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Sample records for sphenoid sinus presenting

  1. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Terra, E R; Guedes, F R; Manzi, F R; Bóscolo, F N

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a case of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in the pterygoid process and greater wing of the sphenoid bone, observed on a panoramic radiograph. Conventional radiographs and computerized tomography in axial and coronal sections confirmed the presence of the pneumatization of these structures.

  2. Sphenoid sinus mucocele presenting with oculomotor nerve palsy and affecting the functions of trigeminal nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of first-episode sphenoid mucocele successfully treated via transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele. A 55 year-old female presented with persistent right-side facial numbness (in the areas of the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve) and right-side ptosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed opacification and expansion of the right-side sphenoid sinus lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as right-side sphenoid mucocele affecting the functions of the trigeminal (first and second branches), and oculomotor nerves. Transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele result in rapid regression of these symptoms. PMID:26629234

  3. Endovascular management of a carotid aneurysm into the sphenoid sinus presenting with epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gascou, Grégory; Trévillot, Vincent; Bonafé, Alain; Crampette, Louis; Machi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms are rare, and favour the occurrence of massive recurrent epistaxis, which is associated with a high mortality rate. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman presenting a ruptured ICA aneurysm extending into the sphenoid sinus, revealed by epistaxis. Selective coil embolization of the aneurysm was performed. Flow-diverter stents were deployed in order to utterly exclude the aneurysm and prevent revascularization. Anti-platelet treatment was provided to lower the risk of in-stent thrombosis. A left frontal hematoma associated with a subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred at day 2. Outcome was favourable with no neurological sequelae, and no clinical recurrence of epistaxis occurred. A 4 months follow-up digital subtraction angiography showed a complete exclusion of the aneurysm. In addition, a magnetic resonance cerebral angiography at 16 months showed stable results. Thus, this two-stage endovascular procedure has proven its effectiveness in preventing epistaxis recurrence while preserving the ICA patency. PMID:26494406

  4. Sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Kuk; Cho, Seok Hyun; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old male patient operated on for sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving. The patient attended our emergency department because of intractable headache but did not improve with conservative treatment. After computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination, he was diagnosed with sphenoid sinusitis that extended to the nasal septum. He therefore underwent surgery for sinus ventilation and abscess drainage.

  5. Isolated sphenoid sinus pathology: spectrum of diagnostic and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Nour, Yasser Ahmed; Al-Madani, Ayman; El-Daly, Ahmed; Gaafar, Alaa

    2008-12-01

    Isolated sphenoid sinus pathology is a relatively uncommon entity. The present study is a retrospective review of 40 patients with isolated sphenoid sinus pathology who were treated at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Alexandria University between July 2002 and December 2005. Special emphasis will be given to the role of various endoscopic approaches in the surgical management of isolated sphenoid sinus pathology. Factors that govern the selection of each approach will be discussed. Extracted data included patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging studies, treatment modalities and complications. Sphenoid sinus was approached through one of the following three approaches: (1) endoscopic transnasal approach, (2) endoscopic transseptal approach and (3) endoscopic transpterygoid approach. Outcome measures were based on assessment of patients' symptoms and confirmation of a patent sphenoid sinus by office endoscopy. The pathology spectrum was rather wide and included 26 (65%) inflammatory conditions (acute/chronic sphenoiditis, mucoceles, and fungal sinusitis), 7 (17.5%) neoplasms and 7 (17.5%) miscellaneous conditions (cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, sphenochoanal polyp, and fibrous dysplasia). The most common initial symptom was headache (50%) followed by ophthalmological symptoms (22.5%). Other presenting symptoms included CSF leak in five patients, epistaxis in four patients and nasal obstruction and/or rhinorrhea in two patients. Radiological workup included computed tomography (CT) scan of the paranasal sinuses in all patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 21 patients (52.5%). The most common indication was a sphenoid mass based on endoscopic and CT findings. Four patients with acute/chronic sphenoiditis were successfully treated with medical therapy. One patient with fibrous dysplasia did not require any definitive treatment. Thirty-five patients underwent endoscopic surgery under general anaesthesia. An adjuvant

  6. Dimensions, septation, and pattern of pneumatization of the sphenoidal sinus.

    PubMed

    Idowu, O E; Balogun, B O; Okoli, C A

    2009-11-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EEA) to treat sellar, parasellar, and suprasellar tumours continues to gain increased significance. Due to the close proximity of the sphenoid sinus to the carotid artery and the optic canal, it is very important for surgeons to know the anatomical features and variations of the sphenoid sinus as relevant to EEA. A prospective study of the sphenoid sinus morphology was carried out on the cranial tomographic (CT) scan images of 60 Nigerian adult patients. The CTs were reviewed regarding the different anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus: dimensions, septation, and pattern of pneumatisation. There were 37 males and 23 females. The patients' ages ranged from 18 years to 85 years, with a mean of 47.2 years. There was a main single intersphenoid septum in most patients (95%). The insertion of the septum was usually to the right posteriorly (38%) and in the midline anterior (65%). Although there is usually a main septum, the septa present were multiple in 29 of the sinuses studied. There was no gender difference with respect to the attachment of the main sphenoid sinus septum. The sphenoid anterior, posterior, and transverse dimensions were not significantly dependent on age, but they were longer in males than in females. Sellar pneumatization was present in the majority of the patients (83%), with 4 patients having postsellar pneumatization (6.7%) and 3 patients having presellar pneumatization (5%). There were no cases with conchal pneumatization or lateral pneumatization of the greater wing of the sphenoid. The present study provides anatomical information about the sphenoid sinus dimensions morphology that is essential for avoiding complications in performing an endoscopic sphenoidotomy.

  7. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  8. Sphenoid Sinus Metastasis as the Presenting Manifestation of a Prostatic Adenocarcinoma: Case Report and Overview of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Puche-Sanz, I.; Vázquez-Alonso, F.; Flores-Martín, J. F.; Almonte-Fernández, H.; Cózar-Olmo, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Although a metastatic presentation of an occult prostatic adenocarcinoma is not uncommon, the majority of these patients present with bone metastasis affecting the axial skeleton. Cranial metastases to the paranasal sinuses are extremely rare. A 56-year-old man presented with loss of vision and numbness of the right side of the face. Computed tomography (CT) scan and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass invading the sphenoid sinus. The patient underwent surgery to remove the lesion, and the histopathological examination suggested metastasis of an adenocarcinoma, with positive staining to prostatic specific antigen (PSA). However, serum PSA was 4 ng/mL, and the patient did not report any lower urinary tract symptoms or bone pain. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy revealed prostatic adenocarcinomas with a Gleason score of 8 [4 + 4]. The subsequent treatment consisted of radiotherapy and androgen deprivation, followed by first- and second-line chemotherapy (docetaxel and cabazitaxel) when the disease progressed. The patient achieved a good response with the last cycle of cabazitaxel and after a 5-year followup is currently alive. Cranial metastases of prostate adenocarcinoma are rare, and there is currently no standard treatment for these patients. Whenever possible, surgery combined with radiotherapy and hormonotherapy is the recommended option. PMID:23198202

  9. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Sinus of the Lesser Sphenoid Wing Presenting with Pontine Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideki; Ishiguro, Tomoya; Terada, Aiko; Komiyama, Masaki

    2017-02-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing (SLSW) with leptomeningeal drainage are rare. We report a patient with a DAVF of the SLSW draining into the basal vein of Rosenthal (BVR) presenting with pontine hemorrhage. A 71-year-old man presented with sudden right hemisensory disturbance of the arm and leg. Brain computed tomography scan showed left pontine hemorrhage, and cerebral angiography revealed a DAVF of the left SLSW. The fistula drained solely into the left BVR, which had an anastomosis to the left lateral mesencephalic vein, which had a varix invaginated into the left pons. The diagnosis was a DAVF of the left SLSW drained into the lateral mesencephalic vein via the bridging vein of the left SLSW, the deep middle cerebral vein, and the BVR, and a varix of the lateral mesencephalic vein caused pontine hemorrhage. The fistula was occluded by clipping through frontotemporal craniotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative cerebral angiography confirmed disappearance of the fistula. A DAVF of the SLSW presenting with pontine hemorrhage is extremely rare, and DAVFs with deep leptomeningeal drainage should be included among a variety of etiologies of pontine hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A review of eight cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to sphenoid sinusitis, including a12-year-old girl at the present department.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Hu; Chen, Po-Yen; Ting, Pei-Ju; Huang, Fang-Liang

    2017-09-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a severe disease which can result from infection of any of the tissues drained by the cavernous sinus. We here review eight cases, including a 12-year-old girl, all secondary to sphenoid sinusitis. The clinical manifestations, laboratory data, imaging findings, pathogens, medications, surgical treatment and clinical outcomes were analyzed. All eight patients had headache and five of them fever. All cases were associated with one or more ophthalmic symptoms. In four cases, computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging showed isolated sphenoid sinusitis. In three cases, streptococci were isolated from blood culture and two cases showed Staphylococcus aureus in blood and sinus cultures. In seven cases, surgery was undertaken. All eight subjects received antibiotics, and 5 were administered intravenous ceftriaxone and metronidazole. Six subjects received anticoagulation therapy and one received corticosteroids. No mortality was recorded. Three cases showed sequelae, including Lemierre syndrome, ophthalmic complaints, and cranial nerve paralysis. In conclusion, the management of CST should include intravenous antibiotic therapy, combined with endonasal sinus surgery.

  11. Isolated Sphenoid Sinus Lesions: Experience with a Few Rare Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiva, Nishanth; Nandeesh, B. N.; Shukla, Dhaval; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Somanna, Sampath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The sphenoid sinus is often neglected because of its difficult access. The deep position of the sphenoid sinus hinders early diagnosis of pathologies in that location. Delayed diagnosis can cause serious complications due to proximity to many important structures. Objectives: The aim of this study is to demonstrate different pathologies which can affect the sphenoid sinus and elucidate the findings. Methods: Cases of isolated sphenoid sinus lesions encountered in the neurosurgical setting which had rare pathologies are discussed. Pathologies such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis, solitary plasmacytoma, chordoma, pituitary adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, fungal infection, and mucocele which appeared primarily in sphenoid sinus are discussed along with their imaging features and pathological findings. Conclusion: Multitude of different pathologies can occur in sphenoid sinus. Detailed preoperative imaging is very helpful, but transnasal biopsy and histological study are required often for definitive diagnosis. The possible advantages of early diagnosis before spread of pathology for prognosis cannot be overemphasized. PMID:28149092

  12. Isolated sphenoid sinus pathologies – the problem of delayed diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sieskiewicz, Andrzej; Lyson, Tomasz; Olszewska, Ewa; Chlabicz, Magdalena; Buonamassa, Simona; Rogowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Isolated sphenoid sinus pathologies are relatively rare. In the majority of cases, symptoms do not arise in the early stages of the disease or are non-specific, therefore making diagnosis difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic process and the reasons for development of complications in patients with isolated sphenoid sinus pathology. Material/Methods The clinical data and observation charts of 32 patients were investigated to determine how long the main symptoms of sphenoid pathology had been present before the patients were referred for medical treatment, and the time that elapsed from the first ambulatory medical assessment to the initial diagnosis. Results Complaints and symptoms of sphenoid sinus pathology had been present for 10.2 months before the diagnosis was established. Although the duration of complaints in “ORL” (diagnosed by otorhinolaryngologist) and “non-ORL” (diagnosed by other specialists) group of patients was similar (10.8 and 9.5 months on average, respectively), unexpectedly, in the “non-ORL” group of patients, the time necessary for making the initial diagnosis was actually shorter than in the “ORL” group (1.8 vs 4.1 months). At the time of hospital admission, endoscopic examination revealed no abnormalities in 31.2% of patients. In 28.1% of patients the pathological process in the sphenoid sinus was diagnosed only after the onset of complications. Conclusions The occult character of the disease and the lack of severe and specific symptoms, rather than the delay in getting extensive diagnostic tests, are responsible for the delayed diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Sphenoid Sinus and Sphenoid Bone Fractures in Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cantini Ardila, Jorge Ernesto; Mendoza, Miguel Ángel Rivera; Ortega, Viviana Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphenoid bone fractures and sphenoid sinus fractures have a high morbidity due to its association with high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to describe individuals with traumatic injuries from different mechanisms and attempt to determine if there is any relationship between various isolated or combined fractures of facial skeleton and sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus fractures. Methods We retrospectively studied hospital charts of all patients who reported to the trauma center at Hospital de San José with facial fractures from December 2009 to August 2011. All patients were evaluated by computed tomography scan and classified into low-, medium-, and high-energy trauma fractures, according to the classification described by Manson. Design This is a retrospective descriptive study. Results The study data were collected as part of retrospective analysis. A total of 250 patients reported to the trauma center of the study hospital with facial trauma. Thirty-eight patients were excluded. A total of 212 patients had facial fractures; 33 had a combination of sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures, and facial fractures were identified within this group (15.5%). Gender predilection was seen to favor males (77.3%) more than females (22.7%). The mean age of the patients was 37 years. Orbital fractures (78.8%) and maxillary fractures (57.5%) were found more commonly associated with sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. Conclusions High-energy trauma is more frequently associated with sphenoid fractures when compared with medium- and low-energy trauma. There is a correlation between facial fractures and sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. A more exhaustive multicentric case-control study with a larger sample and additional parameters will be essential to reach definite conclusions regarding the spectrum of fractures of the sphenoid bone associated with facial fractures. PMID:24436756

  14. Sphenoid sinus microbiota in pituitary apoplexy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Gavin J; Waqar, Mueez; McBain, Andrew J; Gnanalingham, Kanna K

    2017-08-29

    There is a high incidence of abnormal sphenoid sinus changes in patients with pituitary apoplexy (PA). Their pathophysiology is currently unexplored and may reflect an inflammatory or infective process. In this preliminary study, we characterised the microbiota of sphenoid sinus mucosa in patients with PA and compared findings to a control group of surgically treated non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). In this prospective observational study of patients undergoing trans-sphenoidal surgery for PA or NFPA, sphenoid sinus mucosal specimens were microbiologically profiled through PCR-cloning of the 16S rRNA gene. Ten patients (five with PA and five with NFPAs) with a mean age of 51 years (range 23-71) were included. Differences in the sphenoid sinus microbiota of the PA and NFPA groups were observed. Four PA patients harboured Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter spp., N = 3; Escherichia coli, N = 1). In contrast, patients with NFPAs had a sinus microbiota more representative of health, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (N = 2) or Corynebacterium spp. (N = 2). PA may be associated with an abnormal sphenoid sinus microbiota that is similar to that seen in patients with sphenoid sinusitis.

  15. Hemangioma of the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kilde, John D; Rhee, John S; Balla, Andre A; Smith, Michelle M; Smith, Timothy L

    2003-03-01

    Hemangiomas of the paranasal sinuses are rare, particularly those of the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses. Although imaging of the sinuses is key to determining the extent of involvement, the diagnosis is based on the lesion's histologic appearance. Obtaining an adequate biopsy can be difficult in light of the risk of bleeding and the relative inaccessibility of lesions in this region. These obstacles can make the diagnosis and management of these lesions particularly challenging. We describe two new cases of sinonasal hemangioma--one in the ethmoid sinus and one in the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses--and we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that are needed to manage these lesions.

  16. Metallic foreign body in the sphenoid sinus after ballistic injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, A; Abouchadi, A; Jidal, M; Gazzaz, M; Elmostarchid, B; Naama, O; Rzin, A; Boucetta, M

    2008-05-01

    Paranasal sinus injuries by foreign bodies have a lower incidence compared with facial injuries. Among them, penetrating maxillofacial injuries to the sphenoid sinus and skull base remain rare. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with, after a missile-related maxillofacial injury, a metallic foreign body enclosed within the sphenoid sinus with carotid-canal fracture. Angiographic evaluation showed a mass in the right internal carotid artery. The foreign object was successfully extracted through a transmaxillary sublabial approach with a good outcome. We discuss the extensive preoperative evaluation and interdisciplinary management of this unusual injury.

  17. [Isolated inverted papilloma of the sphenoid sinus - case report].

    PubMed

    Oleś, Krzysztof; Wiatr, Maciej; Stręk, Paweł; Składzień, Jacek; Tomik, Jerzy; Podziorny, Henryk; Boroń, Aleksandra; Szaleniec, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Primary inverted papilloma of the sphenoid sinus is rare. The tumor is considered locally aggressive. In selected cases inverted papilloma can be associated with squamous cell carcinoma. Radiologic imaging is a key to an accurate diagnosis. We analyzed patient with inverted papilloma in sphenoid sinus which was removed with endoscopic surgery. We discuss patient with isolated inverted papilloma located in the sphenoid sinus. Performed endoscopic treatment enabled removal of tumour with no complications. Transnasal endoscopic large sphenoidotomy remains an effective modality for management of patients with inverted papilloma. This method does not require external approach and it is performed with no scars, with minimal injury of tissues. Copyright © 2011 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner (Poland). All rights reserved.

  18. Fine needle aspiration cytology of primary sphenoid sinus esthesioneuroblastoma metastatic to the skin

    PubMed Central

    Akinfolarin, Josephine; Jazaerly, Tarek; Jones, Kia; Abu-Hamdan, Maher; Lonardo, Fulvio; Folbe, Adam; Giorgadze, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is a rare tumor derived from olfactory neuroepithelium. ENB in a site outside of where olfactory epithelium exists is exceedingly rare with only five cases of ENB isolated to the sphenoid sinuses described in the literature to date. To the best of our knowledge, a skin metastasis of ENB outside the head and neck region has not been reported. We present an unusual case of a 33-year-old male diagnosed with primary sphenoid sinus ENB, who underwent surgical resection of the tumor followed by chemoradiation. About 5 months later, the patient developed a dermal mass in the sternal region, clinically suspicious for metastasis. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) revealed a tumor with morphological features and immunophenotype consistent with the metastasis from patient's known primary sphenoid sinus ENB. Our case demonstrates that the skin may be a rare site of a metastatic ENB, and FNA is a cost-effective and reliable diagnostic method of a suspected cutaneous metastasis. PMID:23210016

  19. Combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal resection of sphenoorbital meningioma extending into the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masahide; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Shuho; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sphenoorbital meningiomas are surgically challenging because of their nature to extend to adjacent structures. Here, we describe a case of recurrent sphenoorbital meningioma extending into the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa, which was resected using combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal approaches. Case Description: A 62-year-old man who had 15 years earlier undergone partial resection of a left sphenoorbital meningioma presented with a 1-year history of progressive proptosis of the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a Gd-enhancing tumor occupying the left sphenoid wing and orbital lateral wall and extending into extracranial structures such as the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa as well as adjacent structures such as the cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure (SOF). Based on the MRI findings of tumor extension into the sphenoid sinus with broad continuity, the risk of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage through the large defect in the sphenoid sinus was considered high. Subtotal resection using combined simultaneous transzygomatic and endoscopic endonasal approaches was performed, leaving residual tumor in the cavernous sinus and SOF. The large skull base defect between the middle fossa and sphenoid sinus was covered with a free graft of fascia lata from the transcranial side and with a vascularized nasoseptal flap from the endonasal side. No CSF rhinorrhea and no neurological deficits developed postoperatively. Conclusion: Combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal approaches may become a safe and feasible alternative for sphenoorbital meningioma with a large skull base defect penetrating to the paranasal sinus.

  20. Coil migration after endovascular coil occlusion of internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysms within the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Struffert, T; Buhk, J H; Buchfelder, M; Rohde, V; Doerfler, A; Knauth, M

    2009-04-01

    We report two cases of coil migration after endovascular treatment of pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery within the sphenoid sinus with coils and noncovered stents. Two patients underwent sphenoid sinus exposure for pituitary adenoma and chronic infection, respectively. As a complication pseudoaneurysms of the internal carotid artery within the sphenoid sinus developed. One patient was treated with stent and coils, the second with coils alone. Both patients experienced coil migration after 9 and 26 months, respectively, with the necessity for further treatment. Imaging was performed using flat detector computed tomography (FD-CT). Literature review revealed two additional cases of coil migration and four patients with the same treatment in stable condition. Pseudoaneurysms of the internal carotid artery are a special entity and the environment of the aneurysm within the sphenoid sinus may change over a long time. Coil embolization may lead to the late onset complication of coil migration with the possible risk of acute epistaxis. As a consequence, these patients need a careful and prolonged follow up. FD-CT is an appropriate technique to visualize the implanted coils and if present the migration of coil material.

  1. Spontaneous sphenoid wing meningoencephaloceles with lateral sphenoid sinus extension: the endoscopic transpterygoid approach.

    PubMed

    Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Achrol, Achal; Soudry, Ethan; Hwang, Peter H; Harsh, Griffith

    2014-10-01

    Spontaneous meningoencephalocele (SME) of the sphenoid wing is a rare cause of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Surgical closure of the fistula is usually required. The approach taken depends on the location of the defect and the extension of the meningoencephalocele. The endoscopic transpterygoid approach may be useful. We prospectively analyzed the three cases of SME of the sphenoid wing with lateral sphenoid sinus extension treated endoscopically at Stanford over the last 3 years with regard to imaging findings, operative technique, and operative morbidity. In our three cases, the extent of pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) exposure undertaken, complete in one and partial in two, depended on the defect site. Follow-up ranged from 17 to 25 months. The fistula was completely closed in all three cases. Extant literature reports a 97% rate of successful closure (N = 65 of 67, with a mean follow-up of 25 months) and no major complications. Endoscopic transpterygoid repair is a useful, safe alternative to traditional approaches for repair of SME of the sphenoid wing. Its feasibility depends on the site of the defect, which can be identified by preoperative imaging. Larger PPF exposure and postoperative lumbar drainage of CSF can be useful and have a low risk of morbidity.

  2. Sphenoid sinus organized hematoma with cranial neuropathies masquerading as a malignancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIN, YU-HSUAN; WANG, PO-CHIN; LIN, YAOH-SHIANG

    2016-01-01

    Sinonasal organized hematoma (SNOH) is rarely encountered in clinical practice. The disease demonstrates a high tendency for occurrence in East Asian individuals, and in the majority of cases, is located in the maxillary sinus. The current report presents the case of an 81-year-old female who developed a space-occupying lesion, which masqueraded as a skull base malignancy, following surgery for the treatment of isolated sphenoid sinus aspergilloma. Subsequent endoscopic endonasal surgery confirmed the diagnosis of an OH of the sphenoid sinus. The patient recovered from all neurological deficits within two months, with the exception of the loss of visual perception. Although SNOH presents a diagnostic challenge, when physicians possess knowledge of its typical imaging features, this facilitates the achievement of a correct diagnosis and the prescription of optimal treatment. PMID:27284357

  3. Sphenoid sinus organized hematoma with cranial neuropathies masquerading as a malignancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Po-Chin; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang

    2016-06-01

    Sinonasal organized hematoma (SNOH) is rarely encountered in clinical practice. The disease demonstrates a high tendency for occurrence in East Asian individuals, and in the majority of cases, is located in the maxillary sinus. The current report presents the case of an 81-year-old female who developed a space-occupying lesion, which masqueraded as a skull base malignancy, following surgery for the treatment of isolated sphenoid sinus aspergilloma. Subsequent endoscopic endonasal surgery confirmed the diagnosis of an OH of the sphenoid sinus. The patient recovered from all neurological deficits within two months, with the exception of the loss of visual perception. Although SNOH presents a diagnostic challenge, when physicians possess knowledge of its typical imaging features, this facilitates the achievement of a correct diagnosis and the prescription of optimal treatment.

  4. Sphenoid sinus fungall ball: a retrospective study over a 10- year period.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Ph; Grenier, J; Pirlet, A; Poirrier, A L; Stephens, J S; Rombaux, Ph

    2013-06-01

    A fungal ball consists of a dense conglomerate of fungal hyphae growing at the surface of the sinus mucosa without tissue infiltration. The maxillary sinus is by far the most commonly involved paranasal sinus cavity followed by the sphenoid sinus. The present study is a retrospective study of 25 consecutive cases treated during the last 10 years in the two hospitals be- longing to the Catholic University of Louvain (CHU Mont-Godinne and UCL Saint Luc). We report the symptomatology, the imaging and discuss the different surgical managements. We conclude that the clinician must have a high index of suspicion when dealing with a unilateral rhinosinusitis persisting despite a maximal and well conducted medical treatment. This is particularly so in elderly women when associated with facial pain and post nasal drip, particularly when the computed tomography shows an unilateral opacity of the sphenoid sinus with or without a sclerosis or an erosion of the bony walls, a polyp in the sphenoethmoidal recess or a hyperdensity mimicking a foreign body. An endonasal endoscopic sphenoidotomy is the treatment of choice in most cases, allowing good ventilation of the sinus and radical removal of all the fungal concretion. A biopsy of the sinus mucosa adjacent to fungal elements is of upmost important to confirm the non- invasiveness of the fungi within the tissue. Antifungal medication is not required in uncomplicated forms. All host factors producing some degree of immunosuppression must be corrected when present and must alert the clinician to rule out any forms of invasive disease.

  5. Enhancing Mass Lesion of the Sphenoid: Atypical Presentation of Ongoing Pneumatization

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhaneni, Deepak; Badar, Zain; Mangla, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Sinus pneumatization is a complex variable process that begins in early life and continues for many years. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy with progressive headaches and neurologic symptoms suggestive of intracranial pathology. The presence of enhancing tissue within the sphenoid sinus created a diagnostic dilemma which leads to a transsphenoidal biopsy. Knowledge of imaging characteristics associated with incomplete pneumatization can help differentiate it from more ominous skull base pathology and prevent unnecessary testing. We describe four-year imaging follow-up in a patient with incomplete pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus presenting as an enhancing mass lesion with subsequent follow-up imaging demonstrating gradual regression and increased aeration of the sphenoid sinus. PMID:28058123

  6. Bolstering the Nasoseptal Flap Using Sphenoid Sinus Fat Packing: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Zaidi, Hasan A; Cote, David J; Laws, Edward R

    2017-03-01

    Resection of extensive skull base lesions often necessitates relatively large dural openings and arachnoid, resulting in skull base defects with the potential for a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. A nasoseptal flap (NSF) is a vascularized graft that has greatly diminished the incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Annealing of flaps against the ventral skull base can be tenuous within the first few days after surgery. We report the use of sphenoid sinus fat packing as a buttress to support the nasoseptal flap during skull base reconstruction. A 37-year-old man presented with pan-hypopituitarism, bitemporal hemianopsia, and imaging consistent with a craniopharyngioma. He underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach with resection of the planum and tuberculum sphenoidale for resection of this mass. An NSF was harvested, and a combination of suprasellar fat packing, tensor fasciae lata graft, and Porex plate along with the flap were used to reconstruct the skull base. Postoperatively, he precipitously experienced copious rhinorrhea necessitating surgical re-exploration. A redundant segment of the NSF had retracted into the sphenoid sinus, and was no longer supported against the ventral skull base. We repositioned the NSF and used sphenoid sinus fat packing to help support the graft against the ventral skull base. A postoperative computed tomographic scan demonstrated a clear delineation between the vascularized graft and the fat packing, confirming proper positioning of the flap. Sphenoid sinus fat packing can be an important technical adjunct in bolstering the nasoseptal flap against the ventral skull base in the tenuous early perioperative period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acromegaly in a patient with normal pituitary gland and somatotropic adenoma located in the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Kurowska, Maria; Tarach, Jerzy S; Zgliczyński, Wojciech; Malicka, Joanna; Zieliński, Grzegorz; Janczarek, Marzena

    2008-01-01

    Ectopic acromegaly is a very rare clinical entity occurring in less than 1% of acromegalic patients. In most cases it is caused by GHRH or rarely GH-secreting neoplasms. Even rarer are ectopic pituitary adenomas located in the sphenoid sinus or nasopharynx that originate from pituitary remnants in the craniopharyngeal duct. This dissertation presents the difficulties in visualizing GH-secreting adenoma located in the sphenoid sinus. A 55-year-old man had somatic features of acromegaly for several years. MRI imaging revealed a slightly asymmetric pituitary gland (14 yen 4 mm) without focal lesions. Simultaneously, a spherical mass, 10 mm in diameter, corresponding with ectopic microadenoma was demonstrated on the upper wall of the sphenoid sinus. The serum GH level was 4.3 mg/l, IGF-1 = 615 mg/l, and a lack of GH suppression with oral glucose was proven. After preliminary treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue, transsphenoidal pituitary tumour removal was performed. Histopathological, electron microscopical and immunohistochemical analysis revealed densely granulated somatotropic pituitary adenoma: GH(+), PRL(-), ACTH(-), TSH(-), FSH(-), LH(-), MIB1 < 1%, SSTR3(+) and SSTR5(+). Post-surgical evaluation showed normal pituitary MRI scans, GH and IGF-1 levels 0.18 mug/l and 140 mg/l, respectively, as well as normal GH suppression with oral glucose. The careful analysis of possible pituitary embryonic malformations points out their significance for proper localization of extrapituitary adenomas.

  8. Normal Variations of Sphenoid Sinus and the Adjacent Structures Detected in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Azadeh; Ghafari, Roshanak; AnjomShoa, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The sphenoid sinus is a common target of paranasal surgery. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is likely to endanger the anatomic variations of vital structures adjacent to the sphenoid sinus. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the variations of sphenoid sinus and the related structures by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method In this descriptive-analytic study, CBCT images of 103 patients aged above 20-years were selected (206 sides). Degree of pneumatization of sphenoid sinus, pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process, pterygoid process, protrusion of optic canal, vidian canal, and foramen rotundum, as well as prevalence of sinus septa were recorded. Examinations were performed using On-Demand software (Version 1); data were analyzed by using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant correlation between the pterygoid pneumatization and vidian canal protrusion (p< 0.001), and foramen rotundum protrusion (p< 0.001). The optic canal protrusion was found to be significantly associated with the anterior clinoid pneumatization and pterygoid process (p< 0.001). Statistically significant relationship was also observed between the carotid canal protrusion and pterygoid process pneumatization (p< 0.001). Conclusion The anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus tend to give rise to a complexity of symptoms and potentially serious complications. This variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the regional sphenoid sinus anatomy by a detailed CBCT sinus examination. PMID:26966706

  9. Sphenoid sinus ectopic pituitary adenomas: CT and MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B T; Chong, V F H; Wang, Z C; Xian, J F; Chen, Q H

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic pituitary adenomas (EPAs) are rare lesions. The purpose of this study was to describe the CT and MRI features of sphenoid sinus EPAs. Eight patients with histology-proven EPAs in the sphenoid sinus, all of whom underwent CT and MRI, were reviewed retrospectively. The following imaging features were analysed: (i) size, (ii) margin, (iii) CT attenuation characteristics and (iv) MRI signal intensity. In addition, the involvement of adjacent structures and the time–intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were analysed. All EPAs had well-defined margins and showed no relationship to the intrasellar pituitary gland. The mean size was 28 mm (range, 20–46 mm). On non-enhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to grey matter in 7 (88%) patients and hypodense in 1 (12%) patient. Only two patients underwent post-contrast CT, and they showed moderate enhancement. On T1 weighted images, EPAs appeared isointense in 6 (75%) patients and hypointense in 2 (25%). On T2 weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense in 2 (25%) patients and isointense in 6 (75%). EPAs showed mild to moderate heterogeneous contrast enhancement and exhibited a cribriform-like appearance. Two patients underwent DCE MRI; the TIC showed a rapidly enhancing and slow washout pattern. The following features were also seen: an empty sella, bone changes and involvement of the cavernous sinus (5 patients; 62.5%). In conclusion, a high index of suspicion for EPA and a familiarity with the imaging findings may help to diagnose this rare entity accurately. PMID:19651706

  10. Diagnosis of drowning: Electrolytes and total protein in sphenoid sinus liquid.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Akira; Terazawa, Koichi; Matoba, Kotaro; Horioka, Kie; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2017-04-01

    In this study, electrolyte (sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl), and magnesium (Mg)) and total protein (TP) concentrations and volume of liquid in the sphenoid sinus were examined to determine their usefulness to elucidate whether drowning occurred in freshwater or seawater. We examined 68 cases (seawater drowning group: 27 cases, freshwater drowning group: 21 cases, non-drowning group: 20 cases). There was a significant difference in Na, Cl, Mg, and TP concentrations of liquid in the sphenoid sinus among the three groups (seawater drowning, freshwater drowning, and non-drowning groups). To distinguish freshwater drowning from seawater drowning, Na, Cl, and Mg concentrations of liquid in the sphenoid sinus might serve as useful indicators.

  11. Mucoceles of the sphenoid sinus: neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, M G

    1976-01-01

    Seven examples of mucocele of the sphenoid sinus have been described. The characteristic symptoms and signs have been described, and the diagnostic neuroradiologic features have been demonstrated. The condition is not a benign one, as is demonstrated by total blindness which occurred in one patient (Case 2). A high index of suspicion for this condition with early referral for neuroradiologic diagnosis leads to proper management and treatment which is usually successful. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 7 D FIGURE 7 E FIGURE 7 F FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 PMID:867637

  12. Numerous transorbital wooden foreign bodies in the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Fujieda, S; Tanaka, T; Saito, H

    1999-01-01

    A very rare case of numerous transorbital wooden foreign bodies penetrating into the sphenoid sinus in a 47-year-old male is reported. His right eye was nonreactive to light, and the oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nerves were completely disturbed. Although a minor injury was observed on the inner side of the right eyebrow, the wound was not serious or infectious. Computed tomographic scanning of the orbit and parasinus revealed an isodense linear shadow to muscle and an irregular shadow of the lamina papyracea. However, the findings were difficult to discriminate from an optic canal fracture preoperatively. We detected foreign bodies penetrating the optic nerve rise, which were successfully removed in combination with an endoscopic transethmoidal and transorbital approach. Various and careful imaging examinations are recommended to diagnose and manage paraorbital trauma, when a penetrating wound of the face is observed.

  13. The Recesses of the Sellar Wall of the Sphenoid Sinus and Their Intracranial Relationships.

    PubMed

    Peris-Celda, Maria; Kucukyuruk, Baris; Monroy-Sosa, Alejandro; Funaki, Takeshi; Valentine, Rowan; Rhoton, Albert L

    2013-02-19

    BACKGROUND:: The sellar wall of the sphenoid sinus and its recesses have been previously studied, but their intracranial relationships to the diaphragma sellae, tuberculum, clinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, chiasmatic sulcus, and middle clinoid process need further definition. OBJECTIVE:: To describe these intra and extracranial relationships of the recesses in the anterior sellar wall. METHODS:: The middle clinoid was studied in 132 parasellar areas of dry skulls. Thirty-eight parasellar areas of formalin-fixed/silicone-colored specimens were dissected. After transsphenoidal endoscopic exposure, the optic, carotid, and sellar prominences; lateral opticocarotid and tuberculum recesses; and caroticosellar and medial opticocarotid points were identified. High-speed drills opened 1 mm perforations at these points to allow study of intracranial relationships. RESULTS:: Two recesses and two junction points can be recognized in the sphenoid sinus: lateral opticocarotid and tuberculum recesses and medial opticocarotid and caroticosellar points. The lateral opticocarotid recess corresponds to the optic strut base, and the clinoid segment of the internal carotid artery is located medially. The diaphragma sellae attachment is at the level of the tuberculum recess, which in 50% of cases corresponds to the tuberculum. A middle clinoid in base or height greater than 1.5 mm is present in 21.1% and a caroticoclinoid ring in 3%. The middle clinoid is 1 mm inferior and lateral to the caroticosellar point and 4.7 mm inferior to the medial opticocarotid point. CONCLUSION:: An understanding of the intra and extracranial relationships of the recesses of the sphenoid sinus will aid in accurately directing transsphenoidal approaches.

  14. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Isolated Pathologies of the Sphenoid Sinus: Retrospective Study of 46 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Marcolini, Thomas Ribeiro; Safraider, Maryane Cristine; Socher, Jan Alessandro; Lucena, Guilherme Olinto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated disease of the sphenoid is rare and has often been overlooked due to its remote location and difficult access. Objective A retrospective study of the main causes of isolated sphenoid sinus diseases with discussion of the most appropriate methods of diagnosis and treatment. Methods A total of 46 cases of isolated sphenoid disease treated between January 2008 and December 2013 were evaluated by objective ear, nose, and throat examination and video endoscopy, computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses, and, in some cases, magnetic resonance imaging. In each case, we decided between drug and/or endoscopic treatment. Results We identified 12 cases of isolated sphenoiditis (26.1%), 3 cases of fungal sphenoiditis (6.5%), 3 cases of sphenochoanal polyps (6.5%), 22 cases of mucocele (47.8%), 2 cases of cerebrospinal fluid leak (4.3%), and 1 case each of meningoencephalocele (2.1%), inverted papilloma (2.1%), fibrous dysplasia (2.1%), and squamous cell carcinoma (2.1%). Conclusion A prevalence of inflammatory and infectious diseases was found, and endoscopic surgery for the sphenoid sinus approach is effective in treating various diseases of the isolated sphenoid, whether complicated or not. PMID:25992167

  15. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of nose-to-ceiling head positioning for sphenoid sinus irrigation.

    PubMed

    Craig, John R; Palmer, James N; Zhao, Kai

    2017-05-01

    After sinus surgery, patients are commonly instructed to irrigate with saline irrigations with their heads over a sink and noses directed inferiorly (nose-to-floor). Although irrigations can penetrate the sinuses in this head position, no study has assessed whether sphenoid sinus penetration can be improved by irrigating with the nose directed superiorly (nose-to-ceiling). The purpose of this study was to use a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of sinus irrigations to assess the difference in sphenoid sinus delivery of irrigations after irrigating in a nose-to-floor vs nose-to-ceiling head position. Bilateral maxillary antrostomies, total ethmoidectomies, wide sphenoidotomies, and a Draf III frontal sinusotomy were performed on a single fresh cadaver head. CFD models were created from postoperative computed tomography maxillofacial scans. CFD modeling software was used to simulate a 120-mL irrigation to the left nasal cavity with the following parameters: flow rate 30 mL/second, angle of irrigation 20 degrees to the nasal floor, and either nose-to-floor or nose-to-ceiling head positioning. In the postoperative CFD models, the sphenoid sinuses were completely penetrated by the irrigation while in a nose-to-ceiling head position. However, no sphenoid sinus penetration occurred in the nose-to-floor position. Other sinuses were similarly penetrated in both head positions, although the ipsilateral maxillary sinus was less penetrated in the nose-to-ceiling position. CFD modeling demonstrated that the nose-to-ceiling head position was superior to the nose-to-floor position in delivering a 120-mL irrigation to the sphenoid sinuses. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Unilateral optic neuropathy from possible sphenoidal sinus barotrauma after recreational scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gunn, David J; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 35-year-old woman who developed a progressive right optic neuropathy while surfacing from a series of four recreational dives on the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. The patient reported severe sudden onset blurred vision in the right eye associated with a mild headache and epistaxis on surfacing from diving. The patient had her first medical review the day after returning from her trip. At this time visual acuity in the right eye was 20/80, with left eye 20/20. There was a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. A high-resolution computed tomography scan showed fluid in the right sphenoid sinus. Computed perimetry revealed patchy visual field loss in the right eye. The provisional diagnosis of sphenoidal sinus barotrauma-induced optic neuropathy was made. Over 10 days of observation, the visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye and visual field changes resolved. This case highlights a very unusual cause of visual loss associated with diving.

  17. Permanent central diabetes insipidus as a complication of sphenoid sinus mucocele.

    PubMed

    Saylam, Güleser; Bayır, Omer; Girgin, Derya; Arslan, Müyesser Saykı; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Ozdek, Ali; Delibaşı, Tuncay; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Although mucocele is a benign lesion, its unavoidable expansions may result in irreversible damages in adjacent organs. In spheno-ethmoid mucoceles which are extremely rare, this condition may cause more severe problems. Central diabetes insipidus, developed secondary to sphenoid sinus mucocele, was detected in a 54-year-old male patient, who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery 2 times due to nasal polyposis. Endoscopic sphenoid mucocele marsupialization was performed to the patient, but despite partial regression in the 1-year follow up, complete recovery was not observed.

  18. The relationship of the medial roof and the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus to the sphenoid sinus: a radiologic study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ju

    The medial maxillary sinus roof is a ridge formed by the superior margin of the maxillary sinus antrostomy. The posterior wall of the maxillary sinus is always included in operative fields. To perform a radiologic study assessing the utility of the medial maxillary sinus roof and the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus as fixed landmarks for providing a safe route of entry into the sphenoid sinus. We reviewed 115 consecutive paranasal sinus Computed Tomographic scans (230 sides) of Korean adult patients performed from January 2014 to December 2014. Using the nasal floor as a reference point, the vertical distances to the highest point of the medial maxillary sinus roof, the sphenoid ostium and anterior sphenoid roof and floor were measured. Then the vertical distances from the highest point of the medial maxillary sinus roof to the sphenoid ostium and anterior sphenoid roof and floor were calculated. The coronal distance from the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus to the sphenoid ostium was determined. The average height of the highest point of the medial maxillary sinus roof relative to the nasal floor was measured to be 33.83±3.40mm. The average vertical distance from the highest point of the medial maxillary sinus roof to the sphenoid ostium and anterior sphenoid roof and floor was 1.79±3.09mm, 12.02±2.93mm, and 6.18±2.88mm respectively. The average coronal distance from the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus to the sphenoid ostium was 0.78mm. The sphenoid ostium was behind the coronal plane of the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus most frequently in 103sides (44.4%). It was in the same coronal plane in 68 sides (29.3%) and in front of the plane in 61 sides (26.3%). The medial maxillary sinus roof and the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus can be used as a reliable landmark to localize and to enable a safe entry into the sphenoid sinus. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by

  19. Virtual reality surgical anatomy of the sphenoid sinus and adjacent structures by the transnasal approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Sen; Xue, Liang; Jing, Jun-Jie; Wang, Ru-Mi

    2012-09-01

    To examine the three-dimensional virtual anatomical features of the sphenoid sinus and adjacent structures during virtual surgery and explore their relevance to actual transsphenoidal surgery. CT images of the sphenoid sinus and surrounding structures from 28 Chinese adult patients were measured using a 16-slice helical CT scanner. Image analysis was performed using the volume-rendering method. Two experienced neurosurgeons wearing stereoscopic glasses performed virtual transsphenoidal surgery by the transnasal approach. The virtual anatomical features of the sphenoid sinus and the adjacent structures during virtual surgery were described. The distance from the sphenopalatine foramen to the left and right sphenoid ostium was 10.1 ± 2.7 mm and 10.5 ± 3.2 mm, respectively, to the left and right sphenoidal crest 12.9 ± 2.0 mm and 12.8 ± 2.2 mm, respectively, and to the left and right uncinate process 24.0 ± 1.9 mm and 23.9 ± 2.0 mm, respectively. The distance from the uncinate process to the medial and lateral edge of the most prominent part of the anterior bend of the cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) was 33.7 ± 3.7 mm and 34.8 ± 3.7 mm, respectively, and the angle between the two lines was 9.7 ± 1.9°. The study provides virtual anatomical information about the sphenoid sinus and important surrounding structures that is essential for successful real life transsphenoidal surgery. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Headache Induced by Fibrous Dysplasia of the Sphenoid Sinus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-09-01

    Although is a rare disease entity and it is not enough to know about the causal relationship between fibrous dysplasia (FD) of the sphenoid sinus and headache, we should keep in mind the headache is the most common symptom among wide spectrum of potential symptoms in craniofacial FD. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  1. Detection of chlorine and bromine in free liquid from the sphenoid sinus as an indicator of seawater drowning.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Jamal, Mostofa; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the usefulness of elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) in the examination of free liquid from the sphenoid sinus of drowning victims. We detected both chlorine and bromine in liquid taken from the sphenoid sinus of seawater drowning victims. Because these elements were below the quantification limit in freshwater cases, we could easily distinguish seawater from freshwater drowning cases. Detection of these elements from the liquid in the sphenoid sinuses of drowning victims may be useful as a supportive measure for seawater drowning.

  2. Invagination of the Sphenoid Sinus Mucosa after Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Park, Jae-Sung; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Soo Whan; Cho, Jin Hee; Park, Yong Jin; Kang, Yun Jin; Kim, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical features of invagination of the sphenoid sinus mucosa (ISM) and compare them with other similar cases using a visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the various nasal symptoms and to discuss its clinical significance and means of prevention. Study Design Retrospective chart review at a tertiary referral center. Methods Between 2010 and 2015, 8 patients who had undergone EETSA surgery displayed postoperative ISM. The comparison group consisted of 147 patients who underwent the same surgical procedures and were diagnosed with the same diseases. Pre- or postoperative paranasal sinus computed tomography (PNS CT) and VAS were performed and subsequently analyzed. Results The clinical features of ISM of the sphenoid sinus showed sellar floor invagination and regenerated inverted ingrowing sphenoid mucosa on endoscopic imaging. PNS CT also showed a bony defect and invaginated air densities at the sellar turcica. Pre- and postoperative VAS scores revealed that the ISM group had much less of an improvement in headaches after surgery than that of the comparison group (p = 0.049). Conclusion ISM may occur because of a change in pressure, sphenoid mucosal status, or arachnoid membrane status. Moreover, ISM is related to improvements in headaches. Therefore, EETSA patients should avoid activities that cause rapid pressure changes during the healing process. In addition, sellar reconstruction that is resistant to physical pressure changes should be mandated despite the absence of an intraoperative CSF leak. PMID:27622454

  3. Critical analysis of anatomical landmarks within the sphenoid sinus for transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahmadipour, Yahya; Lemonas, Elias; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Goericke, Sophia; Stuck, Boris A; El Hindy, Nicolai; Sure, Ulrich; Mueller, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    The transsphenoidal approach to the sellar region has been introduced more than a 100 years ago. It is the accepted standard operative corridor to pathologies of the pituitary gland and surrounding structures. There are anatomical landmarks within the sphenoid sinus that are used for orientation directing to the sella floor or the cavernous sinus. Yet, little data can be found on the consistency of these landmarks. It is the aim of this study to evaluate the reliability of these anatomical landmarks for the surgeon's orientation. A total of 245 computed tomography (CT) volume data sets of the cranium performed according to a standardized protocol were analyzed for study purposes. CT scans of the cranium of 125 patients admitted to the emergency room of our hospital receiving a trauma spiral according to the local protocol were employed as a control group when no pathology in the sellar region was observed. In addition, preoperative CT scans of a group of 120 patients diagnosed with pituitary adenomas between 2009 and 2013 were analyzed. Image analysis of the anatomical landmarks included the minimal intercarotid distance (ICD), diameter of the sphenoid sinus (DSS), direction of the septum sinuum sphenoidalium (SSS), and the distance between vomer and clivus (VCD). The overall mean ICD was 16.2 mm, with patients suffering from adenomas showing a mean ICD of 15.8 mm compared with an average 16.5 mm in the control group. DSS was equal for both groups (adenoma group: mean 31.5 mm; controls: mean 31.3 mm). Mean VCD was 27.9 mm in patients with pituitary adenomas compared with 26.7 mm in controls. A septum of the sphenoid sinus located in the midline was found in overall 23 % only. SSS was directed into the bony shield of the internal carotid artery in 28 % of underlying tumors and in 37 % of the control group. This is the first detailed description of landmarks of the sphenoid sinus based on a large radiologic-anatomical analysis of CT scans yielding a wide

  4. Ectopic Pituitary Adenomas Presenting as Sphenoid or Clival Lesions: Case Series and Management Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Kuan, Edward C; Adappa, Nithin D; Han, Joseph K; Chandra, Rakesh K; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Marilene B; Suh, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-01

    Background An ectopic pituitary adenoma presenting as a clival or sphenoid mass is a rare clinical occurrence that may mislead the clinician and result in unnecessary interventions or potential medicolegal consequences. Here, we present one of the largest multi-institutional case series and review the literature with an emphasis on radiological findings and critical preoperative workup. Methods Retrospective chart review. Results Nine patients were identified with ectopic pituitary adenomas of the sphenoid or clivus. There were four females and five males. Median age was 60 years old (range, 36-73 years). The most common presenting symptom was headache (56%). Five (56%) patients presented with a mass arising from the clivus while four (44%) presented with a mass in the sphenoid. Six (67%) patients demonstrated biochemical evidence of hypersecretion on full endocrinology panel. All masses showed evidence of enhancement with gadolinium with a propensity for adjacent bone involvement. Lesions also had a predilection for growth toward the cavernous sinus, carotid artery, or sellar floor. Surgical intervention was performed in eight patients (89%). In eight patients (89%), tumors demonstrated immunoreactivity to prolactin. Conclusions Pituitary adenomas can rarely present as an isolated sphenoid or clival mass. Lesions displayed similar magnetic resonance imaging findings with an erosive growth pattern toward the sellar floor, cavernous sinus, or adjacent carotid artery. Patients with clival or parasellar lesions with comparable features should have a preoperative workup which includes prolactin level and alert the physician to consider an ectopic pituitary adenoma in the differential to prevent unnecessary surgery and potential complications.

  5. Skull base erosion and associated complications in sphenoid sinus fungal balls

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Josh C.; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Sadow, Peter; Chambers, Kyle; Dedmon, Matt; Lin, Derrick T.; Holbrook, Eric H.; Metson, Ralph; Gray, Stacey T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sphenoid sinus fungal balls (SSFB) are rare entities that can result in serious orbital and intracranial complications. There are few published reports of complications that result from SSFB. Objective: To review the incidence of skull base erosion and orbital or intracranial complications in patients who present with SSFB. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all the patients with SSFB who were treated at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary from 2006 to 2014. Presenting clinical data, radiology, operative reports, pathology, and postoperative course were reviewed. Results: Forty-three patients with SSFB were identified. Demographic data were compared between patients with (39.5%) and those without (61.5%) skull base erosion. Two patients underwent emergent surgery for acute complications of SSFB (one patient with blindness, one patient who had a seizure). Both patients with acute complications had evidence of skull base erosion, whereas no patients with an intact skull base developed an orbital or intracranial complication (p = 0.15). All the patients were surgically managed via an endoscopic approach. Conclusion: SSFBs are rare but may cause significant skull base erosion and potentially severe orbital and intracranial complications if not treated appropriately. Endoscopic sphenoidotomy is effective in treating SSFB and should be performed emergently in patients who presented with associated complications.

  6. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the sphenoid bone extending into the ethmoid sinus, nasal cavity and orbita in a child.

    PubMed

    Bozbuğa, Mustafa; Turan Süslü, Hikmet

    2009-04-01

    An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) typically involves the long bones of the extremities, thorax, pelvis, or vertebrae. Skull base involvement is rare. We describe the case of a 9-year-old girl with ABC of the skull base. The patient had presented with nasal obstruction and headache over a period of approximately 8 months. The patient had no history of trauma or surgery. Physical and neurological examination findings normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a multicystic lesion arising from the sphenoid sinus and extending into ethmoid sinus, superior nasal cavity and medial walls of the orbit. The lesion contained thin internal septations that revealed high signal characteristics on all sequences. The lesion was resected via an extended frontal approach without any complications. Histological evaluation confirmed that the lesion was an ABC. The patient did not receive postoperative radiotherapy. No recurrence was observed after 22 months. ABC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone neoplasms in this region.

  7. Thickened Pituitary Stalk Associated with a Mass in the Sphenoidal Sinus: An Alarm to Suspect Hypophysitis by Immunoglobulin G4?

    PubMed

    Batista, Rafael Loch; Ramos, Luciano Silva; Cescato, Valter Angelo; Musolino, Nina Rosa Castro; Borba, Clarissa Groberio; Silva, Gilberto Ochman; Moreno, Lilian Hupfeld; Cunha Neto, Malebranche Bernardo Carneiro

    2015-07-01

    Introduction Hypophysitis is a chronic inflammation of the pituitary gland of complex and still incompletely defined pathogenesis. It belongs to the group of non-hormone-secreting sellar masses, sharing with them comparable clinical presentation and radiographic appearance. Objectives Describe the case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related hypophysitis presenting as a mass in the sphenoid sinus. Resumed Report A 40-year-old Brazilian man had a diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus since 2001 associated with pituitary insufficiency. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging revealed a centered pituitary stalk with focal nodular thickening and the presence of heterogeneous materials inside the sphenoid sinus. The patient was treated with testosterone replacement therapy. Laboratory results revealed increased IgG4 serum. Conclusion IgG4-related hypophysitis should be considered in patients with pituitary insufficiency associated with sellar mass and/or thickened pituitary stalk. IgG4 serum measurement for early diagnosis of IgG4-related hypophysitis should be performed.

  8. Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis: management challenge

    PubMed Central

    Charakorn, Natamon; Snidvongs, Kornkiat

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis is a spectrum of inflammatory diseases in isolated sphenoid sinus which may persist over a period of 12 weeks. It is a different entity from other types of rhinosinusitis because clinical presentations include headache, visual loss or diplopia, and patients may or may not have nasal obstruction or nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopic examination is useful, and computed tomography is mandatory. The disease requires comprehensive knowledge and appropriate imaging technique for diagnosis. To treat patients with chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis, surgical treatment with endoscopic transnasal sphenoidotomy is often required. As there are no recent updated reviews of chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis, in this article, we review the anatomy of the sphenoid sinus and its clinical relationship with the clinical signs and symptoms of the disease, the imaging findings of each diagnosis and the comprehensive surgical techniques. PMID:27877057

  9. Ectopic acromegaly due to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma in the sphenoid sinus: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Claudia; Hernández-Ramirez, Laura-Cristina; Espinosa-de-los-Monteros, Ana-Laura; Franco, Juan Manuel; Guinto, Gerardo; Mercado, Moises

    2013-10-12

    In more than 98% of cases, acromegaly is due to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. The term "ectopic acromegaly" includes neuroendocrine tumors secreting GH releasing hormone (GHRH), usually located in the lungs, thymus and endocrine pancreas. Considerably less frequent are cases of ectopic acromegaly due to GH-secreting tumors located out of the pituitary fossa; except for one isolated case of a well-documented GH-secreting lymphoma, the majority of these lesions are located in the sphenoid sinus. We present the case of a 45 year old woman with acromegaly whose MRI showed an empty sella without evidence of a pituitary adenoma but revealed a large mass within the sphenoid sinus. She underwent transsphenoidal surgery and the excised sphenoid sinus mass, proved to be a GH-secreting adenoma; the sellar floor was intact and no other lesions were found in the pituitary fossa. She required postoperative treatment with somatostatin analogs and cabergoline for clinical and biochemical control. This case highlights the importance of carefully evaluating the structures surrounding the sellar area when a pituitary adenoma is not found with currently available imaging techniques. The finding of an intact sellar floor and duramater lead us to conclude that the patient's tumor originated de novo from embryological pituitary remnants. Upon a careful review of the literature and a critical evaluation of our case we found neither clinical nor biochemical features that would distinguish an ectopic from the more common eutopically located somatotrophinoma.

  10. Association of Morbidity with Extent of Resection and Cavernous Sinus Invasion in Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas*

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Michael E.; Cheng, Jason S.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sughrue, Michael E.; Clark, Aaron; Kane, Ari J.; Aranda, Derick; McDermott, Michael; Barani, Igor J.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Sphenoid wing meningiomas (SWMs) typically are histologically benign, insidious lesions, but the propensity of these tumors for local invasion makes disease control very challenging. In this review, we assess whether the degree of resection and extent of cavernous sinus invasion affects morbidity, mortality, and recurrence in patients with SWM. A comprehensive search of the English-language literature was performed. Patients were stratified according to extent of resection and extent of cavernous sinus invasion, and tumor recurrence rate, morbidity, and mortality were analyzed. A total of 23 studies and 131 patients were included. Overall recurrence and surgical mortality rate were 11% and 2%, respectively (average follow-up = 65 months). Cranial nerve III palsy was significantly associated with incompletely versus completely resected SWMs (7 to 0%) as well as meningiomas with cavernous sinus invasion versus no sinus invasion (14 vs. 0%). No significant difference in tumor recurrence rate was noted between these groups. In conclusion, complete excision of SWMs is always recommended whenever possible, but surgeons should acknowledge that there is nonetheless a chance of recurrence and should weigh this against the risk of causing cranial nerve injuries. PMID:23372999

  11. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  12. Osteoradionecrosis of sphenoid and temporal bones in a patient with maxillary sinus carcinoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuchi, T.; Sano, K.; Kaminogo, M. )

    1990-09-01

    A case of radionecrosis of sphenoid and temporal bones is reported. The patient received a combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy for his left maxillary sinus carcinoma. After the combined therapy, necrosis accompanying inflammation developed in the maxillary and temporal regions. Excision of the necrotic tissues was done, and the left ascending ramus of the mandible was resected because of persistent tumor mass at the left infratemporal fossa. Although the excision wound of the maxilla healed by epithelialization, an area of nonvital bone remained exposed in the temporal region, where progressive osteonecrosis with infection led to breakdown of the skin. The necrotic bones of the zygomatic arch and the sphenotemporal sutural region became visible through the skin defect, and computerized tomography scan revealed bone necrosis involving the inferolateral area and the base of the skull. Excision of the necrotic bone and reconstruction with sternocleidomastoid myocutaneous flap were performed.

  13. Extensive visceral calcification demonstrated on Tc-99m MDP bone scan in patient with sphenoidal sinus carcinoma and hypercalcaemia of malignancy: a bad prognostic sign.

    PubMed

    Usmani, S; Khan, H A; Abu Huda, F; Al Nafisi, N; Al Mohannadi, S

    2011-01-01

    Sphenoidal sinus carcinoma is a rare cause of hypercalcemia of malignancy. We report on a 37-year-old male with sphenoidal sinus carcinoma with intracranial extension who developed hypercalcemia of malignancy with progressing disease and demonstrated diffuse metastatic visceral calcifications of lungs, myocardium, stomach, kidneys and thyroid on follow-up 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan. In the absence of extensive skeletal metastases, bone scan help confirm humoral nature of hypercalcaeimia.

  14. Analysis of the Bacterial Flora in the Nasal Cavity and the Sphenoid Sinus Mucosa in Patients Operated on with an Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    SHIBAO, Shunsuke; TODA, Masahiro; TOMITA, Toshiki; OGAWA, Kaoru; YOSHIDA, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the bacterial flora in the nasal cavity and sphenoid sinus and evaluate the sensitivity of these bacteria to antibiotics that can be used to prevent postoperative meningitis. Bacteria of the preoperative nasal cavity and intraoperative sphenoid sinus mucosa were cultured and analyzed in 40 patients (20 men and 20 women; mean age, 52.2 years) who underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. The sensitivity of these bacteria to cephalosporin, a representative prophylactic antibiotic, was examined. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequently detected species in both spaces; 24 (38.7%) of 62 isolates in the nasal cavity and 26 (37.1%) of 70 isolates in the sphenoid sinus. In contrast, Corynebacterium species were found mainly in the nasal cavity, and anaerobic bacteria were found only in the sphenoid sinus. Bacteria that were resistant to cephalosporin were found in the nasal cavity in 3.2% of patients and in the sphenoid sinus in 20% of patients. In conclusion, the composition of bacterial flora, including bacteria that are resistant to prophylactic antibiotics, differs between the nasal cavity and the sphenoid sinus. PMID:25446386

  15. Pneumatization of Mastoid Air Cells, Temporal Bone, Ethmoid and Sphenoid Sinuses. Any Correlation?

    PubMed

    Hindi, Khalid; Alazzawi, Sarmad; Raman, Rajagopalan; Prepageran, Narayanan; Rahmat, Kartini

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the pneumatization of the paranasal sinuses (PNS) and other parts of temporal bone such as mastoid air cells and to investigate if there was any association between the aeration of these structures among the three major ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese, Indian) as this would be representative of Asia. A retrospective review of 150 computed tomography (CT) scans of PNS and temporal bones was done and analysed. The pneumatization of each area was obtained and compared using statistical analysis. Patients with a history of previous medical or surgical problems in the intended areas were excluded from the study. The pneumatization of the mastoid air cells and other temporal bone parts were noted to be symmetrical in more than 75 %. There was a positive correlation between the pneumatization of mastoid air cells and that of the sphenoid sinus. The prevalence of Agger nasi, Haller's and Onodi cells was observed to be significantly higher in the Chinese group. Preoperative assessment of the temporal bone and PNS with CT scan may be helpful in the evaluation of their anatomical landmark and decrease the possibility of surgical complications related to 3D structures.

  16. A pitfall in diagnosing Cushing's disease: ectopic ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma in the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Flitsch, J; Schmid, S M; Bernreuther, C; Winterberg, B; Ritter, M M; Lehnert, H; Burkhardt, T

    2015-04-01

    To show a rare case of Cushing's disease and possible cause of failed transsphenoidal surgery. We report on a 50-year-old woman suffering from ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. Endocrinological work-up including low-dose/high-dose dexamethasone test (Liddle-test) and CRH test were clearly compatible with pituitary origin. Although an MRI showed no pituitary tumor, CRH-stimulated petrosal sinus sampling revealed a significant central-peripheral gradient in ACTH concentrations, rendering Cushing's disease very likely. The patient underwent transsphenoidal surgery with negative exploration of the pituitary gland. After intraoperative re-evaluation of the preoperative MRI, a "polyp" at the bottom of the sphenoid sinus was identified. The intraoperative microscopic aspect as well as instantaneous sections and cytology of a biopsy confirmed an adenoma, which was then removed. Histological analysis demonstrated an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma adjacent to respiratory mucous membrane consisting of ciliated epithelium with submucous connective tissue. Postoperatively, ACTH concentrations were decreased and intermittent hydrocortisone substitution treatment was initiated. At the 3-month follow up, Cushing's stigmata were found to be alleviated and the hydrocortisone dosage could be reduced. Ectopic pituitary adenoma tissue causing Cushing's disease is extremely rare but a potential cause for surgical failure or re-evaluation.

  17. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in Chinese: the differences from Caucasian and its application in the extended transsphenoidal approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuntao; Pan, Jun; Qi, Songtao; Shi, Jin; Zhang, Xi'an; Wu, Kuncheng

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, the transsphenoidal approach has been extensively used surgically to treat parasellar, suprasellar, clival, and even petrous lesions. Extended pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus (SS) is considered an indispensable element for the extended transsphenoidal (ETS) approach. Because most anatomical studies of the ETS approach use Caucasian subjects, the present study aims to clarify the pneumatic extension types in Chinese individuals as well as any differences from those in Caucasians and analyze these differences with respect to the application of the ETS approach. A total of 200 computed tomography (CT) images of SSs and 18 adult cadaveric heads were selected for observation and measurement. The conchal, presellar, and sellar types comprised 6, 28.5, and 65.5% of subjects, respectively; according to the extra extension, the prevalence of the lateral, clival, lesser wing, and combined extension sinus types was 11.4, 21.4, 0.8, and 48.1% of subjects, respectively. The percentages of pneumatization of the anterior and posterior clinoid processes, pterygoid process, and optic strut were 5.0, 1.0, 22.3, and 7.0%, respectively. Onodi cells were observed in 61.1% of the sides of the cadaveric heads, including 30.6% with good pneumatization with identifiable optical or ICA bulges. These features were related to poor lateral and clival gasification in Chinese compared with Caucasians, which might make extended surgery more dangerous. However, the anterior pneumatization, especially the higher presentation of Onodi cells, ensures that the anterior ETS approach can be performed safely in Chinese patients. In general, measurements showing smaller sinus volumes and thicker bones with identifiable bone landmarks that are hard to find compared with those in Caucasians suggest increased surgical risks in the Chinese population. In this situation, carefully analysis of presurgical CT and magnetic resonance imaging scans is important. Furthermore, in the ETS

  18. Ectopic ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma of the sphenoid sinus: case report of endoscopic endonasal resection and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Justin; Lucas, Joshua; Commins, Deborah; Lerner, Olga; Lerner, Alexander; Carmichael, John D; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    from 16 to 76 years, and there were 15 women and 4 men. The mean and median diameters of the resected sphenoid masses were 13.9 and 8 mm, respectively, with a range of 3-55 mm. Seven were microadenomas (< 1 cm). Fifteen of the 19 cases reported serum ACTH and morning cortisol levels, the means of which were 106.7 pg/ml and 32.5 μg/dl, respectively. Gross-total tumor resection was achieved in all patients except one, and in all of them durable hormonal remission of Cushing syndrome was achieved (mean follow-up time 20 months). Ectopic pituitary adenomas are rare but important causes of Cushing syndrome and related endocrinopathies, particularly because of the rapid onset and severity of symptoms with atypical presentation. Ectopic pituitary adenomas, especially those in the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, or paranasal sinuses, are easily misidentified. Any patient presenting with signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome without any obvious pituitary adenoma or other sources of hypercortisolemia should be thoroughly screened for an ectopic adenoma. However, as with the case presented here, the coincident existence of a sellar mass should not preclude the possibility of an ectopic source. There should be a high degree of clinical suspicion for any mass in the general area surrounding the sella when evaluating Cushing syndrome.

  19. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak of the sphenoid sinus mimicking allergic rhinitis, and managed successfully by a ventriculoperitoneal shunt: a case report.

    PubMed

    Darouassi, Youssef; Mliha Touati, Mohamed; Chihani, Mehdi; Akhaddar, Ali; Ammar, Haddou; Bouaity, Brahim

    2016-11-03

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks are rare but may lead to confusion with other diseases in patients without history of trauma. We report a rare case unusual for two reasons. First, our patient was put under antiallergic medication for months before the diagnosis of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak of the sphenoid sinus. Second, our patient was managed successfully by a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Our patient was a nonobese 49-year-old Arab man without history of trauma or surgery who presented with rhinorrhea. He was given allergic rhinitis medication for 4 months without improvement. After the onset of headache leading to the suspicion of paranasal sinusitis, a computed tomography scan discovered an osteodural defect in the sphenoid sinus roof and a magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an aspect of empty sella with an arachnoidocele. An eye fundus examination found papilledema suggesting the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We performed a ventriculoperitoneal shunt without repair of the osteodural defect. Because of the favorable evolution, we decided to postpone surgery. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak should be considered even in nonobese male patients without history of trauma. Our observation adds to other case reports suggesting the decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure alone as an option for the treatment of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Additional studies are necessary to clarify the indications.

  20. Ectopic acromegaly due to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma in the sphenoid sinus: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In more than 98% of cases, acromegaly is due to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. The term “ectopic acromegaly” includes neuroendocrine tumors secreting GH releasing hormone (GHRH), usually located in the lungs, thymus and endocrine pancreas. Considerably less frequent are cases of ectopic acromegaly due to GH-secreting tumors located out of the pituitary fossa; except for one isolated case of a well-documented GH-secreting lymphoma, the majority of these lesions are located in the sphenoid sinus. Case presentation We present the case of a 45 year old woman with acromegaly whose MRI showed an empty sella without evidence of a pituitary adenoma but revealed a large mass within the sphenoid sinus. She underwent transsphenoidal surgery and the excised sphenoid sinus mass, proved to be a GH-secreting adenoma; the sellar floor was intact and no other lesions were found in the pituitary fossa. She required postoperative treatment with somatostatin analogs and cabergoline for clinical and biochemical control. Conclusions This case highlights the importance of carefully evaluating the structures surrounding the sellar area when a pituitary adenoma is not found with currently available imaging techniques. The finding of an intact sellar floor and duramater lead us to conclude that the patient’s tumor originated de novo from embryological pituitary remnants. Upon a careful review of the literature and a critical evaluation of our case we found neither clinical nor biochemical features that would distinguish an ectopic from the more common eutopically located somatotrophinoma. PMID:24119925

  1. Removal of a low-velocity projectile from the base of the sphenoid sinus using navigation-guided endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, Wim; Schepers, Serge; Sun, Yi; Orye, Johan; Vrielinck, Luc; Lakiere, Eva; De Temmerman, Griet; Politis, Constantinus

    2012-03-01

    A patient surviving after a metal projectile penetrates the sphenoid sinus is unusual. Removing a foreign object from this region is challenging because of the difficult access and proximity to delicate structures. The use of navigation-guided endoscopy makes the manipulation of the surgical instruments near delicate structures safer, and the procedure is minimally invasive. A computed tomographic scan of brain showed the projectile located at the base of the left sphenoid sinus. To prevent infection and irritation and avoid secondary surgical damage, navigation-guided endoscopy was used to remove the bullet. Using the BRAINLAB navigation system, the movement of the endoscope could be followed on the screen, and the tip could be navigated into close contact with the projectile. The bullet could be located, without being visible through the endoscope, making the incision and removal of the bony wall of the sinus minimal; it was removed without complications. Intraoperative navigation of endoscopes is very useful because it enables the surgeon to correlate the visual information through the endoscope with the localization of the instruments seen on the navigation screen. Patient safety and reinforced self-confidence of surgeons are advantages of this procedure. Reduced operative time may not always occur because of a lack of experience with the navigation system. When there are no vascular or neurologic complications, a minimally invasive treatment using nasal navigation-guided endoscopic removal can limit the potential surgical damage.

  2. [Invasive aspergillosis of sphenoidal sinus in a patient in Djibouti, revealed by palsy of cranial nerves: a case report].

    PubMed

    Crambert, A; Gauthier, J; Vignal, R; Conessa, C; Lombard, B

    2013-05-01

    The authors report a case of invasive aspergillosis of a sphenoid sinus mucocele revealed in a patient with diabetes in Djibouti by homolateral palsy of the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th nerves. This rare condition occurs preferentially in immunodeficient subjects. Because of its clinical polymorphism, its diagnosis is difficult and is often not made until complications develop. Endonasal surgery with anatomopathological and mycological examination is both a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. It must be performed early, to avoid functional or even life-threatening complications.

  3. Benign Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Presenting with an Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Frič, Radek; Hald, John K.; Antal, Ellen-Ann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECT We report an unusual case of a benign lateral sphenoid wing meningioma that presented with, and was masked by, an acute intracerebral hemorrhage. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old woman was admitted after sudden onset of coma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage, without any underlying vascular pathology on CT angiography. During the surgery, we found a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma with intratumoral bleeding that extended into the surrounding brain parenchyma. RESULTS We removed the hematoma and resected the tumor completely in the same session. The histopathological classification of the tumor was a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. The patient recovered very well after surgery, without significant neurological sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Having reviewed the relevant references from the medical literature, we consider this event as an extremely rare presentation of a benign sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient without any predisposing medical factors. The possible mechanisms of bleeding from this tumor type are discussed. PMID:27127413

  4. Juvenile aggressive cemento-ossifying fibroma of the sphenoid sinus with proptosis: a surgical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rohit; Ramaswamy, Balakrishnan; Hazarika, Manali

    2013-01-01

    The term fibro-osseous lesion has currently grown in popularity as an overall designation for a number of rare, histologically benign head and neck lesions that are made up of bone, fibrous tissue and cementum. Cemento-ossifying fibroma is a variant of cementifying fibroma and is a fibro-osseous disease. They are usually small innocuous lesions which follow a slow benign course and are commonly seen in the skull bone rather than the sphenoid. It is rare for these tumours to attain large size, behave aggressively, destroy bone and require a radical surgery. One such rapidly growing juvenile cemento-ossifying lesion of sphenoid in our 10-year-old young patient causing proptosis and impaired vision is reported here because of its uncommon nature and its surgical dilemma. Selection of surgical approach to resect this tumour becomes difficult because it is deeply seated and needs a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24285811

  5. Juvenile aggressive cemento-ossifying fibroma of the sphenoid sinus with proptosis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Ramaswamy, Balakrishnan; Hazarika, Manali

    2013-11-27

    The term fibro-osseous lesion has currently grown in popularity as an overall designation for a number of rare, histologically benign head and neck lesions that are made up of bone, fibrous tissue and cementum. Cemento-ossifying fibroma is a variant of cementifying fibroma and is a fibro-osseous disease. They are usually small innocuous lesions which follow a slow benign course and are commonly seen in the skull bone rather than the sphenoid. It is rare for these tumours to attain large size, behave aggressively, destroy bone and require a radical surgery. One such rapidly growing juvenile cemento-ossifying lesion of sphenoid in our 10-year-old young patient causing proptosis and impaired vision is reported here because of its uncommon nature and its surgical dilemma. Selection of surgical approach to resect this tumour becomes difficult because it is deeply seated and needs a multidisciplinary approach.

  6. Ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma (ESSPA) with normal anterior pituitary gland: a clinicopathologic and immunophenotypic study of 32 cases with a comprehensive review of the english literature.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lester D R; Seethala, Raja R; Müller, Susan

    2012-03-01

    Ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma (ESSPA) may arise from a remnant of Rathke's pouch. These tumors are frequently misdiagnosed as other neuroendocrine or epithelial neoplasms which may develop in this site (olfactory neuroblastoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, paraganglioma, melanoma). Thirty-two patients with ESSPA identified in patients with normal pituitary glands (intact sella turcica) were retrospectively retrieved from the consultation files of the authors' institutions. Clinical records were reviewed with follow-up obtained. An immunohistochemical panel was performed on available material. Sixteen males and 16 females, aged 2-84 years (mean, 57.1 years), presented with chronic sinusitis, headache, obstructive symptoms, and visual field defects, although several were asymptomatic (n = 6). By definition, the tumors were centered within the sphenoid sinus and demonstrated, by imaging studies or intraoperative examination, a normal sella turcica without a concurrent pituitary adenoma. A subset of tumors showed extension into the nasal cavity (n = 5) or nasopharynx (n = 9). Mean tumor size was 3.4 cm. The majority of tumors were beneath an intact respiratory epithelium (n = 22), arranged in many different patterns (solid, packets, organoid, pseudorosette-rosette, pseudopapillary, single file, glandular, trabecular, insular). Bone involvement was frequently seen (n = 21). Secretions were present (n = 16). Necrosis was noted in 8 tumors. The tumors showed a variable cellularity, with polygonal, plasmacytoid, granular, and oncocytic tumor cells. Severe pleomorphism was uncommon (n = 5). A delicate, salt-and-pepper chromatin distribution was seen. In addition, there were intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions (n = 25) and multinucleated tumor cells (n = 18). Mitotic figures were infrequent, with a mean of 1 per 10 HPFs and a <1% proliferation index (Ki-67). There was a vascularized to sclerotic or calcified

  7. A Rare Presentation of a Dermoid Cyst with Draining Sinus in a Child: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen; Low, David W

    2016-07-01

    Orbitofacial dermoid cysts in children are treated using surgical excision. Dermoid cysts of the frontotemporal region usually present as superficial, slow-growing masses without deep extension. We report a rare case wherein a frontotemporal dermoid in a 21-month-old girl presented with a draining sinus tract to the skin and extended intracranially through the sphenoid bone. It was removed surgically and a dermoid cyst was removed from the frontotemporal region, extending superficially from the skin sinus tract through the sphenoid bone and attaching to the dura of the anterior temporal lobe. In addition to our case presentation, a literature review was performed to identify the few reported similar cases in the published literature, the combination of which suggests that frontotemporal dermoid cysts with associated draining sinus tracts may require preoperative imaging with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging before surgical intervention because of the high likelihood of intracranial extension. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinus changes after maxillomandibular advancement with counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Prado, FB; Rossi, AC; Freire, AR; Groppo, FC; De Moraes, M; Caria, PHF

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically evaluate the pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinus changes after maxillomandibular advancement counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusion. Methods The study included 49 patients (98 lateral teleradiographs; 36 females and 13 males) who were analysed in the pre-operative (1 week before surgery) and post-operative (6 months after surgery) periods. In each lateral teleradiography, the dimensions of the inferior and superior pharyngeal airway space, TB-PhW1 [the point between the posterior aspect of the tongue to the dorsal pharyngeal wall (oropharynx) (TB) and the point on the dorsal pharyngeal wall closest to TB (PhW1)] and UP-PhW2 [and the point between the posterior aspect of the soft palate to the dorsal pharyngeal wall (nasopharynx) (UP) (PhW2)] measurements were evaluated, as well as the dimensions of the frontal and sphenoid sinuses. The differences between the two operative times were evaluated by Student's t-test. Results All measurements showed excellent reproducibility for the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.9; p < 0.0001). There was an increase in the measurements TB-PhW1 and UP-PhW2 and a decrease in the dimensions of the frontal and sphenoid sinuses after orthognathic surgery. Conclusions The morphology of the superior and inferior pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinuses changes after 6 months of maxillomandibular advancement counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusion. PMID:22116128

  9. Diagnosis of drowning using post-mortem computed tomography based on the volume and density of fluid accumulation in the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses.

    PubMed

    Kawasumi, Yusuke; Kawabata, Tomoyoshi; Sugai, Yusuke; Usui, Akihito; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Miho; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Hayashizaki, Yoshie; Funayama, Masato

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have reported that drowning victims frequently have fluid accumulation in the paranasal sinuses, most notably the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses. However, in our previous study, many non-drowning victims also had fluid accumulation in the sinuses. Therefore, we evaluated the qualitative difference in fluid accumulation between drowning and non-drowning cases in the present study. Thirty-eight drowning and 73 non-drowning cases were investigated retrospectively. The fluid volume and density of each case were calculated using a DICOM workstation. The drowning cases were compared with the non-drowning cases using the Mann-Whitney U-test because the data showed non-normal distribution. The median fluid volume was 1.82 (range 0.02-11.7) ml in the drowning cases and 0.49 (0.03-8.7) ml in the non-drowning cases, and the median fluid density was 22 (-14 to 66) and 39 (-65 to 77) HU, respectively. Both volume and density differed significantly between the drowning and non-drowning cases (p=0.001, p=0.0007). Regarding cut-off levels in the ROC analysis, the points on the ROC curve closest (0, 1) were 1.03ml (sensitivity 68%, specificity 68%, PPV 53%, NPV 81%) and 27.5 HU (61%, 70%, 51%, 77%). The Youden indices were 1.03ml and 37.8 HU (84%, 51%, 47%, 86%). When the cut-off level was set at 1.03ml and 27.5HU, the sensitivity was 42%, specificity 45%, PPV 29% and NPV 60%. When the cut-off level was set at 1.03ml and 37.8HU, sensitivity was 58%, specificity 32%, PPV 31% and NPV 59%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sphenoid esthesioneuroblastoma arising from the hindmost olfactory filament.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Mami; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-04-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), or olfactory neuroblastoma, is a rare malignant neoplasm arising from the olfactory neuroepithelium. Typically, ENBs are found in the olfactory cleft with extension to the ethmoid sinuses or anterior skull base. Here we report a case of ENB located in the sphenoid sinus, which had been considered as an ectopic ENB. However, endoscopic resection revealed the continuity of the tumor with the hindmost olfactory filament. The present case suggests that an ENB in the sphenoid sinus was not ectopic, but arose from the normal olfactory neuroepithelium. This continuity of the ENB with this filament indicated that the tumor was not ectopic, and that there was possible tumor invasion into the olfactory neuroepithelium in the cribriform niche. Therefore, pathological examination of the olfactory neuroepithelium in the cribriform niche may be necessary in case of sphenoid ENBs.

  11. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Correll, Daniel P; Luzi, Scott A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2015-12-01

    A 42 year old male presents with worsening pain and an increase in thick chronic drainage of the left sinus. Image studies show complete opacification of the left frontal sinus, left sphenoid sinus, and the left maxillary sinus. The patient was taken to the operating room and tissue for microscopic evaluation was obtained. The microscopic findings were classic for allergic fungal sinusitis: areas of alternating mucinous material and inflammatory cell debris and abundant Charcot-Leyden crystals. Cultures were performed and the patient began steroid therapy and desensitization therapy.

  12. Giant cell tumor of the greater wing of the sphenoid: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Andrés Coca; Llorente Pendás, José L; Rodrigo Tapia, Juan P; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    We report a very unusual presentation of giant cell tumor probably originated on the greater wing of the sphenoid and show a review about the knowledge and the treatment of the lesion in this rare localization. We treated a 48-year-old man with a giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa. He presented with a right-side hearing loss and facial pain. The tumor was resected by means of a subtemporal-preauricular approach, and after 12 months of follow-up, the patient is free of recurrence. Giant cell tumors of the skull base are an extremely rare neoplasm, and there is not much information on the literature about the treatment and the prognostic. Wide resection ought to be made, and at the follow-up, the clinician must try to diagnose not only local recurrence but also the possibility of distant metastases to the lung.

  13. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented as cavernous sinus tumour.

    PubMed

    Moona, Mohammad Shafi; Mehdi, Itrat

    2011-12-01

    A 32 year Libyan male presented with the complaints of headache and diplopia. He was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma on the basis of MRI findings but no initial biopsy was taken. Depending on the radiologic diagnosis the patient was treated with gamma knife surgery twice, abroad. During follow up he developed left ear deafness and left cervical lymph adenopathy. An ENT evaluation with biopsy from the nasopharynx and cervical lymph node was taken. The histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumour showed a nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis (poorly differentiated lympho-epithelial carcinoma). The cavernous sinus tumour which was initially treated as a meningioma was in fact metastasis from the nasopharyngeal carcinoma, making this an interesting and rare occurrence.

  14. Sinusitis: A Rare Cause for Galactorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, W. O.; Kennedy, J. R.; Reddy, V. M.; Dyer, R.; Hickey, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented to the endocrinology clinic with recent onset galactorrhoea. Investigations revealed raised prolactin levels. An MRI scan demonstrated a normal pituitary gland, and an incidental finding of sphenoid sinusitis with expansion of the sphenoid sinus was thought to be due to a mucocele. It is postulated that either the direct local pressure by the mucocele or localised inflammation secondary to sinusitis might cause hyperprolactinaemia. The patient underwent endoscopic surgery to drain the mucocele, after which her galactorrhoea resolved. A review of the literature reveals only one previously documented case of sinusitis causing hyperprolactinaemia and galactorrhoea. PMID:23198229

  15. Sinusitis: a rare cause for galactorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W O; Kennedy, J R; Reddy, V M; Dyer, R; Hickey, S A

    2012-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented to the endocrinology clinic with recent onset galactorrhoea. Investigations revealed raised prolactin levels. An MRI scan demonstrated a normal pituitary gland, and an incidental finding of sphenoid sinusitis with expansion of the sphenoid sinus was thought to be due to a mucocele. It is postulated that either the direct local pressure by the mucocele or localised inflammation secondary to sinusitis might cause hyperprolactinaemia. The patient underwent endoscopic surgery to drain the mucocele, after which her galactorrhoea resolved. A review of the literature reveals only one previously documented case of sinusitis causing hyperprolactinaemia and galactorrhoea.

  16. Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Morcom, Samuel; Phillips, Nicholas; Pastuszek, Andrew; Timperley, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Acute and chronic sinusitis are common primary care presentations. They are caused by mucosal inflammation, which inhibits mucociliary function of the nose and paranasal sinuses. This article provides an overview of acute and chronic sinusitis, and a guide to workup and management in a primary care setting. Complications and other indications for referral are discussed. Sinusitis involves a wide spectrum of presentations, both acute and chronic. It is primarily a medical condition, and surgical management is reserved for complicated or refractory cases.

  17. Presentation of Preauricular Sinus and Preauricular Sinus Abscess in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adegbiji, W. A.; Alabi, B. S.; Olajuyin, O. A.; Nwawolo, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Preauricular sinus abscess is a common congenital external ear disease. This abscess is usually misdiagnosed because it is commonly overlooked during physical examination. In Nigeria, the prevalence was 9.3% in Ilorin, north central Nigeria This study is to determine the distribution and clinical presentation of the preauricular sinus abscess in Ekiti, south west Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective hospital based study of all patients with diagnosis of preauricular sinus abscess seen in our clinic carried out between April 2008 to March 2010. Detailed clinical history, administered interviewer’s assisted questionnaires full examination and. Data obtained were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Preauricular sinus were noticed in 184 (4.4%) out of 4170 patients seen during the study period. Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed in 21 (11.4%) of the preauricular sinuses especially in children. Unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common presenting complaints were preauricular swelling (81.0%), 90.5% with recurrent earaches, 76.2% with ear discharges. All patients had antibiotic / analgesic while 17 out of 21 (81.0%) had surgical excisions. CONCLUSION: Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed among 11.4% of the preauricular sinuses especially in children, unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common complaints were otorrhoea, earaches, and swelling and they were mostly managed surgically. PMID:24711764

  18. Bilateral sphenoid wing metastases of prostate cancer presenting with extensive brain edema.

    PubMed

    Lindsberg, P J; Tatlisumak, T; Tienari, J; Brander, A

    1999-05-01

    A 76-year-old man insidiously developed diffuse neurological symptoms: cognitive decline, dysphagia, dysphasia and mental disturbance. Computed tomography of the cranium revealed widespread bilateral brain edema and symmetrical bilateral sphenoid wing hyperostosis. Adjacent to the hyperostosis that resembled skull base meningiomas, two separate parenchymatous temporal lobe lesions enhancing with contrast medium were observed. The patient had earlier been diagnosed to have prostatic carcinoma. Dexamethasone therapy resulted in discontinuation of the neurological symptoms. The diagnosis of metastasized adenocarcinoma of the prostate was confirmed histologically on autopsy after a sudden death from pneumonia. Intracranial metastases of prostate cancer may have a predilection site at the sphenoid wing, and can mimic a skull base meningioma. Intracranial spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma should be considered in elderly men as a treatable cause of gradual neurological deterioration, especially if cranial malignancy or hyperostosis is found.

  19. Delayed post-traumatic frontal sinus mucopyocoele presenting with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cultrera, Francesco; Giuffrida, Massimiliano; Mancuso, Pietro

    2006-12-01

    To highlight a rare but potentially serious complication of frontal sinus injuries. A case of delayed post-traumatic frontal sinus mucopyocoele presenting with meningitis in a 23-year-old male patient is reported. The anatomy of the frontal sinus is described in relation to the pathogenesis of muco(pyo)coele formation and the relevant literature is reviewed. This case, in our opinion, emphasizes the importance of thorough evaluation and adequate management of craniofacial trauma involving the paranasal sinuses, with special regard to paediatric patients. Mucocoeles and mucopyocoeles are rare complications that can develop many years after trauma, thus necessitating a virtually life-long follow-up.

  20. Various presentations of fourth branchial pouch sinus tract during surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wu-Hao; Feng, Long; Sang, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Liang; Yuan, Lin-Lin; Gao, Ling; Lou, Wei-Hua

    2012-05-01

    A recurrent neck abscess or acute suppurative thyroiditis should arouse suspicion of fourth branchial pouch sinus. Complete surgical excision is usually curative. The classification of sinus tract according to the area where it is emerging from the larynx may be helpful in identifying the tract during surgery. To describe our experience of the diagnosis and management of fourth branchial pouch sinus and elucidate three different emerging pathways of the sinus tract during surgery. Retrospective case series with eight patients who were diagnosed with fourth branchial pouch sinus between January 2007 and July 2011 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Six patients presented with recurrent neck abscess, two presented with acute suppurative thyroiditis. All patients had barium swallow and sinus tract was delineated in six cases. All eight patients underwent surgical excision of the sinus tract. Three different emerging pathways of the sinus tract were identified during surgery. The tract could penetrate the thyroid cartilage near the inferior horn, the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle or the cricothyroid membrane when it emerged from the larynx. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was commonly dissected to avoid inadvertent damage. Hemithyroidectomy was performed in six patients. All eight are currently asymptomatic.

  1. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis presenting with thoracic sinus formation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G. E.; Evans, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is a condition which is well described in the Japanese literature but is rare in Western Europe. It is characterised by pain and swelling in the upper anterior part of the chest, which tends to be progressive. A patient is described with bilateral chronic discharging sinuses over the anterior ends of the clavicles in whom the diagnosis appeared to be one of SCCH. Images PMID:8711690

  2. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity in patients presenting with syncope.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, A B; Stephens, M R; Davies, A G

    1979-01-01

    In 23 patients (ages 44 to 81) presenting with syncope, vertigo, or transient amnesia, carotid sinus massage produced a significant bradycardia in association with symptoms. The 10 most severely symptomatic patients were studied electrophysiologically, including measurement of intracardiac conduction times and corrected sinus node recovery times, as well as with carotid sinus massage before and after atropine. The only detectable abnormality in five of this group was asystole produced by carotid sinus massage; the other five had, in addition, evidence of either sinuatrial disease or an intracardiac conduction defect. Cardiac pacing in these 10 patients completely abolished their symptoms. In a control group of 52 asymptomatic patients (ages 36 to 87), an abnormal response to carotid sinus massage was uncommon (2%). PMID:518783

  3. Extreme clinical presentations of venous stasis: coronary sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Amit; Sideras, Panagiotis; Javaid, Mian; Muralidharan, Sethu; Stevens-Cohen, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Sixty six year old male with history of heart failure was admitted for dysphagia, weight loss. CT scan chest revealed diffuse oesophageal wall thickening. Upper endoscopy, oesophagogram confirmed diagnosis of achalasia. TTE revealed severely reduced biventricular systolic function with LVEF 10%; PASP 75-80 mmHg. Parasternal long views showed dilated coronary sinus with a visible, mobile 2.0 cm thrombus. Pro-thrombotic workup was negative. Coronary sinus thrombosis has been identified as a rare complication to invasive cardiac procedures causing damage to coronary sinus endothelium and in hypercoagulable states.Typically acute thrombosis presents with chest pain, dynamic ECG changes, but chronic development does not present with ischaemic signs due to formation of efficient collateral circulation. We present a case report of stable primary coronary sinus thrombus incidentally diagnosed, secondary to chronic venous stasis in coronary circulation. Currently, there are no guidelines to assist physicians in long term management of such patients and thus warrants further investigations.

  4. Intraoral Mass Presenting as Maxillary Sinus Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Omid; Boostani, Najmehalsadat; Karimi, Sharareh; Tabesh, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma is an extremely rare malignancy of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. It is of unknown etiology, and occurs more commonly in the elderly men, with a routinely shown aggressive behavior and poor prognosis for survival. Radiographically, it looks like severe osteomyelitis. Histopathologic study is essential to confirm diagnosis, and the undifferentiated histologic appearance often necessitates immunohistochemical studies for differentiation from other high-grade neoplasms. We present an 83-year-old man complaining of pain and unilateral swelling on the left side of the face due to a rare malignant tumor of maxillary sinus origin, a sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma. He underwent hemimaxillectomy and radiotherapy, but refused chemotherapy. Maxillary sinus malignancy may be presented with unspecific symptoms mimicking sinusitis or dental pain. Coming across such symptoms, the physician or dentist must consider malignancies as well, and carry out medical and dental workups. PMID:24910668

  5. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  6. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis presenting with auditory hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victoria S S; Adamczyk, Peter; Dahlin, Brian; Richman, David P; Wheelock, Vicki

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may present with seizures or neuropsychiatric symptoms, but does not typically present with hallucinations. We present a case of venous thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses that presented with auditory hallucinations and illusions. We describe a 45-year-old woman with a history of myasthenia gravis, stable on oral prednisone and monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusions, who started on a progesterone/estrogen combination contraceptive pill for menorrhagia 3 weeks before admission and presented with symptoms of headache, fever, and auditory hallucinations and illusions. The patient's cerebrospinal fluid showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. Two electroencephalograms showed significant right temporal lobe slowing. Magnetic resonance venogram of the brain showed venous sinus thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cortical venous infarct in the right middle temporal gyrus. The patient's auditory hallucinations and illusions resolved spontaneously weeks after presentation. This case suggests that auditory hallucinations and illusions should be added to the already broad spectrum of presenting features of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The nondominant right middle temporal gyrus may play a role in such auditory hallucinations.

  7. Value of anatomical landmarks in single-nostril endonasal transnasal-sphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    WEI, LIANG-FENG; ZHANG, JINCHAO; CHEN, HONG-JIE; WANG, RUMI

    2013-01-01

    The sphenoid sinus occupies a central location in transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). It is important to identify relevant anatomical landmarks to enter the sphenoid sinus and sellar region properly. The aim of this study was to identify anatomical landmarks and their value in single-nostril endonasal TSS. A retrospective study was performed to review 148 cases of single-nostril endonasal TSS for pituitary lesions. The structure of the nasal cavities and sphenoid sinus, the position of apertures of the sphenoid sinus and relevant arteries and the morphological characteristics of the anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus and sellar floor were observed and recorded. The important anatomical landmarks included the mucosal aperture of the sphenoid sinus, a blunt longitudinal prominence on the posterior nasal septum, the osseocartilaginous junction of the nasal septum, the ‘bow sign’ of the anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, the osseous aperture and its relationship with the nutrient arteries, the bulge of the sellar floor and the carotid protuberance. These landmarks outlined a clear route to the sella turcica with an optimal view and lesser tissue damage. Although morphological variation may exist, the position of these landmarks was generally consistent. Locating the sphenoid sinus aperture is the gold standard to direct the surgical route of TSS. The ‘bow sign’ and the sellar bulge are critical landmarks for accurate entry into the sphenoid sinus and sella fossa, respectively. PMID:23596471

  8. Unroofed Coronary Sinus Presenting as Cerebral Abscess: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Avinash; Jain, Ankit; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    A sixty eight year-old woman with a long-standing history of hypertension, dizziness and a history of congenital heart disease presented with speech difficulties and disorientation. She was diagnosed with a brain abscess, confirmed by a stereotactic biopsy. Transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation revealed a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with an unroofed coronary sinus (URCS) along with a small secundum atrial septal defect. Her heart catheterization showed a partially unroofed coronary sinus along with a bidirectional shunt. She was referred for surgical closure of her unroofed coronary sinus and the secundum atrial septal defect. Her brain abscess responded well to antibiotic treatment. While waiting for open-heart surgery, she suffered from an acute myocardial infarction and underwent emergent percutaneous coronary intervention to the right coronary artery. Subsequently, she underwent elective surgical repair of the unroofed coronary sinus, along with closure of the atrial septal defect. When she was seen in follow-up she reported a complete resolution of her dizziness and felt more energetic. Unroofed coronary sinus syndrome (URCS) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly in which there is a communication between the coronary sinus and the left atrium. While non-invasive imaging with echocardiography, MRI or CT is helpful in making the diagnosis, cardiac catheterization remains integral in the evaluation and management planning. Management is guided by the presence of clinical symptoms with consideration of repair when patients become symptomatic. Prognosis after surgery is excellent, recently transcatheter based treatment therapies are becoming more frequent. We present a rare case of URCS with PLSVC presenting as a cerebral abscess in late adulthood. She had bidirectional shunting manifesting as a cerebral abscess. She responded well to the corrective surgery and was doing well on follow up.

  9. Advanced cocaine-related necrotising sinusitis presenting with restrictive ophthalmolplegia.

    PubMed

    Lascaratos, Gerassimos; McHugh, James; McCarthy, Karon; Bunting, Howard

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral infero-medial orbital wall destruction, associated with loss of sinonasal architecture. The patient presented with intermittent horizontal diplopia following an acute on chronic infective sinusitis. Eight months previously the patient had developed a midline hard palate fistula for which a palatine prosthesis had been fitted. The broad differential diagnosis is discussed, though in this patient chronic cocaine abuse was identified as the underlying aetiology. Eye movement restriction worsened progressively with bilateral inflammation around the medial and inferior rectus muscles. Attempts to resolve the recurring cycle of sinus infection and inflammation by palatal fistula closure failed despite augmented techniques mobilising flaps from both nasal and palatal sides.

  10. Giant-cell granuloma of the sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, J.T.; Weber, A.L.

    1983-04-01

    Three cases are presented which illustrate giant-cell granulomas in the maxillary, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses. The radiographic features are nonspecific, and the lesion can mimic carcinoma. Ossification can be demonstrated, especially with computed tomography, and may indicate a benign lesion.

  11. Cryptococcal meningitis presenting as sinusitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S P; Movva, K; Wiebel, M; Chandrasekar, P; Alangaden, G; Carron, M; Tranchida, P; Revankar, S G

    2013-10-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a relatively common invasive fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, especially in solid organ transplant recipients. Clinical presentation typically includes fever, headache, photophobia, neck stiffness, and/or altered mental status. Unusual presentations may delay diagnosis. Therapy is challenging in renal transplant patients because of the nephrotoxicity associated with amphotericin B, the recommended treatment. We present a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a renal transplant recipient presenting as acute sinusitis with successful treatment using fluconazole as primary therapy.

  12. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to decrease swelling, especially if there are nasal polyps or allergies Surgery to enlarge the sinus opening and drain the ... each year. Most fungal sinus infections need surgery. Surgery to repair ... or nasal polyps may prevent the condition from returning.

  13. Upper Nasopharyngeal Corridor for Transnasal Endoscopic Drainage of Petroclival Cholesterol Granulomas: Alternative Access in Conchal Sphenoid Patients

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nefize; Baum, Griffin R.; Holland, Christopher M.; Ahmad, Faiz U.; Henriquez, Oswaldo A.; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholesterol granulomas arising at the petrous apex can be treated via traditional open surgical, endoscopic, and endoscopic-assisted approaches. Endoscopic approaches require access to the sphenoid sinus, which is technically challenging in patients with conchal sphenoidal anatomy. Clinical Presentation A 55-year-old woman presented with intermittent headaches and tinnitus. Formal audiometry demonstrated moderately severe bilateral hearing loss. CT of the temporal bones and sella revealed a well-demarcated expansile lytic mass. MRI of the face, orbit, and neck showed a right petrous apex mass measuring 22 × 18 × 19 mm that was hyperintense on T1- and T2-weighted images without enhancement, consistent with a cholesterol granuloma. The patient had a conchal sphenoidal anatomy. Operative Technique Herein, we present an illustrative case of a low-lying petroclival cholesterol granuloma in a patient with conchal sphenoidal anatomy to describe an alternative high nasopharyngeal corridor for endoscopic transnasal transclival access. Postoperative Course Postoperatively, the patient's symptoms recovered and no complications occurred. Follow-up imaging demonstrated a patent drainage tract without evidence of recurrence. Conclusion In patients with a conchal sphenoid sinus, endoscopic transnasal transclival access can be gained using a high nasopharyngeal approach. This corridor facilitates safe access to these lesions and others in this location. PMID:26929897

  14. Metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma to the frontal and ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Fatih; Aldemir, Mustafa; Çakar, Hasan; Güler, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial metastasis of prostate cancer is rarely seen, and there are few studies in this regard in the literature. Most of these studies in the literature comprise the metastasis of prostate cancer to the sphenoid sinus, and metastasis to the frontal and ethmoid sinus is a much rare entity. Association of visual symptoms, epistaxis, headache, and hematuria may indicate a urologic malignancy in terms of the origin of the primary tumor. This study was aimed to present the prostate cancer case of a 73-year-old patient whose paranasal sinus tomograms revealed the presence of frontal and ethmoid sinus metastasis. PMID:27909626

  15. Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by a dental infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis not only presents with constitutional symptoms including fever, pain and swelling but also with specific findings such as proptosis, chemosis, periorbital swelling, and cranial nerve palsies. It is known to occur secondary to the spread of paranasal sinus infections in the nose, ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. However, paranasal sinus infection of dental origin is rare. The following is a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis due to the spread of an abscess in the buccal and pterygomandibular spaces via buccal mucosal laceration. PMID:25247150

  16. Ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm from left coronary sinus into right atrium: a rare anomaly with an odd presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Ramalingam; Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old man presenting with shortness of breath and palpitation on exertion, who was evaluated to have left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm rupturing into right atrium. This is a very rare congenital cardiac anomaly with variable clinical presentation ranging from asymptomatic detection on imaging to acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. Rupture is the most dreaded complication and usually manifests as an acute event. Aneurysmal dilation less commonly affects the left sinus and rupture into the right atrium is still rarer and a chronic insidious presentation as in this case is odd. PMID:23531926

  17. Sphenoidal esthesioneuroblastoma treated with sequential chemo radiotherapy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar; Kamal, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB)-also known as olfactory neuroblastoma-originates primarily from the olfactory epithelium in the roof of the nasal cavity. We present here the 7th reported case of ENB arising from the sphenoidal sinus. We undertook a review of the case notes from the time of initial presentation and literature review of this topic. A 55-year-old male presented with a 3-year history of unilateral progressive nasal obstruction, epistaxis, difficult nasal-breathing, facial pain, frontal headache and blood-tinged discharge. Nasal examination revealed a glistening mass in right nasal cavity. Endoscopy-assisted transnasal excision was performed. Histologically, tumor was identified as small round cell tumor and confirmed by immunohistochemistry to be olfactory neuroblastoma (negative leucocyte common antigen, positive neurone specific enolase). Sphenoidal ENB is rare in the literature, and this presentation is the 7th reported case; in addition, surgical treatment is very challenging, and non-surgical treatment is used most commonly.

  18. Temporal lobe abscess in a patient with isolated sphenoiditis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Thomas A; Carter, Cody S; Seiberling, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old immunocompetent man admitted for severe retro-orbital headache was diagnosed with isolated sphenoiditis. At the time of scheduled surgery, the patient was mildly obtunded, and a head CT revealed a temporal lobe abscess. The patient underwent a left temporal craniectomy and a bilateral endoscopic sphenoid sinusotomy, which revealed gross fungal debris. The patient made a full recovery with resolution of abscess and sinus findings. Suspicion for intracranial infection should be raised in any sinus patient with neurological changes. Early diagnosis with imaging studies is extremely important for surgical drainage before permanent neurological sequelae.

  19. Recurrent sinus pauses: an atypical presentation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amor, Martin Miguel; Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Osofsky, Jeffrey; Holland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction related to seizures may give rise to a broad spectrum of cardiovascular abnormalities. Among these, ictal bradycardia and conduction delays may be encountered. Failure to recognize these abnormalities may contribute to sudden, unexplained death in epilepsy patients. We report a case of a Haitian female with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with recurrent sinus pauses.

  20. Unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm presenting with concurrent Morgagni hernia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S. Scott; Chen, Edward P.; Henry, Travis S.; Book, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with dyspnea and intermittent cyanosis who was found to have concurrent right diaphragmatic and right atrial masses, initially thought to have advanced vascular sarcoma. She was ultimately diagnosed with an unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, a Morgagni hernia, and a patent foramen ovale. Her dyspnea and cyanosis resolved after sequential surgical correction of these defects. PMID:26424953

  1. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with cavernous sinus involvement - An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Namdarian, Dinaz; Hiranandani, N L; Hathiram, Bachi; Rajeevan, C P; Agarwal, Ritu

    2003-10-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibrama (JNA) is a benign vascular tumour which is locally aggressive and occasionally extends intracranially. It occurs mainly in adolescent males. We report an interesting case of a targe JNA with intracranial extention encroaching on the cavernous sinus which we treated surgically by the conventional lateral rhinotomy and transpalatal approach.

  2. Recurrent Sinus Pauses: An Atypical Presentation of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Osofsky, Jeffrey; Holland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction related to seizures may give rise to a broad spectrum of cardiovascular abnormalities. Among these, ictal bradycardia and conduction delays may be encountered. Failure to recognize these abnormalities may contribute to sudden, unexplained death in epilepsy patients. We report a case of a Haitian female with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with recurrent sinus pauses. PMID:25328719

  3. What Are the Key Statistics about Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Paranasal Sinus Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers? Cancers ... rare in the frontal and sphenoid sinuses. Survival statistics for these cancers are discussed in the section ...

  4. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis with a sphenoid/sellar mass: confirmation of the ectopic glial tissue theory?

    PubMed

    Dimou, James; Tsui, Alpha; Maartens, Nicholas F; King, James A J

    2011-05-01

    Gliosarcoma is a rare glioblastoma variant, classically arising in the cerebral hemispheres. We report a patient with primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) with a sphenoid sinus and sellar mass. An 84-year-old woman presented with progressive headache and right-sided visual failure, associated with ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and left temporal field loss. Neuraxial MRI showed a large lesion within the sphenoid sinus and sella resulting in chiasmal compression, and diffuse cranial and spinal leptomeningeal enhancement. Endoscopic transphenoidal biopsy and debulking of the sphenosellar lesion was performed, and gliosarcoma was diagnosed on histopathological examination. The patient was palliated due to poor performance status. To our knowledge, this is the only report of gliosarcoma within the paranasal sinuses and the second report of PDLG where the histological analysis has confirmed gliosarcoma. We believe this adds significant weight to the theory that heterotopic nests of glial tissue, in this instance within the sphenoid or sella, are the putative origin of PDLG. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Late presentation of a paranasal sinus glass foreign body: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mangwani, Jitendra; Su, Archibald Paul

    2009-05-29

    Foreign bodies in the paranasal sinuses are rare and mostly related to maxillo-facial trauma. We treated a 47-year-old man with a late complication arising from a foreign body in the nasoethmoid sinus present for 16 years after a road traffic accident. Patients presenting with maxillo-facial injuries, especially those with lacerations due to glass or car wind-screen trauma should have thorough examination and appropriate imaging of the injury.

  6. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  7. Cemento-ossifying Fibroma Of Paranasal Sinus Presenting Acutely As Orbital Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Maneesh; Buddhavarapu, Shanker Rao; Hussain, Sheik Akbar; Amir, Emran

    2009-01-01

    Fibro-osseous lesions of the face and paranasal sinuses are relatively uncommon. These lesions have overlapping clinical, radiologic and pathologic features causing difficulty in diagnosis. Neoplastic fibro-osseous paranasal sinus lesions can be benign or malignant. The benign fibro-osseous lesions described are: ossifying fibroma (and its histologic variants) and fibrous dysplasia. The variants of ossifying fibroma differ in the nature of calcified material (i.e. cementum versus bone), in the location of the lesion (oral versus paranasal sinus or orbital), other morphologic variations (presence of psammomatoid concretions) and biologic behavior (aggressive versus stable). Presence of cementum or bone classifies the lesion as cementifying fibroma or ossifying fibroma respectively while lesions with mixture of both cementum and bone are called cemento-ossifying fibroma. We describe a case of a young adult male with cemento-ossifying fibroma of paranasal sinus presenting acutely as left orbital cellulitis with proptosis. PMID:22470655

  8. Cemento-ossifying Fibroma Of Paranasal Sinus Presenting Acutely As Orbital Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Maneesh; Buddhavarapu, Shanker Rao; Hussain, Sheik Akbar; Amir, Emran

    2009-01-01

    Fibro-osseous lesions of the face and paranasal sinuses are relatively uncommon. These lesions have overlapping clinical, radiologic and pathologic features causing difficulty in diagnosis. Neoplastic fibro-osseous paranasal sinus lesions can be benign or malignant. The benign fibro-osseous lesions described are: ossifying fibroma (and its histologic variants) and fibrous dysplasia. The variants of ossifying fibroma differ in the nature of calcified material (i.e. cementum versus bone), in the location of the lesion (oral versus paranasal sinus or orbital), other morphologic variations (presence of psammomatoid concretions) and biologic behavior (aggressive versus stable). Presence of cementum or bone classifies the lesion as cementifying fibroma or ossifying fibroma respectively while lesions with mixture of both cementum and bone are called cemento-ossifying fibroma. We describe a case of a young adult male with cemento-ossifying fibroma of paranasal sinus presenting acutely as left orbital cellulitis with proptosis.

  9. Acute sinusitis and blindness as the first presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, K H; Thomas, G; van Beers, E J; Hosman, A E; Mourits, M P; van Noesel, C J M; Kater, A P; Reinartz, S M

    2014-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most frequent form of leukaemia among adults in the Western world, presenting at a median age of 65 years. The diagnosis is usually made incidentally during routine blood examination while the disease is still in its early phase. We report a case of blindness of 24 hours due to acute sinusitis based on CLL localisation in a patient with undiagnosed CLL. Emergency endoscopic sinus surgery and intra- and extra-ocular orbital decompression were performed. The sinusitis resolved after surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Her vision improved within 24 hours and eventually recovered completely after six months. Her CLL remained in an indolent state, needing no active treatment. This case illustrates that blindness from a lymphoproliferative disorder may be treated with emergency endoscopic sinus surgery instead of conventional chemotherapy in order to salvage the vision first, even if the vision is lost for more than 24 hours.

  10. CT-based manual segmentation and evaluation of paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Pirner, S; Tingelhoff, K; Wagner, I; Westphal, R; Rilk, M; Wahl, F M; Bootz, F; Eichhorn, Klaus W G

    2009-04-01

    Manual segmentation of computed tomography (CT) datasets was performed for robot-assisted endoscope movement during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Segmented 3D models are needed for the robots' workspace definition. A total of 50 preselected CT datasets were each segmented in 150-200 coronal slices with 24 landmarks being set. Three different colors for segmentation represent diverse risk areas. Extension and volumetric measurements were performed. Three-dimensional reconstruction was generated after segmentation. Manual segmentation took 8-10 h for each CT dataset. The mean volumes were: right maxillary sinus 17.4 cm(3), left side 17.9 cm(3), right frontal sinus 4.2 cm(3), left side 4.0 cm(3), total frontal sinuses 7.9 cm(3), sphenoid sinus right side 5.3 cm(3), left side 5.5 cm(3), total sphenoid sinus volume 11.2 cm(3). Our manually segmented 3D-models present the patient's individual anatomy with a special focus on structures in danger according to the diverse colored risk areas. For safe robot assistance, the high-accuracy models represent an average of the population for anatomical variations, extension and volumetric measurements. They can be used as a database for automatic model-based segmentation. None of the segmentation methods so far described provide risk segmentation. The robot's maximum distance to the segmented border can be adjusted according to the differently colored areas.

  11. Pseudomastoiditis in lateral sinus thrombosis: a rare presentation with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Thota, Ramadass; Narayanan, Nithya; Mathuram, Dhanraj

    2011-07-01

    Lateral sinus thrombosis due to mastoiditis, is now a relic of the past. Gone are the days when septic lateral sinus thrombosis was a common complication of unsafe suppurative otitis media. In the present era, the neurologists more commonly see cortical venous thrombosis with lateral sinus thrombosis. This entity has been termed as non-septic lateral sinus thrombosis in literature. The incidence is found to be more in females due to the use of oral contraceptives (Rosen and Scher in Laryngoscope 107(5):680-683, 1). In this manuscript, we report a series of three cases of non-septic lateral sinus thrombosis with mastoiditis, seen in a span of 1 month, which is uncommon. All the patients presented to the neurologist with intractable headache and lateral sinus thrombosis with mastoiditis, was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venogram. All the three patients were males and had involvement of the right mastoid in magnetic resonance imaging pictures. We have reviewed the literature and discussed about the etiopathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and management.

  12. Endoscopic transpterygoid approach and skull base repair after sphenoid meningoencephalocele resection. Our experience.

    PubMed

    Martínez Arias, Àngels; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Rioja, Elena; Enseñat, Joaquim; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Alobid, Isam

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leaks associated to meningoencephaloceles of the sphenoid lateral recess are rare entities. A congenital bony defect at this level results in the persistence of Sternberg's canal, or a lateral craniopharyngeal canal, which is supposed to be the origin of these lesions. Our objective was to show that the endoscopic transpterygoid approach is an effective technique for their treatment. We present a series of 5 cases of meningoencephaloceles of the sphenoid lateral recess treated with endoscopic sinus surgery (4 women and one man; mean age=59, range 37-72 years). Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea was present in all of them and they all underwent a transpterygoid approach with reconstruction of the skull base. We describe the surgical technique and review the literature. No complications were observed during surgery or the postoperative period. After a mean follow-up of 81 months, only one recurrence was seen. The transpterygoid approach has proven to be effective for the treatment of meningoencephaloceles of the sphenoid lateral recess. Providing wide access to identify the defect, followed by meningoencephalocele ablation, is the key for successful surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic maxillary sinus lift: Review of a new technique and presentation of a clinical case

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ruiz, Manuel M.; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Pérez-Dorao, Beatriz; Wainwright, Marcel; Abalos-Labruzzi, Camilo; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Placing implants in the posterior maxillary area has the drawback of working with scarce, poor quality bone in a significant percentage of cases. Numerous advanced surgical techniques have been developed to overcome the difficulties associated with these limitations. Subsequent to reports on the elevation of the maxillary sinus through the lateral approach, there were reports on the use of the crestal approach, which is less aggressive but requires a minimal amount of bone. Furthermore, it is more sensitive to operator technique, as the integrity of the sinus membrane is checked indirectly. The aim of this paper is to review the technical literature on minimally invasive sinus lift and compare the advantages of different techniques with Intralift™, a new technique. Study Design: The present study is a review of techniques used to perform minimally invasive sinus lift published in Cochrane, Embase and Medline over the past ten years and the description of the crestal sinus lift technique based on minimally invasive piezosurgery, with the example of a case report. Results: Only eight articles were found on minimally invasive techniques for sinus lift. The main advantage of this new technique, Intralift, is that it does not require a minimum amount of crestal bone (indeed, the smaller the width of the crestal bone, the better this technique is performed). The possibility of damage to the sinus membrane is minimised by using ultrasound based hydrodynamic pressure to lift it, while applying a very non-aggressive crestal approach. Conclusions: We believe that this technique is an advance in the search for less traumatic and aggressive techniques, which is the hallmark of current surgery. Key words: Sinus lift, surgical technique, minimally invasive surgery, ultrasound surgery. PMID:22143696

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea and Seizure Caused by Temporo-Sphenoidal Encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Ingrid; Geletneky, Karsten; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the symptoms and clinical course of a 35-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with a temporo-sphenoidal encephalocele. It is characterized by herniation of cerebral tissue of the temporal lobe through a defect of the skull base localized in the middle fossa. At the time of first presentation the patient complained about recurrent nasal discharge of clear fluid which had begun some weeks earlier. She also reported that three months earlier she had for the first time suffered from a generalized seizure. In a first therapeutic attempt an endoscopic endonasal approach to the sphenoid sinus was performed. An attempt to randomly seal the suspicious area failed. After frontotemporal craniotomy, it was possible to localize the encephalocele and the underlying bone defect. The herniated brain tissue was resected and the dural defect was closed with fascia of the temporalis muscle. In summary, the combination of recurrent rhinorrhea and a first-time seizure should alert specialists of otolaryngology, neurology and neurosurgery of a temporo-sphenoidal encephalocele as a possible cause. Treatment is likely to require a neurosurgical approach. PMID:25932300

  15. Comprehensive management of patients presenting to the otolaryngologist for sinus pressure, pain, or headache.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devyani; Rounds, Alexis; Dodick, David W

    2015-02-01

    To study differential diagnosis and efficacy of management strategies in patients presenting to an otolaryngologist for sinus pressure, pain, or headache. Retrospective analysis at an academic medical center. Patients were seen in the clinic (2010-2012) for sinus-related headache, pressure, pain or fullness (study symptoms) by a rhinologist. A retrospective chart review of patients with study symptoms was conducted. Of 211 patients with study symptoms, 70.62% met American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria for sinusitis or had rhinologic disease. Otolaryngic therapy alone (medical or surgical) relieved study symptoms in 51.66%; combined neurology intervention helped another 15.17%. Nearly half of the patients (48.82%) were diagnosed with primary headache disorders. Comorbid rhinologic-neurologic disease was present in 27.96% and odontogenic disease in 7%. Initial otolaryngology referral was likely unnecessary for 36.49% of the study patients. Sinus computed tomography (CT) was available for 91% of 211 patients, and 80% of scans were positive. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) was used in only 80/211 patients (37.69%) and was effective in 66/211 (31.28%). ESS was most successful in patients receiving concurrent neurological intervention. The Lund-Mackay CT score did not predict outcomes from ESS. Interdisciplinary otolaryngology-neurology efforts resulted in a positive outcome for 92.4% of patients. We present the first series detailing management of patients with sinus-headache pain in an otolaryngology practice. Such symptoms have multifactorial etiologies. Positive sinus CT results require cautious interpretation. ESS should be judiciously used. Interdisciplinary care is critical for success: approximately 50% of patients benefited from otolaryngic management, 50% needed neurological treatment, and 7% required dental disease management. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Sinus barotrauma--late diagnosis and treatment with computer-aided endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anders Schermacher; Buchwald, Christian; Vesterhauge, Søren

    2003-02-01

    Sinus barotrauma is usually easy to diagnose, and treatment achieves good results. We present two severe cases where delayed diagnosis caused significant morbidity. The signs and symptoms were atypical and neither the patients themselves, nor the initial examiners recognized that the onset of symptoms coincided with descent in a commercial airliner. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal, but in both cases showed opafication of the sphenoid sinuses, which lead to the correct diagnosis. Subsequent surgical intervention consisting of endoscopic computer-aided surgery showed blood and petechia in the affected sinuses. This procedure provided immediate relief.

  17. Hyperprolactinemia Secondary to Allergic Fungal Sinusitis Compressing the Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Chapurin, Nikita; Wang, Cynthia; Steinberg, David M.; Jang, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aim to describe the first case in the literature of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) presenting with hyperprolactinemia due to compression of the pituitary gland. Case Presentation. A 37-year-old female presented with bilateral galactorrhea and occipital headaches of several weeks. Workup revealed elevated prolactin of 94.4, negative pregnancy test, and normal thyroid function. MRI and CT demonstrated a 5.0 × 2.7 × 2.5 cm heterogeneous expansile mass in the right sphenoid sinus with no pituitary adenoma as originally suspected. Patient was placed on cabergoline for symptomatic control until definitive treatment. Results. The patient underwent right endoscopic sphenoidotomy, which revealed nasal polyps and fungal debris in the sphenoid sinus, consistent with AFS. There was bony erosion of the sella and clivus. Pathology and microbiology were consistent with allergic fungal sinusitis caused by Curvularia species. Prolactin levels normalized four weeks after surgery with resolution of symptoms. Conclusion. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery alone was able to reverse the patient's pituitary dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case of AFS presenting as hyperprolactinemia due to pituitary compression. PMID:26998375

  18. Infantile Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Transverse Sinus Presenting with Ocular Symptoms, Case Reports and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the transverse sinus with ophthalmic manifestations in young children are rare. We reviewed two cases of direct AVF of the transverse sinus with ocular manifestations managed at our institution. The first, a 2.5 years old male child presented with left exophthalmos. Angiography revealed AVF between the occipital artery and the transverse sinus. The second, a 2 years old female child, complained of left exophthalmos. Imaging studies showed bilateral direct AVFs of the transverse sinus with bilateral dysmaturation of the sigmoid sinus. Transarterial embolization was done in both cases. Clinical and radiological follow up revealed complete cure.This report suggests that DAVF of the transverse sinus supplied by the external carotid branches can present with ophthalmic manifestations especially if there is distal venous stenosis or obliteration involving sigmoid sinus. Transarterial embolization using coils and liquid embolic agents could be safe and feasible to obliterate the fistula. PMID:27226864

  19. Trans-nasal-trans-sphenoidal brain injury by a fencing foil: an unusual case report and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Özay, Rafet; Balkan, Mehmet S; Tönge, Çağhan; Şekerci, Zeki

    2017-11-01

    In this report, the authors present an unusual case of a 10-year-old child who suffered a severe headache and rhinorrhea that occurred as a result of fencing foil sports injury via trans-nasal-trans-sphenoidal (TNTS) pathway. Following trauma, the child had shown neurological symptoms such a pupil dilatation, change in consciousness and mild hemiparesia. Imaging demonstrated destruction of bone structures including posterior wall of sphenoid sinus and antero-superior part of sella turcica, and also a contusion at right thalamic region. For treatment of rhinorrhea lumbar drainage system (LDS) had planted in order to relieve cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. After the treatment, the patient had fully recovered without any need of further surgical intervention. CSF leakage had prevented and neurological symptoms were completely treated. This case represents the first report of brain injury via TNTS pathway in a sports practice. Diagnosis, clinic follow-up and treatment options of this rare accidental sports injury are discussed.

  20. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic maxillary sinus lift: review of a new technique and presentation of a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Cayón, R; Romero-Ruiz, M-M; Torres-Lagares, D; Pérez-Dorao, B; Wainwright, M; Abalos-Labruzzi, C; Gutiérrez-Pérez, J-L

    2012-03-01

    Placing implants in the posterior maxillary area has the drawback of working with scarce, poor quality bone in a significant percentage of cases. Numerous advanced surgical techniques have been developed to overcome the difficulties associated with these limitations. Subsequent to reports on the elevation of the maxillary sinus through the lateral approach, there were reports on the use of the crestal approach, which is less aggressive but requires a minimal amount of bone. Furthermore, it is more sensitive to operator technique, as the integrity of the sinus membrane is checked indirectly. The aim of this paper is to review the technical literature on minimally invasive sinus lift and compare the advantages of different techniques with Intralift™, a new technique. The present study is a review of techniques used to perform minimally invasive sinus lift published in Cochrane, Embase and Medline over the past ten years and the description of the crestal sinus lift technique based on minimally invasive piezosurgery, with the example of a case report. Only eight articles were found on minimally invasive techniques for sinus lift. The main advantage of this new technique, Intralift, is that it does not require a minimum amount of crestal bone (indeed, the smaller the width of the crestal bone, the better this technique is performed). The possibility of damage to the sinus membrane is minimised by using ultrasound based hydrodynamic pressure to lift it, while applying a very non-aggressive crestal approach. We believe that this technique is an advance in the search for less traumatic and aggressive techniques, which is the hallmark of current surgery.

  1. Ethmoid pneumocele presenting with exophthalmos 15 years after endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Song, Michelle; Ahn, Sun M.; Reh, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A pneumocele is an abnormal dilation of an air-containing sinus beyond the normal margins of bone, with associated bony thinning. A delayed ethmoid pneumocele after sinus surgery has not previously been reported. Methods: A case report of a patient with a delayed ethmoid pneumocele after sinus surgery. The diagnostic workup, operative approach, and postoperative results were evaluated. Results: A 57-year-old female with a history of endoscopic sinus surgery 15 years prior presented with right eye proptosis and severe orbital and facial pressure. A maxillofacial computed tomography showed a markedly expanded air-filled right anterior ethmoid space with a dehiscent lamina papyracea, consistent with a pneumocele. Marsupialization of the pneumocele as well as a revision ethmoidectomy were performed, with a visible return of the orbital contents to a more natural position. The patient experienced worsened diplopia immediately postoperatively that resolved within two weeks. Conclusions: This case demonstrates that a pneumocele can present even years after endoscopic sinus surgery, and acute but temporary development or worsening of diplopia can result from surgical decompression of the pneumocele as the eye returns to its natural position. PMID:26302735

  2. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Presentation of Acute Bacterial Sinusitis Complications in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Viraj J; Ling, Jeanie D; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis is a common disease in the pediatric population that typically resolves without significant complications. Children who do suffer from complications involving the orbit or the brain often experience significant morbidity and potential mortality, typically requiring hospitalization for management. Numerous studies have demonstrated that children from low-income families with public or no insurance are less likely to receive adequate preventative care, are more likely to present with later disease stages, and ultimately endure worse health outcomes. We review the literature to examine if there are socioeconomic disparities in the presentation of complications of acute bacterial sinusitis in the pediatric population.

  3. The role of Onodi cells in sphenoiditis: results of multiplanar reconstruction of computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Mehmet; Guler, Ibrahim; Azgin, Isa; Sakarya, Engin Umut; Ovet, Gultekin; Alatas, Necat; Tolu, Ismet; Erdur, Omer

    Onodi cells are the most posterior ethmoid air cells and extend superolateral to the sphenoid sinus. These cells are also intimately related with the sphenoid sinus, optic nerve, and carotid artery. Radiologic evaluation is mandatory to assess for anatomic variations before any treatment modalities related to the sphenoid sinus. To evaluate the effect of Onodi cells on the frequency of sphenoiditis. A retrospective analysis was performed in 618 adult patients who underwent high-resolution computed tomography between January 2013 and January 2015. The prevalence of Onodi cells and sphenoiditis was evaluated. Whether the presence of Onodi cells leads to an increase in the prevalence of sphenoiditis was investigated. Onodi cell positivity was observed in 326 of 618 patients and its prevalence was found to be 52.7%. In the study group, 60.3% (n=73) were ipsilaterally (n=21) or bilaterally (n=52) Onodi-positive, whereas 39.7% (n=48) were Onodi-negative (n=35) or only contralaterally Onodi-positive (n=13). Of the control group, 48.3% (n=240) were Onodi-positive and 51.7% (n=257) were Onodi negative. The co-existence of Onodi cells ipsilaterally was observed to increase the identification of sphenoiditis 1.5-fold, and this finding was statistically significant (p<0.05). The prevalence of sphenoiditis appears to be higher in patients with Onodi cells. However, it is not possible to state that Onodi cells are the single factor that causes this disease. Further studies are needed to investigate contributing factors related to sphenoiditis. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis presenting as a cavernous sinus syndrome: Case report with review of existing literature

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Shashi; Patrawalla, Amee

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculoma involving the cavernous sinus is a rare presentation of CNS disease, with only twelve cases reported in previous literature. We report a case of a 48 year old woman who presented with a right cavernous sinus syndrome of 2 months duration. MRI showed a mass in the right cavernous sinus, and serologic workup revealed an elevated sedimentation rate and positive Quantiferon®-GOLD testing. 18-FDG PET-CT demonstrated a hypermetabolic 3 cm subcarinal lymph node, and lymph node biopsy showed caseating granuloma. Culture of lymphatic tissue grew drug-sensitive M. tuberculosis. The patient was treated with a non-standard 4-drug regimen and prednisone, with rapid improvement of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. Total length of treatment was 12 months. In addition, we review the 12 cases found in literature, and discuss clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas, and approaches to treatment. PMID:26839786

  5. Anatomic variations of posterior paranasal sinuses and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Efendić, Alma; Muharemović, Edin; Skomorac, Rasim; Bečulić, Hakija; Šestić, Sabina; Halilović, Benjamin; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha

    2017-02-01

    Aim To define direct anatomical relations of the sphenoidal (alae minores), ethmoidal sinuses and optic nerve, with an emphasis on determining the effect of age on pneumatisation and dehiscence. Methods This retrospective, descriptive study involved 60 consecutive patients: 30 patients younger than 30 and30 patients older than 60 years of age. All patients underwent computerized tomography(CT). The relationship of the optic nerve and the sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses was classified. The presence of dehiscence in the bone structures, forming the optic canal, was checked. Dehiscence was defined as absence of visible bone density located between the sinus and the optic nerve. Protrusion of the optic nerve into the sphenoidal sinus was defined as optic nerve surrounded by pneumatised space. Results The most common type of relation between the optic nerve and sphenoidal sinus was type I, where the optic nerve was immediately adjacent to the lateral or superior wall of the sphenoidal sinus, without impression on the sinus wall. Dehiscence was documented in 15 (25%) cases, it was more common in older patients (8, 27%) than in younger ones (7, 23%). The pneumatisation processes were more frequent in patients over 60 (5, 17%) than in those younger than 30 years (4, 13%). Conclusion Surgeons and ophthalmologists should be aware of high frequency of dehiscence of sphenoidal sinus walls when treating adult patients in our population, especially when evaluating risks and complications of surgical procedures or when diagnosing inflammatory or tumorous processes in the close vicinity of posterior paranasal sinuses.

  6. Dermal Sinus Tract of the Thoracic Spine Presenting with Intramedullary Abscess and Cranial Nerve Deficits.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, Georgios; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P; Flaris, Nikolaos; Iliadis, Charalampos; Tsonidis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Congenital dermal sinus tract of the spine is an unusual developmental defect which represents a failure of the surface ectoderm and dermal elements to separate from the neuroectoderm. A 15-month-old female presented with high fever, severe right hemiparesis, difficulty breathing and cranial nerve deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed a congenital dermal sinus tract at the Th6 level, an intramedullary collection extending up to the brainstem and a probable intramedullary cystic lesion. The child was operated acutely with ligation of the sinus tract, drainage of the abscess and partial removal of the intramedullary lesion. Due to abscess recurrence, she was reoperated with complete excision of the dermal sinus tract, abscess redrainage and subtotal excision of the dermoid cyst (retaining a part of its capsule). Pus culture isolated Corynebacterium species and Peptococcus species and histology of the lesion showed a dermoid cyst. Postoperatively, after an initial neurologic deterioration, she progressively improved. An MRI scan at 15 months neither showed recurrence of the collection nor regrowth of the lesion. Spinal dermal sinus tracts that remain unnoticed or untreated can result in serious complications and should be operated as soon as possible to prevent undesirable sequelae. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Coexistence of dermal sinus tract, dermoid cyst, and encephalocele in a patient presenting with nasal cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Mahesh; Yellon, Robert F; Murdoch, Geoffrey; Greene, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Dermoid cysts, encephaloceles, and dermal sinus tracts represent abnormalities that develop during the process of embryogenesis. The elucidation of the precise timing of formation for these malformations has remained elusive at the molecular level of study. Yet, clinical experience has demonstrated that these malformations do not all occur in the same patient, suggesting a shared pathway that goes awry at distinct points for different patients, resulting in 1 of the 3 malformations. Herein the authors describe a case in which all 3 malformations were present in a single patient. This is the first description in the English literature of a sincipital encephalocele occurring with a dermoid cyst and a dermal sinus tract.

  8. Unusual presentation of unroofed coronary sinus with cyanosis after ventricular septal defect closure.

    PubMed

    Yarrabolu, Tharakanatha R; Doshi, Unnati H; Douglas, William I; Aly, Ashraf M; Balaguru, Duraisamy

    2015-01-01

    Cyanosis after surgical closure of ventricular and/or atrial septal defect is very unusual. We report a case of unroofed coronary sinus in a six-month-old boy who developed cyanosis after surgical closure of ventricular and atrial septal defects. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. An unusual presentation of a dural arteriovenous fistula of the sphenoparietal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Andrew; Plaha, Puneet; Byrne, James

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) are a rare form of intracranial arteriovenous malformation. We present the case of a patient who presented in a previously undescribed manner with facial swelling and bruising initially misdiagnosed as cellulitis. He was found subsequently to have DAVFs of the sphenoparietal sinus that had hemorrhaged. The rarity of DAVFs at this location may account for this unique presentation. Successful treatment was achieved by transarterial embolization. PMID:24632907

  10. Silent sinus syndrome presenting after a roller coaster ride: a case report.

    PubMed

    Singman, Eric L; Matta, Noelle S; Silbert, David I

    2014-01-01

    This is a case presentation of a 39-year-old male who presents with silent sinus syndrome. He was initially diagnosed by a neuroophthalmologist, and at first, the patient's otolaryngologist disagreed. The patient had a significant reduction in his symptoms with surgical and orthoptic intervention. © 2014 Board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System, American Orthoptic Journal, Volume 64, 2014, ISSN 0065-955X, E-ISSN 1553-4448.

  11. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series and a review.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral venous sinus system is a rare site for venous thrombosis except in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. We describe three patients presenting with cerebral venous thrombosis in association with other thrombotic sites in two patients and as an only site in one patient. Antiphospholipid syndrome has varied clinical manifestations but the defining feature is the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this report we will review the clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria and the management of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

  12. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altissimi, Giancarlo; Turchetta, Rosaria; Rigante, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy. PMID:28168075

  13. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a wound with discharging sinus tracts in a wild African lion (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Mwase, M; Mumba, C; Square, D; Kawarai, S; Madarame, H

    2013-11-01

    A female wild African lion (Panthera leo) was presented with an 8-month history of a wound with multiple discharging sinus tracts on the left paw. Microscopical examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cutaneous SCC in an African lion. Cutaneous SCC presenting as discharging sinus tracts lined by neoplastic squamous cells has not been reported previously in animals.

  14. Isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction in a patient with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Kyung-Jae; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kang, Shin-Hyuk

    2013-07-01

    As a rare cerebrovascular disease, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is caused by various conditions including trauma, infection, oral contraceptive, cancer and hematologic disorders. However, iron deficiency anemia is not a common cause for CVT in adult. Posterior fossa infarction following CVT is not well demonstrated because posterior fossa has abundant collateral vessels. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old man who was admitted with complaints of headache, nausea, and mild dizziness. The patient was diagnosed with isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction. Laboratory findings revealed normocytic normochromic anemia due to iron deficiency, and the patient's symptoms were improved after iron supplementation.

  15. Endovascular stenting of the transverse sinus in a patient presenting with benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ogungbo, B; Roy, D; Gholkar, A; Mendelow, A D

    2003-12-01

    The authors present a 37-year-old lady with symptoms and signs suggestive of benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). Routine CT and MRI scans were normal. Further investigations were performed with magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and cerebral venography. These revealed obstruction of the right transverse sinus with high pressure (40 mmHg) proximal to the obstruction and low pressure (15 mmHg) distally. She was treated by transvenous stent deployment with resolution of her symptoms and the bilateral papilloedema. Evaluation of the cerebral venous system with MRV and or with formal cerebral venography should be included in routine investigations of patients with suspected BIH.

  16. Oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma of frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Kalfert, David; Laco, Jan; Celakovský, Petr; Smatanová, Katarína; Ludvíková, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma (OSP) is one of the three morphologically distinct tumors that arise from Schneiderian membrane (the others include exophytic papilloma and inverted papilloma). OSP almost always occurs unilaterally in the paranasal sinuses, usually in the maxillary sinus, ethmoid cells or sphenoid sinus. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with OSP arising from the left frontal sinus. In the report herein, we describe an OSP originating in the region of frontal sinus, which, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first documented example in English literature of OSP developing in this anatomical site.

  17. [Clinical analysis of fungal rhino-sinusitis in 189 cases].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Zhou, Ni; Chen, Zisong

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the clinical features of fungal rhino-sinusitis. Clinical data of 189 patients suffering from fungal rhino-sinusitis treated by functional endoscopic sinus surgery was analyzed retrospectively. The analyzed data included clinical type, age of onset, predilectionsite, reason, and surgical outcome. Among the 189 patients with fungal rhino-sinusitis,181 cases were fungal ball,6 cases were allergic fungal rhino-sinusitis, 1 case was acute invasive fungnal rhino-sinusitis, 1 case was chronic invasive fungnal rhino-sinusitis. One hundred and twenty-eight cases were in the maxillary sinus (123 cases were unilateral, 5 cases were bilateral). Nineteen cases were in the ethmoid sinus. 31 cases were in the sphenoid sinus. Two cases were both in the maxillary sinus and ethmoid sinus, 1 case was both in the maxillary sinus and sphenoid sinus. Two cases invasive fungnal rhino-sinusitis had diabetes history. All the patients treated by functional endoscopic sinus surgery, 184 cases without recurrence, 5 cases suffered re-operation. The incidence of fungal rhinosinusitis is showing a rising trend, fungal ball is the highest. The sinusitis patients whom we highly doubt for fungal infection should be confirmed by using sinonasal secretion smear, cultivation and histopathological examination. Surgical treatment should completely remove the fungal masses, to avoid reoperation.

  18. Trans-sphenoidal Approach to the Supraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery for Endovascular Access in a Cadaver

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Hunter Kegan; Serici, Anthony Joseph; Moftakhar, Roham

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Sometimes, intracranial pathology in the distal vasculature cannot be accessed by standard endovascular techniques because of occlusion or insurmountable tortuosity of theinternal carotid artery (ICA). A trans-sphenoidal surgical approach can follow a similar trajectory to the course of the supraclinoid ICA. This study evaluates the feasibility of a trans-sphenoidal approach to the supraclinoid ICA for endovascular access. Materials and Methods In a fresh cadaver head, the sphenoid sinus was dissected through a trans-sphenoidal route. Bone over the carotid prominence was removed to expose the ICA. The artery was catheterized using the Seldinger technique, and three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography was performed to evaluate the procedure. Results The catheter was successfully inserted into the supraclinoid ICA via the trans-sphenoidal route. Three-dimensional radiographic reconstruction confirmed placement of the catheter and the trajectory of the sheath into the supraclinoid ICA. Conclusion While the trans-sphenoidal route has innumerable disadvantages over the standard endovascular access techniques, this route could be considered when other treatment options are too risky or impractical. PMID:23515414

  19. A rare presentation of central nervous system in a pediatric patient with Hodgkin disease: cavernous sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alioglu, Bulent; Ustun, Huseyin; Sonmez, Akif; Kaplan, Hacer; Arikan, Fatma Inci; Dallar, Yildiz

    2009-10-01

    Intracranial involvement by Hodgkin disease is rare. We report a pediatric patient with Hodgkin disease who had intracranial disease at presentation. The patient was referred to our hospital with a suspicion of central nervous system tumor. Although the most common presenting feature of intracranial Hodgkin disease is cranial nerve palsy with brain parenchyma being the most common intracranial site of involvement, to our best knowledge no pediatric case of Hodgkin disease presented with isolated cavernous sinus syndrome reported. We report this rare case because of its unusual presentation, in which Hodgkin disease presented with cavernous sinus syndrome. Physicians should consider the probability of Hodgkin disease in children of all ages who present with cavernous sinus syndrome.

  20. Giant Central Ossifying Fibroma of the Maxilla Presenting with a Pus Discharging Intra-Oral Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Anjali; Rastogi, Varun; Priyadarshini, Smita R.; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Central ossifying fibroma (COF) is a rare benign fibro-osseous neoplasm which has a predilection for mandible and is encountered in middle aged women. It arises from mesenchymal blast cells of the periodontal ligament, and with a potential to form fibrous tissue, cementum and bone. It is a well circumscribed lesion mainly comprising of fibrous tissue with varying amounts of bone or cementum or osteo-cementum like tissue. We present an uncommon case of COF of the maxilla in a 35-year-old male who presented with a pus discharging sinus in the maxilla. Due to the bizarre size of the lesion we have termed as ‘giant’ COF. There is extensive facial asymmetry on the right side with obliteration of the maxillary antrum, deviation of the nose and upward displacement of the orbit. PMID:25738089

  1. Anatomic reference for computed tomography of paranasal sinuses and their communication in the Egyptian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Alsafy, M A M; El-Gendy, S A A; El Sharaby, A A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to present an anatomic reference for computed tomography (CT) for the paranasal sinuses of adult buffalo fit the use of anatomists, radiologists, clinicians and veterinary students. CT images with the most closely corresponding cross sections of the head were selected and studied serially in a rostral to caudal progression from the level of the interdental space to the level of the nuchal line. The anatomical features were compared with the dissected heads and skulls. The paranasal sinuses of buffalo comprise dorsal conchal, middle conchal, maxillary, frontal, palatine, sphenoidal (inconstant, small and shallow when present), lacrimal and ethmoidal that were identified and labelled according to the premolar and molar teeth as landmarks. The topographic description of all the compartments, diverticula, septa and communication of the paranasal sinuses in buffalo has been presented. The relationship between the various air cavities and paranasal sinuses was easily visualized.

  2. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Aralasmak, A; Aygun, N; Westra, W H; Yousem, D M

    2006-09-01

    We present 2 patients with giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the sphenoid bone. The first patient is an 8-year-old boy with involvement of the greater wing, and the second is a 53- year-old man with a lateral pterygoid plate mass. Both patients presented with rapid expansion of lytic bone lesions, which had solid and cystic components and lacked matrix calcification. Biopsies were indeterminate for definitive diagnoses. The radiologic appearance, location, and incidence of the lesions, and the patient's age and medical history are helpful aids in narrowing the differential diagnosis of sphenoid bone lesions. However, the imaging and, occasionally, even the histologic findings may not suggest the specific diagnosis of GCRG, which must be added into the differential diagnosis of rapidly enlarging cystic bone lesions of the sphenoid bone.

  3. A stereological study on the correlation of inferior turbinate hypertrophy and paranasal sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ahmet; Songu, Murat; Adibelli, Zehra Hilal; Candan, Huseyin

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the correlation between inferior turbinate size and paranasal sinus opacification on computerized tomography (CT) scans. Paranasal sinus CT scans of a total of 185 patients (92 males, 93 females) were examined in terms of sinus opacification. Sizes of the inferior turbinates were measured using stereological method and these sizes in normal and opacified paranasal sinuses are compared using one-way analysis of variance. Scans of 185 patients (93 female, 92 male) aged between 12 and 84 (mean 37.85 ± 16.27) years were examined in this study. Sizes of the inferior turbinates were found to be increased significantly in case of opacification of ipsilateral maxillary and anterior ethmoid sinuses (p = 0.000 and p = 0.4, respectively) on both sides. On the other hand, such a relationship could not be demonstrated for sizes of inferior turbinates with opacified or non-opacified posterior ethmoid, frontal and sphenoid sinuses. In conclusion, the combination of CT and the Cavalieri principle can provide an unbiased, direct, and assumption-free estimate of the regions of interest. The presented method can be efficiently applied without any need for special software, additional equipment, or personnel than that required for routine CT in daily use. Paranasal sinus disease, especially the inflammatory diseases of maxillary and anterior ethmoid sinuses, must be carefully investigated in cases with inferior turbinate hypertrophy.

  4. Extradural dermoid cyst located in the lateral sphenoid ridge.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Jin; Park, Kyung-Jae; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Hyuk

    2014-04-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare congenital tumors that occur primarily at the midline at a characteristic intradural location. However, dermoid cysts located at extradural and lateral regions have been rarely reported until now. In the present study, the authors demonstrate the unusual instance of an intracranial extradural dermoid cyst at the lateral sphenoid ridge. A 53-year-old woman admitted because of progressive headache and dizziness. The patient had no neurologic deficits, and magnetic resonance imaging with no contrast enhancement revealed a mass at the right sphenoid ridge. The mass was accompanied with sphenoid bone erosion visible on computed tomography. The patient underwent right pterional craniotomy, and the tumor including the capsule was totally resected. Presence of a dermoid cyst was confirmed with histopathological examination. The patient had no complications during the postoperative period. This study suggests that dermoid cyst should be considered for differential diagnosis of extradural and lateral intracranial masses.

  5. Extradural Dermoid Cyst Located in the Lateral Sphenoid Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seok-Jin; Park, Kyung-Jae; Park, Dong-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare congenital tumors that occur primarily at the midline at a characteristic intradural location. However, dermoid cysts located at extradural and lateral regions have been rarely reported until now. In the present study, the authors demonstrate the unusual instance of an intracranial extradural dermoid cyst at the lateral sphenoid ridge. A 53-year-old woman admitted because of progressive headache and dizziness. The patient had no neurologic deficits, and magnetic resonance imaging with no contrast enhancement revealed a mass at the right sphenoid ridge. The mass was accompanied with sphenoid bone erosion visible on computed tomography. The patient underwent right pterional craniotomy, and the tumor including the capsule was totally resected. Presence of a dermoid cyst was confirmed with histopathological examination. The patient had no complications during the postoperative period. This study suggests that dermoid cyst should be considered for differential diagnosis of extradural and lateral intracranial masses. PMID:24926471

  6. Cemento-ossifying fibroma presenting as a posterior fossa mass lesion.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Ritesh; Sharma, Arpit; Gaikwad, Ninad; Mahore, Amit; Goel, Atul

    2010-04-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibromas are benign lesions of the jaw, which arise from the periodontal membrane. Histopathologically these are composed of fibrous tissues with calcified structures resembling bone and cementum. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice. They have rarely been reported in the ethmoid sinus, maxillary sinus and sphenoid sinus Mastoid bone is an extremely rare site of such tumors. Only one case of cemento-ossifying fibroma of petromastoid bone has been reported before. We present a case of cementoossifying fibroma involving the petromastoid bone, with the large intracranial component causing compression on the cerebellum. This unique case may provide insight into the etiopathogenesis of these tumors.

  7. Unusual Synchronous Presentation of Maxillary Sinus Fibrosarcoma and Gemistocytic Astrocytoma with a Complication Called Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cadir, Bilge; Karahan, Nermin; Nasir, Serdar; Aydin, M. Asim; Turkaslan, S. Suha

    2009-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is extremely rare pathology and there is limited report in the literature. We report synchronous presentation of maxillary sinus fibrosarcoma and gemistocytic astrocytoma which is, to our knowledge, unique in the literature. Both tumors metastases to other organ rarely and the metastatic spread of gemistocytic astrocytoma to fibrosarcoma or vice versa have also not been reported in the literature yet. This report discusses the clinical course of the disease, outcome of the treatment approach and survival as well as an unusual occurrence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis during the course of radiotherapy in such unusual presentation. PMID:19756200

  8. Primary soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma of the maxillary sinus in elderly patients: presentation, management and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, M; Ghatak, S; Biswas, G; Sen, A

    2014-06-01

    Nonosseous or soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma is a rare form of Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour that seldom affects the head and neck region. Involvement of the nose and paranasal sinuses is extremely uncommon, with only eight of such patients being reported to date, mostly affecting adolescents and young adults. To our knowledge, this study is the first comprehensive report of primary soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma involving the paranasal sinuses in an elderly patient who successfully completed treatment. We herein discuss the pathogenesis, management and factors affecting the prognosis of this rare group of tumours involving the nose and paranasal sinuses, in relation to the available literature.

  9. New concept in cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: correlation with presenting symptom and venous drainage patterns.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Sun Ju; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Chang Jin; Kook, Michael; Ahn, Hyo-Sook; Kwon, Sun Uck; Kim, Jong Sung

    2005-06-01

    An extradurally located cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) exhibits different clinical behavior from other dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) located between 2 dural leaves. The aim of this study is to define angiographic types of CSDAVF associated with presenting symptom (Sx) and venous drainage patterns. CSDAVFs during a mean of 23-month follow-up period of 58 patients (17 to 73 years, male:female ratio=8:50) were retrospectively analyzed. The 3 types of CSDAF, ie, proliferative (PT), restrictive (RT), and late restrictive (LRT) types, were categorized by the degrees and patterns of prominent arteriovenous shunt as well as venous flow. The status of the venous connection with CS and the presenting Sx patterns classified as orbital (OrbSxP), ocular (OcuSxP), cavernous (CavSxP), and cerebral (CerSxP) were associated with angiographic types as well as symptom onset, age, and gender. Correlations of discrete and categorical variables were statistically analyzed using the chi2 or Fisher exact test. PT (n=23) and RT (n=23) of CSDAVF were more common than LRT (n=12) (P=0.016) in patients with younger than 65 years and were related to OrbSxP (P=0.015) and CavSxP (P=0.038) in contrast to LRT to OcuSxP (P=0.004). Early onset of Sxs was related to the OrbSxP (P=0.08) and CavSxP (P<0.001). CerSxP (5%) was noted in RT or LRT. OrbSxP was related to the superior ophthalmic venous drainage (P=0.026) and CavSxP to the inferior petrosal sinus (P=0.046) and posterior fossa venous drainages (P=0.014). Seven patients revealed chronological progression of CSDAVF from PT to LRT and even to complete healing. CSDAVF presents as 3 distinctive angiographic types and is associated with presenting Sxs and venous drainage patterns.

  10. Endovascular treatment of sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula with pure cortical venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Miyake, Kosuke; Kunieda, Takenobu; Murao, Kenichi

    2014-07-01

    Curative endovascular treatment of sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) with pure cortical venous drainage is challenging because of its rarity, lack of accessible dural sinus for transvenous embolization (TVE), and proximity of skull base vital regions. Direct surgery to disconnect venous reflux has been favored. We report the curative endovascular treatment of two sphenoid wing dAVFs with pure cortical venous drainage. One patient revealed complete obliteration of dAVF by a single session of transarterial embolization (TAE). As part of strategic TAE for this complex dAVF, we used a novel approach to create a complete flow-arrest condition in which coils and an occlusion balloon were combined. A liquid agent was then injected across the pathological fistula and into the parent venous apparatus, thereby occluding the lesion. The other patient was treated with percutaneous TVE after TAE was unsuccessful. With a specific strategy and appropriate devices, the microcatheter was successfully introduced through sigmoid sinus, transverse sinus, superior sagittal sinus, and refluxing cortical vein by puncture of the jugular vein. Coils were deployed at the venous side of the fistula, resulting in successful obliteration of the dAVF. Sphenoid wing dAVF with pure cortical venous drainage could be curable by endovascular treatment with proper strategy and instruments when anatomical condition permits.

  11. Cadaveric validation study of computational fluid dynamics model of sinus irrigations before and after sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Craig, John R; Zhao, Kai; Doan, Ngoc; Khalili, Sammy; Lee, John YK; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigations into the distribution of sinus irrigations have been limited by labor-intensive methodologies that do not capture the full dynamics of irrigation flow. The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for sinonasal irrigations through a cadaveric experiment. Methods Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed on two fresh cadavers to open all eight sinuses, including a Draf III procedure for cadaver 1, and Draf IIb frontal sinusotomies for cadaver 2. Computed tomography maxillofacial scans were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively, from which CFD models were created. Blue-dyed saline in a 240 mL squeeze bottle was used to irrigate cadaver sinuses at 60 mL/s (120 mL per side, over 2 seconds). These parameters were replicated in CFD simulations. Endoscopes were placed through trephinations drilled through the anterior walls of the maxillary and frontal sinuses, and sphenoid roofs. Irrigation flow into the maxillary, frontal, and sphenoid sinuses was graded both ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of nasal irrigation, and then compared with the CFD simulations. Results In both cadavers, preoperative and postoperative irrigation flow into maxillary, frontal, and sphenoid sinuses matched extremely well when comparing the CFD models and cadaver endoscopic videos. For cadaver 1, there was 100% concordance between the CFD model and cadaver videos, and 83% concordance for cadaver 2. Conclusions This cadaveric experiment provided potential validation of the CFD model for simulating saline irrigation flow into the maxillary, frontal, and sphenoid sinuses before and after sinus surgery. PMID:26880742

  12. Cadaveric validation study of computational fluid dynamics model of sinus irrigations before and after sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Craig, John R; Zhao, Kai; Doan, Ngoc; Khalili, Sammy; Lee, John Y K; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N

    2016-04-01

    Investigations into the distribution of sinus irrigations have been limited by labor-intensive methodologies that do not capture the full dynamics of irrigation flow. The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for sinonasal irrigations through a cadaveric experiment. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed on 2 fresh cadavers to open all 8 sinuses, including a Draf III procedure for cadaver 1, and Draf IIb frontal sinusotomies for cadaver 2. Computed tomography maxillofacial scans were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively, from which CFD models were created. Blue-dyed saline in a 240-mL squeeze bottle was used to irrigate cadaver sinuses at 60 mL/second (120 mL per side, over 2 seconds). These parameters were replicated in CFD simulations. Endoscopes were placed through trephinations drilled through the anterior walls of the maxillary and frontal sinuses, and sphenoid roofs. Irrigation flow into the maxillary, frontal, and sphenoid sinuses was graded both ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of nasal irrigation, and then compared with the CFD simulations. In both cadavers, preoperative and postoperative irrigation flow into maxillary, frontal, and sphenoid sinuses matched extremely well when comparing the CFD models and cadaver endoscopic videos. For cadaver 1, there was 100% concordance between the CFD model and cadaver videos, and 83% concordance for cadaver 2. This cadaveric experiment provided potential validation of the CFD model for simulating saline irrigation flow into the maxillary, frontal, and sphenoid sinuses before and after sinus surgery. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  13. [Usefulness of pulsed water jet in dissecting sphenoid ridge meningioma while preserving arteries].

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Fujimura, Miki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-11-01

    We report the utility of a pulsed water jet device in meningioma surgery. The presented case is that of a 61-year-old woman with left visual disturbance. MRI demonstrated heterogeneously enhanced mass with intratumoral hemorrhage, indicating sphenoid ridge meningioma on her left side. The tumor invaded the cavernous sinus and left optic canal, engulfing the internal carotid artery in the carotid cistern and encased middle cerebral arteries. During the operation, the pulsed water jet device was useful for dissecting the tumor away from the arteries since it was safe in light of preserving parent arteries. The jet did not cause any vascular injury and did not induce vasospasm as shown by postoperative symptomatology and MRIs. With the aid of pulsed water jet, we could achieve total resection of the tumor except for the piece within the cavernous sinus. The patient had no new neurological deficits after the operation. We consider the pulsed water jet as a useful device, especially when the need to dissect meningioma from parent arteries exists. The jet can help neurosurgeons simultaneously achieve tumor resection and preservation of blood vessels.

  14. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy Rosai-Dorfman disease: a unique case presentation.

    PubMed

    Kaltman, Jordan M; Best, Steven P; McClure, Shawn A

    2011-12-01

    Rosai and Dorfman first described sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) in 1969 with an article detailing 4 cases in which they differentiated this disease entity from the grouping of diseases categorized as histiocytosis X, where it was previously classified. Also known as Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD), it is clinically characterized as massive, painless, bilateral, symmetric cervical lymphadenopathy, with fever and leukocytosis. An 11-year-old African American boy was referred to our clinic for extraction of a severely decayed tooth #30 and evaluation of a large right-sided neck mass. Initially, the patient had been seen by his general dentist who had diagnosed the mass as an odontogenic abscess. After 2 courses of different antibiotics, no changes in the mass were noted. Subsequently, the patient was sent to the emergency department where CT revealed multiple right-sided neck masses with the largest measuring 4 × 2 cm. The patient underwent an incisional biopsy by otolaryngology and a diagnosis of necrotic lymph tissue was made. Upon our examination, the carious tooth #30 was felt to be an incidental finding and fine-needle aspiration cytology of the largest mass was performed in 2 places. This also provided a diagnosis of necrotic lymph tissue. In concert with the patient and his mother, the decision was made to excise the mass because of psychosocial concerns. A massive right-sided lymph node attached to the submandibular gland was found and excised without complication. Histologic examination with S-100 stain confirmed a diagnosis of RDD. The patient healed well following surgery and has experienced no further lymphadenopathy. This case presentation and review of the literature is unique, as the patient presented with unilateral cervical lymphadenopathy only. Open biopsy and 2 fine-needle aspirations all returned as necrotic lymph tissue. Obtaining the correct diagnosis was additionally hampered by coincidental dental pathology on the

  15. The 360 photography: a new anatomical insight of the sphenoid bone. Interest for anatomy teaching and skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Jacquesson, Timothée; Mertens, Patrick; Berhouma, Moncef; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Simon, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Skull base architecture is tough to understand because of its 3D complex shape and its numerous foramen, reliefs or joints. It is especially true for the sphenoid bone whom central location hinged with most of skull base components is unique. Recently, technological progress has led to develop new pedagogical tools. This way, we bought a new real-time three-dimensional insight of the sphenoid bone that could be useful for the teacher, the student and the surgeon. High-definition photography was taken all around an isolated dry skull base bone prepared with Beauchêne's technique. Pictures were then computed to provide an overview with rotation and magnification on demand. From anterior, posterior, lateral or oblique views and from in out looks, anatomical landmarks and subtleties were described step by step. Thus, the sella turcica, the optic canal, the superior orbital fissure, the sphenoid sinus, the vidian canal, pterygoid plates and all foramen were clearly placed relative to the others at each face of the sphenoid bone. In addition to be the first report of the 360 Photography tool, perspectives are promising as the development of a real-time interactive tridimensional space featuring the sphenoid bone. It allows to turn around the sphenoid bone and to better understand its own special shape, numerous foramen, neurovascular contents and anatomical relationships. This new technological tool may further apply for surgical planning and mostly for strengthening a basic anatomical knowledge firstly introduced.

  16. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of unusual presentations of blunt injury to the ascending aorta and aortic sinuses.

    PubMed

    Wall, Matthew J; Tsai, Peter I; Gilani, Ramyar; Mattox, Kenneth L

    2010-10-01

    Blunt injury to the thoracic aorta continues to carry significant mortality and the diagnostic algorithms are evolving as new technology is developed. With improved pre-hospital care, patients with unusual blunt injuries to the aorta may survive to evaluation. While current algorithms for screening focus on the more common blunt injuries to the descending thoracic aorta, our service has seen four injuries to the ascending aorta that have had unusual presentations and presented significant challenges in their management. Retrospective chart review based on a cardiovascular injury database. Four patients were identified who survived to hospitalization with an injury to the ascending thoracic aorta. Two were to the ascending aorta and two to the aortic sinuses. Two presented with closed head injury complicating management. One patient presented with aortic valve insufficiency. Motion artifacts at the aortic sinus made screening by CT challenging. These injuries were managed with primary repair (1), tube graft replacement (2), and aortic root replacement with reimplantation of the coronaries (1), all with cardiopulmonary bypass. Injuries to the ascending aorta and aortic sinus that survive to evaluation present unique challenges to the screening algorithms. All required cardiopulmonary bypass for repair and potentially complex reconstructions with management decisions affected by the presence of associated injuries. New methodologies such as CT scan gated to cardiac motion may offer higher resolution in this area. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comprehensive review on endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery is the standard procedure for surgery of most paranasal sinus diseases. Appropriate frame conditions provided, the respective procedures are safe and successful. These prerequisites encompass appropriate technical equipment, anatomical oriented surgical technique, proper patient selection, and individually adapted extent of surgery. The range of endonasal sinus operations has dramatically increased during the last 20 years and reaches from partial uncinectomy to pansinus surgery with extended surgery of the frontal (Draf type III), maxillary (grade 3–4, medial maxillectomy, prelacrimal approach) and sphenoid sinus. In addition there are operations outside and beyond the paranasal sinuses. The development of surgical technique is still constantly evolving. This article gives a comprehensive review on the most recent state of the art in endoscopic sinus surgery according to the literature with the following aspects: principles and fundamentals, surgical techniques, indications, outcome, postoperative care, nasal packing and stents, technical equipment. PMID:26770282

  18. Quantitation of and measurements utilizing the sphenoid ridge.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The sphenoid ridge (posterior aspect of the lesser wings) is encountered in many intracranial procedures. Increased knowledge of its morphology and relationships is, therefore, of importance to the neurosurgeon and clinician who appreciate imaging of this anatomical region. We have quantitated this part of the sphenoid bone in dry human skulls (35) and made cadaveric (15) measurements between its parts and surrounding neuroanatomical structures in all three cranial fossae. The length of the left and right lesser wings was on average 4.2 and 4 cm, respectively. The mean widths of this bony part at its midline, midpoint, and lateral point (crista alaris) were 1.5 cm, 2.0 cm, and 2 mm, respectively. From the crista alaris the mean distances to the crista galli, V3 at its exit through the foramen ovale, entrance of the occulomotor nerve into the cavernous sinus, middle meningeal artery at its emergence from the foramen spinosum, and the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves at the internal auditory meatus were 4.9, 4.5, 5, 4.7, and 6.1 cm, respectively. From the midpoint of the lesser wing, the mean distances to the crista galli, V3 at its exit through the foramen ovale, entrance of the occulomotor nerve into the cavernous sinus, middle meningeal artery at its emergence from the foramen spinosum, and the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves at the internal auditory meatus were 4.2, 2.9, 3, 3.4, and 4.7 cm, respectively. From the anterior clinoid process of the lesser wing, the mean distances to the crista galli, V3 at its exit through the foramen ovale, entrance of the oculomotor nerve into the cavernous sinus, middle meningeal artery at its emergence from the foramen spinosum, and the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves at the internal auditory meatus were 4.3, 2.8, 1, 3.3, and 4.1 cm, respectively. Additional measurements between the parts of the sphenoid ridge and surrounding anatomical structures may assist the surgeon who operates in this region or the clinician who

  19. Hemiparkinsonism secondary to sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kleib, A-S; Sid'Ahmed, E; Salihy, S-M; Boukhrissi, N; Diagana, M; Soumaré, O

    2016-10-01

    We describe the case of a 41 year-old woman who presented with a slight slowness of the right hand movement, which began four months prior to admission. Neurological examination showed slight rest tremor of the right hand, moderate bradykinesia and rigidity. She had been taking medication for Parkinson's disease, but without any benefit. The patient underwent a gadolinium-enhanced brain MRI, which showed a large left sphenoid wing meningioma with surrounding edema compressing the basal ganglia. Total excision of tumor was performed. The right hemiparkinsonian signs were completely resolved. This rare case underlines the significance of neuroimaging in patients presenting with Parkinson's disease especially in those patients with a relatively younger age at onset or unresponsive to medication.

  20. [A case of cavernous sinus epidermoid: anatomical classification and surgical approach].

    PubMed

    Kuroi, Yasuhiro; Yoshimura, Chika; Yokosako, Suguru; Arai, Naoyuki; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Sasahara, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Shinji; Tani, Shigeru; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Kubo, Osami; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidermoid rarely appears in the cavernous sinus. We encountered a 41-year-old man with left abducens nerve palsy. A round-shaped, low-density lesion on CT was located lateral to the left cavernous sinus with a compressed and thinned lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. We could not identify cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus, which was found to be packed with a non-enhanced, high-intensity tumor on both T1 and T2 MRI. Part of the tumor capsule and its pearly contents were removed with an intradural subtemporal approach, and an inner membranous layer with cranial nerves and a tumor capsule were seen at the bottom of the tumor cavity. Postoperatively, complete cure was achieved. Reviewing similar cases, we found 18 cavernous sinus epidermoids:extracavernous type in 5;interdural in 10;and intracavernous in 3. The interdural type could be further divided into two subtypes:superficial cavernous sinus and inner membranous types. The present case belongs to the former. Frontotemporal and subtemporal procedures via both intra- and extradural approaches are relatively safe for lesions except for the intracavernous type, because cranial nerves are not located in the lateral wall of the tumor. MRI provides more useful information on cranial nerves and aid in choosing a better treatment strategy.

  1. Transnasal, Endoscopically Guided Skull-Based Surgery by Pharyngotomy for Mass Removal from the Sphenopalatine Sinus in a Horse.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Rolfe M; Messiaen, Yasmine; Irby, Nita L; Divers, Thomas J; Dewey, Curtis W; Mitchell, Katharyn J; Schnabel, Lauren V; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J; Scrivani, Peter V; Ducharme, Norm G

    2016-11-01

    To report a transnasal, endoscopically guided ventral surgical approach for accessing the cranial and caudal segments of the sphenopalatine sinus for mass removal in a horse. Case report. Adult horse with acute onset blindness referable to a soft tissue mass within the sphenopalatine sinus. A 7-year-old Warmblood gelding presented with a history of running into a fence and falling. No neurologic signs were identified at initial examination but acute blindness was noted 3 weeks later. On computed tomography (CT) the sphenopalatine sinus was filled with a large homogeneous mass with poor contrast enhancement that extended dorsally with thinning to the dorsal cortex of the sphenoid bone, just rostral to the entrance of the optic canals into the cranial cavity. Surgical access to the sphenopalatine sinus was achieved using a transnasal, endoscopically guided ventral pharyngotomy approach and the mass lesion was removed. A presumptive diagnosis of chondroma was made based on histopathology. The horse recovered well from surgery, and although it has not regained vision as of 6.5 years postoperatively, the disease has not progressed. Transnasal, endoscopically-guided ventral surgical access to the sphenopalatine sinus is possible in horses and may improve access in horses with disease extending caudally beyond the palatine portion of the sinus. Use of smaller diameter or specialized instruments, such as various endoscopic bone cutting instruments, and CT image guidance may improve sinus access by this route. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Sinonasal carcinoma presenting as chronic sinusitis and sequential bilateral visual loss

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Yu; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma-related rhinogenic optic neuropathy is rare and may lead to visual loss. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bilateral sequential visual loss induced by this etiology. It is important to differentiate between chronic sinusitis and malignancy on the basis of specific findings on magnetic resonance images. Surgical decompression with multidisciplinary therapy, including steroids, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, is indicated. However, no visual improvement was noted in this case, emphasizing the rapid disease progression and importance of early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26265644

  3. Orbital apex syndrome in a patient with sphenoid fungal balls.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok Hyun; Jin, Bong Joon; Lee, Yong Seop; Paik, Seung Sam; Ko, Myung Kyoo; Yi, Hyeong-Joong

    2009-03-01

    Orbital apex syndrome (OAS) is a rare disease that presents with a complex of symptoms, including ophthalmoplegia, ptosis and visual loss. Due to the poor prognosis, making a prompt diagnosis and administering the appropriate treatment must be initiated without delay if OAS is suspected. We report here on a case of a patient with sphenoid fungal balls, and he presented with acute visual loss and ophthalmoplegia.

  4. Orbital Apex Syndrome in a Patient with Sphenoid Fungal Balls

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bong Joon; Lee, Yong Seop; Paik, Seung Sam; Ko, Myung Kyoo; Yi, Hyeong-Joong

    2009-01-01

    Orbital apex syndrome (OAS) is a rare disease that presents with a complex of symptoms, including ophthalmoplegia, ptosis and visual loss. Due to the poor prognosis, making a prompt diagnosis and administering the appropriate treatment must be initiated without delay if OAS is suspected. We report here on a case of a patient with sphenoid fungal balls, and he presented with acute visual loss and ophthalmoplegia. PMID:19434293

  5. Rosai-Dorfman disease mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manish S; Padua, Michelle De; Jha, Ajaya N

    2005-03-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with a single generalized tonic-clonic seizure. MRI revealed an enhancing, dural-based, left lateral sphenoid wing lesion suggestive of a meningioma. At microsurgical excision, the lesion was firm and relatively avascular. The histopathological report revealed S-100 positive histiocytic proliferation with lymphophagocytosis (emperipolesis) characteristic of the Rosai-Dorfman disease. The case and its management are discussed.

  6. Anatomical variations in the human paranasal sinus region studied by CT

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ-PIÑAS, I.; SABATÉ, J.; CARMONA, A.; CATALINA-HERRERA, C. J.; JIMÉNEZ-CASTELLANOS, J.

    2000-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the anatomy of the paranasal sinuses is essential for the clinician. Conventional radiology does not permit a detailed study of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, and has now largely been replaced by computerised tomographic (CT) imaging. This gives an applied anatomical view of the region and the anatomical variants that are very often found. The detection of these variants to prevent potential hazards is essential for the use of current of endoscopic surgery on the sinuses. In the present work, we have studied the anatomical variants observed in the nasal fossae and paranasal sinuses in 110 Spanish subjects, using CT in the coronal plane, complemented by horizontal views. We have concentrated on the variants of the nasal septum, middle nasal concha, ethmoid unciform process and ethmoid bulla, together with others of lesser frequency. The population studied showed great anatomical variability, and a high percentage (67%) presented one or more anatomical variants. Discounting agger nasi air cells and asymmetry of both cavities of the sphenoidal sinus, which were present in all our cases, the variations most often observed were, in order, deviation of the nasal septum, the presence of a concha bullosa, bony spurs of the nasal septum and Onodi air cells. PMID:11005714

  7. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults.

  8. [A case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Hase, Tomomi; Kurita, Hideharu; Matsumoto, Eiji; Kuroda, Hajime; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Shinoda, Souji

    2013-10-01

    We reported a case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis. A 62-year-old man complained of trigeminal neuralgia in the right V1 region. Neurological examination on admission showed ptosis, loss of light reflex and ophthalmoplegia externa in the right side. MRI enhanced with gadolinium demonstrated sphenoid sinusitis and mass lesion in the right cavernous sinus. MRA revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion. An open biopsy using the extradural temporopolar approach was performed. Pus discharge was observed from the cavernous sinus and histological examination showed hypha of Aspergillus. With early voriconazole treatment, the patient had improvement in headache, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia externa. Cavernous sinus aspergillosis is often found after sphenoiditis. It results in invasion to an internal carotid artery and worsens the patient's prognosis by cerebral infarction, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. We should consider aspergillosis as one of the differential diagnoses of a mass in the cavernous sinus. The epidural approach to this lesion was available to obviate aspergillus dissemination into the medullary cavity.

  9. [A case of primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma extending from the orbital rim to the sphenoid wing: a case report].

    PubMed

    Inaka, Yasufumi; Otani, Naoki; Nishida, Sho; Kumagai, Kohsuke; Fujii, Kazuya; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomiyama, Arata; Tomura, Satoshi; Osada, Hideo; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-11-01

    A primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma located at the sphenoid bone with extensive involvement of the orbital roof and the lateral wall of the orbit is very rare. A 48-year-old woman presented with progressive right exophthalmos and diplopia. CT showed a bony mass lesion in the right sphenoid bone extending to the orbital bone. MRI showed an abnormal lesion in the sphenoid bone, which was heterogeneously enhanced with gadolinium. All of the abnormal bone was surgically removed, and histological examination confirmed a cavernous angioma. We also present a brief clinical and radiological review of seven previously reported cases.

  10. Orbital reconstruction for pulsatile exophthalmos secondary to sphenoid wing dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Dale, Elizabeth L; Strait, Timothy A; Sargent, Larry A

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid wing dysplasia or absence of the greater sphenoid wing is a rare condition that is considered pathopneumonic for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). It occurs in 4% to 11% of NF1 patients, and its precise cause is unclear. Some cases appear to be congenital, while others have demonstrated it to be a progressive degeneration of the orbital wall. In about half of cases, associated adjacent neurofibromas are described. Consistently, however, the clinical sequelae is herniation of the temporal lobe into the orbit, causing progressive proptosis and pulsatile exophthalmos. Reconstruction of the orbit has traditionally been with bone grafts, but due to problems with bone resorption and recurrence, titanium plates in conjunction with bone grafts have been reported. We present a case of a 6-year-old male patient who was first diagnosed with NF1 and associated absence of the greater sphenoid wing at the age of 2. Four years later, he was referred for reconstruction after the development of pulsatile exophthalmos. Surgical management included dissection of the dura of the temporal lobe off of the periorbita and skull base reconstruction with a combination of radial-shaped titanium mesh and split calvarial bone grafts. Postoperatively, there was near immediate resolution of the pulsatile exophthalmos, and follow-up at 1 year showed no recurrence.

  11. Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of an endoscope is linked to the theory that the best way to obtain normal healthy sinuses is to open the natural pathways to the sinuses. Once an improved drainage system is achieved, the diseased sinus mucosa has an ...

  12. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  13. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva with Infective Endocarditis Complicated with Post-Infectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Rare Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Mradul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva (RSOV) is a rarely seen disease condition. RSOV can have varied presentations from being asymptomatic with just a cardiac murmur to profound hypotension. There has been simultaneous occurrence of RSOV with Infective Endocarditis (IE) in literature. Glomerulonephritis has also been reported in approximately 20% patients with IE. Large amount of proteinuria or decline in kidney functions is rarely encountered and mostly this finding has been incidental on routine evaluation. The co-existence of all the three conditions in a single patient is rare. This case was diagnosed to have RSOV with IE and was also diagnosed with post-infectious glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy. Patient was advised corrective cardiac surgery, but due to financial constraints, patient could not be operated and he died. Here, we report for the first time an unusual presence of both RSOV and sub-aortic membrane with IE complicated by glomerulonephritis. PMID:27891383

  14. Radiological features for the approach in trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Victoria; Carr, Simon D; Balakumar, Ramkishan; Sinha, Saurabh; Mirza, Showkat

    2017-08-01

    In order to perform trans-sphenoidal endoscopic pituitary surgery safely and efficiently it is important to identify anatomical and pituitary disease features on the pre-operative CT and MRI scans; thereby minimising the risk to surrounding structures and optimising outcomes. We aim to create a checklist to streamline pre-operative planning. We retrospectively reviewed pre-operative CT and MRI scans of 100 adults undergoing trans-sphenoidal endoscopic pituitary surgery. Radiological findings and their incidence included deviated nasal septum (62%), concha bullosa (32%), bony dehiscence of the carotid arteries (18%), sphenoid septation overlying the internal carotid artery (24% at the sella) and low lying CSF (32%). The mean distance of the sphenoid ostium to the skull base was 10 mm (range 2.7-17.6 mm). We also describe the 'teddy bear' sign which when present on an axial CT indicates the carotid arteries will be identifiable intra-operatively. There are significant variations in the anatomical and pituitary disease features between patients. We describe a number of features on pre-operative scans and have devised a checklist including a new 'teddy bear' sign to aid the surgeon in the anatomical assessment of patients undergoing trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery.

  15. Reconstruction of skull base defects in sphenoid wing dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis I with titanium mesh.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Mohamed; Xu, Risheng; McGirt, Matthew; Sakr, Sameh; Ayoub, Basim; Bydon, Ali

    2010-12-01

    Sphenoid wing dysplasia occurs in 3-7% of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The typical radiological features are partial or complete absence of the greater wing of the sphenoid. This condition is slowly progressive and may result in temporal lobe herniation into the orbital cavity, producing pulsating exophthalmos and gross facial deformity. Thus, reconstruction of the orbit is important for both cosmetic and functional reasons. Traditional surgical treatment of sphenoid dysplasia involves split bone grafting and repair of the anterior skull base defect. However, several reports have demonstrated complications of graft resorption and recurrence of proptosis and pulsating exopthalmos. In this case series, we present two patients suffering from pulsating exophthalmos due to sphenoid dysplasia. Radiological and MRI studies demonstrated orbital enlargement and complete absence of the greater wing of the sphenoid. Surgical management of these patients involved dural defect repair, and the use of titanium mesh in conjunction with bone graft to act as a barrier between the orbit and the middle cranial fossa. The mesh was fixed by fine screws. Proptosis improved markedly post-operatively and resolved within a few weeks. Ocular pulsation subsided and remained quiescent with at least 1-year follow-up.

  16. Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery as a primary modality of treatment for primary and recurrent nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Mohammad Shahid; Niazi, Saleem Asif; Niazi, Sohail Baber

    2017-01-01

    To describe the efficacy of Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery(FESS) in our set up in comparison with other published studies to treat primary and recurrent nasal polyposis. This descriptive study was conducted in 02 years at Ear Nose Throat Department Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Multan from October 2013 to October 2015. Convenient sample comprising 116 patients of both sexes of age group from 18 to 60 years were selected from ENT Out Patient Department, with documented diagnosis of nasal polyposis that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Out of 116 patients, 15 (12.9%) had recurrent nasal polyposis while 101 (87.1%) had primary nasal polyposis. Patients were assessed clinically. Preoperative nasal endoscopy and CT scan of nose and paranasal sinuses were performed in every patient to assess the extent of disease and evaluate the surgical anatomy. Patients were followed up 03 monthly, 06 monthly and after 01 year. Clinical signs of nasal polyposis were evaluated by nasal endoscopy at each follow up visit. There were 116 patients with documented diagnosis of nasal polyposis. Among these, 75 (64.7%) were male and 41 (35.3%) were female patients. Mean age of presentation in males was 39.1 years and that of females was 36.7 years. Only 15 patients (12.9%) developed recurrent disease within a year. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is preferred as a primary treatment modality for primary and recurrent nasal polyposis. Mucosal polyps can be carefully debrided, the natural ostia enlarged, the ethmoid sinuses are unroofed, and sphenoid sinuses are opened in nasal cavity and sinus nasal mucosa is mostly preserved due to excellent visualization and surgical technique. Improvement in symptoms with minimal chance of recurrence may be expected in more than 90% patients.

  17. Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery as a primary modality of treatment for primary and recurrent nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Mohammad Shahid; Niazi, Saleem Asif; Niazi, Sohail Baber

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the efficacy of Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery(FESS) in our set up in comparison with other published studies to treat primary and recurrent nasal polyposis. Method: This descriptive study was conducted in 02 years at Ear Nose Throat Department Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Multan from October 2013 to October 2015. Convenient sample comprising 116 patients of both sexes of age group from 18 to 60 years were selected from ENT Out Patient Department, with documented diagnosis of nasal polyposis that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Out of 116 patients, 15 (12.9%) had recurrent nasal polyposis while 101 (87.1%) had primary nasal polyposis. Patients were assessed clinically. Preoperative nasal endoscopy and CT scan of nose and paranasal sinuses were performed in every patient to assess the extent of disease and evaluate the surgical anatomy. Patients were followed up 03 monthly, 06 monthly and after 01 year. Clinical signs of nasal polyposis were evaluated by nasal endoscopy at each follow up visit. Results: There were 116 patients with documented diagnosis of nasal polyposis. Among these, 75 (64.7%) were male and 41 (35.3%) were female patients. Mean age of presentation in males was 39.1 years and that of females was 36.7 years. Only 15 patients (12.9%) developed recurrent disease within a year. Conclusion: Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is preferred as a primary treatment modality for primary and recurrent nasal polyposis. Mucosal polyps can be carefully debrided, the natural ostia enlarged, the ethmoid sinuses are unroofed, and sphenoid sinuses are opened in nasal cavity and sinus nasal mucosa is mostly preserved due to excellent visualization and surgical technique. Improvement in symptoms with minimal chance of recurrence may be expected in more than 90% patients. PMID:28523041

  18. Metastasis of greater wing of sphenoid bone in bronchogenic carcinoma: a unusual case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant K; Mital, Mukta; Dwivedi, Amit; Gupta, Kumkum

    2011-01-01

    Orbital metastasis in systemic cancer is known to occur and occurs in up to 7% of all systemic cancers. Orbital features typically present after the diagnosis of the primary tumor. In about 20% of cases, there is no known primary cancer at the time of presentation with orbital metastatic disease. Here we report a case of a 60-year-old male smoker, in whom proptosis, due to metastasis in greater wing of left sphenoid bone secondary to bronchogenic carcinoma, was the initial symptom. We could not find in literature metastasis to greater wing of sphenoid bone due to small cell carcinoma of lung.

  19. [Bilateral cavernous sinus non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as the presenting sign of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Barreira Junior, Alan Kardec; Moura, Frederico Castelo; Monteiro, Mario Luiz Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Case report of bilateral cavernous sinus syndrome due to primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the central nervous system in a patient infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. A 51-year-old male patient infected by the human immunodeficiency virus but without antiretroviral treatment developed paralysis of the V and VI cranial nerves. Imaging studies were obtained to investigate an orbital apex and a cavernous sinus syndrome. A computerized tomography scan of the orbit was normal but a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated bilateral enlargement of the cavernous sinus. Although primary lymphoma of the central nervous system is a rare condition, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in immunocompromised patients who develop ocular motility abnormalities and imaging signs suggestive of infiltrative cavernous sinus lesions.

  20. Allergic fungal sinusitis involving the lacrimal sac: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Pao, Kristina Y; Yakopson, Vladimir; Flanagan, Joseph C; Eagle, Ralph C

    2014-08-01

    BACKGROUNd: We report a case of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) involving the lacrimal sac and review the current English literature. A literature search for AFS involving the lacrimal sac revealed two reports with only one of the two cases demonstrating histological evidence of fungal elements. This is just the third such case and only the second reported case with histopathologic confirmation of fungal elements by Gomori methenamine silver (GMS) stain. A PubMed database search was performed using combinations of the following key words: allergic fungal sinusitis, lacrimal sac, nasolacrimal duct, ophthalmology, epiphora, orbit. A 70-year-old white man with a history of chronic conjunctivitis and nasal polyps presenting with chronic epiphora was found to have dacryostenosis on the left side. A CT scan of the orbits revealed mucoperiosteal thickening completely obliterating the frontal, ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. A left external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) was performed and the lacrimal sac contents were studied histopathologically. Microscopic examination of the lacrimal sac contents disclosed allergic mucin with laminated aggregates of eosinophils in various stages of degeneration, Charcot-Leyden crystals and rare noninvasive fungal hyphae confirming the diagnosis of AFS. Fungal elements stained positively with Gomori methenamine silver stain. Although rarely reported, AFS can affect the lacrimal sac. AFS should be suspected in patients with a history of recurrent refractory sinusitis, recurrent dacryocystitis and nasal polyposis. Early diagnosis is important for adequate treatment and prevention of recurrence.

  1. Childhood osteosarcoma of greater wing of sphenoid: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Meel, Rachna; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Jagadesan, Pandjatcharan; Mohanti, Bidhu Kalyan; Sharma, Suresh Chandra; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2012-03-01

    Primary osteosarcoma of skull base is extremely rare. We present a case of primary osteosarcoma arising in greater wing of sphenoid in a child. Our patient had an incomplete excision after which he received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There was good response to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and the patient is disease free at a follow-up of 18 months. Treatment of skull base osteosarcomas is difficult, as complete excision is often not possible. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of sphenoid wing osteosarcoma in childhood to be reported in literature.

  2. Guillain-Barré Syndrome Presenting with Sinus Node Dysfunction and Refractory Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Le Dung; Abbas, Farrukh; Rao, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Guillain-Barré syndrome Symptoms: Bradycardia • refractory hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy that is usually associated with preceding respiratory or gastrointestinal infection and has the hallmark manifestation of ascending flaccid paralysis. We report an atypical presentation of GBS. Case Report: A 76-year-old male presented with acute onset of diaphoresis and altered mental status. He subsequently developed severe bradycardia and refractory hypotension, which initially responded to dopamine infusion. A temporary pacemaker wire was placed to stabilize the heart rate but hypotension persisted. Acute autonomic dysfunction was suspected. Head and chest imaging was unrevealing. Lumbar puncture revealed albuminocytologic dissociation that was consistent with a diagnosis of GBS. Hospital course was complicated with acute kidney injury and metabolic acidosis. Plasmapharesis was initiated. The patient eventually died of multi-organ failure. Conclusions: Autonomic dysfunction is a known but rare presentation of GBS. In patients presenting with refractory bradycardia and hypotension, GBS should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:28283677

  3. Isolated pyocele of anterior clinoid process presenting as a cavernous sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Thomas J; Michael, L Madison; Laster, Robert; Fleming, James C

    2013-05-01

    A 37-year-old man presented with fever, decreased vision in the left eye, a partial left cranial nerve III paresis, and a left cranial nerve VI paresis. Neuro-imaging showed an opacification of a left pneumatised anterior clinoid process. After failing a course of intravenous antibiotics, a craniotomy was performed with exenteration of the cavity and resolution of symptoms. Although rare, a pyocele of a pneumatised anterior clinoid process may cause ocular morbidity and require surgical intervention.

  4. A case report of cemento-ossifying fibroma presenting as a mass of the ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatnia, Ali; Ghazavi, Amirhossein; Saboori, Masih; Mahzouni, Parvin; Tayari, Nazila; Hekmatnia, Farzaneh

    2011-01-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibroma is a lesion containing both fibrous and osseous components. Such lesions include fibrous dysplasia, ossifying fibroma, cemento-ossifying fibroma and cementifying fibroma. Periodontal membrane is the origin of fibro-osseous lesions other than fibrous dysplasia. Here a clinical case of a young woman referred for evaluation of a mass in the right side of face between eye and nose is presented. The first time she noticed the mass was 2 years ago and was growing larger inwards. She was treated with surgical resection. In this case of a cemento-ossifying fibroma, histological interpretation was critical, and was the basis of correct treatment. PMID:22091236

  5. A case report of cemento-ossifying fibroma presenting as a mass of the ethmoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Hekmatnia, Ali; Ghazavi, Amirhossein; Saboori, Masih; Mahzouni, Parvin; Tayari, Nazila; Hekmatnia, Farzaneh

    2011-02-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibroma is a lesion containing both fibrous and osseous components. Such lesions include fibrous dysplasia, ossifying fibroma, cemento-ossifying fibroma and cementifying fibroma. Periodontal membrane is the origin of fibro-osseous lesions other than fibrous dysplasia.Here a clinical case of a young woman referred for evaluation of a mass in the right side of face between eye and nose is presented. The first time she noticed the mass was 2 years ago and was growing larger inwards. She was treated with surgical resection.In this case of a cemento-ossifying fibroma, histological interpretation was critical, and was the basis of correct treatment.

  6. Hodgkin’s disease presenting as discharging neck sinuses and a mediastinal mass

    PubMed Central

    Zolotar, Meira; Olaleye, Oladejo; Sherif, Ali; Howe, Rachael; Mathews, John

    2011-01-01

    A 23-year-old Asian lady presented with a hard indurated midline neck swelling of 2 months duration without any upper aerodigestive tract or systemic symptoms of note. Her inflammatory markers were elevated and she was commenced on antibiotics. Ultrasound scan and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) were inconclusive. A CT scan showed an ill-defined soft tissue mass anterior to and not well demarcated from the thyroid, and contiguous with a superior and anterior mediastinal mass. Incisional biopsy revealed necrosis and pockets of purulent material. Microbiology suggested a chronic pyogenic abscess negative for acid fast bacilli. She was treated with antituberculous therapy without resolution. She developed a discharging lateral neck mass with progressive increase of the mediastinal mass. She subsequently required a neck exploration and mediastinoscopy. Repeat mediastinal biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of Hodgkin’s disease and no organisms on culture. She was commenced on chemotherapeutic treatment with a satisfactory outcome. PMID:22689859

  7. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  8. Sinusitis: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressuregrowths called polyps. These can block your sinus passages.When bacteria or a virus causes sinusitis, it’s ... nasal spray. This will clean out your nasal passages and help clear congestion. Your doctor may suggest ...

  9. Acute Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... headache. Acute sinusitis is mostly caused by the common cold. Unless a bacterial infection develops, most cases resolve ... Acute sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold, which is a viral infection. In some cases, ...

  10. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... requests or policy questions to our media and public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Your child’s sinuses ... viral upper respiratory infections in children, and the role of such medications for treatment of sinusitis is ...

  11. Topical Drug Delivery in Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients before and after Sinus Surgery Using Pulsating Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Schuschnig, Uwe; Celik, Gülnaz; Münzing, Wolfgang; Bartenstein, Peter; Häussinger, Karl; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Knoch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common chronic disease of the upper airways and has considerable impact on quality of life. Topical delivery of drugs to the paranasal sinuses is challenging, therefore the rate of surgery is high. This study investigates the delivery efficiency of a pulsating aerosol in comparison to a nasal pump spray to the sinuses and the nose in healthy volunteers and in CRS patients before and after sinus surgery. Methods 99mTc-DTPA pulsating aerosols were applied in eleven CRSsNP patients without nasal polyps before and after sinus surgery. In addition, pulsating aerosols were studied in comparison to nasal pump sprays in eleven healthy volunteers. Total nasal and frontal, maxillary and sphenoidal sinus aerosol deposition and lung penetration were assessed by anterior and lateral planar gamma camera imaging. Results In healthy volunteers nasal pump sprays resulted in 100% nasal, non-significant sinus and lung deposition, while pulsating aerosols resulted 61.3+/-8.6% nasal deposition and 38.7% exit the other nostril. 9.7+/-2.0 % of the nasal dose penetrated into maxillary and sphenoidal sinuses. In CRS patients, total nasal deposition was 56.7+/-13.3% and 46.7+/-12.7% before and after sinus surgery, respectively (p<0.01). Accordingly, maxillary and sphenoidal sinus deposition was 4.8+/-2.2% and 8.2+/-3.8% of the nasal dose (p<0.01). Neither in healthy volunteers nor in CRS patients there was significant dose in the frontal sinuses. Conclusion In contrast to nasal pump sprays, pulsating aerosols can deliver significant doses into posterior nasal spaces and paranasal sinuses, providing alternative therapy options before and after sinus surgery. Patients with chronic lung diseases based on clearance dysfunction may also benefit from pulsating aerosols, since these diseases also manifest in the upper airways. PMID:24040372

  12. [Effect of endoscopic sinus surgery on airflow of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses: a computational fluid dynamics study.].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guan-Xia; Li, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Guang-Li; Zhan, Jie-Min; Rong, Liang-Wan; Xu, Geng

    2009-11-01

    To study the airflow velocity, trace, distribution, pressure, as well as the airflow exchange between the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in a computer simulation of nasal cavity pre and post virtual endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique was applied to construct an anatomically and proportionally accurate three-dimensional nasal model based on a healthy adult woman's nasal CT scans. A virtual ESS intervention was performed numerically on the normal nasal model using Fluent 6.1.22 software. Navier-Stokes and continuity equations were used to calculate and compare the airflow characteristics between pre and post ESS models. (1) After ESS flux in the common meatus decreased significantly. Flux in the middle meatus and the connected area of opened ethmoid sinus increased by 10% during stable inhalation and by 9% during exhalation. (2) Airflow velocity in the nasal sinus complex increased significantly after ESS. (3) After ESS airflow trace was significantly changed in the middle meatus. Wide-ranging vortices formed at the maxillary sinus, the connected area of ethmoid sinus and the sphenoid sinus. (4) Total nasal cavity resistance was decreased after ESS. (5) After ESS airflow exchange increased in the nasal sinuses, most markedly in the maxillary sinus. After ESS airflow velocity, flux and trace were altered. Airflow exchange increased in each nasal sinus, especially in the maxillary sinus.

  13. Audible sphenoid-sellar fistula: An unusual complication of transphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Kristan P; Comer, Brett T

    2016-09-01

    Eustachian tube problems are relatively common complaints to otolaryngologists' offices. However, clinicians should consider other possibilities when traditional therapies fail to improve symptoms. We present a previously not described case of sphenoid-sellar fistula after transphenoidal surgery causing objective and subjective clicking. Laryngoscope, 126:E314-E316, 2016.

  14. Recurrent infarction of sphenoid bone with subperiosteal collection in a child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Marzouk, Mohammed Abu

    2011-01-01

    Infarction of the orbital bone in patients with sickle cell disease is very rare. The authors report a young boy who presented twice with marked acute proptosis and eyelid swelling of the right eye resulting from infarction in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone accompanied by an orbital subperiosteal collection. The time interval between the 2 attacks was 3 years.

  15. [Unilateral exophthalmos revealing agenesia of the greater wing of the sphenoid].

    PubMed

    Gotzamanis, A; Ducasse, A; Niederlender, P; Brugnart, C; Rousseaux, P

    2000-09-01

    We present the case of a 3-year-old child who had painless pulsatory left exophthalmos which revealed sphenoidal agenesis. The radiological investigations including CT scan, MRI, and scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis and excluded other bone abnormalities. Therepeutic behavior in this case was limited to simple inspection.

  16. Bad company: supracristal VSD presenting with ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm. a case presentation with echocardiographic depiction and an analysis of contemporary literature.

    PubMed

    Hartlage, Gregory R; Consolini, Michelle A; Pernetz, Maria A; Williams, B Robinson; Clements, Stephen D; Chen, Edward P; Rab, S Tanveer

    2015-03-01

    Supracristal ventricular septal defect (SCVSD), a defect of the infundibular portion of the interventricular septum just below the right aortic cusp, occurs more frequently in Eastern Asian populations. SCVSD may be complicated by right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SoVA). We present the case of a 26-year-old male of Korean descent with a history of a childhood murmur who was referred to our institution for progressive heart failure symptoms. He was diagnosed with SCVSD and ruptured right SoVA based on history, physical exam, and echocardiography including three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography with reconstructed surgical views. The patient underwent SCVSD closure, SoVA excision, and valve-sparing aortic root replacement. We reviewed the echocardiography literature regarding SCVSD and SoVA, and analyzed contemporary literature of SoVA and its relationship with SCVSD. We conclude that a higher prevalence of ruptured SoVA in Eastern Asians is likely related to a higher prevalence of underlying SCVSD in this population.

  17. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Middle Cranial Fossa through the Cavernous Sinus Triangles: Anatomical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, Fuminari; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; IMAI, Masaaki; SHIGEMATSU, Hideaki; KOMATSU, Mika; TSCHABITSCHER, Manfred; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Access from the sphenoid sinus to the middle cranial fossa through the cavernous sinus triangles was evaluated by cadaver dissection. Anatomical analysis demonstrated that the medial temporal dura mater was exposed through the anterior area of the clinoidal triangle, anteromedial triangle, and superior area of the anterolateral triangle, indicating potential corridors to the middle cranial fossa. This study suggests that the cavernous sinus triangles are applicable in selected cases to manage middle cranial fossa lesions by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:25446385

  18. Interesting case of base of skull mass infiltrating cavernous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Achintya Dinesh; Soneja, Manish; Memon, Saba Samad; Vyas, Surabhi

    2016-11-16

    A man aged 35 years presented with chronic headache and earache of 1-year duration. He had progressive vision loss and diplopia since last 9 months. He also had pain over the face and episodic profuse epistaxis. On examination, perception of light was absent in the right eye and hand movements were detected at 4 m distance in the left eye. Imaging revealed a lobulated mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral cavernous sinuses and sphenoid sinus with bony erosions. Biopsy of the nasopharyngeal mass revealed pathological features which are characteristic of IgG4 disease. His serum IgG4 levels and acute inflammatory markers were also elevated. The patient was started on oral corticosteroid therapy. Fever, headache and earache resolved early and there was gradual improvement in the vision of the left eye. After 6 months, visual acuity in the left eye was 6/9, but right eye visual acuity had no change. Follow-up imaging revealed a significant reduction in the size of the mass.

  19. [The state of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in the children presenting with congenital cleft of upper lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Bogoroditskaya, A V; Sarafanova, M E; Radtsig, E Yu; Prityko, A G

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the state of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in the children presenting with congenital cleft of upper lip and palate (CLP). A total of 23 children at the age from 9 to 16 years who had undergone the surgical treatment of the above malformations during the first year of life were examined. The comprehensive study including routine ENT examination, endoscopic examination of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx, and computed tomography has demonstrated that 50% of the patients with congenital cleft of upper lift and palate suffered the deflection of the nasal septum associated with hyperplasia of inferior turbinal bones. The children with congenital cleft of upper lip and palate were characterized by enhanced pneumatization of the anterior end of the middle turbinate despite the absence of well apparent differences between their paranasal sinuses and those of the healthy children, with the degree of pneumatization being consistent with the patient's age in both groups.

  20. Disseminated mast cell tumor infiltrating the sphenoid bone and causing blindness in a dog.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Elsa; de Stefani, Alberta; Stewart, Jennifer; De Risio, Luisa; Johnson, Victoria

    2010-05-01

    Mast cell tumors are found in most organs and tissues with variable biologic behavior in dogs. This case illustrates the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a dog with disseminated mast cell tumor infiltrating the sphenoid bones. A 6-year-old male neutered Greyhound presented with a 3-day history of acute onset of blindness. General physical examination was normal. Neurological examination revealed mildly disorientated mental status, absent menace response in both eyes, bilaterally decreased vestibulo-oculocephalic reflexes and absent direct and consensual pupillary light reflex in both eyes. An electroretinogram indicated normal retinal function in both eyes. A lesion involving the middle and rostral cranial fossa was suspected. Hematology and serum biochemistry were normal except decreased urea (1.2 mmol/L). MRI of the head revealed heterogeneous signal intensity of the sphenoid bones on T2-weighted images and loss of their normal internal architecture. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hepatosplenomegaly and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspirates were taken from the jejunal lymph nodes and the spleen. Results were consistent with disseminated mast cell tumor. The owner declined any treatment and the dog was euthanatized. Postmortem examination confirmed disseminated mast cell tumor affecting multiple organs, including the sphenoid bones. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing MRI features of disseminated mast cell tumor affecting the sphenoid bones and causing acute onset of blindness in a dog.

  1. Suspected sphenoid bone osteomyelitis causing visual impairment in two dogs and one cat.

    PubMed

    Busse, Claudia; Dennis, Ruth; Platt, Simon R

    2009-01-01

    To present the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of sphenoid bone osteomyelitis. Two dogs (English Springer Spaniel--ESS, Golden Retriever--GR) and one cat (Domestic Long Haired) were presented with a 2-14-day history of visual deficits and reduced pupillary light reflexes. Investigations included physical, ophthalmologic and neurological examination as well as hematology, serum biochemistry, MRI of the head and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. MRI changes included thickening of the sphenoid bone and a loss of normal bone marrow signal on T1W MRI. Enhancement of the sphenoid bones, ventral meninges and ventral surface of the brain was present using paramagnetic contrast medium. CSF analysis was abnormal in the two dogs with increased cellularity, neutrophilic pleocytosis, intracellular bacteria and increased total protein in one, and with lymphocytic pleocytosis in another. CSF analysis was normal in the cat. An underlying cause for the osteomyelitis could not be identified. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for 3-6 weeks combined with anti-inflammatory medications proved effective. Full clinical recovery occurred with no relapse during the follow up time of 7 (ESS) and 4 (Domestic Long Haired) years. The GR relapsed 10 months after treatment and recovered following a second 3-week course of broad-spectrum antibiotics with no relapse during the following 3 years. Visual pathway deficits in dogs and cats may be due to sphenoid bone osteomyelitis. MRI and CSF analysis can assist diagnosing this potentially treatable condition. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of sphenoid bone osteomyelitis in these species.

  2. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  3. Sinus pericranii, petrosquamosal sinus and extracranial sigmoid sinus: Anatomical variations to consider during a retroauricular approach.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Lopes, Paula Tardim; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji

    2017-06-01

    Lateral and sigmoid sinus malformations are uncommon and dangerous anatomical variations that surgeons may encounter when performing a retroauricular approach. We report three cases of rare temporal bone venous sinus anomalies seen in patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. The first patient had a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome and presented a bilateral persistent petrosquamosal sinus with sigmoid sinus agenesis, which made mastoidectomy for cochlear implantation difficult. The second patient presented an anomalous venous lake in the occipital region, which communicated the left dural venous sinuses with a conglomerate of pericranial vessels in the left nuchal region, also consistent with left sinus pericranii. The third patient presented with an extracranial sigmoid sinus that produced a troublesome bleeding immediately after the muscular-periosteal flap incision was performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Raz, Eytan; Win, William; Hagiwara, Mari; Lui, Yvonne W; Cohen, Benjamin; Fatterpekar, Girish M

    2015-11-01

    Fungal sinusitis is characterized into invasive and noninvasive forms. The invasive variety is further classified into acute, chronic and granulomatous forms; and the noninvasive variety into fungus ball and allergic fungal sinusitis. Each of these different forms has a unique radiologic appearance. The clinicopathologic and corresponding radiologic spectrum and differences in treatment strategies of fungal sinusitis make it an important diagnosis for clinicians and radiologists to always consider. This is particularly true of invasive fungal sinusitis, which typically affects immuno compromised patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis allows initiation of appropriate treatment strategies resulting in favorable outcome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The posterior border of the sphenoid greater wing and its phylogenetic usefulness in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Braga, J; Crubézy, E; Elyaqtine, M

    1998-12-01

    The elucidation of patterns of cranial skeletal maturation and growth in fossil hominids is possible not only through dental studies but also by mapping different aspects of ossification in both extant African apes and humans. However, knowledge of normal skeletal development in large samples of extant great apes is flimsy. To remedy this situation, this paper offers an extensive survey and thorough discussion of the ossification of the posterior border of the sphenoid greater wing. Indeed, this area provides much information about basicranial skeletal maturation. We investigate three variants: the absence of the foramen spinosum and the position of both the foramen spinosum and the foramen ovale in relation to the sphenosquamosal suture. Providing original data about humans and 1,425 extant great ape skulls and using a sample of 64 fossil hominids, this study aimed to test whether different ossification patterns occurred during the course of human evolution. The incidence of three derived morphologies located on the posterior border of the sphenoid greater wing increases during human evolution at different geological periods. The evolutionary polarity of these three derived morphologies is assessed by outgroup comparison and ontogenetic methods. During human evolution, there is a clear trend for the foramen spinosum to be present and wholly located on the posterior area of the sphenoid greater wing. Moreover, in all the great ape species and in Australopithecus afarensis, the sphenosquamosal suture may split the foramen ovale. Inversely, the foramen ovale always lies wholly within the sphenoid greater wing in Australopithecus africanus, robust australopithecines, early Homo, H. erectus (and/or H. ergaster), and Homo sapiens. From ontogenetic studies in humans, we conclude that, during human evolution, the ossification of the posterior area of the sphenoid greater wing progressively surrounded the middle meningeal artery (passing through the foramen spinosum) and

  6. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Moran; Binenbaum, Yoav; Sharma, Kanika; Naomi, Ramer; Ilana, Ramer; Abib, Agbetoba; Miles, Brett; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Kristine, Bjoerndal; Christian, Godballe; Thomas, Mücke; Klaus-Dietrich, Wolff; Fliss, Dan; Eckardt, André M.; Chiara, Copelli; Sesenna, Enrico; Frank, Palmer; Patel, Snehal; Gil, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify independent predictors of outcome in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the paranasal sinuses and skull base. Design Meta-analysis of the literature and data from the International ACC Study Group. Setting University-affiliated medical center. Participants The study group consisted of 520 patients, 99 of them from the international cohort. The median follow-up period was 60 months (range, 32 to 100 months). Main Outcome Measures Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results The 5-year OS and DSS of the entire cohort were 62% and 67%, respectively. The local recurrence rate was 36.6%, and the regional recurrence rate was 7%. Distant metastasis, most commonly present in the lung, was recorded in 106 patients (29.1%). In the international cohort, positive margins and ACC of the sphenoid or ethmoidal sinuses were significant predictors of outcome (p < 0.001). Perineural invasion and adjuvant treatment (radiotherapy or chemoradiation) were not associated with prognosis. Conclusion Tumor margin status and tumor site are associated with prognosis in ACC of the paranasal sinuses, whereas perineural invasion is not. Adjuvant treatment apparently has no impact on outcome. PMID:24436900

  7. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Amit, Moran; Binenbaum, Yoav; Sharma, Kanika; Ramer, Naomi; Naomi, Ramer; Ramer, Ilana; Ilana, Ramer; Agbetoba, Abib; Abib, Agbetoba; Miles, Brett; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Kristine, Bjoerndal; Godballe, Christian; Christian, Godballe; Mücke, Thomas; Thomas, Mücke; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Klaus-Dietrich, Wolff; Fliss, Dan; Eckardt, André M; Copelli, Chiara; Chiara, Copelli; Sesenna, Enrico; Palmer, Frank; Frank, Palmer; Patel, Snehal; Gil, Ziv

    2013-06-01

    Objectives To identify independent predictors of outcome in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the paranasal sinuses and skull base. Design Meta-analysis of the literature and data from the International ACC Study Group. Setting University-affiliated medical center. Participants The study group consisted of 520 patients, 99 of them from the international cohort. The median follow-up period was 60 months (range, 32 to 100 months). Main Outcome Measures Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results The 5-year OS and DSS of the entire cohort were 62% and 67%, respectively. The local recurrence rate was 36.6%, and the regional recurrence rate was 7%. Distant metastasis, most commonly present in the lung, was recorded in 106 patients (29.1%). In the international cohort, positive margins and ACC of the sphenoid or ethmoidal sinuses were significant predictors of outcome (p < 0.001). Perineural invasion and adjuvant treatment (radiotherapy or chemoradiation) were not associated with prognosis. Conclusion Tumor margin status and tumor site are associated with prognosis in ACC of the paranasal sinuses, whereas perineural invasion is not. Adjuvant treatment apparently has no impact on outcome.

  8. Sinusitis Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find multiple bacteria present in a single culture sample. In addition, these organisms may demonstrate drug ... are often based on the results of sinus cultures and are prescribed for 3-4 weeks time. ...

  9. Ectopic pituitary adenoma presenting as midline nasopharyngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Ali, R; Noma, U; Jansen, M; Smyth, D

    2010-12-01

    Ectopic pituitary adenomas are extremely rare. We report a case of ectopic pituitary adenoma in the midline of the nasopharynx. This adenoma probably arose from the pharyngeal remnant of Rathke's pouch. We discuss a case of a lady who presented to our unit with 2 months history of dryness and sensation of lump in her throat and a long standing history of hypothyroidism. Examination of nasopharynx revealed a smooth and fluctuant midline mass. CT scan of nose and paranasal sinuses confirmed the midline mass with small defect communicating with the sphenoid sinus. An initial diagnosis of Thornwaldt's cyst was made and she underwent upper aerodigestive tract endoscopy and marsupialization of the mass. Histopathological examination revealed ectopic pituitary adenoma. Ectopic pituitary adenoma is an important differential diagnosis for a midline nasopharyngeal mass. It is recommended that prior to surgical resection of midline nasopharyngeal mass biopsy is taken and MRI is performed.

  10. [A case of fibromuscular dysplasia presenting with Wallenberg syndrome, and developing a giant aneurysm of the internal carotid artery in the cavernous sinus].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, K; Fuse, S; Shimizu, J; Takeda, K; Sakuta, M

    1992-10-01

    A 25-year-old man developed Wallenberg syndrome (WS). At that time his carotid angiography was normal. When he was 28 years old, he suffered from retinal artery embolism in the left eye. At the age of 30 years, he had an acute onset of abducens nerve palsy in his right eye. The carotid angiography showed a giant aneurysm at the cavernous sinus portion in the right internal carotid artery. At his age of 38, the right oculomotor, trochlear and trigeminal nerves were involved. A vertebral angiography revealed a bead-like formation, and a diagnosis of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was made. An intensive angiographic examination revealed many stenotic or dilated lesions in the carotid, vertebral, coronary, renal, and hepatic arteries. A sural nerve biopsy specimen revealed that the sural vein was involved. In Japan only one case of FMD presenting with WS is known. FMD should be under consideration as an underlying disease, when WS occurred in younger patients with few risk factors. In this patient an angiography revealed no abnormality in the cavernous sinus portion of the internal carotid artery, when he suffered from WS. However, eight years later he was proved to have a giant aneurysm in the cavernous sinus portion. In conclusion, we support the hypothesis that aneurysm may originate from angiographically normal arterial wall in FMD.

  11. Landmark of ethmoid arteries in adult Thai cadavers: application for sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2012-11-01

    Ethmoid arteries, branches of the ophthalmic artery, are crucial structures supplying ethmoid mucosa. Its locations are important during ethmoid sinus surgery. There has been no study in Thais before. To determine the number and locations of ethmoid arteries in relation to important surrounding structures. A prospective, descriptive study in 42 Thai cadaveric adult half-heads was conducted at departments of Otorhinolaryngology and Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Meticulous dissections were performed to identify number of ethmoid arteries branching from ophthalmic artery and site of entrance of the arteries into ethmoid sinus. Relationships of these arteries with anterior ethmoid crest, optic foramen, bulla lamella and middle third of basal lamella of middle turbinate were studied. Types of ethmoid arteries, distances between ethmoid arteries and their relations to important surrounding structures: anterior lacrimal crest, optic foramen, superior aspects of bulla lamella, middle third of basal lamella of middle turbinate and the superior aspect of anterior wall of sphenoid sinus. All specimens had anterior and posterior ethmoid arteries. The prevalence of tertiary ethmoid artery was 36% (95% CI22-52%). The mean distance between the anterior ethmoid artery and anterior lacrimal crest, anterior ethmoid artery and posterior ethmoid artery and the distance between posterior ethmoid artery and optic foramen were 24.3, 13.5 and 6.4 millimeters respectively. Most of the entry of anterior ethmoid artery into the ethmoid sinus was in the posterior half of the distance between the bulla lamella and middle third of basal lamella of middle turbinate, 85.7%. This is the first study of location of ethmoid arteries in Thai adult cadavers. The information of the present study may be useful for sinus surgeon.

  12. An unusual presentation of multiple myeloma with unilateral sudden vision loss: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Wen; Lee, Ta-Jen; Chen, Jim-Ray; Huang, Chien-Chia

    2017-06-01

    Plasma cell neoplasms are categorized by neoplastic proliferation of a single clone of plasma cells which produce a monoclonal immunoglobulin. Plasma cell neoplasms can present as a solitary plasmacytoma or as multiple myeloma. Both of them can progress to multiple myeloma. Once a diagnosis of plasmacytoma has been made, thorough examinations should be carried out for identifying the disease entity. Herein, we describe an extraordinary rare case of multiple myeloma with initial presentation of a left sphenoid neoplasm resulting in left-sided headache and rapid deterioration of visual acuity. Histo-pathologic analysis revealed a plasma cell neoplasm with positive immunostaining for cluster of differentiation (CD)138, CD79a, and kappa light chain of immunoglobulin. A bone marrow aspiration was then performed, and the diagnosis of multiple myeloma was then confirmed. After investigative workup, our patient received chemotherapy, localized radiotherapy, and autologous stem cell transplantation. Her visual acuity recovered to the baseline and she sustained a partial response without subjective discomfort. Extramedullary plasmacytoma is an interesting but infrequent presentation of multiple myeloma. Moreover, involvement of the sphenoid sinus in multiple myeloma resulting in extrinsic optic nerve compression is extremely rare. Clinicians should consider plasmacytoma as a diagnostic possibility when presented with cases of solitary sphenoid neoplasm and rapid progression of clinical course.

  13. Hemangioendothelioma of the sphenoid bone: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joo, M; Lee, G J; Koh, Y C; Park, Y K

    2001-04-01

    Hemangioendothelioma is borderline or intermediate type of vascular neoplasm. Hemangioendothelioma is rare lesion that constitutes less than 0.5% of the malignant tumors of bone. We present a case of low-grade hemagioendothelioma of the skull in a 29-yr-old woman. She had pain, diplopia and exophthalmos of the left eye. Radiographic images showed a relatively well-demarcated, expansile osteolytic lesion with irregularly thickened trabeculae and calcifications in the left greater wing of sphenoid bone. Histologically, the tumor was an infiltrative vasoformative lesion. The vessels are generally well-formed with open or compressed lumina surrounded by endothelial cells showing mild atypia. It lacked frequent mitotic figures and severe atypia. Although excessive bleeding occurred during the operation, the mass was totally resected. Postoperative radiation was not necessary. She is free of disease and well 6 months postoperatively.

  14. Optic neuropathy secondary to a sphenoid-ethmoidal mucocele: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mora-Horna, E R; López, V G; Anaya-Alaminos, R; Ceriotto, A; Salcedo, G

    2015-12-01

    The case is presented of a 51-year old male patient with a history of blunt trauma in the frontal region and a one-year history of vision loss, proptosis and paresis of the lateral rectus muscle of the right eye. A right ethmoid and bilateral sphenoid mucocele was diagnosed. Drainage was performed using an external and endoscopic approach with improvement in symptoms without recurrence at 10 months. Sphenoid mucoceles represent 1% of all mucoceles and may present with different clinical manifestations. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is indicated to prevent complications. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... critical nerves and arteries in the area, 4) maintenance of the function of the nose, sinuses and any other involved structures, and 5) maintenance of separation between the intracranial (brain) and sinonasal ...

  16. Rhinitis and sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dykewicz, Mark S; Hamilos, Daniel L

    2010-02-01

    Rhinitis and sinusitis are among the most common medical conditions and are frequently associated. In Western societies an estimated 10% to 25% of the population have allergic rhinitis, with 30 to 60 million persons being affected annually in the United States. It is estimated that sinusitis affects 31 million patients annually in the United States. Both rhinitis and sinusitis can significantly decrease quality of life, aggravate comorbid conditions, and require significant direct medical expenditures. Both conditions also create even greater indirect costs to society by causing lost work and school days and reduced workplace productivity and school learning. Management of allergic rhinitis involves avoidance, many pharmacologic options, and, in appropriately selected patients, allergen immunotherapy. Various types of nonallergic rhinitis are treated with avoidance measures and a more limited repertoire of medications. For purposes of this review, sinusitis and rhinosinusitis are synonymous terms. An acute upper respiratory illness of less than approximately 7 days' duration is most commonly caused by viral illness (viral rhinosinusitis), whereas acute bacterial sinusitis becomes more likely beyond 7 to 10 days. Although the mainstay of management of acute bacterial sinusitis is antibiotics, treatment of chronic sinusitis is less straightforward because only some chronic sinusitis cases have an infectious basis. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been subdivided into 3 types, namely CRS without nasal polyps, CRS with nasal polyps, and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. Depending on the type of CRS present, a variety of medical and surgical approaches might be required. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Indriven sphenoid wing as a cause of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sumer, M M; Atasoy, H T; Unal, A; Kalayci, M; Mahmutyazicioglu, K; Erdem, O

    2003-11-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy is more frequent after severe head injuries, however the severity of the trauma is not always correlated with the injured brain tissue. We report a patient whose seizures developed 4 years after a face trauma. Upward displacement of the sphenoid wing caused a contusion at the orbital surface of the frontal lobe. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic findings are presented. The patient responded well to commonly used antiepileptic drugs.

  18. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation.

  19. Radiographic density profiles link frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses behavior in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Bhattacharyya, Neil

    2012-11-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) may occur through heterogeneous disease processes. It is possible that more than 1 inflammatory process underlies CRS in any given patient. If so, heterogeneity in processes may be a function of the spatial organization of the paranasal sinuses. Density characteristics of sinus opacities on computed tomography (CT) scans offer insight into the nature of sinus opacities and disease, in general, and may thus be used to detect spatial heterogeneity of sinus disease within a given patient. The study was a retrospective chart review of CRS patients with available sinus CT scans. Radiographic density profiles of sinus opacities were assessed by raw measures of densities (in Hounsfield units [HU]). Radiographic density profiles of the different affected sinuses were compared to each other, checked for correlation, and finally, checked for evidence of clustering using a principal component analysis. Frontal sinus opacities appear to be more heterogeneous, with both higher and lower density components than other sinuses. There was strong correlation between the radiographic density profiles of opacities in the frontal, anterior ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses (p < 0.001). However, on principal component analysis the radiographic density characteristics of the opacities of the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses appeared to cluster together more than the other sinuses. Radiographic properties of sinus opacities suggest the nature of sinus opacities are related not only to some common underlying pathology but also to factors related to the specific sinus as well as other spatially close affected sinuses. This suggests an anatomic orientation for sinus pathophysiology in CRS. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  20. Improvement of long-term blindness caused by compression from inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma after optic canal decompression: An extremely rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Horikoshi, Tomo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should definitely be considered as an option. PMID:27413579

  1. [Forms and factors of the variability of paranasal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Nikitiuk, D B

    1983-09-01

    The form, structural variations, sex variations (connected with zygosityz), right and left positions of the sinuses were studied according to the data obtained while measuring the contours of the frontal, sphenoid and maxillary sinuses in the cranial roentgenograms made in the frontal and sagittal projections. By means of the twin method, relationship of the hereditary and environmental influences on the sinus formation was estimated. The data obtained in 111 Ukrainians (30--60 years of age), inhabitants of Vinnitsa region, mono- and dizygote twins of both sex were used. Greater dimensions in the male sinuses and a high variability of their size not connected with sex were stated. Among women the dizygote twin had larger dimensions than the monozygote ones. The sinus size is characterized by a predominant right-sided asymmetry. The hereditary effect is clearly seen in the sinus paranasales formation. A decreasing hereditary influence noted in the maxillary sinus is considered as a dependence of its dimensions on the state of the masticatory apparatus.

  2. Flexible microsensor technology for real-time navigation tracking in balloon sinus ostial dilation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kent; Bigcas, Jo-Lawrence; Luong, Amber; Yao, William

    2017-01-01

    Background: Microsensor navigation has the potential to aid balloon sinus ostial dilation by providing real-time tracking of balloon devices within the complex anatomy of the sinonasal cavities. Objective: This feasibility study evaluated the incorporation of a new microsensor technology into a flexible guidewire for use with current instruments in balloon sinus ostial dilation. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to include seven men and one woman (age range, 33–68 years), who underwent balloon sinus ostial dilation with flexible microsensor navigation in the operating room setting. All the procedures were performed at target sinuses with the patient under general anesthesia, in conjunction with subsequent endoscopic sinus surgery. Results: Balloon dilation was attempted at the maxillary (n = 3), frontal (n = 14), and sphenoid (n = 1) sinuses. In all the cases, the surgical navigation system displayed the flexible wire tip as it was advanced to the target sinus ostia; this visual feedback for wire position guided the balloon placement. Successful balloon dilation with assistance of flexible microsensor navigation was performed on most sinuses, except a single frontal sinus with adjacent type 2 frontal cells. Conclusion: Flexible navigation technology may be combined with balloon sinus technology to facilitate localization of instruments in the sinus anatomy. Additional optimization of both the device and software technology is warranted. PMID:28381323

  3. Concha bullosa, nasal septal deviation and paranasal sinusitis; a computed tomographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Javadrashid, R; Naderpour, M; Asghari, S; Fouladi, D F; Ghojazadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Although concha bullosa, nasal septal deviation (NSD) and paranasal sinusitis are apparently three independent entities, some studies suggest that they are interconnected. Computed tomography (CT) is a useful and accurate imaging modality for examining this interconnection. The objective of this study is to use CT imaging to investigate the possible association between concha bullosa, NSD and paranasal sinusitis. We reviewed 206 nasal and paranasal CT images of individuals with sinonasal symptoms/cosmetic issues and investigated the association between the presence of concha bullosa and NSD with paranasal sinusitis. There was no significant relation between the presence of concha bullosa and paranasal sinusitis. The mean NSD was significantly higher in the cases with frontal, maxillary, ethmoid and sphenoid sinusitis than in unaffected subjects. Similar findings were found in the patients with any involved paranasal sinus and the controls (6.49 +/- 3.060 vs. 3.31 +/- 1.99 degrees; p<0.001). An NSD > or =3.5% differentiated between the presence and absence of paranasal sinusitis, with a sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 76.5%, respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between NSD and the number of involved sinuses (Pearson's r=0.58, p<0.001). The laterality of sinusitis was not associated with NSD or concha bullosa. Nasal septal deviation, but possibly not concha bullosa, is associated with paranasal sinusitis and its extent. An NSD > or = 3.5 degrees is a useful predictor of paranasal sinusitis.

  4. ACR appropriateness criteria(®) nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Smith, Richard V; Yom, Sue S; Beitler, Jonathan J; Busse, Paul M; Cooper, Jay S; Hanna, Ehab Y; Jones, Christopher U; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Quon, Harry; Ridge, John A; Saba, Nabil F; Worden, Francis; Yao, Min; Salama, Joseph K

    2017-03-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Here, we present the Appropriateness Criteria for cancers arising in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses (maxillary, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses). This includes clinical presentation, prognostic factors, principles of management, and treatment outcomes. Controversies regarding management of cervical lymph nodes are discussed. Rare and unusual nasal cavity cancers, such as esthesioneuroblastoma and sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas, are included. © 2016 American College of Radiology. Head Neck, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 407-418, 2017.

  5. Frontal sinus mini-trephination for acute sinusitis complicated by intracranial infection.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, D L; Mahadevan, M

    2007-10-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis is common in the pediatric population. Intracranial spread of infection is a rare but life-threatening complication of acute sinusitis. Due to the infrequent presentation of this complication, there are no well-defined management protocols for the acute sinusitis. We present three pediatric cases where children presented with intracranial sepsis, and the underlying source of infection was from the paranasal sinuses. In all cases, endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in the acute setting, with the use of frontal sinus mini-trephines playing a significant role. We describe our experience and review the available literature.

  6. Leiomyosarcoma of the uterus with sphenoid bone and orbital metastases.

    PubMed

    Su, Grant W; Hong, Sang H

    2007-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with a 1-week history of vision loss in the right eye associated with proptosis and diplopia. Past medical history was significant for high-grade leiomyosarcoma of the uterus status post total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and postoperative pelvic radiation 18 months prior to presentation. Staging studies at the time of initial diagnosis of uterine leiomyosarcoma showed no evidence for metastatic disease. At presentation, CT and MRI showed a well-circumscribed 3.0 cm x 3.6 cm x 2.4 cm mass centered in the right greater sphenoid wing, extending into the middle cranial fossa and the superior and lateral orbital wall. Biopsy of the orbital mass revealed a poorly differentiated high-grade leiomyosarcoma, consistent with recurrent metastatic disease from the uterus. The patient subsequently underwent radiation treatment followed by a left orbital exenteration 6 months after the orbital biopsy. A left thoracostomy was performed 8 months after the orbital biopsy for a metastatic nodule in the left lower lobe of the lung. The clinicopathologic findings of this rare metastatic orbital lesion are presented.

  7. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nasal passage. The right and left nasal passages are separated in the middle by a vertical plate of cartilage and bone ... Most of the sinuses drain from underneath the middle turbinate, into a region ... through the nasal passage on each side, it streams through the crevices ...

  8. [Compound odontoma as a cause of chronic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Crespo Del Hierro, Jorge; Ruiz González, Manuel; Delgado Portela, Margarita; García Del Castillo, Eduardo; Crespo Serrano, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Sinusitis of dental origin is a relatively frequent entity, but the presence of an odontoma in the sinus as a source of this pathology is exceptional. Here we present a case of a young patient who presented chronic maxillary sinusitis over 2 years, originating in an odontoma located in the sinus drainage area.

  9. [Mucormycosis in paranasal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Unkel, C; Neumann, A; Sudhoff, H; Dermoumi, H; Jahnke, K; Dazert, S

    2009-08-01

    Three patients with mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses were treated in the University ENT departments in Bochum and Essen in recent years. All patients were immunocompromised for different reasons and had reduced resistance against microorganism infection. They presented with symptoms of orbital complications of sinusitis. The further progress of these life-threatening fungal infections with a mortality rate between 35 and 70% depends on early and definitive diagnosis and radical surgical therapy to reduce the amount of infectious agent. The difficulties of early diagnosis by imaging, histology, microbiology, or molecular biology and postoperative therapeutic options especially with amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, and posaconazole are illustrated and discussed.

  10. Allergic fungal sinusitis causing nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Charles; Kacker, Ashutosh; Chee, Ru-Ik; Lelli, Gary J

    2013-04-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis is thought to represent a chronic autoimmune reaction directed against fungal elements within the sinuses, and is commonly seen in individuals with a history of chronic sinusitis that is refractory to medical therapy. The authors present a case of allergic fungal sinusitis involving the lacrimal drainage system. A 54-year-old woman initially presented with recurrent erythema and induration of the left nasolacrimal sac due to dacryocystitis, which was unresponsive to treatment with topical and systemic antibiotics. Radiological evaluation demonstrated the presence of multiple soft tissue masses along the medial canthi. During subsequent endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, significant amounts of allergic mucin were found within the sinuses and marked eosinophilia was present within tissue obtained from the lacrimal sac, findings highly suggestive of allergic fungal sinusitis. A diagnosis of allergic fungal sinusitis should be considered in patients presenting with epiphora in the appropriate clinical context. However, involvement of the lacrimal drainage system is an exceedingly unusual presentation.

  11. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  12. The "polymorphous" history of a polymorphous skull bone: the sphenoid.

    PubMed

    Costea, Claudia; Turliuc, Serban; Cucu, Andrei; Dumitrescu, Gabriela; Carauleanu, Alexandru; Buzduga, Catalin; Sava, Anca; Costache, Irina; Turliuc, Dana

    2017-03-27

    For a long time, because of its location at the skull base level, the sphenoid bone was rather mysterious as it was too difficult for anatomists to reach and to elucidate its true configuration. The configuration of the sphenoid bone led to confusion regarding its sutures with the other skull bones, its shape, its detailed anatomy, and the vascular and nervous structures that cross it. This article takes the reader on a journey through time and space, charting the evolution of anatomists' comprehension of sphenoid bone morphology from antiquity to its conception as a bone structure in the eighteenth century, and ranging from ancient Greece to modern Italy and France. The journey illustrates that many anatomists have attempted to name and to best describe the structural elements of this polymorphous bone.

  13. Do altitude and climate affect paranasal sinus volume?

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Omer Tarık; Erol, Bekir; Renda, Levent; Osma, Ustun; Eyigor, Hulya; Gunsoy, Behcet; Yagci, Buket; Yılmaz, Deniz

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of climate and altitude differences on the volume of paranasal sinuses and on the frequency of anatomic variations by comparing the paranasal sinus tomograms (PNSCT) of patients who were born and living in a cold, dry climate at high altitude with those of patients who were born and living on the coast at sea level in a temperate climate. We also aimed to determine differences relating to gender. A total of 55 PNSCTs of 55 patients from the city center of Antalya and 60 PNSCTs of 60 patients from the city center of Agrı were evaluated and compared prospectively. The study included a total of 115 patients with a mean age of 44.75 ± 9.64 years (range, 27-63 years). Group 1 (Antalya) comprised 26 females (47.3%) and 29 males (52.7%) with a mean age of 36.7 ± 12.4 years. Group 2 (Agrı) comprised 25 females (41.7%) and 35 males (58.3%) with a mean age of 35.1 ± 13.4 years. Maxillary sinus volumes were 18.27 cm(3) (range, 5.04-37.62) and 15.06 cm(3) (4.11-41.40); sphenoid sinus volumes were 7.81 cm(3) (1.80-20.63) and 6.35 cm(3) (0.54-16.50); frontal sinus volumes were 5.51 cm(3) (0.50-29.25) and 3.76 cm(3) (0.68-22.81) respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in term of volumes (p > 0.025). Both maxillary and frontal sinus volumes were greater in males compared to females (p < 0.025). The mean value of the maxillary sinus volume was 15.7 ± 5.3 cm(3) and was significantly larger in males than in females (p = 0.004). There was no statistically significant correlation between the volume of maxillary sinuses with age or side. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of septum deviation and concha bullosa rates (p = 0.469 and p = 0.388). There have been many studies of nasal cavity changes due to climatic conditions but this is the first study to measure the difference of paranasal sinus volumes. No difference was determined in the anatomic

  14. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  15. [Cytogenetic aberrations in histologically benign infiltratively growing sphenoid wing meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A; Bekiashev, A Kh; Sycheva, R V

    2007-01-01

    Meningiomas of the sphenoid wing (SW) frequently show an invasive pattern of growth and cause destruction of the adjacent structures. As a result, the rate of recurrent SW meningiomas is as high as 30%. Cytogenetic investigations showed no aberrations specific to invasively growing meningiomas. During this study, the authors evaluated 10 invasive and 5 non-invasive SW meningiomas via comparative genome hybridization (CGH) (matrix CGH), by using the gene chips of GenoSensor Array micromatrixes. The mean number of aberrations in the tumor cells was much greater in case of invasive meningiomas (67.4 versus 40.5 in case of non-invasive SW meningiomas. Furthermore, in invasive SW meningiomas, there were frequently losses in loci 1p, 6q, and 14q and gains in loci 15q and 10, which had been predetermined as molecular markers of stepwise progression of meningioma. Thus, the presence of a complex cytogenetic profile and progression-associated chromosome aberrations in benign SW meningiomas is linked with the increase of their invasive potential. Due to the fact that there are no well-defined adjuvant therapy regimens for recurring meningiomas at present, the revealed genomic aberrations may become potential targets for searching for drugs and a therapeutic intervention in future.

  16. Citrate, a specific substrate for the isolation of Clostridium sphenoides.

    PubMed Central

    Walther, R; Hippe, H; Gottschalk, G

    1977-01-01

    With a medium containing citrate as the carbon and energy source, 10 clostridial strains were isolated from various mud samples. Characterization of these strains revealed that they all belonged to the same species, Clostridium sphenoides. Strains of this organism obtained from culture collections were also able to grow citrate, whereas 15 other clostridial species tested were not. Citrate was fermented by C. sphenoides to acetate, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen. Experiments with stereospecifically 14C-labeled citrate indicated that citrate lyase was involved in citrate degradation. Images PMID:869540

  17. Giant osteochondroma derived from pterygoid process of sphenoid.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Hu, X; Lei, D

    2007-10-01

    Osteochondroma is rarely found in oral and maxillofacial regions. The majority of reported osteochondromas occurred in mandibular areas; their occurrence in bones developed by intramembranous ossification is extremely rare. In this report, a case of osteochondroma arising from the pterygoid process of the sphenoid is described. Radiological investigations showed a large bony mass under the left great wing of the sphenoid and involving the left parapharyngeal space. The tumour was compressive to the mandibular ramus and pharyngeal cavity, causing marked disturbance of mouth opening and secretory otitis media. Histopathological examination confirmed the lesion to be osteochondroma.

  18. Abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid with microphthalmos and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, C; Mullaney, P; Bosley, T M

    2001-02-01

    We report two patients with abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid bone, globe, optic nerve and cerebral hemisphere without stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 1. The lesser wing of the sphenoid bone was abnormally formed and was not ossified ipsilateral to the dysmorphic eye and underdeveloped cerebral hemisphere. Maldevelopment of the sphenoid wing may interfere with the normal closure of the optic vesicle and normal growth of encephalic structures, possibly by disturbing developmental tissue interactions. These patients may exhibit a type of restricted primary sphenoid dysplasia, while the sphenoid dysplasia of neurofibromatosis type 1 may be secondary to orbital or ocular neurofibromas and other factors associated with that disease.

  19. Overview of Frontal Sinus Pathology and Management.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alejandro; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The frontal sinus is the most complex of all paranasal sinuses. Given its proximity to the cranial vault and orbit, frontal sinus pathology can progress to involve these structures and lead to significant morbidity, or even mortality. Surgical management of the frontal sinus is technically challenging. Various open and endoscopic surgical techniques are available to the otolaryngologist. This article presents an overview of the major disease entities that affect the frontal sinus, with a special emphasis on treatment principles and surgical management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic sinusitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cartilage and lined with a mucous membrane. Sinusitis occurs when the membranes becomes inflamed and painful, ... a result of a blocked sinus opening. Chronic sinusitis is often caused by inflammation and blockage due ...

  1. Two- and Three-Dimensional Anatomy of Paranasal Sinuses in Arabian Foals

    PubMed Central

    BAHAR, Sadullah; BOLAT, Durmus; DAYAN, Mustafa Orhun; PAKSOY, Yahya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 2- and 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy and the morphometric properties of the paranasal sinuses of the foal have received little or no attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to obtain details of the paranasal sinuses using multiplane CT imaging to create 3D models and to determine morphological and morphometric data for the sinuses using the 3D models. The heads of five female foals were used in this study. The heads were scanned using computed tomography (CT) in the rostrocaudal direction. After the heads had been frozen, anatomical sections were obtained in the scan position. The 3D models of sinuses and the skull were prepared using MIMICS®. These models were used to assess the surface area and volume of the sinuses, the width, height and orientation of the apertures connecting these sinuses and finally the planar relation of the sinuses with the skull. The right and left sides of all anatomical structures, except the sphenoid sinuses, had symmetric organization on CT images and anatomical sections. The total sinus surface area and volume on both sides were 214.4 cm2 and 72.9 ml, respectively. The largest and the smallest sinuses were the frontal sinus (41.5 ml) and the middle conchal sinus (0.2 ml), respectively. It was found that the planes bounding the sinuses passed through easily palpable points on the head. In conclusion, 3D modeling in combination with conventional sectional imaging of the paranasal sinuses of the foal may help anatomists, radiologists, clinicians and veterinary students. PMID:24004969

  2. The creation and verification of cranial models using three-dimensional rapid prototyping technology in field of transnasal sphenoid endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Waran, Vicknes; Menon, Roshni; Pancharatnam, Devaraj; Rathinam, Alwin Kumar; Balakrishnan, Yuwaraj Kumar; Tung, Tan Su; Raman, Rajagopalan; Prepageran, Narayanan; Chandran, Hari; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Surgical navigation systems have been used increasingly in guiding complex ear, nose, and throat surgery. Although these are helpful, they are only beneficial intraoperatively; thus, the novice surgeon will not have the preoperative training or exposure that can be vital in complex procedures. In addition, there is a lack of reliable models to give surgeons hands-on training in performing such procedures. A technique using an industrial rapid prototyping process by three-dimensional (3D) printing was developed, from which accurate spatial models of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses (sphenoid sinus in particular), and intrasellar/pituitary pathology were produced, according to the parameters of an individual patient. Image-guided surgical (IGS) techniques on two different platforms were used during endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to test and validate the anatomical accuracy of the sinus models by comparing the models with radiological images of the patient on IGS. It was possible to register, validate, and navigate accurately on these models using commonly available navigation stations, matching accurately the anatomy of the model to the IGS images. These 3D models can be reliably used for teaching/training and preoperative planning purposes.

  3. [Destructive mastoiditis with thrombosis of the sigmoid sinus in a 8 year-old child presenting with concomitant chicken pox].

    PubMed

    Bogomil'skiĭ, M R; Polunin, M M; Ivanenko, A M; Poliakov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The specific clinical feature of mastoidities that developed in a patient presenting with chicken pox was the rapid progress in temporal bone destruction with partial thrombosis of the sigmoid sinusis in the absence of typical manifestations of mastoiditis. The pronounced destructive changes found in a series of CT images were regarded as the indications for urgent antromastoidotomy with the puncture of the sigmoid sinusis.

  4. COMMUNITY ACQUIRED METHICILLIN SENSITIVE STAPHYLOCCUS AUREUS CEREBRAL ABSCESS IN A PREVIOUSLY HEALTH GENTLEMAN MIMICKING SIGNS OF CAVERNOUS SINUS THROMBOSIS-A UNIQUE PRESENTATION.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Ibrahim, Ahmad Elbagir

    2015-01-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) infections like meningitis and cerebral abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus are usually seen in patients with neurosurgical interventions or immune compromised patients or patients with cardiac vegetation's. They are extremely rare in healthy patients. We report a case of a 44 year old Indian gentleman who was perfectly healthy with no known co morbidities, which presented with fever, neck stiffness and altered mental status. He had fulminant staph bacteraemia (as evidenced by persistently positive blood cultures) with meningitis and cerebral abscess. Extensive search was made to find the source of infection, but it was inconclusive. Isolated CNS Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection in an apparently healthy patient is very rare. This gentleman presented with altered mental status, asymmetrical exophthalmos and multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case highlights the challenge of making early diagnoses of a brain abscess; since it has symptomology mimicking cavernous sinus thrombosis .This is due to the involvement of the cerebellopontine angle and extensive brain oedema and oedema of the retro bulbar tissues.

  5. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males.

  6. Cushing's disease due to mixed pituitary adenoma-gangliocytoma of the posterior pituitary gland presenting with Aspergillus sp. sinus infection.

    PubMed

    Bridenstine, Mark; Kerr, Janice M; Lillehei, Kevin O; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette K

    2013-01-01

    Gangliocytic lesions of the pituitary gland producing Cushing's disease are extremely rare entities that may exist with or without a pituitary adenoma. The latter have been designated mixed pituitary adenoma-gangliocytomas, the majority of which produce growth hormone, not adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), and are localized to the anterior gland. We now report an immunocompetent woman with hypercortisolism who presented with an intranasal aspergilloma eroding the bony sellar floor. The fungal ball was contiguous with, and extended into, a large neurohypophyseal-centered mass. Transsphenoidal resection revealed a gangliocytic lesion of the posterior gland with small clusters of intimately admixed ACTH-immunoreactive adenoma cells as the cause of her Cushing's disease. Rare transitional sizes and shapes of cells coupled with immunohistochemical findings supported interpretation as advanced neuronal metaplasia within an ACTH adenoma. This mixed ACTH adenoma-gangliocytoma is the first example to present clinically with an opportunistic infection.

  7. More actors, different play: sphenoethmoid cell intimately related to the maxillary nerve canal and cavernous sinus apex.

    PubMed

    Săndulescu, M; Rusu, M C; Ciobanu, Iulia Camelia; Ilie, Angela; Jianu, Adelina Maria

    2011-01-01

    The sphenoid sinus is one of the most morphologically variable and surgically important structures of the skull base. Located below the sella turcica, neighbored by parasellar regions, such as the orbital apex, pterygopalatine fossa and lateral sellar region (cavernous sinus), it is clinically related to these and surgically relevant as corridor for various approaches. Moreover, at the sphenoethmoidal junction, important variations occur, most of these related to the presence of the Onodi cells and the intrasinusal protrusions of the optic nerve. That is why any identified and previously undescribed morphological variation at that level must be added to the well-established protocols, clinical and surgical. During a retrospective CT study of the sphenoid sinus anatomical features a previously unreported morphology was encountered and is reported here. It refers to a unilateral sphenoethmoid cell (SEC), Onodi-positive, not only overriding the superior aspect of the sphenoid but also its lateral side to get intimately related to the maxillary nerve. As that SEC expanded medially to the cavernous sinus apex, it altered the usual endosinusal morphological correlations and also added itself within the limits of the Mullan's triangle. It appears so that such postero-infero-lateral extended pneumatization of an Onodi cell alters the surgical landmarks and also can blur clinical pictures, by adding maxillary and pterygopalatine signs and symptoms.

  8. Endovascular angioplasty before resection of a sphenoidal meningioma with vascular encasement.

    PubMed

    Chivoret, N; Fontaine, D; Lachaud, S; Chau, Y; Sedat, J

    2011-09-01

    We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm.

  9. Endovascular Angioplasty before Resection of a Sphenoidal Meningioma with Vascular Encasement

    PubMed Central

    Chivoret, N.; Fontaine, D.; Lachaud, S.; Chau, Y.; Sedat, J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm. PMID:22005706

  10. Extensive primary Ewings' sarcoma in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, Kostas; Ferekidis, Eleftherios

    2003-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an extensive primary cranial Ewing's sarcoma located in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone with extension to the orbit, the endocranium, the parapharyngeal and infratemporal space. The patient presented with diplopia, anosmia and prolapse of the left eye. He was given chemo- and radiotherapy and was free of symptoms on re-examination 1.5 years later. The prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma in the absence of surgery is uncertain, but prompt treatment appears to have a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. In the future, more cases should be studied in order to investigate the biological behaviour of a primary cranial Ewing's sarcoma.

  11. Fracture of the coronoid process, sphenoid bone, zygoma, and zygomatic arch after a firearm injury.

    PubMed

    de Santana Santos, Thiago; Frota, Riedel; Martins-Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete; Vajgel, André; de Albuquerque Maranhão-Filho, Almir Walter; de Oliveira E Silva, Emanuel Dias

    2011-11-01

    A rare case of fracture of the coronoid process, sphenoid bone, zygoma, and zygomatic arch caused by a firearm is described. A 25-year-old man was hit in the face with a bullet, resulting in restricted mouth opening, difficulty chewing, and pain when opening the mouth. The clinical examination revealed a perforating wound in the right parotid region. A computed tomographic scan revealed a comminuted fracture of the left coronoid process with the bullet stopping in the intact left coronoid process. Treatment was bilateral coronoidectomy associated with speech therapy and was successful. Details of the clinical signs, computed tomography, treatment, and follow-up are presented.

  12. True mycotic aneurysm in a patient with gonadotropinoma after trans-sphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Radotra, Bishan Das; Salunke, Praveen; Parthan, Girish; Dutta, Pinaki; Vyas, Sameer; Mukherjee, Kanchan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged antibiotic use, and intrathecal injections are known risk factors for the development of invasive aspergillosis. Central nervous system (CNS) aspergillosis can manifest in many forms, including mycotic aneurysm formation. The majority of the mycotic aneurysms presents with subarachnoid hemorrhage after rupture and are associated with high mortality. Only 3 cases of true mycotic aneurysms have been reported following trans-sphenoidal surgery. Case Description: A 38-year-old man was admitted with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma for which he underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery. Three weeks later, he presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and meningitis. He was treated with intrathecal and intravenous antibiotics, stress dose of glucocorticoids, and lumbar drain. The defect in the sphenoid bone was closed endoscopically. After 3 weeks of therapy, he suddenly became unresponsive, and computed tomography of the head showed subarachnoid hemorrhage. He succumbed to illness on the next day, and a limited autopsy of the brain was performed. The autopsy revealed extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysmal dilatation, thrombosis of the basilar artery (BA), multiple hemorrhagic infarcts in the midbrain, and pons. Histopathology of the BA revealed the loss of internal elastic lamina and septate hyphae with an acute angle branching on Grocott's methenamine silver stain, conforming to the morphology of Aspergillus. Conclusion: The possibility of intracranial fungal infection should be strongly considered in any patient receiving intrathecal antibiotics who fails to improve in 1–2 weeks, and frequent CSF culture for fungi should be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Since CSF culture has poor sensitivity in the diagnosis of fungal infections of CNS; empirical institution of antifungal therapy may be considered in this scenario. PMID:26759738

  13. Paranasal Sinus Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sirsath, Nagesh T.; Babu, K. Govind; Das, Umesh; Premlatha, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are defined as epithelial neoplasms with predominant neuroendocrine differentiation. They can arise in almost every organ of the body although they are most commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. Nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are a rare site for neuroendocrine carcinoma. In contrast to the other regions, neuroendocrine tumours of the sinuses have been reported to be recurrent and locally destructive. Very few cases of paranasal sinus neuroendocrine carcinoma have been reported till date. Difficulty in pathologic diagnosis and rarity of this malignancy have hindered the progress in understanding the clinical course and improving outcomes. We herein report a case of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour of ethmoid and sphenoid sinus with invasion of orbit and intracranial extension. The patient had complete response at the end of chemoradiation and he was disease-free for 9 months duration after which he developed bone metastasis without regional recurrence. PMID:23476846

  14. Lamb’s head: The model for novice education in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skitarelić, Neven; Mladina, Ranko

    2015-01-01

    Structured training in endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery (EESS) and skull base surgery is essential considering serious potential complications. We have developed a detailed concept on training these surgical skills on the lamb’s head. This simple and extremely cheap model offers the possibility of training even more demanding and advanced procedures in human endonasal endoscopic surgery such as: frontal sinus surgery, orbital decompression, cerebrospinal fluid-leak repair followed also by the naso-septal flap, etc. Unfortunately, the sphenoid sinus surgery cannot be practiced since quadrupeds do not have this sinus. Still, despite this anatomical limitation, it seems that the lamb’s head can be very useful even for the surgeons already practicing EESS, but in a limited edition because of a lack of the experience and dexterity. Only after gaining the essential surgical skills of this demanding field it makes sense to go for the expensive trainings on the human cadaveric model. PMID:26413487

  15. Plain Language Summary: Adult Sinusitis (Sinus Infection).

    PubMed

    Caspersen, Leslie A; Walter, Lindsey M; Walsh, Sandra A; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Piccirillo, Jay F

    2015-08-01

    This plain language summary serves as an overview in explaining sinusitis (pronounced sign-you-side-tis). The purpose of this plain language summary is to provide patients with standard language explaining their condition in an easy-to-read format. This summary applies to those 18 years of age or older with sinusitis. The summary is featured as an FAQ (frequently asked question) format. The summary addresses how to manage and treat sinusitis symptoms. Adult sinusitis is often called a sinus infection. A healthcare provider may refer to a sinus infection as rhinosinusitis (pronounced rhi-no-sign-you-side-tis). This includes the nose as well as the sinuses in the name. A sinus infection is the swelling of the sinuses and nasal cavity.The summary is based on the published 2015 "Clinical Practice Guideline: Adult Sinusitis." The evidence-based guideline includes research to support more effective diagnosis and treatment of adult sinus infections. The guideline was developed as a quality improvement opportunity for managing sinus infections by creating clear recommendations to use in medical practice. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  17. Evaluating Complications of Chronic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Phillip; Pereyra, Charles A.; Breslin, Adam; Melville, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a relatively common diagnosis throughout the US. In patients with an otherwise unremarkable medical history the treatment is typically supportive, requiring only clinical evaluation. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with a history of chronic sinusitis that was brought to our emergency department with new-onset seizure. Three days before he had presented to his usual care facility with two days of headache and fever and was discharged stating headache, subjective fever, and neck stiffness. After further investigation he was diagnosed with a mixed anaerobic epidural abscess. The evaluation and management of chronic sinusitis are based on the presence of symptoms concerning for complication. Prompt investigation of complicated sinusitis is essential in preventing debilitating and fatal sequelae. Our case study underscores the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:28163938

  18. Unusual venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. The dural venous sinuses are important, because they receive blood from the brain and the cranial bones. All sinuses are related to the inner surface of the skull, except for the inferior sagittal and the straight sinus. The sinuses related to the inner surface of the skull produce impressions on it. During routine ostelogical teaching for undergraduate medical students, we observed an unusual oblique sinus, which connected the right and the left transverse sinuses. This unusual oblique sinus measured 2 cm and had a course from the right to the left side. The superior sagittal sinus turned onto the right but at a much higher level than the left transverse sinus. Although these sinuses communicated with each other, the normal position of the confleunce of the sinus (meeting point of superior sagittal sinus, right and left transverse sinus and the occipital sinus) was not seen. The impression meant for the posterior lobe of the left cerebral hemisphere was distinctly greater than that of the right side. The presence of such an anomaly suggests a possible developmental defect or handedness of the individual. The knowledge of the anatomical variations of the dural venous sinuses may have great clinical implications during venography, shunt surgeries and also helpful for neurologists and radiologists in addition to academic interest (Fig. 2, Ref 10) Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  19. Craniectomy for a bilobed dermoid cyst in the temporal fossa and greater wing of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Nevrekar, Dipti; Abdu, Emun; Selden, Nathan R

    2009-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are common periorbital lesions. They usually occur near the superolateral orbital rim, indenting but not extending within the bony outer table. We present an unusual case of a dumbbell-shaped dermoid cyst underlying the temporalis muscle with extension into the lateral wing of the greater sphenoid bone, approaching the optic canal. The cyst was successfully removed en bloc via a small skull base craniectomy without spillage of cyst contents. The patient recovered well without neurological or visual sequelae.

  20. Sinus augmentation by orthodontic movement as an alternative to a surgical sinus lift: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Savi de Carvalho, Renato; Consolaro, Alberto; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; de Macedo Carvalho, Ana Paula Rabello

    2014-10-01

    Maxillary sinus pneumatization may significantly reduce the alveolar bone height. As a result, the sinus membrane may need to be apically repositioned, with or without grafts, before or at the time of implant placement. The sinus lift, however, is a relatively invasive surgical procedure that can lead to complications and sometimes unsuccessful results. This clinical report presents an orthodontic movement to enlarge the amount of bone at the sinus region for implant placement. The approach avoided surgery in a patient who used tobacco and exhibited recurrent sinusitis. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neoplastic infiltration of the sphenoid wing: a rare manifestation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinato, David James; Krell, Jonathan; Wasan, Harpreet; Sharma, Rohini

    2011-12-01

    Atypical patterns of metastatic spread from colorectal primary tumors are often misdiagnosed, with potential implications for the clinical outcome. Metastatic diffusion to the splanchnocranium is extremely rare in colorectal cancer. A histological proof of diagnosis is rarely obtained and therapeutic management is a challenge. We describe the case of a 46-year-old patient who presented with a radiologically proven sphenoid wing metastasis. The patient presented with left-sided exophthalmos while receiving systemic chemotherapy for relapsed high-risk colorectal cancer. A left sphenoid wing metastasis was proven by a head computed tomography scan. A metastatic spread to the sino-nasal tract is regarded as a poor prognosis determinant in colorectal cancer and presents a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The compression of noble structures such as the optic nerve holds serious implications in terms of quality of life but there is insufficient evidence clarifying whether radiotherapy or surgery represent the best option for these patients, leaving the therapeutic plan to be decided case by case.

  2. Sinus floor bone failures in maxillary sinus floor augmentation: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmão Paraíso; Arita, Emiko Saito; Tamimi, Faleh

    2015-04-01

    Extreme bone resorption in posterior maxilla may lead to absence of part of the sinus floor. This phenomenon has been termed sinus floor bone failure, and may compromise sinus floor augmentation. The present article aims to evaluate risk factors related to sinus floor bone failures and to evaluate the influence of these failures in sinus floor augmentation outcomes in patients with severely atrophic posterior maxilla. In this case-control study, patients were selected among those referred for sinus floor augmentation. Only patients presenting a ridge bone height of less than 3 mm were included. Cases were defined as presenting sinus floor bone failure, whereas controls did not present any interruption in the sinus floor bone. Information collected included clinical dental records and computed tomographic assessment of sinus width, septa, and schneiderian membrane. Risk estimates for sinus floor bone failures were calculated as adjusted odds ratios (AORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic regression analyses. A p value under 0.05 was considered statistically significant. In addition, sinus floor augmentation outcomes of both groups were also assessed. In all, 23 cases and 58 controls were included in the study. Sinus floor bone failures were significantly associated with the number of missing posterior teeth (AOR 3.67; 95% CI 0.86 to 15.63; p = .046) and a history of periodontitis (AOR 6.39; 95% CI 1.86 to 21.95; p = .002). Of the total, 15 cases and 27 controls underwent sinus floor augmentation. Schneiderian membrane perforation occurred during the surgery of two cases and of one control. No implants were lost during a mean postsurgical follow-up of 20 months. The number of missing posterior teeth and a history of periodontitis may be considered as risk factors for sinus floor bone failures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An Osteolytic Meningioma en Plaque of the Sphenoid Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin-Uk; Yoo, Jae-Chul

    2008-01-01

    Meningioma en plaque (MEP) is a rare tumor characterized more by its clinical and biological behavior than its histological appearance. Hyperostosis of the skull is one of the characteristic signs of MEP. This bony change can produce clinical symptoms and signs in MEP by pressing against adjacent structures. The authors report a rare case of an osteolytic MEP extending from the sphenoid wing into the orbital wall, middle fossa, and temporalis muscle. PMID:19096543

  4. Monocular nasal hemianopia from atypical sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Rebecca C; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2010-06-01

    Neurogenic monocular nasal field defects respecting the vertical midline are quite uncommon. We report a case of a unilateral nasal hemianopia that was caused by compression of the left optic nerve by a sphenoid wing meningioma. Histological examination revealed that the pathology of the meningioma was consistent with that of an atypical meningioma, which carries a guarded prognosis with increased chance of recurrence. The tumor was debulked surgically, and the patient's visual field defect improved.

  5. Absence of a sphenoid wing in neurofibromatosis type 1 disease: imaging with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Onbas, Omer; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Kantarci, Mecit; Atasoy, Mustafa; Alper, Fatih

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 disease is characterized by pigmented cutaneous lesions and generalized tumors of a neural crest origin and it may affect all the systems of the human body. Sphenoid dysplasia is one of the characteristics of this syndrome and it occurs in 5-10% of the cases; further, abnormalities of the sphenoid wings are often considered pathognomonic. However, complete agenesis of a sphenoid wing is very rare. We report here on an unusual case of neurofibromatosis type 1 disease with the associated absence of a sphenoid wing that was diagnosed by using multidetector computed tomography.

  6. Delayed presentation of traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Richard A; Turner, Justin H

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is one of several complications that can occur after traumatic skull base injury. Although most patients present soon after the injury occurs, some can present years later, with resulting morbidity and the need for additional procedures. We present a case of a patient with a sphenoid sinus CSF leak who presented 12 years after a closed head injury that included a sphenoethmoid skull base fracture. We also reviewed the literature on this topic, with a discussion of previous reports of CSF leaks that occurred months, years, or decades after trauma. A late onset CSF leak appears to be a rare but important complication of traumatic skull base injury. This case highlights the need for clinicians to remain vigilant to the possibility of delayed CSF rhinorrhea, even years after traumatic head injury.

  7. Treatment of severe sinus infection after sinus lift procedure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Almaghrabi, Bandar Abdulrahman; Hatton, Michael N; Andreana, Sebastiano; Hoeplinger, Mark A C

    2011-12-01

    Maxillary sinus floor augmentation may have a variety of postoperative complications including infection, sequestration of bone, and maxillary sinusitis. Complications can also occur due to a preexisting sinus condition called ostium stenosis. This case report presents a complication after sinus lift and grafting procedure due to an unrecognized ostium stenosis. A 50-year-old male patient had sinus augmentation on his right side. However, postoperatively, his symptoms were protracted. A CT scan showed thickening of the Schneiderian membrane and scattered graft material. Management included endoscopic nasal examination and ostium enlargement, antibiotic coverage, and full enucleation of the graft and diseased tissue. Patency of the sinus ostium should be carefully evaluated before sinus lift/grafting procedure using CT technology. Radiology and otolaryngology consultations may be necessary to rule out ostium stenosis before surgery.

  8. Preparation of nasoseptal flap in trans-sphenoidal surgery using 2-μ thulium laser: technical note.

    PubMed

    Passacantilli, Emiliano; Lapadula, Gennaro; Caporlingua, Federico; Anichini, Giulio; Giovannetti, Filippo; Santoro, Antonio; Lenzi, Jacopo

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of the use of the 2μ-thulium laser in harvesting nasal septal flaps. Nasal septal flaps are routinely performed in almost every trans-sphenoidal surgery. The preservation of the arterial vasculature is a mainstay of the procedure. However, the margins of the flap should be sufficiently healthy to regenerate faster, reducing the risk of possible complications. Eight patients underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery and removal of pituitary adenomas. Reparation of the defect was performed with the positioning of a rotational vascularized nasal-septal flap. The flaps were harvested with the aid of the 2μ-thulium laser. Every patient was then monitored for 6 months through seriated endoscopic endonasal controls. There were no complications related to the use of the laser, either intraoperatively, or postoperatively. The operative timing did not significantly differ from that of traditional techniques. The use of the 2μ-thulium laser for the harvesting of nasal septal vascularized flaps can be considered safe and feasible. The limited number of treated patients could be considered as the only restriction to the study. A larger study might have uncovered possible instrumentation-related complications, which were not observed in the present study.

  9. The morphology and morphometry of the foramina of the greater wing of the human sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jerzy; Charuta, Anna; Wysocki, Jarosław

    2005-08-01

    The greater wing of the human sphenoid bone is pierced by several foramina, which contain, as a main element, the venous anastomoses between the interior of the skull and the extracranial veins. Since data concerning these foramina are scarce in the literature, studies comprising the frequency of occurrence and morphology of the foramina of the greater wing of the human sphenoid bone were undertaken on 100 macerated skulls. We found that the foramen ovale is divided into 2 or 3 components in 4.5% of cases. Moreover, the borders of the foramen ovale in some skulls were irregular and rough. This may suggest, on radiological images, the presence of morbid changes, which might be the sole anatomical variation. Concurrent with the foramen ovale are accessory foramina. The foramen of Vesalius and the cavernous foramen were present in 17% and 33% of cases, respectively. The foramen of Vesalius was always single and the cavernous foramen also occurred in multiple form. The foramen spinosus and the foramen rotundum occurred as permanent elements of the skulls studied. The mean area of the foramina measured, excluding the foramen ovale, was not considerable, which may suggest that they play a minor role in the dynamics of blood circulation in the venous system of the head.

  10. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery.

  11. Paecilomyces lilacinus as the cause of chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rockhill, R C; Klein, M D

    1980-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus was isolated on two separate occasions from the left antrum of a patient with chronic maxillary sinusitis. The clinical presentation and characteristics of the fungus and the sinus debris histopathology are discussed. Images PMID:7430339

  12. Sinusitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and mucus can become trapped in the sinuses. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi can grow there and lead to ... cases of sinusitis thought to be caused by bacteria. Some doctors may recommend ... usually goes away without medical treatment. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, ...

  13. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ... cavities. The paranasal sinuses are hollow, air-filled spaces located within the bones of the face and ...

  15. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  16. [Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery using a navigation system for pituitary adenoma].

    PubMed

    Kashio, Akinori; Suzuki, Mitsuya; Watanabe, Hidetoshi

    2005-11-01

    Hardy's operation using a microscope has long been the standard for treating pituitary adenoma. A new endonasal approach to the sella using an endoscope combined with a navigation system has been reported, which we used to conduct endocopic endonasal hypophysectomy from October 2000 to June 2003 in 11 patients with pituitary lesions. We introduced an angle-dependent navigation system, Neuro Navigator III. We approached the sphenoid sinus mainly via the hemilateral common meatus. The deviation of the nasal septum and sphenoidal septum was carefully evaluated to determine the optimal operating side. We concluded that the hemilateral common meatus route is useful because it is least invasive in endocopic endonasal hypophysectomy. Another route should be taken, however, if hemorrhaging is uncontrollable or the tumor is quite large. Navigation systems are quite effective in executing this operation safely. Angle-dependent navigation system is a good choice for this operation, considering its cost performance.

  17. Local deposition fractions of ultrafine particles in a human nasal-sinus cavity CFD model.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qin Jiang; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Ji Yuan

    2012-07-01

    Ultrafine particle deposition studies in the human nasal cavity regions often omit the paranasal sinus regions. Because of the highly diffusive nature of nanoparticles, it is conjectured that deposition by diffusion may occur in the paranasal sinuses, which may affect the residual deposition fraction that leaves the nasal cavity. Two identical CFD models of a human nasal cavity, one with sinuses and one without, were reconstructed from CT-scans to determine the uptake of ultrafine particles. In general, there was little flow passing through the paranasal sinuses. However, flow patterns revealed that some streamlines reached the upper nasal cavity near the olfactory regions. These flow paths promote particle deposition in the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses. It was found that there were some differences in the deposition fractions and patterns for 5 and 10 nm particles between the nasal-sinus and the nasal cavity models. This difference is amplified when the flow rate is decreased and at a flow rate of 4 L/min the maximum difference was 17%. It is suggested that evaluations of nanoparticle deposition should consider some deposition occurring in the paranasal sinuses especially if flow rates are of concern.

  18. Central nervous system lymphoma presenting as trigeminal neuralgia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Jensen W. J.; Khanna, Arjun; Walcott, Brian P.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atypical man with diffuse large B cell lymphoma localized to the sphenoid wing and adjacent cavernous sinus, initially presenting with isolated ipsilateral facial pain mimicking trigeminal neuralgia due to invasion of Meckel’s cave but subsequently progressing to intra-axial extension and having synchronous features of systemic lymphoma. Primary central nervous system lymphoma is uncommon, accounting for approximately 2% of all primary intra-cranial tumors, but its incidence has been steadily increasing in some groups [1]. It usually arises in periventricular cerebral white matter, reports of lymphoma in extra-axial regions are rare [2]. This man highlights the importance of maintaining lymphoma in the differential diagnosis of tumors of the skull base presenting with trigeminal neuralgia-like symptoms. PMID:25865026

  19. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  20. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  1. Sinusitis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by infection. Our sinuses are the moist air spaces within the bones of the face around the nose. The frontal sinuses are located in the area near the eyebrows; the ... our sinuses are filled with air, making our facial bones less dense and much ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  3. Anomalous Origination of Right Coronary Artery from Left Sinus in Asymptomatic Young Male Presenting with Positive Ischemic Response on Treadmill Test

    PubMed Central

    Setianto, Budi Yuli; Hartopo, Anggoro Budi; Gharini, Putrika Prastuti Ratna; Taufiq, Nahar

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous origination of coronary artery from the opposite sinus (ACAOS) is a rare coronary artery anomaly. Right ACAOS with interarterial course is a type of ACAOS, which conveys a high risk for myocardial ischemia or sudden death. We reported a case of right ACAOS with interarterial course in otherwise healthy young male. He was asymptomatic, until an obligatory medical check-up with treadmill test showed a sign of positive ischemic response. Further work-up revealed that he had right ACAOS with interarterial course. Watchful observation was applied to him, while strenuous physical activity and competitive sport were absolutely prohibited. PMID:26885410

  4. A Rational Approach to Sinus Augmentation: The Low Window Sinus Lift

    PubMed Central

    Zaniol, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Sinus augmentation is a well-known approach to treating alveolar bone ridge atrophy in the posterior maxilla. The preparation of the lateral window is crucial. Its size, design, and position in the vestibular sinus wall may affect the intra- and postsurgical complication rates and affect the intrasurgical activity of both surgeons and assistants. The present paper describes a rational technique that also exploits the guided surgery approach for design and preparation of a lateral window for sinus augmentation, the Low Window Sinus Lift. To illustrate the use of this approach, a case is presented in which the 50-year-old patient had the left maxillary first molar extracted, followed two months later by sinus augmentation and placement of three implants. One year after delivery of the definitive prosthesis, all three implants were successful, and the prosthesis was fully functional. Controlled studies should be undertaken to assess whether this technique provides significant advantages compared to other sinus augmentation approaches. PMID:28337349

  5. A Rational Approach to Sinus Augmentation: The Low Window Sinus Lift.

    PubMed

    Zaniol, Terry; Zaniol, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Sinus augmentation is a well-known approach to treating alveolar bone ridge atrophy in the posterior maxilla. The preparation of the lateral window is crucial. Its size, design, and position in the vestibular sinus wall may affect the intra- and postsurgical complication rates and affect the intrasurgical activity of both surgeons and assistants. The present paper describes a rational technique that also exploits the guided surgery approach for design and preparation of a lateral window for sinus augmentation, the Low Window Sinus Lift. To illustrate the use of this approach, a case is presented in which the 50-year-old patient had the left maxillary first molar extracted, followed two months later by sinus augmentation and placement of three implants. One year after delivery of the definitive prosthesis, all three implants were successful, and the prosthesis was fully functional. Controlled studies should be undertaken to assess whether this technique provides significant advantages compared to other sinus augmentation approaches.

  6. Bilateral Maxillary Sinus Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Sachin; Agrawal, Sumit; Goyal, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia (MSH) is an uncommon abnormality of paranasal sinuses noted in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) scan helps in diagnosing the anomaly along with any anatomical variation that may be associated with it. MSH is usually associated with other anomalies like uncinate process hypoplasia. Three types of MSH have been described. Type 1 MSH shows mild maxillary sinus hypoplasia, type 2 shows significant sinus hypoplasia with narrowed infundibular passage and hypoplastic or absent uncinate process, and type 3 is cleft like maxillary sinus hypoplasia with absent uncinate process. CT and endoscopic examination usually complement each other in diagnosing MSH. PMID:25548709

  7. Prevalence of fungal infection among Iranian patients with chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, B; Razmpa, E; Alavi, Sh; Emami, M; Shidfar, M; Naghibzadeh, Gh; Morteza, A

    2011-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a major cause of morbidity today. Regional variations in the incidence of this disease have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of fungal infection as the causative agent of chronic sinusitis among Iranian patients. A cross sectional hospital based study was designed; the patients underwent paranasal sinus washing and maxillary sinus biopsy. All specimens were studied by light microscopy. Fungal culturing was employed to confirm diagnosis. The patients underwent Computed Tomography for sinus evaluation. Of 162 participants, 12 samples from patients showed fungal elements, 2 of them Aspergillus fulvous (1.2%), 9 of them Alternaria species (5.56%) and 1 of them Psilomysis (0.6%). All patients presented radiologic evidence of sinusitis, ranging from mucosal thickening to total opacity. In conclusion, results obtained showed a low prevalence of fungal sinusitis among Iranian patients with chronic sinusitis. Findings also showed that Alternaria is the most causative agent.

  8. Diffuse Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Secondary to Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Agarwal, Amit; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal rupture accounts for the majority of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Increasingly recognized is the occurrence of nontraumatic convexity SAH unaccounted for by aneurysmal rupture. These presentations require consideration of rare but clinically significant sources of SAH. We report a patient presenting with prolonged mild headaches and acute onset of seizure like activity found to have diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and extensive dural venous sinus thrombosis involving the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse-sigmoid sinuses. There are few reported cases of SAH secondary to dural sinus thrombosis; however most of these are convexity hemorrhage. Sinus thrombosis presenting as diffuse SAH is extremely rare, as is showcased in this report.

  9. Unexpected location of pilonidal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Sion-Vardy, N; Osyntsov, L; Cagnano, E; Osyntsov, A; Vardy, D; Benharroch, D

    2009-12-01

    Pilonidal sinuses usually occur in the sacrococcygeal area in young men, and occasionally can be found in other ectopic sites. We present a retrospective case review on unusual locations of pilonidal sinuses in the past 4 years. The lesion sites were as follows: one on the penis, two on the scalp, two on the abdomen, one on the neck, two in the groin and two in the axilla. Abdominal and penile lesions are uncommon, but the other locations reported are unusually rare. To our knowledge, the groin has not been reported previously as a site of a pilonidal sinus, although the histological appearance of hidradenitis suppurativa may well resemble it. When trying to clarify the pathogenesis of these occurrences, we found that recurrent hair removal was a common characteristic of the patients we contacted, and this may have been the initiating trauma.

  10. Modeling the Carotid Sinus Baroreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramachandra; Nudelman, Harvey B.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the relationship between sinus pressure and nerve discharge frequency of the carotid sinus baroreceptor is presented. It is partly based upon the single-fiber data obtained by Clarke from the sinus nerve of a dog. The model takes into account what is currently known about the physiology of the baroreceptor. It consists of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations and eight free parameters. With one set of values for these eight parameters, the model reproduces well the experimental results reported by Clarke for positive ramp pressure inputs. Only three parameters needed to be adjusted in order to fit the dynamic data. The remaining five were obtained from static and steady-state data. PMID:5056961

  11. Treatment for Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Salazar Adum, Juan Pablo; Arora, Rohit

    Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia (IST) is a chronic medical condition with a wide variety of clinical presentations making it, sometimes, very insidious at the time of the diagnosis. Several therapeutic options, including, pharmacotherapy, cardiac rehabilitation, and modification or ablation of the sinus node, have been proposed for the management of IST, but because of the complexity and lack of understanding of pathophysiology, it can be difficult to manage, despite the numerous treatment options currently available. The purpose of this review is to analyze the treatment for IST, focusing on the role of newer therapy and the potential benefits in the management of this cardiac rhythm disturbance.

  12. Safe Corridor to Access Clivus for Endoscopic Trans-Sphenoidal Surgery: A Radiological and Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Zhang, Siwen; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penetration of the clivus is required for surgical access of the brain stem. The endoscopic transclivus approach is a difficult procedure with high risk of injury to important neurovascular structures. We undertook a novel anatomical and radiological investigation to understand the structure of the clivus and neurovascular structures relevant to the extended trans-nasal trans-sphenoid procedure and determine a safe corridor for the penetration of the clivus. Method We examined the clivus region in the computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images of 220 adults, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 50 adults, and dry skull specimens of 10 adults. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) of the CT images was performed, and the anatomical features of the clivus were studied in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. The data from the images were used to determine the anatomical parameters of the clivus and neurovascular structures, such as the internal carotid artery and inferior petrosal sinus. Results The examination of the CTA and MR images of the enrolled subjects revealed that the thickness of the clivus helped determine the depth of the penetration, while the distance from the sagittal midline to the important neurovascular structures determined the width of the penetration. Further, data from the CTA and MR images were consistent with those retrieved from the examination of the cadaveric specimens. Conclusion Our findings provided certain pointers that may be useful in guiding the surgery such that inadvertent injury to vital structures is avoided and also provided supportive information for the choice of the appropriate endoscopic equipment. PMID:26368821

  13. Incidental sinusitis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brooke M.; Kurachek, Stephen C.; Blumberg, Karen; Laguna, Theresa A.; Liu, Meixia; Olson, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intubation is a risk factor for nosocomial sinusitis in adult intensive care patients. Sinusitis in intubated adults can be an occult cause of fever. In children nasal intubation may be associated with a greater risk of sinusitis. No pediatric study has determined the incidence of nosocomial sinusitis in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) setting. We hypothesized that within a subset of patients who had head CT imaging: (1) the incidence of sinusitis in PICU patients exceeds the incidence in non-PICU patients; (2) the incidence of sinusitis is greater in PICU patients with a tube (nasotracheal, nasogastric, orotracheal, or orogastric); and (3) nasal tubes confer an increased risk for sinusitis compared to oral tubes. Design Retrospective chart review Setting Independent not-for-profit pediatric healthcare system Patients PICU and non-PICU (inpatients hospitalized on medical-surgical wards) patients referred for head CT Interventions None Measurements and Main Results CT images were evaluated for the presence of a tube and sinusitis. Images were scored using the Lund-MacKay (LM) staging system. Sinusitis was defined as a LM score >3.5. 596 patients were studied; 395 (66.3%) PICU. 197 (50%) PICU versus 69 (34.3%) non-PICU patients had sinusitis (p <0.001). 108/147 (73.5%) PICU patients with a tube present had sinusitis versus 88/248 (35.9%) of those without a tube present (p <0.001). There was no significant difference in sinusitis based on tube location (p=0.218). Younger age or the presence of a tube increased the probability of sinusitis (p <0.001). Conclusions Almost 50% of our PICU patients imaged for reasons other than evaluation for sinus disease had evidence of sinusitis. This finding raises the concern that sinusitis in PICU patients is common and likely should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever in PICU patients. PMID:21283043

  14. Treatment of dental implant-related maxillary sinusitis with functional endoscopic sinus surgery in combination with an intra-oral approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Bae

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes the case of a patient who underwent maxillary sinusitis right after dental implant installation with sinus lifting. Computed tomography scan revealed a dental implant (#16) was protruded inside the right maxillary sinus and confirmed the obstruction of ostium. A symptom remission was gained with the dual approaches combined by functional endoscopic sinus surgery and an intra-oral approach. Fully recovered function and healing of sinus were identified after 10 months follow-up. We report the case of sinusitis caused by protrusion of implants with sinus floor lift procedures and propose that practitioners should be aware of the possible its complications and management. PMID:24868506

  15. Cholesterol granuloma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ting-Kuang

    2006-06-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the maxillary sinus is very rare. In this study, the searching of the literature was performed with the keywords of cholesterol granuloma and maxillary sinus. All retrieved literature were reviewed throughout to identify and analyze all individual characteristics. Two additional cases in our hospital were also included. The result showed that, in the overall 37 cases, the ratio of male to female was about 3:1. Caucasian (14/37) and Turkish (10/37) were reported more frequently. CG of maxillary sinus had an opposite sex predilection compared with the fungus balls of the maxillary sinus. In addition, the comorbidity of these two diseases was found only in one patient in the literature. These results suggested that the different mechanisms other than poor aeration of the maxillary sinus played a role in the formation of CG of maxillary sinus. The diagnosis for CG of the maxillary sinus before operation is difficult, but the clear golden yellow rhinorrhea and hemorrhagic signs may provide a good diagnostic evidence. The symptoms were vague and about half of the patients presented with non-specific symptoms. Therefore, it seemed reasonable that CG of the maxillary sinus was under diagnosed in the clinical practice. Treatment consists of complete excision via Caldwell-Luc or endoscopic approach and provides a good prognosis. Bilateral involvements are rare but possible in this disease entity.

  16. Congenital midline sinus of the upper lip.

    PubMed

    Fok, Denise; Kua, Ee Hsiang Jonah; Por, Yong Chen

    2015-06-01

    A congenital lip sinus is a rare condition that has been reported to occur in both the upper and lower lips, either in isolation or in association with congenital deformities such as a cleft lip and palate in Van der Woude syndrome. The prevalence of lower lip sinuses has been estimated to be about 0.00001% of the white population. Upper lip sinuses are even more uncommon. To date, there have been several case reports of upper lip sinuses and fistulas, but no similar cases have been described in Singapore. We herein report a case of congenital upper lip sinus presenting as a recurring upper lip abscess and review the current literature on this condition.

  17. Hormone-dependent shrinkage of a sphenoid wing meningioma after pregnancy: case report.

    PubMed

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Freyschlag, Christian F; Stockhammer, Günter; Taucher, Susanne; Maier, Hans; Thomé, Claudius; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are known to be associated with female sex hormones. Worsening neurological symptoms or newly diagnosed meningiomas have been described in the context of elevated levels of sex hormones, for example, in pregnancy. To the authors' knowledge, tumor shrinkage after the normalization of hormones has not been described, even if it is known that neurological deficits due to meningioma compression may improve after giving birth. A 32-year-old female patient presented with severe headache and vision disturbances at the end of her second pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extended mass at the lateral left-sided sphenoid wing that was suspected to be a meningioma. After delivery, the patient's symptoms improved, and MRI obtained 2 months postpartum showed significant shrinkage of the lesion. Significant tumor shrinkage can occur after pregnancy. Thus, repeat imaging is indicated in these patients.

  18. Transient nerve damage following intubation for trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy.

    PubMed

    Evers, K A; Eindhoven, G B; Wierda, J M

    1999-12-01

    To describe a case of transient lingual and hypoglossal nerve damage following intubation for a trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. A 56-yr-old acromegalic man was scheduled for trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. He had been treated with octreotide six months previously which had reduced the swelling of the tongue to an acceptable degree to the patient. During the anesthetic procedure there were no problems. The intubation was performed without any difficulty, no force had been used to place the endotracheal tube, a throat pack was inserted and, before extubation, an oro-gastric tube was inserted. Three days after surgery the patient complained of numbness and swelling of the left side of the tongue, he had difficulty in moving the tongue, speaking difficulties and problems in swallowing food were noted. Also taste was lost on this side of the tongue. Left lingual and hypoglossal nerve damage was diagnosed, which was confirmed by the neurologist. After four months of intensive physiotherapy and speech therapy, the symptoms disappeared. This is a report of a very rare complication of lingual and hypoglossal nerve damage in an acromegalic patient. This incident suggests forceful laryngoscopy, hyperextension of the head and the throat pack (tightly packed in the oropharynx) can result in injury of the lingual and the hypoglossal nerves.

  19. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  20. Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus Masquerading as Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Vengal, Manoj; Siyo, Nizaro; Ahmed, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumours of maxillary sinus are rare. They are usually diagnosed in the late stages when they perforate the sinus walls. The presence of large air space in the maxillary sinus facilitates asymptomatic growth of the sinus malignancy. The clinical presentation of these tumours depends on the sinus wall involved by the disease. The medial wall is usually the first to become eroded, leading to nasal obstruction, epistaxis or discharge. Rarely, symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma can resemble dental infection and the affected patients may visit dental clinic seeking treatment. This report presents a case of carcinoma of maxillary sinus mimicking odontogenic infection. Computed tomographic findings explained the reason for the present lesion to masquerade as an inflammatory condition. The importance of advanced imaging modalities for prompt identification of such lesions is discussed. PMID:27790593

  1. Experimental study on histological changes in the sinus membrane following sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Onişor-Gligor, Fl; Lucaciu, Ondine; Câmpian, R; Oană, L; Gheban, D; Florea, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the histological changes in the sinus mucosa adjacent to the alloplastic material used for subantral augmentation. The study included ten sheep and a dog. The first group of five sheep underwent a sinus lift procedure, using PerioGlas as an augmentation material; the second similar group of sheep was the control group. The dog underwent a sinus lift procedure, with PerioGlas augmentation, after the sinus membrane was intentionally perforated and two implants were placed in the same operative step. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the sinus mucosa in the control group revealed cells without cilia between goblet cells. The cilia were uniformly arranged in sections in the same direction. Changes occurred in the sinus mucosa after grafting, such as drastic reduction of ciliated cells, which seemed to be replaced by goblet cells. In all sheep undergoing grafting, generalized fibrosis was found in the mucosal area that came into contact with PerioGlas. In two of the sheep in which grafting was performed, mucoid cysts with pseudo stratified ciliated epithelium were present. Even when the sinus mucosa was perforated (in the dog), the inflammatory process developed in the mucosa did not prevent the integration of the graft and implants. In conclusion, following the sinus lift procedure, changes occur in the sinus membrane to adapt to the new situation, without the appearance of chronic or acute suppurative processes.

  2. Microbiology of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2011-03-01

    Most sinus infections are viral, and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis. The most common bacteria isolated from pediatric and adult patients with community-acquired acute purulent sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the main isolates in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative gram-negative rods are commonly isolated from patients with nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, those with HIV infection, and in cystic fibrosis. Fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common isolates in neutropenic patients. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by the previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens.

  3. Clinical Features and Treatments of Odontogenic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Jin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical features such as sex, age, etiologic factors, and presenting symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis are differentiated from other types of sinusitis. Also, this study was designed to find methods for reducing the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart analysis was completed on twenty-seven patients with odontogenic sinusitis. They were all treated at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital between February 2006 and August 2008. The study protocol and informed consent forms were approved by the institutional review boards for human beings at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Results Ten patients (37.0%) had dental implant related complications and 8 (29.6%) had dental extraction related complications. Unilateral purulent nasal discharge was the most common symptom (66.7%). The therapeutic modality included transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery in 19 (70.4%) patients, and a Caldwell-Luc operation in two (7.4%) patients. Conclusion In our study, there was no significant difference in the incidence between genders. The average age of the patients was 42.9 years. The incidence was highest in the fourth decade. There were no significant differences between the symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis and that of other types of sinusitis. However, almost all of the patients with odontogenic sinusitis had unilateral symptoms. Iatrogenic causes, which include dental implants and dental extractions, were the most common etiologic factors related to the development of odontogenic sinusitis. Therefore, a preoperative consultation between a rhinologist and a dentist prior to the dental procedure should be able to reduce the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. PMID:20879062

  4. Clinical features and treatments of odontogenic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Chul; Lee, Sung Jin

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical features such as sex, age, etiologic factors, and presenting symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis are differentiated from other types of sinusitis. Also, this study was designed to find methods for reducing the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. A retrospective chart analysis was completed on twenty-seven patients with odontogenic sinusitis. They were all treated at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital between February 2006 and August 2008. The study protocol and informed consent forms were approved by the institutional review boards for human beings at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Ten patients (37.0%) had dental implant related complications and 8 (29.6%) had dental extraction related complications. Unilateral purulent nasal discharge was the most common symptom (66.7%). The therapeutic modality included transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery in 19 (70.4%) patients, and a Caldwell-Luc operation in two (7.4%) patients. In our study, there was no significant difference in the incidence between genders. The average age of the patients was 42.9 years. The incidence was highest in the fourth decade. There were no significant differences between the symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis and that of other types of sinusitis. However, almost all of the patients with odontogenic sinusitis had unilateral symptoms. Iatrogenic causes, which include dental implants and dental extractions, were the most common etiologic factors related to the development of odontogenic sinusitis. Therefore, a preoperative consultation between a rhinologist and a dentist prior to the dental procedure should be able to reduce the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis.

  5. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  6. Assessment of pneumatization of the paranasal sinuses: a comprehensive and validated metric.

    PubMed

    Marino, Michael J; Weinstein, Jacqueline E; Riley, Charles A; Levy, Joshua M; Emerson, Noah A; McCoul, Edward D

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a radiographic metric for characterizing the degree of paranasal sinus pneumatization. A validated metric for the extent of sinus pneumatization that comprehensively includes the maxillary, ethmoid, frontal, and sphenoid cavities is not currently available. A validation study was performed in which 5 independent reviewers evaluated 49 sinus computed tomography (CT) scans in coronal, sagittal, and axial orientations. Reviewers evaluated each scan, bilaterally, for 18 proposed dichotomous items as part of the Assessment of Pneumatization of the Paranasal Sinuses (APPS) metric. Evaluation of APPS items was independent of sinus opacification, which was simultaneously evaluated using the standard and validated Lund-Mackay scoring system. Interrater and intrarater reliability was assessed for each proposed APPS parameter and Lund-Mackay item using Fleiss kappa statistic. Nine parameters were included in the final APPS metric due to substantial interrater reliability (κ(mean) = 0.61, κ(range) = 0.41-0.81) and intrarater consistency (κ(mean) = 0.64, κ(range) = 0.53-0.77), variable radiographic presence, and unique contribution to the characterization of sinus pneumatization. Kappa values were also calculated for Lund-Mackay interrater reliability (κ(mean) = 0.58, κ(range) = 0.45-0.66) and intrarater consistency (κ(mean) = 0.71, κ(range) = 0.65-0.75). The final APPS metric has comparable interrater and intrarater reliability to Lund-Mackay scoring. APPS scores were normally distributed within the study group by Anderson-Darling normality test (p < 0.005). The APPS score is the first comprehensive and validated metric for quantifying the degree of paranasal sinus pneumatization and anatomic variation. This has important potential utility in standardizing evaluation of sinus CT and researching the relationship of sinus pneumatization with clinical parameters. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Ophthalmic manifestations of paranasal sinus mucocoeles.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, S Ahmed; Lim, M Kim; Jones, Nicholas S

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the ophthalmic manifestations of paranasal sinus mucocoeles. A retrospective study of all patients (1992-1998) diagnosed with paranasal sinus mucocoeles. All patients had a CT scan. Of the 45 patients, only 3 (6.7%) did not have ophthalmic symptoms or signs. The most common (64.4%) presenting feature was peri-orbital swelling, often associated with pain and tenderness. Other presenting features included diplopia, proptosis, hypoglobus, diplopia, decreased colour vision, epiphora, facial swelling and nasal polyps. The frontal sinus was the most commonly (70%) involved site. Paranasal sinus mucocoeles present most commonly with ophthalmic symptoms and signs. Patients with this condition are therefore highly likely to present initially to the ophthalmology department. Awareness of the aetiology of this condition is important so that appropriate and timely referral is made to the otolaryngologists to ensure appropriate management of this condition.

  8. Massive Intradural Dermoid Cyst Without Sinus Tract.

    PubMed

    Abouhassan, William; Chao, John Kuang; Lehman, James A

    2017-10-01

    Dermoid cysts can present as a rare, benign, congenital intracranial tumor of neuroectoderm origin trapped during embryogenesis. Past clinical reports have reported lesions in the posterior fossa, at the midline, and in the intradural region all in conjunction with a superficial sinus tract. The authors present a unique patient of a completely intracranial, intradural, dermoid tumor of the midline cerebellum devoid of any evidence of sinus tract. The histological characteristics, radiological features, and management of this unusual patient are described.

  9. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, N; Manjunath, MK

    2014-01-01

    Extra oral sinus of odontogenic origin occurs when the purulent by-products of dental pulp necrosis spread along the path of least resistance from the root apex to the skin on the face. Patients presenting with cutaneous sinus usually visit a general physician or dermatologist first, as the lesion can mimic various dermatologic pathologies, ranging from an infected sebaceous cysts to a basal cell carcinoma. Despite systemic antibiotics, symptoms often persist causing further confusion, and at times leading to unnecessary surgical interventions. The location of this sinus in the head and neck region should lead the physician to seek a dental opinion in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25506495

  10. [Dental foreign body sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Thévoz, F; Arza, A; Jaques, B

    2000-01-01

    Unilateral chronic maxillary sinusitis is frequently attributed to dental origin. The goal of this retrospective study is to determine the frequency of maxillary sinusitis due to a foreign body of dental origin and its characteristics. Review of 197 sinusitis cases with maxillary sinus involvement operated in our department from 1991 to 1999. Selection of the 17 cases preoperatively suspect to be due to a foreign body of dental origin. 9% of the 197 maxillary sinusitis were classified "odontogenic". Intra-sinusal foreign bodies were identified in 5%: 2% of dental origin, 1% dental or radicular remnants, 2% of "pseudo" foreign bodies of mycotic origin. Chronic maxillary sinusitis attributable to a dental foreign body is rare and overestimated. There exists an important disproportion between the number of intra-sinusal dental foreign bodies and the number of patients who are symptomatic. Treatment is surgical by oral antrotomy and/or endonasal meatotomy. Only a prospective study could give a real estimation of the proportion of symptomatic cases and determine the predisposing factors.

  11. The forensic importance of frontal sinus radiographs.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Caputo, Isamara Geandra Cavalcanti; Devito, Karina Lopes; Botelho, Tessa de Luscena; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The identification of unidentified human remains through the comparison of antemortem and postmortem radiographs has found wide acceptance in recent years. Reported here is the forensic case of an unidentified adult male who had died as the result of a traffic accident, after which the body was identified by matching images of ante- and postmortem radiographs of the frontal sinus. A general discussion on identification using frontal sinus radiographs is presented, highlighting the reliability of this method, in reference to the uniqueness of the frontal sinus in humans. However, it also notes a few difficulties, especially in reference to the X-ray technique in cases where antemortem radiographs are available and a potentially larger number of anatomical, pathological or traumatic features are present. The comparison of frontal sinus outlines is recommended when it may become necessary to provide quantitative substantiation for forensic identification based on these structures.

  12. Silent sinus syndrome and maxillary sinus atelectasis in children.

    PubMed

    Farneti, Paolo; Sciarretta, Vittorio; Macrì, Giovanni; Piccin, Ottavio; Pasquini, Ernesto

    2017-07-01

    Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) and chronic maxillary atelectasis (CMA) are unusual conditions having subtle symptoms with a possible progressive evolution. They are particularly infrequent in the pediatric population. Our objective was to review our experience with pediatric patients having SSS or CMA, and to review all cases involving patients under 14 years of age reported in the literature. A retrospective review of 6 patients diagnosed with SSS or CMA surgically treated from 2001 to 2014 was carried out. All cases reported in literature were reviewed. All patients underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery with an improvement in symptoms after surgery. Diplopia disappeared in two patients who presented with it and enophthalmos improved in all five patients presenting with it. Only one patient out of four presenting with headache had a persistence of the symptoms which were, however, milder than they had been preoperatively. Endoscopic examination demonstrated a reventilated maxillary sinus in all cases. A radiological examination at follow-up was performed in 5 cases and demonstrated a reexpansion of the maxillary sinus as compared to the contralateral side in all patients except one. None of the patients required an orbital floor reconstruction. Eleven similar cases reported in the literature were analyzed and compared. Endoscopic uncinectomy and middle meatal antrostomy should be the treatment of choice for these conditions in patients presenting with enophthalmos and/or hypoglobus and symptoms related to it. Orbital floor reconstruction should be performed as a delayed procedure only in selected cases. Chronic maxillary atelectasis or SSS should be considered as a possible cause of persistent headache of unknown origin in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Petrosal sinus sampling: technique and rationale.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Doppman, J L

    1991-01-01

    Bilateral simultaneous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses is an extremely sensitive, specific, and accurate test for diagnosing Cushing disease and distinguishing between that entity and the ectopic ACTH syndrome. It is also valuable for lateralizing small hormone-producing adenomas within the pituitary gland. The inferior petrosal sinuses connect the cavernous sinuses with the ipsilateral internal jugular veins. The anatomy of the anastomoses between the inferior petrosal sinus, the internal jugular vein, and the venous plexuses at the base of the skull varies, but it is almost always possible to catheterize the inferior petrosal sinus. In addition, variations in size and anatomy are often present between the two inferior petrosal sinuses in a patient. Advance preparation is required for petrosal sinus sampling. Teamwork is a critical element, and each member of the staff should know what he or she will be doing during the procedure. The samples must be properly labeled, processed, and stored. Specific needles, guide wires, and catheters are recommended for this procedure. The procedure is performed with specific attention to the three areas of potential technical difficulty: catheterization of the common femoral veins, crossing the valve at the base of the left internal jugular vein, and selective catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses. There are specific methods for dealing with each of these areas. The sine qua non of correct catheter position in the inferior petrosal sinus is demonstration of reflux of contrast material into the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. Images must always be obtained to document correct catheter position. Special attention must be paid to two points to prevent potential complications: The patient must be given an adequate dose of heparin, and injection of contrast material into the inferior petrosal sinuses and surrounding veins must be done gently and carefully. When the procedure is performed as outlined, both inferior

  14. The safe gate to the posterior paranasal sinuses: reassessing the role of the superior turbinate.

    PubMed

    Eweiss, Ahmed Z; Ibrahim, Ahmed A; Khalil, Hisham S

    2012-05-01

    Surgery of the posterior ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses can be challenging. In 1999, a technique was described for identification of the superior turbinate and utilizing it as a landmark in endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy. Although this was more than a decade ago, it has not been supported by further studies. In our practice, we have routinely adopted this technique, and have modified it to allow further orientation during endoscopic surgery of the posterior sinuses. To describe a review of our technique, and to prospectively assess the value of the superior turbinate as a useful landmark during endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy. Fifty patients listed for endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy with or without sphenoidotomy were included in a prospective study utilising our surgical technique. Data were collated for the success or failure of identification of the landmarks, and for any complications during the surgery. A total of 93 sides of endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy and 73 sides of endoscopic sphenoidotomy were performed. The superior turbinate was identified in 100% of the cases. The coronal part of the superior turbinate basal lamella was identified in 60.22% of the cases, and the axial part in 88.17% of the cases. The natural sphenoid ostium was identified medial to the posterior part of the superior turbinate in 98.63% of the cases. The axial part of the superior turbinate basal lamella was a constant landmark for the level of the sphenoid ostium. The number of transverse septae between the axial part of the superior turbinate basal lamella and the skull base was studied, and was found never to exceed one septum. No major complications were recorded. One case of small posterior septal perforation was detected with no post-operative effects. Our study represents the first report of identifying the two parts of the superior turbinate basal lamella intra-operatively. It also represents the first report of using the axial

  15. [The role of carbocystein in the treatment of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Piotr; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata; Mielcarek-Kuchta, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Chronic sinusitis is one of the most common presenting complaints of all doctor visits in the United States and Europe, with more than 13% of people affected in any given year. This disease has a wide range of impact on communities. Patients with recurrent or chronic sinusitis report a deteriorative sense of general health and vitality, when compared to general population. In our Department we perform about 600 functional endoscopic sinus surgeries (FESS) per year. Chronic rhinosinusitis represents a spectrum of inflammatory and infectious processes concurrently affecting the nose and paranasal sinuses. Among chronic paranasal sinusitis one must single out paranasal sinusitis with and without polyps. In the paranasal sinusitis patomechanism the blockage of natural ostium plays one of the most important roles. The closure of sinus proper ventilation passages leads to the triggering of many pathological occurrences within mucous membrane of this region. The treatment of paranasal sinusitis is diversified and involves a surgical procedure as well as anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs (medications) and mucolytics. Its purpose is to clear the nose through the elimination of bacterial infection, liquidating and removal of lying discharge and the restoration of the proper muco-ciliary transportation, and through this the improvement of local condition and faster recovery. In this work the usage of carboxycysteine to treat paranasal sinus conditions has been presented.

  16. Transarterial venous sinus occlusion of dural arteriovenous fistulas using ONYX.

    PubMed

    Torok, Collin M; Nogueira, Raul G; Yoo, Albert J; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Hirsch, Joshua A; Stapleton, Christopher J; Patel, Aman B; Rabinov, James D

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case series of transarterial venous sinus occlusion for dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. From 2006 to 2012, 11 patients with DAVF of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses were treated with transarterial closure of the affected venous sinus using ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (ONYX). The consecutive retrospective cohort included six female and five male patients with an age range of 30-79. Patients presented with stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, seizure, headache, focal neurologic deficit or cognitive change. Lesions were categorized as Cognard II a + b (n = 5) or Cognard II b (n = 6). Four of this latter group consisted of isolated sinus segments. Selection criteria for dural sinus occlusion included direct multi-hole fistulas involving a broad surface in length or circumference of the sinus wall. External carotid artery (ECA) branches were directly embolized when considered safe. High-risk arterial supply from ICA, PICA, AICA or ECA cranial nerve branches were closed via retrograde approach during sinus occlusion. DAVF closure was accomplished in all 11 patients with a total of 17 embolization procedures using ONYX. High-risk arterial collaterals were closed via artery-artery or artery-sinus-artery embolization. The vein of Labbe was spared in the four cases with initial antegrade flow. No neurologic complications occurred, and DAVF closures were durable on three-month angiography. Transarterial closure of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Frontal sinus recognition for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falguera, Juan Rogelio; Falguera, Fernanda Pereira Sartori; Marana, Aparecido Nilceu

    2008-03-01

    Many methods based on biometrics such as fingerprint, face, iris, and retina have been proposed for person identification. However, for deceased individuals, such biometric measurements are not available. In such cases, parts of the human skeleton can be used for identification, such as dental records, thorax, vertebrae, shoulder, and frontal sinus. It has been established in prior investigations that the radiographic pattern of frontal sinus is highly variable and unique for every individual. This has stimulated the proposition of measurements of the frontal sinus pattern, obtained from x-ray films, for skeletal identification. This paper presents a frontal sinus recognition method for human identification based on Image Foresting Transform and shape context. Experimental results (ERR = 5,82%) have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Acute venous sinus thrombosis after chickenpox infection.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Vijay; Mittal, Lal Chand; Meena, S R; Sharma, Deepti; Khandelwal, Girish

    2014-08-01

    Chickenpox is one of the classic childhood diseases. Recently chicken pox has been reported in adults with more severe systemic and neurological complications. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a life threatening disorder if not treated in time. We report a patient with post varicella CVT as a rare complication of primary Varicella zoster virus. Vasculitic arterial infarction is known while venous stroke has rarely been reported with Varicella-zoster virus infection. Here, we report an immunocompetent 30 yr old male who developed chickenpox after contact with his daughter two month back. He presented with acute neurological deficit, one week after onset of skin lesion. MR venography revealed non-visualisation of left transverse sinus and left sigmoid sinus suggestive of venous sinus thrombosis. Varicella infection is rarely associated with venous sinus thrombosis. Possibly hypercoagulable state produced by the infection or direct invasion of virus in venous endothelial wall with subsequent damage to endothelium leading to thrombosis could be the cause.

  19. Terminal Posterior Tilted Implants Planned as a Sinus Graft Alternative for Fixed Full-Arch Implant-Supported Maxillary Restoration: A Case Series with 10- to 19-Year Results on 44 Consecutive Patients Presenting for Routine Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Yvan; Sullivan, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Posterior maxillary tilted implants are gaining prevalence as an alternative to sinus grafts supporting fixed maxillary restorations. This paper reports long-term results after loading using this technique. Consecutive patients presenting for either routine hygiene maintenance or unplanned emergency care who had received tilted implants as a sinus graft alternative to support fixed fully implant-supported restoration of an edentulous maxilla and were followed for a minimum of 10 years from initial implant placement were included in this evaluation. Forty-four patients were identified: 40 with bilateral tilted implants and 4 with one tilted and one axial posterior implant. Eight patients received one-piece fixed porcelain-to-gold screw-retained restorations, and thirty-six patients received a fully implant-supported patient-removable Marius Bridge. Seventy-nine out of 84 originally loaded posterior tilted implants survived a minimum of 10 years loading; one tilted implant was lost at 10 years. Eight additional posterior implants were placed for either these lost tilted posterior implants or as proactive supplemental support; one of these replacement tilted implants survived for at least 10 years and is included in the data. All patients have maintained continuous fixed function throughout the follow-up period. Forty-one out of 44 patients continue with the original restoration, 33 without modification or removal of the fixed restoration or implant-connecting bar. One porcelain-to-gold and seven Marius Bridges had framework modifications to accommodate additional implants; 3 Marius Bridge restorations were replaced with a newer generation. Within the limits of this retrospective study, the results show that continuous fixed function of fully implant-supported maxillary restorations using posterior tilted implants in terminal positions of support as a sinus graft alternative combined with axial anterior implants is possible over a prolonged period. Loss of a posterior

  20. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis. PMID:28971178

  1. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis.

  2. Silent sinus syndrome: A traumatic case.

    PubMed

    Février, E; Vandersteen, C; Castillo, L; Savoldelli, C

    2017-06-01

    Silent sinus syndrome is an unusual cause of progressive enophthalmos and hypoglobus due to atelectasia of the maxillary sinus associated with osteolysis of the orbital floor. This syndrome is classically idiopathic, but the term is also used to describe traumatic or iatrogenic (surgical orbital decompression) cases. We report the case of a 33-year-old man who presented with a left orbital trauma without functional disorder. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a nondisplaced fracture of the left orbital floor. No surgical indication was made. Three months later, the patient presented with progressive enophthalmos. CT revealed a complete lysis of the left orbital floor and a left maxillary sinus atelectasia. The original nondisplaced fracture of the orbital floor was not responsible for enophthalmos but the associated fracture of the left uncinate process that induced the closure of the left maxillary sinus infundibulum. This induced in turn hypoventilation of the sinus and a left orbital floor lysis. Treatment consisted in surgical opening of the maxillary sinus ostium and reconstruction of the orbital floor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Purification of L-glutamate-dependent citrate lyase from Clostridium sphenoides and electron microscopic analysis of citrate lyase isolated from Rhodopseudomonas gelatinosa, Streptococcus diacetilactis and C. sphenoides.

    PubMed

    Antranikian, G; Klinner, C; Kümmel, A; Schwanitz, D; Zimmermann, T; Mayer, F; Gottschalk, G

    1982-08-01

    Citrate lyase from Clostridium sphenoides was purified 72-fold with a yield of 11%. In contrast to citrate lyase from other sources the activity of this enzyme was strictly dependent on the presence of L-glutamate. The purified enzyme was only stable in the presence of 150 mM L-glutamate or 7 mM L-glutamate plus glycerol, sucrose or bovine serum albumin. Changes of the L-glutamate pool and of enzyme activity in growing cells of C. sphenoides indicated that citrate lyase activity in this organism was regulated by the intracellular L-glutamate concentration. Citrate lyase isolated from C. sphenoides, Rhodopseudomonas gelatinosa and Streptococcus diacetilactis was investigated by electron microscopy using the negative staining technique. Three different projections of enzyme molecules were observed: 'star' form, 'ring' form and 'triangle' form. In samples from R. gelatinosa and S. diacetilactis, star and ring forms occurred in a ratio of about 1:9. Using the enzyme from S. diacetilactis it was demonstrated that this ratio could be altered in favour of the star form by the addition of citrate or tricarballylate. The triangle form was observed in less than 1% of all evaluated molecules and may represent a transition form. In lyase samples from C. sphenoides there existed a correlation between enzyme activity and the proportion of stars and rings at varying concentrations of L-glutamate.

  4. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... information in the popular media may not reflect reality. Although useful, balloon sinuplasty is not for everyone. In many cases standard endoscopic sinus surgery or medical therapy may be the best treatment. However, in some ...

  5. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor at a clinic appointment after surgery. Irrigations – The most important thing you can do to ... regularly irrigate your nose and sinuses with saline irrigations after surgery. Your doctor will show you how ...

  6. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  7. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  8. Obstructive hydrocephalus, fifth nerve and hypothalamus involvement: acute presentation of a giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alkatari, Shadin; Aljohani, Naji

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumors from lactotrope cells account for about 40% of all functioning pituitary cancers. Men tend to present with a larger, more invasive and rapid growth prolactinomas than women, possibly because hypogonadism features are less evident. A 27-year-old, previously asymptomatic Saudi man presented with a 3-day history of emesis with severe left-sided frontal headache, left face and right upper limb numbness, with signs of obstructive hydrocephalus. Brain Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed a giant pituitary mass occupying several regions (sellar, infra-sellar, and supra-sellar) measuring 6.5 × 5.7 × 5.9 cm, and invading the sphenoid sinus as well as the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, with intra-pituitary hemorrhage compressing the third ventricle causing obstructive hydrocephalus. Prolactin levels were >200,000 mIU/L, consistent with invasive giant prolactinoma (IGP). He was treated with Cabergoline which eventually normalized the prolactin level and significantly reduced the size of IGP. This is a rare case of obstructive hydrocephalus with super-imposed intra-pituitary hemorrhage secondary to IGP, highlighting the importance of a full hormonal assessment for proper diagnosis and management.

  9. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presenting with rapidly progressive severe visual disturbance: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is one of the most difficult tumors to diagnose correctly at the initial phase because of the occasional lack of nasal symptoms. The perineural spread of the trigeminal nerve is one of the most common and important routes in the intracranial paracavernous extension of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, but visual loss is very rare. Case presentation We report the case of a 54-year-old Japanese man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, who presented with rapid and severe disturbance of left monocular visual acuity and eye movement with a 10-month history of ipsilateral otitis media and facial pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion in the left fossa of Rosenmüller, pterygopalatine fossa, sphenoid and ethmoid sinus, and the left cavernous sinus extending to the orbital apex through the superior orbital fissure. The histopathological diagnosis was nonkeratinizing undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Epstein–Barr virus was detected by in situ hybridization. Although focal radiotherapy induced remarkable tumor shrinkage and relieved ocular motor disturbance and facial pain, his visual acuity did not improve. Conclusion The awareness of cranial nerves in addition to intracranial and orbital apex involvement, as in this case, is important for appropriate diagnosis and treatment planning of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25373786

  10. Chronic sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Calderon, E; O'Neal, M L; Fox, R W; Calderon-Moncloa, J

    1996-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is now recognized as a common clinical syndrome in adults and children. An astute physician can diagnose chronic sinusitis during the physical exam, but fiber-optic rhinoscopy and x-rays (plain films and computerized tomography) are required to confirm this diagnosis, evaluate the severity of the sinusitis and determine follow-up treatment. Appropriate treatment plans are prescribed for an adequate duration to eliminate infection and inflammatory components of the pathologic process of the sinuses involved. Antibiotics, decongestants, and inhaled or systemic corticosteroids are required in the treatment of patients with chronic sinusitis. When combined with close clinical follow-up, successful resolution is expected. Surgical intervention is needed in the medically refractory and symptomatic cases, or when complications develop. The frequent diagnosis of chronic sinusitis in the past 1-2 decades is, in part, due to the enhanced awareness and clinical skills of the treating physicians, but other concerns about environmental influences such as frequent respiratory tract infections in childhood and air quality issues are considered potentially important.

  11. Surgical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis after sinus lift

    PubMed Central

    Jiam, Nicole Tin-Lok; Goldberg, Andrew N.; Murr, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The sinus lift (or sinus augmentation) is a common procedure to improve maxillary bone stock before dental implantation. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a potential complication of this procedure and may be refractory to medical treatment. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery has previously been used to address CRS, however, results of previous studies indicated that implant removal is required. There are limited follow-up data available. Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize the long-term outcomes and efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory CRS after sinus lift, including the ability to salvage dental implants. Methods: This was a retrospective case series that described nine patients who, between June 2011 and September 2016, underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for CRS after a sinus lift procedure. The presenting symptoms of the patients, medical management, imaging results, operative procedures, and outcomes were reviewed. Results: The majority of patients developed symptoms (mucopurulent nasal drainage, facial pain and/or pressure, nasal congestion, and foul smell) within 3 months of implant placement and were treated with at least three courses of antibiotics before referral to an otolaryngologist. All the patients underwent wide endoscopic maxillary antrostomy, with no surgical complications or postoperative reports of infection. There was a statistically significant improvement in 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test scores (t(8) = −2.908; p = 0.02) and discharge, inflammation, and polyps/edema endoscopic scores ([z = −2.539; p = 0.011) between pre- and postsurgical treatment. Four patients had their dental implants removed before presentation. Among the five patients who presented with intact dental implants, none required removal before or after functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Conclusion: Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was a reasonable and efficacious treatment option for patients who presented with

  12. [Cholesteatoma of the paranasal sinuses. Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Cobarro, J; Valles, H; Blanch, J L; Alos, L; Traserra, J

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of cholesteatoma of the facial sinuses are presented. One of them was located in the maxillary sinus and the other was originally located in the ethmoid cells and extended into the maxillary sinus. After reviewing the literature on this subject, the authors analyze the pathogenetic theories and the clinicoradiological expressions. These raise an obvious diagnostic difficulty: the diagnosis is virtually impossible to establish before surgery and a clinicopathological study are performed.

  13. Surgical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis after sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Jiam, Nicole Tin-Lok; Goldberg, Andrew N; Murr, Andrew H; Pletcher, Steven D

    2017-07-01

    The sinus lift (or sinus augmentation) is a common procedure to improve maxillary bone stock before dental implantation. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a potential complication of this procedure and may be refractory to medical treatment. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery has previously been used to address CRS, however, results of previous studies indicated that implant removal is required. There are limited follow-up data available. The purpose of this study was to characterize the long-term outcomes and efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory CRS after sinus lift, including the ability to salvage dental implants. This was a retrospective case series that described nine patients who, between June 2011 and September 2016, underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for CRS after a sinus lift procedure. The presenting symptoms of the patients, medical management, imaging results, operative procedures, and outcomes were reviewed. The majority of patients developed symptoms (mucopurulent nasal drainage, facial pain and/or pressure, nasal congestion, and foul smell) within 3 months of implant placement and were treated with at least three courses of antibiotics before referral to an otolaryngologist. All the patients underwent wide endoscopic maxillary antrostomy, with no surgical complications or postoperative reports of infection. There was a statistically significant improvement in 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test scores (t(8) = -2.908; p = 0.02) and discharge, inflammation, and polyps/edema endoscopic scores ([z = -2.539; p = 0.011) between pre- and postsurgical treatment. Four patients had their dental implants removed before presentation. Among the five patients who presented with intact dental implants, none required removal before or after functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was a reasonable and efficacious treatment option for patients who presented with paranasal sinus disease after a sinus lift. Dental implant

  14. Pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus masquerading as a mucocele.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yok Kuan; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sushil; Chong, Aun Wee; Prepageran, Narayanan; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Khairuzzana, Baharudin; Lingham, Omkara Rubini

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of benign salivary gland tumor. It can also be found in the larynx, ear, neck, and nasal septum. It is rarely found in the maxillary sinus, and it has never been reported in the frontal sinus. We report a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus that masqueraded as a mucocele. We discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient, and we review the literature.

  15. Cardiac Iodine-123-Meta-Iodo-Benzylguanidine Uptake in Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maw Pin; Murray, Alan; Hawkins, Terry; Chadwick, Thomas J; Kerr, Simon R J; Parry, Steve W

    2015-01-01

    understanding the mechanisms behind the symptomatic presentation of carotid sinus hypersensitivity.

  16. Operative Utilization of Balloon versus Traditional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ference, Elisabeth; Graber, Madeline; Conley, David; Chandra, Rakesh; Tan, Bruce; Evans, Charlesnika; Pynnonen, Melissa; Smith, Stephanie Shintani

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study the utilization of balloon catheter dilation(BCD) compared to traditional endoscopic surgery(ESS). Methods Cases identified by CPT codes as BCD(2,717) or traditional ESS(31,059) were extracted from the State Ambulatory Surgery Databases 2011 for California, Florida, Maryland and New York. Patient demographicss, surgical center and surgeon volume, mean charge and OR time were compared. Results 33,776 patients underwent sinus surgery in the included states in 2011. 4.6% of maxillary, 5.6% of sphenoid and 13.9% of frontal procedures were performed using BCD. Adjusted analyses found increased use of BCD in patients with chronic diseases(p<0.001). Patients who had a limited sinus surgery were less likely to have BCD compared to patients who had all 4 sinuses instrumented(p<0.001). Surgeons who performed a medium[odds ratio 1.38(1.14–1.65)] or high[odds ratio 1.71(1.42–2.07)] volume of ESS were more likely to use BCD compared to those who performed a low volume(p <0.001), however among surgeons who utilized BCD there was minimal relationship between the percentage of surgeries performed with BCD and the surgeon's total number of cases(R squared=0.055). Compared to traditional ESS, the median charges for maxillary/ethmoid procedures(Mini-ESS) involving BCD were approximately $4,500(p<0.001) and maxillary/ethmoid/sphenoid/frontal procedures(Pan-ESS) were approximately $2,950(p=0.003) greater, while the median OR time involving BCD was 8 minutes less for Mini-ESS procedures(p=0.01) but not statistically different for Pan-ESS procedures(p=0.58). Conclusions In the study sample, balloon technology was used in 8.0% of ESS cases in 2011. Procedures using BCD were on average more expensive compared to traditional ESS procedures, with minimal decrease in OR time. Level of Evidence 2c PMID:25180840

  17. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  18. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  19. Intradural chordoma mimicking a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Przemysław; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Matyja, Ewa; Marchel, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Chordomas are rare tumours arising from notochordal remnants. Classical chordomas are generally extradural and, despite benign histopathology, they typically destroy the clivus and surrounding bone structures. Intradural lesions are extremely rare and less than thirty cases of intracranial, exclusively intradural chordomas have been reported so far. The intracranial, intradural but extranotochordal location of chordoma is extremely unique. The authors present a case of chordoma in intracranial location that clinically mimics lateral sphenoid wing meningioma. A previously healthy 39-year-old man was admitted to our Department because of optic disc oedema without neurological deficits. Neuroimaging studies showed a large, contrast-enhanced tumour in the right frontotemporal region that was thought to be a pterional meningioma. The patient underwent successful removal of the tumour. Histopathological study revealed a typical pattern of chordoma, confirmed by immunohistochemical findings. Because of the tumour location the differentiation between chordoma and chordoid meningioma ought to be considered. Such cases, including the present one, may lead to the conclusion that embryonic notochordal remnants may be lost in different places, even away from the neuroaxis.

  20. [Use of bone blocks by sinus floor lifting].

    PubMed

    Nazarian, D N; Karaian, A S; Zakharov, G K; Seniuk, A N; Aliev, S E

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents clinical cases illustrating two sinus floor lifting technique performed for dental implant placement in areas with maxillary sinus floor atrophy: bone block fixation for vertical augmentation (used for immediate implant placement by sinus floor atrophy to 1 mm thickness) and perforation closure. Sinus floor perforations wider than 5 mm were repaired by mandible bone graft providing the possibility of immediate implantation. Bone block was fixed between cortical layers of the maxilla with no internal fixation. Free bone blocks provide additional primary stability of dental implants.

  1. Efficacy of Trans-septal Trans-sphenoidal Surgery in Correcting Visual Symptoms Caused by Hematogenous Metastases to the Sella and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Feiz-Erfan, Iman; Rao, Ganesh; White, William L.; McCutcheon, Ian E.

    2008-01-01

    The rate of symptomatic improvement of visual symptoms associated with hematogenous metastases to the sella and pituitary was evaluated retrospectively in seven patients (five men, two women; mean age, 52.3 years) with primarily visual symptoms (diplopia alone in three, diplopia with blurred vision in one, blurred vision alone in one, loss of peripheral vision in one, and unilateral complete blindness in one). Symptom duration ranged from 0.5 to 2 months. The primary diseases were non-small cell lung cancer in two patients, renal cell carcinoma in two patients, prostate cancer in two patients, and medullary thyroid carcinoma in one patient. All patients had widespread metastatic disease. Three patients had a suprasellar tumoral component. One patient had a clival extension, and one patient had extension into the cavernous sinus. All underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery to correct visual symptoms. Gross total resection was achieved in three patients. Subtotal resections and a partial resection were performed in three patients and one patient, respectively. Surgical blood loss averaged 282 mL. One patient died from sepsis. Five patients developed complications (cerebrospinal fluid leakage in three, diabetes insipidus in two, anterior pituitary dysfunction in two, and colitis in one). At a mean follow-up of 15 months, three patients were alive. Visual symptoms improved in five patients and were unchanged in two. Trans-sphenoidal surgery helped improve visual symptoms in most patients. The morbidity rate was high and likely related to the locally destructive and extensive nature of the lesions in overall morbid patients with widespread metastatic disease. Unless nonoperative measures can provide equal results, however, this approach provides reasonable palliation. PMID:18769652

  2. Sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the endoscopic sinus surgery era: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kenny B; Poetker, David M; Rhee, John S

    2010-09-01

    We systematically reviewed the existing literature supporting the efficacy and safety of sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the modern era of endoscopic frontal sinus surgery. A systematic review of the English literature for the targeted objective was conducted using the PubMed database between January 1995 and August 2008. The PubMed database was queried using two major search terms of frontal sinus fracture or frontal sinus injury along with manual review of citations within bibliographies. Citations acquired from the primary search were filtered and relevant abstracts were identified that merited full review. Articles were identified that included any cohort of patients with frontal sinus fractures involving the frontal sinus outflow tract or posterior wall with sinus preservation management. A total of 231 citations were generated, and 56 abstracts were identified as potentially relevant articles. Sixteen articles merited full review, with seven articles meeting inclusion criteria for sinus preservation. There were 515 total patients in the studies with 350 patients managed with frontal sinus preservation. Similar short-term complications and effectiveness were found between fractures managed with sinus preservation and those with traditional management. Sinus preservation appears to be a safe and effective management strategy for select frontal sinus fractures. More transparent reporting of management strategies for individual cases or cohorts is needed. A standardized algorithm and categorization framework for future studies are proposed. Longer-term follow-up and larger prospective studies are necessary to assess the safety and efficacy of sinus preservation protocols.

  3. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glossary For Patients Common Illnesses Bronchitis (Chest Cold) Common Cold & Runny Nose Ear Infection Influenza (Flu) Sinus Infection ( ... A previous respiratory tract infection, such as the common cold Structural problems within the sinuses A weak immune ...

  4. Primary Ewing Sarcoma of Sphenoid Bone with Intracranial Extension: A Common Tumour at an Uncommon Location

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Guddi Rani; Choudhary, Vijayanand

    2017-01-01

    Primary Ewing Sarcoma of the cranial bone is rare, contributing to only 1% of all Ewing Sarcomas. Primary cranial Ewing Sarcoma occurs most commonly in temporal bone followed by parietal and occipital bones. Sphenoid bone is less commonly involved. We report a case of Ewing Sarcoma of the sphenoid bone with intra-cranial extension in a 20-month-old boy. On CT scan a provisional diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma was made. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) and histopathological examination of core needle biopsy showed small round cell tumour. On Immunohistochemistry (IHC), CD99 (MIC2) and FLI 1 were strongly positive and final diagnosis of Ewing Sarcoma was made. Considering the rarity of this unusual site, we report a case of primary Ewing Sarcoma arising in the sphenoid bone with erosion of adjacent bones and intra-cranial extension. PMID:28384876

  5. Diagnostic Value of Next-Generation Sequencing in an Unusual Sphenoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Farzad; Pleasance, Erin; Li, Yvonne; Shen, Yaoqing; Kasaian, Katayoon; Corbett, Richard; Eirew, Peter; Lum, Amy; Pandoh, Pawan; Zhao, Yongjun; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Moore, Richard A.; Rassekh, Rod; Huntsman, David G.; Knowling, Meg; Lim, Howard; Renouf, Daniel J.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Marra, Marco A.; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Laskin, Janessa

    2014-01-01

    Extraordinary advancements in sequencing technology have made what was once a decade-long multi-institutional endeavor into a methodology with the potential for practical use in a clinical setting. We therefore set out to examine the clinical value of next-generation sequencing by enrolling patients with incurable or ambiguous tumors into the Personalized OncoGenomics initiative at the British Columbia Cancer Agency whereby whole genome and transcriptome analyses of tumor/normal tissue pairs are completed with the ultimate goal of directing therapeutics. First, we established that the sequencing, analysis, and communication with oncologists could be completed in less than 5 weeks. Second, we found that cancer diagnostics is an area that can greatly benefit from the comprehensiveness of a whole genome analysis. Here, we present a scenario in which a metastasized sphenoid mass, which was initially thought of as an undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma, was rediagnosed as an SMARCB1-negative rhabdoid tumor based on the newly acquired finding of homozygous SMARCB1 deletion. The new diagnosis led to a change in chemotherapy and a complete nodal response in the patient. This study also provides additional insight into the mutational landscape of an adult SMARCB1-negative tumor that has not been explored at a whole genome and transcriptome level. PMID:24807916

  6. Diagnostic value of next-generation sequencing in an unusual sphenoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Farzad; Pleasance, Erin; Li, Yvonne; Shen, Yaoqing; Kasaian, Katayoon; Corbett, Richard; Eirew, Peter; Lum, Amy; Pandoh, Pawan; Zhao, Yongjun; Schein, Jacqueline E; Moore, Richard A; Rassekh, Rod; Huntsman, David G; Knowling, Meg; Lim, Howard; Renouf, Daniel J; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Nielsen, Torsten O; Laskin, Janessa; Yip, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Extraordinary advancements in sequencing technology have made what was once a decade-long multi-institutional endeavor into a methodology with the potential for practical use in a clinical setting. We therefore set out to examine the clinical value of next-generation sequencing by enrolling patients with incurable or ambiguous tumors into the Personalized OncoGenomics initiative at the British Columbia Cancer Agency whereby whole genome and transcriptome analyses of tumor/normal tissue pairs are completed with the ultimate goal of directing therapeutics. First, we established that the sequencing, analysis, and communication with oncologists could be completed in less than 5 weeks. Second, we found that cancer diagnostics is an area that can greatly benefit from the comprehensiveness of a whole genome analysis. Here, we present a scenario in which a metastasized sphenoid mass, which was initially thought of as an undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma, was rediagnosed as an SMARCB1-negative rhabdoid tumor based on the newly acquired finding of homozygous SMARCB1 deletion. The new diagnosis led to a change in chemotherapy and a complete nodal response in the patient. This study also provides additional insight into the mutational landscape of an adult SMARCB1-negative tumor that has not been explored at a whole genome and transcriptome level.

  7. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yr; Sachdev, S; Parihar, V; Namdev, H; Bhatele, Pr

    2012-09-01

    Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS) is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can add to the safety. The binostril approach provides a wider working area. High definition camera is much superior to three-chip camera. Most of the recent reports favor EETS in terms of safety, quality of life and tumor resection, hospital stay, better endocrinological, and visual outcome as compared to the microscopic technique. Nasal symptoms, blood loss, operating time are less in EETS. Various naso-septal flaps and other techniques of CSF leak repair could help reduce complications. Complications can be further reduced after achieving the learning curve, good understanding of limitations with proper patient selection. Use of neuronavigation, proper post-operative care of endocrine function, establishing pituitary center of excellence and more focused residency and endoscopic fellowship training could improve results. The faster and safe transition from microscopic to EETS can be done by the team concept of neurosurgeon/otolaryngologist, attending hands on cadaveric dissection, practice on models, and observation of live surgeries. Conversion to a microscopic or endoscopic-assisted approach may be required in selected patients. Multi-modality treatment could be required in giant and invasive tumors. EETS appears to be a better surgical option in most pituitary adenoma.

  8. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, YR; Sachdev, S; Parihar, V; Namdev, H; Bhatele, PR

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS) is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can add to the safety. The binostril approach provides a wider working area. High definition camera is much superior to three-chip camera. Most of the recent reports favor EETS in terms of safety, quality of life and tumor resection, hospital stay, better endocrinological, and visual outcome as compared to the microscopic technique. Nasal symptoms, blood loss, operating time are less in EETS. Various naso-septal flaps and other techniques of CSF leak repair could help reduce complications. Complications can be further reduced after achieving the learning curve, good understanding of limitations with proper patient selection. Use of neuronavigation, proper post-operative care of endocrine function, establishing pituitary center of excellence and more focused residency and endoscopic fellowship training could improve results. The faster and safe transition from microscopic to EETS can be done by the team concept of neurosurgeon/otolaryngologist, attending hands on cadaveric dissection, practice on models, and observation of live surgeries. Conversion to a microscopic or endoscopic-assisted approach may be required in selected patients. Multi-modality treatment could be required in giant and invasive tumors. EETS appears to be a better surgical option in most pituitary adenoma. PMID:23188987

  9. Microbiology of intracranial abscesses associated with sinusitis of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2006-12-01

    The unique microbiology of sinusitis of dental origin that is associated with intracranial abscesses (IAs) and the correlation between the organisms at the two sites has not been reported before. This report describes the author's experience during a 30-year period in studying the microbiology of 8 IAs and their corresponding sinusitis of dental origin. Aspirates of pus from 8 infected sinuses associated with odontogenic infections and their corresponding IAs were studied for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Polymicrobial flora was found in all 8 sinuses and 7 IAs, and the number of isolates varied from 1 to 5. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from all sinuses and IAs. A total of 28 isolates (3.5 isolates per site; 25 strict anaerobic, 1 aerobic or facultative, and 2 microaerophilic) were recovered from the sinuses, and 20 isolates (2.5 isolates per site; 16 strict anaerobic, 1 aerobic or facultative, and 3 microaerophilic) were found in the IAs. The bacterial isolates were Fusobacterium spp (14), Prevotella spp (11), Peptostreptococcus spp (13), microaerophilic streptococci (5), Veillonella parvula (3), and beta-hemolytic streptococci group F(2). Concordance in the microbiological findings between the sinus and the IA was found in all instances; however, certain organisms were only present at one site. These data illustrate the concordance in the organisms recovered from sinusitis of dental origin and their associated IAs and confirm the importance of anaerobic bacteria in sinusitis and IAs of dental origin.

  10. [Dural sinus thrombosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Pontalti, João Luis; Teles, Alisson Roberto

    2006-06-01

    We report the case of a 24 year-old pregnant woman, seen at the neurology service by presenting agitation, hallucinations, mental confusion, headache, vision loss, aphasia and seizures. The neuroradiologic exam was compatible with thrombosis in dural sinus and cortical veins. Treatment with abciximab was accomplished and the mechanical lysis of the thrombus was made obtaining restoration of cerebral vein flow. After the procedure, she presented frontal hematoma which was withdrawn surgically. We discuss this infrequent pathology in clinical picture, pathogenesis, image exams and therapeutics.

  11. Headaches and sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, H J

    2001-10-01

    Modern diagnostic tools like fiberoptic nasal endoscopy and CT imaging of the sinuses are very sensitive in helping clinicians diagnose sinus disease; we may now reevaluate the symptoms and signs most useful in making a clinical diagnosis of rhinosinusitis. Two major systems of classification and diagnostic criteria relating headaches and sinus disease have achieved currency-that of the International Headache Society (IHS) (1988) and the more recent task force recommendations of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) (1997). This report compares and contrasts the different starting points, certain assumptions, and conflicting conclusions of these two classification systems and recommends a cooperative alliance of the IHS and AAO-HNS when these diagnostic criteria are revised.

  12. High prevalence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) as presentation of cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency in childhood: molecular and clinical findings of Turkish probands.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Mehmet; Hismi, Burcu; Ozgul, Riza Koksal; Karaca, Sefayet; Yilmaz, Didem Yucel; Coskun, Turgay; Sivri, Hatice Serap; Tokatli, Aysegul; Dursun, Ali

    2014-01-25

    Classical homocystinuria is the most commonly inherited disorder of sulfur metabolism, caused by the genetic alterations in human cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene. In this study, we present comprehensive clinical findings and the genetic basis of homocystinuria in a cohort of Turkish patients. Excluding some CBS mutations, detailed genotype-phenotype correlation for different CBS mutations has not been established in literature. We aimed to make clinical subgroups according to main clinical symptoms and discussed these data together with mutational analysis results from our patients. Totally, 16 different mutations were identified; twelve of which had already been reported, and four are novel (p.N93Y, p.L251P, p.D281V and c.829-2A>T). The probands were classified into three major groups according to the clinical symptoms caused by these mutations. A psychomotor delay was the most common diagnostic symptom (n=12, 46.2% neurological presentation), followed by thromboembolic events (n=6, 23.1% vascular presentation) and lens ectopia, myopia or marfanoid features (n=5, 19.2% connective tissue presentation). Pyridoxine responsiveness was 7.7%; however, with partial responsive probands, the ratio was 53.9%. In addition, five thrombophilic nucleotide changes including MTHFR c.677 C>T and c.1298 A>C, Factor V c.1691 G>A, Factor II c.20210 G>A, and SERPINE1 4G/5G were investigated to assess their contributions to the clinical spectrum. We suggest that the effect of these polymorphisms on clinical phenotype of CBS is not very clear since the distribution of thrombophilic polymorphisms does not differ among specific groups. This study provides molecular findings of 26 Turkish probands with homocystinuria and discusses the clinical presentations and putative effects of the CBS mutations. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Percussional auscultation of frontal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Akopian, R G

    2000-01-01

    Percussional auscultation of the frontal sinuses is used for diagnosis of frontal sinusitides. Phonendoscope placed by the sinus walls auscultates sounds forming as a result of comparative percussion of the anterior sinus walls. Three main percussional tones are singled out. This method was employed for diagnosis in 48 patients with frontal sinusitis. The technique is easy to perform, safe and precise (90%). The trend in frontal sinusitides development can be followed up.

  14. Paranasal Sinus Disease in Children With Headache.

    PubMed

    Vieira Neto, Ronan J; Teixeira, Karine C S; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Montenegro, Maria Augusta

    2017-10-01

    Sinus headache is one of the most frequent misdiagnosis given to children with headache. The objective of this study is to evaluate the frequency of sinus disease in children with headache that do not fulfill the criteria for headache attributed to disorder of the nose or paranasal sinuses. This is a prospective study conducted at the authors' pediatric neurology clinic. Data from children with headache was evaluated and compared with a disease control group composed of children without history of headache. All patients underwent neuroimaging assessment. Patients with diagnosis of acute infectious sinus disease were excluded from the analysis. The type of headache was classified according to the International Headache Society. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test, with a level of significance of .05. A total of 62 patients with headache were evaluated; 24 boys, 38 girls, ages ranging from 3 to 18 years (mean = 9.7 years). Of the patients, 29 had migraine without aura, 4 had frequent episodic tension type headache, 3 had both migraine without aura and frequent episodic tension type headache, 3 had migraine with brainstem aura, 2 had episodic tension type headache, 1 had migraine with aura. In 20 patients the type of headache could not be established. The disease control group had 41 patients; 25 boys, 16 girls, ages ranging from 3 to 17 years (mean = 7.3 years). Sinus abnormalities detected by neuroimaging were present in 12 patients in the headache group and in 11 patients in the disease control group ( P = .469). The authors conclude that sinus abnormalities are a common finding in neuroimaging tests of children with or without headache. Sinus disease disclosed by neuroimaging evaluation should not preclude the diagnosis of migraine or other types of primary headache.

  15. Enhanced detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation by early and prolonged continuous holter monitoring in patients with cerebral ischemia presenting in sinus rhythm.

    PubMed

    Stahrenberg, Raoul; Weber-Krüger, Mark; Seegers, Joachim; Edelmann, Frank; Lahno, Rosine; Haase, Beatrice; Mende, Meinhard; Wohlfahrt, Janin; Kermer, Pawel; Vollmann, Dirk; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Gröschel, Klaus; Wachter, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is difficult but highly relevant in patients presenting with cerebral ischemia yet free from atrial fibrillation on admission. Early initiation and prolongation of continuous Holter monitoring may improve diagnostic yield compared with the standard of care including a 24-hour Holter recording. In the observational Find-AF trial (ISRCTN 46104198), consecutive patients presenting with symptoms of cerebral ischemia were included. Patients free from atrial fibrillation at presentation received 7-day Holter monitoring. Two hundred eighty-one patients were prospectively included. Forty-four (15.7%) had atrial fibrillation documented by routine electrocardiogram on admission. All remaining patients received Holter monitors at a median of 5.5 hours after presentation. In those 224 patients who received Holter monitors but had no previously known paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, the detection rate with early and prolonged (7 days) Holter monitoring (12.5%) was significantly higher than for any 24-hour (mean of 7 intervals: 4.8%, P = 0.015) or any 48-hour monitoring interval (mean of 6 intervals: 6.4%, P = 0.023). Of those 28 patients with new atrial fibrillation on Holter monitoring, 15 (6.7%) had been discharged without therapeutic anticoagulation after routine clinical care (ie, with data from 24-hour Holter monitoring only). Detection rates were 43.8% or 6.3% for short supraventricular runs of ≥ 10 beats or prolonged episodes (> 5 hours) of atrial fibrillation, respectively. Diagnostic yield appeared to be only slightly and not significantly increased during the first 3 days after the index event. Prolongation of Holter monitoring in patients with symptoms of cerebral ischemic events increases the rate of detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation up to Day 7, leading to a relevant change in therapy in a substantial number of patients. Early initiation of monitoring does not appear to be crucial. Hence, prolonged Holter

  16. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Histopathologic study of chronic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Parache, R M; Bodelet, B; Gazel, P

    1983-01-01

    The conventional histopathology of the sinus is a criterium for the therapeutic indication, since it is possible to distinguish between granulomatous chronic sinusitis, chronic sinusitis with oedema and nasal polyposis. Each one of these clinical pictures has his own etiology and requires a specific therapeutic approach.

  18. [Sinus lift with autogenous bone graft: surgical technique].

    PubMed

    Thiéry, G; Coulet, O; Adam, S; Lari, N

    2008-12-01

    Insufficient maxillar bone crest does not allow dental implant placement. The sinus lift technique with an autogenous bone graft compensates this deficiency. This technique is performed in two steps: iliac autogenous bone harvesting and sinus graft. After describing the possible complications, the various approaches of this technique are presented. This pre-implant surgery must be performed by experienced surgeons.

  19. Endoscopic repair of frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, B A; Schlosser, R J; Palmer, J N

    2005-09-01

    To describe endoscopic management of frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. Retrospective. We reviewed all frontal sinus CSF leaks treated using an endoscopic approach at our institutions from 1998 to 2003. CSF leaks originated immediately adjacent to or within the frontal recess or frontal sinus proper for inclusion in the study. Data collected included demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, site and size of skull-base defect, surgical approach, repair technique, and clinical follow up. Seven frontal sinus CSF leaks in six patients were repaired endoscopically. Average age of presentation was 45 years (range 25-65 years). Aetiology was idiopathic (three), congenital (one), accidental trauma (one), and surgical trauma (two). All patients presented with CSF rhinorrhea; two patients presented with meningitis. Four defects originated in the frontal recess, while two others involved the posterior table and frontal sinus outflow tract. Four patients had associated encephaloceles. We performed endoscopic repair in all six patients with one patient requiring an adjuvant osteoplastic flap without obliteration. All repairs were successful at the first attempt with a mean follow up of 13 months. All frontal sinuses remained patent on both post-operative endoscopic and radiographic exam. Endoscopic repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks and encephaloceles can be an effective method if meticulous attention is directed toward preservation of the frontal sinus outflow tract, thus avoiding an osteoplastic flap and obliteration. The major limiting factor for an endoscopic approach is extreme extension superiorly or laterally within the posterior table beyond the reach of current instrumentation.

  20. Diffuse Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Secondary to Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Agarwal, Amit; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Aneurysmal rupture accounts for the majority of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Increasingly recognized is the occurrence of nontraumatic convexity SAH unaccounted for by aneurysmal rupture. Case Report These presentations require consideration of rare but clinically significant sources of SAH. We report a patient presenting with prolonged mild headaches and acute onset of seizure like activity found to have diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and extensive dural venous sinus thrombosis involving the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse-sigmoid sinuses. Conclusions There are few reported cases of SAH secondary to dural sinus thrombosis; however most of these are convexity hemorrhage. Sinus thrombosis presenting as diffuse SAH is extremely rare, as is showcased in this report. PMID:26097524

  1. Prospective, multicenter evaluation of balloon sinus dilation for treatment of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Jeffrey S.; Skarada, Douglas; Gutman, Michael; Hoy, Mark J.; Nguyen, Shaun A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although balloon sinus dilation is a treatment option for adults with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), there have been few studies performed in pediatric patients. Methods This study was designed as a prospective, multicenter, single‐arm investigation. Children (2 to 21 years old) with CRS who had failed medical management were treated with balloon sinus dilation and followed to 6 months postprocedure. Results Fifty children were treated at 4 centers; 33 participants were 2 to 12 years old (mean ± standard deviation age: 6.6 ± 2.2 years) and 17 participants were >12 to 21 years (mean age: 15.7 ± 2.5 years). A total of 157 sinus dilations were attempted (98 maxillary, 30 frontal, and 29 sphenoid sinuses) and all were successful with no complications. Significant improvement in the Sinus and Nasal Quality of Life Survey (SN‐5) was seen for all children between baseline and 6 months (4.6 ± 1.2 vs 1.7 ± 0.8; p < 0.0001) and 92% improved by a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of 1.0 or more. Those children aged 2 to 12 years with standalone balloon dilation also showed significant SN‐5 improvements between baseline and follow‐up (4.5 ± 1.0 vs 1.9 ± 0.8; p < 0.0001). Multivariate regression analysis showed no differences or associations of SN‐5 improvement at 6 months with the presence of allergy, asthma, or concomitant procedures. For adolescents, overall 22‐item Sino‐Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT‐22) mean scores were also significantly improved at 6 months (42.2 ± 19.2 vs 10.4 ± 9.7; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Balloon sinus dilation is safe and appears effective for children with CRS aged 2 years and older. PMID:27888649

  2. Silent sinus syndrome as a recognised cause of unilateral painless enophthalmos

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Weh Loong

    2014-01-01

    An uncommon case of unilateral painless enophthalmos in a 44-year-old woman is presented. Despite the noticeable orbital asymmetry caused by enophthalmos, the patient has normal visual acuities in both eyes with unremarkable ophthalmic examination. Diagnosis of silent sinus syndrome was confirmed on the CT orbits and paranasal sinuses, showing complete opacification and atelectasis of the maxillary sinus. The patient achieved satisfactory improvements in her nasal symptom and facial appearance following functional endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:24859556

  3. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Hari; Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST.

  4. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST. PMID:28274079

  5. Cavernous sinus thrombosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Santamarta, Elena; Martínez, Patricia; Sáiz-Ayala, Antonio; Llorente, José L

    2017-04-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) represents a rare but devastating disease process that may be associated with significant long-term patient morbidity or mortality. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical management are imperative for patients with CST. We present the case of a 24-year-old pregnant woman with intraorbital abscess and CST secondary to Streptococcus milleri. Surgical intervention included orbital abscess drainage and dental extraction, medical therapy included intravenous antibiotic, heparin, and methylprednisolone and an elective cesarean section was performed. The latter was the key point to resolution the disease.

  6. Frontal Sinus Mucocele Formation as a Late Complication of External Dacrocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Malik, Adeela; Syed, Irfan; Osborne, Sarah; Toma, Abbad

    Two cases of frontal sinus mucocele post external approach dacrocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery are reported. The possible anatomical causes of this condition are discussed and in particular, attention is drawn to the consideration of frontal sinus mucocele in patients presenting with frontal sinus symptoms post-DCR surgery.

  7. Delayed carotid pseudoaneurysm: a life-threatening complication after endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Golinelli, Gloria; Toso, Andrea; Taranto, Fausto; Aluffi, Paolo; Pia, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare but potentially lethal complication of sinus surgery. We present 2 cases of delayed carotid pseudoaneurysm development after internal carotid laceration during functional sinus surgery for chronic sinusitis to emphasize the need to follow up the patients with profuse bleeding perioperatively and to identify when to suspect iatrogenic vascular malformations.

  8. Inadequate vertical bone dimension managed by indirect sinus grafting technique and simultaneous implant placement

    PubMed Central

    Nandal, Shikha; Ghalaut, Pankaj; Nandal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Implant placement into the posterior maxilla often creates a challenge due to inadequate bone height because of close sinus proximity. This article presents a case report of indirect sinus lift technique involving hydraulic pressure to elevate the floor of the maxillary sinus. PMID:28356698

  9. Prenatal development of the maxillary sinus: a perspective for paranasal sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Castruita, Alfredo; López-Serna, Norberto; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2012-06-01

    To review the prenatal development of the maxillary sinus under the perspective of the sinus surgery. Cross-sectional study. Basic embryology laboratory. Morphometry and morphology of the maxillary sinus and its ostium were studied under stereomicroscopy in 100 human fetuses from the 9th to the 37th week. Fetuses were obtained from the Fetal Collection of the School of Medicine of the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. Approval was granted by the Ethics Committee. Statistics were applied. The maxillary sinus begins its development at the 10th week. On the 37th week, the anterior-posterior diameter has a mean of 4.36 mm; ossification of the medial wall was absent, and the floor was located below the attachment of the inferior turbinate. Septa and recesses were temporarily observed. Some variations in shape were observed; however, only the oval shape persisted. Maxillary sinus hypoplasia was not found, although asymmetry was present in 30% of cases. The ostium was located at the anterior third of the ethmoid infundibulum; its final dimensions were 1.96 mm in length and 0.44 mm in width. The mean length between the ostium to the lamina papyracea and nasolacrimal duct was 1 mm. One case of double maxillary sinus was observed. Significant difference between the variables, in accordance with the age, was found (P = .02). Knowledge of prenatal development of the maxillary sinus improves the perspective of the sinus surgeon and helps the understanding of postnatal anatomy, especially in children.

  10. Nasal dermoid sinus cyst.

    PubMed

    Cauchois, R; Laccourreye, O; Bremond, D; Testud, R; Küffer, R; Monteil, J P

    1994-08-01

    Nasal dermoid sinus cyst is one of the diagnoses of midline nasal masses in children. This retrospective study analyzes the various theories regarding the origin of this congenital abnormality, the differential diagnosis, and the value of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the various surgical options available.

  11. Cluster headache associated with acute maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Cluster headache is a primary headache by definition not caused by any known underlying structural pathology. However, symptomatic cases have been described, for example tumours, particularly pituitary adenomas, malformations, and infections/inflammations. The evaluation of cluster headache is an issue unresolved. I present a case of a 24-year-old patient who presented with a 4-week history of side-locked attacks of pain located in the left orbit. He satisfied the revised International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for cluster headache. His medical and family histories were unremarkable. There was no history of headache. A diagnosis of cluster headache was made. The patient responded to symptomatic treatment. Low-dose computer tomography scan after 2 weeks displayed a left-sided acute maxillary sinusitis. The headache attacks resolved completely after treatment with antibiotics and sinus puncture. Although I cannot exclude an unintentional comorbidity, in my opinion, the co-occurrence of an acute maxillary sinusitis with unilateral headache, in a hitherto headache-free man, points toward the fact that in this case the cluster headache was caused or triggered by the sinusitis. The headache attacks resolved completely after the treatment and the patient also remained headache free at the follow-up. The response of the headache to sumatriptan and other typical cluster headache medications does not exclude a secondary form. Symptomatic cluster headaches responsive to this therapy have been described. Associated cranial lesions such as infections have been reported in cluster headache patients and the attacks may be clinically indistinguishable from the primary form. Neuroimaging, preferably contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging including sinuses should always be considered in patients with cluster headache despite normal neurological examination. Acute maxillary sinusitis can present as cluster headache.

  12. Frontal sinus septations predict the presence of supraorbital ethmoid cells.

    PubMed

    Comer, Brett T; Kincaid, Nathan W; Smith, Nathan J; Wallace, James H; Kountakis, Stilianos E

    2013-09-01

    This study is undertaken to determine if the presence or absence of multiseptated frontal sinuses is associated with the presence or absence of supraorbital ethmoid cells (SOECs). Analysis of prospectively collected data. Sixty consecutive patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were identified from a prospectively collected database at a tertiary-referral institution as having full-sinus computed tomography (CT) scans. Preoperative or initial CT scans of the sinuses were reviewed, specifically identifying the presence or absence of supraorbital ethmoid air cells (SOECS) and frontal sinus multiseptated sections on coronal imaging. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-squared test to evaluate any association between the two structural entities. Sixty total patients were identified, for a total of 120 sides. Of the 61 sides with frontal septations, 43 (70%) had SOECs present and 18 (30%) did not. Of the 59 sides without frontal sinus septations, 13 (22%) had SOECs present and 46 (78%) did not (chi squared = 28.3; P = 0.0000001). The difference in the presence of supraorbital ethmoid cells between whites and blacks is also statistically significant (chi squared = 4.23; P = 0.040). The presence of frontal sinus septations appears to be significantly associated with and predictive of the presence of supraorbital ethmoid cells. Thus, identifying frontal sinus septations on sinus CT is implicated with more complex anatomy of the frontal recess. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  14. Compressive Optic Neuropathy from Allergic Fungal Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jessica; Jefferson, Niall; Chaganti, Joga; Fraser, Clare L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ophthalmic manifestations of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) are rare, but can occur in advanced disease. A 32-year-old man with advanced AFS presented with severe bilateral vision loss and restricted ocular motility. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis confirmed active chronic AFS. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed, with adjunctive steroid therapy. Although AFS is a reasonably well-recognised entity, severe disease causing bilateral visual deficits is rarely encountered. This can confound the diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Ophthalmologists should thus be aware of compressive optic neuropathy as a complication of advanced AFS to prompt early treatment and mitigate visual loss. PMID:27928361

  15. Pilonidal sinus (Nadi vrana): A case study

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Pradeep; Toshikhane, Hemant

    2010-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus (PNS) occurs in the cleavage between the buttocks (natal cleft) and can cause discomfort, embarrassment and absence from work for thousands of young people (mostly men) annually. The incidence of the disease is calculated to be 26 per 100,000 people. It occurs 2.2 times more often in men than in women. Age at presentation is 21 years for men and 19 years for women this case report describes a 22-year-old man with pilonidal sinus who was treated with ksharasutra. PMID:21170212

  16. Fourth branchial pouch sinus: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, R M; Biller, H F

    1991-07-01

    The fourth branchial pouch sinus (FBPS) is a rare translaryngeal anomaly with diverse manifestations, including neonatal stridor and recurrent deep neck infection. Review of the world literature reveals 23 reports of sinuses consistent with fourth pouch origin. We present two additional cases, including the only example of a right-sided FBPS. Retrograde excision, beginning at the piriform apex, ensures complete removal of the tract and protection of the recurrent nerve. The posterior border of the thyroid ala must be resected or retracted for adequate exposure. Failure to remove the translaryngeal portion of the tract almost guarantees recurrence.

  17. Superior Sagittal Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas Treated by Stent Placement for an Occluded Sinus and Transarterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, N.; Toyota, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Wakayama, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) involving the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) successfully treated with stent placement for an occluded sinus and transarterial embolization. A 61-year-old man who had been treated with anticoagulation for a known SSS thrombosis presented with a sudden onset of headache. CT scan revealed an intraventricular hemorrhage and cerebral angiography revealed DAVFs involving the SSS which had severe venous congestion and sinus occlusion. We treated this case with a staged endovascular approach which consisted of stent placement for the occluded sinus and transarterial intravenous embolization resulting in complete eradication of DAVFs. Recanalization of an occluded sinus by stent placement can reduce venous congestion and transarterial intravenous embolization can obliterate dural arteriovenous shunts. This staged strategy is feasible and should be considered a first option of treatment, especially for DAVFs which presented with intracranial hemorrhage and aggressive venous hypertension. PMID:22958774

  18. Radiological sinus lift: a new minimally invasive CT-guided procedure for maxillary sinus floor elevation in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Matern, Jean-François; Keller, Pierre; Carvalho, Jean; Dillenseger, Jean-Philippe; Veillon, Francis; Bridonneau, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Implant therapy has become an excellent treatment modality as its inception into the modern era of dentistry. However, when patients present with advanced atrophy of the maxillary alveolar ridge, the procedure of choice to restore the anatomic bone deficiency is surgical maxillary sinus floor elevation or sinus lift. The purpose of this study was to describe the CT guided sinus lift technique and to illustrate the minimally invasive aspect of this new radiological procedure called radiological sinus lift. For this prospective study, 17 cadaver heads which met our inclusion criteria (edentulous posterior maxillary sector and bone height less than 5 mm) were analyzed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and orthopantomography (OPT). CT and sinus endoscopy was used to guide each step in the procedure. The radiological sinus lift technique consists of the following four stages: Approach. A 14.5 G OstyCut needle was inserted mesial to the canine eminence, and manual drilling was performed parallel to the sinus floor. Osteotomy. An inner obturator with a blunt tip was introduced to compress bone, to push it in close proximity to the sinus membrane and finally to create an osseous window opening into the submucosal space. Lifting. The sinus lift was performed using hydrodissection with dilute iodinated contrast medium. Filling. The submucosal space was then filled with an injection of dilute collagen. Success of the radiological sinus lift procedure was defined by the presence of a dome shape visible within the maxillary alveolar recess. All cases were imaged postoperatively using OPT and maxillary CBCT. Twelve maxillary sinuses underwent the radiological sinus floor elevation procedure. A dome shape of the Schneiderian membrane was achieved in eight maxillary sinuses (66.7%). All failures (n = 4) were caused by mucosal perforation at the time of maxillary sinus osteotomy. Mean height of membrane elevation was 12.0 mm, with a mean intervention time of 45 min. This

  19. Pituitary apoplexy presenting atypical time course of ophthalmic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Rei; Asahi, Minoru; Matsumoto, Masato; Hirai, Osamu

    2012-05-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is defined as a sudden loss of blood supply to the pituitary gland, leading to tissue necrosis and hemorrhage. Its clinical symptoms are characterized by sudden onset of headache, nausea, vomiting, ophthalmic symptoms and hormonal dysfunction. A 65-year-old woman presented with left-sided ptosis and blurred vision. These ophthalmic symptoms gradually worsened for one month without headache, visual acuity and field deficit. Neuro-ophthalmic examination revealed left oculomotor nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a round mass lesion in the left cavernous sinus, which was initially suspected as thrombosed cerebral aneurysm or hemorrhagic Rathke's cleft cyst. The mass lesion was finally diagnosed as pituitary apoplexy. The patient underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery and oculomotor nerve palsy improved after the surgery. Early diagnosis and treatment including surgical decompression are crucially important in patients with oculomotor nerve palsy in pituitary apoplexy, but the symptoms of pituitary apoplexy may slowly progress. It should be noted that pituitary apoplexy could be misdiagnosed as cerebral aneurysm or Rathke's cleft cyst.

  20. Association between frontal sinus development and persistent metopic suture.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, S; Kantarcı, U H; Duymus, M; Yildirim, C H; Ercakmak, B; Orman, G; Gunenc Beser, C; Kaya, M; Gok, M; Akbasak, A

    2013-11-01

    Frontal sinuses are 2 irregular cavities, placed between 2 lamina of frontal bone. Expansion continues during childhood and reaches full size after puberty. Persistent metopic suture is one of the factors that are related to abnormal frontal sinus development. In this study, we want to discuss about the coexistence of persistent metopic suture and abnormal frontal sinus development using radiological techniques. In this retrospectively planned study, images of 631 patients were examined, 217 (34.4%) of them were men and 414 (65.6%) of them were women. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance images were retrieved from the electronic archive for analysis. In this study, frontal sinus development is categorised as right side atrophy, left side atrophy, bilateral atrophy and bilaterally developed sinuses. The presence of metopic suture was accepted as persistent metopic suture. Frontal sinus atrophy was found in 22.7% and persistent metopic sutures were found in 9.7% of overall. In this study, no significant results were detected that were relatedto the frontal sinus agenesis or dismorphism associated with persistent metopicsuture. We conclude that, although publications propounding metopism thatleads to abnormal frontal sinus development are present in the literature, noreasonable explanation has been mentioned in these articles; and we believe thatthese findings are all incidental.

  1. Allergic fungal sinusitis and eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis: diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Uri, N; Ronen, O; Marshak, T; Parpara, O; Nashashibi, M; Gruber, M

    2013-09-01

    Chronic sinusitis is one of the most common otolaryngological diagnoses. Allergic fungal sinusitis and eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis can easily be misdiagnosed and treated as chronic sinusitis, causing continuing harm. To better identify and characterise these two subgroups of patients, who may suffer from a systemic disease requiring multidisciplinary treatment and prolonged follow up. A retrospective, longitudinal study of all patients diagnosed with allergic fungal sinusitis or eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis within one otolaryngology department over a 15-year period. Thirty-four patients were identified, 26 with eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis and 8 with allergic fungal sinusitis. Orbital involvement at diagnosis was commoner in allergic fungal sinusitis patients (50 per cent) than eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis patients (7.7 per cent; p < 0.05). Asthma was diagnosed in 73 per cent of eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis patients and 37 per cent of allergic fungal sinusitis patients. Allergic fungal sinusitis and eosinophilic mucin rhinosinusitis have the same clinical presentation but different clinical courses. The role of fungus and the ability to confirm its presence are still problematic issues, and additional studies are required.

  2. Management of orbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kinis, Vefa; Ozbay, Musa; Bakir, Salih; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Gun, Ramazan; Akdag, Mehmet; Sahin, Muhammed; Topcu, Ismail

    2013-09-01

    The most common reason of orbital infections is sinusitis. Orbital complications of sinusitis are mostly seen in children. Loss of vision and intracranial infections are among the complications of sinusitis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is very important in the management of orbital complications. The orbital complication can be in the form of cellulitis or abscess. A retrospective review of 26 pediatric patients with orbital complications due to sinusitis was presented in this study. Of 26 patients, there were 13 cases of preseptal cellulitis, 2 cases of orbital cellulitis, and 11 cases of subperiosteal abscess. We grouped the preseptal and orbital cellulites in one category and the subperiosteal abscess in the other. All patients in the cellulitis group recovered by medical treatment. All the patients were treated by surgical drainage. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment method are vital for the treatment of orbital complications secondary to sinusitis.

  3. Maxillary sinus lift performed using ultrasound. Evaluation of 21 patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Recio, Cristina; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the sinus membrane perforations that occurred during a sinus lift procedure using the ultrasound technique, and to evaluate the bone gain obtained. In 21 patients, 26 sinus lifts were performed using ultrasound and filled with bone graft material. The bone height and the bone gain obtained were observed in postoperative orthopantomographs, correcting for previous distortion. Of the 26 maxillary sinus lifts, 4 Schneiderian membrane perforations were observed. The average bone height prior to the intervention was 3.5 mm (scale 0.6- 8.7 mm ) and the average postsurgical bone height was 10.8 mm (scale 7.5- 15.6 mm). An average bone gain of 7.2 mm was observed (range 2.5- 11.7 mm). Based on the results of this study, during ultrasound sinus lift, few Schneiderian membrane perforations occurred and all were small .

  4. [Cerebellar abscesses secondary to infection of an occipital dermal sinus].

    PubMed

    García Galera, A; Martínez León, M I; Pérez da Rosa, S; Ros López, B

    2013-09-01

    A dermal sinus is a congenital defect arising from a closure failure of the neural tube that results in different degrees of communication between the skin and the central nervous system. A dermal sinus can occur anywhere from the root of the nose to the conus medullaris, and the occipital location is the second most common. Dermal sinuses are often found in association with dermoid or epidermoid cysts and less frequently with teratomas. Patients with an occipital dermoid cyst associated with a dermal sinus can develop meningitis and/or abscesses as the first clinical manifestation of the disease due to the dermoid cyst itself becoming abscessed or to the formation of secondary abscesses; few cases of the formation of secondary abscesses have been reported. We present a case of a dermoid cyst associated with an infected dermal sinus and posterior development of cerebellar abscesses and hydrocephalus.

  5. [Congenital left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Simões, M V; Figueira, R R; Barbato, D; Miziara, H L

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of left sinus of Valsalva congenital aneurysm (SVCA), incidentally found are described. The authors call attention on rarity of them, and present new concepts about their morphogenesis and incidence. They also suggested a higher incidence of asymptomatic and undiagnosed cases of SVCA should be considered.

  6. Near-infrared imaging of the sinuses: preliminary evaluation of a new technology for diagnosing maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Usama; Cerussi, Albert; Dehdari, Reza; Nguyen, Quoc; Kelley, Timothy; Tromberg, Bruce; Wong, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Diagnosing sinusitis remains a challenge for primary care physicians. There is a need for a simple, office-based technique to aid in the diagnosis of sinusitis without the cost and radiation risk of conventional radiologic imaging. We designed a low-cost near-infrared (NIR) device to transilluminate the maxillary sinuses. The use of NIR light allows for greater interrogation of deep-tissue structures as compared to visible light. NIR imaging of 21 patients was performed and compared with computed tomography (CT) scans. Individual maxillary sinuses were scored on a scale from 0 to 2 based on their degree of aeration present on CT and similarly based on the NIR signal penetration into the maxilla on NIR images. Our results showed that air-filled and fluid/tissue-filled spaces can be reasonably distinguished by their differing NIR signal penetration patterns, with average NIR imaging scores for fluid-filled maxillary sinuses (0.93+/-0.78, n=29) significantly lower than those for normal maxillary sinuses (1.62+/-0.57, n=13) (p=0.003). NIR imaging of the sinuses is a simple, safe, and cost-effective modality that can potentially aid in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Long-term, significant device refinement and large clinical trials will be needed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of this technique.

  7. Prevalence of sinusitis and efficacy of intranasal corticosteroid treatment on asthmatic symptoms in asthmatic patients with rhinosinusitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Noguchi, Shingo; Nishida, Chinatsu; Oda, Keishi; Akata, Kentarou; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of sinusitis on sinus computed tomography (CT) in asthmatic patients and efficacy of intranasal corticosteroid treatment on asthmatic symptoms in asthmatic patients with rhinosinusitis on sinus CT is unclear. Sinus CT of asthmatic patients were evaluated using the Lund-Mackay system (LMS). Intranasal corticosteroid treatment (mometasone furoate) was newly added to symptomatic asthmatic patients with rhinosinusitis treated without intranasal corticosteroids, and the findings of the Asthma Control Test (ACT), Asthma Control Questionnaire in 5 items (ACQ5), spirometry, and sinus CT were evaluated before and 3 months after additional intranasal corticosteroid treatment. In a total of 160 asthmatic patients, rhinosinusitis and maxillary, ethmoidal, sphenoidal, and frontal sinusitis were observed in 75.0%, 70.0%, 53.1%, 33.1%, and 28.8%, respectively. Nasal symptoms and rhinophonia were observed in 81.9% and 72.5%, respectively, and patients with nasal symptoms and those with rhinophonia both showed significantly higher LMS scores in each sinus. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) was observed in 66.9%, and these patients had significantly more severe asthma than the patients without CRS. In patients with CRS, patients with rhinophonia showed significantly higher LMS scores than those without rhinophonia. ACT, ACQ5, and the value of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) all significantly improved 3 months after the additive intranasal corticosteroid treatment in 24 patients, despite the fact that their LMS scores remained unchanged. Additive intranasal corticosteroid treatment may be an effective treatment option for symptomatic asthmatic patients with rhinosinusitis. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. [Anorexia with sinus bradycardia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-fang; Xu, Ling; Chen, Bao-xia; Cui, Ming; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-02-18

    As anorexia patients always go to the psychiatric clinic, little is concerned about the occurrence of sinus bradycardia in these patients for cardiologists and psychiatrists. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between anorexia and sinus bradycardia, and the feature analysis, differential diagnosis and therapeutic principles of this type of sinus bradycardia. We report a case of sinus bradycardia in an anorexia patient with the clinical manifestations, laboratory exams, auxiliary exams, therapeutic methods, and her prognosis, who was admitted to Peking University Third Hospital recently. The patient was a 19-year-old female, who had the manifestation of anorexia. She lost obvious weight in a short time (about 15 kg in 6 months), and her body mass index was 14.8 kg/m(2). The patient felt apparent palpitation, chest depression and short breath, without dizziness, amaurosis or unconsciousness. Vitals on presentation were notable for hypotension, and bradycardia. The initial exam was significant for emaciation, but without lethargy or lower extremity edema. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with her heart rate being 32 beats per minute. The laboratory work -up revealed her normal blood routine, electrolytes and liver function. But in her thyroid function test, the free thyroid (FT) hormones 3 was 0.91 ng/L (2.3-4.2 ng/L),and FT4 was 8.2 ng/L (8.9-18.0 ng/L), which were all lower; yet the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was normal 1.48 IU/mL (0.55-4.78 IU/mL). Ultrasound revealed her normal thyroid. Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by extremely low body weight, fear of gaining weight or distorted perception of body image, and amenorrhea. Anorexia patients who lose weight apparently in short time enhance the excitability of the parasympathetic nerve, and inhibit the sympathetic nerve which lead to the appearance of sinus bradycardia, and functional abnormalities of multiple systems such as hypothyroidism. But this kind of sinus

  9. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  10. Trichosporon inkin, an unusual agent of fungal sinusitis: a report from south India.

    PubMed

    Janagond, Anand; Krishnan, K Mohana; Kindo, A J; Sumathi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aetiology of fungal sinusitis is diverse and changing. Aspergillus species has been the most common cause for fungal sinusitis, especially in dry and hot regions like India. Trichosporon species as a cause for fungal sinusitis has been very rarely reported the world over. Here, we report a rare case of allergic fungal sinusitis caused by Trichosporon inkin in a 28-year-old immunocompetent woman. Bilateral nasal obstruction, nasal discharge and loss of smell were her presenting complaints. Diagnostic nasal endoscopy showed bilateral multiple polyps. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed and many polyps were removed. Based on mycological and histopathological studies, the pathogen was identified as T. inkin.

  11. Maxillary Reconstruction for Sinus Lift Complications With Oro-Antral Fistula: The Le Fort I Approach.

    PubMed

    Pigache, Pénélope; Anavekar, Namrata; Raoul, Gwénaël; Ferri, Joël

    2016-03-01

    Although sinus lift procedures are reliable, some complications can lead to serious maxillary sequelae, including the development of oro-antral fistula (OAF). Maxillary reconstruction in such patients presents a challenge owing to sinus floor alterations, graft remnants, chronic infection, and morbidity from the original sinus lift approach. The current study describes our technique of maxillary reconstruction using a Le Fort 1 approach following major sinus lift complications with associated residual OAF. This technique provides excellent access for sinus curettage, OAF closure, and osseous reconstruction. It allowed a successful rehabilitation in our patients, with no implant loss and good functional and esthetic results.

  12. Unilateral Maxillary Sinus Actinomycosis with a Closed Oroantral Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Lentner, Mark; Li, Hui; Nagorsky, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a bacterial infection due to Actinomyces israelii, a gram-positive, anaerobic organism that normally affects the cervicofacial region. However, facial injury or trauma (i.e., dental procedures) can allow this bacteria to inhabit other regions. There have been rare reports of actinomycosis of the paranasal sinuses. We present a case of a 50-year-old female who originally presented with a suspected oroantral fistula who subsequently was found to have actinomycosis involving her right maxillary sinus. Additionally, the dental extraction site revealed no connection with the maxillary sinus. We discuss the diagnostic approach and management of this patient as it relates to the limited existing literature. PMID:28352486

  13. [Ptosis secondary to cavernous sinus meningioma].

    PubMed

    Louis, M; Goga, D; François, P; Laure, B

    2013-12-01

    Meningiomas of the cavernous sinus are often the cause of neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations. Fifty percent of affected patients present with ptosis. We report a case of ptosis acquired during the first year of life due to oculomotor nerve palsy secondary to a cavernous sinus meningioma. We then discuss the causes of third cranial nerve palsy and treatment options for ptosis associated with CN III palsy. A fifteen-year-old female patient presented with ptosis due to a third cranial nerve palsy appearing within the first year of life. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cavernous sinus meningioma. The ptosis was treated by frontalis suspension using autologous temporalis fascia. The meningioma required regular follow-up. Ptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy is rare in children. The most common etiologies are congenital and represent 33 to 40% of cases in various studies. Other etiologies are traumatic, tumoral, vascular and infectious. The cause needs to be found by imaging over the entire course of the nerve. Cavernous sinus meningioma is one cause of third cranial nerve palsy. The surgical treatment of ptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy is levator resection or frontalis suspension with a strip of fascia lata or temporalis fascia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  15. Clinical significance of unilateral sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In general, the etiologic factors of chronic paranasal sinusitis are systemic conditions such as nutrition, predisposition, allergy, and local factors such as nasal anatomic conditions. Among these factors, the development of unilateral sinusitis is a model case verifying the influence of local factors. In my study of 640 cases over a certain period of time, a comparison was made between 161 cases of unilateral sinusitis and 479 cases of bilateral sinusitis in order to verify the effects of local factors in the development of this disease. Patients with a history of previous sinus surgery or tumors were eliminated from the cases. 1. The male-female incidence rate, and the age distribution of the patients at the initial visit showed no prominent differences between unilateral and bilateral cases. 2. It was found that a larger number of cases of unilateral sinusitis had a duration of less than one year as compared to bilateral sinusitis which were longer than and year. Therefore it can be said that the duration of unilateral sinusitis is usually shorter than that of bilateral sinusitis. 3. In unilateral cases the patients with moderate to severe nasal septal deviation, one number of patients with septal deviation towards the diseased side was twice as high as that on the non-affected side. 4. The incidence rate of polyps occurring in the middle meatus was shown to be about twice as high in bilateral cases as in unilateral cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2856589

  16. Difference between Sinusitis and a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children. Viral sinusitis usually accompanies a cold. Allergic sinusitis may ...

  17. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  18. Cyst decreased in size post maxillary sinus floor augmentation surgery in diabetic patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sijia; Song, Yingliang; Wei, Hongbo; Ren, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Whether mucosal cyst of maxillary sinus is contraindication for sinus floor augmentation surgery has been a controversial hot spot for years. Presentation of case This case aims to present the surgical procedure of sinus floor augmentation surgery with cyst (18.72 mm × 24.61 mm) in diabetic patient. And 6 months later, the cyst decreased in size. The authors elevated the sinus floor and cyst simultaneously. The surgery was carried out successfully without sinus membrane perforation and the alveolar ridge gained about 8 mm height. Six months later, the cyst decreased in size and osseointegration was observed. Discussion Interdisciplinary cooperation is encouraged to diagnose benign mucosal cyst. The isolation between sinus lumen and the grafted sub-sinus space is important. Graft contamination or dispersion into the sinus lumen should be avoided. The integrity of the sinus membrane and use of antibiotics are very important to prevent the occurrence of postoperative sinus infection Conclusion The authors conclude that sinus augmentation surgery could be done with mucosal cyst in diabetic patient. PMID:26479781

  19. Endoscopic minimally invasive management of a periradicular lesion invading the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, Silvio; Fabbro, Massimo Del; Corbella, Stefano; Weinstein, Tommaso; Rosano, Gabriele; Tsesis, Igor

    2011-12-01

    A referred patient presented with a lesion of endodontic origin located at the apex of tooth #27. The tooth had been endodontically treated and re-treated. A periapical radiograph revealed a close relationship between the lesion and the maxillary sinus. A cone-beam computed tomography scan confirmed that the lesion had invaded the sinus cavity. The treatment plan consisted of periapical surgery using an endoscope as a magnification device. Due to a sinus membrane perforation, a new sinus membrane repair technique was performed. Twelve months after surgery, a cone-beam computed tomography scan revealed successful healing of the lesion. The continuous preservation of the sinus physiology was also observed. The use of an endoscope as a magnification device and a tailored technique for sinus membrane management allowed us to achieve a successful treatment outcome in the case of an endodontic lesion invading the maxillary sinus.

  20. Sphenoid bone changes in rapid maxillary expansion assessed with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Stepanko, Lucas S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is used to expand the maxilla and increase arch perimeter; yet, there are few reports on its effects on the sphenoid bone. With cone-beam computed topography (CBCT), it is possible to visualize sphenoid bone changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate sphenoid bone changes observed in conjunction with RME treatments, using CBCT. Methods Sixty patients (34 women and 26 men, aged 11–17 years) underwent RME as part of their orthodontic treatment. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a tooth-anchored group, a bone-anchored group, or a control group. Initial CBCT scans were performed preceding the RME treatment (T1) and again directly after the completion of expansion (T2). Statistical analysis included ANOVA, descriptive statistics, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results The reliability of the landmark location was at least 0.783, and the largest ICC mean measurement error was 2.32 mm. With regard to distances, the largest change was 0.78 mm, which was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Statistical significance was established in patient groups of the same sex and treatment type for the following distance measurements: right anterior lateral pterygoid plate to the right edge of the hypophyseal fossa (d2), anterior distance between the medial pterygoid plates (d4), and anterior distance between the left medial and lateral plates (d8). Conclusions In this study, there were no clinically significant changes in the sphenoid bone due to RME treatments regardless of sex or treatment type. PMID:27668190

  1. MR findings of primary Ewing's sarcoma of greater wing of sphenoid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramjeet; Jain, Manoj; Singh, D P; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, N; Suri, S

    2002-12-01

    Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the skull is a very rare entity. We report MRI findings in a case of Ewing's sarcoma of the greater wing of sphenoid in a 4-year-old patient. Magnetic resonance imaging showed markedly heterogenous signal intensity with areas of haemorrhage and necrosis. It also demonstrated the exact extent of tumour due to its multiplanar capabilities and was, therefore, helpful in planning surgery.

  2. Surviving All Odds: A Unique Case of Multiple Congenital Unruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysms Involving Both Left and Right Coronary Sinuses with Biventricular Dysfunction and Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Vijay B, Aniketh; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva are very uncommon, with an incidence ranging from 0.1 to 3.5% of all congenital heart defects. Very few cases have been reported in the literature that presented with involvement of two or more sinuses. We report a case of 27-year-old male with a history of exertional breathlessness of one-month duration. After complete evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning, the patient was diagnosed to have large congenital unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms involving both left and right coronary sinuses with extension into the interventricular septum. The patient also displayed second-degree heart block (Mobitz type 2) and biventricular dysfunction. The patient was managed successfully. We present the case with an aim to highlight the management challenges including intraoperative and postoperative complications that are associated with unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms of ≥2 sinuses. PMID:27882249

  3. Automatic measurement of the sinus of Valsalva by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Fabrice; Blanchard, Cédric; Boucher, Arnaud; Sliwa, Tadeusz; Lalande, Alain; Voisin, Yvon

    2017-09-01

    Despite the importance of the morphology of the sinus of Valsalva in the behavior of heart valves and the proper irrigation of coronary arteries, the study of these sinuses from medical imaging is still limited to manual radii measurements. This paper aims to present an automatic method to measure the sinuses of Valsalva on medical images, more specifically on cine MRI and Xray CT. This paper introduces an enhanced method to automatically localize and extract each sinus of Valsalva edge and its relevant points. Compared to classical active contours, this new image approach enhances the edge extraction of the Sinus of Valsalva. Our process not only allows image segmentation but also a complex study of the considered region including morphological classification, metrological characterization, valve tracking and 2D modeling. The method was successfully used on single or multiplane cine MRI and aortic CT angiographies. The localization is robust and the proposed edge extractor is more efficient than the state-of-the-art methods (average success rate for MRI examinations=84% ± 24%, average success rate for CT examinations=89% ± 11%). Moreover, deduced measurements are close to manual ones. The software produces accurate measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva. The robustness and the reproducibility of results will help for a better understanding of sinus of Valsalva pathologies and constitutes a first step to the design of complex prostheses adapted to each patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cytokines in nasal polyposis, acute and chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Rudack, C; Stoll, W; Bachert, C

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines are potent biologic factors involved in the regulation of inflammation, immune defense, and wound healing. Recently, growing interest has developed in the role of cytokines in chronic sinusitis and nasal polyposis. In the present study, we investigated the cytokine profile of different types of rhinosinusitis in order to evaluate whether a specific form of rhinosinusitis is associated with the expression of a certain cytokine profile. Sinus mucosa from patients with acute sinusitis (n = 10), chronic sinusitis (n = 7), antrochoanal polyp (n = 10), nasal polyps (n = 8) and controls of turbinate mucosa (n = 7) were sampled. The cytokine protein content (IL-1 beta, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, GM-CSF, interferon-gamma) of tissue homogenates was measured using ELISA technique. In acute sinusitis, the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and of the neutrophil chemokine IL-8 and IL-3 appeared to be upregulated. Chronic sinusitis mucosa demonstrated no significantly increased concentrations of the measured cytokines. In bilateral nasal polyposis, but not in antrochoanal polyps, the eosinophil related cytokine IL-5 was strongly upregulated. From these findings, it appears that specific cytokine patterns are found in different forms of sinusitis, and that IL-5 may represent the most important cytokine responsible for tissue eosinophilia in nasal polyposis.

  5. [Application of virtual reality system for individualized preoperative planning of sphenoidal ridge meningioma].

    PubMed

    Ma, Shunchang; Chen, Suhua; Hu, Yeshuai; Qi, Jianfa; Li, Zhiqiang; Cun, Enhao; Wang, Liguo; Shi, Xiang'en; Yang, Jun

    2014-12-09

    To evaluate the usefulness of virtual reality (VR) technique for individualized preoperative planning of sphenoidal ridge meningioma. Multiple imaging data of CTA/MR were acquired from 41 surgical patients with sphenoidal ridge meningioma during the period from July 2009 to June 2013 were transferred into the Dextroscope system. A suite of built-in 3D tools enabled users to obtain measurement and simulated intraoperative viewpoint about the lesion and adjacent anatomic structures. A sophisticated preoperative plan was defined.Operative duration, total resection rate, complication rate and KPS scores were compared with control group undergoing routine operation (n = 27). 3D stereoscopic VR images in accordance with reality were reconstructed for 41 cases. As compared with control group,VR preoperative plan could shorten operative duration and reduce complication rate (P < 0.05). However, there was no improvement in total resection rate or KPS score (P > 0.50). VR technique of Dextroscope system offers comprehensive information of sphenoidal ridge and related neurovascular anatomical structure. Thus it may aid surgical planning and facilitate individualized operation.

  6. Managing acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dwyhalo, Kristina M; Donald, Carrlene; Mendez, Anthony; Hoxworth, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis is the most aggressive form of fungal sinusitis and can be fatal, especially in patients who are immunosuppressed. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial and potentially lifesaving, so primary care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease. Patients may need to be admitted to the hospital for IV antifungal therapy and surgical debridement.

  7. Salvage frontal sinus surgery: the endoscopic modified Lothrop procedure.

    PubMed

    Wormald, Peter John

    2003-02-01

    Until recent years, the osteoplastic flap with frontal sinus obliteration has been the gold standard for recalcitrant frontal sinusitis. The present series evaluated the role of the endoscopic modified Lothrop procedure, which has recently been advocated as an alternative. Prospective non-randomized interventional case series. The study prospectively assessed 83 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic modified Lothrop procedure. The mean age was 52.4 years (SD = 13.6 y) with a male-to-female ratio of 3:1. Patients had a mean of six previous sinus surgical procedures with 17 patients having undergone previous frontal sinus obliteration with mucocele formation. Seventy-six patients (91%) had frontal pain or headache as their primary presenting symptom, with 72 having nasal discharge. There were 14 patients who presented with 17 complications of frontal sinus disease. There were eight erosions of the posterior table of the frontal sinus with extension of the mucocele intracranially, seven orbital complications, and one cerebrospinal fluid leak. Twenty-four patients (30%) had fungus cultured from their sinuses at the time of surgery. Six of the 83 patients (7%) developed frontal ostium stenosis resulting in a 93% primary success rate after an average follow-up of 21.9 months (SD = 6.1 mo). These patients all underwent a revision modified Lothrop procedure and had a patent frontal ostium at their last review. Twenty-one patients (25%) developed recurrent symptoms, which were managed medically. Of these 21 patients, 9 with previously diagnosed fungal sinusitis developed mucosal changes again in their frontal sinuses, but their ostia have remained patent. Four patients have had recurrent infections in the frontal sinuses, and three patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma and polyps have developed polyps again in their frontal sinuses. Five patients continued to have frontal pain without radiological evidence of further frontal disease. No patients required an

  8. [Sinus floor bone augmentation: implementation of the concept of sinus-lift].

    PubMed

    Lambert, France; Lecloux, Geoffrey; Rompen, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Sinus floor elevation is a technique allowing implant placement in the posterior edentulous maxilla when residual bone height is limited. This technique has evolved a lot since it has been first introduced in the eighties. Nowadays, this approach is considered as predictable, simple and practicable under local anaesthesia. The present article aims at understanding clearly the biological phenomenon of "sinus-lift". Moreover, the surgical protocol used at the University of Liège is considered didactically and reasoned according to the scientific literature.

  9. Not everything in the maxillary sinus is sinusitis: a case of a dentigerous cyst.

    PubMed

    Haber, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented to a medical clinic with a painless right facial swelling. The treating physician ordered a radiograph of the sinuses and received a report of "maxillary sinusitis." After appropriate antibiotic treatment, the facial swelling increased, and the mother took the child to her community pediatrician. After a period of observation and additional imaging, the diagnosis of dentigerous cyst was made. After appropriate surgical intervention, the cyst was removed, and over the ensuing 6 weeks the facial swelling gradually diminished. Dentigerous cysts, although uncommon, need to be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with painless facial swelling.

  10. Computed tomography measurements of different dimensions of maxillary and frontal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Sahlstrand-Johnson, Pernilla; Jannert, Magnus; Strömbeck, Anita; Abul-Kasim, Kasim

    2011-04-05

    We have previously proposed the use of Doppler ultrasound to non-invasively stage sinus infection, as we showed that acoustic streaming could be generated in nonpurulent sinus secretions and helped to distinguish it from mucopurulent sinus secretions. In order to continue this development of a clinically applicable Doppler equipment, we need to determine different dimensions of the paranasal sinuses, especially the thickness of the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus (at the canine fossa). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the thickness of the canine fossa. This study aimed to (a) estimate different dimensions of the maxillary and frontal sinuses measured on computed tomography (CT) of the head, (b) define cut-off values for the normal upper and lower limits of the different measured structures, (c) determine differences in age, side and gender, (d) compare manually and automatically estimated maxillary sinuses volumes, and (e) present incidental findings in the paranasal sinuses among the study patients. Dimensions of 120 maxillary and frontal sinuses from head CTs were measured independently by two radiologists. The mean value of the maxillary sinus volume was 15.7±5.3 cm3 and significantly larger in males than in females (P=0.004). There was no statistically significant correlation between the volume of maxillary sinuses with age or side. The mean value of the bone thickness at the canine fossa was 1.1±0.4 mm. The automatically estimated volume of the maxillary sinuses was 14-17% higher than the calculated volume. There was high interobserver agreement with regard to the different measurements performed in this study. Different types of incidental findings of the paranasal sinuses were found in 35% of the patients. We presented different dimensions of the maxillary and frontal sinuses on CTs. We believe that our data are necessary for further development of a clinically applicable Doppler equipment for staging rhinosinusitis.

  11. Two-stage closed sinus lift: a new surgical technique for maxillary sinus floor augmentation.

    PubMed

    Krasny, Kornel; Krasny, Marta; Kamiński, Artur

    2015-12-01

    Bone tissue atrophy may constitute a relative contraindication for implantation. The methods used in reconstruction of the alveolar ridge within the lateral section of the maxilla have been well known but not perfect. Presentation of the two-stage, closed sinus lift technique as well as efficacy evaluation of reconstruction of the alveolar ridge in the maxilla within its vertical dimension with the use of this technique. The total procedure was performed in 26 out of 28 patients qualified for the study. The height of the alveolar ridge at the site of the planned implantation was no <3 mm, the width of the ridge was no <5 mm. During the treatment stage 1 the sinus lift was performed for the first time. The created hollow was filled with allogeneic granulate. After 3-6 months stage 2 was performed consisting in another sinus lift with simultaneous implantation. The treatment was completed with prosthetic restoration after 6 months of osteointegration. In 24 out of 26 cases stage 1 was completed with the average ridge height of 7.2 mm. In stage 2, simultaneously with the second sinus lift, 26 implants were placed and no cases of sinusitis were found. In the follow-up period none of the implants were lost. The presented method is efficient and combines the benefits of the open technique-allowing treatment in cases of larger reduction of the vertical dimension and the closed technique-as it does not require opening of the maxillary sinus.

  12. Maxillary sinus cavernous hemangioma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jammal, H; Barakat, F; Hadi, U

    2004-04-01

    Vascular lesions of the sinonasal tract are rare. These lesions do not have typical signs or symptoms. They may present insidiously with minimal symptoms. A high index of suspicion and a good preoperative evaluation are needed for diagnosis. No standard surgical approach is indicated. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma of the maxillary sinus in an adult male. We present the diagnostic work-up and discuss the differential diagnosis and potential therapeutic approaches.

  13. Occult sinusitis may be a key feature for non-controlled asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, G L; Caimmi, S; Marseglia, A; Pagella, F; Ciprandi, G; La Rosa, M; Leonardi, S; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Caimmi, D

    2012-01-01

    Sinusitis is frequently associated with asthma. The diagnosis and management of patients with asthma associated with sinusitis are often challenging, though sometimes unsatisfactory. Detection and treatment of sinusitis in asthmatics may lead to a better control of asthma symptoms. Most of the studies regarding the relationship between sinusitis and asthma have been conducted in adults. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of sinusal comorbidity in children with un-controlled asthma both clinically and through nasal endoscopy after the first 6 months of treatment. The present study included 294 consecutive asthmatic children (97 males, mean age 7.3 years). Asthma diagnosis, severity assessment and treatment were performed according to GINA guidelines. Twenty-one patients with non-controlled asthma presented with endoscopic features of sinusitis, but without any clinical sign or symptom. We defined such condition occult sinusitis. Not only overt sinusitis, but also occult sinusitis could be a significant comorbidity in asthmatic patients. For this reason, it may be beneficial to determine the presence of sinus inflammation in children with non-controlled asthma, even when they do not present clinical signs or symptoms of upper airways involvement.

  14. NI-18MULTIMODAL NAVIGATION IN ENDOSCOPIC TRANS-SPHENOIDAL RESECTION OF PITUITARY TUMORS USING IMAGE-BASED VASCULAR AND CRANIAL NERVE SEGMENTATION: A PROSPECTIVE VALIDATION STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Parviz; Raber, Michael; Golby, Alexandra; Laws, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Trans-Sphenoidal surgery (TSS) is a well-known approach for treatment of pituitary tumors. However, in inexperienced hands, the risk of lateral misdirection and vascular damage, intraoperative CSF leakage, and optic nerve injury are all well-known complications of this procedure. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation in localization of neurovascular structures during TSS. METHODS: Eight patients with pituitary tumor underwent preoperative 3TMRI, which included thin sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE sequences. Images were reviewed by an expert independent neuroradiologist. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet (6/8) and Stryker (2/8) for segmentation and pre-op planning. After patient registration to the intra-op neuronavigation system and surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe. The pulses of the bilateral ICA were confirmed using micro-Doppler. RESULTS: Pre-operative segmentation of the ICA and cavernous sinus matched with the intra-operative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases (Dice-coefficient =1). This information reassured surgeons regarding the lateral extent of bone removal at the sellar floor and the limits of lateral explorations. Perfect correspondence between image-based segmentation and endoscopic view was also found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal gland interfaces. This helped in preventing unnecessary removal of the normal pituitary gland. Image-guidance helped surgeon to localize the optic nerve and chiasm in 63% of case and Diaphragma sella in 50% of cases, which helped to determine the limits of upward exploration and decrease the risk of CSF leakage. CONCLUSION: Image-based pre-operative vascular and neural element segmentation especially with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and helps young and inexperienced neurosurgeons to prevent

  15. Mucosal cavernous hemangioma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mainak; Kundu, Sohag; Barik, Sabyasachi; Banerjee, Shoham; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-01

    Mucosal cavernous hemangiomas of maxillary sinus and the lateral nasal wall are seldom encountered and difficult to diagnose with misleading radiologic features like bone erosion and heterogeneity due to patchy contrast uptake. The overall picture mimicking sinonasal malignancy, it is unclear whether there is true breach in the bone or remodeling due to the lesion's chronicity. Interestingly, it often does not bleed as expected during surgery, questioning the use of therapeutic embolization and pre-intervention vascular shrinkage. The clinical presentation and management protocol of sinonasal cavernous hemangiomas seem greatly individualized. We here present a patient with cavernous hemangioma of maxillary sinus and discuss the distinguishing clinical, histologic and imaging characteristics and subsequent management options, and attempt to establish the findings as the basis of considering it as an important differential diagnosis of radiologically heterogeneous sinonasal mass with suspected bone erosions presenting with nasal obstruction and epistaxis, mostly in young women.

  16. Infantile Maxillary Sinus Osteomyelitis Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Nagarajan; Ramamoorthy, Nathan; Panchanathan, Suresh; Balasundaram, Jothiramalingam S

    2014-01-01

    Periorbital soft tissue swelling may result due to primary orbital pathology or from adjacent facio-maxillary or sino-nasal inflammatory causes. Osteomyelitis of maxilla in the pediatric age group is a rare entity in this era of antibiotics. We present an 11-month-old female infant who was brought with peri-orbital selling and purulent nasal discharge. Computed Tomography showed erosions of the walls of maxillary sinus suggestive of osteomyelitis. Culture of sinus scraping showed Staphylococcus aureus growth and the child improved with intravenous cloxacillin therapy. This case is presented due to the rarity of its presentation in this age group and for awareness to consider this entity in children having fever and peri-orbital swelling. PMID:25191055

  17. [Permanent idiopathic sinus tachycardia in pregnancy. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Proclemer, A; Feruglio, G A

    1988-04-01

    A 35 year old primigravida presented a rare arrhythmia defined as persistent idiopathic sinus tachycardia, which appeared strongly symptomatic during the first weeks of pregnancy. Based on electrophysiological evaluation and pharmacological tests, we retained that the pathogenetic mechanism was due to enhanced automaticity in the sinus node, or in a near "atrial ectopic focus", as a result of a localized autonomic dysfunction. The maternal-foetal prognosis resulted extremely favorable thanks to antiarrhythmic drug association during the last six months of pregnancy.

  18. Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis associated with intranasal drug use.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Kelly R; Clavenna, Matthew J; Shockley, Ross; Weiss, Vivian L; Turner, Justin H

    2015-12-01

    Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis (CIFS) is a rare but potentially aggressive form of invasive fungal disease that occurs in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of CIFS in an otherwise healthy young adult associated with intranasal illicit drug abuse. The patient presented with nonhealing nasal septal and palatal perforations. Biopsy demonstrated invasive Aspergillus flavus requiring surgical debridement and extended intravenous antifungal therapy. Tissue necrosis and ulceration related to intranasal drug use should be recognized as a potential risk factor for invasive fungal sinusitis.

  19. New York state ear, nose, and throat specialists' views on pre-sinus lift referral.

    PubMed

    Cote, Michael T; Segelnick, Stuart L; Rastogi, Amita; Schoor, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Dental implant surgery in the posterior maxilla often involves the maxillary sinuses. Sinus surgery for dental implants is highly successful, but the preoperative risk is difficult to assess because a routine preoperative evaluation does not include an intranasal examination by an otolaryngologist. The purpose of the present study is to obtain the opinions of ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialists located within New York state in an effort to establish a referral protocol before performing a maxillary sinus elevation. This study assesses the need to consult an ENT specialist for evaluation and treatment recommendations in the pretreatment workup. A questionnaire and a stamped, return envelope with an identification number was mailed to 302 physicians who maintained a current ENT-specialty practice or practiced that specialty in a hospital or clinic setting in New York state. The requirement criteria included a valid address and specialty designation. Up to two follow-up phone calls were made, and another questionnaire was mailed 30 days after the initial mailing. The questionnaire included eight computerized tomography (CT)?scan images that represented different sinus configurations. Answers to the five questions were statistically evaluated and analyzed. A total of 63 recipients returned the questionnaire and were included in the study. A majority of 58.7% (95% confidence interval: 46.9% to 71.1%) of respondents recommended that a maxillary sinus CT scan should be routinely prescribed before a sinus-lift surgery. Patient symptoms that ENT specialists suggested indicated referral included nose complications/problems (40.1%) and sinus issues (23.6%). Of the eight CT-scan images, referral suggestions were >50% for the following: an occluded sinus with septum, inflammation at the base of the sinus only, a sinus with a generalized thickened membrane, an oroantral fistula, a thickened sinus membrane in association with teeth that had endodontic and/or periodontic

  20. Sinusitis in people living in the medieval ages.

    PubMed

    Teul, Iwona; Lorkowski, Jacek; Lorkiewicz, Wieslaw; Nowakowski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Breathing vitally serves body homeostasis. The prevalence of upper airway infections is often taken as an indicator of overall health status of a population living at a given time. In the present study we examined the unearthed remains of skulls from the XIII-XV century inhabitants searching for signs of maxillary sinusitis. Maxillary sinuses of the skulls of 92 individuals were inspected macroscopically and, if necessary, endoscopically. Osseous changes, including the pitting and abnormal spicule formation were present in 69 cases (75.0 %). It was found that, overall, dental infection was a major cause of maxillary sinusitis (18.8 %). Severe bone changes were observed in the adults' skulls, but were also present in the sinus walls of children's skulls. Post-inflammatory changes were manifest as remodeling and damage to the sinus walls. The results indicate that both children and adults of the Middle Ages suffered from chronic sinusitis. These observations confirm that the climate, environment, and lifestyle of the medieval populations contributed to the morbidity of the upper respiratory tract.

  1. Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Mahdieh; Kamali, Azadeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Arashnia, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a rare condition that can result in high mortality and morbidity rates if not treated immediately. CST may be aseptic or septic. Less common primary sites of infection include the tonsils, soft palate, middle ear, and orbit. Reported cases of middle ear infection are very rare, and response to treatment is poor. Case Presentation The present study is a case report of acute otitis media which led to septic cavernous sinus thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman in Bojnord city, North Khorasan, Iran. Conclusions Findings of laboratory tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Clinical-based medical care led to successful management of the patient with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics that prevented serious complications. PMID:27781123

  2. Sinus Pause in Association with Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Dibs, Samer R.; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis. PMID:26175640

  3. Sinus pause in association with Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Oktay, A Afsin; Dibs, Samer R; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-06-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis.

  4. Cephalometric Analysis for Gender Determination Using Maxillary Sinus Index: A Novel Dimension in Personal Identification

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ritika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Radiography is important in forensic odontology for the identification of humans. The maxillary sinus is the largest of the paranasal sinuses and first to develop. Sinus radiography has been used for identification of skeletal remains and determination of gender. Hence, the aim and objectives of the present study were to establish a new method for gender determination using maxillary sinus index from lateral cephalometric radiographs and to establish the reliability of maxillary sinus for gender determination. Methods. A total of 50 adult digital lateral cephalometric radiographs (25 males and 25 females) were included in the study. The maxillary sinus analysis was performed on these radiographs using the height and width measurement tools of Sidexis XG software. Maxillary sinus index was calculated, discriminant function analysis performed, and discriminant equation derived for determination of gender. Results. The mean maxillary sinus height and width were found to be higher in males, whereas the maxillary sinus index was greater in females. The discriminant function analysis derived in the study was able to differentiate the sex groups with sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 76%. Conclusions. From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus can be used as a reliable tool in gender determination. PMID:28373883

  5. Cephalometric Analysis for Gender Determination Using Maxillary Sinus Index: A Novel Dimension in Personal Identification.

    PubMed

    Khaitan, Tanya; Kabiraj, Arpita; Ginjupally, Uday; Jain, Ritika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Radiography is important in forensic odontology for the identification of humans. The maxillary sinus is the largest of the paranasal sinuses and first to develop. Sinus radiography has been used for identification of skeletal remains and determination of gender. Hence, the aim and objectives of the present study were to establish a new method for gender determination using maxillary sinus index from lateral cephalometric radiographs and to establish the reliability of maxillary sinus for gender determination. Methods. A total of 50 adult digital lateral cephalometric radiographs (25 males and 25 females) were included in the study. The maxillary sinus analysis was performed on these radiographs using the height and width measurement tools of Sidexis XG software. Maxillary sinus index was calculated, discriminant function analysis performed, and discriminant equation derived for determination of gender. Results. The mean maxillary sinus height and width were found to be higher in males, whereas the maxillary sinus index was greater in females. The discriminant function analysis derived in the study was able to differentiate the sex groups with sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 76%. Conclusions. From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus can be used as a reliable tool in gender determination.

  6. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  7. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  8. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  9. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium.

  10. [Ostium of maxillary sinus in endoscopic sinus surgery].

    PubMed

    Tan, G; Sun, H; Chen, J

    1998-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance and operative method of maxillary sinus ostium in the treatment of chronic sinusitis and nasal polyps. Fifty-six patients (112 sides) undergone endoscopic sinus surgery were studied. The patency rates of the maxillary ostia in patients with enlarged and unchanged maxillary ostia were 92.9% and 80.4% respectively. Fifty-one patients (64 sides) undergone Caldwell-Luc operations were retrospectively studied. The patency rate of inferior antrostomy was 40.6%. CT scans of the sinuses of 38 cases with unilateral sinisitis or nasal polyps were reviewed. The scaled values of the maxillary hiatus on CT images showed no difference between the normal group and the diseased group. Pneumatization and proliferation of middle turbinate and bent uncinate process were the most common anatomic variation in the diseased group. The results suggest that management of anatomic variations surrounding the ostia is very important in the treatment of maxillary ostium.

  11. Paranasal Sinus Involvement in Metastatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Fadel, Francois; Smith, Peter R.; Ayaz, Asim; Sundaram, Krishnamurthi

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma involving the paranasal sinuses is uncommon. One hundred-sixty seven cases have been published in the literature since 1951. Symptoms, signs, and rhinoscopic and imaging findings are often nonspecific, and the diagnosis may be missed for considerable time. Therefore, a high level of suspicion is warranted in patients with known malignancies presenting with persistent or recurrent rhinosinusitis or facial complaints. PMID:23946928

  12. [Invasive maxilar sinusitis by Rhizopus oryzae].

    PubMed

    Perea, S; del Palacio, A; Gil, R; de la Serna, J; Mata, R; Arribi, A

    1997-12-01

    We herein present a diabetic with non Hodgkin lymphoma patient that had been treated with steroids and developed fungal invasive sinusitis. The patient had intensive facial pain that did not respond to antibiotics and on clinical inspection had a necrotic lesion on right nasal area. A smear and biopsy tissue showed broad non septate hyphae and on cultures Rhizopus oryzae was isolated. There was an unfavorable outcome, and the patient died even though liposomal Amphotericin B was administered and surgical treatment was performed.

  13. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  14. [Treatment effects analysis of preoperative long-acting somatostatin analogs combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery for patients with growth hormone secreting pituitary macroadenomas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Y; Deng, K; Zhang, Y; Yao, Y; Zhu, H J; Jin, Z M; Pan, H

    2017-02-07

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment effects of preoperative long-acting somatostatin analogue (SSA) combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery for patients with growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenomas. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out on 20 patients with GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas who were treated with preoperative SSA and trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery in our apartment from January 2010 to January 2016. We also selected 20 patients with only trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery treatment and 20 patients with preoperative SSA and non-trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery treatment. The changes of tumor imaging, endocrine and blood pressure before and after treatment were analysed. Results: The Gross total resection (GTR) rate of invasive GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas of preoperative SSA combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group (8/13) were higher than that if only trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group (4/16) and preoperative SSA combined non endoscopic surgery group (1/8) (P<0.05). Meanwhile, preoperative SSA combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group had significantly improved the GH levels, blood glucose, lipid metabolism and blood pressure levels (P<0.05). Conclusion: The trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery on patients with GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas has a significant improvement on GH levels, blood glucose, lipid metabolism and blood pressure levels. Through the treatment of preoperative long-acting SSA, the gross total resection rate is higher than other two groups.

  15. [Secondary lung diseases in patients with nasotracheal intubation. Role of nosocomial sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Guérin, J M; Habib, Y; Lévy, C

    1988-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is a frequent infectious complication in ICU patients. All the patients with prolonged nasotracheal intubation presenting with nosocomial pneumonia according to Salata's criteria were examined for sinusitis in the prospective study. Diagnosis was confirmed via CT-scan views and transnasal sinus puncture. In eleven nasally intubated patients, CT-scan views showed air fluid levels and multiple sinus involvement. Bacteriological studies isolated the same gram negative bacilli in both sinus and bronchial aspirates. In four cases, a polymicrobial sinusitis was found with a single organism predominant. This predominant germ was always found in bronchial aspirate. Recovery from pneumonia was obtained only after sinus drainage. Treatment included removing the nasal tubes, or performing tracheostomy and systemic antibiotics. One patient required surgical maxillary sinus drainage after failure of medical management. The occurrence of nosocomial pneumonia in nasotracheally intubated patients should lead physicians to explore the paranasal sinuses. Sinus CT-scan views should be routinely obtained in the assessment of pulmonary sepsis in patients with prolonged nasotracheal intubation. Persistent or ignored nosocomial sinusitis in such circumstances could be a major source of treatment failure.

  16. Combined Endoscopic and Trans Palpebral Orbital Reconstruction for Silent Sinus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tieghi, Riccardo; Malagutti, Nicola; Valente, Luisa; Carnevali, Giulia; Clauser, Luigi C

    2017-01-31

    Silent Sinus Syndrome is defined as a painless spontaneous and progressive enophthalmos and hypoglobus with maxillary sinus hypoplasia and orbital floor resorption. It is caused by maxillary sinus atelectasis in a setting of ipsilateral chronic maxillary sinus hypoventilation. The syndrome was first described in 1964 by Montgomery, but the term "Silent Sinus Syndrome" was not coined until 1994 by Soparkar. The aetiology is still controversial: some authors postulate a basal hypoplastic sinus, other suggest an acquired process due to an obstruction of the ostium in the medium meatus. Silent Sinus Syndrome presents in the third to fifth decades of life, very rarely in childhood with no gender predilection and it is usually a unilateral disorder. The symptoms are not shown to be related to chronic sinuses disease. The clinical signs are: enophthalmos, hypoglobus, upper lid retraction secondary to dystopia of the globe, sinking of the eye and orbital asymmetry, deepened upper lid sulcus, disappearance of the palpebral fold line, lagophthalmos, vertical diplopia, malar depression, and facial asymmetry. Extraocular muscle function is generally preserved and usually there is no visual impairment. The diagnosis is confirmed by computed tomography scan of the orbits and paranasal sinuses. The treatment consists of orbital reconstruction and functional rehabilitation of the maxillary sinuses.

  17. [Bacteriological study of maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Renon, P; Casanova, M; Verdier, M; Asperge, A; Le Mouel, C

    1984-01-01

    Suppurated maxillary sinusitis are frequent diseases. Diameatic puncture allows bacteriological investigations. Our results are positive in two thirds of cases. The bacterial flora is very varied, whose identification and antibiograms involve efficient treatment with daily washing and in situ antibiotherapy.

  18. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  19. [Surgical dilemmas. Sinus floor elevation].

    PubMed

    ten Bruggenkate, C M; Schulten, E A J M; Zijderveld, S A

    2008-12-01

    Limited alveolar bone height prevents the placement of dental implants. Sinus floor elevation is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus that allows implants to be placed. The principle of this surgical procedure is the preparation of a 'top hinge door', that is raised together with the Schneiderian membrane in the cranial direction. The space which created under this lid is filled with a bone transplant. Autogenous bone is the standard transplant material, despite the fact that a second surgery site is necessary. Under certain circumstances bone substitutes can be used, with a longer healing phase. If sufficient alveolar bone height is available to secure implant stability, simultaneous implantation and sinus floor elevation are possible. Considering the significant anatomical variation in the region of the maxillary sinus, a sound knowledge of the anatomy is of great importance.

  20. The mold conundrum in chronic hyperplastic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ebbens, Fenna A; Georgalas, Christos; Fokkens, Wytske J

    2009-03-01

    The role of fungi in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is not clear. Fungi can be detected in the nose and paranasal sinuses of virtually all CRS patients; however, they also appear to be present in healthy controls. Various theories attempt to explain the mechanisms by which fungi can exert an effect on sinus mucosa in susceptible individuals. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fungi in CRS, which fungal organisms (if any) are pathogenic, and what exactly characterizes the immunologic response to fungi that may result in the development of disease. However, in the absence of convincing immunologic data and evidence of clinical improvement of CRS after antifungal therapy, the case against the fungus remains unproven.

  1. Primary carcinoid tumor of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian; Bray, Eric; Bregy, Amade; Norenberg, Michael; Weed, Donald; Morcos, Jacques J

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial carcinoid tumors belong to the class of neuroendocrine tumors and their incidence is extremely rare. The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of carcinoid tumors of the skull base are outlined in this case report. A 61-year-old multimorbid woman presented with transient memory loss. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain demonstrated a left cavernous sinus mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. The lesion was biopsied using the Caldwell-Luc approach, and histology showed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor. The tumor was subtotally resected with a neurosurgery/head and neck combined preauricular infratemporal and subtemporal extradural approaches to the cavernous sinus. Further histologic evaluation revealed that the tumor was of carcinoid differentiation with no other primary or metastatic sites detectable. Primary intracranial carcinoid tumors, though rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of extradural and dural-based lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-hole trephination (Muntarbhorn) technique for a large frontal sinus osteoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Sinawat, Poonsiri

    2012-11-01

    To present an alternative surgical option for frontal sinus osteoma. A woman presented with a symptomatic large osteoma in right frontal sinus. Two-hole trephination was planned to remove the osteoma using nasal endoscope and a drill in each hole. The osteoma was drilled and removed transnasally. Two months later, two small fragments of osteoma were detected remaining in the lateral aspect of the sinus. The fragments were removed successfully with the same technique. The patient was asymptomatic six months postoperatively. Two-hole trephination technique or Muntarbhorn technique is an attractive option for frontal sinus osteoma.

  3. MC-19 Margaritifer Sinus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-19 quadrangle, Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands, which dominate the Margaritifer Sinus quadrangle, are marked by large expanses of chaotic terrain. In the northwestern part, the major rift zone of Valles Marineris connects with a broad canyon filled with chaotic terrain. Latitude range -30 to 0, longitude range 0 to 45 degrees.

  4. MC-20 Sinus Sabeus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-20 quadrangle, Sinus Sabeus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands dominate the Sinus Sabeus quadrangle. The northern part is marked by a large impact crater, Schiaparelli. Schiaparelli is an ancient remnant of the many large impact events that occurred during the period of heavy bombardment. Latitude range -30 to 0 degrees, longitude range -45 to 0.

  5. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    chest CT was performed to evaluate for pulmonary embolism (figure 2). The chest radiograph (figure 1) demonstrates increased central pulmonary ...Fig. 5 Sinus venosus defect at birth . The shaded area in purple represents the sinus venosum. The anomalous right pulmonary venous anatomy...department (ED) with chest pain and an ankle fracture after being hit by a car while riding a horse. Chest imaging noted enlarged central pulmonary

  6. BRIEF REPORT: A Red Streak in the Lateral Recess of the Oropharynx Predicts Acute Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Colin; Aizin, Vitali

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the oropharyngeal red streak sign for diagnosing acute sinusitis. DESIGN Exploratory cohort study. SETTING A Veterans Affairs medical center urgent care center. PARTICIPANTS Sixty consecutive subjects presenting with nasal symptoms lasting 4 weeks or less. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Each subject underwent a structured history and physical examination, followed by a sinus computed tomography (CT) scan. Acute sinusitis was defined by an air-fluid level or opacification of 1 or more sinuses on CT imaging. Twenty-seven subjects were diagnosed with sinusitis. A localized red streak in the lateral recess of the oropharynx was associated with sinusitis, with a positive likelihood ratio (LR+) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.11 (1.23, 3.63) and a negative likelihood ratio (LR−) and 95% CI of 0.44 (0.24, 0.83). Opacity on maxillary or frontal sinus transillumination was also associated with sinusitis (LR+ of 1.89; CI 1.03, 3.32 and LR− of 0.56; CI 0.32, 0.96). Symptom duration >10 days was associated with acute sinusitis with an LR+ of 1.89 (1.06, 3.59). A history of facial pain (LR+ of 0.59; CI 0.39, 0.90 and LR− of 2.85; CI 1.27, 6.41) and the finding of sinus percussion tenderness (LR+ of 0.22; CI 0.05, 0.90 and LR− of 1.88; CI 1.17, 3.03) were inversely associated with sinusitis. CONCLUSIONS The oropharyngeal red streak may be an accurate physical sign for diagnosing acute sinusitis. This sign should be included in future studies of clinical diagnostic criteria for acute sinusitis. PMID:16918746

  7. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    PubMed Central

    PARIZI, José Luiz Santos; NAI, Gisele Alborghetti

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) tissue expression. PMID:20379688

  8. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    PubMed

    Parizi, José Luiz Santos; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) tissue expression.

  9. The prevalence of intracranial complications in pediatric frontal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hamdy El-; Malik, Anita C; Aronyk, Keith; Ledi, Edmund; Bhargava, Ravi

    2006-08-01

    Intracranial extension of infection represents a serious complication of sinusitis but with no clearly documented prevalence. The frontal sinus with its unique anatomical characteristics, has been singled out as a catalyst for intracranial spread, but without solid evidence. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of intracranial complications in pediatric acute frontal sinusitis and to test the claimed association. A retrospective chart review of all children (sinusitis was undertaken in a tertiary children's hosiptal. Included were those with acute disease (<3 months duration) that required active medical and/or surgical management. Patients with history of conditions that predispose to rhinosinusitis or intracranial infections were excluded. Data collected included demographics, sinuses involved, intracranial complications and their types, aspects of management, imaging, and mortality. In our search 466 patients were included. Of these, 386 did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the 80 remaining patients, 10 had no films or imaging data available for analysis. The 70 included patients ranged in age from 7 months to 15 years (mean 8.8, median 10). Forty-nine (70%) were males. Twenty-six required medical treatment and 44 (62.9%) required surgical therapy in addition. Forty-nine had orbital complications and 8 (11.4%) had intracranial complications. There was no mortality. The eight patients with intracranial complications ranged in age from 3 to 14 years (mean 12). Six were males. Of the 23 patients with frontal sinus involvement, 7 (30.4%) had intracranial complications. The odds ratio for developing intracranial complications if the frontal sinus was involved in the inflammatory process was 20 (95% CI 2.30-176.4). There is a high probability of developing intracranial complications in children who present with acute frontal sinusitis to a tertiary care hospital. This should prompt all involved

  10. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  11. Pituitary metastasis presenting as ischemic pituitary apoplexy following heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kruljac, Ivan; Cerina, Vatroslav; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Pažanin, Leo; Matić, Tomas; Božikov, Velimir; Vrkljan, Milan

    2012-12-01

    Pituitary apoplexy (PA) typically results from infarction or hemorrhage in a pituitary adenoma, while PA in nonadenomatous pituitary gland is uncommon. Prothrombotic states have never been recognized as precipitating factors for PA. The authors report a case of an elderly female who received prophylactic fractionated heparin therapy due to sepsis, consequent rhabdomyolysis, and overt disseminated intravascular coagulation. On the seventh day of heparin therapy, she reported sudden vision loss, ptosis, diplopia, and severe headache. Severe thrombocytopenia and positive antibodies to the complex of platelet factor 4 and heparin confirmed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type 2 (HIT). Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a homogenous pituitary tumor mass with pronounced sphenoid sinus mucosa thickening and two hypointense zones within the tumor mass on contrast-enhanced images consistent with focal ischemic necrosis. The tumor was confirmed to be squamous cell carcinoma with no signs of necrosis. Ischemic necrosis was found within marginal pituitary tissue. This is the first reported case of ischemic PA associated with pituitary metastasis and the first case in which HIT triggered PA. Our case demonstrates that prothrombotic states such as HIT can precipitate ischemic PA. Pituitary metastasis can present with ischemic PA, but radiological features differ from those described in pituitary adenomas. Segregated low-signal intensity zones within the tumor mass on postcontrast images indicate partial infarction of the tumor, which could be a special feature of ischemic PA in pituitary metastasis and has never been described in pituitary adenomas. These are all novel findings and might enlighten the pathogenesis of PA.

  12. Ectopic pituitary adenoma of the clivus presenting with apoplexy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Pamela A; Hohensee, Samantha; Lillehei, Kevin O; Kingdom, Todd T; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, Bette K

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic pituitary adenomas usually occur within sphenoid sinus or nasopharynx, and seldom within the clivus. There is only a single reported example of ectopic adenoma with clinical apoplexy, albeit not from clivus. We report a 78-year-old male with known prostate carcinoma admitted with acute onset of blurred vision, suggestive of apoplexy. Work-up revealed unilateral cranial nerve VI palsy and neuroimaging showed a mass confined to the clivus; sellar region was normal. Preoperative considerations included chordoma, chondrosarcoma, or metastatic prostate carcinoma to bone. Resection was via endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to the clivus. An ectopic null cell pituitary adenoma with bland infarction was identified as the cause of the patient's clinical apoplexy. No antecedent precipitating factors for apoplexy were present; specifically the patient had not received leuprolide preoperatively, a known precipitant of pituitary apoplexy in prostate cancer patients who receive drug. We review the literature on ectopic clival pituitary adenomas, apoplexy in ectopic adenomas, and the link between apoplexy and leuprolide usage.

  13. Direct vs. indirect sinus lift procedure: A comparison.

    PubMed

    Pal, U S; Sharma, Nanda Kishor; Singh, R K; Mahammad, Shadab; Mehrotra, Divya; Singh, Nimisha; Mandhyan, Devendra

    2012-01-01

    There are different techniques for the sinus augmentation; the factors that contribute to the survival rate of sinus augmentation and dental implant placement are still the subject of discussion. So we compare the two different ways of sinus floor elevation: a) Lateral antrostomy as a one or two step procedure as direct method. b) Osteotome technique with a crestal approach as indirect method. A total of twenty partially edentulous patients in maxillary posterior region who opted for implant retained prosthesis but had a low sinus and deficient alveolar ridge within the age group of 20-55 years were taken up, 25 implants were placed in combination with bone grafting material for sinus augmentation. The final bone height was measured from Orthopantomogram. Post-operative Clinical Evaluation was based on pain, gingival inflammation status, stability, swelling and bone height. Statistical analysis was done by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 15.0) (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The gain in bone height was significantly greater in direct procedure through lateral antrostomy (mean 8.5 mm) than in indirect method through crestal approach by osteotome technique (mean 4.4 mm). Osteotome technique can be recommended when more than 6 mm of residual bone height is present and an increase of 3-4 mm is expected. In case of more advanced resorption direct method through lateral antrostomy has to be performed. Both sinus elevation techniques did not seem to affect the implant success rate.

  14. Medial maxillectomy in recalcitrant sinusitis: when, why and how?

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Iordanis; Constantinidis, Jannis

    2014-02-01

    We reviewed all journal articles relevant to endoscopic medial maxillectomy in patients with recalcitrant chronic maxillary sinusitis in order to present all indications, the underlying pathophysiology and the developed surgical techniques. Despite the high success rate of middle meatal antrostomy, cases with persistent maxillary sinus disease exist and often need a more extended endoscopic procedure for the better control of the disease. Such surgical option uses gravity for better sinus drainage and offers better saline irrigation, local application of medications and follow-up inspection. An endoscopic medial maxillectomy and its modified forms offer a wider surgical field and access to all 'difficult' areas of the maxillary sinus. Patients with previous limited endoscopic sinus surgery or extended open surgery, cystic fibrosis, extensive mucoceles, allergic fungal sinusitis, odontogenic infections, foreign bodies and so on may suffer from recurrent disease requiring an endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Depending on the disease, various modifications of the procedure can be performed preserving the anterior buttress, nasolacrimal duct and inferior turbinate if possible.

  15. Sick sinus syndrome associated with hypopituitarism: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Jingping; Zhang, Gang; Lu, Huihe; Huang, Jianfei; Shan, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Though an association between autoimmune diseases and sick sinus syndrome has been reported, there has been no report on the association of hypopituitarism and sick sinus syndrome. Herein, we provide the first case report of hypopituitarism accompanying sick sinus syndrome in a 51-year-old woman presented to our hospital with syncope due to cardiac arrest. The patient was successfully managed by pacemaker installation and hormone replacement therapy. PMID:25332716

  16. Numerical flow simulation in the post-endoscopic sinus surgery nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guanxia; Zhan, Jiemin; Zuo, Kejun; Li, Jianfeng; Rong, Liangwan; Xu, Geng

    2008-11-01

    In this study we utilized computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques to construct a numerical simulation of nasal cavity airflow pre and post virtual functional endoscopic surgery (FESS). A healthy subject was selected, and CFD techniques were then applied to construct an anatomically and proportionally accurate three-dimensional nasal model based on nasal CT scans. A virtual FESS intervention was performed numerically on the normal nasal model using Fluent software. Navier-Stokes and continuity equations were used to calculate and compare airflow, velocity, distribution and pressure in both the pre and post FESS models. In the post-FESS model, there was an increase in airflow distribution in the maxillary, ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses, and a 13% increase through the area connecting the middle meatus and the surgically opened ethmoid. There was a gradual decrease in nasal resistance in the posterior ethmoid sinus region following FESS. These findings highlight the potential of this technique as a powerful preoperative assessment tool to aid clinical decision-making.

  17. Sphenoid wing meningioma behavior on 11C-PiB and 18F-FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Hernan; Bergamo, Yanina; Paz, Santiago; Sanchez, Flavio; Vazquez, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Two patients with mild cognitive impairment underwent C-PiB and F-FDG brain PET. Both patients had previously gone through a contrast-enhanced MRI scan that revealed extra-axial tumors next to the sphenoid wing, suggestive of meningiomas. C-PiB PET images showed a highly increased uptake by the extra-axial masses. These 2 cases represent 1.2% of our C-PiB population (n = 163). No meningioma was found with negative C-PiB uptake. The F-FDG concentration was not increased within the lesions. C-PiB could be used as a meningioma marker.

  18. Resection of sphenoidal crest, orbit and infratemporal fossa communicative meningioma through fronto-tempo-preauricular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Song, Xueming; An, Yihua; Hu, Shaoshan; Shi, Huaizhang; Wu, Huailan; Yang, Guoming; Cao, Xiangyi

    1999-09-01

    We reported our experience using diode laser under microscope to resect a sphenoidal crest, orbit and infratemporal fossa communicative meningioma through fronto-tempo-preauricular approach. We used contacting, un-contacting and inserting methods and the power was in the range of 5 - 30 watt. The tumor was totally removed and the patient received radiotherapy post- operation. Follow up showed that the patient survived for two years after operation. The result showed that combination of laser application during surgery and radiotherapy post-operation was an effective method to delay or prevent tumor recurrence.

  19. Reconstruction of the sphenoid wing in a case of neurofibromatosis type 1 and complex unilateral orbital dysplasia with pulsating exophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E

    2011-01-01

    Sphenoid wing dysplasia is a defining feature of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). This defect of the skull base can be associated with pulsating exophthalmos. This report describes the successful reconstruction of a dysplastic sphenoid wing in an NF1 patient using lateral orbitotomy as a scarcely visible and sufficiently extendable approach. An intraoperative computed cone-beam computed tomography system (3D C-arm system) was used as a prompt and feasible technique to check the positioning of the titanium mesh in an anatomic region that is sensitive to mechanical stress.

  20. Is the Maxillary Sinus Really Suitable in Sex Determination? A Three-Dimensional Analysis of Maxillary Sinus Volume and Surface Depending on Sex and Dentition.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Heussen, Nicole; Peters, Florian; Steiner, Timm; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus was recently presented as a helpful instrument for sex determination. The aim of the present study was to examine the volume and surface of the fully dentate, partial, and complete edentulous maxillary sinus depending on the sex. Computed tomography data from 276 patients were imported in DICOM format via special virtual planning software, and surfaces (mm) and volumes (mm) of maxillary sinuses were measured. In sex-specific comparisons (women vs men), statistically significant differences for the mean maxillary sinus volume and surface were found between fully dentate (volume, 13,267.77 mm vs 16,623.17 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3480.05 mm vs 4100.83 mm, P < 0.0001) and partially edentulous (volume, 10,577.35 mm vs 14,608.10 mm, P = 0.0002; surface, 2980.11 mm vs 3797.42 mm, P < 0.0001) or complete edentulous sinuses (volume, 11,200.99 mm vs 15,382.29 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3118.32 mm vs 3877.25 mm, P < 0.0001). For males, the statistically different mean values were calculated between fully dentate and partially edentulous (volume, P = 0.0022; surface, P = 0.0048) maxillary sinuses. Between the sexes, no differences were only measured for female and male partially dentate fully edentulous sinuses (2 teeth missing) and between partially edentulous sinuses in women and men (1 teeth vs 2 teeth missing). With a corresponding software program, it is possible to analyze the maxillary sinus precisely. The dentition influences the volume and surface of the pneumatic maxillary sinus. Therefore, sex determination is possible by analysis of the maxillary sinus event through the increase in pneumatization.

  1. Preauricular sinus, nephrolithiasis, infantine eczema and natal tooth: a new association.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ayse Esra; Sarıfakıoglu, Evren; Aydemır, S; Taş, T; Orün, E; Aydemır, H

    2011-01-01

    Preauricular sinuses (ear pits) are common congenital abnormalities. The incidence of preauricular sinus is widely varied. Usually asymptomatic, they manifest as small hollows adjacent to the external ear near the anterior margin of the ascending limb of the helix, most frequently on the right side. Preauricular sinuses can be either inherited or sporadic. They may be bilateral, increasing the likelihood of being inherited, in 25-50% of cases. Preauricular sinuses are features of other conditions or syndromes in 3-10% of cases, primarily in association with deafness and branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. When other congenital anomalies coexist with these sinuses, auditory testing and renal ultrasound should be considered. A girl, who was three months and 20 days old, was presented because of the co-existence of a right infected preauricular sinus, nephrolithiasis, infantile eczema and a natal tooth.

  2. F-18 FDG imaging of an asymptomatic sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus in a patient with malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Ak, Ilknur

    2007-10-01

    This case illustrates a pitfall associated with F-18 FDG imaging. We present the images of a 57-year-old woman with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that shows intense accumulation of F-18 FDG in a sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus that could indicate a lymphomatous involvement from a primary disease. MRI showed a well-defined sinus tract from skin to the sacrococcygeal region corresponding to the F-18 FDG uptake. She did not have any symptoms of a sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus such as discharge, swelling or pain. There was no visible opening of the sinus tract on the skin. Pilonidal sinus is commonly a hair-containing sinus or abscess in the sacrococcygeal area. Hair acts as a foreign body causing an inflammatory reaction.

  3. Invasive Aspergillus Sinusitis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, John M.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Aspergillus (IA) sinusitis is a life-threatening opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals, but it is uncommon in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To gain a better understanding of the characteristics of IA sinusitis in this population, we present a unique case of chronic IA sinusitis in an HIV-infected patient taking antiretroviral therapy and review the literature summarizing published cases of invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal (n = 41) and mastoid (n = 17) sinuses in HIV-infected individuals. Among these cases, only 4 were reported after 1999, and 98% of patients had acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Orbital invasion occurred in 54% of paranasal sinus cases, whereas intracranial invasion was reported in 53% of mastoid sinus cases. The overall mortality was 79%. We also discuss various clinical and immunologic factors that may play a role in the development of IA and consider the changing epidemiology of aspergillosis in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27800523

  4. Investigation of the relationship between serum hormones and pilonidal sinus disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Z; Aksoy, N; Emir, S; Kanat, B H; Gönen, A N; Yazar, F M; Çimen, A R

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether pilonidal sinus is influenced by hormones that stimulate body hair growth. Currently, there are insufficient data on the presence of hormonal abnormalities in pilonidal sinus disease. Hormone levels (including those of thyroid-stimulating hormone, follicular-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, oestradiol, testosterone, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone) were measured in 39 patients with pilonodal sinus presenting between February 2013 and March 2013. The results were compared with those of 39 volunteers without this disease. There was no statistically significant difference between men with pilonidal sinus disease (P > 0.05). The prolactin levels of women with pilonoidal sinus were significantly higher than those of women in the control group (P < 0.05). Raised serum prolactin levels in women may be related to the development of pilonidal sinus disease. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Sick sinus syndrome. Symptomatic cases in children.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, D J; Izukawa, T

    1975-01-01

    In 20 children needing treatment for symptomatic sick sinus syndrome, the average age at presentation was 7.1 years and ranged from 9 months to 18 years. Symptoms were never precise but, in retrospect, 5 children had syncope, 7 had a rapid heart action, 6 had dyspnoea or tachypnoea, 2 had nonspecific chest pains, 2 had pale spells, and 1 had a sudden hemiplegia. Symptoms followed cardiac surgery in 15 cases and were related to unoperated congenital heart disease in 2 and to myocarditis in 2. The aetiology was unknown in 1 case. The type of cardiac surgery resulting in the development of the sick sinus syndrome was predominantly related to atrial suturing. Both tachy- and bradydysrhythmias were found, including wandering atrial pacemaker (9 cases), junctional rhythm (19 cases), supraventricular tachycardia (9 cases), atrial flutter (11 cases), and atrial fibrillation (2 cases). Both atrial (8 cases) and ventricular (7 cases) premature beats were seen. All patients were given trials of drug therapy but difficulties were encountered. Cardioversion was used for tachyarrhythmias in 11 cases without serious problems. Six children had permanent cardiac pacemakers inserted with good results. Recognition of the sick sinus syndrome in childhood is important and treatment must be regulated by the severity of symptoms. Images FIG. PMID:1211960

  6. Cellular comparison of sinus mucosa vs polyp tissue from a single sinus cavity in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jacqueline; Bailey, Michelle; Zaunders, John; Mrad, Nadine; Sacks, Raymond; Sewell, William; Harvey, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nasal polyposis is a common development in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and sinus mucosa and polyp tissue have been used interchangeably in studies investigating CRS. However, potential differences may exist between these 2 tissue types, which have not been entirely characterized. A cross-sectional study of CRS with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery was conducted. Sinus mucosal biopsies and corresponding polyp tissue were obtained from the same sinus cavity via flow cytometry, single-cell suspensions identified type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), CD4 and CD8 T cells, activated CD4 and CD8 T cells, plasma cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), regulatory T cells, T follicular helper cells, B cells, and immunoglobulin A (IgA)(+) and IgG(+) B cells. Cells were measured as a percentage of CD45(+) cells. Paired nonparametric comparisons between sinus and polyp tissue were performed. Ten patients (50% female; age 48 ± 16 years) were recruited. Significantly elevated ILC2 levels were found in polyp tissue compared to sinus mucosa (0.12 [0.07 to 0.23] vs 0.07 [0.04 to 0.16], p = 0.02), as well as plasma cells (2.25 [0.84 to 3.68] vs 1.18 [0.74 to 2.41], p = 0.01); pDCs (0.15 [0.12 to 0.50[ vs 0.04 [0.02 to 0.17], p = 0.03); activated CD8 T cells (29.22 [17.60 to 41.43] vs 16.32 [10.07 to 36.16], p = 0.04) and IgG(+) B cells (6.96 [0.06 to 11.82] vs 1.51 [0.38 to 5.13], p = 0.04). Other cell populations showed no significant differences. Polyps have a similar cellular composition to that of mucosa. Higher levels of ILC2s, plasma cells, pDCs, activated CD8 T cells, and IgG(+) B cells in polyp tissue may be reflective of cell populations driving nasal polyp development. The cellular machinery of CRS is present in polyps and representative of the disease process. This pilot study strongly suggests that a larger study would provide significant insights into the relationship of sinus mucosa to pathogenesis of nasal polyps. © 2014 ARS

  7. A Ruptured Dermoid Cyst of the Cavernous Sinus Extending into the Posterior Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-01-01

    Supratentorial dermoid cysts are uncommon to develop in the cavernous sinus. We present a ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. The patient was a 32-year-old female who complained occipital headache, blurred vision, and tinnitus over 4 years. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an enhanced tumor in the right cavernous sinus extending into the right temporal base and the posterior fossa with findings of ruptured cyst. Surgical resection was performed, and pathological findings were confirmed to be a dermoid cyst. We report a second case with ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. PMID:26113964

  8. A Ruptured Dermoid Cyst of the Cavernous Sinus Extending into the Posterior Fossa.

    PubMed

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Kim, Choong-Hyun; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-05-01

    Supratentorial dermoid cysts are uncommon to develop in the cavernous sinus. We present a ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. The patient was a 32-year-old female who complained occipital headache, blurred vision, and tinnitus over 4 years. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an enhanced tumor in the right cavernous sinus extending into the right temporal base and the posterior fossa with findings of ruptured cyst. Surgical resection was performed, and pathological findings were confirmed to be a dermoid cyst. We report a second case with ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa.

  9. Three-dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography-guided Transcathetar Closure of Ruptured Noncoronary Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G Anil; Parimala, P S; Jayaranganath, M; Jagadeesh, A M

    2017-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm accounts for only 1% of congenital cardiac anomalies. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm can cause aortic insufficiency, coronary artery flow compromise, cardiac arrhythmia, or aneurysm rupture. Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) represents an adjunctive tool to demonstrate the ruptured sinus of Valsalva with better delineation. We present an adult patient with rupture of noncoronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm into the right atrium (RA). 3DTEE accurately delineated the site of rupture into the RA and showed the exact size and shape of the defect, which helped in the successful transcatheter closure of the defect with a duct occluder device. PMID:28074828

  10. Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography-guided transcathetar closure of ruptured noncoronary sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Anil; Parimala, P S; Jayaranganath, M; Jagadeesh, A M

    2017-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm accounts for only 1% of congenital cardiac anomalies. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm can cause aortic insufficiency, coronary artery flow compromise, cardiac arrhythmia, or aneurysm rupture. Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) represents an adjunctive tool to demonstrate the ruptured sinus of Valsalva with better delineation. We present an adult patient with rupture of noncoronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm into the right atrium (RA). 3DTEE accurately delineated the site of rupture into the RA and showed the exact size and shape of the defect, which helped in the successful transcatheter closure of the defect with a duct occluder device.

  11. Computed tomographic detection of sinusitis responsible for intracranial and extracranial infections

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, B.L.; Bankoff, M.S.; Fisk, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now used extensively for the evaluation of orbital, facial, and intracranial infections. Nine patients are presented to illustrate the importance of detecting underlying and unsuspected sinusitis. Prompt treatment of the sinusitis is essential to minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with complications such as brain abscess, meningitis, orbital cellulitis, and osteomyelitis. A review of the literature documents the persistence of these complications despite the widespread use of antibiotic therapy. Recognition of the underlying sinusitis is now possible with CT if the region of the sinuses is included and bone-window settings are used during the examination of patients with orbital and intracranial infection.

  12. A novel multipurpose mini-endoscope for frontal sinus endoscopy "sinus view".

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Bozzato, Victoria; Bozzato, Alessandro; Papaspyrou, George; Schick, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic frontal sinus surgery has been proven to enable the treatment of most frontal sinus pathologies but may be challenging for the surgeon in regard to the variable frontal sinus anatomy. Frontal sinus drainage identification and frontal sinus visualization are an essential part of successful frontal sinus surgery. We demonstrate a novel modular mini-endoscopic system for frontal sinus surgery. Fifty-two patients (37 male, 15 female) with a chronic rhino-sinusitis were enrolled. In this study, all patients were subjected to standard endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery with use of the fibre optic endoscope "Sinus View" (1.1 mm diameter, 10,000 pixels, irrigation channel and additional working channel) accessing the frontal sinus. A frontal sinus drainage type I in 38 cases, a frontal sinus drainage type IIa in 9 cases and a frontal sinus drainage type IIb in 5 cases according to Draf were performed. The modular mini-endoscopic system "Sinus view" was used to identify frontal sinus drainage in ten patients before ethmoidectomy and in the remaining patients (N = 42) after ethmoidectomy. Visualization of the frontal sinus drainage or the frontal sinus itself was easily carried out after irrigation. A clear identification of the frontal sinus by illumination was achieved in all cases. In addition the working channel of the endoscope was successfully used to perform visualized balloon dilatation at the frontal sinus drainage or for biopsy. The endonasal visualization of the frontal sinus drainage and frontal sinus itself is facilitated by also using a modular mini-endoscope with the option to use the working channel of the endoscope for biopsy or balloon dilatation.

  13. [Pediatric orbital cellulitis without sinusitis: report of four cases].

    PubMed

    Promelle, V; Bennai, D; Drimbea, A; Milazzo, S; Bremond-Gignac, D

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric orbital cellulitis is most often caused by ethmoid sinusitis. We present a description of 4 atypical cases of orbital cellulitis without sinusitis. A 4-day-old girl presented with medical canthal swelling and preseptal cellulitis caused by bilateral congenital dacryocystoceles. The second patient was an 8-year-old boy seen for infectious conjunctivitis complicated by preseptal cellulitis without sinusitis. Conjunctival cultures revealed Neisseria gonorrheae. The next patient, a 5-month-old boy, presented with lid swelling, fever, proptosis and epiphora. It was caused by dacryocystitis extending into the ethmoid and complicated by a sub-periostal abscess with mass effect on the globe. The fourth patient was a 10-year-old boy referred for inflammatory eyelid edema and severe non-axial proptosis. Imaging revealed an orbital tumor; the diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma was confirmed by anatomopathology. Thorough etiologic work-up of orbital cellulitis in children will prevent missing a non-sinus-based cause such as lacrimal infections, conjunctivitis secondary to atypical pathogens, or even tumors. All patients should undergo a detailed clinical examination, orbital imaging and microbiological testing. Orbital cellulitis in children poses diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties due to the many possible etiologies. Aside from sinusitis, the most important etiologies to pursue are lacrimal system infections and tumors. When confronted with a non-specific clinical presentation, thorough etiologic work-up is essential, in view of the potential life-threatening, functional and social implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Sex determination using maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kanthem, Ranjith Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Kumari, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual identification is a subtle concept and often one of the most important priorities in mass disasters, road accidents, air crashes, fires, and even in the investigation of criminal cases. Matching specific features detected on the cadaver with data recorded during the life of an individual is an important aspect in forensics, and can be performed by fingerprint analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid matching, anthropological methods, radiological methods and other techniques which can facilitate age and sex identification. Sinus radiography is one such method that has been used for determination of the sex of an individual. Hence, an attempt is being made to use the different dimensions of the maxillary sinus in the determination of sex using coronal and axial sections of plain computed tomography (CT) scan. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients including 17 male and 13 female, visiting the Outpatient Department of the Mamata General Hospital were included as the study subjects. The dimensions of right and left maxillary sinuses of 30 subjects from plain CT were measured using SYNGO software and statistical analysis was done. Results: Sex determination using height, length, width, and volume of the maxillary sinus on both sides showed statistically significant results with a higher percentage of sexual dimorphism in the case of volume. Conclusion: Volume of the right maxillary sinus can be used as accurate diagnostic parameter for sex determination. PMID:26005308

  15. Neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć; Smajlović, Dževdet; Dostović, Zikrija; Iljazović, Amra; Kojić, Biljana; Zonić, Lejla

    2017-10-01

    To present a case of co-occurrence of neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case report.  We presented 49-year-old Caucasian domicile female-farmer with a history of headache, weakness, and vomiting for a period of three months. Also, she had significant papilledema. We diagnosed rare co-morbidity of neurobrucellosis (confirmed after ELISA-test in serum samples and CSF analysis of pleocytosis/increase in protein/decrease in glucose level) in the setting of cerebral venous thrombosis developed in left sigmoid/left transverse sinus (confirmed after MRV of brain). Favorable outcome was achieved by applying protracted polymicrobial antibiotic therapy and heparin. It may be challenging to diagnose neurobrucellosis, especially in patients with atypical presentation and abortive clinical forms. The co-morbidity of neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is uncommon. However, it provides a possibility of brucella-colonization in cerebral venous sinuses as a potential hidden link between them. Patients with severe and persistent headache, as well as other neurological symptoms/signs should be considered for neurobrucellosis in endemic, but also in brucella non-endemic regions due to migrations. According to literature survey, this co-occurrence of neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is third one reported from Europe.

  16. Human paranasal sinuses and selective brain cooling: a ventilation system activated by yawning?

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Hack, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    The function of the paranasal sinuses has been a controversial subject since the time of Galen, with many different theories advanced about their biological significance. For one, the paranasal sinuses have been regarded as warmers of respiratory air, when in actuality these structures appear to function in cooling the blood. In fact, human paranasal sinuses have been shown to have higher volumes in individuals living in warmer climates, and thus may be considered radiators of the brain. The literature suggests that the transfer of cool venous blood from the paranasal sinuses to the dura mater may provide a mechanism for the convection process of cooling produced by the evaporation of mucus within human sinuses. In turn, the dura mater may transmit these temperature changes, initiated by the cool venous blood from the heat-dissipating surfaces of the sinuses, to the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated in cadaveric dissections that the thin bony posterior wall of the maxillary sinus serves as an origin for both medial and lateral pterygoid muscle segments, an anatomic finding that had been previously underappreciated in the literature. The present authors hypothesize that the thin posterior wall of the maxillary sinus may flex during yawning, operating like a bellows pump, actively ventilating the sinus system, and thus facilitating brain cooling. Such a powered ventilation system has not previously been described in humans, although an analogous system has been reported in birds.

  17. Rare and massive odontogenic parakeratotic cyst treated by endoscopic sinus surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Keratocystic odontogenic tumors are benign neoplasms of odontogenic origin with a potential for aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Many different treatments for this type of lesion have been reported. However, no common consensus has emerged to date regarding the most effective therapeutic approach. Cases of maxillary sinus giant keratocystic odontogenic tumors completely excised by enucleation or marsupialization via endoscopic sinus surgery are extremely rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been described in the literature since 2005. Case presentation We report a case of a 24-year-old Italian man who came to our department with maxillary sinus region swelling, pain and left nasal obstruction. A massive keratocystic odontogenic tumor involving the right maxillary sinus and causing focal erosions of the bony walls was diagnosed. The keratocystic odontogenic tumor was removed as much as possible by a transnasal approach using endoscopic sinus surgery, which produced optimal surgical and prognostic outcomes. Follow-up is reported for an 8-year period. Conclusion Conservative management in this case demonstrated good therapeutic efficacy with a low risk of recurrence. For injuries involving the maxillary sinus, the possibility of decompression or marsupialization by endoscopic sinus surgery should always be considered because it demonstrated the potential to lead to excellent results even after 8 years of follow-up in our patient. To our knowledge, no case report has described follow-up longer than 8 years for a maxillary sinus keratocystic odontogenic tumor treated with endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:25193270

  18. Managment of orbital complications of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ozkurt, Fazil Emre; Ozkurt, Zeynep Gursel; Gul, Aylin; Akdag, Mehmet; Sengul, Engin; Yilmaz, Beyhan; Yuksel, Harun; Meric, Faruk

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We reported on the clinical approaches of ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology departments in the treatment of the orbital complications of sinusitis. We also included an in-depth literature review. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 51 patients from January 2008 to January 2014. The records were evaluated for age, gender, type of orbital complications, symptoms, predisposing factors, imaging studies, medical and surgical management, culture results, and follow-up information. SPSS version 15.0 software (Statistical Analysis, The Statistical Package for Social Sciences Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria, with available medical records, for the study (29 male, 22 female). Thirty-two (62.7%) were diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis and 19 (37.3%) with postseptal cellulitis. After a detailed evaluation, 15 were diagnosed with a subperiosteal abscess (SPA), and 4 were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis. The age and gender was similar for the two groups. Five patients with medial SPA were treated with endoscopic sinus surgery, one patient with inferior SPA was treated with external surgery, and six patients with other localizations were treated with a combination of endoscopic sinus surgery and external surgery. All patients presented with periorbital erythema and edema. The length of hospitalization and duration of symptoms were similar in both groups. Visual acuity was between 1/10 to 10/10 (mean 7/10) and statistically significant for preseptal and postseptal cellulitis groups (p<0.001). All patients received intravenous antibiotics upon the first day of admission. Conclusion: Orbital complications of acute sinusitis required intensive follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. A contrast-enhanced paranasal sinus computerized tomography (CT) scan can detect the extent of the infection. An initial trial of intravenosus (IV) antibiotics may be appropriate when close

  19. A new preoperative radiological assessment in LeFort I surgery: anterior nasal spine-sphenoidal rostrum.

    PubMed

    Gulses, Aydin; Oren, Cem; Altug, Hasan Ayberk; Ilica, Turan; Sencimen, Metin; Erdemci, Fevzi; Gider, Ismail Korhan; Dogan, Necdet

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the distance between the anterior nasal spine and the sphenoidal rostrum related to the LeFort I surgery in a Turkish population sample. We retrospectively reviewed multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT) scans of 209 patients (134 males and 75 females). The images were obtained on a 64-MDCT scanner. The imaging parameters were 0.5 × 64 mm slice thickness, 0.5/0.3 mm increment, 120 kV, 250 mAs, 0.5 sn rotation time, 0.641 pitch, and 512 matrix. The distance between the anterior nasal spine and the sphenoidal rostrum was assessed with the Vitrea 2 software program. The study group consisted of 134 male (mean age 57.90 ± 5.86) and 75 female (mean age 54.84 ± 4.31) patients. The distance between the anterior nasal spine and the sphenoidal rostrum was ranging between 40.4 and 70.9 mm (average 58.3 ± 5.9) in males and 45.0 and 63.2 mm in (average 55.2 ± 4.3) females. In addition, no statistically significant differences were found between genders. The results of the current study showed that after 40 mm proceeding of the ball end nasal osteotome, the surgeons must be aware of penetrating the sphenoidal rostrum.

  20. Clinical and biological analysis in graftless maxillary sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcelo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Maxillary sinus lift for dental implant installation is a well-known and versatile technique; new techniques are presented based on the physiology of intrasinus bone repair. The aim of this review was to determine the status of graftless maxillary sinus lift and analyze its foundations and results. A search was conducted of the literature between 1995 and 2015 in the Medline, ScienceDirect, and SciELO databases using the keywords "maxillary sinus lift," "blood clot," "graftless maxillary sinus augmentation," and "dental implant placement." Ten articles were selected for our analysis of this technique and its results. Despite the limited information, cases that were followed for at least six months and up to four years had a 90% success rate. Published techniques included a lateral window, elevation of the sinus membrane, drilling and dental implant installation, descent of the membrane with variations in the installation of the lateral wall access and suturing. The physiology behind this new bone formation response and the results of the present research were also discussed. We concluded that this is a promising and viable technique under certain inclusion criteria.

  1. Clinical and biological analysis in graftless maxillary sinus lift

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Maxillary sinus lift for dental implant installation is a well-known and versatile technique; new techniques are presented based on the physiology of intrasinus bone repair. The aim of this review was to determine the status of graftless maxillary sinus lift and analyze its foundations and results. A search was conducted of the literature between 1995 and 2015 in the Medline, ScienceDirect, and SciELO databases using the keywords “maxillary sinus lift,” “blood clot,” “graftless maxillary sinus augmentation,” and “dental implant placement.” Ten articles were selected for our analysis of this technique and its results. Despite the limited information, cases that were followed for at least six months and up to four years had a 90% success rate. Published techniques included a lateral window, elevation of the sinus membrane, drilling and dental implant installation, descent of the membrane with variations in the installation of the lateral wall access and suturing. The physiology behind this new bone formation response and the results of the present research were also discussed. We concluded that this is a promising and viable technique under certain inclusion criteria. PMID:28875135

  2. Primary frontal sinus squamous cell carcinoma in a dog treated with surgical excision.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Janet A; Pagano, Candace J; Boudreaux, Bonnie B

    2017-01-01

    An 8-year-old castrated male mixed breed dog was presented for a squamous cell carcinoma of the left frontal sinus. A partial craniectomy was performed and polytetrafluoroethylene mesh was placed over the craniectomy site. The dog recovered well with a good cosmetic outcome. Histopathology confirmed primary frontal sinus squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. Salmonella enterica Subspecies diarizonae Maxillary Sinusitis in a Snake Handler: First Report

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Lukas; Kraft, Marcel; Fostiropoulos, Karolos; Falkowski, Anna; Tarr, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the first case of reptile-associated maxillary sinusitis due to Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae in a snake handler and the third case of salmonella-associated sinusitis worldwide. The case highlights the potential of respiratory transmission and atypical salmonellosis presentations. PMID:27186588

  4. Frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial and intraorbital extension.

    PubMed

    Peral Cagigal, Beatriz; Barrientos Lezcano, Javier; Floriano Blanco, Raúl; García Cantera, José Miguel; Sánchez Cuéllar, Luis Antonio; Verrier Hernández, Alberto

    2006-11-01

    Frontal sinus mucoceles can present with a multitude of different symptoms including ophthalmic disturbances. Even benign, they have a tendency to expand by eroding the surrounding bony walls that displaces and destroys structures by pressure and bony resorption. A 32-year-old man with diplopia, proptosis of the right eye and headache was presented. The diagnosis was frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial and intraorbital extension. Possible clinical manifestations of mucoceles, diagnostic imaging techniques and treatment used are discussed. Frontal mucoceles are benign and curable, early recognition and management of them is of paramount importance, because they can cause local, orbital or intracranial complications.

  5. Primary sinonasal tuberculosis confined to the unilateral maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Yeon; Bae, Jung Ho; Park, Jee Soo; Lee, Seung-Sin

    2014-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is not rare and occurs mainly in the head and neck region. Cervical tuberculous lymphadenopathy is the most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Sinonasal tuberculosis is known to occur very rarely due to the protective functions of sinonasal mucosa. Although some signs of sinonasal tuberculosis may be present, such as associated facial abscesses, the symptoms and signs are usually nonspecific. Clinical suspicion is important for timely diagnosis and proper management of sinonasal tuberculosis due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. We report a case of tuberculosis confined to the unilateral maxillary sinus that was first misdiagnosed as recurrent rhinosinusitis after endoscopic sinus surgery.

  6. [Cholesterol granuloma in paranasal sinus. An unfrequent pseudotumor in maxillary sinuses].

    PubMed

    García de Hombre, Alina María; Pérez Peñate, Armando

    2005-01-01

    The cholesterol granuloma is well known in the middle ear, in the mastoid antrum and the air cells of temporal bone, mostly related to a chronic infectious process. There are other localizations such as the pleura, lung, pericardium, kidneys, arterial wall, nerves, brain, testicles, lymphatic ganglion and in the paranasals sinuses. Its localization in the mediofacial area is very unfrequent, having only been described 44 cases up to the year 2002. We present a 42 year-old patient, who required surgical treatment because of a increase in the volume of area her left facial of one month's old. It resulted to be secundary to an expansion of the maxilar sinus, such as seen on the computerized tomography carried out on the patient. The diagnosis was cholesterol granuloma, performed, through the anatomo-pathology study. We review the litterature on this subject and analyse the possible etiologic cause of this lesion, its clinic, diagnostic methodology and treatment.

  7. Demographic study of pituitary adenomas undergone trans-sphenoidal surgery in Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran 2001–2013

    PubMed Central

    Zerehpoosh, Farahnaz Bidari; Sabeti, Shahram; Sharifi, Guive; Shakeri, Hania; Alipour, Setareh; Arman, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are abnormal benign tumors that develop in the pituitary gland. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of different types of PAs with an indication for trans-sphenoidal surgery in a well-defined population referred to Loghman Hakim Hospital during 2001–2013. Subjects and Methods: In this retrospective study, the prevalence rate and symptoms associated with pituitary mass and hormone excess in operated patients were investigated. The diagnosis was verified after retrieval of clinical, hormonal, radiological, and pathological data. Demographic data were collected in all cases. Descriptive analysis, t-test, one-way analysis of variance and Fischer exacts test were used. Results: A total of 278 patients with PAs who underwent surgical interventions were evaluated. Most of the patients were aged 40–50 years with an average of 41 ± 14. The most prominent complaint was pressure effect, which was detected in 153 cases (55.2%). At the second place, hormonal disorders were observed in 125 cases (44.8%). Type of pituitary tumors were: Prolactinomas (29.1%), growth hormone (GH)-producing tumors (25%), nonfunctioning PAs (28.4%), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing tumors (2.1%), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-producing tumors (0.7%), GH/prolactin (13.6%), GH/ACTH (0.3%), and TSH/ACTH (0.3%). Fifty-seven patients presented with recurrent adenomas. Pituitary apoplexy was found in 11 patients. One case of Sheehan syndrome was recorded among these. The correlations between clinical symptoms and patients, age and sex were not significant. Conclusion: The overview of demographic characteristics in Iranian patients with PAs with surgical indication has been discussed in the present investigation. The prevalence of different types of PAs and the most common clinical symptoms have been demonstrated. PMID:26693430

  8. Unroofed coronary sinus in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Luciano Pereira; Meyer, Maria Rita F.; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the uncommon association between neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and unroofed coronary sinus. CASE DESCRIPTION: Girl with four years and six months old who was hospitalized for heart surgery. The cardiac problem was discovered at four months of life. On physical examination, the patient presented several café-au-lait spots in the trunk and the limbs and freckling of the axillary and groin regions. Her father had similar skin findings, suggesting the NF1 diagnosis. The cardiac evaluation by echocardiography disclosed an atrial septal defect of unroofed coronary sinus type. This cardiac finding was confirmed at surgery. The procedure consisted of the atrial septal defect repair with autologous pericardium. COMMENTS: NF1 is a common autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. Among the NF1 findings, congenital heart defects are considered unusual. In the literature review, there was no association between NF1 and unroofed coronary sinus, which is a rare cardiac malformation, characterized by a communication between the coronary sinus and the left atrium, resultant from the partial or total absence of the coronary sinus roof. It represents less than 1% of atrial septal defect cases. More reports are important to determine if this association is real or merely casual, since NF1 is a common condition. PMID:24473962

  9. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma of Ethmoid Sinus Recurring as an Orbital Mass

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Bahram; Ameli, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a primitive, malignant, round cell neoplasm derived from mesenchymal tissue that exhibits partial skeletal muscle differentiation. We describe a rare case of alveolar RMS of ethmoid sinus, recurring as an orbital mass. A 23-year-old man with the chief complaint of anosmia and mild proptosis was diagnosed with RMS of the left ethmoid sinus and orbit following an endoscopic biopsy of the mass. He was treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At 12 months after diagnosis, while still on maintenance chemotherapy, he presented to our eye hospital with a large medial canthal mass and lateral globe displacement. Orbital computed tomography revealed an extraconal mass in the medial orbit of the left eye, extending posteriorly and compressing the medial rectus muscle. Notably, the ethmoid sinus was clear. Incisional biopsy was performed and the recurrence of alveolar RMS was confirmed. Alveolar RMS of the ethmoid sinus may recur as an orbital mass, even if the sinus where it originated is clear at the time of recurrence. PMID:27190854

  10. Absence of the superior petrosal veins and sinus: Surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ken; Ribas, Eduardo Santamaria Carvalhal; Kiyosue, Hiro; Komune, Noritaka; Miki, Koichi; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superior petrosal vein, one of the most constant and largest drainage pathways in the posterior fossa, may result in complications if occluded. This study calls attention to a unique variant in which the superior petrosal veins and sinus were absent unilaterally, and the venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial drainage groups. Methods: This study examines one venogram and another anatomic specimen in which the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent. Results: The superior petrosal veins, described as 1–3 bridging veins, emptying into the superior petrosal sinus, are the major drainage pathways of the petrosal group of posterior fossa veins. In the cases presented, the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent and venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial groups, including the lateral mesencephalic or bridging vein on the tentorial cerebellar surface. Conclusions: In cases in which the superior petrosal sinus and veins are absent, care should be directed to preserving the collateral drainage through the galenic and tentorial tributaries. Although surgical strategies for intraoperative management and preservation of venous structures are still controversial, knowledge of the possible anatomical variations is considered to be essential to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:25745589

  11. When Sinuses Attack! (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a cold? continue When Good Sinuses Go Bad What about that cold that won't go away? A cold virus can: damage the delicate ... if you are feeling well enough, you can go to school or go outside and play. In ...

  12. Study of relationship of concha bullosa to nasal septal deviation and sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Kamath P, Shrinath D

    2009-09-01

    To study the etiological role of concha bollosa in deviated nasal septum (DNS) and sinusitis. In this retrospective study 419 consecutive CT scans of paranasal sinuses done between October 2005 and September 2007 were serially evaluated for the presence of concha, DNS and sinusitis. Out of 419 CT scans evaluated, concha bullosa was present in 40.3% of patients. Among these, concha co-existent DNS was found in 87.5%, air column between DNS and concha was found in 88.5% and sinus disease was present in 69.2% of patients. Presence of air column between DNS and concha excludes the etiological role of concha in DNS. Concha bullosa may predispose to sinusitis.

  13. [The rationale for the efficacious puncture therapy of acute suppurative sinusitis in the children].

    PubMed

    Edgem, S R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the clinical efficacy of local antibacterial therapy in the children presenting with sinusitis. The study included a total of 104 patients allocated to 2 groups. In one of them, the patients underwent therapeutic and diagnostic punctures of the maxillary sinuses to obtain the material for subsequent microbiological analysis and to administer antibiotics into the sinuses. The results of the study give evidence that local application of antibacterial agents in combination with mucolytic drugs is at least as efficient for the treatment of acute maxillary sinusitis as the traditional methods for the management of the same conditions with the use of systemic antibiotics. The study confirmed the expediency of using the puncture technique for the treatment of patients with acute inflammatory process in maxillary sinuses.

  14. Sinus Disventilation and Atrophy of the Upper Maxilla: A Combined Surgical Approach Is Possible?

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Orlando; Vellone, Valentino; Arangio, Paolo; Della Rocca, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to assess the effectiveness and reliability of a new combined approach to treat the maxillary atrophy and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and other rhino-sinusal pathologies. This 1-step procedure consisting functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and maxillary sinus-lift with simultaneous implant placement for patients with a severe reabsorbed maxillary bone and sinuses' disease. In case of disventilation and maxillary sinuses flogosis, the mucociliary clearance and physiological ventilation have to be aided, in order to make a safer and predictable sinus-lift surgery. This new surgical approach provides the restitution ad integrum of sinus health and at the same time, its grafting. If possible, implants were placed during the same surgical procedures. A 1 center retrospective study was performed in a private clinic of Rome, from January 2006 to November 2013. Seventy-eight adult patients with maxillary atrophy and sinus disventilation no responding to 3-week pharmacological therapy were admitted. All of them underwent to medical history, clinical examination, nasal endoscopies, and computed tomography (CT) scan of nose and paranasal sinuses. Patients were divided in 2 groups using Lund Mackay CT scoring. A 1-step surgery based on FESS and maxillary sinus-lift was performed. Simultaneous implant placement was performed when a crestal thickness of at least 4 mm was present on CT examination. Patient's symptoms scoring was evaluated through visual analogical scale both pre- and postoperatively. Computed tomography scores were usually not in accordance with presurgical clinical condition. Patients with clinical symptoms of disventilatory sinus and low evidence of CRS on CT showed relevant improvements in symptoms' scores after endoscopic surgery. All implants achieved good primary stability; Only 1 patient had lost implant due to peri-implantitis during 1-year follow-up period (1.3%).

  15. Charles Bonnet Syndrome Following Trans-Sphenoidal Adenomectomy without Optic Nerve Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jang-Ho; Ahn, Joon-Ho; Park, Jun-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) can develop after trans-sphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA); however, the neural mechanisms remain unknown. Sensory deprivation and releasing phenomenon are both hypothetical explanations for this condition; however, there is no definite evidence that strongly supports either supposition. We report the first case of CBS after TSA without optic nerve atrophy. Postoperatively, the patient's vision seemed to be relatively well preserved, apart from the left-side hemianopsia in the right eye. Distinctive visual hallucinations only appeared when his eyes were closed, and these responded to quetiapine in a dose-dependent manner. Dose dependent change in colors and formation of hallucination was reported. Two weeks after quetiapine initiation, the patient's CBS was completely resolved. This unique case suggests that blocking sensory input from the periphery is more critical than neural damage of the bottom-up connection to the visual association cortex. In addition, quetiapine should be considered as a specific treatment for CBS. PMID:27757139

  16. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Netalkar, A; Lad, S D

    2000-02-01

    Primary Ewing's sarcoma is an uncommon lethal tumour of the long bones and pelvic girdle mainly affecting children and young adults. An origin in the cranial bones is extremely rare. We report a unique case of primary involvement of the greater wing of sphenoid bone in a 16-year-old patient. Aggressive management using microsurgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy was curative. Localized, primary Ewing's sarcoma of the cranial bones should be considered as a distinct clinicopathological entity with an extremely low rate of dural penetration and metastases, and with a relatively better prognosis as compared with those of long bones and pelvic girdle. In neurosurgical practice, primary Ewing's sarcoma of the cranial bones requires early aggressive management to achieve adequate long-term prognosis and cure.

  17. Follow-Up of the Sinus Membrane Elevation Technique for Maxillary Sinus Implants without the Use of Graft Material.

    PubMed

    Riben, Christopher; Thor, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    There is a limited amount of studies evaluating long-term results of the sinus membrane elevation technique for bone formation around implants in the maxillary sinus floor without the use of bone graft material. To investigate the long-term results of this technique with regard to implant survival and bone gain in the maxillary sinus floor. A retrospective study was conducted on patients who had undergone the surgical procedure from November 2001 to August 2008. Thirty-six patients with a total of 87 implants (ASTRA TECH Implant System™) in 53 sinuses were examined. After a submerged healing period of 6 months and at least 12 months of loading, the patients were examined clinically and radiologically. Implant stability was measured using resonance frequency analysis (RFA). The mean follow-up time was 4.6 years (range 1.5-7 years). Five implants were lost giving a survival rate of 94.3%.Subantral preoperative vertical bone levels were in the range of 1 to 10 mm. The average bone gain at the sinus floor was 6 mm. The 55 fixtures eligible for RFA displayed a mean implant stability quotient of 77 (range 56-85.5). The present study illustrates the long-term reliability of the technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Paranasal sinus anatomy of Aegyptopithecus: implications for hominoid origins.

    PubMed

    Rossie, James B; Simons, Elwyn L; Gauld, Suellen C; Rasmussen, D Tab

    2002-06-11

    The East African Early Miocene apes, or proconsulids, have often been considered to be among the earliest members of the Hominoidea, as defined by the divergence of the Cercopithecoidea, but this hypothesis is only weakly supported by available fossil evidence. The ethmofrontal sinus is one of a few morphological features that may link proconsulids with later hominoids. Here we present direct evidence of an ethmofrontal sinus in an early Oligocene stem catarrhine, Aegyptopithecus zeuxis. The presence of this sinus in Aegyptopithecus suggests that its presence in proconsulids is most likely to be a retained primitive condition. The morphological evidence bearing on proconsulids' purported hominoid affinities is further weakened by this conclusion, and alternative phylogenetic possibilities, such as the placement of proconsulids as stem catarrhines are considered more likely.

  19. Paranasal sinus anatomy of Aegyptopithecus: Implications for hominoid origins

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Simons, Elwyn L.; Gauld, Suellen C.; Rasmussen, D. Tab

    2002-01-01

    The East African Early Miocene apes, or proconsulids, have often been considered to be among the earliest members of the Hominoidea, as defined by the divergence of the Cercopithecoidea, but this hypothesis is only weakly supported by available fossil evidence. The ethmofrontal sinus is one of a few morphological features that may link proconsulids with later hominoids. Here we present direct evidence of an ethmofrontal sinus in an early Oligocene stem catarrhine, Aegyptopithecus zeuxis. The presence of this sinus in Aegyptopithecus suggests that its presence in proconsulids is most likely to be a retained primitive condition. The morphological evidence bearing on proconsulids' purported hominoid affinities is further weakened by this conclusion, and alternative phylogenetic possibilities, such as the placement of proconsulids as stem catarrhines are considered more likely. PMID:12060786

  20. Pilonidal sinus - management in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Postanal pilonidal sinus is a skin condition in the midline of the natal cleft. A primary pit forms in the midline, caused by a hair follicle that has become infected, into which loose hairs enter to create a track or abscess. This article explains how a pilonidal sinus develops and presents, and details methods of treatment in the primary care setting and specialist management options. The devastation of recurrence with further pain, embarrassment, and time off work or school (in some cases for months or years), plus the prospect of more surgery is still common for patients with postanal pilonidal sinus. This can be avoided with the correct management. Surgery now has methods that produce early healing, low recurrence rates and acceptable cosmetic results.