very early times, which are indicative of fast vibrational relaxation with a time constant of a few hundred femtoseconds. PMID:7892185

  17. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of phosphoribulokinase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D. L.; Runquist, J. A.; Miziorko, H. M.; Kim, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    A recombinant form of Rhodobacter sphaeroides phosphoribulokinase (PRK), expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated by affinity chromatography, was crystallized by the sitting drop vapor diffusion technique using NH4H2PO4 (pH 5.6) as the precipitating agent. PRK crystallizes in the cubic space group P432, with unit cell parameters a = b = c = 129.55 A. Based on the assumption of one 32-kDa monomer per asymmetric unit, the Vm value is 2.83 A3/Da. The octameric molecular symmetry is consistent with two planar tetramers stacked in a nearly eclipsed arrangement. A native data set has been collected to 2.6 A resolution. PMID:8563645

  20. [On the electron stabilization within the quinone acceptor part of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers].

    PubMed

    Noks, P P; Krasil'nikov, P M; Mamonov, P A; Seĭfullina, N Kh; Uchoa, A F; Baptista, M S

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of the photoinduced differential absorption spectrum of isolated Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers was investigated. The measurements were carried out in the spectral region of 400-500 nm on the time scale of up to 200 microseconds. The spectral changes observed can be interpreted in terms of the effects of proton shift along hydrogen bonds between the primary quinone acceptor and the protein. A theoretical analysis of the spectrum time evolution was performed, which is based on the consideration of the kinetics of proton tunneling along the hydrogen bond. It was shown that the stabilization of the primary quinone electronic state occurs within the first several tens of microseconds after quinone reduction. It slows down upon the deuteration of reaction centers as well as after adding 90% of glycerol; on the other hand, it accelerates as temperature rises up to 40 degrees C.

  1. Pentasubstituted ferrocene and dirhodium(II) tetracarboxylate as building blocks for discrete fullerene-like and extended supramolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lok H; Guénée, Laure; Williams, Alan F

    2011-03-21

    The synthesis of a penta(1-methylpyrazole)ferrocenyl phosphine oxide ligand (1) [Fe(C(5)(C(3)H(2)N(2)CH(3))(5))(C(5)H(4)PO(t-C(4)H(9))(2))] is reported together with its X-ray crystal structure. Its self-assembly behavior with a dirhodium(II) tetraoctanoate linker (2) [Rh(2)(O(2)CC(7)H(15))(4)] was investigated for construction of fullerene-like assemblies of composition [(ligand)(12)(linker)(30)]. Reaction between 1 and 2 in acetonitrile resulted in the formation of a light purple precipitate (3). Evidence for the ligand-to-linker ratio of 1:2.5 expected for a fullerene-like structure [Fe(C(5)(C(3)H(2)N(2)CH(3))(5))(C(5)H(4)PO(t-C(4)H(9))(2))](12)[Rh(2)(O(2)CC(7)H(15))(4)](30) was obtained from (1)H NMR and elemental analysis. IR and Raman studies confirmed the diaxially bound coordination environment of the dirhodium linker by comparing the stretching frequencies of the carboxylate group and the rhodium-rhodium bond with those in model compound (5), [Rh(2)(O(2)CC(7)H(15))(4)](C(3)H(3)N(2)CH(3))(2), the bis-adduct of linker 2 with 1-methylpyrazole. X-ray powder diffraction and molecular modeling studies provide additional support for the formation of a spherical molecule topologically identical to fullerene with a diameter of approximately 38 Å and a molecular formula of [(1)(12)(2)(30)]. Dissolution of 3 in tetrahydrofuran (THF) followed by layering with acetonitrile afforded purple crystals of [(1)(2)(2)](∞) (6) [Fe(C(5)(C(3)H(2)N(2)CH(3))(5))(C(5)H(4)PO(t-C(4)H(9))(2))][Rh(2)(O(2)CC(7)H(15))(4)](2) with a two-dimensional polymeric structure determined by X-ray crystallography. The dirhodium linkers link ferrocenyl units by coordination to the pyrazoles but only four of the five pyrazole moieties of the pentapyrazole ligand are coordinated. The ligand-to-linker ratio of 1:2 in 6 was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis, while results from IR and Raman are in agreement with the diaxially coordinated environment of the linker observed in

  2. Advancing Rhodobacter sphaeroides as a platform for expression of functional membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Erbakan, Mustafa; Curtis, Brandon S; Nixon, B Tracy; Kumar, Manish; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein overexpression is often hindered by toxic effects on the expression host, limiting achievable volumetric productivity. Moreover, protein structure and function may be impaired due to inclusion body formation and proteolytic degradation. To address these challenges, we employed the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides for expression of challenging membrane proteins including human aquaporin 9 (hAQP9), human tight junction protein occludin (Occ), Escherichia coli toxin peptide GhoT, cellulose synthase enzyme complex (BcsAB) of R. sphaeroides and cytochrome-cy (Cyt-cy) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Titers of 47 mg/L for Cyt-cy, 7.5 mg/L for Occ, 1.5 mg/L for BcsAB and 0.5 mg/L for hAQP9 were achieved from affinity purification. While purification of GhoT was not successful, transformants displayed a distinct growth phenotype that correlated with GhoT expression. We also evaluated the functionality of these proteins by performing water transport studies for hAQP9, peroxidase activity for cytochrome-cy, and in vitro cellulose synthesis activity assay for BcsAB. While previous studies with Rhodobacter have utilized oxygen-limited semi-aerobic growth for membrane protein expression, substantial titer improvements are achieved as a result of a 3-fold increase in biomass yield using the anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth regime, which utilizes the strong native puc promoter. This versatile platform is shown to enable recovery of a wide variety of difficult-to-express membrane proteins in functional form.

  3. Energy transfer properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores during adaptation to low light intensity.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, B; Lunceford, C; Lin, S; Woronowicz, K; Niederman, R A; Woodbury, N W

    2014-08-28

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to explore the pathway and kinetics of energy transfer in photosynthetic membrane vesicles (chromatophores) isolated from Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides cells harvested 2, 4, 6 or 24 hours after a transition from growth in high to low level illumination. As previously observed, this light intensity transition initiates the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus and an increase in the number of light harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes relative to light harvesting 1 (LH1) and reaction center (RC) complexes. It has generally been thought that the increase in LH2 complexes served the purpose of increasing the overall energy transmission to the RC. However, fluorescence lifetime measurements and analysis in terms of energy transfer within LH2 and between LH2 and LH1 indicate that, during the remodeling time period measured, only a portion of the additional LH2 generated are well connected to LH1 and the reaction center. The majority of the additional LH2 fluorescence decays with a lifetime comparable to that of free, unconnected LH2 complexes. The presence of large LH2-only domains has been observed by atomic force microscopy in Rba. sphaeroides chromatophores (Bahatyrova et al., Nature, 2004, 430, 1058), providing structural support for the existence of pools of partially connected LH2 complexes. These LH2-only domains represent the light-responsive antenna complement formed after a switch in growth conditions from high to low illumination, while the remaining LH2 complexes occupy membrane regions containing mixtures of LH2 and LH1-RC core complexes. The current study utilized a multi-parameter approach to explore the fluorescence spectroscopic properties related to the remodeling process, shedding light on the structure-function relationship of the photosynthetic assembles. Possible reasons for the accumulation of these largely disconnected LH2-only pools are discussed.

  4. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Donati, Alessandro; Rossi, Claudio; Sabadini, Luciano; Rollo, Libertario; Lorenzini, Sauro; Gelli, Renata; Marcolongo, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    rates of neutral, zwitterionic and anionic piroxicam, in DMSO solution are explained by the thermal equilibrium between the three most stable structures of the three forms, thus confirming the high quality of the force field. The EPR spectrum of [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (DMSO/GLY, 2:1, v/v, 298 and 110 K) agrees with a N2O2+O2 pseudo-octahedral coordination geometry. The EPR spectrum of [CuII(Pir)2·0.5DMF agrees with a pseudo-tetrahedral coordination geometry. The parameters extracted from the room temperature spectra of the solution phases are in agreement with the data reported for powder and frozen solutions. The extended-Hückel calculations on minimum energy structures of [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] and [CuII(Pir)2] (square planar) revealed that the HOMOs have a relevant character of dx2−y2. On the other hand the HOMO of a computer generated structure for [CuII(Pir)2] (pseudo-tetrahedral) has a relevant character of dxy atomic orbital. A dxy orbital is better suited to allow a dπ-pπ interaction to the O2- anion. Therefore this work shows that the anti-inflammatory activity of piroxicam could be due in part to the formation of [CuII(Pir)2] chelates, which can exert a SOD-like activity. PMID:18472745

  5. Formation of the regular satellites of giant planets in an extended gaseous nebula II: satellite migration and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, Ignacio; Estrada, Paul R.

    2003-05-01

    For a satellite to survive in the disk the time scale of satellite migration must be longer than the time scale for gas dissipation. For large satellites (˜1000 km) migration is dominated by the gas tidal torque. We consider the possibility that the redistribution of gas in the disk due to the tidal torque of a satellite with mass larger than the inviscid critical mass causes the satellite to stall and open a gap (W.R. Ward, 1997, Icarus 26, 261-281). We adapt the inviscid critical mass criterion to include gas drag, and m-dependent nonlocal deposition of angular momentum. We find that such a model holds promise of explaining the survival of satellites in the subnebula, the mass versus distance relationship apparent in the saturnian and uranian satellite systems, the concentration of mass in Titan, and the observation that the satellites of Jupiter get rockier closer to the planet whereas those of Saturn become increasingly icy. It is also possible that either weak turbulence (close to the planet) or gap-opening satellite tidal torque removes gas on a similar time scale (10 4-10 5 years) as the orbital decay time of midsized (200-700 km) regular satellites forming in the inner disk (inside the centrifugal radius (I. Mosqueira and P.R. Estrada, 2003, Icarus, this issue)). We argue that Saturn's satellite system bridges the gap between those of Jupiter and Uranus by combining the formation of a Galilean-sized satellite in a gas optically thick subnebula with a strong temperature gradient, and the formation of smaller satellites, closer to the planet, in a disk with gas optical depth ≲1, and a weak temperature gradient. Using an optically thick inner disk (given gaseous opacity), and an extended, quiescent, optically thin outer disk, we show that there are regions of the disk of small net tidal torque (even zero) where satellites (Iapetus-sized or larger) may stall far from the planet. For our model these outer regions of small net tidal torque correspond roughly

  6. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques.

  7. HLA Class I and Class II Conserved Extended Haplotypes and Their Fragments or Blocks in Mexicans: Implications for the Study of Genetic Diversity in Admixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Yunis, María; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Granados, Julio; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are highly polymorphic and informative in disease association, transplantation, and population genetics studies with particular importance in the understanding of human population diversity and evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the HLA diversity in Mexican admixed individuals. We studied the polymorphism of MHC class I (HLA-A, -B, -C), and class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1) genes using high-resolution sequence based typing (SBT) method and we structured the blocks and conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) in 234 non-related admixed Mexican individuals (468 haplotypes) by a maximum likelihood method. We found that HLA blocks and CEHs are primarily from Amerindian and Caucasian origin, with smaller participation of African and recent Asian ancestry, demonstrating a great diversity of HLA blocks and CEHs in Mexicans from the central area of Mexico. We also analyzed the degree of admixture in this group using short tandem repeats (STRs) and HLA-B that correlated with the frequency of most probable ancestral HLA-C/−B and -DRB1/−DQB1 blocks and CEHs. Our results contribute to the analysis of the diversity and ancestral contribution of HLA class I and HLA class II alleles and haplotypes of Mexican admixed individuals from Mexico City. This work will help as a reference to improve future studies in Mexicans regarding allotransplantation, immune responses and disease associations. PMID:24086347

  8. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) - III. Construction of the first flux-limited supercluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Nowak, Nina

    2013-03-01

    We present the first supercluster catalogue constructed with the extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX II) Galaxy Cluster survey data, which comprises 919 X-ray selected galaxy clusters with a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2. Based on this cluster catalogue we construct a supercluster catalogue using a friends-of-friends algorithm with a linking length depending on the (local) cluster density, which thus varies with redshift. The resulting catalogue comprises 164 superclusters at redshift z ≤ 0.4. The choice of the linking length in the friends-of-friends method modifies the properties of the superclusters. We study the properties of different catalogues such as the distributions of the redshift, extent and multiplicity by varying the choice of parameters. In addition to the supercluster catalogue for the entire REFLEX II sample, we compile a large volume-limited cluster sample from REFLEX II with the redshift and luminosity constraints of z ≤ 0.1 and LX ≥ 5 × 1043 erg s-1. With this catalogue we construct a volume-limited sample of superclusters. This sample is built with a homogeneous linking length, and hence selects effectively the same type of superclusters. By increasing the luminosity cut we can build a hierarchical tree structure of the volume-limited samples, where systems at the top of the tree are only formed via the most luminous clusters. This allows us to test if the same superclusters are found when only the most luminous clusters are visible, comparable to the situation at higher redshift in the REFLEX II sample. We find that the selection of superclusters is very robust, independent of the luminosity cut, and the contamination of spurious superclusters among cluster pairs is expected to be small. Numerical simulations and observations of the substructure of clusters suggest that regions of high cluster number density provide an astrophysically different environment for galaxy clusters, where the mass function and X

  9. Definition of an extended MHC class II-peptide binding motif for the autoimmune disease-associated Lewis rat RT1.BL molecule.

    PubMed

    Wauben, M H; van der Kraan, M; Grosfeld-Stulemeyer, M C; Joosten, I

    1997-02-01

    The Lewis rat, an inbred rat strain susceptible to several well-characterized experimental autoimmune diseases, provides a good model to study peptide-mediated immunotherapy. Peptide immunotherapy focussing on the modulation of T cell responses by interfering with TCR-peptide-MHC complex formation requires the elucidation of the molecular basis of TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for an efficient design of modulatory peptides. In the Lewis rat most autoimmune-associated CD4+ T cell responses are MHC class II RT1.BL restricted. In this study, the characteristics of RT1.BL-peptide interactions were explored. A series of substitution analogs of two Lewis rat T cell epitopes was examined in a direct peptide-MHC binding assay on isolated RT1.BL molecules. Furthermore, other autoimmune-related as well as non-disease-related T cell epitopes were tested in the binding assay. This has led to the definition of an extended RT1.BL-peptide binding motif. The RT1.BL-peptide binding motif established in this study is the first described rat MHC-peptide binding motif based on direct MHC-peptide binding experiments. To predict good or intermediate RT1.BL binding peptides, T cell epitope search profiles were deduced from this motif. The motif and search profiles will greatly facilitate the prediction of modulatory peptides based on autoimmune-associated T cell epitopes and the identification of target structures in experimental autoimmune diseases in Lewis rats.

  10. Assembly and structural organization of pigment-protein complexes in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hunter, C N; Pennoyer, J D; Niederman, R A

    1982-01-01

    The B875 and B800-850 light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides are characterized further by lithium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 degrees C. Bacteriochlorophyll a was shown in reconstruction studies to remain complexed with its respective binding proteins during this procedure. From distributions in these gels, a quantitative description for the arrangement of the complexes is proposed. Assembly of the complexes was examined in delta-aminolevulinate-requiring mutant H-5 after a shift from high- to low-light intensity. After 10 h of delta-[3H]aminolevulinate labeling, the specific radioactivity of bacteriochlorophyll in a fraction containing putative membrane invaginations reached the maximal level, while that of the mature photosynthetic membrane was at only one-third this level. This suggests that membrane invaginations are sites of preferential bacteriochlorophyll synthesis in which completed pigment-proteins exist transiently. Analysis of the 3H distribution after electrophoretic separation further suggests that photosynthetic membranes grow mainly by addition of B800-850 to preformed membrane consisting largely of B875 and photochemical reaction centers. These results corroborate the above model for the structural organization of the light-harvesting system and indicate that the structurally and functionally discrete B800-850 pool is not completely assembled until all B875 sites for B800-850 interactions are occupied.

  11. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-08-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  12. Kinetic analysis of the thermal stability of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Arwel V; Rees, Paul; Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R

    2006-06-01

    The temperature-induced denaturation of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been studied through the changes that occur in the absorption spectrum of the bound chromophores on heating. At elevated temperatures, the characteristic absorbance bands of the bacteriochlorins bound to the polypeptides within the reaction center are lost, and are replaced by features typical of unbound bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin. The kinetics of the spectral changes cannot be explained by a direct conversion from the functional to the denatured form of the protein, and require the presence of at least one intermediate. Possible mechanisms for the transformation via an intermediate are examined using a global analysis of the kinetic data, and the most likely mechanism is shown to involve a reversible transformation between the native state and an off-pathway intermediate, coupled to an irreversible transformation to the denatured state. The activation energies for the transformations between the three components are calculated from the effect of temperature on the individual rate constants, and the likely structural changes of the protein during the temperature-induced transformation are discussed.

  13. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    DOE PAGES

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Taguchi, Alexander T.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; ...

    2015-03-03

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, in this paper we have investigated and characterized themore » interactions of the protein with the quinones in the QA and QB sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the QB site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the QA and QB sites. Finally, disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the QA–QB– biradical and competitive binding assays.« less

  14. Native Mass Spectrometry Characterizes the Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex from the Purple Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Lucas B.; Lu, Yue; Prado, Mindy; Saer, Rafael; Rempel, Don; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging approach to study protein complexes in their near-native states and to elucidate their stoichiometry and topology. Here, we report a native MS study of the membrane-embedded reaction center (RC) protein complex from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The membrane-embedded RC protein complex is stabilized by detergent micelles in aqueous solution, directly introduced into a mass spectrometer by nano-electrospray (nESI), and freed of detergents and dissociated in the gas phase by collisional activation. As the collision energy is increased, the chlorophyll pigments are gradually released from the RC complex, suggesting that native MS introduces a near-native structure that continues to bind pigments. Two bacteriochlorophyll a pigments remain tightly bound to the RC protein at the highest collision energy. The order of pigment release and their resistance to release by gas-phase activation indicates the strength of pigment interaction in the RC complex. This investigation sets the stage for future native MS studies of membrane-embedded photosynthetic pigment-protein and related complexes.

  15. Sequence analysis of the cbb3 oxidases and an atomic model for the Rhodobacter sphaeroides enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Puustinen, Anne; Wikström, Mårten; Laakkonen, Liisa

    2006-05-09

    The cbb3-type oxidases are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily, distant by sequence comparisons, but sharing common functional characteristics. To understand the minimal common properties of the superfamily, and to learn about cbb3-type oxidases specifically, we have analyzed a wide set of heme-copper oxidase sequences and built a homology model of the catalytic subunit of the cbb3 oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We conclude that with regard to the active site surroundings, the cbb3 oxidases greatly resemble the structurally known oxidases, while major differences are found in three segments: the additional N-terminal stretch of ca. 60 amino acids, the segment following helix 3 to the end of helix 5, and the C-terminus from helix 11 onward. The conserved core contains the active site tyrosine and also an analogue of the K-channel of proton transfer, but centered on a well-conserved histidine in the lower part of helix 7. Modeling the variant parts of the enzyme suggests that two periplasmic loops (between helices 3 and 4 and between helices 11 and 12) could interact with each other as a part of the active site structure and might have an important role in proton pumping. An analogue of the D-channel is not found, but an alternative channel might form around helix 9. A preliminary packing model of the trimeric enzyme is also presented.

  16. The Extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Inhibits Melanogenesis through the MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Kuan, Yu-Diao; Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Wang, Wei-Kuang; Chang, Fu-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Hsun; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Reducing hyperpigmentation has been a big issue for years. Even though pigmentation is a normal mechanism protecting skin from UV-causing DNA damage and oxidative stress, it is still an aesthetic problem for many people. Bacteria can produce some compounds in response to their environment. These compounds are widely used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. Some probiotics have immunomodulatory activities and modulate the symptoms of several diseases. Previously, we found that the extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Lycogen™) inhibited nitric oxide production and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression in activated macrophages. In this study, we sought to investigate an anti-melanogenic signaling pathway in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-treated B16F10 melanoma cells and zebrafish. Treatment with Lycogen™ inhibited the cellular melanin contents and expression of melanogenesis-related protein, including microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Moreover, Lycogen™ reduced phosphorylation of MEK/ERK without affecting phosphorylation of p38. Meanwhile, Lycogen™ decreased zebrafish melanin expression in a dose-dependent manner. These findings establish Lycogen™ as a new target in melanogenesis and suggest a mechanism of action through the ERK signaling pathway. Our results suggested that Lycogen™ may have potential cosmetic usage in the future. PMID:23736765

  17. The effect of flowable materials on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Lynch, Christopher D

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the effects of a thin layer of flowable composite or compomer on microleakage occurring in Class II packable and nanofilled composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The current study also investigated any differences in microleakage that occur between restorations light-cured using a light-emitting diode (LED) and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. Standardized Class II "slot" cavity preparations were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 72 extracted, unrestored, non-carious premolars (n = 144). The gingival margins were placed 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into two groups (n = 72) and restored with a "packable composite" (Filtek P60) or a "nano-filled composite" (Universal Filtek Supreme XT) with or without flowable composite (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT) or flowable composite (Dyract Flow) as gingival liners placed with thicknesses of 1.0 mm. Each increment was cured for 20 seconds before adding the next. One-half of the samples in each group was cured with QTH (Coltolux 75) and the other half with LED (Coltolux LED) LCUs. After a two-week incubation period at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled (5 degrees C-55 degrees C x 1500), immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours, sectioned and the microleakage was then evaluated at the gingival margin by two examiners using a 0-3 score scale. Within the current study, when flowable liners were used, both the packable (Filtek P60) and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT Universal Restorative) composite materials had significantly less microleakage than when flowable liners were not used (p < 0.05). Both flowable liners (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT and Dyract Flow) resulted in a significant reduction of the microleakage occurring under both types of composite materials at the gingival floors ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between them. The choice of light curing technology (LED vs

  18. How Accurately Can Extended X-ray Absorption Spectra Be Predicted from First Principles? Implications for Modeling the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Martha A; Ames, William; Vila, Fernando D; Krewald, Vera; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Mantel, Claire; Pécaut, Jacques; Gennari, Marcello; Duboc, Carole; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Yano, Junko; Rehr, John J; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-10-14

    First principle calculations of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data have seen widespread use in bioinorganic chemistry, perhaps most notably for modeling the Mn4Ca site in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). The logic implied by the calculations rests on the assumption that it is possible to a priori predict an accurate EXAFS spectrum provided that the underlying geometric structure is correct. The present study investigates the extent to which this is possible using state of the art EXAFS theory. The FEFF program is used to evaluate the ability of a multiple scattering-based approach to directly calculate the EXAFS spectrum of crystallographically defined model complexes. The results of these parameter free predictions are compared with the more traditional approach of fitting FEFF calculated spectra to experimental data. A series of seven crystallographically characterized Mn monomers and dimers is used as a test set. The largest deviations between the FEFF calculated EXAFS spectra and the experimental EXAFS spectra arise from the amplitudes. The amplitude errors result from a combination of errors in calculated S0(2) and Debye-Waller values as well as uncertainties in background subtraction. Additional errors may be attributed to structural parameters, particularly in cases where reliable high-resolution crystal structures are not available. Based on these investigations, the strengths and weaknesses of using first-principle EXAFS calculations as a predictive tool are discussed. We demonstrate that a range of DFT optimized structures of the OEC may all be considered consistent with experimental EXAFS data and that caution must be exercised when using EXAFS data to obtain topological arrangements of complex clusters.

  19. Mechanism of nitrogenase switch-off by oxygen. [Klebsiella pneumoniae; Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans; Rhodopseudomonas capsulate

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, I.; Nadler, V.; Hochman, A.

    1987-02-01

    Oxygen caused a reversible inhibition (switch-off) of nitrogenase activity in whole cells of four strains of diazotrophs, the facultative anaerobe Klebsiella pneumoniae and three strains of photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata strians AD2 and BK5). In K. pneumoniae 50% inhibition of acetylene reduction was attained at an O/sub 2/ concentration of 0.37 ..mu..M. Cyanide (90 ..mu..M), which did not affect acetylene reduction but inhibited whole-cell respiration by 60 to 70%, shifted the O/sub 2/ concentration that caused 50% inhibition of nitrogenase activity to 2.9 ..mu..M. A mutant strain of K. pneumoniae, strain AH11, has a respiration rate that is 65 to 75% higher than that of the wild type, but is nitrogenase activity is similar to wild-type activity. Acetylene reduction by whole cells of this mutant was inhibited 50% by 0.20 ..mu..M O/sub 2/. Inhibition by CN/sup -/ of 40 to 50% of the O/sub 2/ uptake in the mutant shifted the O/sub 2/ concentration that caused 50% inhibition of nitrogenase to 1.58 ..mu..M. Thus, when the respiration rates were lower, higher oxygen concentrations were required to inhibit nitrogenase. Reversible inhibition of nitrogenase activity in vivo was caused under anaerobic conditions by other electron acceptors. Addition of 2 mM sulfite to cell suspensions of R. capsulata B10 and R. sphaeroides inhibited nitrogenase activity. Nitrite also inhibited acetylene reduction in whole cells of the photodenitrifier R. sphaeroides but not in R. capsulata B10, which is not capable of enzymatic reduction of NO/sub 2//sup -/. Lower concentrations of NO/sub 2//sup -/ were required to inhibit the activity in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cells, which have higher activities of nitrite reductase.

  20. Gene co-expression network analysis in Rhodobacter capsulatus and application to comparative expression analysis of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Pena-Castillo, Lourdes; Mercer, Ryan; Gurinovich, Anastasia; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.; Westbye, Alexander; Beatty, J. T.; Lang, Andrew S.

    2014-08-28

    The genus Rhodobacter contains purple nonsulfur bacteria found mostly in freshwater environments. Representative strains of two Rhodobacter species, R. capsulatus and R. sphaeroides, have had their genomes fully sequenced and both have been the subject of transcriptional profiling studies. Gene co-expression networks can be used to identify modules of genes with similar expression profiles. Functional analysis of gene modules can then associate co-expressed genes with biological pathways, and network statistics can determine the degree of module preservation in related networks. In this paper, we constructed an R. capsulatus gene co-expression network, performed functional analysis of identified gene modules, and investigated preservation of these modules in R. capsulatus proteomics data and in R. sphaeroides transcriptomics data. Results: The analysis identified 40 gene co-expression modules in R. capsulatus. Investigation of the module gene contents and expression profiles revealed patterns that were validated based on previous studies supporting the biological relevance of these modules. We identified two R. capsulatus gene modules preserved in the protein abundance data. We also identified several gene modules preserved between both Rhodobacter species, which indicate that these cellular processes are conserved between the species and are candidates for functional information transfer between species. Many gene modules were non-preserved, providing insight into processes that differentiate the two species. In addition, using Local Network Similarity (LNS), a recently proposed metric for expression divergence, we assessed the expression conservation of between-species pairs of orthologs, and within-species gene-protein expression profiles. Conclusions: Our analyses provide new sources of information for functional annotation in R. capsulatus because uncharacterized genes in modules are now connected with groups of genes that constitute a joint functional

  1. Isolation of SIP, a protein that interacts with SPB, a possible transcriptional regulatory factor in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Machiya, Yasuhiro; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro

    2007-10-01

    SPB is a transcriptional factor in Rhodobacter sphaeroides that represses expression of the puf operon under aerobic or semi-aerobic light conditions. Here, we identified a 17,500 Da protein designated SIP (SPB interaction protein) that interacts with SPB, as determined by binding to an SPB-His(x6) fusion protein-Ni column. The SPB-SIP interaction in vivo was confirmed by an immunoprecipitation assay. The level of transcripts and protein of SIP did not differ for all growth conditions tested, indicating that regulation of the SIP-SPB interaction, if any, is not through modulation of sip or spb expression but rather by modification of the proteins.

  2. Characterization and localization of phosphatidylglycerophosphate and phosphatidylserine synthases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, C W; Steiner, F X; Carman, G M; Niederman, R A

    1989-01-01

    Catalytic properties and membrane associations of the phosphatidylglycerophosphate (PGP) and phosphatidylserine (PS) synthases of Rhodobacter sphaeroides were examined to further characterize sites of phospholipid biosynthesis. In preparations of cytoplasmic membrane (CM) enriched in these activities, apparent Km values of PGP synthase were 90 microM for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and 60 microM for CDP-diacylglycerol; the apparent Km of PS synthase for L-serine was near 165 microM. Both enzymes required Triton X-100 with optimal PS synthase activity at a detergent/CDP-diacylglycerol (mol/mol) ratio of 7.5:1.0, while for optimal PGP synthase, a range of 10-50:1.0 was observed. Unlike the enzyme in Escherichia coli and several other Gram-negative bacteria, the PS synthase activity had a specific requirement for magnesium and was tightly associated with membranes rather than ribosomes in crude cell extracts. Sedimentation studies suggested that the PGP synthase was distributed uniformly over the CM in both chemoheterotrophically and photoheterotrophically grown cells, while the PS synthase was confined mainly to a vesicular CM fraction. Solubilized PGP synthase activity migrated as a single band with a pI value near 5.5 in a chromato-focusing column and 5.8 on isoelectric focusing; in the latter procedure, the pI was shifted to 5.3 in the presence of CDP-diacylglycerol. The PGP synthase activity gave rise to a single polypeptide band in lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 degrees C.

  3. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. Objective The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. Methods This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Results Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one

  4. Effects of extending the π-conjugation of the acetylide ligand on the photophysics and reverse saturable absorption of Pt(ii) bipyridine bisacetylide complexes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Taotao; Wang, Chengzhe; Lystrom, Levi; Pei, Chengkui; Kilina, Svetlana; Sun, Wenfang

    2016-10-19

    The synthesis and photophysics of four platinum(ii) bipyridine (bpy) bisacetylide complexes with different degrees of π-conjugation and an electron-donating diphenylamino (NPh2) or electron-withdrawing benzothiazolyl (BTZ) terminal substituent on the acetylide ligands are reported. The UV-vis absorption spectra of these complexes are composed of intense ligand-localized (1)π,π* transitions at 330-430 nm and broad, moderately strong ligand-to-ligand charge transfer/metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((1)LLCT/(1)MLCT) transitions at 430-530 nm. All complexes are phosphorescent in solutions at room temperature and exhibit very broad and moderately strong triplet excited-state absorption in the visible to the NIR spectral region (425-800 nm). It is found that extending the π-conjugation of the acetylide ligands via adding one or two more ethynylfluorenyl unit(s) to the acetylide ligand does not change the energies of the (1)π,π* and (1)LLCT/(1)MLCT transitions pronouncedly except for increasing the molar extinction coefficients of the (1)π,π* transitions. The emitting triplet excited states of the four complexes are the (3)MLCT/(3)LLCT states and have the same energy. However, the complex that contains the tris(ethynylfluorenyl) units and the terminal NPh2 substituent on the acetylide ligand exhibits longer triplet lifetimes than the corresponding complex that has the bis(ethynylfluorenyl) units. The transient absorption band maxima of the complexes with tris(ethynylfluorenyl) units are slightly red-shifted in comparison to those of their respective counterparts with bis(ethynylfluorenyl) units. The nature of the terminal substituent does not influence the parentage and energies of the lowest singlet and triplet excited states. However, the triplet excited-state lifetimes of the complexes with the NPh2 terminal substituent on the bis(ethynylfluorenyl) or tris(ethynylfluorenyl) ligands are much longer than that of their counterpart with monofluorenylacetylide

  5. Isolation of a thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides Strain, NAT, and its capacity for oil and chemical oxygen demand removal at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yosuke; Takeno, Kenji; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Sasaki, Ken

    2008-06-01

    A thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium NAT identified as Rhodobacter sphaeroides was isolated. When alginate-immobilized cells of strain NAT were used in high-temperature treatment of artificial sewage wastewater containing oil, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 80% and 76% of the oil was removed after 96 h of treatment at 55 degrees C. Lipase activity was observed in the culture.

  6. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Isolation and partial characterization of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides mutants defective in the regulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Weaver, K E; Tabita, F R

    1983-11-01

    Several mutants of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides defective in the derepression of the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase have been isolated by using the unstable Tn5 vectors pJB4JI and pRK340. Transpositional insertion mutants obtained with pJB4JI were demonstrated to be incapable of increasing ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase levels when grown on butyrate-bicarbonate medium or under conditions of carbon starvation, whereas the wild-type strain increased activity four- to eightfold. When the wild-type strain was starved for carbon in the presence of chloramphenicol, no derepression was observed. Crude extracts from mutant and wild-type strains had distinct and consistent differences in protein content as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chromatographic evidence indicated that mutants were defective in the regulation of only one of the two forms of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase synthesized by R. sphaeroides.

  8. Characteristics of Pos19 – A Small Coding RNA in the Oxidative Stress Response of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhardt, Benjamin D.; Remes, Bernhard; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides induces several small RNAs (sRNAs) when singlet oxygen (1O2) levels are elevated, a situation also referred to as photo-oxidative stress. An RNA-seq study identified the RSs0019 sRNA, which is renamed Pos19 (photo-oxidative stress induced sRNA 19). Pos19 is part of the RpoE regulon and consequently induced upon 1O2 and peroxide stress. The 219 nt long Pos19 transcript contains a small open reading frame (sORF) of 150 nt, which is translated in vivo. Over-expression of Pos19 results in reduced mRNA levels for several genes, of which numerous are involved in sulfur metabolism. The negative effect on the potential targets is maintained even when translation of the sORF is abolished, arguing that regulation is entailed by the sRNA itself. Reporter studies further revealed that regulation of the most affected mRNA, namely RSP_0557, by Pos19 is Hfq-dependent. Direct binding of Pos19 to Hfq was shown by co-immunoprecipitation. Physiological experiments indicated Pos19 to be involved in the balance of glutathione biosynthesis. Moreover, a lack of Pos19 leads to elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Taken together our data identify the sRNA Pos19 as a coding sRNA with a distinct expression pattern and potential role under oxidative stress in the phototrophic bacterium R. sphaeroides. PMID:27669425

  9. Biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate co-production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides from Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, A; Sandhya, M; Ponnusami, V

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of coupled biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides using Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake was studied under dark and photo fermentation conditions. The utilization of a non-edible acidic oil cake (C. inophyllum), and exploitation of a modified minimal salt media led to reduction in the cost of media. Cost of fermentation is reduced by implementation of alternate dark-photo fermentative periods and through the use of a co-culture consisting of a dark fermentative (E. aerogenes) and a photo fermentative (R. sphaeroides) bacterium. The biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate produced were 7.95 L H2/L media and 10.73 g/L media, respectively, under alternate dark and photo fermentation and were 3.23 L H2/L media and 5.6g/L media, respectively under complete dark fermentation. The characteristics of the oil cake and alternate dark (16 h) and photo (8h) fermentative conditions were found to be supportive in producing high biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) yield.

  10. Accumulation of a novel glycolipid and a betaine lipid in cells of Rhodobacter sphaeroides grown under phosphate limitation.

    PubMed

    Benning, C; Huang, Z H; Gage, D A

    1995-02-20

    Cells of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides grown under phosphate-limiting conditions accumulated nonphosphorous glycolipids and lipids carrying head groups derived from amino acids. Concomitantly, the relative amount of phosphoglycerolipids decreased from 90 to 22 mol% of total polar lipids in the membranes. Two lipids, not detectable in cells grown under standard conditions, were synthesized during phosphate-limited growth. Fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, exact mass measurements, 1H NMR spectroscopy, sugar composition analysis, and methylation analysis of the predominant glycolipid led to the identification of the novel compound 1,2-di-O-acyl-3-O-[alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-galactopyr anosyl]glycerol. The second lipid was identified as the betaine lipid 1,2-di-O-acyl-[4'-(N,N,N-trimethyl)-homoserine]glycerol by cochromatography employing an authentic standard from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, exact mass measurements, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Prior to this observation, the occurrence of this lipid was thought to be restricted to lower plants and algae. Apparently, these newly synthesized nonphosphorous lipids, in addition to the sulfo- and the ornithine lipid also found in R. sphaeroides grown under optimal conditions, take over the role of phosphoglycerolipids in phosphate-deprived cells.

  11. Structural model and excitonic properties of the dimeric RC-LH1-PufX complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Şener, Melih; Hsin, Jen; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Villa, Elizabeth; Qian, Pu; Hunter, C. Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The light-harvesting apparatus of the purple bacterial photosynthetic unit consists of a pool of peripheral light-harvesting complexes that transfer excitation energy to a reaction center (RC) via the surrounding pigment-protein complex LH1. Recent electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies have revealed that RC-LH1 units of Rhodobacter sphaeroides form membrane-bending dimeric complexes together with the polypeptide PufX. We present a structural model for these RC-LH1-PufX dimeric complexes constructed using the molecular dynamics flexible fitting method based on an EM density map. The arrangement of the LH1 BChls displays a distortion near the proposed location of the PufX polypeptide. The resulting atomic model for BChl arrays is used to compute the excitonic properties of the dimeric RC-LH1 complex. A comparison is presented between the structural and excitonic features of the S-shaped dimeric BChl array of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the circular BChl arrangement found in other purple bacteria. PMID:20161332

  12. Understanding Medicines: Conceptual Analysis of Nurses' Needs for Knowledge and Understanding of Pharmacology (Part I). Understanding Medicines: Extending Pharmacology Education for Dependent and Independent Prescribing (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathard, Helen L.

    2001-01-01

    Part I reviews what nurses need to know about the administration and prescription of medicines. Part II addresses drug classifications, actions and effects, and interactions. Also discussed are the challenges pharmacological issues pose for nursing education. (SK)

  13. Enhancing the ferromagnetic coupling in extended phloroglucinol complexes by increasing the metal SOMO-ligand overlap: synthesis and characterization of a trinuclear Co(II)(3) triplesalophen complex.

    PubMed

    Oldengott, Jan; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Glaser, Thorsten

    2015-06-07

    The triplesalophen complex [(baron(Me))Co(II)(3)] has been synthesized and characterized. The low-spin Co(II) ions possess an (2)A2 ground state with the magnetic orbitals of dyz type. These are well oriented for a strong π overlap with the bridging phloroglucinol, which results in the strongest ferromagnetic interactions by the spin-polarization mechanism for a 3d phloroglucinol complex.

  14. Integration of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; Olsen, John D.; Sener, Melih; Jackson, Philip J.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Qian, Pu; Dickman, Mark J.; Leggett, Graham J.; Schulten, Klaus; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts absorbed solar energy to a protonmotive force, which drives ATP synthesis. The membrane network of chlorophyll–protein complexes responsible for light absorption, photochemistry and quinol (QH2) production has been mapped in the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides using atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the membrane location of the cytochrome bc1 (cytbc1) complexes that oxidise QH2 to quinone (Q) to generate a protonmotive force is unknown. We labelled cytbc1 complexes with gold nanobeads, each attached by a Histidine10 (His10)-tag to the C-terminus of cytc1. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained chromatophore vesicles showed that the majority of the cytbc1 complexes occur as dimers in the membrane. The cytbc1 complexes appeared to be adjacent to reaction centre light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) complexes, consistent with AFM topographs of a gold-labelled membrane. His-tagged cytbc1 complexes were retrieved from chromatophores partially solubilised by detergent; RC-LH1-PufX complexes tended to co-purify with cytbc1, whereas LH2 complexes became detached, consistent with clusters of cytbc1 complexes close to RC-LH1-PufX arrays, but not with a fixed, stoichiometric cytbc1-RC-LH1-PufX supercomplex. This information was combined with a quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the RC, cytbc1, ATP synthase, cytaa3 and cytcbb3 membrane protein complexes, to construct an atomic-level model of a chromatophore vesicle comprising 67 LH2 complexes, 11 LH1-RC-PufX dimers & 2 RC-LH1-PufX monomers, 4 cytbc1 dimers and 2 ATP synthases. Simulation of the interconnected energy, electron and proton transfer processes showed a half-maximal ATP turnover rate for a light intensity equivalent to only 1% of bright sunlight. Thus, the photosystem architecture of the chromatophore is optimised for growth at low light intensities. PMID:24530865

  15. Weak temperature dependence of P (+) H A (-) recombination in mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Białek, Rafał; Pajzderska, Maria; Karolczak, Jerzy; Burdziński, Gotard; Jones, Michael R; Brettel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In contrast with findings on the wild-type Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, biexponential P (+) H A (-)  → PH A charge recombination is shown to be weakly dependent on temperature between 78 and 298 K in three variants with single amino acids exchanged in the vicinity of primary electron acceptors. These mutated reaction centers have diverse overall kinetics of charge recombination, spanning an average lifetime from ~2 to ~20 ns. Despite these differences a protein relaxation model applied previously to wild-type reaction centers was successfully used to relate the observed kinetics to the temporal evolution of the free energy level of the state P (+) H A (-) relative to P (+) B A (-) . We conclude that the observed variety in the kinetics of charge recombination, together with their weak temperature dependence, is caused by a combination of factors that are each affected to a different extent by the point mutations in a particular mutant complex. These are as follows: (1) the initial free energy gap between the states P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) , (2) the intrinsic rate of P (+) B A (-)  → PB A charge recombination, and (3) the rate of protein relaxation in response to the appearance of the charge separated states. In the case of a mutant which displays rapid P (+) H A (-) recombination (ELL), most of this recombination occurs in an unrelaxed protein in which P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) are almost isoenergetic. In contrast, in a mutant in which P (+) H A (-) recombination is relatively slow (GML), most of the recombination occurs in a relaxed protein in which P (+) H A (-) is much lower in energy than P (+) H A (-) . The weak temperature dependence in the ELL reaction center and a YLH mutant was modeled in two ways: (1) by assuming that the initial P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) states in an unrelaxed protein are isoenergetic, whereas the final free energy gap between these states following the protein relaxation is large (~250 meV or

  16. Kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase from R. sphaeroides initiated by direct electron transfer followed by tr-SEIRAS.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Christoph; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L C

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy (tr-SEIRAS) has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The enzyme was converted electrochemically into the fully reduced state. Thereafter, in the presence of oxygen, the potential was switched to open circuit potential (OCP). Under these conditions, the enzyme is free to undergo enzymatic oxidation in the absence of an external electric field. Tr-SEIRAS was performed using the step-scan technique, triggered by periodic potential pulses switching between - 800mV and OCP. Single bands were resolved in a broad band in the amide I region using phase sensitive detection. Amplitudes of these bands were analyzed as a function of time. Time constants in the ms time scale were considered in terms of conformational changes of the protein secondary structures associated with the enzymatic turnover of the protein.

  17. Characterization of D-tagatose-3-epimerase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides that converts D-fructose into D-psicose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longtao; Mu, Wanmeng; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Tao

    2009-06-01

    A non-characterized gene, previously proposed as the D-tagatose-3-epimerase gene from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 64 kDa with two identical subunits. The enzyme specificity was highest with D-fructose and decreased for other substrates in the order: D-tagatose, D-psicose, D-ribulose, D-xylulose and D-sorbose. Its activity was maximal at pH 9 and 40 degrees C while being enhanced by Mn(2+). At pH 9 and 40 degrees C, 118 g D-psicose l(-1) was produced from 700 g D-fructose l(-1) after 3 h.

  18. Direct Visualization of Exciton Reequilibration in the LH1 and LH2 Complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by Multipulse Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, Thomas A. Cohen; Vengris, Mikas; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hunter, C. Neil; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the excited states of the light-harvesting complexes LH1 and LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are governed, mainly, by the excitonic nature of these ring-systems. In a pump-dump-probe experiment, the first pulse promotes LH1 or LH2 to its excited state and the second pulse dumps a portion of the excited state. By selective dumping, we can disentangle the dynamics normally hidden in the excited-state manifold. We find that by using this multiple-excitation technique we can visualize a 400-fs reequilibration reflecting relaxation between the two lowest exciton states that cannot be directly explored by conventional pump-probe. An oscillatory feature is observed within the exciton reequilibration, which is attributed to a coherent motion of a vibrational wavepacket with a period of ~150 fs. Our disordered exciton model allows a quantitative interpretation of the observed reequilibration processes occurring in these antennas.

  19. Biohydrogen production by purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gabrielyan, Lilit; Sargsyan, Harutyun; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-09-01

    The present work was focused on the effects of low-intensity (the flux capacity was of 0.06mWcm(-2)) electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of extremely high frequencies or millimeter waves on the growth and hydrogen (H2) photoproduction by purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC6521 (from Armenian mineral springs). After exposure of R. sphaeroides, grown under anaerobic conditions upon illumination, to EMI (51.8GHz and 53.0GHz) for 15min an increase of specific growth rate by ~1.2-fold, in comparison with control (non-irradiated cells), was obtained. However, the effect of EMI depends on the duration of irradiation: the exposure elongation up to 60min caused the delay of the growth lag phase and the decrease specific growth rate by ~1.3-fold, indicating the bactericidal effect of EMI. H2 yield of the culture, irradiated by EMI for 15min, determined during 72h growth, was ~1.2-fold higher than H2 yield of control cells, whereas H2 production by cultures, irradiated by EMI for 60min was not observed during 72h growth. This difference in the effects of extremely high frequency EMI indicates a direct effect of radiation on the membrane transfer and the enzymes of these bacteria. Moreover, EMI increased DCCD-inhibited H(+) fluxes across the bacterial membrane and DCCD-sensitive ATPase activity of membrane vesicles, indicating that the proton FoF1-ATPase is presumably a basic target for extremely high frequency EMI related to H2 production by cultures.

  20. Multiple chromosomes in bacteria. The yin and yang of trp gene localization in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, C; Simmons, A E; Kaplan, S

    1999-01-01

    The existence of multiple chromosomes in bacteria has been known for some time. Yet the extent of functional solidarity between different chromosomes remains unknown. To examine this question, we have surveyed the well-described genes of the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway in the multichromosomal photosynthetic eubacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. The genome of this organism was mutagenized using Tn5, and strains that were auxotrophic for tryptophan (Trp(-)) were isolated. Pulsed-field gel mapping indicated that Tn5 insertions in both the large (3 Mb CI) and the small (0.9 Mb CII) chromosomes created a Trp(-) phenotype. Sequencing the DNA flanking the sites of the Tn5 insertions indicated that the genes trpE-yibQ-trpGDC were at a locus on CI, while genes trpF-aroR-trpB were at locus on CII. Unexpectedly, trpA was not found downstream of trpB. Instead, it was placed on the CI physical map at a locus 1.23 Mb away from trpE-yibQ-trpGDC. To relate the context of the R. sphaeroides trp genes to those of other bacteria, the DNA regions surrounding the trp genes on both chromosomes were sequenced. Of particular significance was the finding that rpsA1, which encodes ribosomal protein S1, and cmkA, which encodes cytidylate monophosphate kinase, were on CII. These genes are considered essential for translation and chromosome replication, respectively. Southern blotting suggested that the trp genes and rpsA1 exist in single copy within the genome. To date, this topological organization of the trp "operon" is unique within a bacterial genome. When taken with the finding that CII encodes essential housekeeping functions, the overall impression is one of close regulatory and functional integration between these chromosomes. PMID:10511537

  1. The Semiquinone at the Qi Site of the bc1 Complex Explored Using HYSCORE Spectroscopy and Specific Isotopic Labeling of Ubiquinone in Rhodobacter sphaeroides via 13C Methionine and Construction of a Methionine Auxotroph

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Specific isotopic labeling at the residue or substituent level extends the scope of different spectroscopic approaches to the atomistic level. Here we describe 13C isotopic labeling of the methyl and methoxy ring substituents of ubiquinone, achieved through construction of a methionine auxotroph in Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain BC17 supplemented with l-methionine with the side chain methyl group 13C-labeled. Two-dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (HYSCORE) was applied to study the 13C methyl and methoxy hyperfine couplings in the semiquinone generated in situ at the Qi site of the bc1 complex in its membrane environment. The data were used to characterize the distribution of unpaired spin density and the conformations of the methoxy substituents based on density functional theory calculations of 13C hyperfine tensors in the semiquinone of the geometry-optimized X-ray structure of the bc1 complex (Protein Data Bank entry 1PP9) with the highest available resolution. Comparison with other proteins indicates individual orientations of the methoxy groups in each particular case are always different from the methoxy conformations in the anion radical prepared in a frozen alcohol solution. The protocol used in the generation of the methionine auxotroph is more generally applicable and, because it introduces a gene deletion using a suicide plasmid, can be applied repeatedly. PMID:25184535

  2. Seasat over-land scatterometer data. II - Selection of extended area land-target sites for the calibration of spaceborne scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennett, Rosemary G.; Li, Fuk K.

    1989-01-01

    The post-launch performance verification for future scatterometers can use extended area land targets to calibrate antenna gain patterns and to verify and monitor deployment configurations. For the Ku-band Seasat scatterometer, a region of tropical rain forest in the Amazon basin was used as a homogeneous extended-area land target. As this region is continuously being deforested, other regions are investigated for calibrating scatterometers. The global backscatter coefficients (sigma0) are compared to classifications of natural vegetation and cultivation intensity and the variability with time during the three-month mission is studied. The statistical variability of sigma0 is compared with prior estimates resulting from the known variability of the instrument parameters and communication noise. Data from selected forested regions with relatively homogeneous sigma0 and little time-dependence are presented.

  3. Magnesium-protoporphyrin chelatase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: reconstitution of activity by combining the products of the bchH, -I, and -D genes expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gibson, L C; Willows, R D; Kannangara, C G; von Wettstein, D; Hunter, C N

    1995-03-14

    Magnesium-protoporphyrin chelatase lies at the branch point of the heme and (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthetic pathways. In this work, the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been used as a model system for the study of this reaction. The bchH and the bchI and -D genes from R. sphaeroides were expressed in Escherichia coli. When cell-free extracts from strains expressing BchH, BchI, and BchD were combined, the mixture was able to catalyze the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX in an ATP-dependent manner. This was possible only when all three genes were expressed. The bchH, -I, and -D gene products are therefore assigned to the Mg chelatase step in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis. The mechanism of the Mg chelation reaction and the implications for chlorophyll biosynthesis in plants are discussed.

  4. Whole-genome shotgun optical mapping of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4. 1 and its use for whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shou, S.; Kvikstad, E.; Kile, A.; Severin, J.; Forrest, D.; Runnheim, R.; Churas, C.; Hickman, J. W.; Mackenzie, C.; Choudhary, M.; Donohue, T.; Kaplan, S.; Schwartz, D. C.

    2003-09-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is a facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium with tremendous metabolic diversity, which has significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular genetics of photosynthesis, photoheterotrophy, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, taxis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. To further understand this remarkable bacterium, and to accelerate an ongoing sequencing project, two whole-genome restriction maps (EcoRI and HindIII) of R. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1 were constructed using shotgun optical mapping. The approach directly mapped genomic DNA by the random mapping of single molecules. The two maps were used to facilitate sequence assembly by providing an optical scaffold for high-resolution alignment and verification of sequence contigs. Our results show that such maps facilitated the closure of sequence gaps by the early detection of nascent sequence contigs during the course of the whole-genome shotgun sequencing process.

  5. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe–S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe–S clusters featuring (Cys)3(His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe–S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe–S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe–S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved. PMID:26235649

  6. Extended antipaternalism

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, S

    2005-01-01

    Extended antipaternalism means the use of antipaternalist arguments to defend activities that harm (consenting) others. As an example, a smoker's right to smoke is often invoked in defence of the activities of tobacco companies. It can, however, be shown that antipaternalism in the proper sense does not imply such extended antipaternalism. We may therefore approve of Mill's antipaternalist principle (namely, that the only reason to interfere with someone's behaviour is to protect others from harm) without accepting activities that harm (consenting) others. This has immediate consequences for the ethics of public health. An antipaternalist need not refrain from interfering with activities such as the marketing of tobacco or heroin, boxing promotion, driving with unbelted passengers, or buying sex from "voluntary" prostitutes. PMID:15681674

  7. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M

    2016-06-23

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC═C + NC═O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids.

  8. The role of Cercospora zeae-maydis homologs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 1O2-resistance genes in resistance to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Goulart da Silva, Marilia; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae have been used as models for understanding resistance to singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), a highly toxic reactive oxygen species. In Rhodobacter and Cercospora, (1)O(2) is derived, respectively, from photosynthesis and from the (1)O(2)-generating toxin cercosporin which the fungus produces to parasitize plants. We identified common genes recovered in transcriptome studies of putative (1)O(2)-resistance genes in these two systems, suggesting common (1)O(2)-resistance mechanisms. To determine if the Cercospora homologs of R. sphaeroides (1)O(2)-resistance genes are involved in resistance to cercosporin, we expressed the genes in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa and assayed for increases in cercosporin resistance. Neurospora crassa transformants expressing genes encoding aldo/keto reductase, succinyl-CoA ligase, O-acetylhomoserine (thiol) lyase, peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase and glutathione S-transferase did not have elevated levels of cercosporin resistance. Several transformants expressing aldehyde dehydrogenase were significantly more resistant to cercosporin. Expression of the transgene and enzyme activity did not correlate with resistance, however. We conclude that although the genes tested in this study are important in (1)O(2) resistance in R. sphaeroides, their Cercospora homologs are not involved in resistance to (1)O(2) generated from cercosporin.

  9. The cobinamide amidohydrolase (cobyric acid-forming) CbiZ enzyme: A critical activity of the cobamide remodeling system of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael J.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The chemical structures of cobamides (cobalamin [Cbl]-like compounds) are the same, except for the lower ligand, which in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) is 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), and in adenosylpseudocobalamin (AdopseudoCbl) is adenine. Why the lower ligand of cobamides varies and what the mechanism of lower ligand replacement is are long-standing questions in the field of B12 biosynthesis. Work reported here uncovers the strategy used by the photosynthetic α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to procure the cobamide it needs to grow on acetate as a carbon and energy source. On the basis of genetic and biochemical evidence we conclude that, in R. sphaeroides, the activity of the cobyric acid-producing amidohydrolase CbiZ enzyme is essential for the conversion of AdopseudoCbl into AdoCbl, the cobamide needed for the catabolism of acetate. The CbiZ enzyme uses AdopseudoCbl as a substrate, but not AdoCbl. Implications of these findings for cobamide remodeling in R. sphaeroides and in other CbiZ-containing microorganisms are discussed. PMID:19889098

  10. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC=C + NC=O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  11. Fuel extender

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.K.; Gilbert, H.A.

    1989-02-21

    An efficient and cost competitive fuel extender liquid is described for blending with lead-free gasoline as an additive thereto in a maximum amount of up to about 35% thereof with 65% by volume of the gasoline in a blended mixture wherein. The content of the extender in the resultant fuel as proportioned on the basis of its thus representative maximum content consists essentially of: naphtha X as represented by C/sub 4/, C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ hydrocarbons having a Reid vapor pressure of about 8.5 to 9.6 per ASTM, D323 test procedure and an initial distillation point of about 101/sup 0/F. and an end point of about 280/sup 0/F. within a range of about 10 to 25% by volume, about 3.8 to 6.0% by volume of anhydrous ethanol, a stabilizing amount of a water repellent of the class consisting of ethyl acetate and methyl isotubyl ketone; and about 4 to 10.5% by volume of aromatics benzene and toluene, of benzene and xylene or of benzene with toluene and xylene; the extender having a specific gravity substantially comparable with that of the lead-free gasoline to which it is to be added and having phase stability in the presence of water when mixed with the gasoline.

  12. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  13. The utilization of classical spin Monte Carlo methods to simulate the magnetic behavior of extended three-dimensional cubic networks incorporating M(II) ions with an S = 5/2 ground state spin.

    PubMed

    Boullant, E; Cano, J; Journaux, Y; Decurtins, S; Gross, M; Pilkington, M

    2001-07-30

    The numerical simulations of the magnetic properties of extended three-dimensional networks containing M(II) ions with an S = 5/2 ground-state spin have been carried out within the framework of the isotropic Heisenberg model. Analytical expressions fitting the numerical simulations for the primitive cubic, diamond, together with (10-3) cubic networks have all been derived. With these empirical formulas in hands, we can now extract the interaction between the magnetic ions from the experimental data for these networks. In the case of the primitive cubic network, these expressions are directly compared with those from the high-temperature expansions of the partition function. A fit of the experimental data for three complexes, namely [(N(CH(3))(4)][Mn(N(3))] 1, [Mn(CN(4))](n)() 2, and [Fe(II)(bipy)(3)][Mn(II)(2)(ox)(3)] 3, has been carried out. The best fits were those obtained using the following parameters, J = -3.5 cm(-)(1), g = 2.01 (1); J = -8.3 cm(-)(1), g = 1.95 (2); and J = -2.0 cm(-)(1), g = 1.95 (3).

  14. Intergalactic Medium Emission Observations with the Cosmic Web Imager. II. Discovery of Extended, Kinematically Linked Emission around SSA22 Lyα Blob 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Lyα blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyα emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Lyα emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 1011 M ⊙, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 1012 M ⊙. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have significant and

  15. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Lyα BLOB 2

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Martin, D.; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-05-10

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Lyα blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyα emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Lyα emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas

  16. Numerical computation of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order by extending exponent of floating point numbers: II first-, second-, and third-order derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2012-11-01

    We confirm that the first-, second-, and third-order derivatives of fully-normalized Legendre polynomial (LP) and associated Legendre function (ALF) of arbitrary degree and order can be correctly evaluated by means of non-singular fixed-degree formulas (Bosch in Phys Chem Earth 25:655-659, 2000) in the ordinary IEEE754 arithmetic when the values of fully-normalized LP and ALF are obtained without underflow problems, for e.g., using the extended range arithmetic we recently developed (Fukushima in J Geod 86:271-285, 2012). Also, we notice the same correctness for the popular but singular fixed-order formulas unless (1) the order of differentiation is greater than the order of harmonics and (2) the point of evaluation is close to the poles. The new formulation using the fixed-order formulas runs at a negligible extra computational time, i.e., 3-5 % increase in computational time per single ALF when compared with the standard algorithm without the exponent extension. This enables a practical computation of low-order derivatives of spherical harmonics of arbitrary degree and order.

  17. The Effects of Extending of Co-planarity in a Series of Structurally Relative Polypyridyl Palladium(II) Complexes on DNA-binding and Cytotoxicity Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Somaye; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Sori Nezami, Ziba; Ghahghaei, Arezou; Yaghoubi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali-Akbar; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    In depth interaction studies between calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (CT-DNA) and a series of four structurally relative palladium(II) complexes [Pd(en)(HB)](NO3)2 (a-d), where en is ethylenediamine and heterocyclic base (HB) is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, a); 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, b); dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq, c) and dipyridophenazine (dppz, d) (Figure 1), were performed. These studies have been investigated by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra and ethidium bromide (EBr) displacement and gel filtration techniques. a-d complexes cooperatively bind and denature the DNA at low concentrations. Their concentration at midpoint of transition, L1/2, follows the order a >> b > c > d. Also the g, the number of binding sites per 1000 nucleotides, follows the order a >> b ~ c > d. EBr and Scatchard experiments for a-d complexes suggest efficient intercalative binding affinity to CT-DNA giving the order: d > c > b > a. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. The biological activity of these cationic and water soluble palladium complexes were tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562. b, c and d complexes show cytotoxic concentration (Cc50) values much lower than cisplatin. PMID:25587317

  18. A platinum(II) phenylphenanthroimidazole with an extended side-chain exhibits slow dissociation from a c-Kit G-quadruplex motif.

    PubMed

    Castor, Katherine J; Liu, Zhaomin; Fakhoury, Johans; Hancock, Mark A; Mittermaier, Anthony; Moitessier, Nicolas; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2013-12-23

    A series of three platinum(II) phenanthroimidazoles each containing a protonable side-chain appended from the phenyl moiety through copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were evaluated for their capacities to bind to human telomere, c-Myc, and c-Kit derived G-quadruplexes. The side-chain has been optimized to enable a multivalent binding mode to G-quadruplex motifs, which would potentially result in selective targeting. Molecular modeling, high-throughput fluorescence intercalator displacement (HT-FID) assays, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies demonstrate that complex 2 exhibits significantly slower dissociation rates compared to platinum phenanthroimidazoles without side-chains and other reported G-quadruplex binders. Complex 2 showed little cytotoxicity in HeLa and A172 cancer cell lines, consistent with the fact that it does not follow a telomere-targeting pathway. Preliminary mRNA analysis shows that 2 specifically interacts with the ckit promoter region. Overall, this study validates 2 as a useful molecular probe for c-Kit related cancer pathways.

  19. NEAR-INFRARED H{sub 2} AND CONTINUUM SURVEY OF EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS. II. COMPLETE CENSUS FOR THE NORTHERN GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hsu-Tai; Karr, Jennifer; Su, Yu-Nung; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Takami, Michihiro; Liao, Wei-Ting; Froebrich, Dirk; Ioannidis, Georgios; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Duan, Hao-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    We discuss 94 Extended Green Objects (EGOs) in the northern Galactic plane cataloged by Cyganowski et al., based on near-infrared narrow H{sub 2} (2.122 μm) and continuum observations from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. This data set is three times larger than the one in our previous study and is unbiased by preselection. As discussed in the previous paper, the morphologies of the 4.5 μm emission generally resemble those of the near-infrared continuum, but are different from those of the H{sub 2} emission. Of our sample, only 28% of EGOs with H{sub 2} emission show similar morphologies between 4.5 μm and H{sub 2} emission. These results suggest that the 4.5 μm emission mainly comes from scattered continuum from the embedded young stellar objects, and partially from H{sub 2} emission. About half of EGOs are associated with H{sub 2} outflows, if the H{sub 2} outflow incompleteness is considered. The H{sub 2} outflow detection rate for EGOs with K-band detections (61%) is significantly higher than for those without K-band detections (36%). This difference may be due to the fact that both H{sub 2} and K-band emissions are associated with outflows, i.e., H{sub 2} emission and K-band continuum are associated with shocks and outflow cavities, respectively. We also compared the correlation between the H{sub 2} outflows and Class I 44 GHz methanol masers from the literature. The methanol masers can be located upstream or downstream of the H{sub 2} outflows and some bright H{sub 2} spots or outflows are not associated with methanol masers, suggesting that methanol masers and H{sub 2} emission trace different excitation conditions.

  20. An Extended Minimal Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model: Evaluation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy on Human IgG Pharmacokinetics in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Gurkishan S; Morris, Marilyn E

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of low molecular weight molecules, there is limited information regarding effects on monoclonal antibodies. Our previous studies have reported significant increases in total (2-4 fold) and renal (100-300 fold) clearance of human IgG, an antibody isotype, in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pioglitazone treatment incompletely reversed the disease-related PK changes. The objective of this study was to construct a mechanistic model for simultaneous fitting plasma and urine data, to yield physiologically relevant PK parameters. We propose an extended minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) model specifically for IgG by classifying organs as either leaky or tight vascular tissues, and adding a kidney compartment. The model incorporates convection as the primary mechanism of IgG movement from plasma into tissues, interstitial fluid (ISF) in extravascular distribution space, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sieving coefficient and fraction reabsorbed in the kidney. The model captured the plasma and urine PK profiles well, and simulated concentrations in ISF. The model estimated a 2-4 fold increase in nonrenal clearance from plasma and 30-120 fold increase in renal clearance with T2DM, consistent with the experimental findings, and these differences in renal clearance were related to changes in GFR, sieving coefficient, and proximal tubular reabsorption. In conclusion, the mPBPK model offers a more relevant approach for analyzing plasma and urine IgG concentration-time data than conventional models and provides insight regarding alterations in distributional and elimination parameters occurring with T2DM.

  1. Local injection of the 90Y-labelled peptidic vector DOTATOC to control gliomas of WHO grades II and III: an extended pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, T; Hofer, S; Eichhorn, K; Wasner, M; Zimmerer, S; Freitag, P; Probst, A; Gratzl, O; Reubi, J-C; Maecke, R; Mueller-Brand, J; Merlo, A

    2002-04-01

    We have previously presented preliminary observations on targeting somatostatin receptor-positive malignant gliomas of all grades by local injection of the radiolabelled peptidic vector 90Y-DOTATOC. We now report on our more thorough clinical experience with this novel compound, focussing on low-grade and anaplastic gliomas. Small peptidic vectors have the potential to target invisible infiltrative disease within normal surrounding brain tissue, thereby opening a window of opportunity for early intervention. Five progressive gliomas of WHO grades II and III and five extensively debulked low-grade gliomas were treated with varying fractions of 90Y-DOTATOC. The vectors were locally injected into the resection cavity or into solid tumour. The activity per single injection ranged from 555 to 1,875 MBq, and the cumulative activity from 555 to 7,030 MBq, according to tumour volumes and eloquence of the affected brain area, yielding dose estimates from 76+/-15 to 312+/-62 Gy. Response was assessed by the clinical status, by steroid dependence and, every 4-6 months, by magnetic resonance imaging and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. In the five progressive gliomas, lasting responses were obtained for at least 13-45 months without the need for steroids. Radiopeptide brachytherapy had been the only modality applied to counter tumour progression. Interestingly, we observed the slow transformation of a solid, primarily inoperable anaplastic astrocytoma into a resectable multi-cystic lesion 2 years after radiopeptide brachytherapy. Based on these observations, we also assessed the feasibility of local radiotherapy following extensive debulking, which was well tolerated. Targeted beta-particle irradiation based on diffusible small peptidic vectors appears to be a promising modality for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  2. Extended phenotype description and new molecular findings in late onset glycogen storage disease type II: a northern Italy population study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Ronchi, Dario; Magri, Francesca; Lamperti, Costanza; Bordoni, Andreina; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid alpha-1,4-glucosidase deficiency and associated with recessive mutations in its coding gene GAA. Few studies have provided so far a detailed phenotypical characterization in late onset GSDII (LO-GSDII) patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation has been previously attempted with controversial results. We aim to provide an in-depth description of a cohort (n = 36) of LO-GSDII patients coming from the north of Italy and compare our population's findings to the literature. We performed a clinical record-based retrospective and prospective study of our patients. LO-GSDII in our cohort covers a large variability of phenotype including subtle clinical presentation and did not differ significantly from previous data. In all patients, molecular analysis disclosed GAA mutations, five of them being novel. To assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations we divided IVS1-32-13T>G heterozygous patients into two groups following the severity of the mutations on the second allele. Our patients harbouring "severe" mutations (n = 21) presented a strong tendency to have more severe phenotypes and more disability, more severe phenotypes and more disability, higher prevalence of assisted ventilation and a shorter time of evolution to show it. The determination of prognostic factors is mandatory in order to refine the accuracy of prognostic information, to develop follow-up strategy and, more importantly, to improve the decision algorithm for enzyme replacement therapy administration. The demonstration of genotype-phenotype correlations could help to reach this objective. Clinical assessment homogeneity is required to overcome limitations due to the lack of power of most studies.

  3. Magnetic Interactions in the Copper Complex (L-Aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) Hydrate. An Exchange-Coupled Extended System with Two Dissimilar Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Calvo, Rafael; Atria, Ana María; Spodine, Evgenia; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Peña, Octavio

    1997-07-02

    We report EPR measurements in single-crystal samples at the microwave frequencies 9.8 and 34.3 GHz and magnetic susceptibility measurements in polycrystalline samples for the ternary complex of copper with aspartic acid and phenanthroline, (L-aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) hydrate. The crystal lattice of this compound is composed of two dissimilar copper ions identified as Cu(A) and Cu(B), which are in two types of copper chains called A and B, respectively, running parallel to the b crystal axis. The copper ions in the A chains are connected by the aspartic acid molecule, and those in the B chains by a chemical path that involves a carboxylate bridge and a hydrogen bond. Both chains are held together by a complex network of hydrogen bonds and by hydrophobic interactions between aromatic amines. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate a Curie-Weiss behavior in the studied temperature range (2-300 K). The EPR spectra at 9.8 GHz display a single exchange collapsed resonance for any magnetic field orientation, in the so-called strong exchange regime. Those at 34.3 GHz are within the so-called weak exchange regime and display two resonances which belong to each type of copper ion chain. The decoupling of the spectra at 34.3 GHz using a theory based on Anderson's model for the case of two weakly exchange coupled spins S = (1)/(2) allows one to obtain the angular variation of the squares of the g-factor and the peak-to-peak line width of each resonance. This model also allows one to evaluate the exchange parameter |J(AB)/k| = 2.7(6) mK associated with the chemical path connecting dissimilar copper ions. The line width data obtained for each component of the spectra at 34.3 GHz are analyzed in terms of a model based on Kubo and Tomita's theory, to obtain the exchange parameters |J(A)/k| = 0.77(2) K and |J(B)/k| = 1.44(2) K associated with the chemical paths connecting the similar copper ions of types A and B, respectively.

  4. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    DOE PAGES

    Grayson, Katie J.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Huang, Xia; ...

    2017-01-05

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP–RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX)more » absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Fo¨rster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40±10%. Finally, this proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis.« less

  5. Physiological Roles for Two Periplasmic Nitrate Reductases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 (ATCC 17025)▿

    PubMed Central

    Hartsock, Angela; Shapleigh, James P.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 is a denitrifier whose genome contains two periplasmic nitrate reductase-encoding gene clusters. This work demonstrates nonredundant physiological roles for these two enzymes. One cluster is expressed aerobically and repressed under low oxygen while the second is maximally expressed under low oxygen. Insertional inactivation of the aerobically expressed nitrate reductase eliminated aerobic nitrate reduction, but cells of this strain could still respire nitrate anaerobically. In contrast, when the anaerobic nitrate reductase was absent, aerobic nitrate reduction was detectable, but anaerobic nitrate reduction was impaired. The aerobic nitrate reductase was expressed but not utilized in liquid culture but was utilized during growth on solid medium. Growth on a variety of carbon sources, with the exception of malate, the most oxidized substrate used, resulted in nitrite production on solid medium. This is consistent with a role for the aerobic nitrate reductase in redox homeostasis. These results show that one of the nitrate reductases is specific for respiration and denitrification while the other likely plays a role in redox homeostasis during aerobic growth. PMID:21949073

  6. Isolation and characterization of the pigment-protein complexes of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides by lithium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Broglie, R M; Hunter, C N; Delepelaire, P; Niederman, R A; Chua, N H; Clayton, R K

    1980-01-01

    When purified photosynthetic membranes from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides were treated with lithium dodecyl sulfate and subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 degrees C, up to 11 pigment-protein complexes were resolved. Absorption spectra revealed that the smallest complex contained reaction center pigments and the others contained the antenna components B850 and B875 in various proportions. Of these antenna complexes, the largest was almost entirely B850 and the smallest contained only B875. After solubilization at 100 degrees C and electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gradient gels, the B850 complex gave rise to two polypeptide components migrating with apparent Mr of 10,000 and 8000, whereas with the B875 complex, two components were observed with apparent Mr of 12,000 and 8000. The reaction center complex gave rise to only the 24 and 21 kilodalton polypeptide subunits. Fluorescence emission spectra showed maxima at 872 and 902 nm for B850 and B875, respectively. Analyses of bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids indicated that, in the B875 complex, two molecules of each of these pigments are associated with the two polypeptides. The associations of B850 and B875 in large and small complexes obtained by lithium dodecyl sulfate treatment are consistent with models of their organization within the membrane.

  7. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  8. Electrochromic absorbance changes of photosynthetic pigments in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. I. Stimulation by secondary electron transport at low temperature.

    PubMed

    de Grooth, B G; Amesz, J

    1977-11-17

    Light-induced absorbance changes were measured at temperatures between --30 and --55 degrees C in chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Absorbance changes due to photooxidation of reaction center bacteriochlorophyll (P-870) were accompanied by a red shift of the absorption bands of a carotenoid. The red shift was inhibited by gramicidin D. The kinetics of P-870 indicated electron transport from the "primary" to a secondary electron acceptor. This electron transport was slowed down by lowering the temperature or increasing the pH of the suspension. Electron transport from soluble cytochrome c to P-870+ occurred in less purified chromatophore preparations. This electron transport was accompanied by a relatively large increase of the carotenoid absorbance change. This agrees with the hypothesis that P-870 is located inside the membrane, so that an additional membrane potential is generated upon transfer of an electron from cytochrome to P-870+. A strong stimulation of the carotenoid changes (more than 10-fold in some experiments) and pronounced band shifts of bacteriochlorophyll B-850 were observed upon illumination in the presence of artifical donor-acceptor systems. Reduced N-methylphenazonium methosulphate (PMS) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (TMPD) were fairly efficient donors, whereas endogenous ubiquinone and oxidized PMS acted as secondary acceptor. These results indicate the generation of large membrane potentials at low temperature, caused by sustained electron transport across the chromatophore membrane. The artificial probe, merocyanine MC-V did not show electrochromic band shifts at low temperature.

  9. Insights into the species-specific TLR4 signaling mechanism in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 in complex with MD2 senses the presence of lipid A (LA) and initiates a signaling cascade that curb the infection. This complex is evolutionarily conserved and can initiate the immune system in response to a variety of LAs. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation (25 ns) was performed to elucidate the differential behavior of TLR4/MD2 complex in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RsLA). Penta-acyl chain-containing RsLA is at the verge of agonist (6 acyl-chains) and antagonist (4 acyl-chains) structure, and activates the TLR4 pathway in horses and hamsters, while inhibiting in humans and murine. In the time-evolved coordinates, the promising factors that dictated the differential response included the local and global mobility pattern of complexes, solvent-accessible surface area of ligand, and surface charge distributions of TLR4 and MD2. We showed that the GlcN1-GlcN2 backbone acquires agonist (3FXI)-like configurations in horses and hamsters, while acquiring antagonist (2E59)-like configurations in humans and murine systems. Moreover, analysis of F126 behavior in the MD2 F126 loop (amino acids 123-129) and loop EF (81-89) suggested that certain sequence variations also contribute to species-specific response. This study underlines the TLR4 signaling mechanism and provides new therapeutic opportunities.

  10. Enhanced production of coenzyme Q10 by self-regulating the engineered MEP pathway in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Xu, Haoming; Xie, Wenping; Gu, Jiali; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-04-01

    Fine-tuning the expression level of an engineered pathway is crucial for the metabolic engineering of a host toward a desired phenotype. However, most engineered hosts suffer from nonfunctional protein expression, metabolic imbalance, cellular burden or toxicity from intermediates when an engineered pathway is first introduced, which can decrease production of the desired product. To circumvent these obstacles, we developed a self-regulation system utilizing the trc/tac promoter, LacI(q) protein and ribosomal binding sites (RBS). With the purpose of improving coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 ) production by increasing the decaprenyl diphosphate supplement, enzymes DXS, DXR, IDI, and IspD were constitutively overexpressed under the control of the trc promoter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Then, a self-regulation system combining a set of RBSs for adjusting the expression of the LacI(q) protein was applied to tune the expression of the four genes, resulting in improved CoQ10 production. Finally, another copy of the tac promoter with the UbiG gene (involved in the ubiquinone pathway of CoQ10 biosynthesis) was introduced into the engineered pathway. By optimizing the expression level of both the upstream and downstream pathway, CoQ10 production in the mutants was improved up to 93.34 mg/L (7.16 mg/g DCW), about twofold of the wild-type (48.25 mg/L, 3.24 mg/g DCW).

  11. Coupling of cytochrome and quinone turnovers in the photocycle of reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Osváth, S; Maróti, P

    1997-01-01

    A minimal kinetic model of the photocycle, including both quinone (Q-6) reduction at the secondary quinone-binding site and (mammalian) cytochrome c oxidation at the cytochrome docking site of isolated reaction centers from photosynthetic purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was elaborated and tested by cytochrome photooxidation under strong continuous illumination. The typical rate of photochemical excitation by a laser diode at 810 nm was 2.200 s-1, and the rates of stationary turnover of the reaction center (one-half of that of cytochrome photooxidation) were 600 +/- 70 s-1 at pH 6 and 400 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 8. The rate of turnover showed strong pH dependence, indicating the contribution of different rate-limiting processes. The kinetic limitation of the photocycle was attributed to the turnover of the cytochrome c binding site (pH < 6), light intensity and quinone/quinol exchange (6 < pH < 8), and proton-coupled second electron transfer in the quinone acceptor complex (pH > 8). The analysis of the double-reciprocal plot of the rate of turnover versus light intensity has proved useful in determining the light-independent (maximum) turnover rate of the reaction center (445 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 7.8). PMID:9251814

  12. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Taguchi, Alexander T.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Wraight, Colin A.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-03

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, in this paper we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the QA and QB sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the QB site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the QA and QB sites. Finally, disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the QA–QB– biradical and competitive binding assays.

  13. Optimization of Biomass and 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC17023 via Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Jianzheng; Li, Xiangkun; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Microbial 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) produced from wastewater is considered as potential renewable energy. However, many hurdles are needed to be overcome such as the regulation of key influencing factors on ALA yield. Biomass and ALA production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides was optimized using response surface methodology. The culturing medium was artificial volatile fatty acids wastewater. Three additives were optimized, namely succinate and glycine that are precursors of ALA biosynthesis, and D-glucose that is an inhibitor of ALA dehydratase. The optimal conditions were achieved by analyzing the response surface plots. Statistical analysis showed that succinate at 8.56 mmol/L, glycine at 5.06 mmol/L, and D-glucose at 7.82 mmol/L were the best conditions. Under these optimal conditions, the highest biomass production and ALA yield of 3.55 g/L and 5.49 mg/g-biomass were achieved. Subsequent verification experiments at optimal values had the maximum biomass production of 3.41 ± 0.002 g/L and ALA yield of 5.78 ± 0.08 mg/g-biomass.

  14. The light-induced carotenoid absorbance changes in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: an analysis and interpretation of the band shifts.

    PubMed

    Symons, M; Swysen, C; Sybesma, C

    1977-12-23

    An analysis has been made of the spectrum of the carotenoid absorption band shift generated by continuous illumination of chromatophores of the GlC-mutant of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides at room temperature by means of three computer programs. There appears to be at least two pools of the same carotenoid, only one of which, comprising about 20% of the total carotenoid content, is responsible for the light-induced absorbance changes. The 'remaining' pool absorbs at wavelengths which were about 5 nm lower than those at which the 'changing' pool absorbs. This difference in absorption wavelength could indicate that the two pools are influenced differently by permanent local electric fields. The electrochromic origin of the absorbance changes has been demonstrated directly; the isosbestic points of the absorption difference spectrum move to shorter wavelengths upon lowering of the light-induced electric field. Band shifts up to 1.7 nm were observed. A comparison of the light-induced absorbance changes with a KCl-valinomycin-induced diffusion potential has been used to calibrate the electrochromic shifts. The calibration value appeared to be 137 +/- 6 mV per nm shift.

  15. Inhibitor-complexed Structures of the Cytochrome bc[subscript 1] from the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Elberry, Maria; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Chang-An; Yu, Linda; Xia, Di

    2008-06-30

    The cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex (bc{sub 1}) is a major contributor to the proton motive force across the membrane by coupling electron transfer to proton translocation. The crystal structures of wild type and mutant bc{sub 1} complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rsbc{sub 1}), stabilized with the quinol oxidation (Q{sub P}) site inhibitor stigmatellin alone or in combination with the quinone reduction (Q{sub N}) site inhibitor antimycin, were determined. The high quality electron density permitted assignments of a new metal-binding site to the cytochrome c1 subunit and a number of lipid and detergent molecules. Structural differences between Rsbc{sub 1} and its mitochondrial counterparts are mostly extra membranous and provide a basis for understanding the function of the predominantly longer sequences in the bacterial subunits. Functional implications for the bc{sub 1} complex are derived from analyses of 10 independent molecules in various crystal forms and from comparisons with mitochondrial complexes.

  16. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Katie J.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Huang, Xia; Qian, Pu; Dilbeck, Preston; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Yuen, Jonathan M.; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Leggett, Graham J.; Holten, Dewey; Kirmaier, Christine; Neil Hunter, C.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP-RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX) absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Förster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40+/-10%. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis.

  17. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  18. Concomitant biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from dark fermentation effluents by adapted Rhodobacter sphaeroides and mixed photofermentative cultures.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Valentino, Serena; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed at investigating concomitant production of biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by photofermentation (PF) using dark fermentation effluents (DFE). An adapted culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides AV1b (pH 6.5, 24±2°C) achieved H2 and PHB yields of 256 (±2) NmLH2/g Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and 273.8mgPHB/gCOD (32.5±3% of the dry cells weight (DCW)), respectively. When a diluted (1:2) DFE medium was applied to the adapted pure and mixed photofermentative culture, the respective H2 yields were 164.0 (±12) and 71.3 (±6) NmLH2/gCOD and the PHB yields were 212.1 (±105.2) and 50.7 (±2.7) mgPHB/gCOD added, corresponding to 24 (±0.7) and 6.3 (±0) % DCW, respectively. The concomitant H2 and PHB production from the PF process gave a good DFE post treatment achieving up to 80% COD removal from the initial DFE.

  19. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite I: X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    "Two-line" ferrihydrite samples precipitated and then exposed to a range of aqueous Zn solutions (10-5 to 10-3 M), and also coprecipitated in similar Zn solutions (pH 6.5), have been examined by Zn and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Typical Zn complexes on the surface have Zn-O distances of 1.97(0.2) A?? and coordination numbers of about 4.0(0.5), consistent with tetrahedral oxygen coordination. This contrasts with Zn-O distances of 2.11(.02) A?? and coordination numbers of 6 to 7 in the aqueous Zn solutions used in sample preparation. X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) fits to the second shell of cation neighbors indicate as many as 4 Zn-Fe neighbors at 3.44(.04) A?? in coprecipitated samples, and about two Zn-Fe neighbors at the same distance in adsorption samples. In both sets of samples, the fitted coordination number of second shell cations decreases as sorption density increases, indicating changes in the number and type of available complexing sites or the onset of competitive precipitation processes. Comparison of our results with the possible geometries for surface complexes and precipitates suggests that the Zn sorption complexes are inner sphere and at lowest adsorption densities are bidentate, sharing apical oxygens with adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra. Coprecipitation samples have complexes with similar geometry, but these are polydentate, sharing apices with more than two adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 polyhedra. The results are inconsistent with Zn entering the ferrihydrite structure (i.e., solid solution formation) or formation of other Zn-Fe precipitates. The fitted Zn-Fe coordination numbers drop with increasing Zn density with a minimum of about 0.8(.2) at Zn/(Zn + Fe) of 0.08 or more. This change appears to be attributable to the onset of precipitation of zinc hydroxide polymers with mainly tetrahedral Zn coordination. At the highest loadings studied, the nature of the complexes changes further

  20. Functional importance of a pair of conserved glutamic acid residues and of Ca(2+) binding in the cbb(3)-type oxygen reductases from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hanlin; Han, Huazhi; Roh, Jung H; Hemp, James; Hosler, Jonathan P; Gennis, Robert B

    2012-09-18

    The cbb(3)-type cytochrome c oxidases are members of the family of heme-copper proton pumping respiratory oxygen reductases. The structure of the cbb(3)-type oxidase from Pseudomonas stutzeri reveals that, in addition to the six redox-active metal centers (two b-type hemes, three c-type hemes, and Cu(B)), the enzyme also contains at least one Ca(2+). The calcium bridges two propionate carboxyls at the interface between the low-spin heme b and the active-site heme b(3) and, in addition, is ligated to a serine in subunit CcoO and by a glutamate in subunit CcoN. The glutamate that is ligated to Ca(2+) is one of a pair of glutamic acid residues that has previously been suggested to be part of a proton exit pathway for pumped protons. In this work, mutations of these glutamates are investigated in the cbb(3)-type oxidases from Vibrio cholerae and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Metal analysis shows that each of these wild-type enzymes contains Ca(2+). Mutations of the glutamate expected to ligate the Ca(2+) in each of these enzymes (E126 in V. cholerae and E180 in R. sphaeroides) result in a loss of activity as well as a loss of Ca(2+). Mutations of the nearby glutamate (E129 in V. cholerae and E183 in R. sphaeroides) also resulted in a loss of oxidase activity and a loss of Ca(2+). It is concluded that the Ca(2+) is essential for assembly of the fully functional enzyme and that neither of the glutamates is likely to be part of a pathway for pumped protons within the cbb(3)-type oxygen reductases. A more likely role for these glutamates is the maintenance of the structural integrity of the active conformation of the enzyme.

  1. Time-Resolved Surface-Enhanced IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Direct Electron Transfer to Cytochrome c Oxidase from R. sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Steininger, Christoph; Hildenbrandt, David M.; Srajer, Johannes; Nowak, Christoph; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L.C.

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy triggered by electrochemical modulation has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Single bands isolated from a broad band in the amide I region using phase-sensitive detection were attributed to different redox centers. Their absorbances changing on the millisecond timescale could be fitted to a model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics established previously. Substantial conformational changes of secondary structures coupled to redox transitions were revealed. PMID:24359742

  2. In vivo sensitivity of blue-light-dependent signaling mediated by AppA/PpsR or PrrB/PrrA in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Metz, Sebastian; Jäger, Andreas; Klug, Gabriele

    2009-07-01

    Formation of photosynthesis complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is regulated in a redox- and light-dependent manner by the AppA/PpsR and PrrB/PrrA systems. While on the one hand, blue light is sensed by the flavin adenine dinucleotide-binding BLUF domain of AppA, on the other, light is absorbed by bacteriochlorophyll signals through PrrB/PrrA. We show that much smaller quantities initiate the AppA-mediated response to blue light than the bacteriochlorophyll-mediated response.

  3. Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides lipid A derivatives block in vitro induction of tumor necrosis factor and endotoxin tolerance by smooth lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Perera, P Y; Qureshi, N; Takayama, K; Vogel, S N

    1992-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas (Rhodobacter) sphaeroides diphosphoryl lipid A is a relatively inert species of lipid A but has been shown to antagonize the effects of toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in vivo and in vitro. The antagonist and its monophosphoryl derivative were examined for the ability to block tumor necrosis factor synthesis and reverse tolerance induction in vitro in macrophage cultures stimulated with bioactive preparations of smooth LPS, rough LPS, diphosphoryl lipid A, and monophosphoryl lipid A. Inhibition of agonist activity and reversal of tolerance by these novel penta-acylated lipid A antagonists provides new insight into macrophage-LPS interactions. PMID:1398939

  4. Role of phospholipids of subunit III in the regulation of structural rearrangements in cytochrome c oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Alnajjar, Khadijeh S; Cvetkov, Teresa; Prochaska, Lawrence

    2015-02-03

    Subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase possesses structural domains that contain conserved phospholipid binding sites. Mutations within these domains induce a loss of phospholipid binding, coinciding with decreased electron transfer activity. Functional and structural roles for phospholipids in the enzyme from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been investigated. Upon the removal of intrinsic lipids using phospholipase A2, electron transfer activity was decreased 30-50%. Moreover, the delipidated enzyme exhibited turnover-induced, suicide inactivation, which was reversed by the addition of exogenous lipids, most specifically by cardiolipin. Cardiolipin exhibited two sites of interaction with the delipidated enzyme, a high-affinity site (Km = 0.14 μM) and a low-affinity site (Km = 26 μM). Subunit I of the delipidated enzyme exhibited a faster digestion rate when it was treated with α-chymotrypsin compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that lipid removal induces a conformational change to expose the digestion sites further. Upon reaction of subunit III of the enzyme with a fluorophore (AEDANS), fluorescence anisotropy showed an increased rotational rate of the fluorophore in the absence of lipids, indicating increased flexibility of subunit III within the enzyme's tertiary structure. Additionally, Förster resonance energy transfer between AEDANS and a fluorescently labeled cardiolipin revealed that cardiolipin binds in the v-shaped cleft of subunit III in the delipidated enzyme and that it moves closer to the active site in subunit I upon a change in the redox state of the enzyme. In conclusion, these results show that the phospholipids regulate events occurring during electron transfer activity by maintaining the structural integrity of the enzyme at the active site.

  5. High yield of B-branch electron transfer in a quadruple reaction center mutant of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjo L; Neerken, Sieglinde; de Wijn, Rik; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Gast, Peter; Vijgenboom, Erik; Hoff, Arnold J

    2002-03-05

    A new reaction center (RC) quadruple mutant, called LDHW, of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is described. This mutant was constructed to obtain a high yield of B-branch electron transfer and to study P(+)Q(B)(-) formation via the B-branch. The A-branch of the mutant RC contains two monomer bacteriochlorophylls, B(A) and beta, as a result of the H mutation L(M214)H. The latter bacteriochlorophyll replaces bacteriopheophytin H(A) of wild-type RCs. As a result of the W mutation A(M260)W, the A-branch does not contain the ubiquinone Q(A); this facilitates the study of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation. Furthermore, the D mutation G(M203)D introduces an aspartic acid residue near B(A). Together these mutations impede electron transfer through the A-branch. The B-branch contains two bacteriopheophytins, Phi(B) and H(B), and a ubiquinone, Q(B.) Phi(B) replaces the monomer bacteriochlorophyll B(B) as a result of the L mutation H(M182)L. In the LDHW mutant we find 35-45% B-branch electron transfer, the highest yield reported so far. Transient absorption spectroscopy at 10 K, where the absorption bands due to the Q(X) transitions of Phi(B) and H(B) are well resolved, shows simultaneous bleachings of both absorption bands. Although photoreduction of the bacteriopheophytins occurs with a high yield, no significant (approximately 1%) P(+)Q(B)(-) formation was found.

  6. Interactions between Cytochrome c2 and the Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides : The Cation-pi Interaction†

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, M. L.; Weber, K. H.; Chang, C.; Okamura, M. Y.

    2008-01-01

    The cation-pi interaction between positively charged and aromatic groups is a common feature of many proteins and protein complexes. The structure of the complex between cytochrome c2 (cyt c2) and photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides exhibits a cation-pi complex formed between Arg-C32 on cyt c2 and Tyr-M295 on the RC (Axelrod et. al (2002) J. Mol. Biol. 319, 501–515). The importance of the cation-pi interaction for binding and electron transfer was studied by mutating Tyr-M295 and Arg-C32. The first and second order rates for electron transfer were not affected by mutating Tyr-M295 to Ala indicating that the cation-pi complex does not greatly affect the association process or structure of the state active in electron transfer. The dissociation constant KD showed a greater increase when Try-M295 was replaced by non-aromatic Ala (3-fold) than by aromatic Phe (1.2-fold) characteristic of a cation-pi interaction. Replacement of Arg-C32 by Ala increased KD (80-fold) largely due to removal of electrostatic interactions with negatively charged residues on the RC. Replacement by Lys, increased KD (6-fold) indicating that Lys does not form a cation-pi complex. This specificity for Arg may be due to a solvation effect. Double mutant analysis indicates interaction energy between Tyr-M295 and Arg-C32 of about −24 meV (−0.6 kcal/mole). This energy is surprisingly small considering the widespread occurrence of cation-pi complexes and may be due to the trade-off between the favorable cation-pi binding energy and the unfavorable desolvation energy needed to bury Arg-C32 in the short-range contact region between the two proteins. PMID:16008347

  7. New insights into the photochemistry of carotenoid spheroidenone in light-harvesting complex 2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Martin, Elizabeth C; Bocian, David F; Hunter, C Neil; Holten, Dewey

    2017-03-01

    Light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the semi-aerobically grown purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied using optical (static and time-resolved) and resonance Raman spectroscopies. This antenna complex comprises bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a and the carotenoid spheroidenone, a ketolated derivative of spheroidene. The results indicate that the spheroidenone-LH2 complex contains two spectral forms of the carotenoid: (1) a minor, "blue" form with an S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) spectral origin band at 522 nm, shifted from the position in organic media simply by the high polarizability of the binding site, and (2) the major, "red" form with the origin band at 562 nm that is associated with a pool of pigments that more strongly interact with protein residues, most likely via hydrogen bonding. Application of targeted modeling of excited-state decay pathways after carotenoid excitation suggests that the high (92%) carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in this LH2 system, relative to LH2 complexes binding carotenoids with comparable double-bond conjugation lengths, derives mainly from resonance energy transfer from spheroidenone S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) state to BChl a via the Qx state of the latter, accounting for 60% of the total transfer. The elevated S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) → Qx transfer efficiency is apparently associated with substantially decreased energy gap (increased spectral overlap) between the virtual S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) → S0 (1(1)A g(-) ) carotenoid emission and Qx absorption of BChl a. This reduced energetic gap is the ultimate consequence of strong carotenoid-protein interactions, including the inferred hydrogen bonding.

  8. PucC and LhaA direct efficient assembly of the light‐harvesting complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Mothersole, David J.; Jackson, Philip J.; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Tucker, Jaimey D.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Dickman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mature architecture of the photosynthetic membrane of the purple phototroph R hodobacter sphaeroides has been characterised to a level where an atomic‐level membrane model is available, but the roles of the putative assembly proteins LhaA and PucC in establishing this architecture are unknown. Here we investigate the assembly of light‐harvesting LH2 and reaction centre‐light‐harvesting1‐PufX (RC‐LH1‐PufX) photosystem complexes using spectroscopy, pull‐downs, native gel electrophoresis, quantitative mass spectrometry and fluorescence lifetime microscopy to characterise a series of lha A and puc C mutants. LhaA and PucC are important for specific assembly of LH1 or LH2 complexes, respectively, but they are not essential; the few LH1 subunits found in Δlha A mutants assemble to form normal RC‐LH1‐PufX core complexes showing that, once initiated, LH1 assembly round the RC is cooperative and proceeds to completion. LhaA and PucC form oligomers at sites of initiation of membrane invagination; LhaA associates with RCs, bacteriochlorophyll synthase (BchG), the protein translocase subunit YajC and the YidC membrane protein insertase. These associations within membrane nanodomains likely maximise interactions between pigments newly arriving from BchG and nascent proteins within the SecYEG‐SecDF‐YajC‐YidC assembly machinery, thereby co‐ordinating pigment delivery, the co‐translational insertion of LH polypeptides and their folding and assembly to form photosynthetic complexes. PMID:26419219

  9. Physical and genetic mapping of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 genome: genome size, fragment identification, and gene localization.

    PubMed Central

    Suwanto, A; Kaplan, S

    1989-01-01

    Four restriction endonucleases, AseI (5'-ATTAAT), SpeI (5'-ACTAGT), DraI (5'-TTTAAA), and SnaBI (5'-TACGTA), generated DNA fragments of suitable size distributions for mapping the genome of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by transverse alternating field electrophoresis. AseI produced 17 fragments, ranging in size from 3 to 1,105 kilobases (kb), SpeI yielded 16 fragments (12 to 1,645 kb), DraI yielded at least 25 fragments (6 to 800 kb), and SnaBI generated 10 fragments (12 to 1,225 kb). A total genome size of approximately 4,400 +/- 112 kb was determined by summing the fragment lengths in each of the digests generated by using the different restriction endonucleases. The total genomic DNA consisted of chromosomal DNA (3,960 +/- 112 kb) and the five endogenous plasmids (approximately 450 kb total) whose cognate DNA fragments have been unambiguously identified. A number of genes have been physically mapped to the AseI-generated restriction endonuclease fragments of total genomic DNA by Southern hybridization analysis with either homologous or heterologous specific gene probes or, in the case of several auxotrophic and pigment-biosynthetic mutants apparently generated by Tn5, a Tn5-specific probe. Other genes have been mapped by a comparison with wild-type patterns of the electrophoretic banding patterns of the AseI-digested genomic DNA derived from mutants generated by the insertion of either kanamycin or spectinomycin-streptomycin resistance cartridges. The relative orientations, distance, and location of the pufBALMX, puhA, cycA, and pucBA operons have also been determined, as have been the relative orientations between prkB and hemT and between prkA and the fbc operon. Images PMID:2553662

  10. Expression of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA and hemT genes, encoding two 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase isozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Neidle, E L; Kaplan, S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA and hemT genes, encoding 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase isozymes, were determined. ALA synthase catalyzes the condensation of glycine and succinyl coenzyme A, the first and rate-limiting step in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. The hemA and hemT structural gene sequences were 65% identical to each other, and the deduced HemA and HemT polypeptide sequences were 53% identical, with an additional 16% of aligned amino acids being similar. HemA and HemT were homologous to all characterized ALA synthases, including two human ALA synthase isozymes. In addition, they were evolutionarily related to 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid synthetase (BioF) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), enzymes which catalyze similar reactions. Two hemA transcripts were identified, both expressed under photosynthetic conditions at levels approximately three times higher than those found under aerobic conditions. A single transcriptional start point was identified for both transcripts, and a consensus sequence at this location indicated that an Fnr-like protein may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of hemA. Transcription of hemT was not detected in wild-type cells under the physiological growth conditions tested. In a mutant strain in which the hemA gene had been inactivated, however, hemT was expressed. In this mutant, hemT transcripts were characterized by Northern (RNA) hybridization, primer extension, and ribonuclease protection techniques. A small open reading frame of unknown function was identified upstream of, and transcribed in the same direction as, hemA. Images PMID:8468290

  11. Homogeneous Universes in Extended Inflation II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Enrique

    1997-04-01

    It is shown that the scalar field π of the Brans-Dicke theory in the Bianchi TypeVIo-VIh-VIIh-VIII and IX models has the same form that in the isotropic Robertson-Walker case. It is shown that the Universe will be isotropized very fast, permitting so that the approximation of an Universe Robertson-Walker isotropic to be a good approach in the early Universe.

  12. Control of hemA Expression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1: Effect of a Transposon Insertion in the hbdA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fales, Linda; Kryszak, Luiza; Zeilstra-Ryalls, Jill

    2001-01-01

    The common precursor to all tetrapyrroles is 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and in Rhodobacter sphaeroides its formation occurs via the Shemin pathway. ALA synthase activity is encoded by two differentially regulated genes in R. sphaeroides 2.4.1: hemA and hemT. In our investigations of hemA regulation, we applied transposon mutagenesis under aerobic conditions, followed by a selection that identified transposon insertion mutants in which hemA expression is elevated. One of these mutants has been characterized previously (J. Zeilstra-Ryalls and S. Kaplan, J. Bacteriol. 178:985–993, 1996), and here we describe our analysis of a second mutant strain. The transposon inserted into the coding sequences of hbdA, coding for S-(+)-β-hydroxybutyryl–coenzyme A dehydrogenase and catalyzing an NAD-dependent reaction. We provide evidence that the hbdA gene product participates in polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism and, based on our findings, we discuss possibilities as to how defective PHB metabolism might alter the level of hemA expression. PMID:11160087

  13. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme.

  14. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme. PMID:8550452

  15. 70 Years Making the World Safer: Extended

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    Extended version with narration. This video shows our roles in making the world safer — working to end World War II, providing stable isotopes for research, providing unique precision manufacturing capabilities, and meeting nonproliferation and global security missions.

  16. Isolation, size estimates, and spectral heterogeneity of an oligomeric series of light-harvesting 1 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Westerhuis, Willem H J; Sturgis, James N; Ratcliffe, Emma C; Hunter, C Neil; Niederman, Robert A

    2002-07-09

    A series of light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complexes was isolated by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 degrees C from Rhodobacter sphaeroides M21, which lacks the peripheral light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex. This ladder of LH1 bands was also demonstrated in the wild type, partially superimposed upon a smaller number of LH2 complexes. An assessment of electrophoretic mobility vs acrylamide concentration, in which the reaction center LM particle and annular LH1 and LH2 complexes were used as standards of known structure, indicated that the LH1 gel bands 2 to 10 represent regular oligomers of an alpha beta heterodimeric unit, that vary in size from (alpha beta)(2-3) to (alpha beta)(10-11). The isolated LH1 complexes exhibited oligomeric state dependent optical properties, characterized by red shifts in near-IR absorption and emission maxima at 77 K of approximately 6 nm as aggregate sizes increased from approximately 3 to 7-8 alpha beta-heterodimers, accompanied by shifts in highly polarized fluorescence from the blue to the red side of the absorption band. This has been explained by the oligomerization of heterodimers to form a curvilinear array of excitonically coupled chromophores, with the anisotropic long-wavelength component, designated originally as B896, corresponding to low energy excitonic transitions arising from interactions within inhomogeneous BChl clusters [Westerhuis et al. (1999) J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 7733-7742]. Differences in electrophoretic profiles of LH1 bands between strains M21 and M2192, an LH1-only strain that also lacks PufX, further suggested that the more rapidly migrating bands represent arced fragments of the curvilinear array of LH1 complexes thought to exist as a large closed circular structure only in the latter strain. The electrophoretic banding pattern also indicated that the LH1 complex may be located at the peripheries of dimeric intramembrane particle arrays seen in freeze-fracture replicas of tubular M21

  17. Enhanced photo-fermentative H2 production using Rhodobacter sphaeroides by ethanol addition and analysis of soluble microbial products

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological fermentation routes can provide an environmentally friendly way of producing H2 since they use renewable biomass as feedstock and proceed under ambient temperature and pressure. In particular, photo-fermentation has superior properties in terms of achieving high H2 yield through complete degradation of substrates. However, long-term H2 production data with stable performance is limited, and this data is essential for practical applications. In the present work, continuous photo-fermentative H2 production from lactate was attempted using the purple non-sulfur bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131. As a gradual drop in H2 production was observed, we attempted to add ethanol (0.2% v/v) to the medium. Results As continuous operation went on, H2 production was not sustained and showed a negligible H2 yield (< 0.5 mol H2/mol lactateadded) within two weeks. Electron balance analysis showed that the reason for the gradual drop in H2 production was ascribed to the increase in production of soluble microbial products (SMPs). To see the possible effect of ethanol addition, a batch test was first conducted. The presence of ethanol significantly increased the H2 yield from 1.15 to 2.20 mol H2/mol lactateadded, by suppressing the production of SMPs. The analysis of SMPs by size exclusion chromatography showed that, in the later period of fermentation, more than half of the low molecular weight SMPs (< 1 kDa) were consumed and used for H2 production when ethanol had been added, while the concentration of SMPs continuously increased in the absence of ethanol. It was found that the addition of ethanol facilitated the utilization of reducing power, resulting in an increase in the cellular levels of NAD+ and NADP+. In continuous operation, ethanol addition was effective, such that stable H2 production was attained with an H2 yield of 2.5 mol H2/mol lactateadded. Less than 15% of substrate electrons were used for SMP production, whereas 35% were used in

  18. B-branch electron transfer in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides assessed with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjo L; Neerken, Sieglinde; de Wijn, Rik; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Gast, Peter; Vijgenboom, Erik; Hoff, Arnold J

    2002-01-01

    Mutants of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides are described which were designed to study electron transfer along the so-called B-branch of reaction center (RC) cofactors. Combining the mutation L(M214)H, which results in the incorporation of a bacteriochlorophyll, beta, for H(A) [Kirmaier et al. (1991) Science 251: 922-927] with two mutations, G(M203)D and Y(M210)W, near B(A), we have created a double and a triple mutant with long lifetimes of the excited state P(*) of the primary donor P, viz. 80 and 160 ps at room temperature, respectively. The yield of P(+)Q(A) (-) formation in these mutants is reduced to 50 and 30%, respectively, of that in wildtype RCs. For both mutants, the quantum yield of P(+)H(B) (-) formation was less than 10%, in contrast to the 15% B-branch electron transfer demonstrated in RCs of a similar mutant of Rba. capsulatus with a P(*) lifetime of 15 ps [Heller et al. (1995) Science 269: 940-945]. We conclude that the lifetime of P(*) is not a governing factor in switching to B-branch electron transfer. The direct photoreduction of the secondary quinone, Q(B), was studied with a triple mutant combining the G(M203)D, L(M214)H and A(M260)W mutations. In this triple mutant Q(A) does not bind to the reaction center [Ridge et al. (1999) Photosynth Res 59: 9-26]. It is shown that B-branch electron transfer leading to P(+)Q(B) (-) formation occurs to a minor extent at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures (about 3% following a saturating laser flash at 20 K). In contrast, in wildtype RCs P(+)Q(B) (-) formation involves the A-branch and does not occur at all at cryogenic temperatures. Attempts to accumulate the P(+)Q(B) (-) state under continuous illumination were not successful. Charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) formed by B-branch electron transfer in the new mutant is much faster (seconds) than has been previously reported for charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) trapped in wildtype RCs (10(5) s) [Kleinfeld et al. (1984b) Biochemistry 23

  19. Transcriptional Activation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Cytochrome c2 Gene P2 Promoter by the Response Regulator PrrA

    PubMed Central

    Comolli, James C.; Carl, Audrey J.; Hall, Christine; Donohue, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Anoxygenic photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a member of the α subclass of the class Proteobacteria, requires the response regulator PrrA. PrrA and the sensor kinase PrrB are part of a two-component signaling pathway that influences a wide range of processes under oxygen-limited conditions. In this work we characterized the pathway of transcription activation by PrrB and PrrA by purifying these proteins, analyzing them in vitro, and characterizing a mutant PrrA protein in vivo and in vitro. When purified, a soluble transmitter domain of PrrB (cPrrB) could autophosphorylate, rapidly transfer phosphate to PrrA, and stimulate dephosphorylation of phospho-PrrA. Unphosphorylated PrrA activated transcription from a target cytochrome c2 gene (cycA) promoter, P2, which contained sequences from −73 to +22 relative to the transcription initiation site. However, phosphorylation of PrrA increased its activity since activation of cycA P2 was enhanced up to 15-fold by treatment with the low-molecular-weight phosphodonor acetyl phosphate. A mutant PrrA protein containing a single amino acid substitution in the presumed phosphoacceptor site (PrrA-D63A) was not phosphorylated in vitro but also was not able to stimulate cycA P2 transcription. PrrA-D63A also had no apparent in vivo activity, demonstrating that aspartate 63 is necessary both for the function of PrrA and for its phosphorylation-dependent activation. The cellular level of wild-type PrrA was negatively autoregulated so that less PrrA was present in the absence of oxygen, conditions in which the activities of many PrrA target genes increase. PrrA-D63A failed to repress expression of the prrA gene under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that this single amino acid change also eliminated PrrA function in vivo. PMID:11751815

  20. Mutational analysis of the C-terminal domain of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides response regulator PrrA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Denise F.; Stenzel, Rachelle A.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides response regulator PrrA directly activates transcription of genes necessary for energy conservation at low O2 tensions and under anaerobic conditions. It is proposed that PrrA homologues contain a C-terminal DNA-binding domain (PrrA-CTD) that lacks significant amino acid sequence similarity to those found in other response regulators. To test this hypothesis, single amino acid substitutions were created at 12 residues in the PrrA-CTD. These mutant PrrA proteins were purified and tested for the ability to be phosphorylated by the low-molecular-mass phosphate donor acetyl phosphate, to activate transcription and to bind promoter DNA. Each mutant PrrA protein accepted phosphate from 32P-labelled acetyl phosphate. At micromolar concentrations of acetyl phosphate-treated wild-type PrrA, a single 20 bp region in the PrrA-dependent cycA P2 promoter was protected from DNase I digestion. Of the mutant PrrA proteins tested, only acetyl phosphate-treated PrrA-N168A and PrrA-I177A protected cycA P2 from DNase I digestion at similar protein concentrations compared to wild-type PrrA. The use of in vitro transcription assays with the PrrA-dependent cycA P2 and puc promoters showed that acetyl phosphate-treated PrrA-N168A produced transcript levels similar to that of wild-type PrrA at comparable protein concentrations. Using concentrations of acetyl phosphate-treated PrrA that are saturating for the wild-type protein, PrrA-H170A and PrrA-I177A produced<45%as much transcript as wild-type PrrA. Under identical conditions, the remaining mutant PrrA proteins produced little or no detectable transcripts from either promoter in vitro. Explanations are presented for why these amino acid side chains in the PrrA-CTD are important for its ability to activate transcription. PMID:16339955

  1. B-side electron transfer promoted by absorbance of multiple photons in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Jackson, J.A.; Taguchi, A.K.W.; Woodbury, N.W.

    1999-06-03

    Femtosecond transient absorbance spectra of quinone-depleted Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers in the Q{sub X} transition region have been measured at 15 K under various excitation conditions. This study focuses on the excitation wavelength dependence and excitation intensity dependence of the formation of charge-separated states on the A- and B-side of the reaction center, judging from the bleaching of the 533 nm (B-side) and 544 nm (A-side) ground-state transitions of the reaction center bacteriopheophytins (H{sub A} and H{sub B}). Upon low-intensity selective excitation directly into the bacteriopheophytin Q{sub Y} transitions (near 760 nm), bleaching of both ground-state bacteriopheophytin Q{sub X} transitions appeared immediately, showing that initially either the A- or B-side bacteriopheophytin could be excited. However, both excited states ultimately resulted in P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} formation under these conditions. Low-intensity excitation at any of the various wavelengths showed no difference in the kinetics of the A-side charge separation forming P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} and no substantial formation of the B-side charge-separated state, P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}}. In contrast, high-intensity 595 nm excitation resulted in substantial long-lived bleaching of the B-side bacteriopheophytin ground-state transition at 533 nm. This 533 nm bleaching was formed with essentially the same time constant as the bleaching at 544 nm due to A-side charge separation. Both bleaching bands persisted at the longest times measured in quinone-removed reaction centers. The long-lived bleaching at 533 nm using high-intensity excitation most likely represents the formation of P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}} with a relative yield of nearly 40%. One possible mechanism for B-side electron transfer is that two-photon excitation of the reaction center resulting in the state P{sup *}B{sub B}{sup *} makes P{sup +}B{sub B}{sup {minus}} thermodynamically

  2. Isolation and characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Worland, S.T.

    1984-09-01

    Reaction centers were isolated by affinity chromatography on equine cytochrome C. Peripheral proteins were removed with 0.05% LDAO. Absorption and EPR spectra and bleaching assays indicate that the reaction centers retained their electron donors and acceptors in the native environment. Three reaction center polypeptides were isolated and submitted for amino-terminal sequence determination. By comparing these sequences to those deduced from DNA, it was established that the M and L subunits are post-translationally modified to remove the aminoterminal Met, whereas the H subunit is not. Inhibition of O/sub 2/ evolution in photosystem II particles from spinach by naphthoquinone derivatives show O/sub 2/ inhibition by bromomethyl and acetoxymethyl derivatives but not with hydroxymethyl derivatives. Inhibition by acetoxymethyl derivatives in irreversible and dependent on illumination suggesting that reduction of the quinone is necessary. Therefore acetoxymethyl derivatives may be useful as suicide reagents for labelling quinone binding sites. Procedures were developed to extract one or both of the quinones present in reaction centers and preserve the integrity of the co-factor binding sites. The H and M subunits were cleaned using furmic acid. Both fragments were isolated from the H subunit, while the larger fragment was isolated from the M subunit. Electrophoretic mobilities of the isolated fragments agrees well with the expected molecular weights. The L subunit was digested with Staphylococcus areus vs protease. The pattern obtained was consistant with the potential sites of cleavage, but it was not possible to assign cleavage sites unambiguously. 112 references, 37 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Molecular analysis of HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, DQ promoter polymorphism and extended class I/class II haplotypes in the Seri Indians from Northwest Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alaez, C; Infante, E; Pujol, J; Duran, C; Navarro, J L; Gorodezky, C

    2002-05-01

    The study of the genetics of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) in Amerindians is of great value in understanding the origins and migrations of these native groups, as well as the impact of immunogenetics on the epidemiology of diseases affecting these populations. We analyzed, using Polymerase Chain Reaction and Sequence Specific Oligonucleotide Probes (PCR-SSOP), DRB1, DQA1, DQB1 alleles and the promoter regions of DQA1 and DQB1 genes in 31 unrelated and 24 related Seri, a Mexican Indian group, from the state of Sonora (Northwest Mexico). The class II genotypes of this population were found to be in genetic equilibrium. The allele frequency (AF) of the prevalent DRB1 alleles were DRB1*0407 (48.4%), DRB1*0802 (33.9%) and DRB1*1402 (16.1%). The most frequent DQA1 and DQB1 alleles were DQA1*03011 (AF = 50.00%), DQA1*0401 (AF = 33.87%) and DQA1*0501 (AF = 16.13%); DQB1*0302 (AF = 50.00%), DQB1*0402 (33.87%) and DQB1*0301 (16.13%); which were in combination with DRB1*0407, DRB1*0802 and DRB1*1402, respectively. Three QAP and three QBP alleles were present (QAP 3.1, 4.1, 4.2; QBP 3.1, 3.21, 4.1) associated with the typical published DQA1 and DQB1 alleles. Four class II haplotypes were present in family members: DRB1*0407-QAP-3.1-DQA1*03011-QBP-3.21-DQB1*0302; DRB1*0802-QAP-4.2-DQA1*0401-QBP-4.1-DQB1*0402; DRB1*1402-QAP-4.1-DQA1*0501-QBP-3.1-DQB1*0301 and DRB1*0701-QAP-2.1-DQA1*0201-QBP-2.1-DQB1*0201. The family data were used to confirm extended haplotypes. A total of 21 haplotypes were found when A* and B* loci were also considered. The three most frequent combinations included A*0201-B*3501-DRB1*0407, A*3101-B*5101-DRB1*0802, and A*0201-B*40-DRB1*1402.

  4. Structural and preliminary molecular dynamics studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and its mutant form L(M196)H + H(M202)L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashtorny, V. G.; Fufina, T. Yu.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Shuvalov, V. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    Pigment-protein interactions are responsible for the high efficiency of the light-energy transfer and conversion in photosynthesis. The reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the most convenient model for studying the mechanisms of primary processes of photosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to study the effect of the protein environment of electron-transfer cofactors on the optical properties, stability, pigment composition, and functional activity of RC. The preliminary analysis of RC was performed by computer simulation of the amino acid substitutions L(M196)H + H(M202)L at the pigment-protein interface and by estimating the stability of the threedimensional structure of the mutant RC by the molecular dynamics method. The doubly mutated reaction center was overexpressed, purified, and crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of this mutant was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the molecular dynamics model.

  5. New tetragonal form of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the involvement of a manganese ion at a crystal contact point.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, G; Cámara-Artigas, A; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2005-08-01

    Crystals have been obtained of wild-type reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides using manganese chloride as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4(2)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 207.8, c = 107.5 A. The crystal structure has been determined to a resolution limit of 4.6 A using a previously determined structure of the reaction center as a molecular-replacement model. The calculated electron-density maps show the presence of a manganese ion at one of the crystal contact points bridging two symmetry-related histidine residues, suggesting that the metal plays a key role in facilitating the crystallization of the protein in this form.

  6. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA-NapB complex) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Pignol, D; Adriano, J M; Fontecilla-Camps, J C; Sabaty, M

    2001-12-01

    The periplasmic nitrate reductase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans is a heterodimer responsible for the first step of reduction in the denitrification process by the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. It consists of a 91 kDa molybdenum-containing catalytic subunit (NapA) and a 17 kDa dihaem cytochrome c (NapB). Crystals of the NapA-NapB complex were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. They belong to the P6(1)22 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 151.9, c = 255.8 A, and contain a single complex in the asymmetric unit. A complete native data set was collected at a synchrotron source to 3.1 A resolution.

  8. Absence of the cbb3 Terminal Oxidase Reveals an Active Oxygen-Dependent Cyclase Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll Biosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu E.; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic green color associated with chlorophyll pigments results from the formation of an isocyclic fifth ring on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle during the biosynthesis of these important molecules. This reaction is catalyzed by two unrelated cyclase enzymes employing different chemistries. Oxygenic phototrophs such as plants and cyanobacteria utilize an oxygen-dependent enzyme, the major component of which is a diiron protein named AcsF, while BchE, an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster protein, dominates in phototrophs inhabiting anoxic environments, such as the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We identify a potential acsF in this organism and assay for activity of the encoded protein in a strain lacking bchE under various aeration regimes. Initially, cells lacking bchE did not demonstrate AcsF activity under any condition tested. However, on removal of a gene encoding a subunit of the cbb3-type respiratory terminal oxidase, cells cultured under regimes ranging from oxic to micro-oxic exhibited cyclase activity, confirming the activity of the oxygen-dependent enzyme in this model organism. Potential reasons for the utilization of an oxygen-dependent enzyme in anoxygenic phototrophs are discussed. IMPORTANCE The formation of the E ring of bacteriochlorophyll pigments is the least well characterized step in their biosynthesis, remaining enigmatic for over 60 years. Two unrelated enzymes catalyze this cyclization step; O2-dependent and O2-independent forms dominate in oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, respectively. We uncover the activity of an O2-dependent enzyme in the anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, initially by inactivation of the high-affinity terminal respiratory oxidase, cytochrome cbb3. We propose that the O2-dependent form allows for the biosynthesis of a low level of bacteriochlorophyll under oxic conditions, so that a rapid initiation of photosynthetic processes is possible for

  9. Magnesium chelatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: initial characterization of the enzyme using purified subunits and evidence for a BchI-BchD complex.

    PubMed

    Gibson, L C; Jensen, P E; Hunter, C N

    1999-01-15

    The enzyme magnesium-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg chelatase) catalyses the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX, the first committed step in (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthesis. In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, this reaction is catalysed by the products of the bchI, bchD and bchH genes. These genes have been expressed in Escherichia coli so that the BchI, BchD and BchH proteins are produced with N-terminal His6 affinity tags, which has led to the production of large amounts of highly purified, highly active Mg chelatase subunits from a single chromatography step. Furthermore, BchD has been purifed free of contamination with the chaperone GroEL, which had proven to be a problem in the past. BchD, present largely as an insoluble protein in E. coli, was purified in 6 M urea and refolded by addition of BchI, MgCl2 and ATP, yielding highly active protein. BchI/BchD mixtures prepared in this way were used in conjunction with BchH to determine the kinetic parameters of R. sphaeroides Mg chelatase for its natural substrates. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that BchI and BchD form a complex, and that Mg2+ and ATP are required to establish and maintain this complex. Gel filtration data suggest that BchI and BchD form a complex of molecular mass 200 kDa in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP. Our data suggest that, in vivo, BchD is only folded correctly and maintained in its correct conformation in the presence of BchI, Mg2+ and ATP.

  10. Dimerisation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC-LH1 photosynthetic complex is not facilitated by a GxxxG motif in the PufX polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Lucy I; Holden-Dye, Katherine; Jones, Michael R

    2010-11-01

    In purple photosynthetic bacteria the initial steps of light energy transduction take place in an RC-LH1 complex formed by the photochemical reaction centre (RC) and the LH1 light harvesting pigment-protein. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the RC-LH1 complex assembles in a dimeric form in which two RCs are surrounded by an S-shaped LH1 antenna. There is currently debate over the detailed architecture of this dimeric RC-LH1 complex, with particular emphasis on the location and precise function of a minor polypeptide component termed PufX. It has been hypothesised that the membrane-spanning helical region of PufX contains a GxxxG dimerisation motif that facilitates the formation of a dimer of PufX at the interface of the RC-LH1 dimer, and more specifically that the formation of this PufX dimer seeds assembly of the remaining RC-LH1 dimer (J. Busselez et al., 2007). In the present work this hypothesis was tested by site directed mutagenesis of the glycine residues proposed to form the GxxxG motif. Mutation of these glycines to leucine did not decrease the propensity of the RC-LH1 complex to assemble in a dimeric form, as would be expected from experimental studies of the effect of mutation on GxxxG motifs in other membrane proteins. Indeed increased yields of dimer were seen in two of the glycine-to-leucine mutants constructed. It is concluded that the PufX from Rhodobacter sphaeroides does not contain a genuine GxxxG helix dimerisation motif.

  11. Functional characteristics of spirilloxanthin and keto-bearing Analogues in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with a genetically modified carotenoid synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Hunter, C Neil

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes from a genetically modified strain of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Carotenoid synthesis in the Rba. sphaeroides strain was engineered to redirect carotenoid production away from spheroidene into the spirilloxanthin synthesis pathway. The strain assembles LH2 antennas with substantial amounts of spirilloxanthin (total double-bond conjugation length N=13) if grown anaerobically and of keto-bearing long-chain analogs [2-ketoanhydrorhodovibrin (N=13), 2-ketospirilloxanthin (N=14) and 2,2'-diketospirilloxanthin (N=15)] if grown semi-aerobically (with ratios that depend on growth conditions). We present the photophysical, electronic, and vibrational properties of these carotenoids, both isolated in organic media and assembled within LH2 complexes. Measurements of excited-state energy transfer to the array of excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules (B850) show that the mean lifetime of the first singlet excited state (S1) of the long-chain (N≥13) carotenoids does not change appreciably between organic media and the protein environment. In each case, the S1 state appears to lie lower in energy than that of B850. The energy-transfer yield is ~0.4 in LH2 (from the strain grown aerobically or semi-aerobically), which is less than half that achieved for LH2 that contains short-chain (N≤11) analogues. Collectively, the results suggest that the S1 excited state of the long-chain (N≥13) carotenoids participates little if at all in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer, which occurs predominantly via the carotenoid S2 excited state in these antennas.

  12. The O2-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Recent Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), and Femtosecond X-ray Crystallography Data.

    PubMed

    Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-01-17

    Efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation may open a way to produce energy from renewable solar power. In biology, generation of fuel due to water oxidation happens efficiently on an immense scale during the light reactions of photosynthesis. To oxidize water, photosynthetic organisms have evolved a highly conserved protein complex, Photosystem II. Within that complex, water oxidation happens at the CaMn4O5 inorganic catalytic cluster, the so-called oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which cycles through storage "S" states as it accumulates oxidizing equivalents and produces molecular oxygen. In recent years, there has been significant progress in understanding the OEC as it evolves through the catalytic cycle. Studies have combined conventional and femtosecond X-ray crystallography with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and have addressed changes in protonation states of μ-oxo bridges and the coordination of substrate water through the analysis of ammonia binding as a chemical analog of water. These advances are thought to be critical to understanding the catalytic cycle since protonation states regulate the relative stability of different redox states and the geometry of the OEC. Therefore, establishing the mechanism for substrate water binding and the nature of protonation/redox state transitions in the OEC is essential for understanding the catalytic cycle of O2 evolution. The structure of the dark-stable S1 state has been a target for X-ray crystallography for the past 15 years. However, traditional X-ray crystallography has been hampered by radiation-induced reduction of the OEC. Very recently, a revolutionary X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) technique was applied to PSII to reveal atomic positions at 1.95 Å without radiation damage, which brought us closer than ever to establishing the ultimate structure of the OEC in the S1 state. However, the atom positions in this crystal

  13. A Cluster of Four Homologous Small RNAs Modulates C1 Metabolism and the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Billenkamp, Fabian; Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, regulatory RNAs play an important role in the regulation and balancing of many cellular processes and stress responses. Among these regulatory RNAs, trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) are of particular interest since one sRNA can lead to the regulation of multiple target mRNAs. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, several sRNAs are induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of four homologous sRNAs that are cotranscribed with the gene for the conserved hypothetical protein RSP_6037, a genetic arrangement described for only a few sRNAs until now. Each of the four sRNAs is characterized by two stem-loops that carry CCUCCUCCC motifs in their loops. They are induced under oxidative stress, as well as by various other stress conditions, and were therefore renamed here sRNAs CcsR1 to CcsR4 (CcsR1–4) for conserved CCUCCUCCC motif stress-induced RNAs 1 to 4. Increased CcsR1–4 expression decreases the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism or encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex either directly by binding to their target mRNAs or indirectly. One of the CcsR1–4 target mRNAs encodes the transcriptional regulator FlhR, an activator of glutathione-dependent methanol/formaldehyde metabolism. Downregulation of this glutathione-dependent pathway increases the pool of glutathione, which helps to counteract oxidative stress. The FlhR-dependent downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces a primary target of reactive oxygen species and reduces aerobic electron transport, a main source of reactive oxygen species. Our findings reveal a previously unknown strategy used by bacteria to counteract oxidative stress. IMPORTANCE Phototrophic organisms have to cope with photo-oxidative stress due to the function of chlorophylls as photosensitizers for the formation of singlet oxygen. Our study assigns an important role in photo-oxidative stress resistance to a

  14. Chronic exposure to Rhodobacter sphaeroides extract Lycogen™ prevents UVA-induced malondialdehyde accumulation and procollagen I down-regulation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsai-Hsiu; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Lin, Tsuey-Pin; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Kuan, Li-Chun; Liu, Chia-Chyuan

    2014-01-23

    UVA contributes to the pathogenesis of skin aging by downregulation of procollagen I content and induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-associated responses. Application of antioxidants such as lycopene has been demonstrated as a convenient way to achieve protection against skin aging. Lycogen™, derived from the extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, exerts several biological effects similar to that of lycopene whereas most of its anti-aging efficacy remains uncertain. In this study, we attempted to examine whether Lycogen™ could suppress malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation and restore downregulated procollagen I expression induced by UVA exposure. In human dermal fibroblasts Hs68 cells, UVA repressed cell viability and decreased procollagen I protein content accompanied with the induction of MMP-1 and MDA accumulation. Remarkably, incubation with 50 µM Lycogen™ for 24 h ameliorated UVA-induced cell death and restored UVA-induced downregulation of procollagen in a dose-related manner. Lycogen™ treatment also prevented the UVA-induced MMP-1 upregulation and intracellular MDA generation in Hs68 cells. Activation of NFκB levels, one of the downstream events induced by UVA irradiation and MMP-1 induction, were also prevented by Lycogen™ administration. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Lycogen™ may be an alternative agent that prevents UVA-induced skin aging and could be used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications.

  15. Eukaryotic behaviour of a prokaryotic energy-transducing membrane: fully detached vesicular organelles arise by budding from the Rhodobacter sphaeroides intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    A major feature that distinguishes prokaryotic organisms from eukaryotes is their less complex internal structure, in which all membrane-associated functions are thought to be present within a continuous lipid-protein bilayer, rather than with distinct organelles. Contrary to this notion, as described by Tucker and co-workers in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, the application of cryo-electron tomography to the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized ultrastructural complexity within the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) housing the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition to distinguishing invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) and interconnected vesicular structures still attached to the CM, a eukaryote-like ICM budding process was revealed, which results in the formation of fully detached vesicular structures. These bacterial organelles are able to carry out both the light-harvesting and light-driven energy transduction activities necessary for the cells to assume a photosynthetic lifestyle. Their formation is shown to represent the final stage in a membrane invagination and growth process, originating with small CM indentations, which after cell disruption give rise to a membrane fraction that can be separated from mature ICM vesicles by rate-zone sedimentation.

  16. In vitro and in vivo safety assessment of edible blue-green algae, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing and Spirulina plantensis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Cassada, David A.; Snow, Daniel D.; Rogers, Douglas G.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) have been consumed as food and herbal medicine for centuries. However, safety for their consumption has not been well investigated. This study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro and in vivo toxicity of cultivated Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP). Neither NO nor SP contained detectable levels of microcystin (MC)-LA, MC-RR, MC-LW and MC-LR by LC/MS/MS. Cell viability remained ~70-80% when HepG2 cells were incubated with 0-500 μg/ml of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water-extractable fractions of NO and SP. Four-week-old male and female C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93G/M diet supplemented with 0, 2.5% or 5% of NO and SP (wt/wt) for 6 months. For both genders, BGA-rich diets did not induce noticeable abnormality in weight gain and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations except a significant increase in plasma ALT levels by 2.5% NO supplementation in male mice at 6 month. Histopathological analysis of livers, however, indicated that BGA did not cause significant liver damage compared with controls. In conclusion, our results suggest that NO and SP are free of MC and the long-term dietary supplementation of up to 5% of the BGA may be consumed without evident toxic side-effects. PMID:21473896

  17. Coproporphyrin Excretion and Low Thiol Levels Caused by Point Mutation in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides S-Adenosylmethionine Synthetase Gene ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sabaty, Monique; Adryanczyk, Géraldine; Roustan, Chloë; Cuiné, Stephan; Lamouroux, Christine; Pignol, David

    2010-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL-106 was found to excrete a large amount of a red compound identified as coproporphyrin III, an intermediate in bacteriochlorophyll and heme synthesis. The mutant, named PORF, is able to grow under phototrophic conditions but has low levels of intracellular cysteine and glutathione and overexpresses the cysteine synthase CysK. The expression of molybdoenzymes such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate reductases is also affected under certain growth conditions. Excretion of coproporphyrin and overexpression of CysK are not directly related but were both found to be consequences of a diminished synthesis of the key metabolite S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The wild-type phenotype is restored when the gene metK encoding SAM synthetase is supplied in trans. The metK gene in the mutant strain has a mutation leading to a single amino acid change (H145Y) in the encoded protein. This point mutation is responsible for a 70% decrease in intracellular SAM content which probably affects the activities of numerous SAM-dependent enzymes such as coproporphyrinogen oxidase (HemN); uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase (CobA), which is involved in siroheme synthesis; and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein A (MoaA). We propose a model showing that the attenuation of the activities of SAM-dependent enzymes in the mutant could be responsible for the coproporphyrin excretion, the low cysteine and glutathione contents, and the decrease in DMSO and nitrate reductase activities. PMID:20038586

  18. The role of dor gene products in controlling the P2 promoter of the cytochrome c2 gene, cycA, in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Tavano, Christine L.; Comolli, James C.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the regulatory networks controlling anaerobic energy production by the facultative phototroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The specific aim was to determine why activity of the P2 promoter for the gene (cycA) encoding the essential photosynthetic electron carrier, cytochrome c2, is decreased when the alternative electron acceptor DMSO is added to photosynthetically grown cells. The presence of DMSO is believed to activate the DorR response regulator, which controls expression of proteins required to reduce DMSO. A DorR− strain showed no change in cycA P2 promoter activity when DMSO was added to photosynthetic cells, indicating that DorR was required for the decreased expression in wild-type cells. To test if DorR acted directly at this promoter to change gene expression, recombinant DorR was purified and studied in vitro. Preparations of DorR that were active at other target promoters showed no detectable interaction with cycA P2, suggesting that this protein is not a direct regulator of this promoter. We also found that cycA P2 activity in a DorA− strain was not decreased by the addition of DMSO to photosynthetic cells. A model is presented to explain why the presence of a functional DMSO reductase (DorA) is required for DMSO to decrease cycA P2 expression under photosynthetic conditions. PMID:15184575

  19. Properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction center with double amino acid substitution I(L177)H+H(M182)L.

    PubMed

    Fufina, T Yu; Vasilieva, L G; Khatypov, R A; Shuvalov, V A

    2011-04-01

    Histidine M182 in the reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides serves as the fifth ligand of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) B(B) Mg atom. When this His is substituted by an amino acid that is not able to coordinate Mg, bacteriopheophytin appears in the B(B) binding site instead of BChl (Katilius, E., et al. (1999) J. Phys. Chem. B, 103, 7386-7389). We have shown that in the presence of the additional mutation I(L177)H the coordination of the BChl B(B) Mg atom in the double mutant I(L177)H+H(M182)L RC still remains. Changes in the double mutant RC absorption spectrum attributed to BChl absorption suggest that BChl B(B) Mg atom axial ligation might be realized not from the usual α-side of the BChl macrocycle, but from the opposite, β-side. Weaker coordination of BChl B(B) Mg atom compared to the other mutant RC BChl molecules suggests that not an amino acid residue but a water molecule might be a possible ligand. The results are discussed in the light of the structural changes that occurred in the RC upon Ile/His substitution in the L177 position.

  20. Effects of the cryptochrome CryB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides on global gene expression in the dark or blue light or in the presence of singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Frühwirth, Sebastian; Teich, Kristin; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Several regulators are controlling the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Among the proteins affecting photosynthesis gene expression is the blue light photoreceptor cryptochrome CryB. This study addresses the effect of CryB on global gene expression. The data reveal that CryB does not only influence photosynthesis gene expression but also genes for the non-photosynthetic energy metabolism like citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition several genes involved in RNA processing and in transcriptional regulation are affected by a cryB deletion. Although CryB was shown to undergo a photocycle it does not only affect gene expression in response to blue light illumination but also in response to singlet oxygen stress conditions. While there is a large overlap in these responses, some CryB-dependent effects are specific for blue-light or photooxidative stress. In addition to protein-coding genes some genes for sRNAs show CryB-dependent expression. These findings give new insight into the function of bacterial cryptochromes and demonstrate for the first time a function in the oxidative stress response.

  1. Protonation of interacting residues in a protein by a Monte Carlo method: application to lysozyme and the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Beroza, P; Fredkin, D R; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1991-01-01

    We used Monte Carlo methods to treat statistical problem of electrostatic interactions among many titrating amino acids and applied these methods to lysozyme and the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, including all titrating sites. We computed the average protonation of residues as a function of pH from an equilibrium distribution of states generated by random sampling. Electrostatic energies were calculated from a finite difference solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation using the coordinates from solved protein structures. For most calculations we used the Metropolis algorithm to sample protonation states; for strongly coupled sites, we substantially reduced sampling errors by using a modified algorithm that allows multiple site transitions. The Monte Carlo method agreed with calculations for a small test system, lysozyme, for which the complete partition function was calculated. We also calculated the pH dependence of the free energy change associated with electron transfer from the primary to the secondary quinone in the photosynthetic reaction center. The shape of the resulting curve agreed fairly well with experiment, but the proton uptake from which the free energy was calculated agreed only to within a factor of two with the observed values. We believe that this discrepancy resulted from errors in the individual electrostatic energy calculations rather than from errors in the Monte Carlo sampling. PMID:2062860

  2. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  3. Extended family medicine training

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  4. Nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of the flanking region of the gene (spb) for the trans-acting factor that controls light-mediated expression of the puf operon in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Masuda, T; Nishimura, K; Shimada, H; Ohta, H; Shioi, Y; Takamiya, K

    1997-05-01

    We recently reported the existence of a trans-acting factor (SPB) in Rhodobacter sphaeroides that repressed the expression of the puf operon during illumination. SPB was somewhat homologous to HvrA of Rhodobacter capsulatus, but these proteins appear to have functionally different properties. We now report an analysis of the flanking region of spb in the genome of R.sphaeroides, and we show that spb is a positional counterpart of hvrA of R. capsulatus. The region directly downstream of spb was found to contain three genes, two of which were highly homologous to orf5 and ahcY in R. capsulatus. However, a gene corresponding to hvrB, which controls the expression of orf5 and ahcY in R. capsulatus, was absent in R. sphaeroides. The level of the transcript of ahcY did not change in cells grown under photosynthetic and by respiratory conditions. By contrast, orf5 was transcribed at a higher rate in photosynthetically grown cells under high-intensity light than under low-intensity light, indicating features of transcription different from those in R. capsulatus. A third gene, orf318, which was absent in the corresponding region of R. capsulatus, encoded an amino acid sequence that was significantly homologous to the consensus sequence of RfaI and RfaJ of E.coli, which are glycosyl transferases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide. orf318 was transcribed in the opposite direction to ahcY, and at only a low level, under all conditions tested.

  5. Dicyanometallates as Model Extended Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the structures of eight new dicyanometallate frameworks containing molecular extra-framework cations. These systems include a number of hybrid inorganic–organic analogues of conventional ceramics, such as Ruddlesden–Popper phases and perovskites. The structure types adopted are rationalized in the broader context of all known dicyanometallate framework structures. We show that the structural diversity of this family can be understood in terms of (i) the charge and coordination preferences of the particular metal cation acting as framework node, and (ii) the size, shape, and extent of incorporation of extra-framework cations. In this way, we suggest that dicyanometallates form a particularly attractive model family of extended frameworks in which to explore the interplay between molecular degrees of freedom, framework topology, and supramolecular interactions. PMID:27057759

  6. Transcriptional Regulation by the Short-Chain Fatty Acyl Coenzyme A Regulator (ScfR) PccR Controls Propionyl Coenzyme A Assimilation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) assimilation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides proceeds via the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway. The activity of the key enzyme of the pathway, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC), was upregulated 20-fold during growth with propionate compared to growth with succinate. Because propionyl-CoA is an intermediate in acetyl-CoA assimilation via the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway, acetate growth also requires the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway. PCC activities were upregulated 8-fold in extracts of acetate-grown cells compared to extracts of succinate-grown cells. The upregulation of PCC activities during growth with propionate or acetate corresponded to increased expression of the pccB gene, which encodes a subunit of PCC. PccR (RSP_2186) was identified to be a transcriptional regulator required for the upregulation of pccB transcript levels and, consequently, PCC activity: growth substrate-dependent regulation was lost when pccR was inactivated by an in-frame deletion. In the pccR mutant, lacZ expression from a 215-bp plasmid-borne pccB upstream fragment including 27 bp of the pccB coding region was also deregulated. A loss of regulation as a result of mutations in the conserved motifs TTTGCAAA-X4-TTTGCAAA in the presence of PccR allowed the prediction of a possible operator site. PccR, together with homologs from other organisms, formed a distinct clade within the family of short-chain fatty acyl coenzyme A regulators (ScfRs) defined here. Some members from other clades within the ScfR family have previously been shown to be involved in regulating acetyl-CoA assimilation by the glyoxylate bypass (RamB) or propionyl-CoA assimilation by the methylcitrate cycle (MccR). IMPORTANCE Short-chain acyl-CoAs are intermediates in essential biosynthetic and degradative pathways. The regulation of their accumulation is crucial for appropriate cellular function. This work identifies a regulator (PccR) that prevents the accumulation of propionyl-CoA by controlling

  7. Role of B800 in carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll energy and electron transfer in LH2 complexes from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Polívka, Tomas; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Fuciman, Marcel; Sundström, Villy; Frank, Harry A

    2007-06-28

    The role of the B800 in energy and electron transfer in LH2 complexes has been studied using femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The B800 site was perturbed by application of lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS), and comparison of treated and untreated LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids neurosporene, spheroidene, and spheroidenone was used to explore the role of B800 in carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChla) energy transfer and carotenoid radical formation. Efficiencies of the S1-mediated energy transfer in the LDS-treated complexes were 86, 61, and 57% in the LH2 complexes containing neurosporene, spheroidene, and spheroidenone, respectively. Analysis of the carotenoid S1 lifetimes in solution, LDS-treated, and untreated LH2 complexes allowed determination of B800/B850 branching ratio in the S1-mediated energy transfer. It is shown that B800 is a major acceptor, as approximately 60% of the energy from the carotenoid S1 state is accepted by B800. This value is nearly independent of conjugation length of the carotenoid. In addition to its role in energy transfer, the B800 BChla is the only electron acceptor in the event of charge separation between carotenoid and BChla in LH2 complexes, which is demonstrated by prevention of carotenoid radical formation in the LDS-treated LH2 complexes. In the untreated complexes containing neurosporene and spheroidene, the carotenoid radical is formed with a time constant of 300-400 fs. Application of different excitation wavelengths and intensity dependence of the carotenoid radical formation showed that the carotenoid radical can be formed only after excitation of the S2 state of carotenoid, although the S2 state itself is not a precursor of the charge-separated state. Instead, either a hot S1 state or a charge-transfer state lying between S2 and S1 states of the carotenoid are discussed as potential precursors of the charge-separated state.

  8. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M](+•)) and negative ([M](-•)) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Examination of stability of mutant photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides I(L177)H and determination of location of bacteriochlorophyll covalently bound to the protein.

    PubMed

    Fufina, T Y; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrated earlier that as a result of the I(L177)H mutation in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, one of the bacteriochlorophylls (BChl) binds with the L-subunit, simultaneously raising coordination stability of the central magnesium atom of the bacteriochlorophyll associated with the protein. In this study, spectral properties of wild type RC and I(L177)H in the presence of urea and SDS as well as at 48 degrees C were examined. It is shown that the I(L177)H mutation decreases the RC stability. Under denaturing conditions, some changes indicating breakdown of oligomeric structure of the complex and loss of interaction between pigments and their protein environment are observed in I(L177)H RC spectra. In addition, pheophytinization of bacteriochlorophylls occurs in both types of RC in the presence of SDS. However, an 811-nm band is observed in the spectrum of the mutant RC under these conditions, which indicates retention of one of the BChl molecules in the protein binding site and stable coordination of its central magnesium atom. It is shown that in both types of RC, monomeric BChl B(B) can be modified by sodium borohydride treatment and then extracted by acetone-methanol mixture. Spectral properties of the BChl covalently bound with the protein in I(L177)H RC do not change. The results demonstrate that BChl P(A) is the molecule of BChl tightly bound with the L-subunit in mutant RC as it was supposed earlier.

  10. Multiconformation Continuum Electrostatics Analysis of the Effects of a Buried Asp Introduced Near Heme a in Rb. sphaeroides Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Gunner, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces O2 to water via a series of proton coupled electron transfers generating a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. Coupling electron and proton transfer requires changing buried residues pKas at each stage in the reaction cycle. Heme a is a key cofactor in the CcO electron transfer chain. Mutation of Ser44 to Asp has been reported (Mills et al Biochemistry (2008) 47, 11499-11509), changing the hydrogen bond acceptor from His102, the Heme a axial ligand in Rhodobactor sphaeroides CcO. This adds an acidic residue to the CcO interior. The electrochemical behavior of Heme a in wild type and S44D CcO is compared using the continuum electrostatics program MCCE. The introduced, deeply buried Asp remains ionized at physiological pH only when the nearby heme is oxidized. Heme a reduction is now calculated to be strongly coupled to Asp proton binding, while with Ser44 it is weakly coupled to small protonation shifts at multiple sites, increasing the pH dependence in the mutant. At pH 7, the partially ionized Asp44 is calculated to lower the Heme redox potential by 50 mV as expected given the thermodynamics of coupled electron and proton transfers. This highlights an inconsistency in the experimental results where a low Asp pKa is found together with a stabilized reduced Heme. The stabilization of a model complex heme oxidation by a hydrogen bond to the axial His ligand calculated with Continuum Electrostatics and with Density Functional Theory was in good agreement. PMID:20701325

  11. The site-directed mutation I(L177)H in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center affects coordination of P(A) and B(B) bacteriochlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, L G; Fufina, T Y; Gabdulkhakov, A G; Leonova, M M; Khatypov, R A; Shuvalov, V A

    2012-08-01

    To explore the influence of the I(L177)H single mutation on the properties of the nearest bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), three reaction centers (RCs) bearing double mutations were constructed in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and their properties and pigment content were compared with those of the correspondent single mutant RCs. Each pair of the mutations comprised the amino acid substitution I(L177)H and another mutation altering histidine ligand of BChl P(A) or BChl B(B). Contrary to expectations, the double mutation I(L177)H+H(L173)L does not bring about a heterodimer RC but causes a 46nm blue shift of the long-wavelength P absorbance band. The histidine L177 or a water molecule were suggested as putative ligands for P(A) in the RC I(L177)H+H(L173)L although this would imply a reorientation of the His backbone and additional rearrangements in the primary donor environment or even a repositioning of the BChl dimer. The crystal structure of the mutant I(L177)H reaction center determined to a resolution of 2.9Å shows changes at the interface region between the BChl P(A) and the monomeric BChl B(B). Spectral and pigment analysis provided evidence for β-coordination of the BChl B(B) in the double mutant RC I(L177)H+H(M182)L and for its hexacoordination in the mutant reaction center I(L177)H. Computer modeling suggests involvement of two water molecules in the β-coordination of the BChl B(B). Possible structural consequences of the L177 mutation affecting the coordination of the two BChls P(A) and B(B) are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  12. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R. I.; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a ( BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M]+•) and negative ([M]-•) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward.

  13. Assembly of photosynthetic apparatus in Rhodobacter sphaeroides as revealed by functional assessments at different growth phases and in synchronized and greening cells.

    PubMed

    Kis, M; Asztalos, E; Sipka, G; Maróti, P

    2014-12-01

    The development of photosynthetic membranes of intact cells of Rhodobacter sphaeroides was tracked by light-induced absorption spectroscopy and induction and relaxation of the bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence. Changes in membrane structure were induced by three methods: synchronization of cell growth, adjustment of different growth phases and transfer from aerobic to anaerobic conditions (greening) of the bacteria. While the production of the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid pigments and the activation of light harvesting and reaction center complexes showed cell-cycle independent and continuous increase with characteristic lag phases, the accumulation of phospholipids and membrane potential (electrochromism) exhibited stepwise increase controlled by cell division. Cells in the stationary phase of growth demonstrated closer packing and tighter energetic coupling of the photosynthetic units (PSU) than in their early logarithmic stage. The greening resulted in rapid (within 0-4 h) induction of BChl synthesis accompanied with a dominating role for the peripheral light harvesting system (up to LH2/LH1 ~2.5), significantly increased rate (~7·10(4) s(-1)) and yield (F v/F max ~0.7) of photochemistry and modest (~2.5-fold) decrease of the rate of electron transfer (~1.5·10(4) s(-1)). The results are discussed in frame of a model of sequential assembly of the PSU with emphasis on crowding the LH2 complexes resulting in an increase of the connectivity and yield of light capture on the one hand and increase of hindrance to diffusion of mobile redox agents on the other hand.

  14. Overexpression of Rhodobacter sphaeroides PufX-bearing maltose-binding protein and its effect on the stability of reconstituted light-harvesting core antenna complex.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shunnsuke; Hiro, Akito; Kondo, Masaharu; Mizuno, Toshihisa; Tanaka, Toshiki; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru

    2012-03-01

    The PufX protein, encoded by the pufX gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, plays a key role in the organization and function of the core antenna (LH1)-reaction centre (RC) complex, which collects photons and triggers primary photochemical reactions. We synthesized a PufX/maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion protein to study the effect of the PufX protein on the reconstitution of B820 subunit-type and LH1-type complexes. The fusion protein was synthesized using an Escherichia coli expression system and purified by affinity chromatography. Reconstitution experiments demonstrated that the MBP-PufX protein destabilizes the subunit-type complex (20°C), consistent with previous reports. Interestingly, however, the preformed LH1-type complex was stable in the presence of MBP-PufX. The MBP-PufX protein did not influence the preformed LH1-type complexes (4°C). The LH1-type complex containing MBP-PufX showed a unique temperature-dependent structural transformation that was irreversible. The predominant form of the complex at 4°C was the LH1-type. When shifted to 20°C, subunit-type complexes became predominant. Upon subsequent cooling back to 4°C, instead of re-forming the LH1-type complexes, the predominant form remained the subunit-type complexes. In contrast, reversible transformation of LH1 (4°C) and subunit-type complexes (20°C) occurs in the absence of PufX. These results are consistent with the suggestion that MBP-PufX interacts with the LH1α- polypeptide in the subunit (α/β)-type complex (at 20°C), preventing oligomerization of the subunit to form LH1-type complexes.

  15. Extended spider cognition.

    PubMed

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-02-07

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  16. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2016-05-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure.

  17. Niacin extended-release/simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark; Curran, Monique P

    2008-01-01

    Niacin extended-release (ER)/simvastatin is a once-daily, fixed-dose combination of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin and an ER formulation of niacin (a B-complex vitamin). In healthy volunteers who were given niacin ER/simvastatin 2000 mg/40 mg, niacin exposure was similar to that with niacin ER 2000 mg, while simvastatin exposure was increased compared to that with simvastatin 40 mg. In patients with elevated non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) but with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at or below the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) goal after a > or = 2-week simvastatin 20 mg/day run-in period (SEACOAST I), 24 weeks of niacin ER/simvastatin 1000 mg/20 mg or 2000 mg/20 mg per day reduced median plasma non-HDL-C levels to a significantly greater extent than simvastatin 20 mg/day. In patients with elevated non-HDL-C and LDL-C at any level after a > or = 2-week simvastatin 40 mg/day run-in period (SEACOAST II), 24 weeks of niacin ER/simvastatin 1000 mg/40 mg or 2000 mg/40 mg per day was noninferior to simvastatin 80 mg/day in reducing median plasma non-HDL-C levels. Compared with simvastatin monotherapy, there was no significant difference in reduction in plasma LDL-C levels with niacin ER/simvastatin in SEACOAST I, and the noninferiority criterion for LDL-C was not met in SEACOAST II. However, plasma HDL-C levels increased more and triglyceride levels were lowered more than with simvastatin monotherapy (SEACOAST I and II). Niacin ER/simvastatin was generally well tolerated, with flushing being the most common adverse reaction.

  18. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.

    1991-05-28

    A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

  19. Physical properties of galaxies and their evolution in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. II. Extending the mass-metallicity relation to the range z ≈ 0.89-1.24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, E.; Contini, T.; Lamareille, F.; Brinchmann, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Charlot, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2009-02-01

    Aims: We present a continuation of our study about the relation between stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). In this work we extend the determination of metallicities up to redshift ≈1.24 for a sample of 42 star-forming galaxies with a mean redshift value of 0.99. Methods: For a selected sample of emission-line galaxies, we use both diagnostic diagrams and empirical calibrations based on [Oii] emission lines along with the empirical relation between the intensities of the [Oiii] and [Neiii] emission lines and the theoretical ratios between Balmer recombination emission lines to identify star-forming galaxies and to derive their metallicities. We derive stellar masses by fitting the whole spectral energy distribution with a set of stellar population synthesis models. Results: These new methods allow us to extend the mass-metallicity relation to higher redshift. We show that the metallicity determinations are consistent with more established strong-line methods. Taken together this allows us to study the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation up to z ≈ 1.24 with good control of systematic uncertainties. We find an evolution with redshift of the average metallicity of galaxies very similar to those reported in the literature: for a given stellar mass, galaxies at z ~ 1 have, on average, a metallicity ~ 0.3 dex lower than galaxies in the local universe. However we do not see any significant metallicity evolution between redshifts z ~ 0.7 (Paper I) and z ~ 1.0 (this paper). We find also the same flattening of the mass-metallicity relation for the most massive galaxies as reported in Paper I at lower redshifts, but again no apparent evolution of the slope is seen between z ~ 0.7 and z ~ 1.0. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007, and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the CNRS in France, CNRC in Canada and the

  20. Towards Extended Vantage Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaz, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of Vantage Theory (VT), a model of (colour) categorization, to linguistic data largely depends on the modifications and adaptations of the model for the purpose. An attempt to do so proposed here, called Extended Vantage Theory (EVT), slightly reformulates the VT conception of vantage by capitalizing on some of the entailments of…

  1. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hydrae revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER. II. Time variations between pre-maximum and minimum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Our recent visible polarimetric images of the well-studied AGB star W Hya taken at pre-maximum light (phase 0.92) with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL have revealed clumpy dust clouds close to the star at 2 R⋆. We present second-epoch SPHERE-ZIMPOL observations of W Hya at minimum light (phase 0.54) as well as high-spectral resolution long-baseline interferometric observations with the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Methods: We observed W Hya with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL at three wavelengths in the continuum (645, 748, and 820 nm), in the Hα line at 656.3 nm, and in the TiO band at 717 nm. The VLTI/AMBER observations were carried out in the wavelength region of the CO first overtone lines near 2.3 μm with a spectral resolution of 12 000. Results: The high-spatial resolution polarimetric images obtained with SPHERE-ZIMPOL have allowed us to detect clear time variations in the clumpy dust clouds as close as 34-50 mas (1.4-2.0 R⋆) to the star. We detected the formation of a new dust cloud as well as the disappearance of one of the dust clouds detected at the first epoch. The Hα and TiO emission extends to 150 mas ( 6 R⋆), and the Hα images obtained at two epochs reveal time variations. The degree of linear polarization measured at minimum light, which ranges from 13 to 18%, is higher than that observed at pre-maximum light. The power-law-type limb-darkened disk fit to the AMBER data in the continuum results in a limb-darkened disk diameter of 49.1 ± 1.5 mas and a limb-darkening parameter of 1.16 ± 0.49, indicating that the atmosphere is more extended with weaker limb-darkening compared to pre-maximum light. Our Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling shows that the second-epoch SPHERE-ZIMPOL data can be explained by a shell of 0.1 μm grains of Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, and MgSiO3 with a 550 nm optical depth of 0.6 ± 0.2 and an inner and outer radii of 1.3 R⋆ and 10 ± 2R⋆, respectively. Our modeling suggests the predominance of small (0

  2. Changing Requirements of Assurance and Extended Deterrence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Larsen, eds., Weapons of Mass Destruction: An Encyclopedia of Worldwide Policy, Technology, and History, Vol. II (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC - CLIO, 2005...Appendix A Abbreviations ABM Anti-Ballistic Missile ABMT Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty AEIO Atomic Energy Organization of Iran AKP Justice and... ABC -CLIO, 2005. Thranert, Oliver. “NATO, Missile Defence and Extended Deterrence.” Survival 51:6 (December2009-January 2010): 63–75. Wheeler

  3. Regulation of the primary quinone binding conformation by the H subunit in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Taguchi, Alexander T; Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2015-11-19

    Unlike photosystem II (PSII) in higher plants, bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (bRCs) from Proteobacteria have an additional peripheral membrane subunit "H". The H subunit is necessary for photosynthetic growth, but can be removed chemically in vitro. The remaining LM dimer retains its activity to perform light-induced charge separation. Here we investigate the influence of the H subunit on interactions between the primary semiquinone and the protein matrix, using a combination of site-specific isotope labeling, pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The data reveal substantially weaker binding interactions between the primary semiquinone and the LM dimer than observed for the intact bRC; the amount of electron spin transferred to the nitrogen hydrogen bond donors is significantly reduced, the methoxy groups are more free to rotate, and the spectra indicate a heterogeneous mixture of bound semiquinone states. These results are consistent with a loosening of the primary quinone binding pocket in the absence of the H subunit.

  4. Propelling Extended Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humbert, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A force acting on just part of an extended object (either a solid or a volume of a liquid) can cause all of it to move. That motion is due to the transmission of the force through the object by its material. This paper discusses how the force is distributed to all of the object by a gradient of stress or pressure in it, which creates the local…

  5. extendFromReads

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kelly P.

    2013-10-03

    This package assists in genome assembly. extendFromReads takes as input a set of Illumina (eg, MiSeq) DNA sequencing reads, a query seed sequence and a direction to extend the seed. The algorithm collects all seed--]matching reads (flipping reverse--]orientation hits), trims off the seed and additional sequence in the other direction, sorts the remaining sequences alphabetically, and prints them aligned without gaps from the point of seed trimming. This produces a visual display distinguishing the flanks of multi-]copy seeds. A companion script hitMates.pl collects the mates of seed--]hi]ng reads, whose alignment reveals longer extensions from the seed. The collect/trim/sort strategy was made iterative and scaled up in the script denovo.pl, for de novo contig assembly. An index is pre--]built using indexReads.pl that for each unique 21--]mer found in all the reads, records its gfateh of extension (whether extendable, blocked by low coverage, or blocked by branching after a duplicated sequence) and other characteristics. Importantly, denovo.pl records all branchings that follow a branching contig endpoint, providing contig-]extension information

  6. Effects of ionizable residues on the absorption spectrum and initial electron-transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E T; Nagarajan, V; Zazubovich, V; Riley, K; Small, G J; Parson, W W

    2003-11-25

    Effects of ionizable amino acids on spectroscopic properties and electron-transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated by site-directed mutations designed to alter the electrostatic environment of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer that serves as the photochemical electron donor (P). Arginine residues at homologous positions in the L and M subunits (L135 and M164) are changed independently: Arg L135 is replaced by Lys, Leu, Glu, and Gln and Arg M164 by Leu and Glu. Asp L155 also is mutated to Asn, Tyr L164 to Phe, and Cys L247 to Lys and Asp. The mutations at L155, L164, and M164 have little effect on the absorption spectrum, whereas those at L135 and L247 shift the long-wavelength absorption band of P to higher energies. Fits to the ground-state absorption and hole-burned spectra indicate that the blue shift and increased width of the absorption band in the L135 mutants are due partly to changes in the distribution of energies for the zero-phonon absorption line and partly to stronger electron-phonon coupling. The initial electron-transfer kinetics are not changed significantly in most of the mutants, but the time constant increases from 3.0 +/- 0.2 in wild-type RCs to 4.7 +/- 0.2 in C(L247)D and 7.0 +/- 0.3 ps in C(L247)K. The effects of the mutations on the solvation free energies of the product of the initial electron-transfer reaction (P(+)) and the charge-transfer states that contribute to the absorption spectrum ( and ) were calculated by using a distance-dependent electrostatic screening factor. The results are qualitatively in accord with the view that electrostatic interactions of the bacteriochlorophylls with ionized residues of the protein are strongly screened and make only minor contributions to the energetics and dynamics of charge separation. However, the slowing of electron transfer in the Cys L247 mutants and the blue shift of the spectrum in some of the Arg L135 and Cys L247 mutants cannot be

  7. Protonated rhodosemiquinone at the Q(B) binding site of the M265IT mutant reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-03-31

    The second electron transfer from primary ubiquinone Q(A) to secondary ubiquinone Q(B) in the reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides involves a protonated Q(B)(-) intermediate state whose low pK(a) makes direct observation impossible. Here, we replaced the native ubiquinone with low-potential rhodoquinone at the Q(B) binding site of the M265IT mutant RC. Because the in situ midpoint redox potential of Q(A) of this mutant was lowered approximately the same extent (≈100 mV) as that of Q(B) upon exchange of ubiquinone with low-potential rhodoquinone, the inter-quinone (Q(A) → Q(B)) electron transfer became energetically favorable. After subsequent saturating flash excitations, a period of two damped oscillations of the protonated rhodosemiquinone was observed. The Q(B)H(•) was identified by (1) the characteristic band at 420 nm of the absorption spectrum after the second flash and (2) weaker damping of the oscillation at 420 nm (due to the neutral form) than at 460 nm (attributed to the anionic form). The appearance of the neutral semiquinone was restricted to the acidic pH range, indicating a functional pK(a) of <5.5, slightly higher than that of the native ubisemiquinone (pK(a) < 4.5) at pH 7. The analysis of the pH and temperature dependencies of the rates of the second electron transfer supports the concept of the pH-dependent pK(a) of the semiquinone at the Q(B) binding site. The local electrostatic potential is severely modified by the strongly interacting neighboring acidic cluster, and the pK(a) of the semiquinone is in the middle of the pH range of the complex titration. The kinetic and thermodynamic data are discussed according to the proton-activated electron transfer mechanism combined with the pH-dependent functional pK(a) of the semiquinone at the Q(B) site of the RC.

  8. Identification of the first steps in charge separation in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by ultrafast mid-infrared spectroscopy: electron transfer and protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pawlowicz, Natalia P; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Breton, Jacques; Jones, Michael R; Groot, Marie Louise

    2008-08-01

    Time-resolved visible pump/mid-infrared (mid-IR) probe spectroscopy in the region between 1600 and 1800 cm(-1) was used to investigate electron transfer, radical pair relaxation, and protein relaxation at room temperature in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center (RC). Wild-type RCs both with and without the quinone electron acceptor Q(A), were excited at 600 nm (nonselective excitation), 800 nm (direct excitation of the monomeric bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) cofactors), and 860 nm (direct excitation of the dimer of primary donor (P) BChls (P(L)/P(M))). The region between 1600 and 1800 cm(-1) encompasses absorption changes associated with carbonyl (C=O) stretch vibrational modes of the cofactors and protein. After photoexcitation of the RC the primary electron donor P excited singlet state (P*) decayed on a timescale of 3.7 ps to the state P(+)B(L)(-) (where B(L) is the accessory BChl electron acceptor). This is the first report of the mid-IR absorption spectrum of P(+)B(L)(-); the difference spectrum indicates that the 9-keto C=O stretch of B(L) is located around 1670-1680 cm(-1). After subsequent electron transfer to the bacteriopheophytin H(L) in approximately 1 ps, the state P(+)H(L)(-) was formed. A sequential analysis and simultaneous target analysis of the data showed a relaxation of the P(+)H(L)(-) radical pair on the approximately 20 ps timescale, accompanied by a change in the relative ratio of the P(L)(+) and P(M)(+) bands and by a minor change in the band amplitude at 1640 cm(-1) that may be tentatively ascribed to the response of an amide C=O to the radical pair formation. We conclude that the drop in free energy associated with the relaxation of P(+)H(L)(-) is due to an increased localization of the electron hole on the P(L) half of the dimer and a further consequence is a reduction in the electrical field causing the Stark shift of one or more amide C=O oscillators.

  9. Partial steps of charge translocation in the nonpumping N139L mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase with a blocked D-channel.

    PubMed

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Zhu, Jiapeng; Gennis, Robert B; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2010-04-13

    The N139L substitution in the D-channel of cytochrome oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides results in an approximately 15-fold decrease in the turnover number and a loss of proton pumping. Time-resolved absorption and electrometric assays of the F --> O transition in the N139L mutant oxidase result in three major findings. (1) Oxidation of the reduced enzyme by O(2) shows approximately 200-fold inhibition of the F --> O step (k approximately 2 s(-1) at pH 8) which is not compatible with enzyme turnover ( approximately 30 s(-1)). Presumably, an abnormal intermediate F(deprotonated) is formed under these conditions, one proton-deficient relative to a normal F state. In contrast, the F --> O transition in N139L oxidase induced by single-electron photoreduction of intermediate F, generated by reaction of the oxidized enzyme with H(2)O(2), decelerates to an extent compatible with enzyme turnover. (2) In the N139L mutant, the protonic phase of Deltapsi generation coupled to the flash-induced F --> O transition greatly decreases in rate and magnitude and can be assigned to the movement of a proton from E286 to the binuclear site, required for reduction of heme a(3) from the Fe(4+) horizontal lineO(2-) state to the Fe(3+)-OH(-) state. Electrogenic reprotonation of E286 from the inner aqueous phase is missing from the F --> O step in the mutant. (3) In the N139L mutant, the KCN-insensitive rapid electrogenic phase may be composed of two components with lifetimes of approximately 10 and approximately 40 mus and a magnitude ratio of approximately 3:2. The 10 mus phase matches vectorial electron transfer from Cu(A) to heme a, whereas the 40 mus component is assigned to intraprotein proton displacement across approximately 20% of the membrane dielectric thickness. This proton displacement might be triggered by rotation of the charged K362 side chain coupled to heme a reduction. The two components of the rapid electrogenic phase have been resolved subsequently with other D

  10. Effect of light intensity and various organic acids on the growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides LHII-deficient mutant in a turbidostat culture.

    PubMed

    Eltsova, Zinaida; Bolshakov, Maxim; Tsygankov, Anatoly

    2016-12-01

    The composition of photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides wild strain 2.4.1 and its LHII-deficient mutant DBCΩ was compared. The absence of LHII in the mutant was confirmed by comparison of chromatophores spectra and by the absence of electrophoretic band corresponding to LHII complex. Continuous turbidostat cultures of wild strain and its LHII-deficient mutant were compared in response to different light intensities. Cultures were grown using lactate, mixture of lactate and acetate or succinate as carbon source. For comparative analysis, an approximation of experimental data by Monod and Gompertz equations were used. Cultures of DBCΩ had lower growth rates than wild strain when grown on lactate as electron donor and carbon source. Cultures of both strains grown on lactate and acetate or on succinate had similar growth rates. The cultures showed maximum growth rates when grown with succinate. Bacteriochlorophyll a content increased in both strains with decrease of incident light intensity. However, the variation of Bchl a content in wild strain was much more significant. Under light-limiting conditions, bacteriochlorophyll a content in DBCΩ was 4-5 times lower than in the wild strain. Under light-saturating conditions, it was only 1.5-2.5 times lower. Growing with lactate or with lactate and acetate, the mutant switched from light limitation under low light intensities to limitation by organic acids under higher light, whereas the parental strain had similar switch of limiting factor only when growing with lactate and acetate mixture. DBCΩ mutant has higher minimal light intensity enabling growth on any organic acid as a substrate. When growing with lactate or with lactate and acetate, the mutant reached maximum growth rate at lower light intensities than the wild strain. This phenomenon was observed for the first time. Taking into account the concentration of BChl a under light-limiting conditions, the thickness of the suspension capable of

  11. Extended optical model for fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  12. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; ...

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  13. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  14. Binuclear Complexes and Extended Chains Featuring Pt(II)-Tl(I) Bonds: Influence of the Pyridine-2-Thiolate and Cyclometalated Ligands on the Self-Assembly and Luminescent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Jesús R; Lalinde, Elena; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa; Sánchez, Sergio; Shahsavari, Hamid R

    2016-08-15

    Platinum solvate complexes [Pt(C6F5)(C^N)(S)] [C^N = phenylpyridinyl (ppy), S = dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (A); C^N = benzoquinolinyl (bzq), S = CH3COCH3 (B)] react with [Tl(Spy)] (Spy = 2-pyridinethiolate) to afford binuclear [{Pt(C6F5)(C^N)}Tl(Spy)] [C^N = ppy (1) and bzq (2)] species containing a Pt-Tl bonding interaction, supported by a μ-Spy-κN,S bridging ligand, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction. However, the related reactions with [Tl(SpyCF3-5)] [SpyCF3-5 = 5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinethiolate] give neutral extended chains [{Pt(C6F5)(C^N)}Tl(SpyCF3-5)]n [C^N = ppy (3) and bzq (4)]. 3 features a zigzag -Pt-Tl···S-Pt- chain, generated by Pt-Tl and Tl···S bonds, with the SpyCF3 acting as a μ-κN:κ(2)S bridging ligand, whereas 4 displays an unsupported ···Tl-Pt···Tl-Pt··· backbone (angle of ca. 158.7°). The lowest-energy absorption bands in the UV-vis spectra in CH2Cl2, associated with (1)L'LCT transitions with minor (1)LC/(1)MLCT (L' = Spy or SpyCF3-5; L = C^N) character, are similar for all complexes 1-4, demonstrating that for 3 and 4 the chains break down in solution to yield similar bimetallic Pt-Tl units. For 2, two different forms, 2-o (orange) and 2-y (yellow), exhibiting different colors and emissions were found depending on the isolation conditions. Slow crystallization favors formation of the thermodynamically more stable yellow form (2-y), which exhibits a high-energy (HE) structured emission band, whereas fast crystallization gives rise to the orange form (2-o), with a remarkably lower energy structureless emission. Complexes 1 and 3 exhibit dual luminescence in the solid state at 298 K: an unstructured low-energy band associated with (3)ππ* excimeric emission due to π···π (C^N) interactions and a more structured HE band, assigned, with support of density functional theory calculations, to an intraligand (3)LC (C^N) excited state mixed with some ligand (SPy)/platinum-to-ligand (C^N)(3)[(L' + M)LCT] charge transfer. Chain

  15. Inequalities of extended beta and extended hypergeometric functions.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Saiful R

    2017-01-01

    We study the log-convexity of the extended beta functions. As a consequence, we establish Turán-type inequalities. The monotonicity, log-convexity, log-concavity of extended hypergeometric functions are deduced by using the inequalities on extended beta functions. The particular cases of those results also give the Turán-type inequalities for extended confluent and extended Gaussian hypergeometric functions. Some reverses of Turán-type inequalities are also derived.

  16. Extended cooperative control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Schmidt, David K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on research for extending the Cooperative Control Synthesis methodology to include a more accurate modeling of the pilot's controller dynamics. Cooperative Control Synthesis (CCS) is a methodology that addresses the problem of how to design control laws for piloted, high-order, multivariate systems and/or non-conventional dynamic configurations in the absence of flying qualities specifications. This is accomplished by emphasizing the parallel structure inherent in any pilot-controlled, augmented vehicle. The original CCS methodology is extended to include the Modified Optimal Control Model (MOCM), which is based upon the optimal control model of the human operator developed by Kleinman, Baron, and Levison in 1970. This model provides a modeling of the pilot's compensation dynamics that is more accurate than the simplified pilot dynamic representation currently in the CCS methodology. Inclusion of the MOCM into the CCS also enables the modeling of pilot-observation perception thresholds and pilot-observation attention allocation affects. This Extended Cooperative Control Synthesis (ECCS) allows for the direct calculation of pilot and system open- and closed-loop transfer functions in pole/zero form and is readily implemented in current software capable of analysis and design for dynamic systems. Example results based upon synthesizing an augmentation control law for an acceleration command system in a compensatory tracking task using the ECCS are compared with a similar synthesis performed by using the original CCS methodology. The ECCS is shown to provide augmentation control laws that yield more favorable, predicted closed-loop flying qualities and tracking performance than those synthesized using the original CCS methodology.

  17. Extended Wordsearches in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, Simon

    1998-04-01

    Students can be encouraged to develop their factual knowledge by use of puzzles. One strategy described here is the extended wordsearch, where the wordsearch element generates a number of words or phrases from which the answers to a series of questions are selected. The wordsearch can be generated with the aid of computer programs, though in order to make them suitable for students with dyslexia or other learning difficulties, a simpler form is more appropriate. These problems can be employed in a variety of contexts, for example, as topic tests and classroom end-of-lesson fillers. An example is provided in the area of calcium chemistry. Sources of suitable software are listed.

  18. ALMA Extended Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameno, S.; Nakai, N.; Honma, M.

    2013-10-01

    We propose to append five 12-m antennas within 300-km from ALMA to realize high angular resolution of < 1 mas and sensitivity to detect Tb < 1000 K. This ALMA extended array offers a new parameter space of "Thermal universe with VLBI resolution". Proposed science case includes black-hole formation in sub-mm galaxies, mass accretion processes onto protostars, imaging stellar photospheres, distance measurements of stars, and so on. The array also functions as a part of sub-mm VLBI that targets black-hole imaging.

  19. Trapping kinetics in mutants of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides: influence of the charge separation rate and consequences for the rate-limiting step in the light-harvesting process.

    PubMed

    Beekman, L M; van Mourik, F; Jones, M R; Visser, H M; Hunter, C N; van Grondelle, R

    1994-03-22

    The primary light-harvesting processes, energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna, and trapping of the excited states by reaction centers were studied in several mutant strains of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The mutants had reaction centers in which the rates of electron transfer were modified by site-directed mutations at the M210 position. Low-intensity pump-probe laser spectroscopy was used to monitor the absorbance transients in the Qy region of the antenna pigments, and it was found that despite a wide variation in charge separation rates within the RC, produced by the alterations at Tyr M210, there was relatively little corresponding variation in the overall trapping rate. These effects of the mutations on the trapping kinetics demonstrate that the rate-limiting step of the overall light-harvesting process is the transfer of the excitations from the antenna to the reaction center.

  20. Extended Ewald summation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylänpää, Ilkka; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-09-01

    We present a technique to improve the accuracy and to reduce the computational labor in the calculation of long-range interactions in systems with periodic boundary conditions. We extend the well-known Ewald method by using a linear combination of screening Gaussian charge distributions instead of only one. This enables us to find faster converging real-space and reciprocal space summations. The combined simplicity and efficiency of our method is demonstrated, and the scheme is readily applicable to large-scale periodic simulations, classical as well as quantum. Moreover, apart from the required a priori optimization the method is straightforward to include in most routines based on the Ewald method within, e.g., density-functional, molecular dynamics, and quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

  1. Extending juvenility in grasses

    DOEpatents

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  2. Stars with Extended Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2002-12-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA, Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the presented talks in written form as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Cees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  3. Oxazoles for click chemistry II: synthesis of extended heterocyclic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravin C; Luzzio, Frederick A; Demuth, Donald R

    2015-06-03

    New routes to 2, 4, 5-trisubstituted oxazoles were established whereby the substitution pattern was established by the structure of the starting nonsymmetrical acyloins. 2-Chloromethyl-4, 5-disubstituted oxazoles were prepared by refinements of an earlier described process whereby chloroacetyl esters of symmetrical and non-symmetrical acyloins were cyclized using an ammonium acetate/acetic acid protocol. After substitution is effected, the azide moiety is then installed by substitution under mild conditions. While dibrominated and iodinated phenyloxazoles are required for further synthetic elaboration, the cyclization reaction was found to be very sensitive to the relative positions of the halogens in the starting materials.

  4. Giotto Extended Mission (GEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, D. E. B.; Grensemann, M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the Giotto Extended Mission (GEM), are to determine the composition and physical state of the Grigg Skjellerup Comet's nucleus; to determine the processes that govern the composition and distribution of neutral and ionized species in the cometary atmosphere. Giotto consists of a single European Space Agency (ESA) spacecraft that was launched in 1985 from Center Spatial Guyanis in French Guiana on an Ariane launch vehicle. After a successful launch into geostationary orbit and a heliocentric transfer trajectory, the spacecraft successfully encountered Halley's Comet in 1986. One month after encountering Halley's Comet, Mar. 1986, the spacecraft was placed in hibernation in a heliocentric orbit slightly less than 1 AU. Between Feb. and Jul. 1990 the spacecraft was successfully reactivated, checked out, and placed on a trajectory course to intercept comet Grigg Skjellerup. The spacecraft has been in hibernation since Jul. 1990. Information is presented in tabular form in the following areas: coverage goals, Deep Space Network Support, frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  5. An Extended Lagrangian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    1995-01-01

    A unique formulation of describing fluid motion is presented. The method, referred to as 'extended Lagrangian method,' is interesting from both theoretical and numerical points of view. The formulation offers accuracy in numerical solution by avoiding numerical diffusion resulting from mixing of fluxes in the Eulerian description. The present method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method have a similarity in spirit-eliminating the cross-streamline numerical diffusion. For this purpose, we suggest a simple grid constraint condition and utilize an accurate discretization procedure. This grid constraint is only applied to the transverse cell face parallel to the local stream velocity, and hence our method for the steady state problems naturally reduces to the streamline-curvature method, without explicitly solving the steady stream-coordinate equations formulated a priori. Unlike the Lagrangian method proposed by Loh and Hui which is valid only for steady supersonic flows, the present method is general and capable of treating subsonic flows and supersonic flows as well as unsteady flows, simply by invoking in the same code an appropriate grid constraint suggested in this paper. The approach is found to be robust and stable. It automatically adapts to flow features without resorting to clustering, thereby maintaining rather uniform grid spacing throughout and large time step. Moreover, the method is shown to resolve multi-dimensional discontinuities with a high level of accuracy, similar to that found in one-dimensional problems.

  6. Extended chameleon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Tamanini, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    We extend the chameleon models by considering scalar-fluid theories where the coupling between matter and the scalar field can be represented by a quadratic effective potential with density-dependent minimum and mass. In this context, we study the effects of the scalar field on Solar System tests of gravity and show that models passing these stringent constraints can still induce large modifications of Newton's law on galactic scales. On these scales we analyze models which could lead to a percent deviation of Newton's law outside the virial radius. We then model the dark matter halo as a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and explicitly find that the fifth force can give large contributions around the galactic core in a particular model where the scalar field mass is constant and the minimum of its potential varies linearly with the matter density. At cosmological distances, we find that this model does not alter the growth of large scale structures and therefore would be best tested on galactic scales, where interesting signatures might arise in the galaxy rotation curves.

  7. Extended HI disks in nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosma, Albert

    2017-03-01

    In this short write-up, I will concentrate on a few topics of interest. In the 1970s I found very extended HI disks in galaxies such as NGC 5055 and NGC 2841, out to 2 - 2.5 times the Holmberg radius. Since these galaxies are warped, a ``tilted ring model'' allows rotation curves to be derived, and evidence for dark matter to be found. The evaluation of the amount of dark matter is hampered by a disk-halo degeneracy, which can possibly be broken by observations of velocity dispersions in both the MgI region and the CaII region.

  8. Extending Romanovski polynomials in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesne, C.

    2013-12-01

    Some extensions of the (third-class) Romanovski polynomials (also called Romanovski/pseudo-Jacobi polynomials), which appear in bound-state wavefunctions of rationally extended Scarf II and Rosen-Morse I potentials, are considered. For the former potentials, the generalized polynomials satisfy a finite orthogonality relation, while for the latter an infinite set of relations among polynomials with degree-dependent parameters is obtained. Both types of relations are counterparts of those known for conventional polynomials. In the absence of any direct information on the zeros of the Romanovski polynomials present in denominators, the regularity of the constructed potentials is checked by taking advantage of the disconjugacy properties of second-order differential equations of Schrödinger type. It is also shown that on going from Scarf I to Scarf II or from Rosen-Morse II to Rosen-Morse I potentials, the variety of rational extensions is narrowed down from types I, II, and III to type III only.

  9. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  10. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  11. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  12. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  13. From Self-Organized to Extended Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Elisa; Allegrini, Paolo; Geneston, Elvis; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We address the issue of criticality that is attracting the attention of an increasing number of neurophysiologists. Our main purpose is to establish the specific nature of some dynamical processes that although physically different, are usually termed as “critical,” and we focus on those characterized by the cooperative interaction of many units. We notice that the term “criticality” has been adopted to denote both noise-induced phase transitions and Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) with no clear connection with the traditional phase transitions, namely the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one state of matter to another. We notice the recent attractive proposal of extended criticality advocated by Bailly and Longo, which is realized through a wide set of critical points rather than emerging as a singularity from a unique value of the control parameter. We study a set of cooperatively firing neurons and we show that for an extended set of interaction couplings the system exhibits a form of temporal complexity similar to that emerging at criticality from ordinary phase transitions. This extended criticality regime is characterized by three main properties: (i) In the ideal limiting case of infinitely large time period, temporal complexity corresponds to Mittag-Leffler complexity; (ii) For large values of the interaction coupling the periodic nature of the process becomes predominant while maintaining to some extent, in the intermediate time asymptotic region, the signature of complexity; (iii) Focusing our attention on firing neuron avalanches, we find two of the popular SOC properties, namely the power indexes 2 and 1.5 respectively for time length and for the intensity of the avalanches. We derive the main conclusion that SOC emerges from extended criticality, thereby explaining the experimental observation of Plenz and Beggs: avalanches occur in time with surprisingly regularity, in apparent conflict with the temporal complexity of physical

  14. Cosmological dynamics of extended chameleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanini, Nicola; Wright, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the cosmological dynamics of the recently proposed extended chameleon models at both background and linear perturbation levels. Dynamical systems techniques are employed to fully characterize the evolution of the universe at the largest distances, while structure formation is analysed at sub-horizon scales within the quasi-static approximation. The late time dynamical transition from dark matter to dark energy domination can be well described by almost all extended chameleon models considered, with no deviations from ΛCDM results at both background and perturbation levels. The results obtained in this work confirm the cosmological viability of extended chameleons as alternative dark energy models.

  15. Extended scaling in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, B.; Chatelain, C.; Dhall, C.; Kenna, R.; Low, R.; Walter, J.-C.

    2008-11-01

    We apply and test the recently proposed 'extended scaling' scheme in an analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of Ising systems above the upper critical dimension. The data are obtained by Monte Carlo simulations using both the conventional Wolff cluster algorithm and the Prokof'ev-Svistunov worm algorithm. As already observed for other models, extended scaling is shown to extend the high-temperature critical scaling regime over a range of temperatures much wider than that achieved conventionally. It allows for an accurate determination of leading and sub-leading scaling indices, critical temperatures and amplitudes of the confluent corrections.

  16. Blue shifts in bacteriochlorophyll absorbance correlate with changed hydrogen bonding patterns in light-harvesting 2 mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with alterations at alpha-Tyr-44 and alpha-Tyr-45.

    PubMed

    Fowler, G J; Sockalingum, G D; Robert, B; Hunter, C N

    1994-05-01

    A combination of Fourier-Transform (FT) resonance Raman spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis has been used to examine the function of two highly conserved aromatic residues, alpha-Tyr-44 and alpha-Tyr-45, in the light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In LH2 complexes, aromatic residues located at positions alpha-44 and alpha-45 are thought to be located near the putative binding site for bacteriochlorophyll, and alterations at these positions are known to produce blue shifts in bacteriochlorophyll absorbance. In the present work, mutant LH2 complexes carrying the alterations alpha-Tyr-44-->Phe, alpha-Tyr-45-->Phe and alpha-Tyr-44,-45-->Phe,Leu were examined. FT resonance Raman spectroscopy of the resulting complexes shows the breakage of a hydrogen bond to the 2-acetyl carbonyl group of one of the B850 bacteriochlorophylls in the LH2 complex; in the double mutant, breakage of a second bond is probable. These results suggest that one of these hydrogen bonds is to alpha-Tyr-44, placing this residue in close proximity to ring I of one of the B850 bacteriochlorophyll a pigments. The breakage of one, then two, 2-acetyl carbonyl hydrogen bonds correlates well with the shift in the absorbance of the B850 pigments of 11 nm then 26 nm at 77 K. Thus a consistency between literature theoretical calculations and the observations from both absorption and FT resonance Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  17. Cognitive Transformations and Extended Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menary, Richard; Kirchhoff, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expertise is extended by becoming immersed in cultural practices. We look at an example of mathematical expertise in which immersion in cognitive practices results in the transformation of expert performance.

  18. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1988-01-12

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

  19. Topological defects in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Kolb, Edward W.; Liddle, Andrew R.

    1990-01-01

    The production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models was considered. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large scale structure via cosmic strings.

  20. Extender for securing a closure

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, II, Patrick A.

    2012-10-02

    An apparatus for securing a closure such as door or a window that opens and closes by movement relative to a fixed structure such as a wall or a floor. Many embodiments provide a device for relocating a padlock from its normal location where it secures a fastener (such as a hasp) to a location for the padlock that is more accessible for locking and unlocking the padlock. Typically an extender is provided, where the extender has a hook at a first end that is disposed through the eye of the staple of the hasp, and at an opposing second end the extender has an annulus, such as a hole in the extender or a loop or ring affixed to the extender. The shackle of the padlock may be disposed through the annulus and may be disposed through the eye of a second staple to secure the door or window in a closed or open position. Some embodiments employ a rigid sheath to enclose at least a portion of the extender. Typically the rigid sheath has an open state where the hook is exposed outside the sheath and a closed state where the hook is disposed within the sheath.

  1. An Extended Keyword Extraction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bao; Zhen, Deng

    Among numerous Chinese keyword extraction methods, Chinese characteristics were shortly considered. This phenomenon going against the precision enhancement of the Chinese keyword extraction. An extended term frequency based method(Extended TF) is proposed in this paper which combined Chinese linguistic characteristics with basic TF method. Unary, binary and ternary grammars for the candidate keyword extraction as well as other linguistic features were all taken into account. The method establishes classification model using support vector machine. Tests show that the proposed extraction method improved key words precision and recall rate significantly. We applied the key words extracted by the extended TF method into the text file classification. Results show that the key words extracted by the proposed method contributed greatly to raising the precision of text file classification.

  2. A novel extended state observer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shaofeng; Wang, Weihong; Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Zengqiang; Wang, Sen

    2015-09-01

    A novel extended state observer, which feeds back the output estimation error via both nonlinear and switching terms, is put forward for the first time in this paper. No longer neglecting the lumped uncertainty׳s first time derivative, the problem of disturbance observer design is transformed into the problem of state observer design in the presence of external disturbance. The switching term of the output estimation error is employed to counteract the adverse effect of external disturbance. The newly developed extended state observer provides an attractive solution to the issue of high precision motion control system. Both numerical simulation and experimentation on a speed turntable with temperature box are implemented to verify the performance of the proposed newly developed extended state observer.

  3. Extended cognition in science communication.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, David

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a methodological externalism that takes knowledge about science to be partly constituted by the environment. My starting point is the debate about extended cognition in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science. Externalists claim that human cognition extends beyond the brain and can be partly constituted by external devices. First, I show that most studies of public knowledge about science are based on an internalist framework that excludes the environment we usually utilize to make sense of science and does not allow the possibility of extended knowledge. In a second step, I argue that science communication studies should adopt a methodological externalism and accept that knowledge about science can be partly realized by external information resources such as Wikipedia.

  4. WFRC patrners: our extended family

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connolly, P.; Elliot, D.; Parsley, M.; Winton, J.

    2007-01-01

    For more than five decades the Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has worked with partners to provide research findings to managers of aquatic resources. Those partners form an extended family, a network of clients, colleagues, co-investigators, and customers. Our partners include numerous clients in other Department of Interior bureaus such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, and the National Park Service. But there is much more--we have partners in other federal agencies, state agencies, and universities. The extended family includes tribal governments, and non-government organizations such as the Nature Conservancy and the Lower Columbia River Estuary Program.

  5. Adjustable extender for instrument module

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, J.B.; Stein, A.D.

    1975-11-01

    A blank extender module used to mount an instrument module in front of its console for repair or test purposes has been equipped with a rotatable mount and means for locking the mount at various angles of rotation for easy accessibility. The rotatable mount includes a horizontal conduit supported by bearings within the blank module. The conduit is spring-biased in a retracted position within the blank module and in this position a small gear mounted on the conduit periphery is locked by a fixed pawl. The conduit and instrument mount can be pulled into an extended position with the gear clearing the pawl to permit rotation and adjustment of the instrument.

  6. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

  7. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, John L.; Brandt, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

  8. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  9. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  10. Group Development: Extending Tuckman's Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maples, Mary F.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a framework for extending the Tuckman model of developmental sequence in small groups. Considers Tuckman's stages of forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning lacking in descriptive depth and clear definition. Gathered and organized group dynamics graduate students' assessments of characteristics of stages over five-year…

  11. Extending the Internet 2 Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 community, formed from partnerships involving universities, businesses, and the government, focuses on the K-20 Initiative that extends Internet 2 developments to other nonmember environments, including elementary and secondary schools, community colleges, universities, libraries, and museums. Discusses networking and…

  12. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  13. Engage, Enhance, and Extend Learning!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keren-Kolb, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Educators often say that technology is more than a gimmick or add-on, and that it should engage, enhance, or extend learning in ways that traditional tools do not. Yet they seldom stop to define these terms, and they can be confusing, especially for teachers and preservice teachers. Recently, while collaborating on an English language arts and…

  14. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  15. Pathogen-Reduced, Platelet Additive Solution, Extended Stored Platelets (PREPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    trauma patients. References: 1. Slichter SJ, Harker LA. Preparation and storage of platelet concentrates . II. Storage variables influencing ...Storage variables influencing platelet viability and function. Br J Haematol 1976;34(3):403-419. 2. Becker GA, Tuccelli M, Kunicki T, et al. Studies of...platelet additive solution (PAS) to extend the life of stored platelets. Our project also aims to determine how long acceptable platelet viability can be

  16. Mechanism of energy transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophyll : light-harvesting by carotenoids having different extents of {pi}-electron conjugation incorporated into the B850 antenna complex from the carotenoidless bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1.

    SciTech Connect

    Desamero, R. Z. B.; Chynwat, V.; van der Hoef, I.; Jansen, F. J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Cua, A.; Bocian, D. F.; Frank, H. A.; Univ. of Connecticut; Leiden Univ.; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of California; Univ. of connecticut

    1998-10-15

    Spheroidene and a series of spheroidene analogues with extents of p-electron conjugation ranging from 7 to 13 carbon-carbon double bonds were incorporated into the B850 light-harvesting complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1. The structures and spectroscopic properties of the carotenoids and the dynamics of energy transfer from the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in the B850 complex were studied by using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, resonance Raman, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The spheroidene analogues used in this study were 5',6'-dihydro-7',8'-didehydrospheroidene, 7',8'-didehydrospheroidene, and 1',2'-dihydro-3',4',7',8'-tetradehydrospheroidene. These data, taken together with results from 3,4,7,8-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, and spheroidene already published (Frank, H. A.; Farhoosh, R.; Aldema, M. L.; DeCoster, B.; Christensen, R. L.; Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J. Photochem. Photobiol. 1993, 57, 49. Farhoosh, R.; Chynwat, V.; Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J.; Frank, H. A. Photosynth. Res. 1994, 42, 157), provide a systematic series of molecules for understanding the molecular features that determine the mechanism of energy transfer from carotenoids to BChl in photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complexes. The data support the hypothesis that only carotenoids having 10 or less carbon-carbon double bonds transfer energy via their 21Ag (S1) states to BChl to any significant degree. Energy transfer via the 11Bu (S2) state of the carotenoid becomes more important than the S1 route as the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds increases. The results also suggest that the S2 state associated with the Qx transition of the B850 BChl is the most likely acceptor state for energy transfer originating from both the 2{sup 1}A{sub g} (S{sub 1}) and 1{sup 1}B{sub u} (S{sub 2}) states of all carotenoids.

  17. FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-01

    FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) I - Extended Time Observations were conducted in Utah. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Home Page SCAR-B Block:  ...

  18. Predictability in the extended range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, John O.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the results of extended range predictability experiments using an efficient two-level spherical quasi-geostrophic model. The experiments have an initial rms doubling time of about two days. This growth rate, along with an initial error of about one-half the initial error of present operational models, produces an rms error equal to the climatological rms error and a correlation of 0.5 on about day 12 of the forecast. On the largest scales, this limiting point is reached shortly thereafter. The error continues to grow at a decreasing rate until at about 30 days the forecast skill is extremely small and comparable to the skill of a persistence forecast. Various time averages at various lags are examined for skill in the extended range. Filters that weighted most strongly in the initial forecast days provide increased skill.

  19. ESA extends solar observatory mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-06-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) announced on 24 May that it would extend the life of its Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) from April 2007 to December 2009. Since it was launched in December 1995, SOHO has provided scientists with a view of the Sun's surface. ``This mission extension will allow SOHO to cement its position as the most important spacecraft in the history of solar physics,'' said SOHO project scientist Bernhard Fleck.

  20. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  1. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  2. Extending lithography with advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Douglas J.

    2014-03-01

    Material evolution has been a key enabler of lithography nodes in the last 30 years. This paper explores the evolution of anti-reflective coatings and their transformation from materials that provide only reflection control to advanced multifunctional layers. It is expected that complementary processes that do not require a change in wavelength will continue to dominate the development of new devices and technology nodes. New device architecture, immersion lithography, negative-tone development, multiple patterning, and directed self-assembly have demonstrated the capabilities of extending lithography nodes beyond what anyone thought would be possible. New material advancements for future technology nodes are proposed.

  3. 38 CFR 21.57 - Extended evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extended evaluation. 21... Initial and Extended Evaluation § 21.57 Extended evaluation. (a) Purpose. The purpose of an extended evaluation for a veteran with a serious employment handicap is to determine the current feasibility of...

  4. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  5. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Schreiber, Jeffery G.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator 110 (SRG110) is being developed for potential NASA exploration missions. The SRG system efficiency is greater than 20%, making it an attractive candidate power system for deep space missions and unmanned rovers. The Department of Energy SRG110 Project team consists of the System Integrator, Lockheed Martin (LM), Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). One of the GRC roles is to provide Independent Verification and Validation of the Stirling TDC s. At the request of LM, a part of this effort includes the Extended Operation of the TDC s in the dynamically balanced dual-opposed configuration. Performance data of Stirling Convertors over time is required to demonstrate that an SRG110 can meet long-duration mission requirements. A test plan and test system were developed to evaluate TDC s #13 and #14 steady-state performance for a minimum of 5000 hours. Hardware, software and TDC preparation processes were developed to support this test and insure safe, round-the-clock operation of the TDC s. This paper will discuss the design and development, and status of the Extended Operation Test.

  6. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  7. Extended suicide with a pet.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases.

  8. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator 110 (SRG110) is being developed for potential NASA exploration missions. The SRG system efficiency is greater than 20%, making it an attractive candidate power system for deep space missions and unmanned rovers. The Department of Energy SRG110 Project team consists of the System Integrator, Lockheed Martin (LM), Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). One of the GRC roles is to provide Independent Verification and Validation of the Stirling TDC's. At the request of LM, a part of this effort includes the extended operation of the TDC's in the dynamically balanced dual-opposed configuration. Performance data of the Stirling Converters over time is required to demonstrate that an SRG110 can meet long-duration mission requirements. A test plan and test system were developed to evaluate TDC's #13 and #14 steady-state performance for a minimum of 5000 hours and insure safe, round-the-clock operation of the TDC's. This paper will discuss the design and development, and status of the Extended Operation Test.

  9. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  10. Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, Charles F. (Editor); Taylor, Gerald R. (Editor); Smith, Wanda L. (Editor); Brown, J. Travis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Biomedical issues have presented a challenge to flight physicians, scientists, and engineers ever since the advent of high-speed, high-altitude airplane flight in the 1940s. In 1958, preparations began for the first manned space flights of Project Mercury. The medical data and flight experience gained through Mercury's six flights and the Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab projects, as well as subsequent space flights, comprised the knowledge base that was used to develop and implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The EDOMP yielded substantial amounts of data in six areas of space biomedical research. In addition, a significant amount of hardware was developed and tested under the EDOMP. This hardware was designed to improve data gathering capabilities and maintain crew physical fitness, while minimizing the overall impact to the microgravity environment. The biomedical findings as well as the hardware development results realized from the EDOMP have been important to the continuing success of extended Space Shuttle flights and have formed the basis for medical studies of crew members living for three to five months aboard the Russian space station, Mir. EDOMP data and hardware are also being used in preparation for the construction and habitation of International Space Station. All data sets were grouped to be non-attributable to individuals, and submitted to NASA s Life Sciences Data Archive.

  11. Solar Type II Radio Bursts and IP Type II Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined radio data from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft in conjunction with ground-based data in order to investigate the relationship between the shocks responsible for metric type II radio bursts and the shocks in front of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bow shocks of fast, large CMEs are strong interplanetary (IP) shocks, and the associated radio emissions often consist of single broad bands starting below approx. 4 MHz; such emissions were previously called IP type II events. In contrast, metric type II bursts are usually narrowbanded and display two harmonically related bands. In addition to displaying complete dynamic spectra for a number of events, we also analyze the 135 WAVES 1 - 14 MHz slow-drift time periods in 2001-2003. We find that most of the periods contain multiple phenomena, which we divide into three groups: metric type II extensions, IP type II events, and blobs and bands. About half of the WAVES listings include probable extensions of metric type II radio bursts, but in more than half of these events, there were also other slow-drift features. In the 3 yr study period, there were 31 IP type II events; these were associated with the very fastest CMEs. The most common form of activity in the WAVES events, blobs and bands in the frequency range between 1 and 8 MHz, fall below an envelope consistent with the early signatures of an IP type II event. However, most of this activity lasts only a few tens of minutes, whereas IP type II events last for many hours. In this study we find many examples in the radio data of two shock-like phenomena with different characteristics that occur simultaneously in the metric and decametric/hectometric bands, and no clear example of a metric type II burst that extends continuously down in frequency to become an IP type II event. The simplest interpretation is that metric type II bursts, unlike IP type II events, are not caused by shocks driven in front of CMEs.

  12. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  13. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  14. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  15. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  16. Extended thermodynamics of dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Ruggeri, T.; Sugiyama, M.

    2012-11-01

    We study extended thermodynamics of dense gases by adopting the system of field equations with a different hierarchy structure to that adopted in the previous works. It is the theory of 14 fields of mass density, velocity, temperature, viscous stress, dynamic pressure, and heat flux. As a result, most of the constitutive equations can be determined explicitly by the caloric and thermal equations of state. It is shown that the rarefied-gas limit of the theory is consistent with the kinetic theory of gases. We also analyze three physically important systems, that is, a gas with the virial equations of state, a hard-sphere system, and a van der Waals fluid, by using the general theory developed in the former part of the present work.

  17. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  18. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-08-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  19. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong

    2014-12-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  20. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  1. The effect of exchange of bacteriopheophytin a with plant pheophytin a on charge separation in Y(M210)W mutant reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Shkuropatov, Anatoli Ya; Neerken, Sieglinde; Permentier, Hjalmar P; de Wijn, Rik; Schmidt, Kristiane A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Aartsma, Thijs J; Gast, Peter; Hoff, Arnold J

    2003-03-06

    The bacteriopheophytin a molecules at the H(A) and H(B) binding sites of reaction centers (RCs) of the Y(M210)W mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides were chemically exchanged with plant pheophytin a. The Y(M210)W mutation slows down the formation of H(A)(-), presumably by raising the free energy level of the P(+)B(A)(-) state above that of P* due to increasing the oxidation potential of the primary electron donor P and lowering the reduction potential of the accessory bacteriochlorophyll B(A). Exchange of the bacteriopheophytins with pheophytin a on the contrary lowers the redox potential of H(A), inhibiting its reduction. A combination of the mutation and pigment exchange was therefore expected to make the A-side of the RC incapable of electron transfer and cause the excited state P* to deactivate directly to the ground state or through the B-side, or both. Time-resolved absorption difference spectroscopy at 10 K on the RCs that were modified in this way showed a lifetime of P* lengthened to about 500 ps as compared to about 200 ps measured in the original Y(M210)W RCs. We show that the decay of P* in the pheophytin-exchanged preparations is accompanied by both return to the ground state and formation of a new charge-separated state, the absorption difference spectrum of which is characterized by bleachings at 811 and 890 nm. This latter state was formed with a time constant of ca. 1.7 ns and a yield of about 30%, and lasted a few nanoseconds. On the basis of spectroscopic observations these bands at 811 and 890 nm are tentatively attributed to the presence of the P(+)B(B)(-) state, where B(B) is the accessory bacteriochlorophyll in the "inactive" B-branch of the cofactors. The B(B) molecules in Y(M210)W RCs are suggested to be spectrally heterogeneous, absorbing in the Q(y) region at 813 or 806 nm. The results are discussed in terms of perturbation of the free energy level of the P(+)B(B)(-) state and absorption properties of the B(B) bacteriochlorophyll in the

  2. Movement of elongation factor G between compact and extended conformations.

    PubMed

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2015-01-30

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pretranslocation ribosomes or with posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation.

  3. Movement of Elongation Factor G between Compact and Extended Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pre- or posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to, but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation. PMID:25463439

  4. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  5. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  6. Bioconvection in spatially extended domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, A.; Paul, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    We numerically explore gyrotactic bioconvection in large spatially extended domains of finite depth using parameter values from available experiments with the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas nivalis. We numerically integrate the three-dimensional, time-dependent continuum model of Pedley [J. Fluid Mech.10.1017/S0022112088002393 195, 223 (1988)] using a high-order, parallel, spectral-element approach. We explore the long-time nonlinear patterns and dynamics found for layers with an aspect ratio of 10 over a range of Rayleigh numbers. Our results yield the pattern wavelength and pattern dynamics which we compare with available theory and experimental measurement. There is good agreement for the pattern wavelength at short times between numerics, experiment, and a linear stability analysis. At long times we find that the general sequence of patterns given by the nonlinear evolution of the governing equations correspond qualitatively to what has been described experimentally. However, at long times the patterns in numerics grow to larger wavelengths, in contrast to what is observed in experiment where the wavelength is found to decrease with time.

  7. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  8. Studies of extended planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    1988-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of gases and plasmas in the Jupiter system, and related phenomena such as the recently-discovered sodium atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon were made. Cunningham's work on Jupiter spectroscopy is complete. The optical thickness of the ammonia cloud increases from about 3 in the morning to 6 at sunset. This effect seems to be due to the combination of internal heat flow and a convective region heated at the top, giving strong convection at night and none during the day. Near-simultaneous methane data are of poor quality, but are consistent with this picture. Schneider's work on the sodium environment of Io is also complete. The eclipse data extend to nearly 10 Io radii and nicely match the densities in the outer regions (to 100 Io radii) obtained from the intensity scattered in the D lines. Other data show very fast jets of sodium (up to 100 km/sec), frequently tilted out of the orbital plane. Researchers seem to be seeing neutralized ions, not from the torus itself but from atmospheric sodium ionized and then quickly neutralized. The data set on Mercurian sodium has been augmented, and supplemented by IR reflectance spectra.

  9. Extended Analysis of Mo VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlén, B.; Rahimullah, K.; Tauheed, A.; Chaghtai, M. S. Z.

    1985-09-01

    The analysis of the RbI-like spectrum Mo VI has been extended to include a total of some 110 classified lines and 44 energy levels belonging to the one-electron configurations 4s24p6(1S) nl with n ranging up to 9 and l up to 7. The analysis is based on recordings of vacuum spark spectra made at Lund in the region 230-2350 Å, complemented by a list of lines from 2193 to 6336 Å observed and identified by Romanov and Striganov in a Penning type arc discharge. The one-electron level system is partly mixed with core-excited configurations, not treated in the present paper. Especially the nf series is strongly perturbed by 4s24p54d2, and an anomalous behaviour of the ng series is explained by interaction with the 2G term of 4s4p64d2. The ionization limit, derived from 6h, 7i and 8k by means of the polarization formula, is found to be 555 132 ± 2 cm-1.

  10. Extended attention span training system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T.; Bogart, Edward H.

    1991-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a behavioral disorder characterized by the inability to sustain attention long enough to perform activities such as schoolwork or organized play. Treatments for this disorder include medication and brainwave biofeedback training. Brainwave biofeedback training systems feed back information to the trainee showing him how well he is producing the brainwave pattern that indicates attention. The Extended Attention Span Training (EAST) system takes the concept a step further by making a video game more difficult as the player's brainwaves indicate that attention is waning. The trainee can succeed at the game only by maintaining an adequate level of attention. The EAST system is a modification of a biocybernetic system that is currently being used to assess the extent to which automated flight management systems maintain pilot engagement. This biocybernetic system is a product of a program aimed at developing methods to evaluate automated flight deck designs for compatibility with human capabilities. The EAST technology can make a contribution in the fields of medical neuropsychology and neurology, where the emphasis is on cautious, conservative treatment of youngsters with attention disorders.

  11. The Extended Mission Rover (EMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, W.; Halecki, Anthony; Chung, Manh; Clarke, Ken; Frankle, Kevin; Kassemkhani, Fariba; Kuhlhoff, John; Lenzini, Josh; Lobdell, David; Morgan, Sam

    1992-01-01

    A key component in ensuring America's status as a leader in the global community is its active pursuit of space exploration. On the twentieth anniversary of Apollo 11, President George Bush challenged the nation to place a man on the moon permanently and to conduct human exploration of Mars in the 21st century. The students of the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering hope to make a significant contribution to this challenge, America's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), with their participation in the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program. The project selected by the 1991/1992 Aerospace Design group is the design of an Extended Mission Rover (EMR) for use on the lunar surface. This vehicle will serve as a mobile base to provide future astronauts with a 'shirt-sleeve' living and working environment. Some of the proposed missions are planetary surface exploration, construction and maintenance, hardware setup, and in situ resource experimentation. This vehicle will be put into use in the 2010-2030 time frame.

  12. Extended visual appearance texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désage, Simon-Frédéric; Pitard, Gilles; Pillet, Maurice; Favrelière, Hugues; Maire, Jean-Luc; Frelin, Fabrice; Samper, Serge; Le Goïc, Gaëtan

    2015-03-01

    The research purpose is to improve surface characterization based on what is perceived by human eye and on the 2006 CIE report. This report defines four headings under which possible measures might be made: color, gloss, translucency and texture. It is therefore important to define parameters able to discriminate surfaces, in accordance with the perception of human eye. Our starting point in assessing a surface is the measurement of its reflectance (acquisition of ABRDF for visual rendering), i.e. evaluate a set of images from different angles of lighting rather than a single image. The research question is how calculate, from this enhanced information, some discriminating parameters. We propose to use an image processing approach of texture that reflects spatial variations of pixel for translating changes in color, material and relief. From a set of images from different angles of light, we compute associated Haralick features for constructing new (extended) features, called Bidimensional Haralick Functions (BHF), and exploit them for discriminating surfaces. We propose another framework in three parts such as color, material and relief.

  13. Earth Observing-1 Extended Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Since November 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission has demonstrated the capabilities of a dozen spacecraft sensor and communication innovations. Onboard the EO-1 spacecraft are two land remote sensing instruments. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) acquires data in spectral bands and at resolutions similar to Landsat. The Hyperion instrument, which is the first civilian spaceborne hyperspectral imager, acquires data in 220 10-nanometer bands covering the visible, near, and shortwave-infrared bands. The initial one-year technology demonstration phase of the mission included a detailed comparison of ALI with the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument. Specifications for the Operational Land Imager (OLI), the planned successor to ETM+, were formulated in part from performance characteristics of ALI. Recognizing the remarkable performance of the satellite's instruments and the exceptional value of the data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA agreed in December 2001 to share responsibility for operating EO-1. The extended mission continues, on a cost-reimbursable basis, as long as customer sales fully recover flight and ground operations costs. As of May 2005, more than 17,800 scenes from each instrument have been acquired, indexed, archived, and made available to the public.

  14. Earth Observing-1 Extended Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2003-01-01

    From its beginning in November 2000, the NASA Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission demonstrated the feasibility and performance of a dozen innovative sensor, spacecraft, and operational technologies. The 1-year mission tested a variety of technologies, some of which may be included on the planned 2007 Landsat Data Continuity Mission. Onboard the spacecraft are two land remote sensing instruments: the Advanced Land Imager (ALI), which acquires data in spectral bands and at resolutions similar to Landsat, and Hyperion, which acquires data in 220 10-nanometer-wide bands covering the visible, near-, and shortwave-infrared bands. Recognizing the remarkable performance of the satellite's instruments and the exceptional value of the data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA agreed in December 2001 to share responsibility for operating EO-1 on a cost-reimbursable basis as long as customer sales are sufficient to recover flight and ground operations costs. The EO-1 extended mission operates within constraints imposed by its technology-pioneering origins, but it also provides unique and valuable capabilities. The spacecraft can acquire a target scene three times in a 16-day period. The ALI instrument has additional spectral coverage and greater radiometric dynamic range compared with the sensors on Landsat 7. Hyperion is the first civilian spaceborne hyperspectral imager. As of January 2003, more than 5,000 scenes had been acquired, indexed, and archived.

  15. An extended relativistic quantum oscillator for ? particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedjadi, Y.; Ait-Tahar, S.; Barrett, R. C.

    1998-04-01

    We introduce the extended Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) oscillator obtained by combining two relativistic quantum oscillator models. In a study analogous to Kukulin, Loyola and Moshinsky's work on extended Dirac oscillators, we investigate whether this extended version has oscillator shells controllably independent from the spin-orbit coupling. This extended DKP oscillator is found to be exactly solvable for natural parity states. We calculate and discuss both the natural- and unnatural-parity eigenspectra of its spin-1 representation.

  16. Validation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm at extended SSD.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amjad; Villarreal-Barajas, Eduardo; Brown, Derek; Dunscombe, Peter

    2010-06-08

    The accuracy of dose calculations at extended SSD is of significant importance in the dosimetric planning of total body irradiation (TBI). In a first step toward the implementation of electronic, multi-leaf collimator compensation for dose inhomogeneities and surface contour in TBI, we have evaluated the ability of the Eclipse AAA to accurately predict dose distributions in water at extended SSD. For this purpose, we use the Eclipse AAA algorithm, commissioned with machine-specific beam data for a 6 MV photon beam, at standard SSD (100 cm). The model was then used for dose distribution calculations at extended SSD (179.5 cm). Two sets of measurements were acquired for a 6 MV beam (from a Varian linear accelerator) in a water tank at extended SSD: i) open beam for 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 20 x 20 and 40 x 40 cm2 field sizes (defined at 179.5 cm SSD), and ii) identical field sizes but with a 1.3 cm thick acrylic spoiler placed 10 cm above the water surface. Dose profiles were acquired at 5 cm, 10 cm and 20 cm depths. Dose distributions for the two setups were calculated using the AAA algorithm in Eclipse. Confidence limits for comparisons between measured and calculated absolute depth dose curves and normalized dose profiles were determined as suggested by Venselaar et al. The confidence limits were within 2% and 2 mm for both setups. Extended SSD calculations were also performed using Eclipse AAA, commissioned with Varian Golden beam data at standard SSD. No significant difference between the custom commissioned and Golden Eclipse AAA was observed. In conclusion, Eclipse AAA commissioned at standard SSD can be used to accurately predict dose distributions in water at extended SSD for 6 MV open beams.

  17. Extended foil capacitor with radially spoked electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Foster, James C.

    1990-01-01

    An extended foil capacitor has a conductive disk electrically connected in oncrushing contact to the extended foil. A conductive paste is placed through spaces between radial spokes on the disk to electrically and mechanically connect the extended foil to the disk.

  18. 38 CFR 21.74 - Extended evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Duration of Rehabilitation Programs § 21.74 Extended evaluation. (a) General. An extended evaluation may be... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extended evaluation....

  19. Probing outflows in z = 1 ∼ 2 galaxies through Fe II/Fe II* multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuping; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-10-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600 Å Fe II/Fe II* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z ∼ 1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spectroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the Very Large Telescope and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the Fe II absorption lines down to a limit of W{sub r} > 1.5 Å and of the Fe II* emission lines to W{sub r} > 0.5 Å. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [O II] emission line, we find that both the Fe II and Mg II absorption lines are blueshifted, indicating that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the Fe II gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of Mg II. We investigate the variation of Fe II line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that Fe II lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the Fe II lines relative to the Mg II doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended Fe II* emission in two-dimensional stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for Fe II absorption lie close (3 ∼ 4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the Fe II/Fe II* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS (Frieswijk+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-04-01

    Basic parameters of 2909 extended red regions in the outer Galactic plane (1320 at 60" and 1589 at 90" resolution). The sources have been extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, Cat. <II/246>). For each source Galactic coordinates, total number of resolution cells, linear extend in longitude and latitude and number of 2MASS point sources are given. The calculated reliability of the sources is >99.9%. (1 data file).

  1. Exciton exciton annihilation dynamics in chromophore complexes. II. Intensity dependent transient absorption of the LH2 antenna system.

    PubMed

    Bruggemann, B; May, V

    2004-02-01

    Using the multiexciton density matrix theory of excitation energy transfer in chromophore complexes developed in a foregoing paper [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 746 (2003)], the computation of ultrafast transient absorption spectra is presented. Beside static disorder and standard mechanisms of excitation energy dissipation the theory incorporates exciton exciton annihilation (EEA) processes. To elucidate signatures of EEA in intensity dependent transient absorption data the approach is applied to the B850 ring of the LH2 found in rhodobacter sphaeroides. As main indications for two-exciton population and resulting EEA we found (i) a weakening of the dominant single-exciton bleaching structure in the transient absorption, and (ii) an intermediate suppression of long-wavelength and short-wavelength shoulders around the bleaching structure. The suppression is caused by stimulated emission from the two-exciton to the one-exciton state and the return of the shoulders follows from a depletion of two-exciton population according to EEA. The EEA-signature survives as a short-wavelength shoulder in the transient absorption if orientational and energetic disorder are taken into account. Therefore, the observation of the EEA-signatures should be possible when doing frequency resolved transient absorption experiments with a sufficiently strongly varying pump-pulse intensity.

  2. Extended Family Integration among Euro and Mexican Americans: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkisian, Natalia; Gerena, Mariana; Gerstel, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    This article compares the extended family integration of Euro and Mexican American women and men and assesses the importance of class and culture in explaining ethnic differences. Using National Survey of Families and Households II data (N = 7,929), we find that ethnic differences depend on the dimension of integration. Mexican Americans exhibit…

  3. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  4. 42 CFR 488.720 - Extended surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extended surveys. 488.720 Section 488.720 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Home Health Agencies § 488.720 Extended surveys. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  5. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  6. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  7. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  8. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  9. 42 CFR 488.720 - Extended surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extended surveys. 488.720 Section 488.720 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Home Health Agencies § 488.720 Extended surveys. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  10. Evaluation of Kentucky's Extended School Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Schumacher, Debbie; Hauser, Brenda

    The Extended School Services (ESS) program was established in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act. The program extends the school day, week, or year for students at risk of academic failure, providing them with additional instructional time to help them meet academic goals. An evaluation of ESS in 2001 utilized statewide surveys and…

  11. Big Gods: Extended prosociality or group binding?

    PubMed

    Galen, Luke W

    2016-01-01

    Big Gods are described as having a "prosocial" effect. However, this conflates parochialism (group cohesion) with cooperation extended to strangers or out-group members. An examination of the cited experimental studies indicates that religion is actually associated with increased within-group parochialism, rather than extended or universal prosociality, and that the same general mechanisms underlie both religious and secular effects.

  12. Extended, Embodied Cognition and Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight

    2010-01-01

    A "cognitivist" approach to cognition has traditionally dominated second language acquisition (SLA) studies. In this article, I examine two alternative approaches--"extended cognition" and "embodied cognition"--for how they might help us conceptualize SLA. More specifically, I present: (i) summaries of extended and embodied cognition, followed by…

  13. Novel Functional Extended Solids at Extreme Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    characterization of static and dynamic properties of energetic materials. A. Functional Extended Solids: Super Oxidizing Candidates A1. Novel 2D and 3D...fundamental rules in high-pressure chemistry such as pressure-induced electron delocalization, from sp3d hybridized Xe atoms in linear XeF2, to sp3d2 in 2D ... graphite -like 2D extended phase (Pnnm-2, middle) at 52 GPa, and metallic fluorite-like 3D extended phase (Fmmm, right) at 70 GPa. 4 from that of C

  14. Life extending control: A concept paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of Life Extending Control is defined. Life is defined in terms of mechanical fatigue life. A brief description is given of the current approach to life prediction using a local, cyclic, stress-strain approach for a critical system component. An alternative approach to life prediction based on a continuous functional relationship to component performance is proposed.Base on cyclic life prediction an approach to Life Extending Control, called the Life Management Approach is proposed. A second approach, also based on cyclic life prediction, called the Implicit Approach, is presented. Assuming the existence of the alternative functional life prediction approach, two additional concepts for Life Extending Control are presented.

  15. Apparatus and methods for a human extender

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, John F.

    2001-01-01

    A human extender controller for interface between a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant. The human extender controller uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human extender controller of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the present invention is able to achieve a force reflection ratio 500 to 1 and capable of handling loads above the two (2) ton range.

  16. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2005-05-10

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  17. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2006-08-22

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  18. Physical nature of interactions in Zn(II) complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl: quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), interacting quantum atoms (IQA), noncovalent interactions (NCI), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV) comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; de Lange, Jurgens H; Mitoraj, Mariusz

    2014-01-23

    In the present account factors determining the stability of ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3 complexes (L = bpy, 2,2′-bipyridyl) were characterized on the basis of various techniques: the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), energy decomposition schemes based on interacting quantum atoms (IQA), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). Finally, the noncovalent interactions (NCI) index was also applied. All methods consistently indicated that the strength of the coordination bonds, Zn–O and Zn–N, decreases from ZnL to ZnL3. Importantly, it has been identified that the strength of secondary intramolecular heteropolar hydrogen bonding interactions, CH···O and CH···N, increases when going from ZnL to ZnL3. A similar trend appeared to be valid for the π-bonding as well as electrostatic stabilization. In addition to the above leading bonding contributions, all techniques suggested the existence of very subtle, but non-negligible additional stabilization from the CH···HC electronic exchange channel; these interactions are the weakest among all considered here. From IQA it was found that the local diatomic interaction energy, Eint(H,H), amounts at HF to −2.5, −2.7, and −2.9 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3, respectively (−2.1 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL at MP2). NOCV-based deformation density channels showed that formation of CH--HC contacts in Zn complexes causes significant polarization of σ(C–H) bonds, which accordingly leads to charge accumulation in the CH···HC bay region. Charge depletion from σ(C–H) bonds was also reflected in the calculated spin–spin (1)J(C–H) coupling constants, which decrease from 177.06 Hz (ZnL) to 173.87 Hz (ZnL3). This last result supports our findings of an increase in the local electronic CH···HC stabilization from ZnL to ZnL3 found from QTAIM, IQA, and ETS-NOCV. Finally, this work unites for the first time the results from four methods that are widely

  19. Generalized Laplace Transforms and Extended Heaviside Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2008-01-01

    An extended Heaviside calculus proposed by Peraire in a recent paper is similar to a generalization of the Laplace transform proposed by the present author. This similarity will be illustrated by analysis of an example supplied by Peraire.

  20. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  1. Phosphate effects on copper(II) and lead(II) sorption to ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberg, Charlotta; Sjöstedt, Carin; Persson, Ingmar; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2013-11-01

    Transport of lead(II) and copper(II) ions in soil is affected by the soil phosphorus status. Part of the explanation may be that phosphate increases the adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) to iron (hydr)oxides in soil, but the details of these interactions are poorly known. Knowledge about such mechanisms is important, for example, in risk assessments of contaminated sites and development of remediation methods. We used a combination of batch experiments, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and surface complexation modeling with the three-plane CD-MUSIC model to study the effect of phosphate on sorption of copper(II) and lead(II) to ferrihydrite. The aim was to identify the surface complexes formed and to derive constants for the surface complexation reactions. In the batch experiments phosphate greatly enhanced the adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) to ferrihydrite at pH < 6. The largest effects were seen for lead(II).

  2. eXtended MetaData Registry

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  3. Extended-release methylphenidate (Ritalin LA).

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2002-01-01

    An extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (Ritalin LA), a CNS stimulant that inhibits dopamine and noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake into presynaptic neurons, has been developed for use in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In children with ADHD and healthy male adults, extended-release methylphenidate 20mg was rapidly absorbed and demonstrated two distinct peak plasma concentrations approximately 4 hours apart. The absorption pharmacokinetics of extended-release methylphenidate 20mg, which closely mimics those of immediate-release methylphenidate 10mg given in two doses 4 hours apart, permits once-daily administration. In a 2-week randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 134 evaluable children aged 6 to 12 years with ADHD, symptoms improved to a significantly greater extent with extended-release methylphenidate 10 to 40mg once daily than with placebo. Extended-release methylphenidate improved both inattention and hyperactivity symptoms and was effective in children with combined- (inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive) type or predominantly inattentive-type ADHD. In clinical trials, the safety and tolerability profiles of extended-release methylphenidate were consistent with that of the immediate-release formulation.

  4. Extended Jackiw-Pi model and its supersymmetrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2015-07-01

    We present an extended version of the so-called Jackiw-Pi (JP) model in three dimensions, and perform its supersymmetrization. Our field content has three multiplets: (i) Yang-Mills vector multiplet (AIμ ,λI), (ii) Parity-odd extra vector multiplet (BIμ ,χI), and (iii) Scalar multiplet (CI ,ρI ;fI). The bosonic fields in these multiplets are the same as the original JP-model, except for the auxiliary field fI which is new, while the fermions λI, χI and ρI are their super-partners. The basic difference from the original JP-model is the presence of the kinetic term for CI with its modified field-strength HIμ ≡DμCI + mBIμ. The inclusion of the CI-kinetic term is to comply with the recently-developed tensor hierarchy formulation for supersymmetrization.

  5. Extending the scope of holographic mutual information and chaotic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Nilanjan; Sonnenschein, Jacob; Tangarife, Walter

    2016-05-01

    We extend the use of holography to investigate the scrambling properties of various physical systems. Specifically, we consider: (i) non-conformal backgrounds of black Dp branes, (ii) asymptotically Lifshitz black holes, and (iii) black AdS solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We use the disruption of the entanglement entropy as a probe of the chaotic features of such systems. Our analysis shows that these theories share the same type of behavior as conformal theories as they undergo chaos; however, in the case of Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we find a stark difference in the evolution of the mutual information for negative Gauss-Bonnet coupling. This may signal an inconsistency of the latter.

  6. Structure of the extended emission in the infrared celestial background

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The extended infrared celestial emission is due to three main sources: zodiacal dust, large discrete objects in the galaxy, and interstellar dust. As viewed from earth orbit, the thermal reradiation of sunlight absorbed by dust in the solar system produces a pervasive IR background that peaks roughly along the ecliptic plane, where the density of dust is highest. Much-smaller-scale structure was also observed in both the visual and infrared. Between 7 and 30 micrometers, H II regions are the brightest discrete objects in the galaxy. An additional emission mechanism is needed, however, to account for the shorter-wavelength observations. The galactic sources combine along the line of sight to produce an intense band of emission, centered on the galactic plane. Structure in all of these backgrounds creates a clutter problem for an orbiting IR telescope.

  7. C-terminal truncation and histidine-tagging of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II reveals the native processing site, shows involvement of the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding, and improves the assay for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Hiser, C; Mills, D A; Schall, M; Ferguson-Miller, S

    2001-02-13

    To enable metal affinity purification of cytochrome c oxidase reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, a histidine-tag was engineered onto the C-terminal end of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Characterization of the natively processed wildtype oxidase and artificially processed forms (truncated with and without a his-tag) reveals Km values for cytochrome c that are 6-14-fold higher for the truncated and his-tagged forms than for the wildtype. This lowered ability to bind cytochrome c indicates a previously undetected role for the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding and is mimicked by reduced affinity for an FPLC anion exchange column. The elution profiles and kinetics indicate that the removal of 16 amino acids from the C-terminus, predicted from the known processing site of the Paracoccus denitrificans oxidase, does not produce the same enzyme as the native processing reaction. MALDI-TOF MS data show the true C-terminus of subunit II is at serine 290, three amino acids longer than expected. When the his-tagged form is reconstituted into lipid vesicles and further purified by metal affinity chromatography, significant improvement is observed in proton pumping analysis by the stopped-flow method. The improved kinetic results are attributed to a homogeneous, correctly oriented vesicle population with higher activity and less buffering from extraneous lipids.

  8. Extended Ginzburg-Landau formalism for two-band superconductors.

    PubMed

    Shanenko, A A; Milošević, M V; Peeters, F M; Vagov, A V

    2011-01-28

    Recent observation of unusual vortex patterns in MgB(2) single crystals raised speculations about possible "type-1.5" superconductivity in two-band materials, mixing the properties of both type-I and type-II superconductors. However, the strict application of the standard two-band Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory results in simply proportional order parameters of the two bands-and does not support the "type-1.5" behavior. Here we derive the extended GL formalism (accounting all terms of the next order over the small τ=1-T/T(c) parameter) for a two-band clean s-wave superconductor and show that the two condensates generally have different spatial scales, with the difference disappearing only in the limit T→T(c). The extended version of the two-band GL formalism improves the validity of GL theory below T(c) and suggests revisiting the earlier calculations based on the standard model.

  9. SCATTERED NEBULAR LIGHT IN THE EXTENDED ORION NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, C. R.; Goss, W. M.

    2009-11-15

    We have combined 327.5 MHz radio observations and optical spectroscopy to study conditions in the Extended Orion Nebula (EON). We see a steady progression of characteristics with increasing distance from the dominant photoionizing star {theta}{sup 1}Ori C. This progression includes a decrease in the F(H{alpha})/F(H{beta}) ratio, an increase in the relative strength of scattered stellar continuum, decrease in electron density determined from the [S II] doublet, and increase in the ratio of emission measures derived from the H{beta} line and the 327.5 MHz radio continuum. We conclude that beyond about 5' south of {theta}{sup 1}Ori C that scattered light from the much brighter central Huygens region of the nebula significantly contaminates local emission. This strengthens earlier arguments that wavelength and model-dependent scattering of emission-line radiation imposes a fundamental limit on our ability to determine the physical conditions and abundances in this and arguably other similar Galactic Nebulae. The implications for the study of extragalactic H II regions are even more severe. We confirm the result of an earlier study that at least the eastern boundary of the EON is dominated by scattered light from the Huygens region.

  10. M dwarfs from the Einstein extended medium sensitivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Thomas A.; Liebert, James; Gioia, Isabella M.; Maccacaro, Tommaso

    1988-01-01

    A complete sample of X-ray selected M dwarfs are presented which were serendipitously detected in the extended Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS). The MSS detected only early M dwarfs (type MO through M5), 84 percent of which were emission stars (i.e., type Me V). It was calculated that the X-ray luminosity function for early M dwarfs with a log Lx greater than 27.6 and, by comparison to optical luminosity functions, find that about 25 percent of all early M dwarfs emit X-rays at a level greater than log Lx = 27.6. This result is compared to luminosity function estimates from optically selected samples and discussed in light of the sample's kinematic and mean age. Also presented is H alpha and Ca II K line fluxes for each member of the sample and it is shown that the surface H alpha and Ca II K luminosities do indeed correlate with Lx. The significance of this effect to theories of chromospheric and coronal heating is explained.

  11. WILSON-BAPPU EFFECT: EXTENDED TO SURFACE GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sunkyung; Kang, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Sang-Gak E-mail: wskang@khu.ac.kr E-mail: sanggak@snu.ac.kr

    2013-10-01

    In 1957, Wilson and Bappu found a tight correlation between the stellar absolute visual magnitude (M{sub V} ) and the width of the Ca II K emission line for late-type stars. Here, we revisit the Wilson-Bappu relationship (WBR) to claim that the WBR can be an excellent indicator of stellar surface gravity of late-type stars as well as a distance indicator. We have measured the width (W) of the Ca II K emission line in high-resolution spectra of 125 late-type stars obtained with the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph and adopted from the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph archive. Based on our measurement of the emission line width (W), we have obtained a WBR of M{sub V} = 33.76 - 18.08 log W. In order to extend the WBR to being a surface gravity indicator, stellar atmospheric parameters such as effective temperature (T{sub eff}), surface gravity (log g), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and micro-turbulence ({xi}{sub tur}) have been derived from self-consistent detailed analysis using the Kurucz stellar atmospheric model and the abundance analysis code, MOOG. Using these stellar parameters and log W, we found that log g = -5.85 log W+9.97 log T{sub eff} - 23.48 for late-type stars.

  12. Potential future applications for the tracking and data relay satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-04-01

    During the conceptual design phases of the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system provision was made for a future service growth (FSG) payload with an undefined mission. The intent of the FSG was to provide a resource for TDRS II applications which would be available to meet a change in requirements for the operational TDRS II system. This paper summarizes the effect of the consideration of potential FSG applications imposed on the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system. The following applications were considered as FSG candidates: An optical 650 Mbps space-to-space link (SSL) coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, -zone of exclusion (ZOE) closure, relay for lunar communications either RF or optically, and relay for Martian communications either RF or optically. This paper summarizes work done in the 1990 time frame on the above stated applications. Since then, NASA has sponsored several studies (during phase B of the TDRS II development cycle) of the ZOE closure application of the FSG. The purpose of this paper is to report on the efforts previously considered for the FSG. A previous paper was presented at the 1991 Congress related to the second application above. This paper extends this effort to the four stated applications.

  13. Potential future applications for the tracking and data relay satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    During the conceptual design phases of the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system provision was made for a future service growth (FSG) payload with an undefined mission. The intent of the FSG was to provide a resource for TDRS II applications which would be available to meet a change in requirements for the operational TDRS II system. This paper summarizes the effect of the consideration of potential FSG applications imposed on the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system. The following applications were considered as FSG candidates: An optical 650 Mbps space-to-space link (SSL) coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, -zone of exclusion (ZOE) closure, relay for lunar communications either RF or optically, and relay for Martian communications either RF or optically. This paper summarizes work done in the 1990 time frame on the above stated applications. Since then, NASA has sponsored several studies (during phase B of the TDRS II development cycle) of the ZOE closure application of the FSG. The purpose of this paper is to report on the efforts previously considered for the FSG. A previous paper was presented at the 1991 Congress related to the second application above. This paper extends this effort to the four stated applications.

  14. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  15. Emergent lattices with geometrical frustration in doped extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Gros, Claudius

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous charge ordering occurring in correlated systems may be considered as a possible route to generate effective lattice structures with unconventional couplings. For this purpose we investigate the phase diagram of doped extended Hubbard models on two lattices: (i) the honeycomb lattice with on-site U and nearest-neighbor V Coulomb interactions at 3 /4 filling (n =3 /2 ) and (ii) the triangular lattice with on-site U , nearest-neighbor V , and next-nearest-neighbor V' Coulomb interactions at 3 /8 filling (n =3 /4 ). We consider various approaches including mean-field approximations, perturbation theory, and variational Monte Carlo. For the honeycomb case (i), charge order induces an effective triangular lattice at large values of U /t and V /t , where t is the nearest-neighbor hopping integral. The nearest-neighbor spin exchange interactions on this effective triangular lattice are antiferromagnetic in most of the phase diagram, while they become ferromagnetic when U is much larger than V . At U /t ˜(V/t ) 3 , ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions nearly cancel out, leading to a system with four-spin ring-exchange interactions. On the other hand, for the triangular case (ii) at large U and finite V', we find no charge order for small V , an effective kagome lattice for intermediate V , and one-dimensional charge order for large V . These results indicate that Coulomb interactions induce [case (i)] or enhance [case(ii)] emergent geometrical frustration of the spin degrees of freedom in the system, by forming charge order.

  16. Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

  17. Extending Double Optical Gating to the Midinfrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Timothy; Camper, Antoine; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade there has been great interest in creating broadband isolated attosecond pulses (IAPs). Primarily these IAPs have been generated using Ti:Sapphire 800nm short pulses, namely through spatiotemporal gating with the attosecond lighthouse technique, amplitude gating, polarization gating, and double optical gating (DOG). Here we present theoretical calculations and experimental investigations into extending DOG to using a 2 μm driving wavelength, the benefits of which include extended harmonic cutoff and longer input driving pulse durations. It is proposed that broadband IAPs with cutoffs extending up to 250 eV can be generated in Argon by using >30 fs pulses from the passively-CEP stabilized 2 μm idler out of an optical parametric amplifier combined with a collinear DOG experimental setup.

  18. Extended Kalman filtering of point process observation.

    PubMed

    Salimpour, Yousef; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Abolhassani, Mohammad D

    2010-01-01

    A temporal point process is a stochastic time series of binary events that occurs in continuous time. In computational neuroscience, the point process is used to model neuronal spiking activity; however, estimating the model parameters from spike train is a challenging problem. The state space point process filtering theory is a new technique for the estimation of the states and parameters. In order to use the stochastic filtering theory for the states of neuronal system with the Gaussian assumption, we apply the extended Kalman filter. In this regard, the extended Kalman filtering equations are derived for the point process observation. We illustrate the new filtering algorithm by estimating the effect of visual stimulus on the spiking activity of object selective neurons from the inferior temporal cortex of macaque monkey. Based on the goodness-offit assessment, the extended Kalman filter provides more accurate state estimate than the conventional methods.

  19. Remarkable connections between extended magnetohydrodynamics models

    SciTech Connect

    Lingam, M. Morrison, P. J. Miloshevich, G.

    2015-07-15

    Through the use of suitable variable transformations, the commonality of all extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models is established. Remarkable correspondences between the Poisson brackets of inertialess Hall MHD and inertial MHD (which has electron inertia, but not the Hall drift) and extended MHD (which has both effects) are established. The helicities (two in all) for each of these models are obtained through these correspondences. The commonality of all the extended MHD models is traced to the existence of two Lie-dragged 2-forms, which are closely associated with the canonical momenta of the two underlying species. The Lie-dragging of these 2-forms by suitable velocities also leads to the correct equations of motion. The Hall MHD Poisson bracket is analyzed in detail, the Jacobi identity is verified through a detailed proof, and this proof ensures the Jacobi identity for the Poisson brackets of all the models.

  20. The geometry of branes and extended superspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chryssomalakos, C.; de Azcárraga, J. A.; Izquierdo, J. M.; Pérez Bueno, J. C.

    We argue that a description of supersymmetric extended objects from a unified geometric point of view requires an enlargement of superspace. To this aim we study in a systematic way how superspace groups and algebras arise from Grassmann spinors when these are assumed to be the only primary entities. In the process, we recover generalized space-time superalgebras and extensions of supersymmetry found earlier. The enlargement of ordinary superspace with new parameters gives rise to extended superspace groups, on which manifestly supersymmetric actions may be constructed for various types of p-branes, including D-branes (given by Chevalley-Eilenberg cocycles) with their Born-Infeld fields. This results in a field/extended superspace democracy for superbranes: all brane fields appear as pull-backs from a suitable target superspace. Our approach also clarifies some facts concerning the origin of the central charges for the different p-branes.

  1. Extended inflation from higher dimensional theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.; Vadas, Sharon L.; Wang, Yun

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is considered that higher dimensional theories may, upon reduction to four dimensions, allow extended inflation to occur. Two separate models are analayzed. One is a very simple toy model consisting of higher dimensional gravity coupled to a scalar field whose potential allows for a first-order phase transition. The other is a more sophisticated model incorporating the effects of non-trivial field configurations (monopole, Casimir, and fermion bilinear condensate effects) that yield a non-trivial potential for the radius of the internal space. It was found that extended inflation does not occur in these models. It was also found that the bubble nucleation rate in these theories is time dependent unlike the case in the original version of extended inflation.

  2. Extended nebular emission in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.

    2015-02-01

    The morphological, spectroscopic and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium ( wim ) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer a precious opportunity for advancing our understanding in this respect. We use deep IFS data from CALIFA (califa.caha.es) to study the wim over the entire extent and optical spectral range of 32 nearby ETGs. We find that all ETGs in our sample show faint (Hα equivalent width EW(Hα)~0.5 ... 2 Å) extranuclear nebular emission extending out to >=2 Petrosian50 radii. Confirming and strengthening our conclusions in Papaderos et al. (2013, hereafter P13) we argue that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence with regard to the properties of their wim , and they can be roughly subdivided into two characteristic classes. The first one (type i) comprises ETGs with a nearly constant EW(Hα)~1-3 Å in their extranuclear component, in quantitative agreement with (even though, no proof for) the hypothesis of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component being the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) consists of virtually wim -evacuated ETGs with a large Lyman continuum (Ly c) photon escape fraction and a very low (<=0.5 Å) EW(Hα) in their nuclear zone. These two ETG classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios. Additionally, here we extend the classification by P13 by the class i+ which stands for a subset of type i ETGs with low-level star-forming activity in contiguous spiral-arm like features in their outermost periphery. These faint features, together with traces of localized star formation in several type i&i+ systems point to a non-negligible contribution from young massive stars to the global ionizing photon

  3. Aircrew Eye/Respiratory Protection (AERP): 16-Hour Extended Wear Evaluation of Chemical Protective Equipment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Respiratory Protection (AERP) and associated clothing and equipment. Two subjects each carried out simulated tanker/transport and fighter/attack scenarios. No...AD A277 288 N•.• AL-TP-1 993-0014 ý’vI~~I~ 11~ II~I AIRCREW EYE/ RESPIRATORY PROTECTION (AERP): 16-HOUR EXTENDED WEAR EVALUATION OF R CHEMICAL...S. FUNDING NUMBERS ’Aircrew Eye/ Respiratory Protection (AERP): 16-Hour Extended PE - 62202F Wear Evaluation of Chemical Protective Equipment PR

  4. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome.

  5. Weak Lie symmetry and extended Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Goenner, Hubert

    2013-04-15

    The concept of weak Lie motion (weak Lie symmetry) is introduced. Applications given exhibit a reduction of the usual symmetry, e.g., in the case of the rotation group. In this context, a particular generalization of Lie algebras is found ('extended Lie algebras') which turns out to be an involutive distribution or a simple example for a tangent Lie algebroid. Riemannian and Lorentz metrics can be introduced on such an algebroid through an extended Cartan-Killing form. Transformation groups from non-relativistic mechanics and quantum mechanics lead to such tangent Lie algebroids and to Lorentz geometries constructed on them (1-dimensional gravitational fields).

  6. NASA Orbiter Extended Nose Landing Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Steven R.; Jensen, Scott A.; Hansen, Christopher P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the design, development, test, and evaluation of a prototype Extended Nose Landing Gear (ENLG) for NASA's Space Shuttle orbiters. The ENLG is a proposed orbiter modification developed in-house at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) by a joint government/industry team. It increases the orbiter's nose landing gear (NLG) length, thereby changing the vehicle's angle of attack during rollout, which lowers the aerodynamic forces on the vehicle. This, in combination with a dynamic elevon change, will lower the loads on the orbiter's main landing gear (MLG). The extension is accomplished by adding a telescoping section to the current NLG strut that will be pneumatically extended during NLG deployment.

  7. Breathing mode in the extended Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Merabet, H. )

    1993-09-01

    We study an extended Skyrme model which includes fourth- and sixth-order terms. We explore some static properties such as the [Delta]-nucleon mass splitting and investigate the Skyrmion breathing mode in the framework of the linear response theory. We find that the monopole response function has a pronounced peak located at [similar to]400 MeV, which we identify as the Roper resonance [ital N](1440). As compared to the standard one, the extended Skyrme model provides a more accurate description of baryon properties.

  8. Life extending control for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.; Saus, J. R.; Ray, A.; Carpino, M.; Wu, M.-K.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of life extending control is defined. A brief discussion of current fatigue life prediction methods is given and the need for an alternative life prediction model based on a continuous functional relationship is established. Two approaches to life extending control are considered: (1) the implicit approach which uses cyclic fatigue life prediction as a basis for control design; and (2) the continuous life prediction approach which requires a continuous damage law. Progress on an initial formulation of a continuous (in time) fatigue model is presented. Finally, nonlinear programming is used to develop initial results for life extension for a simplified rocket engine (model).

  9. Extending the ADM formalism to Weyl geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, A. B.; Almeida, T. S.; Romero, C.

    2015-03-26

    In order to treat quantum cosmology in the framework of Weyl spacetimes we take the first step of extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism to Weyl geometry. We then obtain an expression of the curvature tensor in terms of spatial quantities by splitting spacetime in (3+l)-dimensional form. We next write the Lagrangian of the gravitation field based in Weyl-type gravity theory. We extend the general relativistic formalism in such a way that it can be applied to investigate the quantum cosmology of models whose spacetimes are endowed with a Weyl geometrical structure.

  10. The Extended Mind: Coupling Environment and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrobel, Susie

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes embodiment and cognitive extension as examples of strong anticipation as defined by Dubois. Clark and Chalmers formulated a thesis which states that parts of the environment, if coupled successfully, can become part of the extended mind. This coupling, be it deliberate or unintentional, shifts the observer-world boundary outwards when the observer encompasses parts of his environment. The resulting extended observer forms a new systemic whole, which consists of both the assimilated context and the recalibrated version of the original observer. Recalibration occurs when conditioning and adaptation lead to corresponding changes on the neural level, for instance, when an agent compensates for delays in a control loop. Plasticity is a prerequisite for any successful incorporation of external structures. However, uncoupled parts of the observer must remain inviolate in order to preserve the boundary. Neither the extended mind nor the core observer are absolute concepts. Depending on whether we focus on local-scale interactions or on large-scale behaviour, boundaries are formed at different interfacial cuts, which lead to either an endo- or an exo-perspective or endo- or exo-anticipation, respectively. For biological extended agents which undergo a transition from exo- to endo-states, a tell-tale sign of a successful exo-endo transition is invisibility. This invisibility occurs when the agent is no longer aware of the delay originally introduced into the control loop by the assimilated part of the environment. Explaining the world in terms of effective causality is not sufficient to account for extended minds. The latter require explanations in terms of final causation. For extended minds, this ordering principle comes in the shape of nested hierarchical layers. The interfaces of these layers may have merged for an endo-observer, whereas an exo-observer can make out the detailed structure, including artificially introduced delays. A sufficient

  11. Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel. 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Iterative Extended Huekel is modified by inclusion of explicit effective internuclear and electronic interactions. The one electron energies are shown to obey a variational principle because of the form of the effective electronic interactions. The modifications permit mimicking of aspects of valence bond theory with the additional feature that the energies associated with valence bond type structures are explicitly calculated. In turn, a hybrid molecular, orbital valence, bond scheme is introduced which incorporates variant total molecular electronic density distributions similar to the way that Iterative Extended Hueckel incorporates atoms.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IIA, IIB, and stage II primary peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that ...

  13. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  14. The VRI colours of H II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, Eduardo; Terlevich, Roberto

    1997-03-01

    We present a high spatial resolution CCD surface photometry study in the optical V, R and I broad-band filters of a sample of 15 H II galaxies. Narrow-band imaging allows the separation of the emission-line region from the extended parts of the galaxy. The latter are assumed to represent the underlying galaxy in H II galaxies; thus the colours of the underlying galaxy are measured. The colours of the underlying stellar continuum within the starburst are also derived by subtracting the contribution of the emission lines falling in the broad-band filters. The distribution of colours of the underlying galaxy in H II galaxies is similar to the colours of other late-type low surface brightness galaxies, which suggests a close kinship of these with the quiescent phases of H II galaxies. However, comparison wtih recent evolutionary population synthesis models shows that the observational errors and the uncertainties in the models are still too large to put strict constraints on their past star formation history. Our analysis of the morphology and structural properties, from contour maps and luminosity profiles, of this sample of 15 H II galaxies agrees with what has been found by Telles and Telles, Melnick & Terlevich, namely that H II galaxies comprise two broad classes segregated by their luminosity; Type I H II galaxies are luminous and have disturbed and irregular outer shapes, while Type II H II galaxies are less luminous and have regular shapes. The outer parts of their profiles are well represented by an exponential, as in other types of known dwarf galaxy.

  15. Characteristics of He II Proximity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Syphers, David; Meiksin, Avery; Kriss, Gerard A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.; Anderson, Scott F.

    2015-06-01

    The proximity profile in the spectra of z≈ 3 quasars, where fluxes extend blueward of the He ii Lyα wavelength 304 (1+z) Å, is one of the most important spectral features in the study of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Based on the Hubble Space Telescope spectra of 24 He ii quasars, we find that the majority of them display a proximity profile, corresponding to an ionization radius as large as 20 Mpc in the source's rest frame. In comparison with those in the H i spectra of the quasars at z ≈ 6, the He ii proximity effect is more prominent and is observed over a considerably longer period of reionization. The He ii proximity zone sizes decrease at higher redshifts, particularly at z\\gt 3.3. This trend is similar to that for H i, signaling an onset of He ii reionization at z≳ 4. For quasar SDSS1253+6817 (z = 3.48), the He ii absorption trough displays a gradual decline and serves as a good case for modeling the He ii reionization. To model such a broad profile requires a quasar radiation field whose energy distribution between 4 and 1 Rydberg is considerably harder than normally assumed. The UV continuum of this quasar is indeed exceptionally steep, and the He ii ionization level in the quasar vicinity is higher than the average level in the IGM. These results are evidence that a very hard EUV continuum from this quasar produces a large ionized zone around it. Distinct exceptions are the two brightest He ii quasars at z ≈ 2.8, for which no significant proximity profile is present, probably implying that they are very young.

  16. Electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy supports the suggested coordination of two histidine ligands to the Rieske Fe-S centers of the cytochrome b sub 6 f complex of spinach and the cytochrome bc sub 1 complexes of Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26, and bovine heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, R.D.; Sauer, K.; Klein, M.P. ); Knaff, D.B.; Kriauciunas, A. ); Yu, Changan; Yu, Linda ); Malkin, R. )

    1991-02-19

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments performed on the Rieske Fe-S clusters of the cytochrome b{sub 6}f complex of spinach chloroplasts and of the cytochrome bc{sub 1} complexes of Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26, and bovine heart mitochondria show modulation components resulting from two distinct classes of {sup 14}N ligands. At the g = 1.92 region of the Rieske EPR spectrum of the cytochrome b{sub 6}f complex, the measured hyperfine couplings for the two classes of coupled nitrogens are A{sub 1} = 4.6 MHz and A{sub 2} = 3.8 MHz. Similar couplings are observed for the Rieske centers in the three cytochrome bc{sub 1} complexes. These ESEEM results indicate a nitrogen coordination environment for these Rieske Fe-S centers that is similar to that of the Fe-S cluster of a bacterial dioxygenase enzyme with two coordinated histidine ligands. The Rieske Fe-S cluster lacks modulation components from a weakly coupled peptide nitrogen observed in water-soluble spinach ferredoxin. Treatment with the quinone analogue inhibitor DBMIB causes a shift in the Rieske EPR spectrum to g = 1.95 with no alteration in the magnetic couplings to the two nitrogen atoms. However, the ESEEM pattern of the DBMIB-altered Rieske EPR signal shows evidence of an additional weakly coupled nitrogen similar to that observed in the spinach ferrodoxin ESEEM patterns.

  17. On energy conservation in extended magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    A systematic study of energy conservation for extended magnetohydrodynamic models that include Hall terms and electron inertia is performed. It is observed that commonly used models do not conserve energy in the ideal limit, i.e., when viscosity and resistivity are neglected. In particular, a term in the momentum equation that is often neglected is seen to be needed for conservation of energy.

  18. Interpolation of the Extended Boolean Retrieval Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Daniel Z.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interpolation theorem for an extended Boolean information retrieval model. Results show that whenever two or more documents are similarly ranked at any two points for a query containing exactly two terms, then they are similarly ranked at all points in between; and that results can fail for queries with more than two terms. (Author/LRW)

  19. Time-Extended Multiple Group Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficek, Daniel E.

    Time-extended groups provide the following: (1) they ease the need to get things started immediately, (2) they provide the opportunity for interaction to be carried to its natural end-point, (3) they allow a greater range of techniques to be experienced by members, (4) they increase the chances for therapeutic contact, (5) they allow participants…

  20. Extended Learning: What Are the States Doing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia G.

    2001-01-01

    The standards movement and family work schedules are major factors underpinning the expansion of extended learning opportunities. A recent report by the Council of Chief State School Officials details the development of afterschool and other programs in California, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Texas. (MLH)

  1. Extending the Agricultural Extension Model. Preliminary Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.; And Others

    The purposes of this report are: to describe the main elements of the U.S. agricultural extension model and its effects on the agricultural revolution; to analyze attempts to extend this model to non-agricultural technology and/or to less developed countries; and to draw general conclusions about the diffusion of technological innovations, with…

  2. Extended-release trazodone (Oleptro) for depression.

    PubMed

    2010-11-15

    The FDA has approved the marketing of an extended-release formulation of trazodone (Oleptro--Angelini Labopharm) for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. Immediate-release trazodone has been available for treatment of depression for many years, but is used mostly in low doses for its sedating effects.

  3. Integrable extended van der Waals model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Francesco; Landolfi, Giulio; Moro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the recent developments in the study of the thermodynamics of van der Waals fluids via the theory of nonlinear conservation laws and the description of phase transitions in terms of classical (dissipative) shock waves, we propose a novel approach to the construction of multi-parameter generalisations of the van der Waals model. The theory of integrable nonlinear conservation laws still represents the inspiring framework. Starting from a macroscopic approach, a four parameter family of integrable extended van der Waals models is indeed constructed in such a way that the equation of state is a solution to an integrable nonlinear conservation law linearisable by a Cole-Hopf transformation. This family is further specified by the request that, in regime of high temperature, far from the critical region, the extended model reproduces asymptotically the standard van der Waals equation of state. We provide a detailed comparison of our extended model with two notable empirical models such as Peng-Robinson and Soave's modification of the Redlich-Kwong equations of state. We show that our extended van der Waals equation of state is compatible with both empirical models for a suitable choice of the free parameters and can be viewed as a master interpolating equation. The present approach also suggests that further generalisations can be obtained by including the class of dispersive and viscous-dispersive nonlinear conservation laws and could lead to a new type of thermodynamic phase transitions associated to nonclassical and dispersive shock waves.

  4. 14 CFR 1274.207 - Extended agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... as new cooperative agreements. Continued performance within a period specified under a multiple year....207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Pre-Award Requirements § 1274.207 Extended agreements. (a) Multiple year...

  5. 14 CFR 1274.207 - Extended agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as new cooperative agreements. Continued performance within a period specified under a multiple year....207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Pre-Award Requirements § 1274.207 Extended agreements. (a) Multiple year...

  6. Q-Method Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; Ainscough, Thomas; Christian, John; Spanos, Pol D.

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm is proposed that smoothly integrates non-linear estimation of the attitude quaternion using Davenport s q-method and estimation of non-attitude states through an extended Kalman filter. The new method is compared to a similar existing algorithm showing its similarities and differences. The validity of the proposed approach is confirmed through numerical simulations.

  7. Extending Word Processing for Foreign Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Alan K.

    1984-01-01

    Presents short text in French and discusses possible methods of extending word processing to allow text entry, text editing, and hard copy output of foreign characters. Highlights include discussions of using ASCII for English and problems with French, one-character and two-character approaches, and examples in terms of specific microcomputer…

  8. Extending the Use of Saramaccan in Suriname.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glock, Naomi

    1983-01-01

    Advocates the use of the vernacular language, not only as an important vehicle for learning, but also as a means of enhancing the native speakers' feeling of self-worth. Presents several ways of extending the use of the vernacular, as well as the problems that can arise. (EKN)

  9. Extending Program Resources: Meeting Necessity with Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuston, Judith; Hargens, Mark

    This document describes collaborative strategies used by one school guidance department that allow counselors to complete their designated work without extending their school day. One strategy involves pairing mentors with first-year counselors to help answer their questions. Another uses retired counselors as "substitutes" when regular…

  10. Collaborating for Success: Merritt Elementary Extended School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Darren W.; Shannon, Nancy R.; Efimba, Maloke O.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Emma Francis Grayson Merritt School, Washington (District of Columbia) which has been a Comer school since 1990. The Merritt Elementary Extended School has created a foundation for educational progress and student achievement based on adult collaboration and a nurturing and developmentally sound approach to student learning. (SLD)

  11. Adult Day Care--Extended Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This pamphlet describes a multi-purpose day-care center for the elderly in Abilene, Texas which is intended to fill the "extended family" role of offering companionship, medical attention, and other aspects of concern to older persons in the community. The goals of the program are as follows: (1) to keep individuals out of institutions…

  12. Some Remarks on the Extended Galilean Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Daniel M.

    1979-01-01

    The extended Galilean transformation carries an inertial frame into a rigid frame with uniform spatial, but arbitrary translational acceleration. Besides being useful in discussing the equivalence principle, this transformation provides a physical interpretation for the theorem in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, that we cannot coherently…

  13. Robotic extended pyelolithotomy for complete staghorn calculus.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Rene; Astigueta, Juan Carlos; Giedelman, Camilo; de Andrade, Robert; Carmona, Oswaldo; Ramirez, Daniel; Clavijo, Rafael

    2010-08-01

    Staghorn stones represent a therapeutic challenge to urologists. We present our experience with laparoscopic extended pyelolithotomy for treatment of staghorn and complex renal calculi in highly selected cases. This approach provides the principles of open surgery with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. We describe our experience with robot-assisted extended pyelolithotomy for complex coralliform calculi. Since January 2007, robotic extended pyelolithotomy has been performed by transperitoneal approach in two patients with complete coralliform lithiasis (calculi average size 8 cm). One patient had history of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Demographic and operative data were collected. All procedures were technically successful without need for open conversion. Mean estimated blood loss was 175 ml (range 50-300 ml), and mean operative time was 150 min (range 120-150 min). A perinephric drain was employed in one patient with duration of 5 days. Postoperative imaging confirmed complete stone clearance. Robotic extended pyelolithotomy is a feasible and reproducible procedure for removal of complete and partial staghorn calculi in selected patients with complex nephrolithiasis. This approach might limit the role of open surgery for these calculi, but further publications with more cases are necessary to further define its utility.

  14. Mass flux in extended and classical hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Grmela, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    In classical hydrodynamics, the mass flux is universally chosen to be the momentum field. In extended hydrodynamics, the mass flux acquires different terms. The extended hydrodynamics introduced and investigated in this paper uses a one-particle distribution function as the extra state variable chosen to characterize the microstructure. We prove that the extended hydrodynamics is fully autonomous in the sense that it is compatible with thermodynamics (i.e., the entropy does not decrease during the time evolution) and with mechanics (i.e., the part of the time evolution that leaves the entropy unchanged is Hamiltonian). Subsequently, we investigate its possible reductions. In some situations the emerging reduced dynamical theory is the classical hydrodynamics that is fully autonomous (i.e., all the structure that makes the extended theory fully autonomous is kept in the reduced theory). In other situations (for example, when the fluids under investigation have large density gradients) the reduced theories are not fully autonomous. In such a case the reduced theories constitute a family of mutually related dynamical theories (each of them involving a different amount of detail) that we consider to be a mathematical formulation of multiscale (or multilevel) hydrodynamics. It is in the reduced theories belonging to the multiscale hydrodynamics where the terms that emerge in the mass flux take the form of self-diffusion.

  15. The inflation sector of extended inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL )

    1990-11-01

    In extended inflation the inflationary era is brought to a close by the process of percolation of true vacuum bubbles produced in a first-order phase transition. In this paper I discuss several effects that might obtain if the Universe undergoes an inflationary first-order phase transition. 17 refs.

  16. The Extended Family and Children's Educational Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Mads Meier

    2012-01-01

    Research on family background and educational success focuses almost exclusively on two generations: parents and children. This study argues that the extended family contributes significantly to the total effect of family background on educational success. Analyses using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study show that, net of family factors shared by…

  17. Extended Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segawa, Eisuke; Emery, Sherry; Curry, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized linear latent and mixed modeling (GLLAMM framework) includes many models such as hierarchical and structural equation models. However, GLLAMM cannot currently accommodate some models because it does not allow some parameters to be random. GLLAMM is extended to overcome the limitation by adding a submodel that specifies a…

  18. Elaborated Odor Test for Extended Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Henry, Emily J.; Mast, Dion J.; Harper, Susana A.; Beeson, Harold D.; Tapia, Alma S.

    2016-01-01

    Concerns were raised when incidental exposure to a proprietary bonding material revealed the material had an irritating odor. The NASA-STD-6001B document describes a supplemental test method option for programs to evaluate materials with odor concerns (Test 6, Odor Assessment). In addition to the supplemental standard odor assessment with less than 10 seconds of exposure, the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Materials Flight Acceptance Testing section was requested to perform an odor test with an extended duration to evaluate effects of an extended exposure and to more closely simulate realistic exposure scenarios. With approval from the NASA Johnson Space Center Industrial Hygienist, WSTF developed a 15-minute odor test method. WSTF performed this extended-duration odor test to evaluate the odor and physical effects of the bonding material configured between two aluminum plates, after the safety of the gas was verified via toxicity analysis per NASA-STD-6001B Test 7, Determination of Offgassed Products. During extended-duration testing, odor panel members were arranged near the test material in a small room with the air handlers and doors closed to minimize dilution. The odor panel members wafted gas toward themselves and recorded their individual assessments of odor and physical effects at various intervals during the 15-minute exposure and posttest. A posttest interview was conducted to obtain further information. Testing was effective in providing data for comparison and selection of an optimal offgassing and odor containment configuration. The developed test method for extended exposure is proposed as a useful tool for further evaluating materials with identified odors of concern if continued use of the material is anticipated.

  19. Extended Superspheres for Shape Approximation of Near Polyhedral Nanoparticles and a Measure of the Degree of Polyhedrality

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline nanoparticles or nanoprecipitates with a cubic structure often have near polyhedral shapes composed of low-index planes with {100}, {111} and {110}. To consider such near polyhedral shapes, algebraic formulas of extended superspheres that can express intermediate shapes between spheres and various polyhedra have been presented. Four extended superspheres, (i) {100} regular-hexahedral; (ii) {111} regular-octahedral (iii) {110} rhombic-dodecahedral and (iv) {100}-{111}-{110} rhombicuboctahedral superspheres are treated in this study. A measure ∏ to indicate the degree of polyhedrality is presented to discuss shape transitions of the extended superspheres. As an application of ∏ superspherical coherent precipitate is shown. PMID:28344284

  20. Extending the Season for Concrete Construction and Repair. Phase II - Defining Engineering Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    5 Figure 4. Typical cooling curves taken from...26 Figure 13. Time–temperature cooling curve used to determine the...27 Figure 14. Length–change curves for non–air–entrained control mortar beams subjected to

  1. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-12-01

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  2. VELOCITY-RESOLVED [C ii] EMISSION AND [C ii]/FIR MAPPING ALONG ORION WITH HERSCHEL *,**

    PubMed Central

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Teyssier, D.; Etxaluze, M.; Goldsmith, P.F.; Ossenkopf, V.; Gerin, M.; Bergin, E.A.; Black, J.H.; Cernicharo, J.; Cuadrado, S.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Fuente, A.; Hacar, A.; Lis, D.C.; Marcelino, N.; Melnick, G.J.; Müller, H.S.P.; Persson, C.; Pety, J.; Röllig, M.; Schilke, P.; Simon, R.; Snell, R.L.; Stutzki, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first ~7.5′×11.5′ velocity-resolved (~0.2 km s−1) map of the [C ii] 158 μm line toward the Orion molecular cloud 1 (OMC 1) taken with the Herschel/HIFI instrument. In combination with far-infrared (FIR) photometric images and velocity-resolved maps of the H41α hydrogen recombination and CO J=2-1 lines, this data set provides an unprecedented view of the intricate small-scale kinematics of the ionized/PDR/molecular gas interfaces and of the radiative feedback from massive stars. The main contribution to the [C ii] luminosity (~85 %) is from the extended, FUV-illuminated face of the cloud (G0>500, nH>5×103 cm−3) and from dense PDRs (G≳104, nH≳105 cm−3) at the interface between OMC 1 and the H ii region surrounding the Trapezium cluster. Around ~15 % of the [C ii] emission arises from a different gas component without CO counterpart. The [C ii] excitation, PDR gas turbulence, line opacity (from [13C ii]) and role of the geometry of the illuminating stars with respect to the cloud are investigated. We construct maps of the L[C ii]/LFIR and LFIR/MGas ratios and show that L[C ii]/LFIR decreases from the extended cloud component (~10−2–10−3) to the more opaque star-forming cores (~10−3–10−4). The lowest values are reminiscent of the “[C ii] deficit” seen in local ultra-luminous IR galaxies hosting vigorous star formation. Spatial correlation analysis shows that the decreasing L[C ii]/LFIR ratio correlates better with the column density of dust through the molecular cloud than with LFIR/MGas. We conclude that the [C ii] emitting column relative to the total dust column along each line of sight is responsible for the observed L[C ii]/LFIR variations through the cloud. PMID:26568638

  3. VELOCITY-RESOLVED [C ii] EMISSION AND [C ii]/FIR MAPPING ALONG ORION WITH HERSCHEL(.)

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Teyssier, D; Etxaluze, M; Goldsmith, P F; Ossenkopf, V; Gerin, M; Bergin, E A; Black, J H; Cernicharo, J; Cuadrado, S; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Fuente, A; Hacar, A; Lis, D C; Marcelino, N; Melnick, G J; Müller, H S P; Persson, C; Pety, J; Röllig, M; Schilke, P; Simon, R; Snell, R L; Stutzki, J

    2015-10-10

    We present the first ~7.5'×11.5' velocity-resolved (~0.2 km s(-1)) map of the [C ii] 158 μm line toward the Orion molecular cloud 1 (OMC 1) taken with the Herschel/HIFI instrument. In combination with far-infrared (FIR) photometric images and velocity-resolved maps of the H41α hydrogen recombination and CO J=2-1 lines, this data set provides an unprecedented view of the intricate small-scale kinematics of the ionized/PDR/molecular gas interfaces and of the radiative feedback from massive stars. The main contribution to the [C ii] luminosity (~85 %) is from the extended, FUV-illuminated face of the cloud (G0>500, nH>5×10(3) cm(-3)) and from dense PDRs (G≳10(4), nH≳10(5) cm(-3)) at the interface between OMC 1 and the H ii region surrounding the Trapezium cluster. Around ~15 % of the [C ii] emission arises from a different gas component without CO counterpart. The [C ii] excitation, PDR gas turbulence, line opacity (from [(13)C ii]) and role of the geometry of the illuminating stars with respect to the cloud are investigated. We construct maps of the L[C ii]/LFIR and LFIR/MGas ratios and show that L[C ii]/LFIR decreases from the extended cloud component (~10(-2)-10(-3)) to the more opaque star-forming cores (~10(-3)-10(-4)). The lowest values are reminiscent of the "[C ii] deficit" seen in local ultra-luminous IR galaxies hosting vigorous star formation. Spatial correlation analysis shows that the decreasing L[C ii]/LFIR ratio correlates better with the column density of dust through the molecular cloud than with LFIR/MGas. We conclude that the [C ii] emitting column relative to the total dust column along each line of sight is responsible for the observed L[C ii]/LFIR variations through the cloud.

  4. Potential future applications for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1992-08-01

    The effect of the consideration of potential Future Service Growth (FSG) payload applications imposed on the TDRS II system is examined. The FSG applications considered include an optical 650 Mbps Space-to-Space Link coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, relay for lunar communications (RF or optical), and relay for Martian communications (RF or optical). The traffic requirements and link distances require very different designs for the different applications, providing little room for synergy across the various applications.

  5. Optimizing Extender Code for NCSX Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    M. Richman, S. Ethier, and N. Pomphrey

    2008-01-22

    Extender is a parallel C++ code for calculating the magnetic field in the vacuum region of a stellarator. The code was optimized for speed and augmented with tools to maintain a specialized NetCDF database. Two parallel algorithms were examined. An even-block work-distribution scheme was comparable in performance to a master-slave scheme. Large speedup factors were achieved by representing the plasma surface with a spline rather than Fourier series. The accuracy of this representation and the resulting calculations relied on the density of the spline mesh. The Fortran 90 module db access was written to make it easy to store Extender output in a manageable database. New or updated data can be added to existing databases. A generalized PBS job script handles the generation of a database from scratch

  6. Is XTE J1701-407 Extended?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, David

    2007-09-01

    We recently observed the neutron star X-ray transient XTE J1701-407 with Chandra, using 1 ks of ACIS-S data for localization. However, the Chandra data do not show a point source. Instead the source appears extended over ~6 arcsec. We have investigated the data, consulting with experts both at MIT and SAO, and cannot ascribe the data to purely instrumental effects (aspect errors or pileup). The extended X-ray emission could come from an outflow or a dust scattering halo - both very interesting and rare phenomena. Jets allow detailed calorimetry of the outbursts, while scattering halos lead to geometric distances. We request a 5 ks ACIS-S subarray observation to definitively assess the morphology, trying to discriminate between these scenarios before the target fades into quiescence.

  7. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  8. Thermal waves in an extended hydrodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Áurea R.; Luzzi, Roberto; Jou, David; Casas-Vazquez, José

    1994-12-01

    A study of the question of heat propagation in an extended quantum hydrodynamic approach is presented. We consider a fluid of Fermi particles in interaction with a thermal bath of bosons. The equation of evolution for the flux of energy, which is incorporated as a basic thermodynamic variable thus extending the space of variables of linear thermodynamics, is derived via the nonequilibrium statistical operator method. We obtain an equation of propagation of thermal waves with damping. This hyperbolic equation, which replaces Fourier's heat law removing associated inconsistencies, depends on several thermodynamic forces that include the space variation of the flux itself. The equation allows for the propagation of damped thermal excitations that are of the type of a second sound. The dispersion relation is derived with the transport coefficients given at a microscopic (mechano-statistical)level. The limiting conditions that allow to go from the damped-wave regime of propagation to the diffusive regime are discussed.

  9. Extending resolution limits of EUV resist materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysak, Marie; Leeson, Michael; Han, Eungnak; Blackwell, James; Harlson, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology continues to progress and remains a viable candidate for next generation lithography1, which drives the need for EUV resists capable of high resolution with high sensitivity and low LWR. While chemically amplified resists (CARs) have demonstrated the ability to pattern 12nm half-pitch features2, pattern collapse continues to limit their ultimate resolution. We have taken multiple approaches to extend resist capabilities past these limits. Recent results in pattern collapse mitigation using a resist encapsulation and etch back strategy will be discussed. We continue to investigate EUV patterning of semi-inorganic resists to simultaneously increase EUV photon absorption and extend mechanical strength beyond CAR capabilities. The limitations of metal oxide-based nanoparticle photoresists have been investigated, and have provided key insights to further understanding the mechanism of this class of materials.

  10. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Pierce, Aaron; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-08-01

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ratios to these extended Higgs sector states. In fact, top partner decays may provide the most promising discovery mode for such scalars, especially given the large backgrounds to direct and associated production. In this paper, we present a search strategy for top partner decays to a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark, focusing on the case where the charged Higgs dominantly decays to third-generation quarks to yield a multi- b final state. We also discuss ways to extend this search to exotic neutral scalars decaying to bottom quark pairs.

  11. Extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yimin; Meng, Huadong; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive waveform design for extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks. A closed-loop active target recognition radar system is extended to the case of a centralized cognitive radar network, in which a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) framework is employed. Using Doppler velocities measured by multiple radars, the target aspect angle for each radar is calculated. The joint probability of each target hypothesis is then updated using observations from different radar line of sights (LOS). Based on these probabilities, a minimum correlation algorithm is proposed to adaptively design the transmit waveform for each radar in an amplitude fluctuation situation. Simulation results demonstrate performance improvements due to the cognitive radar network and adaptive waveform design. Our minimum correlation algorithm outperforms the eigen-waveform solution and other non-cognitive waveform design approaches.

  12. An extended retinotopic map of mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Ng, Lydia; Williams, Derric; Valley, Matthew; Li, Yang; Garrett, Marina; Waters, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Visual perception and behavior are mediated by cortical areas that have been distinguished using architectonic and retinotopic criteria. We employed fluorescence imaging and GCaMP6 reporter mice to generate retinotopic maps, revealing additional regions of retinotopic organization that extend into barrel and retrosplenial cortices. Aligning retinotopic maps to architectonic borders, we found a mismatch in border location, indicating that architectonic borders are not aligned with the retinotopic transition at the vertical meridian. We also assessed the representation of visual space within each region, finding that four visual areas bordering V1 (LM, P, PM and RL) display complementary representations, with overlap primarily at the central hemifield. Our results extend our understanding of the organization of mouse cortex to include up to 16 distinct retinotopically organized regions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18372.001 PMID:28059700

  13. Extended ion pumped vacuum friction test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Boundary layer friction data under ion pumped vacuum was taken for sixteen material couples. The test series was an extension of a previous study of the effects of modified ion pumped environments. Sliding distances imposed in the present effort greatly exceeded any studied in the previous contiguous, flight or ground tests. Wear out of specific couples, in particular, thin film lubricants was noted. The behavior of the test hardware including wear out of the mechanisms was noted. As a result, the impact of test interruption was observed for several test couples. Recovery of the friction upon re-establishing sliding in vacuum was generally rapid. The results of the extended sliding study reinforce the previous conclusion that sliding distance (mechanical history) is the primary factor in establishing the force limiting boundary layer friction. General friction value under the extended sliding confirm those observed in previous orbital and the related ground test studies.

  14. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  15. Extending Installation Sustainability Beyond the Fenceline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations and Environment) DoD Executive Agent Extending Installation Sustainability Beyond...Technology Transition – Supporting DoD Readiness, Sustainability , and the Warfighter Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUN 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010

  16. Extended Temperature Solar Cell Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Rafaelle, Ryne

    2004-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require solar cells to operate both in regimes closer to the sun, and farther from the sun, where the operating temperatures will be higher and lower than standard operational conditions. NASA Glenn is engaged in testing solar cells under extended temperature ranges, developing theoretical models of cell operation as a function of temperature, and in developing technology for improving the performance of solar cells for both high and low temperature operation.

  17. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  18. Extended use of photovoltaic solar panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzoni, Guido E.; Rose, M. Frank

    1996-02-01

    The use of photovoltaic solar panels (and related generation of electric power) can be extended to a 24 hours per day under any environmental condition by equipping them with an artificial source of light, with emitting wavelengths matched to the photovoltaic solar panels, to be turned on in the absence of sunlight. This source of light can be obtained by heating a mantle to an incandescent temperature via the efficient, low polluting combustion of Natural Gas, Butane, Propane, or other gaseous Hydrocarbon fuel.

  19. Formatting scripts with computers and Extended BASIC.

    PubMed

    Menning, C B

    1984-02-01

    A computer program, written in the language of Extended BASIC, is presented which enables scripts, for educational media, to be quickly written in a nearly unformatted style. From the resulting script file, stored on magnetic tape or disk, the computer program formats the script into either a storyboard , a presentation, or a narrator 's script. Script headings and page and paragraph numbers are automatic features in the word processing. Suggestions are given for making personal modifications to the computer program.

  20. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  1. Effects of Extended Hypoxia on Night Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    and Krill (5) have reported a study of fundamental sig- nificance on the effects of stimulus paraneter; and retinal placement of the stimulus on night...by Ernest and Krill (5), that the early segment of the dark adaptation function was unaffected by hypoxia. This disagreement probably can be explained...in recovery capability, even after extended hypoxia. The clear implication of this relationship for practical operetions is that supplemental oxygen

  2. THE EXTENDED OPTICAL DISK OF M101

    SciTech Connect

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Spengler, Chelsea E.; Rudick, Craig S.; Feldmeier, John J. E-mail: paul.harding@case.edu E-mail: craig.rudick@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-01-10

    We have used deep, wide-field optical imaging to study the faint outskirts of the luminous spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457) as well as its surrounding environment. Over 6 deg{sup 2}, our imaging has a limiting surface brightness of {mu} {sub B} {approx} 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}, and has revealed the stellar structure of M101's disk out to nearly 25' (50 kpc), 3 times our measured R {sub 25} isophotal size of the optical disk. At these radii, the well-known asymmetry of the inner disk slews 180 Degree-Sign , resulting in an asymmetric plume of light at large radius which follows the very extended H I disk to the northeast of M101. This plume has very blue colors (B - V {approx} 0.2), suggesting that it is the somewhat more evolved (few hundred Myr to {approx}1 Gyr) counterpart of the young far-ultraviolet emitting population traced by Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging. We also detect another, redder spur of extended light to the east of the disk, and both structures are reminiscent of features produced during fly-by galaxy interactions. However, we see no evidence of very extended tidal tails around M101 or any of its companions which might be expected from a recent encounter with a massive companion. We consider the properties of M101's outer disk in light of possible past interactions with the nearby companion galaxies NGC 5477 and NGC 5474. The detection of optical starlight at such large radii gives us the ability to study star formation histories and stellar populations in outer disks over longer timescales than those traced by the UV or H{alpha} emitting populations. Our data suggest an ongoing buildup of M101's outer disk due to encounters in the group environment triggering extended star formation and tidal heating of existing disk populations.

  3. Astrophysical constraints on extended gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, Gaetano; Stabile, Antonio; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Stabile, Arturo E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: arturo.stabile@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the propagation of gravitational waves in the context of fourth order gravity nonminimally coupled to a massive scalar field. Using the damping of the orbital period of coalescing stellar binary systems, we impose constraints on the free parameters of extended gravity models. In particular, we find that the variation of the orbital period is a function of three mass scales which depend on the free parameters of the model under consideration; we can constrain these mass scales from current observational data.

  4. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Jones, D. L.; Lanyi, G. E.; Lowe, S. T.; Naudet, C. J.; Resch, G. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Zhang, L. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRF forms the basis for all astrometry including use as the inertial coordinate system for navigating deep space missions. This frame was defined using S/X-band observations over the past 20+ years. In January 2002, the VLBA approved our proposal for observing time to extend the ICRF to K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz). The first step will be observations at K- and Q-bands on a subset of ICRF sources. Eventually, K- and Q-band multi-epoch observations will be used to estimate positions, flux density and source structure for a large fraction of the current S/X-band ICRF source list. This work will benefit the radio astronomy community by extending the VLBA calibrator list at these bands. In the longer term, we would also like to extend the ICRF to Ka-band (32 GHz). A celestial reference frame will be needed at this frequency to support deep space navigation. A navigation demonstration is being considered for NASA's Mars 2005 mission. The initial K- and Q-band work will serve to identify candidate sources at Ka-band for use with that mission.

  5. Extended pie menus for immersive virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Sascha; Pick, Sebastian; Leithold, Franziska; Hentschel, Bernd; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2013-04-01

    Pie menus are a well-known technique for interacting with 2D environments and so far a large body of research documents their usage and optimizations. Yet, comparatively little research has been done on the usability of pie menus in immersive virtual environments (IVEs). In this paper we reduce this gap by presenting an implementation and evaluation of an extended hierarchical pie menu system for IVEs that can be operated with a six-degrees-of-freedom input device. Following an iterative development process, we first developed and evaluated a basic hierarchical pie menu system. To better understand how pie menus should be operated in IVEs, we tested this system in a pilot user study with 24 participants and focus on item selection. Regarding the results of the study, the system was tweaked and elements like check boxes, sliders, and color map editors were added to provide extended functionality. An expert review with five experts was performed with the extended pie menus being integrated into an existing VR application to identify potential design issues. Overall results indicated high performance and efficient design.

  6. An extended active control for chaos synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Liu, Ya-Li; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2009-04-01

    By introducing a control strength matrix, the active control theory in chaotic synchronization is developed. With this extended method, chaos complete synchronization can be achieved more easily, i.e., a much smaller control signal is enough to reach synchronization in most cases. Numerical simulations on Rossler, Liu's four-scroll, and Chen system confirmed this and show that the synchronization result depends on the control strength significantly. Especially, in the case of Liu and Chen systems, the response systems' largest Lyapunov exponents' variation with the control strength is not monotone and there exist minima. It is novel for Chen system that the synchronization speed with a special small strength is higher than that of the usual active control which, as a special case of the extended method, has a much larger control strength. All these results indicate that the control strength is an important factor in the actual synchronization. So, with this extended active control, one can make a better and more practical synchronization scheme by adjusting the control strength matrix.

  7. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  8. The Properties and Prevalence of Galactic Outflows at z ~ 1 in the Extended Groth Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornei, Katherine A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Martin, Crystal L.; Coil, Alison L.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Schiminovich, David; Bundy, Kevin; Noeske, Kai G.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate galactic-scale outflowing winds in 72 star-forming galaxies at z ~ 1 in the Extended Groth Strip. Galaxies were selected from the DEEP2 survey and follow-up LRIS spectroscopy was obtained covering Si II, C IV, Fe II, Mg II, and Mg I lines in the rest-frame ultraviolet. Using Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer imaging available for the Extended Groth Strip, we examine galaxies on a per-object basis in order to better understand both the prevalence of galactic outflows at z ~ 1 and the star-forming and structural properties of objects experiencing outflows. Gas velocities, measured from the centroids of Fe II interstellar absorption lines, are found to span the interval [-217, +155] km s-1. We find that ~40% (10%) of the sample exhibits blueshifted Fe II lines at the 1σ (3σ) level. We also measure maximal outflow velocities using the profiles of the Fe II and Mg II lines; we find that Mg II frequently traces higher velocity gas than Fe II. Using quantitative morphological parameters derived from the HST imaging, we find that mergers are not a prerequisite for driving outflows. More face-on galaxies also show stronger winds than highly inclined systems, consistent with the canonical picture of winds emanating perpendicular to galactic disks. In light of clumpy galaxy morphologies, we develop a new physically motivated technique for estimating areas corresponding to star formation. We use these area measurements in tandem with GALEX-derived star formation rates (SFRs) to calculate SFR surface densities. At least 70% of the sample exceeds an SFR surface density of 0.1 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, the threshold necessary for driving an outflow in local starbursts. At the same time, the outflow detection fraction of only 40% in Fe II absorption provides further evidence for an outflow geometry that is not spherically symmetric. We see a ~3σ trend between outflow velocity and SFR surface density, but no significant trend

  9. High-Frequency (1)H NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb(II) Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-10-17

    The role of relativistic effects on (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides is investigated by using fully relativistic DFT calculations. The stability of possible Pb(II) hydride isomers is studied together with their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, which are predicted in the high-frequency region, up to 90 ppm. These (1)H signals are dictated by sizable relativistic contributions due to spin-orbit coupling at the heavy atom and can be as large as 80 ppm for a hydrogen atom bound to Pb(II). Such high-frequency (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Pb(II) hydride resonances cannot be detected in the (1)H NMR spectra with standard experimental setup. Extended (1)H NMR spectral ranges are thus suggested for studies of Pb(II) compounds. Modulation of spin-orbit relativistic contribution to (1)H NMR chemical shift is found to be important also in the experimentally known Sn(II) hydrides. Because the (1)H NMR chemical shifts were found to be rather sensitive to the changes in the coordination sphere of the central metal in both Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides, their application for structural investigation is suggested.

  10. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  11. Implantation induced extended defects and transient enhanced diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Liu, J.; Listebarger, J.; Krishnamoorthy, W.; Zhang, L.; Jones, K.S.

    1995-08-01

    Transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of dopant in silicon caused by point defects during annealing of implanted. Si has become one of the essential concerns in miniaturization of silicon device technology. In order to control and minimize the TED effect, a fundamental understanding of the evolution of the point defects upon annealing and the interaction between point defects and extended defects and their effects on dopant diffusion is necessary. Our studies were carried out by two parts; (1) For understanding the evolution of <311> and <110> defects, B{sup +} and Si{sup +} implantation at energies (from 5 keV to 40 keV) and doses in the range from 5 x 10{sup 12} to 1 x 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} were used. The annealing kinetics were investigated using a N{sub 2} ambient with temperatures for time ranging from 500{degrees}C to 1100{degrees}C for time ranging from 3 min to 3 hours. A matrix of implant energy vs. dose on formation threshold of <311> and <110> defect, interstitials napped and dissolved condition were obtained. (2) For Understanding the interaction between Type II dislocation loop and point defect a B doped buried marker layer was used. The oxidation of silicon surface used as a interstitials injection source and a buried type II loop layer as a point defect detector used to quantify the flux of interstitials injected. Combining the flux measured by loops and dopant diffusion the D{sub I} C{sub I} was determined. The diffusion limited kinetics was concluded. The TED from <311> and EOR (End of Range) <110> defect was studied using 8keV B{sup +} implanted Si to a dose of the le14 and 190keV Ge{sub +} implanted to a dose of le15. Subsequent anneals are done for 5 min and 30 min, respectively, These defects affect dopant diffusion by trapping and releasing point defects.

  12. Simultaneous observations of Ca II K and Mg II k in T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, N.; Basri, G.; Imhoff, C. L.; Giampapa, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    The first simultaneous, calibrated observations of the Ca II K and Mg II k resonance lines in T Tauri stars are presented. It is found that for T Tauri stars with mass greater than 1.5 solar mass, which have radiative cores and tend to be fast rotators, the k line seems to arise in an extended region (probably also responsible for the H-alpha emission), whereas the K line apparently originates closer to the highly inhomogeneous stellar surface. The lower mass stars, which are fully convective and tend to be slow rotators, are more easily described by a largely chromospheric model, consistent with main-sequence activity structures but at greater values of the nonradiative flux. The strongest emission-line stars in the low-mass group, however, are also likely to have extended k line regions.

  13. The influence of quorum sensing in compartment II of the MELiSSA loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condori, Sandra; Mastroleo, Felice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) has been conceived as a 5 compartments microorganisms and higher plants recycling system for long haul space flights. Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H colonizes compartment II. Previous work reported that continuous culture of the bacterium in a photobioreactor could lead to thick biofilm formation, leading to bioreactor arrest. Our aim is to investigate the unknown quorum sensing (QS) system of R. rubrum S1H, specifically under MELiSSA relevant culture conditions meaning light anaerobic (LAN) and using acetate as carbon source. In that purpose an autoinducer synthase gene (Rru_A3396) knockout mutant was constructed by allelic exchange generating strain M68. In addition phenotypic comparison between wild type (WT) and M68 was performed. Results of thin layer chromatography assay where Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 have been used as reporter strain showed that WT produces acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) from C4 to C12 acyl carbon chain length; however, in M68 no AHLs were detected confirming that gene Rru_A3396 (named rruI) encodes an autoinducer synthase. Interestingly under a low shear or static environment M68 showed cell aggregation similar as reported in a closely related bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (cerI mutant). In contrast to WT, M68 did not form biofilm and exhibited a decreased motility and pigment content. M68 vs wild type transcriptomics results showed that 326 genes were statistically significant differentially expressed. Downregulation of genes related to photosynthesis e.g., reaction center subunits, light harvesting complex and photosynthetic assembly proteins was observed. Similar results were obtained for preliminary proteomic analysis. Results obtained showed that in R. rubrum S1H the AHL-based QS system regulates almost 8% of the genome which is linked to biofilm formation among other biological processes described above. Since strain M68 could not be used in compartment II due to its less

  14. Modeling fatigue crack growth for life-extending control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Ravindra Prakash

    1999-12-01

    This dissertation presents a nonlinear dynamic model of fatigue crack growth in the state-space setting under variable amplitude cyclic load. The model is especially suited to the needs of real-time decision-making for life-extending control. The state variables are crack length and crack opening stress. The model is capable of capturing the effects of a single-cycle overload, block loads, random loads, and irregular sequences through a fading memory algorithm. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental data on 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys. Compiled results also demonstrate that the proposed model compares well with one of the most comprehensive models, FASTRAN-II that is used by the aircraft industry. Specifically, the state-space model recursively computes the crack opening stress via a simple functional relationship based on the principle of fading memory and does not require the storage of the stress history for its execution. Therefore, savings in both computation time and memory requirements are significant. The need for a reliable damage model for life-extending control is addressed with reference to the colossal inaccuracies that could occur in controller synthesis for a reusable rocket engine if a simplistic damage model is used under variable-amplitude load conditions. The seemingly counter-intuitive notion of overload injection could be gainfully utilized for life-extending optimization. The proof of this concept is demonstrated on a laboratory test apparatus by life-extension of test specimens with intentionally injected overload pulses at specific intervals. A stochastic model of fatigue crack growth under variable-amplitude load is proposed using the framework of the state-space model. The stochastic model is validated with four sets of constant-amplitude load test data and a set under variable-amplitude load test. The crack growth process is observed to be nearly deterministic for a cyclic load applied to a given specimen

  15. Implementing extended observing at the JCMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Craig; Dempsey, Jessica; Campbell, Ian

    2014-08-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) is the largest single dish submillimetre telescope in the world. Recently the Joint Astronomy Centre (JAC) has learned that the JCMT will no longer receive financial support from its original supporting agencies after September 2014. There is significant pressure to complete some surveys that have been in progress at the JCMT for many years now. With the goal of completing a higher percentage of these surveys it was decided to take advantage of the hours between when the telescope operator leaves the telescope and when the day crew arrives. These hours generally have reasonable seeing and low column integrated water vapor, so they are good for observing. This observing is being performed remotely, in Hilo, without staff at the telescope, by staff members who do not have telescope operation as part of their job descriptions. This paper describes the hardware changes necessary to implement remote observing at JCMT. It also describes the software needed for remote, fail safe, operation of the telescope. The protocols and rules for passing the control of the telescope between the various groups are discussed. Since these Extended Operators are not expert telescope operators, the system was simplified as much as possible, but some training was necessary and proper checklists are essential. Due to the success of the first phase of Extending Observing at the JCMT, the hours when the weather is good and no one is at the telescope, but no day crew is on the way, are also now being utilized. Extended Observing has already yielded a considerable amount of science observing time.

  16. Extended quantification of the generalized recurrence plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Maik; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The generalized recurrence plot is a modern tool for quantification of complex spatial patterns. Its application spans the analysis of trabecular bone structures, Turing structures, turbulent spatial plankton patterns, and fractals. But, it is also successfully applied to the description of spatio-temporal dynamics and the detection of regime shifts, such as in the complex Ginzburg-Landau- equation. The recurrence plot based determinism is a central measure in this framework quantifying the level of regularities in temporal and spatial structures. We extend this measure for the generalized recurrence plot considering additional operations of symmetry than the simple translation. It is tested not only on two-dimensional regular patterns and noise but also on complex spatial patterns reconstructing the parameter space of the complex Ginzburg-Landau-equation. The extended version of the determinism resulted in values which are consistent to the original recurrence plot approach. Furthermore, the proposed method allows a split of the determinism into parts which based on laminar and non-laminar regions of the two-dimensional pattern of the complex Ginzburg-Landau-equation. A comparison of these parts with a standard method of image classification, the co-occurrence matrix approach, shows differences especially in the description of patterns associated with turbulence. In that case, it seems that the extended version of the determinism allows a distinction of phase turbulence and defect turbulence by means of their spatial patterns. This ability of the proposed method promise new insights in other systems with turbulent dynamics coming from climatology, biology, ecology, and social sciences, for example.

  17. Extending the applicability of multigrid methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brannick, J; Brezina, M; Falgout, R; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J; Sheehan, B; Xu, J; Zikatanov, L

    2006-09-25

    Multigrid methods are ideal for solving the increasingly large-scale problems that arise in numerical simulations of physical phenomena because of their potential for computational costs and memory requirements that scale linearly with the degrees of freedom. Unfortunately, they have been historically limited by their applicability to elliptic-type problems and the need for special handling in their implementation. In this paper, we present an overview of several recent theoretical and algorithmic advances made by the TOPS multigrid partners and their collaborators in extending applicability of multigrid methods. Specific examples that are presented include quantum chromodynamics, radiation transport, and electromagnetics.

  18. Extended Criteria Donors in Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vodkin, Irine; Kuo, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Mortality rates on the liver transplant waiting list are increasing. The shortage of organs has resulted in higher utilization of extended criteria donors (ECDs), with centers pushing the limits of what is acceptable for transplantation. Donor quality is more appropriately represented as a continuum of risk, and careful selection and matching of ECD grafts with recipients may lead to excellent outcomes. Although there is no precise definition for what constitutes an ECD liver, this review focuses on frequently cited characteristics, including donor age, steatosis, donation after cardiac death, and donors with increased risk of disease transmission.

  19. Extending quantum coherence of superconducting flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems, MIT Team

    We present the design of a superconducting qubit with multiple Josephson junctions. The design starts with a capacitively shunted flux qubit, and it incorporates particular junction parameter choices for the purpose of simultaneously optimizing over transition frequency, anharmonicity, flux- and charge-noise sensitivity around flux degeneracy. By studying the scaling properties with design parameters, we identify directions to extend coherence substantially. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  20. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  1. Improving epidemic control strategies by extended detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Paweł; Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Kleczkowski, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Majority of epidemics eradication programs work in preventive responsive way. The lack of exact information about epidemiological status of individuals makes responsive actions less efficient. Here, we demonstrate that additional tests can significantly increase the efficiency of "blind" treatment (vaccination or culling). Eradication strategy consisting of "blind" treatment in very limited local neighborhood supplemented by extra tests in a little bit larger neighborhood is able to prevent invasion of even highly infectious diseases and to achieve this at a cost lower than for the "blind" strategy. The effectiveness of the extended strategy depends on such parameters as the test efficiency and test cost.

  2. Extended Scaling Relations for Planar Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfatto, G.; Falco, P.; Mastropietro, V.

    2009-12-01

    It is widely believed that the critical properties of several planar lattice systems, like the Eight Vertex or the Ashkin-Teller models, are well described by an effective continuum fermionic theory obtained as a formal scaling limit. On the basis of this assumption several extended scaling relations among their indices were conjectured. We prove the validity of some of them, among which the ones predicted by Kadanoff (Phys Rev Lett 39:903-905, 1977) and by Luther and Peschel (Phys Rev B 12:3908-3917, 1975).

  3. Primordial fluctuations in extended Liouville theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Wynton E.

    Liouville gravity can be used to precisely model features of 3+1 dimensional cosmology in a simplified 1+1d setting. We study primordial fluctuations in a generally covariant extension of Liouville theory, in the context of single field inflation. The scale invariant spectrum of scalar curvature perturbations is exhibited, and their three-point correlation function is computed in the slow roll approximation. We recover Maldacena's consistency relation for the three-point function, which in this context depends on a global shift symmetry of extended Liouville theory.

  4. Primordial fluctuations in extended Liouville theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Wynton E.

    2015-03-01

    Liouville gravity can be used to precisely model features of 3+1 dimensional cosmology in a simplified 1+1d setting. We study primordial fluctuations in a generally covariant extension of Liouville theory, in the context of single field inflation. The scale invariant spectrum of scalar curvature perturbations is exhibited, and their three-point correlation function is computed in the slow roll approximation. We recover Maldacena's consistency relation for the three-point function, which in this context depends on a global shift symmetry of extended Liouville theory.

  5. Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporinase in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel; Nordmann, Patrice; Ronco, Esthel; Poirel, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    An AmpC-type β-lactamase conferring high-level resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and monobactams was characterized from an Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate. This class C β-lactamase (named ADC-33) possessed a Pro210Arg substitution together with a duplication of an Ala residue at position 215 (inside the Ω-loop) compared to a reference AmpC cephalosporinase from A. baumannii. ADC-33 hydrolyzed ceftazidime, cefepime, and aztreonam at high levels, which allows the classification of this enzyme as an extended-spectrum AmpC (ESAC). Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the role of both substitutions in its ESAC property. PMID:20547808

  6. Simulating futures in extended common LISP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1988-01-01

    Stack-groups comprise the mechanism underlying implementation of multiprocessing in Extended Common LISP, i.e., running multiple quasi-simultaneous processes within a single LISP address space. On the other hand, the future construct of MULTILISP, an extension of the LISP dialect scheme, deals with parallel execution. The source of concurrency that future exploits is the overlap between computation of a value and use of the value. Described is a simulation of the future construct by an interpreter utilizing stack-group extensions to common LISP.

  7. Proving refinement transformations using extended denotational semantics

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.; Boyle, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    TAMPR is a fully automatic transformation system based on syntactic rewrites. Our approach in a correctness proof is to map the transformation into an axiomatized mathematical domain where formal (and automated) reasoning can be performed. This mapping is accomplished via an extended denotational semantic paradigm. In this approach, the abstract notion of a program state is distributed between an environment function and a store function. Such a distribution introduces properties that go beyond the abstract state that is being modeled. The reasoning framework needs to be aware of these properties in order to successfully complete a correctness proof. This paper discusses some of our experiences in proving the correctness of TAMPR transformations.

  8. Consequence Analysis for Used Fuel Extended Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Timothy; Gerhard, Michael; Sutton, Mark; Wen, Josh

    2014-09-23

    Early identification and evaluation of security issues related to the extended storage of used nuclear fuel is critical. A breach in a dry fuel storage container has the possibility of external gas from the atmosphere interacting with the used fuel rods at high temperatures, resulting in rapid oxidation and possibly the ignition of a zirconium fire. In support of this idea, the current work aims to develop a computational model of heat transfer and fluid flow in and through a breached dry fuel storage cask to determine if the resulting flow conditions are likely to result in a fire.

  9. Resonance regions of extended Mathieu equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, V. P.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    One of the mechanisms of energy transfer between degrees of freedom of dusty plasma system is based on parametric resonance. Initial stage of this process can de described by equation similar to Mathieu equation. Such equation is studied by analytical and numerical approach. The numerical solution of the extended Mathieu equation is obtained for a wide range of parameter values. Boundaries of resonance regions, growth rates of amplitudes and times of onset are obtained. The energy transfer between the degrees of freedom of dusty plasma system can occur over a wide range of frequencies.

  10. Modified extended Hückel band calculations on conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Y.; Marynick, Dennis S.

    1992-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict band gaps, corresponding to π-π* transitions of one-dimensional conducting polymers, the formula for the off-diagonal elements, Hαβij in the extended Hückel (EH) band calculation method was modified according to the form Hαβij=K1(Hααii +Hββjj)exp(-K2Rαβ) Sαβij. Parametrizations for the constants K1 and K2 were performed so as to yield reasonable band gaps for the pure hydrocarbon polymers trans-polyacetylene, poly(para-phenylene), and poly(phenylene vinylene). Since there is a large difference in bond alternations along polymeric chains between ab initio and modified neglect of diatomic overlap optimized geometries, especially for heterocyclic polymers, the valence orbital exponents of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur were separately adjusted, depending on the chosen geometry, to reproduce the band gaps of polyfuran, polypyrrole, and polythiophene. It is found that geometrical relaxations in the presence of heteroatoms strongly affect the C1-C4 interactions as well as bond alternations, which in turn affect the band gap. Modified EH band calculations were performed for various polymers. The predicted band gaps had average errors of ca. 10% (less than 0.3 eV) compared to the experimental values, and the method produced band structures consistent with electron-energy-loss spectroscopic observations.

  11. Design considerations for extending ADMX to temperatures below 1K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Phase II of the ADMX experiment is a large-scale upgrade with the objective of integrating the state-of-the-art in microwave detection and in cryogenic technologies. From its initial operations with pumped liquid 4He at ~1.5 K, a further reduction in physical temperature to the targeted 100 mK would improve its sensitivity more than twentyfold, extending the search below the DFSZ limit. But the cooling of a large microwave cavity to millikelvin temperatures in a high magnetic field poses some new challenges with no turnkey solutions from commercial cryogenic technologies. In this talk, we address the issue of incorporating current commercial technologies within our custom made insert to construct a dilution refrigeration system with a cooling power of 800 μW at 100 mK. Additionally, we describe a separate homemade pumped liquid 3He system with a 2-3 mW cooling power at 0.5 K, which will be used as a bridge between the current 4He system at 1.5 K and the planned 100 mK dilution system. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF grants PHY-1067242 and PHY-1306729, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  12. Structure of the extended emission in the infrared celestial background

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.D.

    1986-09-30

    The extended emission in the infrared celestial background may be divided into three main components: the zodiacal background, the large discrete sources in the galaxy, and the interstellar dust. The zodiacal background is due to the thermal reradiation of sunlight absorbed by the dust in the solar system. An earth-orbiting infrared telescope will detect the diffuse emission from this dust in all directions with maximum intensity lying roughly along the ecliptic plane where the density of dust is highest. Structure with scale lengths of 10/sup 0/ was measured in both the visual and infrared; finer structure was detected in the infrared by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite. H II regions, areas of ionized gas mixed with and surrounded by dust, are the brightest discrete objects in the galaxy in the long wavelength infrared re-emitted in the infrared with a range of temperatures characteristic of the thermal equilibrium for the surroundings of the dust. The emission from the interstellar dust produces a filimentary structured background, the infrared cirrus. The observed far-infrared color temperature of about 20-35K for the cirrus is consistent with emission-form graphite and silicate grains which absorb the interstellar radiation field. The much-larger LWIR color temperature is likely due to a greater abundance of sub-micron particles in the interstellar medium and, perhaps, from band emission due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These galactic planes have full width at half maxima of about 2/sup 0/.

  13. Composite tissue allograft extends a helping hand to transplant immunologists.

    PubMed

    Thaunat, O; Badet, L; El-Jaafari, A; Kanitakis, J; Dubernard, J-M; Morelon, E

    2006-10-01

    The first successful human hand transplantation, performed on September 1998, has translated the scope of 'composite tissue allotransplantation' from research concepts into clinical practice. Beyond microsurgical problems that have been overcome several years ago, the main obstacle that still prevents the generalization of composite tissue allotransplantation is immunologic. This review, which summarizes the evidence obtained both from experimental animal models and from the first recipients of a hand transplant, is focused on the two immunological characteristics of composite allografts that set them apart from other solid organ allografts: (i) they contain skin tissue that elicits a strong immune response; and (ii) they contain lymphoid tissues (such as bone marrow and lymph nodes) that have the potential both to attack the recipient, and also to down-modulate the host immune response and induce tolerance. While on one hand, the composite tissue allografts raise new challenges to transplant immunologists, on the other they provide answers to questions that have remained unresolved for a long time. In this sense, composite tissue allografts extend a helping hand to transplant immunologists.

  14. Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project. Phase II: Internal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Dana

    This report is based on the Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project - Phase II. The project was a follow-up to an earlier study, extending from June 1980 to June 1983, in which government funding and engineering manpower were used to conduct an energy management program in 52 selected pilot schools in 5 areas of the province. The report…

  15. Preparation and Spectrophotometric Analysis of Hexaamminenickel(II) Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieder, Grace M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed at Brooklyn College (New York) in which the preparation and ammonia analysis of an amminenickel(II) chloride is extended to include a spectrophotometric analysis for nickel. Discusses the materials needed and the procedure for the experiment which takes nine hours of laboratory work. (TW)

  16. Extending problem-solving procedures through reflection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Fincham, Jon M

    2014-11-01

    A large-sample (n=75) fMRI study guided the development of a theory of how people extend their problem-solving procedures by reflecting on them. Both children and adults were trained on a new mathematical procedure and then were challenged with novel problems that required them to change and extend their procedure to solve these problems. The fMRI data were analyzed using a combination of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA). This HMM-MVPA analysis revealed the existence of 4 stages: Encoding, Planning, Solving, and Responding. Using this analysis as a guide, an ACT-R model was developed that improved the performance of the HMM-MVPA and explained the variation in the durations of the stages across 128 different problems. The model assumes that participants can reflect on declarative representations of the steps of their problem-solving procedures. A Metacognitive module can hold these steps, modify them, create new declarative steps, and rehearse them. The Metacognitive module is associated with activity in the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC). The ACT-R model predicts the activity in the RLPFC and other regions associated with its other cognitive modules (e.g., vision, retrieval). Differences between children and adults seemed related to differences in background knowledge and computational fluency, but not to the differences in their capability to modify procedures.

  17. Extended life aluminide fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    As the price of fuel fabrication, shipment of both new and spent fuel, and fuel reprocessing continue to rise at a rapid rate, researchers look for alternate methods to keep reactor fuel costs within their limited funding. Extended fuel element lifetimes, without jeopardizing reactor safety, can reduce fuel costs by up to a factor of two. The Extended Life Aluminide (ELAF) program was started at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a joint project of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the University of Missouri, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactors. Fuel plates of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) type construction were fabricated at Atomics International and irradiated in the ATR at the INEL. Four fuel matrix compositions were tested (i.e., 50 vol% UAl/sub x/ cores for reference, and 40, 45 and 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores). The 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores contained up to 3 grams U-235 per cm/sup 3/ of core. Three plates of each composition were irradiated to peak burnup levels of 3 x 10/sup 21/ fission/cm/sup 3/ of core. The only observed damage was due to external corrosion at similar rates experienced by UAl/sub x/ fuel elements in test reactors.

  18. Spatially Extended Memory Models of Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jeffrey; Riccio, Mark; Hua, Fei; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gilmour, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Beat-to-beat alternation of cardiac electrical properties (alternans) commonly occurs during rapid periodic pacing. Although alternans is generally associated with a resititution curve with slope >=1, recent studies by Gauthier and co-workers reported the absence of alternans in frog heart tissue with a restitution curve of slope >=1. These experimental findings were understood in terms of a memory model in which the duration D of an action potential depends on the preceding rest interval I as well as a memory variable M that accumulates during D and dissipates during I. We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a spatially extended 1-d fiber using an ionic model that exhibits memory effects. We find that while a single cell can have a restitution slope >=1 and not show alternans (because of memory), the spatially extended system exhibits alternans. To understand the dynamical mechanism of this behavior, we study a coupled maps memory model both numerically and analytically. These results illustrate that spatial effects and memory effects can play a significant role in determining the dynamics of wave propagation in cardiac tissue.

  19. Pumpdown assistance extends coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect

    Tailby, R.J. )

    1992-07-01

    One of the most challenging coiled tubing applications to emerge in the last few years is horizontal well maintenance. When wireline cannot be used, techniques that offer some of the same flexibility, availability and relatively low cost must be used. During this same period, however, drilling technology has also made huge strides in horizontal and extended-reach areas. Wells are now being drilled with horizontal lengths in excess of 6,000 ft and measured depths of more than 22,000 ft. This paper reports that although horizontal wells are definitely here to stay, many operators have had to reevaluate their positions after being confronted with the problem of recompleting these wells to eliminate excessive water or gas production. A full workover with workstring using either a drilling rig or snubbing unit can be expensive and may lead to lost production because of limited rig availability. Coiled tubing has successfully been used in most cases thus far, but it has length and horizontal reach limitations that drilling technology will soon overtake. Within the constraints of current technology and tube capabilities, coiled tubing does not have the buckling resistance or reel capacity to service today's longest horizontal and extended reach wells or those planned and foreseen in the future. Even if coiled tubing can reach TD, operations requiring downward force are severely restricted.

  20. Medical planning for extended remote expeditions.

    PubMed

    Iserson, Kenneth V

    2013-12-01

    Remote extended expeditions often support scientific research and commercial resource exploration or extraction in hostile environments. Medical support for these expeditions is inherently complex and requires in-depth planning. To be successful, this planning must include substantial input from clinicians with experience in remote, emergency, and prehospital medicine and from personnel familiar with the proposed working environment. Using the guidelines discussed in this paper will help ensure that planners consider all necessary, medically relevant elements before launching an extended remote expedition. The 10 key elements of a workable remote healthcare system are to: 1. Optimize workers’ fitness. 2. Anticipate treatable problems. 3. Stock appropriate medications. 4. Provide appropriate equipment. 5. Provide adequate logistical support. 6. Provide adequate medical communications. 7. Know the environmental limitations on patient access and evacuation. 8. Use qualified providers. 9. Arrange for knowledgeable and timely consultations. 10. Establish and distribute rational administrative rules. Planners using these guidelines may better be able to generate a strategy that optimizes the participants' health benefits, the expedition's productivity, and the expedition sponsor's cost savings.

  1. NASA's extended duration orbiter medical program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam Lee; Sawin, Charles F.

    1992-01-01

    The physiological issues involved in safely extending Shuttle flights from 10 to 16 days have been viewed by some as academic. After all, they reasoned, humans already have lived and worked in space for periods exceeding even 28 days in the United States Skylab Program and onboard the Russian space stations. The difference in the Shuttle program is in the physical position of the astronauts as they reenter the Earth's atmosphere. Crewmembers in the earlier Apollo, Skylab, and Russian programs were returned to Earth in the supine position. Space Shuttle crewmembers, in contrast, are seated upright during reentry and landing; reexperiencing the Earth's g forces in this position has far more pronounced effects on the crewmember's physiological functions. The goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) Medical Project (EDOMP) has been to ensure that crewmembers maintain physiological reserves sufficient to perform entry, landing, and egress safely. Early in the Shuttle Program, it became clear that physiological deconditioning during space flight could produce significant symptoms upon return to Earth. The signs and symptoms observed during the entry, landing, and egress after Shuttle missions have included very high heart rates and low blood pressures upon standing. Dizziness, 'graying out,' and fainting have occurred on ambulation or shortly thereafter. Other symptoms at landing have included headache, light-headedness, nausea and vomitting, leg cramping, inability to stand for several minutes after wheel-stop, and unsteadiness of gait.

  2. Agents in grid extended to clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasielewska, K.; Ganzha, M.; Paprzycki, M.; Bǎdicǎ, C.; Ivanovic, M.; Lirkov, I.; Fidanova, S.

    2016-10-01

    The presented work is an attempt to extend considerations from the Agents in Grid (AiG) project to the Clouds. The AiG project is aimed at the development of an agent-semantic infrastructure for efficient resource management in the grid. Decision support within the AIG system helps the user, without in-depth knowledge, to choose optimal algorithm and/or resource to solve a problem from a given domain, and later to choose the best contract defining terms of collaboration with the provider of a resource used to solve the problem. Cloud computing refers to an architecture, in which groups of remote servers are networked, to allow online access to computer services or resources. The general vision is the same as in the case of computational grids, i.e., to reduce cost of computing, as well as to increase flexibility and reliability of the infrastructure. However, there are also important differences. It is relatively easy to notice that solutions considered in the context of the AiG system can be easily extended to computational clouds that evolved from computational grids. As it was shown in the case of grids, integrating software agents, semantics and cloud computing could enable highly efficient, intelligent systems, making clouds even more flexible, autonomic and usable.

  3. Silicon drift chamber with extended energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labanti, Claudio; Dal Fiume, Daniele; Fiorini, Carlo; Longoni, Antonio; Mauri, Alessandro; Perotti, Francesco; Rossi, Elio; Stephen, John B.

    2000-12-01

    The requirement for future X-ray Astronomy instrumentation to exhibit a combination of good energy resolution and an extended energy range may be fulfilled by the development of a X ray detectors made from coupling a Silicon Drift Chamber (SDC), to a scintillation crystal. We report on such a detector made with an SDC of 3 mm diameter and using a Caesium Iodide [CsI(Tl)] scintillator. The radiation input window is located on the Si side of the assembly so than soft X-rays are directly detected by the SDC. This allows a minimum threshold of about 1 keV at 0 degrees Celsius to be obtained. The Silicon Drift Chamber acts also as a photodiode able to detect the scintillation light produced by the CsI(Tl), thus extending the energy range of such a device up to some MeV. The discrimination of events between these two detection layers is performed by using a pulse shape discriminator in order to differentiate between the different rise times of the collected charge. The detector concept is discussed on the basis of the results already achieved and the future developments foreseen.

  4. Applying SPAM to the extended MWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley-Walker, N.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The extended baselines of the MWA move the instrument into a more difficult calibration and imaging regime, where the more widely-separated antennas are more likely to view the sky through different ionospheric conditions, leading to differential refractive effects over the array. Current extrapolations by Trott, Jordan, and Hurley-Walker imply that the diffractive scale will remain larger than the longest baseline for 50-70% of observations, but these are extrapolations only. Other instruments have performed observations with baselines longer than the diffractive scale, and used software techniques to mitigate the ionospheric distortions. One such survey is the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope Sky Survey (TGSS) at 150 MHz. Intema et al. (2016) used the Source Peeling & Atmospheric Modeling (SPAM) software to produce a catalogue of over 600,000 sources from data that had previously been slow and difficult to process. This proposal is for a short series of observations to test the usage of the SPAM software on the extended MWA, and to find the optimal observing parameters for its use. If successful, this could assist other groups in effectively utilising the long baselines.

  5. Extending U.S. Medicare to Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Haims, Marla C.; Dick, Andrew W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is a lack of hard data on the exact number of Medicare-eligible retirees residing in Mexico, but it is at least in the tens of thousands and is certainly rising as the baby boom generation reaches retirement. Because Medicare does not cover health services received outside the United States, these retirees must travel to the United States for health care or purchase alternative coverage for health services received in Mexico. There are several arguments for extending Medicare to Mexico—that is, allowing Medicare-eligible beneficiaries to receive their Medicare benefits in Mexico. Medicare-eligible retirees living in Mexico would certainly benefit, and Mexico might benefit from improved quality of care and an expanded health economy. Moreover, American taxpayers might benefit from a reduced total cost of Medicare: To the extent that extending Medicare to Mexico induces Medicare beneficiaries to substitute higher-cost U.S. health care services with lower-cost Mexican services, overall Medicare expenditures might be reduced. The authors outline four options for how this policy change might be implemented and describe a conceptual model that could be used to assess the effects of each option. PMID:28083264

  6. An extended synthesis for evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2009-06-01

    Evolutionary theory is undergoing an intense period of discussion and reevaluation. This, contrary to the misleading claims of creationists and other pseudoscientists, is no harbinger of a crisis but rather the opposite: the field is expanding dramatically in terms of both empirical discoveries and new ideas. In this essay I briefly trace the conceptual history of evolutionary theory from Darwinism to neo-Darwinism, and from the Modern Synthesis to what I refer to as the Extended Synthesis, a more inclusive conceptual framework containing among others evo-devo, an expanded theory of heredity, elements of complexity theory, ideas about evolvability, and a reevaluation of levels of selection. I argue that evolutionary biology has never seen a paradigm shift, in the philosophical sense of the term, except when it moved from natural theology to empirical science in the middle of the 19th century. The Extended Synthesis, accordingly, is an expansion of the Modern Synthesis of the 1930s and 1940s, and one that--like its predecessor--will probably take decades to complete.

  7. Fundamentals of Physics, Extended 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition and the Extended Version, 7th Edition offer a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, helping readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving, in a breezy, easy-to-understand style. A unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications. * Numerous improvements in the text, based on feedback from the many users of the sixth edition (both instructors and students) * Several thousand end-of-chapter problems have been rewritten to streamline both the presentations and answers * 'Chapter Puzzlers' open each chapter with an intriguing application or question that is explained or answered in the chapter * Problem-solving tactics are provided to help beginning Physics students solve problems and avoid common error * The first section in every chapter introduces the subject of the chapter by asking and answering, "What is Physics?" as the question pertains to the chapter * Numerous supplements available to aid teachers and students The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory.

  8. Extended Solar System Structures Observed by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Masci, Frank; Cutri, Roc; Walker, Russell; Mainzer, Amy; Bauer, James; Stevenson, Rachel; Tricarico, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Extended structures associated with recent asteroid collisions and comets were detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, which conducted the first survey of the thermal emission of the sky in 1983. Twenty-seven years later, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), conducted a more sensitive survey of the sky at wavelengths spanning the shorter IRAS bandpasses and detected many of these same structures. Initial identifications include asteroid dust bands associated with collisions giving rise to the Karin and Beagle clusters within the Koronis and Themis asteroid families, respectively. An additional pair of bands is associated with the collision giving rise to the Veritas asteroid family. Comet trails associated with short-period comets have also been observed. Type 2 trails, detected by IRAS and possibly associated with asteroid collisions within the past few thousand years, have yet to be identified. Because WISE is significantly more sensitive than IRAS in the mid-infrared, it has detected some trails extending much further over their orbits and will greatly expand the catalog of trails detected in addition to those observed by IRAS and Spitzer (the latter by targeted observations). WISE and the yet more sensitive NEOCAM survey telescope will provide important insights into the recent collisional history of the asteroid belt and the nature and evolution of comets.

  9. Screw-Shaped Light in Extended Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, B.

    2005-01-01

    Twisted light beams have recently been observed for which the energy travels in a corkscrew-shaped path, spiralling around the beam's central axis. These discoveries are expected to become important to the development of new methods in the field of communication, as well as to the invention of new tools in microbiology. In this paper is shown that conventional theory based on Maxwell's equations cannot explain the basic features of twisted light. On the other hand an extended electromagnetic theory, based on a nonzero electric field divergence in the vacuum state, appears to be reconcilable with the main behaviour of the twisted light phenomena. The solutions and the set of modes being obtained from this extended theory are applicable both to models of high and low density photon beams and to those of individual photons, all having limited extensions in space and possessing an angular momentum (spin). Thereby beam models can be developed the intensity of which forms a ring-shaped cross-section, and individual photon models can be obtained which have the features of "needle radiation". However, within the limits of validity of the approximations made so far in the analysis, it is not clear whether the effective diameter of the individual photon models can be small enough to approach atomic dimensions.

  10. Planet Hunters in the Kepler Extended Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, C. J.; Fischer, D.; Brewer, J. M.; Giguere, M. J.; Lynn, S.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.; Smith, A. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Carter, J. A.; Howard, A.; Torres, G.; Crepp, J. R.; Keel, W. C.; Welsh, W. F.; Kaib, N. A.; Terrell, D.; Gagliano, R.; Jek, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse's (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of online citizen science projects, uses the World Wide Web to enlist the general public to identify transits in the Kepler light curves. Volunteers are asked to draw boxes to mark the locations of visible transits, with multiple independent classifiers reviewing a randomly selected ~30-day light curve segment from one of Kepler's ~160,000 target stars. Since December 2010, more than 170,000 members of the general public have participated in Planet Hunters contributing over 13 million classifications. With the start of the Kepler extended mission, Planet Hunters has entered a new phase. We will detail the upgrades and new features added to the project, highlighting in particular our search for circumbinary planets (planets orbiting both stars in binary) in the the extended mission Quarterly data releases. We will also report on our latest planet candidates, including the characterization of our first confirmed planet candidate, a circumbinary planet in a four star system. Acknowledgements: MES is supported by a National Science Foundation Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-1003258 and in part by an American Philosophical Society Franklin Grant.

  11. Thermoplastic Polyurethanes with Isosorbide Chain Extender

    SciTech Connect

    Javni, Ivan; Bilic, Olivera; Bilic, Nikola; Petrovic, Zoran; Eastwood, Eric; Zhang, Fan; Ilavsky, Jan

    2015-12-15

    Isosorbide, a renewable diol derived from starch, was used alone or in combination with butane diol (BD) as the chain extender in two series of thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) with 50 and 70% polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG) soft segment concentration (SSC), respectively. In the synthesized TPUs, the hard segment composition was systematically varied in both series following BD/isosorbide molar ratios of 100 : 0; 75 : 25; 50 : 50; 25 : 75, and 0 : 100 to examine in detail the effect of chain extenders on properties of segmented polyurethane elastomers with different morphologies. We found that polyurethanes with 50% SSC were hard elastomers with Shore D hardness of around 50, which is consistent with assumed co-continuous morphology. Polymers with 70% SSC displayed lower Shore A hardness of 74–79 (Shore D around 25) as a result of globular hard domains dispersed in the soft matrix. Insertion of isosorbide increased rigidity, melting point and glass transition temperature of hard segments and tensile strength of elastomers with 50% SSC. These effects were weaker or non-existent in 70% SSC series due to the short hard segments and low content of isosorbide. We also found that the thermal stability was lowered by increasing isosorbide content in both series.

  12. Choice mechanisms for past, temporally extended outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Martin D.; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Accurate retrospection is critical in many decision scenarios ranging from investment banking to hedonic psychology. A notoriously difficult case is to integrate previously perceived values over the duration of an experience. Failure in retrospective evaluation leads to suboptimal outcome when previous experiences are under consideration for revisit. A biologically plausible mechanism underlying evaluation of temporally extended outcomes is leaky integration of evidence. The leaky integrator favours positive temporal contrasts, in turn leading to undue emphasis on recency. To investigate choice mechanisms underlying suboptimal outcome based on retrospective evaluation, we used computational and behavioural techniques to model choice between perceived extended outcomes with different temporal profiles. Second-price auctions served to establish the perceived values of virtual coins offered sequentially to humans in a rapid monetary gambling task. Results show that lesser-valued options involving successive growth were systematically preferred to better options with declining temporal profiles. The disadvantageous inclination towards persistent growth was mitigated in some individuals in whom a longer time constant of the leaky integrator resulted in fewer violations of dominance. These results demonstrate how focusing on immediate gains is less beneficial than considering longer perspectives. PMID:26063841

  13. Thermodynamic products in extended phase-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    We have examined the thermodynamic properties for a variety of spherically symmetric charged-AdS black hole (BH) solutions, including the charged AdS BH surrounded by quintessence dark energy and charged AdS BH in f(R) gravity in extended phase-space. This framework involves treating the cosmological constant as thermodynamic variable (for example: thermodynamic pressure and thermodynamic volume). Then they should behave as an analog of Van-der-Waal (VdW) like systems. In the extended phase-space we have calculated the entropy product and thermodynamic volume product of all horizons. The mass (or enthalpy) independent nature of the said product signals they are universal quantities. The divergence of the specific heat indicates that the second-order phase transition occurs under certain condition. In Appendix A, we have studied the thermodynamic volume products for axisymmetric spacetime and it is shown to be not universal in nature. Finally, in Appendix B, we have studied the P ‑ V criticality of Cauchy horizon for charged-AdS BH and found to be an universal relation of critical values between two horizons as Pc‑ = P c+, vc‑ = v c+, Tc‑ = ‑T c+, ρc‑ = ‑ρ c+. The symbols are defined in the main work.

  14. Extended-release dalfampridine in the management of multiple-sclerosis-related walking impairment.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Carrie; Rae-Grant, Alex

    2012-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that causes neurological impairment in young adults. As part of the disease, ambulation remains one of the most disabling features of multiple sclerosis. Extended-release dalfampridine is a long-acting form of 4-aminopyridine that has been shown in two phase III trials to increase ambulation speed in a subset of patients with multiple sclerosis (timed walk responders). The primary endpoint of these studies was 'responder status', analyzing difference in the proportion of timed walk responders between extended-release dalfampridine and placebo groups. Extended-release dalfampridine exerts its effects by inhibiting voltage-activated K(+) channels and has been previously demonstrated to improve action potential propagation in demyelinated nerve fibers in vitro. Side effects of extended-release dalfampridine include increased urinary tract infections, insomnia, headache, asthenia, dizziness, back pain, and paresthesias. Rare seizure events are also reported on the approved dose of 10 mg every 12 h. In this review we will summarize the results of key phase II and phase III trials of extended-release dalfampridine, its safety, and potential use in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  15. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  16. Analysis of the kinetics of P+ HA- recombination in membrane-embedded wild-type and mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers between 298 and 77 K indicates that the adjacent negatively charged QA ubiquinone modulates the free energy of P+ HA- and may influence the rate of the protein dielectric response.

    PubMed

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Pajzderska, Maria; Dobek, Andrzej; Brettel, Klaus; Jones, Michael R

    2013-09-26

    Time-resolved spectroscopic studies of recombination of the P(+)HA(-) radical pair in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides give an opportunity to study protein dynamics triggered by light and occurring over the lifetime of P(+)HA(-). The state P(+)HA(-) is formed after the ultrafast light-induced electron transfer from the primary donor pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P) to the acceptor bacteriopheophytin (HA). In order to increase the lifetime of this state, and thus increase the temporal window for the examination of protein dynamics, it is possible to block forward electron transfer from HA(-) to the secondary electron acceptor QA. In this contribution, the dynamics of P(+)HA(-) recombination were compared at a range of temperatures from 77 K to room temperature, electron transfer from HA(-) to QA being blocked either by prereduction of QA or by genetic removal of QA. The observed P(+)HA(-) charge recombination was significantly slower in the QA-deficient RCs, and in both types of complexes, lowering the temperature from RT to 77 K led to a slowing of charge recombination. The effects are explained in the frame of a model in which charge recombination occurs via competing pathways, one of which is thermally activated and includes transient formation of a higher-energy state, P(+)BA(-). An internal electrostatic field supplied by the negative charge on QA increases the free energy levels of the state P(+)HA(-), thus decreasing its energetic distance to the state P(+)BA(-). In addition, the dielectric response of the protein environment to the appearance of the state P(+)HA(-) is accelerated from ∼50-100 ns in the QA-deficient mutant RCs to ∼1-16 ns in WT RCs with a negatively charged QA(-). In both cases, the temperature dependence of the protein dynamics is weak.

  17. A Combined MG II/CA II Survey of Stellar Magnetic Activity in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicklund, B. M.; Donahue, R. A.; Dobson, A. K.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1997-01-01

    We use nearly contemporaneus low-resolution IUE observations of Mg II h + k emission and Mount Wilson Observatory Ca II H + K S indices for 33 pairs of observations of lower main sequence stars to formulate a relationship that will permit accurate predictions of S values as a function of (B - V) color and Mg II h + k flux. The resulting relationship is useful because it will extend the set of solar neighborhood stars for which a uniform estimate of chromospheric activity is available to include stars that are not observable from Mount Wilson as well as providing additional estimates of activity levels for stars that are on the Mount Wilson HK Project observing list.

  18. Interband cascade light emitting devices based on type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lin, C.H.; Murry, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    The authors discuss physical processes in the newly developed type-II interband cascade light emitting devices, and review their recent progress in the demonstration of the first type-II interband cascade lasers and the observation of interband cascade electroluminescence up to room temperature in a broad mid-infrared wavelength region (extended to 9 {mu}m).

  19. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the extended solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, John L.; Noci, Giancarlo; Cranmer, Steven R.; Raymond, John C.

    2006-04-01

    The first observations of ultraviolet spectral line profiles and intensities from the extended solar corona (i.e., more than 1.5 solar radii from Sun-center) were obtained on 13 April 1979 when a rocket-borne ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics made direct measurements of proton kinetic temperatures, and obtained upper limits on outflow velocities in a quiet coronal region and a polar coronal hole. Following those observations, ultraviolet coronagraphic spectroscopy has expanded to include observations of over 60 spectral lines in coronal holes, streamers, coronal jets, and solar flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events. Spectroscopic diagnostic techniques have been developed to determine proton, electron and ion kinetic temperatures and velocity distributions, proton and ion bulk flow speeds and chemical abundances. The observations have been made during three sounding rocket flights, four Shuttle deployed and retrieved Spartan 201 flights, and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the extended solar corona has led to fundamentally new views of the acceleration regions of the solar wind and CMEs. Observations with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO revealed surprisingly large temperatures, outflow speeds, and velocity distribution anisotropies in coronal holes, especially for minor ions. Those measurements have guided theorists to discard some candidate physical processes of solar wind acceleration and to increase and expand investigations of ion cyclotron resonance and related processes. Analyses of UVCS observations of CME plasma properties and the evolution of CMEs have provided the following: temperatures, inflow velocities and derived values of resistivity and reconnection rates in CME current sheets, compression ratios and extremely high ion temperatures behind CME shocks, and three dimensional flow velocities and magnetic field chirality in

  20. PREFACE: Complex Dynamics in Spatially Extended Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Bohr, Tomas; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Leth Christiansen, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Self-organization, or the spontaneous emergence of patterns and structures under far-from-equilibrium conditions, turbulence, and related nonlinear dynamic phenomena in spatially extended systems have developed into one of the most exciting topics of modern science. Phenomena of this type arise in a wide variety of different fields, ranging from the development of chemical and biological patterns in reaction-diffusion systems over vortex formation in connection with chemical, optical, hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to technical applications in connection with liquid crystal displays or pulse compression in optical communication systems. Lasers often show interesting patterns produced by self-focusing and other nonlinear phenomena, diffusion limited aggregation is known to generate fractal-like structures, and amazing struc- tures also arise in bacterial growth processes or when a droplet of an oil suspension of finely divided magnetic particles is subject to a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the cell in which it is contained. In September 1995 the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen was the venue of an International Conference on Complex Dynamics in Spatially Extended Systems. Organizers of the conference were the three Danish centers for nonlinear dynamics: The Center for Chaos and Turbulence Studies (CATS), located at the Niels Bohr Institute; the Center for Modeling, Nonlinear Dynamics and Irreversible Thermodynamics (MIDIT), located at the Technical University of Denmark, and the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Continuum Systems, located at the Risø National Laboratories. In the spirit of the successful NATO Advanced Research Workshops on Spatiotemporal Patterns in Nonequilibrium Systems of which the last was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1993, the conference aimed at stimulating new ideas and providing a forum for the exchange of knowledge between leading practitioners of the field. With its 50 invited speakers and more than