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Sample records for spherical geometry izmerenie

  1. Characterizing Student Mathematics Teachers' Levels of Understanding in Spherical Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Baki, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an exploratory study aimed at the identification of students' levels of understanding in spherical geometry as van Hiele did for Euclidean geometry. To do this, we developed and implemented a spherical geometry course for student mathematics teachers. Six structured, "task-based interviews" were held with eight student…

  2. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  3. Disruption and Disclosure: Learning To Model Spherical Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of learning to read the process of the variation in congruence and relate it to the original geometry of the sphere since it touches on more general questions about how models are appropriated and used. Presents a learning episode that implemented projective models for both spherical and hyperbolic geometry in Object Logo.…

  4. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  5. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  6. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster (F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  7. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-08

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955)] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer one that is to some extent improved.

  8. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-01

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955), 10.1093/qjmam/8.1.1] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer a somewhat improved one. A third DR, based on transforming a planar DR into a spherical one, suffers no unphysical predictions and compares reasonably well with the exact work of Chandrasekhar and a more recent numerical analysis of the problem [Terrones and Carrara, Phys. Fluids 27, 054105 (2015), 10.1063/1.4921648].

  9. The AGCE related studies of baroclinic flows in spherical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Steady state, axisymmetric motions of a Boussineaq fluid continued in rotating spherical anmulus are considered. The motions are driven by latitudinally varying temperature gradient at the shells. Linearized formulations for a narrow gap are derived and the flow field is divided into the Ekman layers and the geostrophic interior. The Ekman layer flows are consistent with the known results for cylindrical geometries. Within the framework of rather restrictive assumptions, the interior flows are solved by a series of associated Legendre polynomials. The solutions show qualitative features valid at midlatitudes.

  10. The effects of spherical geometry on baroclinic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moura, A. D.; Stone, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    A baroclinic stability analysis is performed for a simple family of zonal shear profiles over a sphere, using a two-layer, quasi-geostrophic model. The stability properties and the structure of the most unstable waves are qualitatively similar to those on a beta-plane. However, the spherical geometry plays a major role in locating some of the important features of the most unstable waves. In particular, the locations of the maximum wave amplitude, maximum eddy heat fluxes, and maximum convergence of the eddy angular momentum flux are all well correlated with the location of the maximum excess of the vertical shear over the minimum value necessary for local instability on a sphere. Consequently the eddy momentum flux tends to generate a mid-latitude jet even if there is no preexisting mid-latitude jet in the basic state zonal flow. These findings suggest some of the elements needed for parameterizing the meridional variations of baroclinic eddy fluxes accurately.

  11. Technology in Spherical Geometry Investigations: Reflections on Spontaneous Use and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students in a graduate geometry class used items such as paper, ribbon, plastic spheres, cardboard tubes, and markers to carry out investigations in spherical geometry. The hands-on activities helped students develop a new appreciation of geometry as a study of shape and space; however, the difficulty of subduing wayward elastics and drawing lines…

  12. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE PAGES

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  13. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  14. Spherical Nanoparticle Supported Lipid Bilayers for the Structural Study of Membrane Geometry-Sensitive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward Y.; Briley, Nicole E.; Tyndall, Erin R.; Xu, Jie; Li, Conggang; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.; Flanagan, John M.; Tian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Many essential cellular processes including endocytosis and vesicle trafficking require alteration of membrane geometry. These changes are usually mediated by proteins that can sense and/or induce membrane curvature. Using spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (SSLBs), we characterize how SpoVM, a bacterial development factor, interacts with differently curved membranes by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR. Our results demonstrate that SSLBs are an effective system for structural and topological studies of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules. PMID:26488086

  15. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  16. TOA Lightning Location Retrieval on Spherical and Oblate Spheroidal Earth Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solakiewicz, R. J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple linear algebraic solution is introduced for retrieving the location and time-of-occurrence of lightning ground strikes on a spherical Earth from a network of four or more time-of-arrival (TOA) sensors. Since the solution accounts for Earth curvature, it represents an extension to earlier planar model results described by Koshak et al. A test of the retrieval method is provided using computer-simulated data sets. The method is easy to comprehend and completely avoids reference to the mathematics of spherical hyperbolas such as discussed by Lewis. A quasi-analytic extension to the spherical Earth solution is provided for an oblate spheroidal Earth geometry, and the importance/relevance of oblate effects are discussed. Future application of these methods in support of the North American National Lightning Detection Network (NALDN) described by Cummins et al. is desirable, but additional theoretical investigations are required to incorporate magnetic bearing information into the present solution process.

  17. A spectral solution of the magneto-convection equations in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerbach, Rainer

    2000-04-01

    A fully three-dimensional solution of the magneto-convection equations - the nonlinearly coupled momentum, induction and temperature equations - is presented in spherical geometry. Two very different methods for solving the momentum equation are presented, corresponding to the limits of slow and rapid rotation, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The possibility of including a freely rotating, finitely conducting inner core in the solution of the momentum and induction equations is also discussed. Copyright

  18. Sum frequency generation image reconstruction: Aliphatic membrane under spherical cap geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-07

    The article explores an opportunity to approach structural properties of phospholipid membranes using Sum Frequency Generation microscopy. To establish the principles of sum frequency generation image reconstruction in such systems, at first approach, we may adopt an idealistic spherical cap uniform assembly of hydrocarbon molecules. Quantum mechanical studies for decanoic acid (used here as a representative molecular system) provide necessary information on transition dipole moments and Raman tensors of the normal modes specific to methyl terminal – a typical moiety in aliphatic (and phospholipid) membranes. Relative degree of localization and frequencies of the normal modes of methyl terminals make nonlinearities of this moiety to be promising in structural analysis using Sum Frequency Generation imaging. Accordingly, the article describes derivations of relevant macroscopic nonlinearities and suggests a mapping procedure to translate amplitudes of the nonlinearities onto microscopy image plane according to geometry of spherical assembly, local molecular orientation, and optical geometry. Reconstructed images indicate a possibility to extract local curvature of bilayer envelopes of spherical character. This may have practical implications for structural extractions in membrane systems of practical relevance.

  19. Directional decomposition of the acoustic wave equation for fluids and metafluids in spherical geometries, with application to transformational acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter

    2016-03-01

    A new directional decomposition of the acoustic 3D wave equation is derived for spherically symmetric geometries, where the wave fields do not need to possess such a symmetry. This provides an alternative basis for various applications of techniques like invariant embedding and time domain Green functions in spherically symmetric geometries. Contrary to previous results on spherical wave splittings, the new decomposition is given in a very explicit form. The wave equation considered incorporates effects from radially varying compressibility and density, but also from anisotropic density, a property of certain so called metafluids. By applying the new spherical wave splitting, we show that all spherically symmetric acoustic metafluid cloaks are diffeomorphic images of a homogeneous and isotropic spherical ball of perfect fluid.

  20. CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY DUE TO TURBULENT CONVECTION IN SPHERICAL WEDGE GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepylae, Petri J.; Mantere, Maarit J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-08-10

    We report on simulations of turbulent, rotating, stratified, magnetohydrodynamic convection in spherical wedge geometry. An initially small-scale, random, weak-amplitude magnetic field is amplified by several orders of magnitude in the course of the simulation to form oscillatory large-scale fields in the saturated state of the dynamo. The differential rotation is solar-like (fast equator), but neither coherent meridional poleward circulation nor near-surface shear layer develop in these runs. In addition to a poleward branch of magnetic activity beyond 50 Degree-Sign latitude, we find for the first time a pronounced equatorward branch at around 20 Degree-Sign latitude, reminiscent of the solar cycle.

  1. Sensitivity Kernels for Flows in Time-Distance Helioseismology: Extension to Spherical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, Vincent G. A.; Roth, Markus; Zima, Wolfgang; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    We extend an existing Born approximation method for calculating the linear sensitivity of helioseismic travel times to flows from Cartesian to spherical geometry. This development is necessary for using the Born approximation for inferring large-scale flows in the deep solar interior. As first sanity check, we compare two f-mode kernels from our spherical method and from an existing Cartesian method. The horizontal and total integrals agree to within 0.3%. As a second consistency test, we consider a uniformly rotating Sun and a travel distance of 42°. The analytical travel-time difference agrees with the forward-modeled travel-time difference to within 2%. In addition, we evaluate the impact of different choices of filter functions on the kernels for a meridional travel distance of 42°. For all filters, the sensitivity is found to be distributed over a large fraction of the convection zone. We show that the kernels depend on the filter function employed in the data analysis process. If modes of higher harmonic degree (90 ≲ l ≲ 170) are permitted, a noisy pattern of a spatial scale corresponding to l ≈ 260 appears near the surface. When mainly low-degree modes are used (l ≲ 70), the sensitivity is concentrated in the deepest regions and it visually resembles a ray-path-like structure. Among the different low-degree filters used, we find the kernel for phase-speed-filtered measurements to be best localized in depth.

  2. A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow water equations in spherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D.L.; Hack, J.J.; Jakob, R.; Swarztrauber, P.N. ); Drake, J.B. )

    1991-08-01

    A suite of seven test cases is proposed for the evaluation of numerical methods intended for the solution of the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. The shallow water equations exhibit the major difficulties associated with the horizontal dynamical aspects of atmospheric modeling on the spherical earth. These cases are designed for use in the evaluation of numerical methods proposed for climate modeling and to identify the potential trade-offs which must always be made in numerical modeling. Before a proposed scheme is applied to a full baroclinic atmospheric model it must perform well on these problems in comparison with other currently accepted numerical methods. The cases are presented in order of complexity. They consist of advection across the poles, steady state geostrophically balanced flow of both global and local scales, forced nonlinear advection of an isolated low, zonal flow impinging on an isolated mountain, Rossby-Haurwitz waves and observed atmospheric states. One of the cases is also identified as a computer performance/algorithm efficiency benchmark for assessing the performance of algorithms adapted to massively parallel computers. 31 refs.

  3. Efficient projection and backprojection scheme for spherically symmetric basis functions in divergent beam geometry.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andy; Köhler, Thomas; Nielsen, Tim; Proksa, Roland

    2006-12-01

    In cone-beam transmission tomography the measurements are performed with a divergent beam of x-rays. The reconstruction with iterative methods is an approach that offers the possibility to reconstruct the corresponding images directly from these measurements. Another approach based on spherically symmetric basis functions (blobs) has been reported with results demonstrating a better image quality for iterative reconstruction algorithms. When combining the two approaches (i.e., using blobs in iterative cone-beam reconstruction of divergent rays) the problem of blob sampling without introducing aliasing must be addressed. One solution to this problem is to select a blob size large enough to ensure a sufficient sampling, but this prevents a high resolution reconstruction, which is not desired. Another solution is a heuristic low-pass filtering, which removes this aliasing, but neglects the different contributions of blobs to the absorption depending on the spatial position in the volume and, therefore, cannot achieve the best image quality. This article presents a model of sampling the blobs which is motivated by the beam geometry. It can be used for high resolution reconstruction and can be implementedefficiently.

  4. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly {sup 2139}Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase {sup 239}Pu containing 5.9 wt-% {sup 240}Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal.

  5. RAPID OPTIMAL SPH PARTICLE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRIES FOR CREATING ASTROPHYSICAL INITIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-04-01

    Creating spherical initial conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that are spherically conformal is a difficult task. Here, we describe two algorithmic methods for evenly distributing points on surfaces that when paired can be used to build three-dimensional spherical objects with optimal equipartition of volume between particles, commensurate with an arbitrary radial density function. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method against stretched lattice arrangements on the metrics of hydrodynamic stability, spherical conformity, and the harmonic power distribution of gravitational settling oscillations. We further demonstrate how our method is highly optimized for simulating multi-material spheres, such as planets with core–mantle boundaries.

  6. CSDUST3 - A radiation transport code for a dusty medium with 1-D planar, spherical or cylindrical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun Ming; Spagna, George F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The program solves the radiation transport problem in a dusty medium with one-dimensional planar, spherical or cylindrical geometry. It determines self-consistently the effects of multiple scattering, absorption, and re-emission of photons on the temperature of dust grains and the characteristics of the internal radiation field. The program can treat radiation field anisotropy, linear anisotropic scattering, and multi-grain components. The program output consists of the dust-temperature distribution, flux spectrum, surface brightness at each frequency and the observed intensities (involving a convolution with a telescope beam pattern).

  7. Hydrodynamics of Spherical Flows and Geometry of Premixed Flames near the Stagnation Point of Axisymmetric Viscous Counterflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.

    1999-01-01

    Counterflow premixed flames play a significant role in the modeling of laminar flames. This is in part motivated by the fact that stretched premixed flames simulate local flamelet dynamics within turbulent premixed flames. In the present study, the modified form of the Navier-Stokes equation for reactive fields introduced earlier is employed to investigate the hydrodynamics of spherical flows embedded within counterflows. The geometry of premixed flames near the stagnation point is also determined. The predictions are in favorable agreement with the experimental observations and prior numerical studies.

  8. Landau level quantization for massless Dirac fermions in the spherical geometry: Graphene fractional quantum Hall effect on the Haldane sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniaga, Michael; Peterson, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We derive the single-particle eigenenergies and eigenfunctions for massless Dirac fermions confined to the surface of a sphere in the presence of a magnetic monopole, i.e., we solve the Landau level problem for electrons in graphene on the Haldane sphere. With the single-particle eigenfunctions and eigenenergies we calculate the Haldane pseudopotentials for the Coulomb interaction in the second Landau level and calculate the effective pseudopotentials characterizing an effective Landau level mixing Hamiltonian entirely in the spherical geometry to be used in theoretical studies of the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. Our treatment is analogous to the formalism in the planar geometry and reduces to the planar results in the thermodynamic limit.

  9. A parallel implementation of an MHD code for the simulation of mechanically driven, turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, K.; Jenko, F.; Forest, C. B.; Bayliss, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    A parallel implementation of a nonlinear pseudo-spectral MHD code for the simulation of turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry is reported. It employs a dual domain decomposition technique in both real and spectral space. It is shown that this method shows nearly ideal scaling going up to 128 CPUs on Beowulf-type clusters with fast interconnect. Furthermore, the potential of exploiting single precision arithmetic on standard x86 processors is examined. It is pointed out that the MHD code thereby achieves a maximum speedup of 1.7, whereas the validity of the computations is still granted. The combination of both measures will allow for the direct numerical simulation of highly turbulent cases ( 1500

  10. Determination of projection geometry from quantitative assessment of the distortion of spherical references in single-view projection radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Ralf; Bruellmann, Dan Dominik; Roeder, Felix; D'Hoedt, Bernd

    2004-10-01

    A method is introduced, inferring the three-dimensional (3-D) location from the 2-D radiographic shadow of an opaque spherical reference body of known radius by considering its elliptical distortion, the 2-D shadow location and a known source-to-receptor distance. Three noncollinear spheres fixed to a rigid object constitute all possible degrees of freedom, i.e., the entire 3-D imaging geometry. The method may be used (a) to determine the 3-D imaging geometry from a single 2-D view and (b) to correct for foreshortening of object distances coplanar with the plane defined by the sphere triplet. Apart from the mathematical background the article describes a small feasibility experiment, performed with four different sphere diameters and a commercial dental ccd-receptor system (pixel length: 0.0195 mm). The mouse-cursor based image evaluation revealed an average underestimation of the critical depth- (x-) coordinate decreasing with increasing radius (-30.3% for r=0.5 mm to 2.8% for r=2.5 mm). Intraobserver reliability (the standard deviation between three single cursor-based assessments) ranged between 0% and 8% of the actual true depth. The main source of the input error is associated with the assessment of the amount of elliptical distortion, where subpixel accuracy is demanded. Consequently, software-based automated image evaluation is required using available methods for pattern recognition and point-spread correction. Provided sufficient accuracy, the method provides an important tool for foreshortening correction, depth assessment, motion analysis, and 3-D reconstruction from two or more 2-D views.

  11. Shell thickness and dynamic magnetic field effects on the critical phenomena of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles with spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel, Yusuf

    2017-03-01

    By using Monte Carlo simulations for classical Heisenberg spins, we study the critical phenomena and ferrimagnetic properties of spherical nanoparticles with core-shell geometry. The particle core is composed of ferromagnetic spins, and it is coated by a ferromagnetic shell. Total size of the particle is fixed but the thickness of the shell is varied in such a way that the shell layer is grown at the expense of the core. Effects of the shell thickness, as well as dynamic magnetic field parameters such as oscillation period and field amplitude on the magnetization profiles, dynamic hysteresis loops and phase diagrams have been investigated for the present system. It has been found that as the shell thickness varies then the easy axis magnetization of the overall system may exhibit Q-, P-, L- and N- type behaviors based on the Neél terminology. We also found that three distinct anomalies originate in the thermal variation of specific heat with increasing field period. Dynamic hysteresis loops corresponding to off-axial magnetization components exhibit unconventional behavior such as double rings with symmetric shapes around the vertical axis over the h (t) = 0 line which may originate due to the stochastic resonance behavior of these components.

  12. Effect of zone size on the convergence of exact solutions for diffusion in single phase systems with planar, cylindrical or spherical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Exact solutions for diffusion in single phase binary alloy systems with constant diffusion coefficient and zero-flux boundary condition have been evaluated to establish the optimum zone size of applicability. Planar, cylindrical and spherical interface geometry, and finite, singly infinite, and doubly infinite systems are treated. Two solutions are presented for each geometry, one well suited to short diffusion times, and one to long times. The effect of zone-size on the convergence of these solutions is discussed. A generalized form of the diffusion solution for doubly infinite systems is proposed.

  13. Diffuse light propagation in a turbid medium with varying refractive index: Monte Carlo modeling in a spherically symmetrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Shendeleva, Margarita L; Molloy, John A

    2006-09-20

    We report on the development of Monte Carlo software that can model media with spatially varying scattering coefficient, absorption, and refractive index. The varying refractive index is implemented by calculating curved photon paths in the medium. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with analytical solutions obtained using the diffusion approximation. The model under investigation is a scattering medium that contains a spherically symmetrical inclusion (inhomogeneity) created by variation in optical properties and having no sharp boundaries. The following steady-state cases are considered: (a) a nonabsorbing medium with a spherically symmetrical varying refractive index, (b) an inclusion with varying absorption and scattering coefficients and constant refractive index, and (c) an inclusion with varying absorption, scattering, and refractive index. In the latter case it is shown that the interplay between the absorption coefficient and the refractive index may create the effect of a hidden inclusion.

  14. Calculation of absorption and secondary scattering of X-rays by spherical amorphous materials in an asymmetric transmission geometry.

    PubMed

    Bendert, J C; Blodgett, M E; Kelton, K F

    2013-03-01

    Expressions for absorption and the secondary scattering intensity ratio are presented for a small beam impinging off-center of a spherical amorphous sample. Large gradients in the absorption correction are observed from small offsets from the central axis. Additionally, the secondary scattering intensity ratio causes an intensity asymmetry in the detector image. The secondary scattering intensity ratio is presented in integral form and must be computed numerically. An analytic, small-angle, asymptotic series solution for the integral form of the absorption correction is also presented.

  15. Electro-magneto-encephalography for the three-shell model: numerical implementation via splines for distributed current in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokas, A. S.; Hauk, O.; Michel, V.

    2012-03-01

    The basic inverse problems for the functional imaging techniques of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) consist in estimating the neuronal current in the brain from the measurement of the electric potential on the scalp and of the magnetic field outside the head. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the relevant formulae for a three-shell spherical model in the case of independent as well as simultaneous MEG and EEG measurements. Furthermore, we introduce an explicit and stable technique for the numerical implementation of these formulae via splines. Numerical examples are presented using the locations and the normal unit vectors of the real 102 magnetometers and 70 electrodes of the Elekta Neuromag (R) system. These results may have useful implications for the interpretation of the reconstructions obtained via the existing approaches.

  16. Euclidean, Spherical, and Hyperbolic Shadows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Many classical problems in elementary calculus use Euclidean geometry. This article takes such a problem and solves it in hyperbolic and in spherical geometry instead. The solution requires only the ability to compute distances and intersections of points in these geometries. The dramatically different results we obtain illustrate the effect…

  17. An Improvement on SSA Congruence for Geometry and Trigonometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeshurun, Shraga; Kay, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Three ideas are explored: (1) an improvement of the SSA congruence theorem for trigonometry; (2) a discussion of the failure of SSA in spherical geometry; and (3) an extension of SSA to spherical geometry and hyperbolic geometry. (MNS)

  18. Method for characterization of a spherically bent crystal for K.alpha. X-ray imaging of laser plasmas using a focusing monochromator geometry

    DOEpatents

    Kugland, Nathan; Doeppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-04-07

    A method is provided for characterizing spectrometric properties (e.g., peak reflectivity, reflection curve width, and Bragg angle offset) of the K.alpha. emission line reflected narrowly off angle of the direct reflection of a bent crystal and in particular of a spherically bent quartz 200 crystal by analyzing the off-angle x-ray emission from a stronger emission line reflected at angles far from normal incidence. The bent quartz crystal can therefore accurately image argon K.alpha. x-rays at near-normal incidence (Bragg angle of approximately 81 degrees). The method is useful for in-situ calibration of instruments employing the crystal as a grating by first operating the crystal as a high throughput focusing monochromator on the Rowland circle at angles far from normal incidence (Bragg angle approximately 68 degrees) to make a reflection curve with the He-like x-rays such as the He-.alpha. emission line observed from a laser-excited plasma.

  19. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  20. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  1. Dispersion in Spherical Water Drops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, John C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a laboratory exercise simulating the paths of light rays through spherical water drops by applying principles of ray optics and geometry. Describes four parts: determining the output angles, computer simulation, explorations, model testing, and solutions. Provides a computer program and some diagrams. (YP)

  2. A Module in Spherical Trigonometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congleton, C. A.; Broome, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    This module, designed for use at the high school level as a four- to eight-hour topic, includes: the geometry of a sphere, the coordinate system used to describe points on the earth's surface, parallel and meridian sailing, and the solution of right spherical triangles. (Author/MK)

  3. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    generated by evaporation-induced nanoparticle crystallization or polymerization of ordered nanoparticle crystallization arrays. In particular, because microfluidics was used for the generation of the droplet templates, the development of spherical colloidal PhCs has progressed significantly. These new strategies not only ensure monodispersity, but also increase the structural and functional diversity of the PhC beads, paving the way for the development of advanced optoelectronic devices. In this Account, we present the research progress on spherical colloidal PhCs, including their design, preparation, and potential applications. We outline various types of spherical colloidal PhCs, such as close-packed, non-close-packed, inverse opal, biphasic or multiphasic Janus structured, and core-shell structured geometries. Based on their unique optical properties, applications of the spherical colloidal PhCs for displays, sensors, barcodes, and cell culture microcarriers are presented. Future developments of the spherical colloidal PhC materials are also envisioned.

  4. Spherical Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Developed largely through a Small Business Innovation Research contract through Langley Research Center, Interactive Picture Corporation's IPIX technology provides spherical photography, a panoramic 360-degrees. NASA found the technology appropriate for use in guiding space robots, in the space shuttle and space station programs, as well as research in cryogenic wind tunnels and for remote docking of spacecraft. Images of any location are captured in their entirety in a 360-degree immersive digital representation. The viewer can navigate to any desired direction within the image. Several car manufacturers already use IPIX to give viewers a look at their latest line-up of automobiles. Another application is for non-invasive surgeries. By using OmniScope, surgeons can look more closely at various parts of an organ with medical viewing instruments now in use. Potential applications of IPIX technology include viewing of homes for sale, hotel accommodations, museum sites, news events, and sports stadiums.

  5. Spherical solitons in Earth’S mesosphere plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Annou, K.; Annou, R.

    2016-01-15

    Soliton formation in Earth’s mesosphere plasma is described. Nonlinear acoustic waves in plasmas with two-temperature ions and a variable dust charge where transverse perturbation is dealt with are studied in bounded spherical geometry. Using the perturbation method, a spherical Kadomtsev–Petviashvili equation that describes dust acoustic waves is derived. It is found that the parameters taken into account have significant effects on the properties of nonlinear waves in spherical geometry.

  6. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  7. Spatial symmetry breaking in rapidly rotating convective spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in geophysical and astrophysical convection systems are characterized by fast rotation and spherical shell geometry. The combined effects of Coriolis forces and spherical shell geometry produce a unique spatial symmetry for the convection pattern in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. In this paper, we first discuss the general spatial symmetries for rotating spherical shell convection. A special model, a spherical shell heated from below, is then used to illustrate how and when the spatial symmetries are broken. Symmetry breaking occurs via a sequence of spatial transitions from the primary conducting state to the complex multiple-layered columnar structure. It is argued that, because of the dominant effects of rotation, the sequence of spatial transitions identified from this particular model is likely to be generally valid. Applications of the spatial symmetry breaking to planetary convection problems are also discussed.

  8. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  9. The spherical birdcage resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpen, Michael D.

    A description of the operation of a spherical resonator capable of producing a uniform magnetic induction throughout a spherical volume is presented. Simple closed-form expressions for the spectrum of resonant frequencies are derived for both the low-pass and the high-pass configuration of the resonator and are shown to compare favorably with observation in an experimental coil system. It is shown that the spherical resonator produces a uniform spherical field of view when used as a magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency coil.

  10. Spherical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  11. Faraday instability of a spherical drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebo Adou, A.; Tuckerman, Laurette; Shin, Seungwon; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2014-11-01

    A liquid drop subjected to an oscillatory radial force comprises a spherical version of the Faraday instability, with a subharmonic response which is half of the forcing frequency. The time-dependent shape of the drop and the velocity field in and around it are calculated using BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. We compare this shape with the spherical harmonic selected at onset, calculated by adapting the Floquet stability analysis of Kumar and Tuckerman to a spherical geometry. We interpret the shape in light of theoretical results by Busse, Matthews and others concerning pattern formation in the presence of O(3) symmetry.

  12. Simulation on the aggregation process of spherical particle confined in a spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xu, J. J.; Zhang, L.

    2016-04-01

    The aggregation process of spherical particles confined in a spherical shell was studied by using a diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA) model. The influence of geometrical confinement and wetting-like properties of the spherical shell walls on the particle concentration profile, aggregate structure and aggregation kinetics had been explored. The results show that there will be either depletion or absorption particles near the shell walls depending on the wall properties. It is observed that there are four different types of density distribution which can be realized by modifying the property of the inner or outer spherical shell wall. In addition, the aggregate structure will become more compact in the confined spherical shell comparing to bulk system with the same particle volume fraction. The analysis on the aggregation kinetics indicates that geometrical confinement will promote the aggregation process by reducing the invalid movement of the small aggregates and by constraining the movement of those large aggregates. Due to the concave geometrical characteristic of the outer wall of the spherical shell, its effects on the aggregating kinetics and the structure of the formed aggregates are more evident than those of the inner wall. This study will provide some instructive information of controlling the density distribution of low-density porous polymer hollow spherical shells and helps to predict gel structures developed in confined geometries.

  13. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  14. Poisson-Riemannian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Edwin J.; Majid, Shahn

    2017-04-01

    We study noncommutative bundles and Riemannian geometry at the semiclassical level of first order in a deformation parameter λ, using a functorial approach. This leads us to field equations of 'Poisson-Riemannian geometry' between the classical metric, the Poisson bracket and a certain Poisson-compatible connection needed as initial data for the quantisation of the differential structure. We use such data to define a functor Q to O(λ2) from the monoidal category of all classical vector bundles equipped with connections to the monoidal category of bimodules equipped with bimodule connections over the quantised algebra. This is used to 'semiquantise' the wedge product of the exterior algebra and in the Riemannian case, the metric and the Levi-Civita connection in the sense of constructing a noncommutative geometry to O(λ2) . We solve our field equations for the Schwarzschild black-hole metric under the assumption of spherical symmetry and classical dimension, finding a unique solution and the necessity of nonassociativity at order λ2, which is similar to previous results for quantum groups. The paper also includes a nonassociative hyperboloid, nonassociative fuzzy sphere and our previously algebraic bicrossproduct model.

  15. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  16. The Precessing Spherical Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Explains how the spherical pendulum could be used to observe nonreentrant orbits, and shows, using theoretical analysis, that for small displacements the elliptical orbit will precess at a rate proportional to its area. (GA)

  17. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  18. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki; Kaita, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  19. Spherical geodesic mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Jimmy; Kenamond, Mark Andrew; Burton, Donald E.; Shashkov, Mikhail Jurievich

    2015-02-27

    In ALE simulations with moving meshes, mesh topology has a direct influence on feature representation and code robustness. In three-dimensional simulations, modeling spherical volumes and features is particularly challenging for a hydrodynamics code. Calculations on traditional spherical meshes (such as spin meshes) often lead to errors and symmetry breaking. Although the underlying differencing scheme may be modified to rectify this, the differencing scheme may not be accessible. This work documents the use of spherical geodesic meshes to mitigate solution-mesh coupling. These meshes are generated notionally by connecting geodesic surface meshes to produce triangular-prismatic volume meshes. This mesh topology is fundamentally different from traditional mesh topologies and displays superior qualities such as topological symmetry. This work describes the geodesic mesh topology as well as motivating demonstrations with the FLAG hydrocode.

  20. Applications of Differential Geometry to Cartography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Julio; Thome, Nestor

    2004-01-01

    This work introduces an application of differential geometry to cartography. The mathematical aspects of some geographical projections of Earth surface are revealed together with some of its more important properties. An important problem since the discovery of the 'spherical' form of the Earth is how to compose a reliable map of the surface of…

  1. Spherical mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Jay L. (Inventor); Messick, Glenn C. (Inventor); Nardell, Carl A. (Inventor); Hendlin, Martin J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A spherical mounting assembly for mounting an optical element allows for rotational motion of an optical surface of the optical element only. In that regard, an optical surface of the optical element does not translate in any of the three perpendicular translational axes. More importantly, the assembly provides adjustment that may be independently controlled for each of the three mutually perpendicular rotational axes.

  2. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  3. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  4. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  5. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  6. Footprint Geometry and Sessile Drop Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2016-11-01

    How does a sessile drop resonate if its footprint is square (square drop)? In this talk, we discuss the two distinct families of observed modes in our experiments. One family (spherical modes) is identified with the natural modes of capillary spherical caps, and the other (grid modes) with Faraday waves on a square bath (square Faraday waves). A square drop exhibits grid or spherical modes depending on its volume, and the two families of modes arise depending on how wavenumber selection of footprint geometry and capillarity compete. For square drops, a dominant effect of footprint constraint leads to grid modes which are constrained response; otherwise the drops exhibit spherical modes, the characteristic of sessile drops on flat plates. Chun-Ti Chang takes his new position at National Taiwan University on Aug. 15th, 2016. Until then, Chun-Ti Chang is affiliated with Technical University Dortmund, Germany.

  7. Geometric Monte Carlo and black Janus geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Kim, Chanju; Kim, Kyung Kiu; Min, Hyunsoo; Song, Jeong-Pil

    2017-04-01

    We describe an application of the Monte Carlo method to the Janus deformation of the black brane background. We present numerical results for three and five dimensional black Janus geometries with planar and spherical interfaces. In particular, we argue that the 5D geometry with a spherical interface has an application in understanding the finite temperature bag-like QCD model via the AdS/CFT correspondence. The accuracy and convergence of the algorithm are evaluated with respect to the grid spacing. The systematic errors of the method are determined using an exact solution of 3D black Janus. This numerical approach for solving linear problems is unaffected initial guess of a trial solution and can handle an arbitrary geometry under various boundary conditions in the presence of source fields.

  8. Enrichment Activities for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman

    1983-01-01

    Enrichment activities that teach about geometry as they instruct in geometry are given for some significant topics. The facets of geometry included are tessellations, round robin tournaments, geometric theorems on triangles, and connections between geometry and complex numbers. (MNS)

  9. Noncommuting spherical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Bander, Myron

    2004-10-15

    Restricting the states of a charged particle to the lowest Landau level introduces a noncommutativity between Cartesian coordinate operators. This idea is extended to the motion of a charged particle on a sphere in the presence of a magnetic monopole. Restricting the dynamics to the lowest energy level results in noncommutativity for angular variables and to a definition of a noncommuting spherical product. The values of the commutators of various angular variables are not arbitrary but are restricted by the discrete magnitude of the magnetic monopole charge. An algebra, isomorphic to angular momentum, appears. This algebra is used to define a spherical star product. Solutions are obtained for dynamics in the presence of additional angular dependent potentials.

  10. Sensational spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kendall, J. M., Jr.; Bahrami, P. A.; Wang, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid-dynamic and capillary forces can be used to form nearly perfect, very small spherical shells when a liquid that can solidify is passed through an annular die to form an annular jet. Gravity and certain properties of even the most ideal materials, however, can cause slight asymmetries. The primary objective of the present work is the control of this shell formation process in earth laboratories rather than space microgravity, through the development of facilities and methods that minimize the deleterious effects of gravity, aerodynamic drag, and uncontrolled cooling. The spherical shells thus produced can be used in insulation, recyclable filter materials, fire retardants, explosives, heat transport slurries, shock-absorbing armor, and solid rocket motors.

  11. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  12. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-04-04

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  13. Spherical nitroguanidine process

    DOEpatents

    Sanchez, John A.; Roemer, Edward L.; Stretz, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    A process of preparing spherical high bulk density nitroguanidine by dissing low bulk density nitroguanidine in N-methyl pyrrolidone at elevated temperatures and then cooling the solution to lower temperatures as a liquid characterized as a nonsolvent for the nitroguanidine is provided. The process is enhanced by inclusion in the solution of from about 1 ppm up to about 250 ppm of a metal salt such as nickel nitrate, zinc nitrate or chromium nitrate, preferably from about 20 to about 50 ppm.

  14. Recent progress on spherical torus research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Masayuki; Kaita, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ˜ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ˜ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of an attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two mega-ampere class ST facilities in 2000, the National Spherical Torus Experiment in the United States and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than 16 ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  15. Recent progress on spherical torus research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki; Kaita, Robert

    2015-04-15

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R{sub 0}/a) reduced to A ∼ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ∼ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of an attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two mega-ampere class ST facilities in 2000, the National Spherical Torus Experiment in the United States and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than 16 ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  16. Growing an actin gel on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Noireaux, V; Golsteyn, R M; Friederich, E; Prost, J; Antony, C; Louvard, D; Sykes, C

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by the motility of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, we have experimentally studied the growth of an actin gel around spherical beads grafted with ActA, a protein known to be the promoter of bacteria movement. On ActA-grafted beads F-actin is formed in a spherical manner, whereas on the bacteria a "comet-like" tail of F-actin is produced. We show experimentally that the stationary thickness of the gel depends on the radius of the beads. Moreover, the actin gel is not formed if the ActA surface density is too low. To interpret our results, we propose a theoretical model to explain how the mechanical stress (due to spherical geometry) limits the growth of the actin gel. Our model also takes into account treadmilling of actin. We deduce from our work that the force exerted by the actin gel on the bacteria is of the order of 10 pN. Finally, we estimate from our theoretical model possible conditions for developing actin comet tails. PMID:10692348

  17. Automated semi-spherical irradiance meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Vera-Dimas, J. G.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Cabello-Ruiz, R.; Varona, J.

    2011-09-01

    In this semi-spherical meter, a single detector is used to realize all measurements, which is located on the extreme of a rectangular ring (assumed as joined two mobile branches in order to compensate the weights), describing half-meridians from 0° up to 170°. The illumination source under test is located at the center of the mobile support, which can rotate 360° horizontally. The two combined movements allow us to obtain a semi-spherical geometry. The number of measurement points is determined by the two step-motors located under the mobile support of the luminary and on one of the two fixed arms, which support the mobile rectangular ring, respectively. The mechanical arrangement has the enough rigidity to support the precision required for the acquisition stage, based on a dsPIC. The main advantages of this arrange are: Its low costs (using recyclable materials only such as "electronic waste"), a reliable detection based on a single photo-detector, with an integrated amplification stage, and the mechanical design. The received power by the detector is useful to obtain the irradiance profile of the lighting sources under test. The semi-spherical geometry of the meter makes it useful for the analysis of directive and non directive sources, in accordance with the angle described by the mobile ring. In this work, special attention is given to LED lamps due to its impact in several sceneries of the daily life. A comparison between the irradiance patterns of two LED lamps is also given.

  18. Comparison of the Gauss-Seidel spherical polarized radiative transfer code with other radiative transfer codes.

    PubMed

    Herman, B M; Caudill, T R; Flittner, D E; Thome, K J; Ben-David, A

    1995-07-20

    Calculations that use the Gauss-Seidel method are presented of the diffusely scattered light in a spherical atmosphere with polarization fully included. Comparisons are made between this method and the Monte Carlo calculations of other researchers for spherical geometry in a pure Rayleigh atmosphere. Comparisons with plane-parallel atmospheres are also presented. Single-scatter intensity comparisons with spherical geometry show excellent agreement. When all orders of scattering are included, comparisons of polarization parameters I, Q and U as well as the plane of polarization show good agreement when allowances are made for the statistical variability inherent in the Monte Carlo method.

  19. Spherical harmonic expansion of the Levitus Sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    Prior information for the stationary sea surface topography (SST) may be needed in altimetric solutions that intend to simultaneously improve the gravity field and determine the SST. For this purpose the oceanographically derived SST estimates are represented by a spherical harmonic expansion. The spherical harmonic coefficients are computed from a least squares adjustment of the data covering the majority of the oceanic regions of the world. Several tests are made to determine the optimum maximum degree of solution and the best configuration of the geometry of the data in order to obtain a solution that fits the data and also provides a good spectral representation of the SST.

  20. Strongly Localized Image States of Spherical Graphitic Particles

    PubMed Central

    Gumbs, Godfrey

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the localization of charged particles by the image potential of spherical shells, such as fullerene buckyballs. These spherical image states exist within surface potentials formed by the competition between the attractive image potential and the repulsive centripetal force arising from the angular motion. The image potential has a power law rather than a logarithmic behavior. This leads to fundamental differences in the nature of the effective potential for the two geometries. Our calculations have shown that the captured charge is more strongly localized closest to the surface for fullerenes than for cylindrical nanotube. PMID:24587747

  1. A Spherical Earth Solution for TOA Lightning Location Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solakiewicz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of retrieving ligntning, ground-strike location on a spherical Earth surface using a network of 4 or more time-of-arrival (TOA) sensors is considered, It is shown that this problem has an analytic solution and therefore does not require the use of nonlinear estimation theory (e.g., minimization). The mathematical robustness of the analytic solution is tested using computer-generated lightning sources and simulated TOA measurement errors. A summary of a quasi-analytic extension of the spherical Earth solution to an oblate spheroid Earth geometry is also provided.

  2. Spherical artifacts on ferrograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In the past, hollow spheres detected on ferrograms have been interpreted as being due to fretting, abrasion, cavitation erosion, and fatigue-related processes. Here it is reported that such spheres were found to result from the fact that a routine grinding operation on a steel plate was carried out about 20 feet away from the ferrograph. A similar grinding operation was performed on a piece of low carbon steel a few feet from the ferrograph, and after a few minutes of grinding, the resulting ferrogram contained thousands of particles of which more than 90% were spherical. Because of the widespread occurrence of ordinary grinding operations, it seems prudent that those utilizing the ferrograph be cognizant of this type of artifact.

  3. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  4. Effective geometries in self-gravitating polytropes

    SciTech Connect

    Bini, D.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.

    2008-09-15

    Perturbations of a perfect barotropic and irrotational Newtonian self-gravitating fluid are studied using a generalization of the so-called 'effective geometry' formalism. The case of polytropic spherical stars, as described by the Lane-Emden equation, is studied in detail in the known cases of existing explicit solutions. The present formulation gives a natural scenario in which the acoustic analogy has relevance for both stellar and galactic dynamics.

  5. Geometry of Discrete-Time Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, Robert I.; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Classical Hamiltonian spin systems are continuous dynamical systems on the symplectic phase space (S^2)^n. In this paper, we investigate the underlying geometry of a time discretization scheme for classical Hamiltonian spin systems called the spherical midpoint method. As it turns out, this method displays a range of interesting geometrical features that yield insights and sets out general strategies for geometric time discretizations of Hamiltonian systems on non-canonical symplectic manifolds. In particular, our study provides two new, completely geometric proofs that the discrete-time spin systems obtained by the spherical midpoint method preserve symplecticity. The study follows two paths. First, we introduce an extended version of the Hopf fibration to show that the spherical midpoint method can be seen as originating from the classical midpoint method on T^*{R}^{2n} for a collective Hamiltonian. Symplecticity is then a direct, geometric consequence. Second, we propose a new discretization scheme on Riemannian manifolds called the Riemannian midpoint method. We determine its properties with respect to isometries and Riemannian submersions, and, as a special case, we show that the spherical midpoint method is of this type for a non-Euclidean metric. In combination with Kähler geometry, this provides another geometric proof of symplecticity.

  6. SPHERICAL SHOCK WAVES IN SOLIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Introduction-Reasons for Studying Spherical Shock Waves, Physics of Cavity Expansion due to Explosive Impact, General Nature of Shock Waves...Governing Differential Equation of Self-Similar Motion; Application of the Theory of Self-Similar Motion to the Problem of Expansion of a Spherical

  7. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  8. Features of spherical torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.

    1985-12-01

    The spherical torus is a very small aspect ratio (A < 2) confinement concept obtained by retaining only the indispensable components inboard to the plasma torus. MHD equilibrium calculations show that spherical torus plasmas with safety factor q > 2 are characterized by high toroidal beta (..beta../sub t/ > 0.2), low poloidal beta (..beta../sub p/ < 0.3), naturally large elongation (kappa greater than or equal to 2), large plasma current with I/sub p//(aB/sub t0/) up to about 7 MA/mT, strong paramagnetism (B/sub t//B/sub t0/ > 1.5), and strong plasma helicity (F comparable to THETA). A large near-omnigeneous region is seen at the large-major-radius, bad-curvature region of the plasma in comparison with the conventional tokamaks. These features combine to engender the spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost. Because of its strong paramagnetism and helicity, the spherical torus plasma shares some of the desirable features of spheromak and reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas, but with tokamak-like confinement and safety factor q. The general class of spherical tori, which includes the spherical tokamak (q > 1), the spherical pinch (1 > q > O), and the spherical RFP (q < O), have magnetic field configurations unique in comparison with conventional tokamaks and RFPs. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Optimal mollifiers for spherical deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Ralf; Quellmalz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the inversion of the spherical Funk-Radon transform, and, more generally, with the inversion of spherical convolution operators from the point of view of statistical inverse problems. This means we consider discrete data perturbed by white noise and aim at estimators with optimal mean square error for functions out of a Sobolev ball. To this end we analyze a specific class of estimators built upon the spherical hyperinterpolation operator, spherical designs and the mollifier approach. Eventually, we determine optimal mollifier functions with respect to the noise level, the number of data points and the smoothness of the original function. We complete this paper by providing a fast algorithm for the numerical computation of the estimator, which is based on the fast spherical Fourier transform, and by illustrating our theoretical results with numerical experiments.

  10. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  11. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A; Halo, Tiffany L; Merkel, Timothy J; Rische, Clayton H; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A; Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2015-03-31

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies.

  12. Consider a spherical cow

    SciTech Connect

    Harte, J.

    1985-01-01

    Consider a Spherical Cow describes relatively simple mathematical methods for developing quantitative answers to often complex environmental problems. Early chapters provide systematic insights into problem solving and identifying mathematical tools and models that lead to back of the envelope answers. Subsequent chapters treat increasingly complex problems. Solutions are sought at different levels, e.g., informed guesses, quantitative solutions based on detailed analytical models, and ultimately, critical evaluation of the consequences of removing simplifying assumptions from the models. The vehicle employed is a collection of 44 challenging problems, with clearly worked out solutions, plus ample exercises. The book, though directed at environmentalists, should appeal to chemists. Many of the problems are rooted in chemistry, including acid rain, the CO/sub 2/ greenhouse effect, chemical contamination, and the disturbing of cyclical chemical balances. Readers feeling a civic responsibility to think and speak more clearly on environmental issues will find the essential modeling and quantitative approaches valuable assets beyond the help provided by the usual courses in science and mathematics. In fact, the techniques of problem solving have broad applicability beyond the specific environmental examples covered in this text.

  13. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C.; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S.; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A.; Halo, Tiffany L.; Merkel, Timothy J.; Rische, Clayton H.; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies. PMID:25775582

  14. Gravity inversion in spherical coordinates using tesseroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of the gravity field have provided geophysicists with exceptionally dense and uniform coverage of data over vast areas. This enables regional or global scale high resolution geophysical investigations. Techniques like forward modeling and inversion of gravity anomalies are routinely used to investigate large geologic structures, such as large igneous provinces, suture zones, intracratonic basins, and the Moho. Accurately modeling such large structures requires taking the sphericity of the Earth into account. A reasonable approximation is to assume a spherical Earth and use spherical coordinates. In recent years, efforts have been made to advance forward modeling in spherical coordinates using tesseroids, particularly with respect to speed and accuracy. Conversely, traditional space domain inverse modeling methods have not yet been adapted to use spherical coordinates and tesseroids. In the literature there are a range of inversion methods that have been developed for Cartesian coordinates and right rectangular prisms. These include methods for estimating the relief of an interface, like the Moho or the basement of a sedimentary basin. Another category includes methods to estimate the density distribution in a medium. The latter apply many algorithms to solve the inverse problem, ranging from analytic solutions to random search methods as well as systematic search methods. We present an adaptation for tesseroids of the systematic search method of "planting anomalous densities". This method can be used to estimate the geometry of geologic structures. As prior information, it requires knowledge of the approximate densities and positions of the structures. The main advantage of this method is its computational efficiency, requiring little computer memory and processing time. We demonstrate the shortcomings and capabilities of this approach using applications to synthetic and field data. Performing the inversion of gravity and gravity gradient

  15. Unsteady Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2001-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu-g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and (mu-g) flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames, flame spread over solids, droplet combustion, and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the "weak" (low burning rate per unit flame area) mu-g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in mu-g will burn indefinitely. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the mu-g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem one

  16. Reynolds stress and heat flux in spherical shell convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Mantere, M. J.; Guerrero, G.; Brandenburg, A.; Chatterjee, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Turbulent fluxes of angular momentum and enthalpy or heat due to rotationally affected convection play a key role in determining differential rotation of stars. Their dependence on latitude and depth has been determined in the past from convection simulations in Cartesian or spherical simulations. Here we perform a systematic comparison between the two geometries as a function of the rotation rate. Aims: Here we want to extend the earlier studies by using spherical wedges to obtain turbulent angular momentum and heat transport as functions of the rotation rate from stratified convection. We compare results from spherical and Cartesian models in the same parameter regime in order to study whether restricted geometry introduces artefacts into the results. In particular, we want to clarify whether the sharp equatorial profile of the horizontal Reynolds stress found in earlier Cartesian models is also reproduced in spherical geometry. Methods: We employ direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical and Cartesian geometries. In order to alleviate the computational cost in the spherical runs, and to reach as high spatial resolution as possible, we model only parts of the latitude and longitude. The rotational influence, measured by the Coriolis number or inverse Rossby number, is varied from zero to roughly seven, which is the regime that is likely to be realised in the solar convection zone. Cartesian simulations are performed in overlapping parameter regimes. Results: For slow rotation we find that the radial and latitudinal turbulent angular momentum fluxes are directed inward and equatorward, respectively. In the rapid rotation regime the radial flux changes sign in accordance with earlier numerical results, but in contradiction with theory. The latitudinal flux remains mostly equatorward and develops a maximum close to the equator. In Cartesian simulations this peak can be explained by the strong "banana cells". Their effect in the

  17. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  18. BSSN equations in spherical coordinates without regularization: Vacuum and nonvacuum spherically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Pedro J.; Cordero-Carrión, Isabel

    2012-06-01

    Brown [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 104029 (2009)] has recently introduced a covariant formulation of the BSSN equations which is well suited for curvilinear coordinate systems. This is particularly desirable as many astrophysical phenomena are symmetric with respect to the rotation axis or are such that curvilinear coordinates adapt better to their geometry. However, the singularities associated with such coordinate systems are known to lead to numerical instabilities unless special care is taken (e.g., regularization at the origin). Cordero-Carrión will present a rigorous derivation of partially implicit Runge-Kutta methods in forthcoming papers, with the aim of treating numerically the stiff source terms in wavelike equations that may appear as a result of the choice of the coordinate system. We have developed a numerical code solving the BSSN equations in spherical symmetry and the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations written in flux-conservative form. A key feature of the code is that it uses a second-order partially implicit Runge-Kutta method to integrate the evolution equations. We perform and discuss a number of tests to assess the accuracy and expected convergence of the code—namely a pure gauge wave, the evolution of a single black hole, the evolution of a spherical relativistic star in equilibrium, and the gravitational collapse of a spherical relativistic star leading to the formation of a black hole. We obtain stable evolutions of regular spacetimes without the need for any regularization algorithm at the origin.

  19. Learning Geometry through Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates effective teaching and learning of geometrical concepts using dynamic geometry software (DGS). Based from her students' reactions to her project, the author found that her students' understanding of the concepts was better than if they had learned geometry through paper-based tasks. However, mixing computer…

  20. Optofluidic encapsulation of crystalline colloidal arrays into spherical membrane.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Yang, Seung-Man

    2008-05-07

    Double emulsion droplets encapsulating crystalline colloidal arrays (CCAs) with a narrow size distribution were produced using an optofluidic device. The shell phase of the double emulsion was a photocurable resin that was photopolymerized downstream of the fluidic channel within 1 s after drop generation. The present optofluidic synthesis scheme was very effective for fabricating highly monodisperse spherical CCAs that were made structurally stable by in situ photopolymerization of the encapsulating shells. The shell thickness and the number of core emulsion drops could be controlled by varying the flow rates of the three coflowing streams in the dripping regime. The spherical CCAs confined in the shell exhibited distinct diffraction patterns in the visible range, in contrast to conventional film-type CCAs. As a result of their structure, the spherical CCAs exhibited photonic band gaps for normal incident light independent of the position on the spherical surface. This property was induced by heterogeneous nucleation at the smooth wall of the spherical emulsion drop during crystallization into a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. On the other hand, the solidified shells did not permit the penetration of ionic species, enabling the CCAs to maintain their structure in a continuous aqueous phase of high ionic strength for at least 1 month. In addition, the evaporation of water molecules inside the shell was slowed considerably when the core-shell microparticles were exposed to air: It took approximately 6 h for a suspension encapsulated in a thick shell to evaporate completely, which is approximately 1000 times longer than the evaporation time for water droplets with the same volume. Finally, the spherical CCAs additionally exhibited enhanced stability against external electric fields. The spherical geometry and high dielectric constant of the suspension contributed to reducing the electric field inside the shell, thereby inhibiting the electrophoretic movement of

  1. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  2. Milking the spherical cow - on aspherical dynamics in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Read, Justin I.; Teyssier, Romain; Governato, Fabio; Gualandris, Alessia; Roth, Nina; Devriendt, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies and the dark matter haloes that host them are not spherically symmetric, yet spherical symmetry is a helpful simplifying approximation for idealized calculations and analysis of observational data. The assumption leads to an exact conservation of angular momentum for every particle, making the dynamics unrealistic. But how much does that inaccuracy matter in practice for analyses of stellar distribution functions, collisionless relaxation, or dark matter core-creation? We provide a general answer to this question for a wide class of aspherical systems; specifically, we consider distribution functions that are `maximally stable', i.e. that do not evolve at first order when external potentials (which arise from baryons, large-scale tidal fields or infalling substructure) are applied. We show that a spherically symmetric analysis of such systems gives rise to the false conclusion that the density of particles in phase space is ergodic (a function of energy alone). Using this idea we are able to demonstrate that: (a) observational analyses that falsely assume spherical symmetry are made more accurate by imposing a strong prior preference for near-isotropic velocity dispersions in the centre of spheroids; (b) numerical simulations that use an idealized spherically symmetric setup can yield misleading results and should be avoided where possible; and (c) triaxial dark matter haloes (formed in collisionless cosmological simulations) nearly attain our maximally stable limit, but their evolution freezes out before reaching it.

  3. Newtonian wormholes with spherical symmetry and tidal forces on test particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, Paulo; Lemos, José P. S.

    2015-06-01

    A spherically symmetric wormhole in Newtonian gravitation in curved space, enhanced with a connection between the mass density and the Ricci scalar, is presented. The wormhole, consisting of two connected asymptotically flat regions, inhabits a spherically symmetric curved space. The gravitational potential, gravitational field and the pressure that supports the fluid that permeates the Newtonian wormhole are computed. Particle dynamics and tidal effects in this geometry are studied. The possibility of having Newtonian black holes in this theory is sketched.

  4. Footprint geometry and sessile drop resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we examine experimentally the resonance of a sessile drop with a square footprint (square drop) on a flat plate. Two families of modal behaviors are reported. One family is identified with the modes of sessile drops with circular footprints (circular drop), denoted as "spherical modes." The other family is associated with Faraday waves on a square liquid bath (square Faraday waves), denoted as "grid modes." The two families are distinguished based on their dispersion behaviors. By comparing the occurrence of the modes, we recognize spherical modes as the characteristic of sessile drops, and grid modes as the constrained response. Within a broader context, we further discuss the resonance modes of circular sessile drops and free spherical drops, and we recognize various modal behaviors as surface waves under different extents of constraint. From these, we conclude that sessile drops resonate according to how wave-number selection by footprint geometry and capillarity compete. For square drops, a dominant effect of footprint constraint leads to grid modes; otherwise, the drops exhibit spherical modes, the characteristic of sessile drops on flat plates.

  5. Spherical harmonics in texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeben, Helmut; van den Boogaart, K. Gerald

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this contribution is to emphasize the fundamental role of spherical harmonics in constructive approximation on the sphere in general and in texture analysis in particular. The specific purpose is to present some methods of texture analysis and pole-to-orientation probability density inversion in a unifying approach, i.e. to show that the classic harmonic method, the pole density component fit method initially introduced as a distinct alternative, and the spherical wavelet method for high-resolution texture analysis share a common mathematical basis provided by spherical harmonics. Since pole probability density functions and orientation probability density functions are probability density functions defined on the sphere Ω3⊂ R3 or hypersphere Ω4⊂ R4, respectively, they belong at least to the space of measurable and integrable functions L1( Ωd), d=3, 4, respectively. Therefore, first a basic and simplified method to derive real symmetrized spherical harmonics with the mathematical property of providing a representation of rotations or orientations, respectively, is presented. Then, standard orientation or pole probability density functions, respectively, are introduced by summation processes of harmonic series expansions of L1( Ωd) functions, thus avoiding resorting to intuition and heuristics. Eventually, it is shown how a rearrangement of the harmonics leads quite canonically to spherical wavelets, which provide a method for high-resolution texture analysis. This unified point of view clarifies how these methods, e.g. standard functions, apply to texture analysis of EBSD orientation measurements.

  6. Cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitary waves in the presence of superthermal hot electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidan, Kurosh; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2012-02-01

    Propagation of cylindrical and spherical electron-acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized plasmas consisting of cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a superthermal distribution and stationary ions are investigated. The standard reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de-Vries equation which governs the dynamics of electron-acoustic solitons. The effects of nonplanar geometry and superthermal hot electrons on the behavior of cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic soliton and its structure are also studied using numerical simulations.

  7. Robustness of oscillatory α2 dynamos in spherical wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Large-scale dynamo simulations are sometimes confined to spherical wedge geometries by imposing artificial boundary conditions at high latitudes. This may lead to spatio-temporal behaviours that are not representative of those in full spherical shells. Aims: We study the connection between spherical wedge and full spherical shell geometries using simple mean-field dynamos. Methods: We solve the equations for one-dimensional time-dependent α2 and α2Ω mean-field dynamos with only latitudinal extent to examine the effects of varying the polar angle θ0 between the latitudinal boundaries and the poles in spherical coordinates. Results: In the case of constant α and ηt profiles, we find oscillatory solutions only with the commonly used perfect conductor boundary condition in a wedge geometry, while for full spheres all boundary conditions produce stationary solutions, indicating that perfect conductor conditions lead to unphysical solutions in such a wedge setup. To search for configurations in which this problem can be alleviated we choose a profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity that decreases toward the poles, corresponding to high conductivity there. Oscillatory solutions are now achieved with models extending to the poles, but the magnetic field is strongly concentrated near the poles and the oscillation period is very long. By changing both the turbulent magnetic diffusivity and α profiles so that both effects are more concentrated toward the equator, we see oscillatory dynamos with equatorward drift, shorter cycles, and magnetic fields distributed over a wider range of latitudes. Those profiles thus remove the sensitive and unphysical dependence on θ0. When introducing radial shear, we again see oscillatory dynamos, and the direction of drift follows the Parker-Yoshimura rule. Conclusions: A reduced α effect near the poles with a turbulent diffusivity concentrated toward the equator yields oscillatory dynamos with equatorward migration and

  8. Radiance calibration of spherical integrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, James T.; Guenther, Bruce W.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for improving the knowledge of the radiance of large area spherical and hemispherical integrating energy sources have been investigated. Such sources are used to calibrate numerous aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing instruments. Comparisons are made between using a standard source based calibration method and a quantum efficient detector (QED) based calibration method. The uncertainty involved in transferring the calibrated values of the point source standard lamp to the extended source is estimated to be 5 to 10 percent. The use of the QED allows an improvement in the uncertainty to 1 to 2 percent for the measurement of absolute radiance from a spherical integrator source.

  9. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  10. Developments in special geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Vaughan, Owen

    2012-02-01

    We review the special geometry of Script N = 2 supersymmetric vector and hypermultiplets with emphasis on recent developments and applications. A new formulation of the local c-map based on the Hesse potential and special real coordinates is presented. Other recent developments include the Euclidean version of special geometry, and generalizations of special geometry to non-supersymmetric theories. As applications we disucss the proof that the local r-map and c-map preserve geodesic completeness, and the construction of four- and five-dimensional static solutions through dimensional reduction over time. The shared features of the real, complex and quaternionic version of special geometry are stressed throughout.

  11. Photoelectric sheath formation around small spherical objects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The formation of a photoelectron sheath around positively charged small (∼cm) spherical objects roaming in near earth space due to the solar radiation (with continuous spectrum) and the solar wind plasma has been investigated. The sheath structure has been derived, taking into account anisotropic photoelectron flux with the Poisson equation, spherical geometry of the object, and half Fermi Dirac distribution of photoelectron velocities. Two cases, viz., when the object is illuminated by (i) isotropic or (ii) unidirectional (parallel beam) radiation, have been analyzed. The analysis predicts a spherically symmetric sheath in case of isotropic illumination, while a symmetry in sheath about a θ=π/4 is seen in case of parallel beam illumination; θ is the angle of incidence which is the angle made by the normal to a surface element with the direction of incidence of solar radiation. The radial and angular profiles of the electric potential and electron density in the photoelectron sheath have been evaluated and illustrated graphically; the dependence of the sheath structure on the solar wind plasma parameters, material properties of the spherical object, and its size have been discussed.

  12. The method of planes pressure tensor for a spherical subvolume

    SciTech Connect

    Heyes, D. M. Smith, E. R. Dini, D. Zaki, T. A.

    2014-02-07

    Various formulas for the local pressure tensor based on a spherical subvolume of radius, R, are considered. An extension of the Method of Planes (MOP) formula of Todd et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] for a spherical geometry is derived using the recently proposed Control Volume formulation [E. R. Smith, D. M. Heyes, D. Dini, and T. A. Zaki, Phys. Rev. E 85, 056705 (2012)]. The MOP formula for the purely radial component of the pressure tensor is shown to be mathematically identical to the Radial Irving-Kirkwood formula. Novel offdiagonal elements which are important for momentum conservation emerge naturally from this treatment. The local pressure tensor formulas for a plane are shown to be the large radius limits of those for spherical surfaces. The radial-dependence of the pressure tensor computed by Molecular Dynamics simulation is reported for virtual spheres in a model bulk liquid where the sphere is positioned randomly or whose center is also that of a molecule in the liquid. The probability distributions of angles relating to pairs of atoms which cross the surface of the sphere, and the center of the sphere, are presented as a function of R. The variance in the shear stress calculated from the spherical Volume Averaging method is shown to converge slowly to the limiting values with increasing radius, and to be a strong function of the number of molecules in the simulation cell.

  13. Spherical-Bearing Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Computer program SPHERBEAN, developed to predict thermomechanical performance characteristics of double-row spherical roller bearings over wide range of operating conditions. Analysis allows six degrees of freedom for each roller and three for each half of an optionally split cage. Program capabilities provide sufficient generality to allow detailed simulation of both high-speed and conventional bearing operation.

  14. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  15. Analytical solution of the simplified spherical harmonics equations in spherical turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edjlali, Ehsan; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2016-10-01

    We present for the first time an analytical solution for the simplified spherical harmonics equations (so-called SPN equations) in the case of a steady-state isotropic point source inside a spherical homogeneous absorbing and scattering medium. The SPN equations provide a reliable approximation to the radiative transfer equation for describing light transport inside turbid media. The SPN equations consist of a set of coupled partial differential equations and the eigen method is used to obtain a set of decoupled equations, each resembling the heat equation in the Laplace domain. The equations are solved for the realistic partial reflection boundary conditions accounting for the difference in refractive indices between the turbid medium and its environment (air) as occurs in practical cases of interest in biomedical optics. Specifically, we provide the complete solution methodology for the SP3, which is readily applicable to higher orders as well, and also give results for the SP5. This computationally easy to obtain solution is investigated for different optical properties of the turbid medium. For validation, the solution is also compared to the analytical solution of the diffusion equation and to gold standard Monte Carlo simulation results. The SP3 and SP5 analytical solutions prove to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo results. This work provides an additional tool for validating numerical solutions of the SPN equations for curved geometries.

  16. Collective neutrino oscillations in nonspherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg

    2008-08-01

    The rich phenomenology of collective neutrino oscillations has been studied only in one-dimensional or spherically symmetric systems. Motivated by the nonspherical example of coalescing neutron stars, presumably the central engines of short gamma-ray bursts, we use the Liouville equation to formulate the problem for general source geometries. Assuming the neutrino ensemble displays self-maintained coherence, the problem once more becomes effectively one-dimensional along the streamlines of the overall neutrino flux. This approach for the first time provides a formal definition of the 'single-angle approximation' frequently used for supernova neutrinos and allows for a natural generalization to nonspherical geometries. We study the explicit example of a disk-shaped source as a proxy for coalescing neutron stars.

  17. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  18. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  19. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability…

  20. The Beauty of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  1. A Potential Field Model for Spherical Sub-domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, George H.; Bercik, David; Welsch, Brian; Kazachenko, Maria D.; CGEM Team

    2016-05-01

    Potential field models are used widely in Solar Physics to estimate coronal magnetic field geometry and connectivity, to provide lower limits on magnetic energies, and to provide initial configurations for time-dependent models of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere. Potential field models in a spherical geometry can be global, covering the entire Sun, or confined to localized sub-volumes of the sphere. Here, we focus on the latter case.We describe an efficient potential field model for localized spherical sub-volumes (wedges consisting of upper and lower limits of radius, co-latitude, and longitude), employing a finite-difference approach for the solution. The solution is derived in terms of a "poloidal" potential, which can then be used to find either the scalar potential or the vector potential for the magnetic field (if desired), as well as all three magnetic field components. The magnetic field components are computed on the faces of spherical voxels, and the finite difference grid is consistent with the well-known "Yee" grid. The inner spherical boundary is defined by radial magnetic field measurements, and at the outer radius a source-surface boundary condition is imposed.Potential field solutions on active region scales, at full HMI resolution, and with the source surface located a solar radius above the photosphere, can be obtained on a laptop computer in just a few minutes. The three-dimensional finite difference equations are solved using NCAR's FISHPACK elliptic equation solver.The potential field model was developed by the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM) project, funded by the NASA and NSF Strategic Capabilities program. The potential field model described here was motivated by CGEM's need for such a model. The model will be released as open-source code when the model details are published.

  2. A Experimental Investigation and Optimization of a Variable Reluctance Spherical Motor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Ronald B.

    1992-01-01

    In robotic wrist applications, a three degree -of-freedom variable reluctance (VR) spherical motor offers advantages over conventional mechanisms which includes its compact size, the potential of no singularities in its workspace except at its boundaries, and continuous three dimensional motion with uniform resolution. Although the principle of a VR spherical motor has been demonstrated, the modeling techniques remained to be verified. Therefore, this research investigated and further developed the magnetic modeling techniques essential to the design and control law development of a VR spherical motor. A nonlinear magnetic circuit model is presented which is composed of linear (airgap) permeance elements and nonlinear (iron) permeance elements. The model reduces the complex field distribution of the spherical motor magnetic system governed by Maxwell's equations to a tractable magnetic model. A torque prediction model is presented which determines the torque generated by the spherical motor for a given set of input currents to the coils. An experimental airgap permeance function was determined from a VR spherical motor experimental testbed utilizing the linear magnetic circuit model. The permeance function showed good agreement with the theoretical overlapping area permeance model for small pole separation angles. Flux density levels were estimated in iron "choke" points and saturation was successfully predicted. Inclusion of the iron permeance in noncritical motor iron regions improved torque predictions under saturated conditions. Finally, a methodology for optimizing the VR spherical motor's magnetics is presented. The formulation focused on the derivation of inequalities governing geometry, thermal, amplifier, saturation, and leakage flux. An example problem is presented where the motor's geometry is determined by maximizing the output torque at one rotor orientation subject to constraints. The resulting analysis provides experimental verification of modeling

  3. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes.

  4. Comparison between realistic and spherical approaches in EEG forward modelling.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Fabio; Vatta, Federica; Esposito, Fabrizio; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesco

    2010-06-01

    In electroencephalography (EEG) a valid conductor model of the head (forward model) is necessary for predicting measurable scalp voltages from intra-cranial current distributions. All inverse models, capable of inferring the spatial distribution of the neural sources generating measurable electrical and magnetic signals outside the brain are normally formulated in terms of a pre-estimated forward model, which implies considering one (or more) current dipole(s) inside the head and computing the electrical potentials generated at the electrode sites on the scalp surface. Therefore, the accuracy of the forward model strongly affects the reliability of the source reconstruction process independently of the specific inverse model. So far, it is as yet unclear which brain regions are more sensitive to the choice of different model geometry, from both quantitative and qualitative points of view. In this paper, we compare the finite difference method-based realistic model with the four-layers sensor-fitted spherical model using simulated cortical sources in the MNI152 standard space. We focused on the investigation of the spatial variation of the lead fields produced by simulated cortical sources which were placed on the reconstructed mesh of the neocortex along the surface electrodes of a 62-channel configuration. This comparison is carried out by evaluating a point spread function all over the brain cortex, with the aim of finding the lead fields mismatch between realistic and spherical geometry. Realistic geometry turns out to be a relevant factor of improvement which is particularly important when considering sources placed in the temporal or in the occipital cortex. In these situations, using a realistic head model will allow a better spatial discrimination of neural sources when compared to the spherical model.

  5. A comparison of the conductor requirements for energy storage devices made with ideal coil geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) plants have been proposed in both solenoidal and toroidal geometries. The former is efficient in terms of the quantity of superconductor required per unit of stored energy. For applications where a fringe field could be a problem, the toroidal geometry, which requires at least a factor of two more material, has been proposed. In addition to the solenoid and toroid, other geometries are possible, such as linear multipoles and spherical coils. These geometries have been considered for use in applications other than energy storage. In this report, the effectiveness (quantity of superconductor/stored energy) is calculated for various coil geometries. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  7. Buckling of spherical shells revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, John W.

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented of the post-buckling behaviour and imperfection sensitivity of complete spherical shells subject to uniform external pressure. The study builds on and extends the major contribution to spherical shell buckling by Koiter in the 1960s. Numerical results are presented for the axisymmetric large deflection behaviour of perfect spheres followed by an extensive analysis of the role axisymmetric imperfections play in reducing the buckling pressure. Several types of middle surface imperfections are considered including dimple-shaped undulations and sinusoidal-shaped equatorial undulations. Buckling occurs either as the attainment of a maximum pressure in the axisymmetric state or as a non-axisymmetric bifurcation from the axisymmetric state. Several new findings emerge: the abrupt mode localization that occurs immediately after the onset of buckling, the existence of an apparent lower limit to the buckling pressure for realistically large imperfections, and comparable reductions of the buckling pressure for dimple and sinusoidal equatorial imperfections.

  8. Spherically Symmetric Solutions of Light Galileon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, D.; Houndjo, M. J. S.; Güdekli, E.; Rodrigues, M. E.; Alvarenga, F. G.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2016-02-01

    We have been studied the model of light Galileon with translational shift symmetry ϕ → ϕ + c. The matter Lagrangian is presented in the form {L}_{φ }= -η (partial φ )2+β G^{μ ν }partial _{μ }φ partial _{ν }φ . We have been addressed two issues: the first is that, we have been proven that, this type of Galileons belong to the modified matter-curvature models of gravity in type of f(R,R^{μ ν }T_{μ ν }m). Secondly, we have been investigated exact solution for spherically symmetric geometries in this model. We have been found an exact solution with singularity at r = 0 in null coordinates. We have been proven that the solution has also a non-divergence current vector norm. This solution can be considered as an special solution which has been investigated in literature before, in which the Galileon's field is non-static (time dependence). Our scalar-shift symmetrized Galileon has the simple form of ϕ = t, which it is remembered by us dilaton field.

  9. Large Amplitude Nonlinear Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Convergent Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    The Richtmyer Meshkov Instability (RMI) is a common hydrodynamic instability that occurs when an interface seperating two fluids of different densities is impulsively accelerated. Any perturbation along the seperating interface will likely evolve to induce mixing. This occurs in many natural events and engineering applications, such as supernovae and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), both of which are inherently spherical. Therefore, to further understand these complicated events in their entirety, it is of interest to identify the specific effects of convergence in RMI induced mixing. To this end, we report results from detailed simulations of singlemode RMI in spherically convergent geometry, and focus on the nonlinear growth of imposed perturbations.

  10. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  11. Fresnel diffraction by spherical obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    Lommel functions were used to solve the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral for the case of a spherical obstacle. Comparisons were made between Fresnel diffraction theory and Mie scattering theory. Fresnel theory is then compared to experimental data. Experiment and theory typically deviated from one another by less than 10 percent. A unique experimental setup using mercury spheres suspended in a viscous fluid significantly reduced optical noise. The major source of error was due to the Gaussian-shaped laser beam.

  12. Spherical gearing with intermediate ball elements: parameter ranges with a high contact ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, M. V.; Gorbenko, T. I.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents analytical research of the geometry and kinematical parameters of spherical gearing with ball intermediate elements. The main attention is paid to the influence of the offset coefficient on the tooth geometry generation, the contact ratio and the motion transmission angle. Intermediate ball element racetracks on the gear are trochoidal curves on a spherical surface. Two areas for the offset coefficient values providing a high value of the contact ratio – basic trochoid (without offset) and prolate trochoid with abutting racetracks of adjacent ball elements ― were revealed. Analysis of the investigated parameters showed that for power transmission, it is preferable to use spherical gearing without an offset, and for kinematic transmission, it is possible to use profiles with a large offset. The present study allows making a rational choice of geometrical parameters depending on the transmission predestination.

  13. Sphericity Tests and Repeated Measures Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robey, Randall R.; Barcikowski, Robert S.

    The mixed model analysis of variance assumes a mathematical property known as sphericity. Several preliminary tests have been proposed to detect departures from the sphericity assumption. The logic of the preliminary testing procedure is to conduct the mixed model analysis of variance if the preliminary test suggests that the sphericity assumption…

  14. Theoretical Study of a Spherical Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Yasar

    A theoretical model is developed for two concentric electrodes spherical plasma focus device in order to investigate the plasma sheath dynamics, radiative emission, and the ion properties. The work focuses on the model development of the plasma sheath dynamics and its validation, followed by studying of the radiation effects and the beam-ion properties in such unique geometry as a pulsed source for neutrons, soft and hard x-rays, and electron and ion beams. Chapter 1 is an introduction on fusion systems including plasma focus. Chapter 2 is an extensive literature survey on plasma focus modeling and experiments including the various radiations and their mechanism. Chapter 3 details modeling and validation of the plasma sheath dynamics model with comparison between hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and deuterium-tritium mixture for the production of pulsed neutrons. Chapter 4 is a study of the radiative phase, in which neutron yield is investigated, as well as the predicted beam-ion properties. Chapter 5 summarizes and discusses the results. Chapter 6 provides concluding remarks and proposed future works. The phases of the developed model are the rundown phase I, rundown phase II, the reflected phase and a radiative phase. The rundown phase I starts immediately after the completion of the gas breakdown and ends when the current sheath reaches the equator point of the spherical shape. Then immediately followed by rundown phase II to start and it ends when the shock front hits the axis, which is the beginning of the reflected shock phase. Reflected shock front moves towards the incoming current sheath and meets it which is both the end of the reflected shock phase and the beginning of the radiative phase. After the reflected shock front and the current sheath meet, the current sheath continues to move radially inward by compressing the produced plasma column until it reaches the axis. Since the discharge current contains important information about the plasma dynamic

  15. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of metachronal waves in ciliated microorganisms can arise solely from the hydrodynamic interactions between the cilia. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it was observed that fluid forces can lead the system to form a metachronal wave. However, several microorganisms such as paramecium and volvox possess a curved shaped ciliate body. To understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the embedded periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wave-like behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  16. Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    The Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool is a computer program for computing trajectories and trajectory-altering impulsive maneuvers for spacecraft used in radio relay of scientific data to Earth from an exploratory airplane flying in the atmosphere of Mars.

  17. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  18. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  19. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  20. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  1. Van der waals-like isotherms in a confined electrolyte by spherical and cylindrical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pineda, Gabriel E; Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Yu, Jiang; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    Electrolytes confined by spherical, cylindrical, and slit-like charged nanopores are studied. Results for ionic distribution profiles, pressures of the confined fluid, and absorption isotherms are obtained through the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (HNC/MSA) integral equations theory. In spherical and cylindrical geometries, an inward, non-monotonic behavior of the pressure is found as confinement increases, implying a negative compressibility. The pressure vs volume isotherms resemble liquid-vapor van der Waals-like phase transition diagrams. This effect is correlated with a charge separation inside a spherical pore previously reported (Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 3656, 1997). Here, the mechanism of charge separation and negative compressibility are explored in detail. When compared with the slit-like pore pressure, important qualitative differences are found.

  2. Sphere quadtrees - A new data structure to support the visualization of spherically distributed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekete, Gyorgy; Treinish, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The concept of the sphere quadtree (SQT) is introduced to enable the structuring of spherically distributed data to be consistent with its geometry and facilitate mapping of the data onto a flat file system. The SQT is based on the recursive subdivision of the spherical triangles that result from the projection of the faces of an icosahedron onto a sphere. The SQT concept is insensitive to the distortions that occur far from the equator in spherically distributed data sets. Geographic data can be shown at several levels and at any resolution, allowing a system of referencing between data sets of different resolutions as well as data that are not geographically registered. SQTs are found to facilitate the search for particular spherically distributed data sets and improve the efficiency of surface rendering algorithms.

  3. Common Geometry Module

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  4. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  5. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound spherical test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D.

    1984-12-06

    Increased use of composite materials in enclosed geometries such as cylindrical, spherical, or conical shapes has led to the desire to transfer and further develop the most promising nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques used on nonenclosed geometries to enclosed geometries. Known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy filament wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber, and an alternate high void content winding pattern. Ultrasonic C-scan analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound spheres was performed to determine detectability of normal winding patterns and implanted flaw conditions in the composite using this technique. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite.

  6. A Spherical Aerial Terrestrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Christopher J.

    This thesis focuses on the design of a novel, ultra-lightweight spherical aerial terrestrial robot (ATR). The ATR has the ability to fly through the air or roll on the ground, for applications that include search and rescue, mapping, surveillance, environmental sensing, and entertainment. The design centers around a micro-quadcopter encased in a lightweight spherical exoskeleton that can rotate about the quadcopter. The spherical exoskeleton offers agile ground locomotion while maintaining characteristics of a basic aerial robot in flying mode. A model of the system dynamics for both modes of locomotion is presented and utilized in simulations to generate potential trajectories for aerial and terrestrial locomotion. Details of the quadcopter and exoskeleton design and fabrication are discussed, including the robot's turning characteristic over ground and the spring-steel exoskeleton with carbon fiber axle. The capabilities of the ATR are experimentally tested and are in good agreement with model-simulated performance. An energy analysis is presented to validate the overall efficiency of the robot in both modes of locomotion. Experimentally-supported estimates show that the ATR can roll along the ground for over 12 minutes and cover the distance of 1.7 km, or it can fly for 4.82 minutes and travel 469 m, on a single 350 mAh battery. Compared to a traditional flying-only robot, the ATR traveling over the same distance in rolling mode is 2.63-times more efficient, and in flying mode the system is only 39 percent less efficient. Experimental results also demonstrate the ATR's transition from rolling to flying mode.

  7. APPARATUS FOR GRINDING SPHERICAL BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Burch, R.F. Jr.

    1963-09-24

    A relatively inexpensive device is described for grinding rough ceramic bodies into accurate spherical shapes using a conventional drill press and a belt sander. A horizontal disk with an abrasive-surfaced recess in its lower face is mounted eccentrically on a vertical shaft which is forced downward against a stop by a spring. Bodies to be ground are placed in the recess and are subjected to the abrasive action of the belt sander as the disk is rotated by the drill press. (AEC)

  8. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  9. Physics of Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2000-01-01

    Broad and important progress in plasma tests, theory, new experiments, and future visions of the spherical torus (ST, or very low aspect ratio tokamaks) have recently emerged. These have substantially improved our understanding of the potential properties of the ST plasmas, since the preliminary calculation of the ST magnetohydrodynamic equilibria more than a decade ago. Exciting data have been obtained from concept exploration level ST experiments of modest capabilities (with major radii up to 35 cm), making important scientific contributions to toroidal confinement in general. The results have helped approval and construction of new and/or more powerful ST experiments, and stimulated an increasing number of theoretical calculations of interest to magnetic fusion energy. Utilizing the broad knowledge base from the successful tokamak and advanced tokamak research, a wide range of new ST physics features has been suggested. These properties of the ST plasma will be tested at the 1 MA level with major radius up to similar to 80 cm in the new proof of principle devices National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX, U.S.) [M. Peng , European Conf. Abst. 22C, 451 (1998); S. M. Kaye , Fusion Technol. 36, 16 (1999); M. Ono , "Exploration of Spherical Torus Physics in the NSTX Device," 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf., paper IAEA-CN-69/ICP/01 (R), Yokohama, Japan (1998)], Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, U.K.) [A. C. Darke , Fusion Technol. 1, 799 (1995); Q. W. Morris , Proc. Int. Workshop on ST (Ioffe Inst., St. Petersburg, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 290], and Globus-M (R.F.) [V. K. Gusev , European Conf. Abst. 22C, 576 (1998)], which have just started full experimental operation. New concept exploration experiments, such as Pegasus (University of Wisconsin) [R. Fonck and the PEGASUS Team, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 267 (1999)], Helicity Injected Tokamak-II (HIT-II, University of Washington) [T. R. Jarboe , Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)], and Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX

  10. The Appearance of Non-Spherical Systems. Application to LMXB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Bełdycki, B.; Madej, J.; Adhikari, T. P.; You, B.

    2017-03-01

    We study the appearance of the neutron star-accretion disk system as seen by a distant observer in the UV/X-ray domain. The observed intensity spectra are computed assuming non-spherical geometry of the whole system, in which outgoing spectrum is not represented by the flux spectrum, the latter being valid for spherically symmetric objects. Intensity spectra of our model display double bumps in UV/X-ray energy domains. Such structure is caused by the fact that the the source is not spherically symmetric, and the proper integration of intensity over emitted area is needed to reproduce observed spectral shape. Relative normalization of double bump is self consistently computed by our model. X-ray spectra of such a type were often observed in LMXB with accretion disk, ultra luminous X-ray sources, and accreting black hole systems with hot inner compact corona. Our model naturally explains high energy broadening of the disk spectrum observed in some binaries. We attempted to fit our model to X-ray data of XTE J1709-267 from XMM-Newton. Unfortunately, the double intensity bump predicted by our model for LMXB is located in soft X-ray domain, uncovered by existing data for this source.

  11. Zonal Flow Velocimetry in Spherical Couette Flow using Acoustic Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew M.; Mautino, Anthony R.; Stone, Douglas R.; Triana, Santiago A.; Lekic, Vedran; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-11-01

    We present studies of spherical Couette flows using the technique of acoustic mode Doppler velocimetry. This technique uses rotational splittings of acoustic modes to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of a rotating flow, and is of special interest in experiments where direct flow visualization is impractical. The primary experimental system consists of a 60 cm diameter outer spherical shell concentric with a 20 cm diameter sphere, with air or nitrogen gas serving as the working fluid. The geometry of the system approximates that of the Earth's core, making these studies geophysically relevant. A turbulent shear flow is established in the system by rotating the inner sphere and outer shell at different rates. Acoustic modes of the fluid volume are excited using a speaker and measured via microphones, allowingdetermination of rotational splittings. Preliminary results comparing observed splittings with those predicted by theory are presented. While the majority of these studies were performed in the 60 cm diameter device using nitrogen gas, some work has also been done looking at acoustic modes in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Prospects for measuring zonal velocity profiles in a wide variety of experiments are discussed.

  12. Performance of Spherically Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimenti, D. E.; Song, Junho

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports the development, testing, and performance evaluation of spherically focused capacitive air-coupled ultrasonic transducers 1 and 5 cm in diameter. A flexible micro-machined copper/polyimide backplate permits a conformal fit to a spherically shaped fixture, forming the rear capacitor plate. A spherically deformed 6-μm aluminized Mylar foil forms the front capacitor plate, completing the transducer. The device's frequency spectrum is centered near 800 kHz with -6dB points at about 400 and 1200 kHz. The device's focal-plane behavior is successfully modeled theoretically as a focused piston radiator. The imaging and defect detection capabilities of the new transducer are demonstrated in a series of critical tests: a 250-μm wire is easily imaged in a confocal geometry with a second device. Composite, honeycomb, and wood samples are imaged in through-transmission C-scans, showing internal defects. A printed circuit board is imaged, showing features as small as 200-μm.

  13. Polymeric carriers: role of geometry in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric A; Dziubla, Thomas D; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2009-01-01

    The unique properties of synthetic nanostructures promise a diverse set of applications as carriers for drug delivery, which are advantageous in terms of biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, targeting and controlled drug release. Historically, more traditional drug delivery systems have focused on spherical carriers. However, there is a growing interest in pursuing non-spherical carriers, such as elongated or filamentous morphologies, now available due to novel formulation strategies. Unique physiochemical properties of these supramolecular structures offer distinct advantages as drug delivery systems. In particular, results of recent studies in cell cultures and lab animals indicate that rational design of carriers of a given geometry (size and shape) offers an unprecedented control of their longevity in circulation and targeting to selected cellular and subcellular locations. This article reviews drug delivery aspects of non-spherical drug delivery systems, including material selection and formulation, drug loading and release, biocompatibility, circulation behavior, targeting and subcellular addressing. PMID:19040392

  14. On the Explosion Geometry of Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Douglas Christopher; Dessart, Luc; Pignata, Giuliano; Hillier, D. John; Williams, George Grant; Smith, Paul S.; Khandrika, Harish; Bilinski, Christopher; Duong, Nhieu; Flatland, Kelsi; Gonzalez, Luis; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Horst, Chuck; Huk, Leah; Milne, Peter; Rachubo, Alisa A.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    From progenitor studies, type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) have been decisively and uniquely determined to arise from isolated red supergiant (RSG) stars with initial masses ranging from 8 to 16 solar masses (Smartt 2009), establishing the most homogeneous -- and well understood -- progenitor class of any type of core-collapse supernova. However, we must admit a fundamental truth: We do not know how these stars explode. A basic discriminant among proposed explosion models is explosion geometry, since some models predict severe distortions from spherical symmetry. A primary method to gain such geometric information is through spectropolarimetry of the expanding (but, unresolved) atmosphere, with higher degrees of linear polarization generally demanding larger departures from spherical symmetry. Initially, as a class, SNe II-P were found to be only weakly polarized at the early epochs observed, suggesting a nearly spherical explosion for RSG stars. However, late-time observations of SN 2004dj captured a dramatic spike in polarization at just the moment the "inner core" of the ejecta was first revealed in this SN II-P (i.e., at the "drop" off of the photometric plateau; Leonard et al. 2006). This raised the possibility that the explosion of RSGs might be driven by a strongly non-spherical mechanism, with the evidence for the asphericity cloaked at early times by the massive, opaque, quasi-spherical hydrogen envelope. In this presentation we shall describe the continuing work on the explosion geometry of RSGs being carried out by the SuperNova SpectroPOLarimetry project (SNSPOL), with a particular focus on SN 2013ej -- an SN II-P that exhibited remarkably high polarization just days after the explosion (Leonard et al. 2013), and for which twelve epochs of spectropolarimetry trace an intriguing tale about its geometry deep into the nebular phase. We acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1009571 and AST-1210311, under which part of this research was carried out.

  15. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ℓ-manifold, determines a (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometry (k+ℓ≤4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ℓ-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(∞) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(Σ^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently

  16. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-04-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry were calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres were found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates was found to underestimate mass loading compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles. The underestimate increases with the mass loading. For an ash cloud recorded during the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption, the mass-equivalent spheres underestimate the total mass of the ash cloud by approximately 30% compared to the morphologically complex inhomogeneous particles.

  17. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  18. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  19. Three-dimensional ray tracing in spherical and elliptical generalized Luneburg lenses for application in the human eye lens.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Correa, J E; Coello, V; Garza-Rivera, A; Puente, N P; Chávez-Cerda, S

    2016-03-10

    Ray tracing in spherical Luneburg lenses has always been represented in 2D. All propagation planes in a 3D spherical Luneburg lens generate the same ray tracing, due to its radial symmetry. A geometry without radial symmetry generates a different ray tracing. For this reason, a new ray tracing method in 3D through spherical and elliptical Luneburg lenses using 2D methods is proposed. The physics of the propagation is shown here, which allows us to make a ray tracing associated with a vortex beam. A 3D ray tracing in a composite modified Luneburg lens that represents the human eye lens is also presented.

  20. Plasma instability in fast spherical discharge induced by a preionization

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.

    2015-04-07

    As it was shown earlier, fast discharge (dI/dt ∼ 10{sup 12 }A/s and I{sub max} ≈ 40 kA) in a spherical cavity (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inner diameter 11 mm, 4 mm apertures for the current supply) filled with working gas (Ar and Xe, pressure 80 Pa), results in the formation of a plasma with the form close to spherical. The physical mechanism can be the cumulation of a convergent shock wave, which was originated near the inner surface of the discharge cavity. It was also shown for the cylindrical fast discharge that the preionization influences the dynamics of the cylindrical convergent shock wave, its evolutions becomes faster. The present work is devoted to the study of the influence of the preionization on the plasma formation in the fast discharge with spherical geometry (Ar, 80 Pa). The inductive storage with plasma erosion opening switch was used as a current driver. The spatial structure of the discharge plasma was studied by means of a pin-hole camera with the microchannel plate (MCP) detector with time gate of 5 ns. The extreme ultra violet spectra were studied by means of the grazing incidence spectrometer with the same MCP detector with time gate of 20 ns. Beside the expected effects (reduction of the spherical plasma formation time and some increase of the electron temperature), the preionization of the discharge by the current 500 A results also in the development of the plasma instabilities and destruction of the compact plasma ball in several tens of nanoseconds. Possible mechanism of the instability is discussed.

  1. Plasma instability in fast spherical discharge induced by a preionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.

    2015-04-01

    As it was shown earlier, fast discharge (dI/dt ˜ 1012 A/s and Imax ≈ 40 kA) in a spherical cavity (Al2O3, inner diameter 11 mm, 4 mm apertures for the current supply) filled with working gas (Ar and Xe, pressure 80 Pa), results in the formation of a plasma with the form close to spherical. The physical mechanism can be the cumulation of a convergent shock wave, which was originated near the inner surface of the discharge cavity. It was also shown for the cylindrical fast discharge that the preionization influences the dynamics of the cylindrical convergent shock wave, its evolutions becomes faster. The present work is devoted to the study of the influence of the preionization on the plasma formation in the fast discharge with spherical geometry (Ar, 80 Pa). The inductive storage with plasma erosion opening switch was used as a current driver. The spatial structure of the discharge plasma was studied by means of a pin-hole camera with the microchannel plate (MCP) detector with time gate of 5 ns. The extreme ultra violet spectra were studied by means of the grazing incidence spectrometer with the same MCP detector with time gate of 20 ns. Beside the expected effects (reduction of the spherical plasma formation time and some increase of the electron temperature), the preionization of the discharge by the current 500 A results also in the development of the plasma instabilities and destruction of the compact plasma ball in several tens of nanoseconds. Possible mechanism of the instability is discussed.

  2. MUSCLE: MUltiscale Spherical-ColLapse Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.

    2016-05-01

    MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution) produces low-redshift approximate N-body realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales. It applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory - 2LPT), and by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme.

  3. Archimedes' floating bodies on a spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorres, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Archimedes was the first to systematically find the centers of gravity of various solid bodies and to apply this concept in determining stable configurations of floating bodies. In this paper, we discuss an error in a proof developed by Archimedes that involves determining whether a uniform, spherical cap will float stably with its base horizontal in a liquid on a spherical Earth. We present a simpler, corrected proof and discuss aspects of his proof regarding a spherical cap that is not uniform.

  4. Measuring Spherical Harmonic Coefficients on a Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pollaine, S; Haan, S W

    2003-05-16

    The eigenfunctions of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on a spherical capsule are the spherical harmonics Y{sub l,m} These can be measured by measuring the surface perturbations along great circles and fitting them to the first few modes by a procedure described in this article. For higher mode numbers, it is more convenient to average the Fourier power spectra along the great circles, and then transform them to spherical harmonic modes by an algorithm derived here.

  5. Origami, Geometry and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  6. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-02-07

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry.

  7. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  8. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  9. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  10. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry.

  11. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry. PMID:28167818

  12. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  13. Geoff Giles and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielker, David

    2007-01-01

    Geoff Giles died suddenly in 2005. He was a highly original thinker in the field of geometry teaching. As early as 1964, when teaching at Strathallen School in Perth, he was writing in "MT27" about constructing tessellations by modifying the sides of triangles and (irregular) quadrilaterals to produce what he called "trisides" and "quadrisides".…

  14. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  15. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  16. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  17. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  18. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  19. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  20. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  1. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  2. Mode-coupling approach for the slow dynamics of a liquid on a spherical substrate.

    PubMed

    Vest, Julien-Piera; Tarjus, Gilles; Viot, Pascal

    2015-08-28

    We study the dynamics of a one-component liquid constrained on a spherical substrate, a 2-sphere, and investigate how the mode-coupling theory (MCT) can describe the new features brought by the presence of curvature. To this end we have derived the MCT equations in a spherical geometry. We find that, as seen from the MCT, the slow dynamics of liquids in curved space at low temperature does not qualitatively differ from that of glass-forming liquids in Euclidean space. The MCT predicts the right trend for the evolution of the relaxation slowdown with curvature but is dramatically off at a quantitative level.

  3. Wormhole dynamics in spherical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2009-06-15

    A dynamical theory of traversable wormholes is detailed in spherical symmetry. Generically a wormhole consists of a tunnel of trapped surfaces between two mouths, defined as temporal outer trapping horizons with opposite senses, in mutual causal contact. In static cases, the mouths coincide as the throat of a Morris-Thorne wormhole, with surface gravity providing an invariant measure of the radial curvature or ''flaring-out''. The null energy condition must be violated at a wormhole mouth. Zeroth, first, and second laws are derived for the mouths, as for black holes. Dynamic processes involving wormholes are reviewed, including enlargement or reduction, and interconversion with black holes. A new area of wormhole thermodynamics is suggested.

  4. Libsharp - spherical harmonic transforms revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinecke, M.; Seljebotn, D. S.

    2013-06-01

    We present libsharp, a code library for spherical harmonic transforms (SHTs), which evolved from the libpsht library and addresses several of its shortcomings, such as adding MPI support for distributed memory systems and SHTs of fields with arbitrary spin, but also supporting new developments in CPU instruction sets like the Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX) or fused multiply-accumulate (FMA) instructions. The library is implemented in portable C99 and provides an interface that can be easily accessed from other programming languages such as C++, Fortran, Python, etc. Generally, libsharp's performance is at least on par with that of its predecessor; however, significant improvements were made to the algorithms for scalar SHTs, which are roughly twice as fast when using the same CPU capabilities. The library is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/libsharp/ under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  5. Nonadiabatic charged spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2007-09-15

    We present a complete set of the equations and matching conditions required for the description of physically meaningful charged, dissipative, spherically symmetric gravitational collapse with shear. Dissipation is described with both free-streaming and diffusion approximations. The effects of viscosity are also taken into account. The roles of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decrease of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamic state, is reobtained, with the viscosity terms included. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decrease factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. The effect of the electric charge on the relation between the Weyl tensor and the inhomogeneity of the energy density is discussed.

  6. Spherical collapse in chameleon models

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Ph.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: rosenfel@ift.unesp.br

    2010-08-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of an overdensity of nonrelativistic matter under the action of gravity and a chameleon scalar field. We show that the spherical collapse model is modified by the presence of a chameleon field. In particular, we find that even though the chameleon effects can be potentially large at small scales, for a large enough initial size of the inhomogeneity the collapsing region possesses a thin shell that shields the modification of gravity induced by the chameleon field, recovering the standard gravity results. We analyse the behaviour of a collapsing shell in a cosmological setting in the presence of a thin shell and find that, in contrast to the usual case, the critical density for collapse in principle depends on the initial comoving size of the inhomogeneity.

  7. Maximum entropy spherical deconvolution for diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Daniel C

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a maximum entropy method for spherical deconvolution. Spherical deconvolution arises in various inverse problems. This paper uses the method to reconstruct the distribution of microstructural fibre orientations from diffusion MRI measurements. Analysis shows that the PASMRI algorithm, one of the most accurate diffusion MRI reconstruction algorithms in the literature, is a special case of the maximum entropy spherical deconvolution. Experiments compare the new method to linear spherical deconvolution, used previously in diffusion MRI, and to the PASMRI algorithm. The new method compares favourably both in simulation and on standard brain-scan data.

  8. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  9. Geometry and Mechanics of Thin Growing Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Smith, Gabriel; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas

    We investigate how thin sheets of arbitrary shapes morph under the isotropic in-plane expansion of their top surface, which may represent several stimuli such as nonuniform heating, local swelling and differential growth. Inspired by geometry, an analytical model is presented that rationalizes how the shape of the disk influences morphing, from the initial spherical bending to the final isometric limit. We introduce a new measure of slenderness that describes a sheet in terms of both thickness and plate shape. We find that the mean curvature of the isometric state is three fourth's the natural curvature, which we verify by numerics and experiments. We finally investigate the emergence of a preferred direction of bending in the isometric state, guided by numerical analyses. The scalability of our model suggests that it is suitable to describe the morphing of sheets spanning several orders of magnitude. NSF Grant CMMI-1300860.

  10. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  11. Geometry of thermodynamic control.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E; DeWeese, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    A deeper understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena is needed to reveal the principles governing natural and synthetic molecular machines. Recent work has shown that when a thermodynamic system is driven from equilibrium then, in the linear response regime, the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized friction tensor. We exploit this geometric insight to construct closed-form expressions for minimal-dissipation protocols for a particle diffusing in a one-dimensional harmonic potential, where the spring constant, inverse temperature, and trap location are adjusted simultaneously. These optimal protocols are geodesics on the Riemannian manifold and reveal that this simple model has a surprisingly rich geometry. We test these optimal protocols via a numerical implementation of the Fokker-Planck equation and demonstrate that the friction tensor arises naturally from a first-order expansion in temporal derivatives of the control parameters, without appealing directly to linear response theory.

  12. Onthe static and spherically symmetric gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Ioan; Maftei, Gheorghe; Mociutchi, Cleopatra

    Starting from a generalization of Einstein 's theory of gravitation, proposed by one of the authors (Cleopatra Mociutchi), the authors study a particular spherical symmetric case. Among other one obtain the compatibility conditions for the existence of the static and spherically symmetruic gravitational filed in the case of extended Einstein equation.

  13. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  14. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  15. How Spherical Is a Cube (Gravitationally)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanny, Jeff; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    An important concept that is presented in the discussion of Newton's law of universal gravitation is that the gravitational effect external to a spherically symmetric mass distribution is the same as if all of the mass of the distribution were concentrated at the center. By integrating over ring elements of a spherical shell, we show that the…

  16. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  17. E 8 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederwall, Martin; Rosabal, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate exceptional generalised diffeomorphisms based on E 8(8) in a geometric setting. The transformations include gauge transformations for the dual gravity field. The surprising key result, which allows for a development of a tensor formalism, is that it is possible to define field-dependent transformations containing connection, which are covariant. We solve for the spin connection and construct a curvature tensor. A geometry for the Ehlers symmetry SL( n + 1) is sketched. Some related issues are discussed.

  18. Spherical combustion clouds in explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Bell, J. B.; Beckner, V. E.; Balakrishnan, K.; Aspden, A. J.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores the properties of spherical combustion clouds in explosions. Two cases are investigated: (1) detonation of a TNT charge and combustion of its detonation products with air, and (2) shock dispersion of aluminum powder and its combustion with air. The evolution of the blast wave and ensuing combustion cloud dynamics are studied via numerical simulations with our adaptive mesh refinement combustion code. The code solves the multi-phase conservation laws for a dilute heterogeneous continuum as formulated by Nigmatulin. Single-phase combustion (e.g., TNT with air) is modeled in the fast-chemistry limit. Two-phase combustion (e.g., Al powder with air) uses an induction time model based on Arrhenius fits to Boiko's shock tube data, along with an ignition temperature criterion based on fits to Gurevich's data, and an ignition probability model that accounts for multi-particle effects on cloud ignition. Equations of state are based on polynomial fits to thermodynamic calculations with the Cheetah code, assuming frozen reactants and equilibrium products. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to resolve thin reaction zones and capture the energy-bearing scales of turbulence on the computational mesh (ILES approach). Taking advantage of the symmetry of the problem, azimuthal averaging was used to extract the mean and rms fluctuations from the numerical solution, including: thermodynamic profiles, kinematic profiles, and reaction-zone profiles across the combustion cloud. Fuel consumption was limited to ˜ 60-70 %, due to the limited amount of air a spherical combustion cloud can entrain before the turbulent velocity field decays away. Turbulent kinetic energy spectra of the solution were found to have both rotational and dilatational components, due to compressibility effects. The dilatational component was typically about 1 % of the rotational component; both seemed to preserve their spectra as they decayed. Kinetic energy of the blast wave decayed due to the

  19. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; ...

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  20. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  1. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  2. Noncommutative geometry and arithmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, P.

    2009-09-01

    We intend to illustrate how the methods of noncommutative geometry are currently used to tackle problems in class field theory. Noncommutative geometry enables one to think geometrically in situations in which the classical notion of space formed of points is no longer adequate, and thus a “noncommutative space” is needed; a full account of this approach is given in [3] by its main contributor, Alain Connes. The class field theory, i.e., number theory within the realm of Galois theory, is undoubtedly one of the main achievements in arithmetics, leading to an important algebraic machinery; for a modern overview, see [23]. The relationship between noncommutative geometry and number theory is one of the many themes treated in [22, 7-9, 11], a small part of which we will try to put in a more down-to-earth perspective, illustrating through an example what should be called an “application of physics to mathematics,” and our only purpose is to introduce nonspecialists to this beautiful area.

  3. Ribozyme-Spherical Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Liangliang; Kouri, Fotini M.; Briley, William E.; Stegh, Alexander H.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribozymes are highly structured RNA sequences that can be tailored to recognize and cleave specific stretches of mRNA. Their current therapeutic efficacy remains low due to their large size and structural instability compared to shorter therapeutically relevant RNA such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Herein, a synthetic strategy that makes use of the spherical nucleic acid (SNA) architecture to stabilize ribozymes and transfect them into live cells is reported. The properties of this novel ribozyme SNA are characterized in the context of the targeted knockdown of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein involved in chemotherapeutic resistance of solid tumors, foremost glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Data showing the direct cleavage of full-length MGMT mRNA, knockdown of MGMT protein, and increased sensitization of GBM cells to therapy-mediated apoptosis, independent of transfection agents, provide compelling evidence for the promising properties of this new chemical architecture. PMID:26271335

  4. Osmotic buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-11-07

    We study the buckling of elastic spherical shells under osmotic pressure with the osmolyte concentration of the exterior solution as a control parameter. We compare our results for the bifurcation behavior with results for buckling under mechanical pressure control, that is, with an empty capsule interior. We find striking differences for the buckling states between osmotic and mechanical buckling. Mechanical pressure control always leads to fully collapsed states with opposite sides in contact, whereas uncollapsed states with a single finite dimple are generic for osmotic pressure control. For sufficiently large interior osmolyte concentrations, osmotic pressure control is qualitatively similar to buckling under volume control with the volume prescribed by the osmolyte concentrations inside and outside the shell. We present a quantitative theory which also captures the influence of shell elasticity on the relationship between osmotic pressure and volume. These findings are relevant for the control of buckled shapes in applications. We show how the osmolyte concentration can be used to control the volume of buckled shells. An accurate analytical formula is derived for the relationship between the osmotic pressure, the elastic moduli and the volume of buckled capsules. This also allows use of elastic capsules as osmotic pressure sensors or deduction of elastic properties and the internal osmolyte concentration from shape changes in response to osmotic pressure changes. We apply our findings to published experimental data on polyelectrolyte capsules.

  5. Nanophotonics of isolated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. É.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Panina, E. K.

    2010-09-01

    The problem of extreme focusing of an optical beam into the spatial region with wavelength dimensions is considered with the use of the special features of radiation interaction with isolated spherical particles. Results of numerical computations of the optical field intensity at the surface of silver particles of different radii upon exposure to laser radiation with different wavelengths are presented. It is demonstrated that the relative intensity of the plasmon optical field on the nanoparticle surface increases and the field focusing region decreases with increasing particle radius. Results of numerical computations illustrating the influence of the shell of composite nanoparticles comprising a dielectric core and a metal shell on the optical field intensity in the vicinity of the particle are presented. The problem of local optical foci of a transparent microparticle (photonic nanojets) is investigated. It is established that variation of the micron particle size, its optical properties, and laser radiation parameters allows the amplitude and spatial characteristics of the photonic nanojet region to be controlled efficiently.

  6. QED with a spherical mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Hetet, G.; Blatt, R.; Slodicka, L.; Hennrich, M.; Glaetzle, A.

    2010-12-15

    We investigate the quantum electrodynamic (QED) properties of an atomic electron close to the focus of a spherical mirror. We first show that the spontaneous emission and excited-state level shift of the atom can be fully suppressed with mirror-atom distances of many wavelengths. A three-dimensional theory predicts that the spectral density of vacuum fluctuations can indeed vanish within a volume {lambda}{sup 3} around the atom, with the use of a far-distant mirror covering only half of the atomic emission solid angle. The modification of these QED atomic properties is also computed as a function of the mirror size, and large effects are found for only moderate numerical apertures. We also evaluate the long-distance ground-state energy shift (Casimir-Polder shift) and find that it scales as ({lambda}/R){sup 2} at the focus of a hemispherical mirror of radius R, as opposed to the well-known ({lambda}/R){sup 4} scaling law for an atom at a distance R from an infinite plane mirror. Our results are relevant for investigations of QED effects as well as free-space coupling to single atoms using high-numerical-aperture lenses.

  7. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2013-10-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  8. Spherical relativistic vacuum core models in a Λ-dominated era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is devoted to analyzing the effects of the cosmological constant in the evolution of exact analytical collapsing vacuum core celestial models. For this purpose, relativistic spherical geometry coupled with null expansion locally anisotropic matter distributions is considered. We have first developed a relation between tidal forces and structural variables. We then explored some viable spherical cosmological models by taking the expansion-free condition. Our first class of spherical models is obtained after constraining system matter content, while the second class is obtained by considering barotropic equation of state. We propose that our calculated solutions could be regarded as a relativistic toy model for those astronomical compact populations where vacuum core is expected to appear, like cosmological voids.

  9. Analytical solutions to the simplified spherical harmonics equations using eigen decompositions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Yi, Xi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2013-12-15

    We develop a modified method to simplify the analytical solutions to the simplified spherical harmonics equations (SP(N)). The scheme decouples the SP(N) partial differential equations into independent equations using eigen decompositions and calculates the Green's function of the photon migrations based on the eigenvectors and eigenvalues. In contrast to the established solutions that are based on the original coupled equations, the proposed derivation is theoretically concise and universally extendable to other regular geometries. We validate the proposed method in comparison with Monte-Carlo simulations for an infinite scattering medium and a circular geometry as an example of the boundary value problems.

  10. Worldwide complete spherical Bouguer and isostatic anomaly maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, S.; Balmino, G.; Briais, A.; Peyrefitte, A.; Vales, N.; Biancale, R.; Gabalda, G.; Reinquin, F.

    2011-12-01

    We present here a set of digital maps of the Earth's gravity anomalies (surface "free air", Bouguer and isostatic), computed at Bureau Gravimetric International (BGI) as a contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Systems (GGOS) and to the global geophysical maps published by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW). The free air and Bouguer anomaly concept is extensively used in geophysical interpretation to investigate the density distributions in the Earth's interior. Complete Bouguer anomalies (including terrain effects) are usually computed at regional scales by integrating the gravity attraction of topography elements over and beyond a given area (under planar or spherical approximations). Here, we developed and applied a worldwide spherical approach aimed to provide a set of homogeneous and high resolution gravity anomaly maps and grids computed at the Earth's surface, taking into account a realistic Earth model and reconciling geophysical and geodetic definitions of gravity anomalies. This first version (1.0) has been computed by spherical harmonics analysis / synthesis of the Earth's topography-bathymetry up to degree 10800. The detailed theory of the spherical harmonics approach is given in Balmino et al., (Journal of Geodesy, submitted). The Bouguer and terrain corrections have thus been computed in spherical geometry at 1'x1' resolution using the ETOPO1 topography/bathymetry, ice surface and bedrock models from the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and taking into account precise characteristics (boundaries and densities) of major lakes, inner seas, polar caps and of land areas below sea level. Isostatic corrections have been computed according to the Airy Heiskanen model in spherical geometry for a constant depth of compensation of 30km. The gravity information given here is provided by the Earth Geopotential Model (EGM2008), developed at degree 2160 by the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) (Pavlis

  11. Spherically Symmetric Space Time with Regular de Sitter Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    We formulate the requirements which lead to the existence of a class of globally regular solutions of the minimally coupled GR equations asymptotically de Sitter at the center. The source term for this class, invariant under boosts in the radial direction, is classified as spherically symmetric vacuum with variable density and pressure Tμ ν vac associated with an r-dependent cosmological term Λ μ ν = 8π GTμ ν vac, whose asymptotic at the origin, dictated by the weak energy condition, is the Einstein cosmological term Λgμν, while asymptotic at infinity is de Sitter vacuum with λ < Λ or Minkowski vacuum. For this class of metrics the mass m defined by the standard ADM formula is related to both the de Sitter vacuum trapped at the origin and the breaking of space time symmetry. In the case of the flat asymptotic, space time symmetry changes smoothly from the de Sitter group at the center to the Lorentz group at infinity through radial boosts in between. Geometry is asymptotically de Sitter as r → 0 and asymptotically Schwarzschild at large r. In the range of masses m ≥ mcrit, the de Sitter Schwarzschild geometry describes a vacuum nonsingular black hole (ΛBH), and for m < mcrit it describes G-lump — a vacuum selfgravitating particle-like structure without horizons. In the case of de Sitter asymptotic at infinity, geometry is asymptotically de Sitter as r → 0 and asymptotically Schwarzschild de Sitter at large r. Λμν geometry describes, dependently on parameters m and q = √ {Λ /λ } and choice of coordinates, a vacuum nonsingular cosmological black hole, self-gravitating particle-like structure at the de Sitter background λgμν, and regular cosmological models with cosmological constant evolving smoothly from Λ to λ.

  12. Static spherically symmetric wormholes in f( R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, M.; Waheed, Saira; Ahmad, Yasir

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we explore wormhole solutions in f( R, T) theory of gravity, where R is the scalar curvature and T is the trace of stress-energy tensor of matter. To investigate this, we consider a static spherically symmetric geometry with matter contents as anisotropic, isotropic, and barotropic fluids in three separate cases. By taking into account the Starobinsky f( R) model, we analyze the behavior of energy conditions for these different kinds of fluids. It is shown that the wormhole solutions can be constructed without exotic matter in few regions of space-time. We also give the graphical illustration of the results obtained and discuss the equilibrium picture for the anisotropic case only. It is concluded that the wormhole solutions with anisotropic matter are realistic and stable in this theory of gravity.

  13. Apparent sizes and spectral line profiles for spherical ('three-dimensional') astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmering, Robert T.; Watson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations are performed for the frequency-dependent transport of radiation in a uniform spherical maser. Coupling between the intensities at different frequencies is treated. Spherical masers are commonly utilized as idealized geometries in which to assess possible deviations (sometimes, 'three-dimensional effects') from the approximation of a linear geometry. We find that the spectral line profile rebroadens in approximately the same manner as that for a linear maser so that the relationship between the line breadth and the luminosity, beaming angle, and degree of saturation is essentially unchanged. The variation of the apparent size of a spherical maser with frequency is not found to be significant at frequencies within the line profile at which the intensity is appreciable. The 'standard approximation' is adequate for obtaining most of the basic properties of spherical masers that have been examined including the relationship between the pumping (or molecular populations) and the intensity of maser radiation. The improved methods employed here are, however, necessary to obtain variation of the apparent size with frequency in the saturated regime. These conclusions differ from those of previous investigators. The calculations here are more reliable than those of previous investigators because these are self-consistent and avoid certain inaccurate simplifications.

  14. The CLAS12-RICH hybrid geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Giovanni; CLAS12-RICH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A Ring-imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) has been designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer (JLAB, Hall B) in order to increase the particle identification. Among the approved physics program focused upon 3D imaging of the nucleon, some Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments (E12-09-007, E12-09-008, E12-09-009) demand an efficient kaon identification across the momentum range from 3 to 8 GeV/c. The detector exploits a novel elaborated hybrid geometry based on a complex focusing mirror system that will reduce the area instrumented with photon detectors. For forward scattered particles (θ <12°) with momenta p = 3-8 GeV/c, a proximity imaging method with direct Cherenkov light detection will be used. For larger angles of 12° < θ <35° and momenta of p = 3-6 GeV/c, the Cherenkov light will be focused by a spherical mirror, undergo two further passes through the aerogel radiator and will be reflected from planar mirrors before detection. A carefully study on reflections has been performed considering microscopic and macroscopic effects. In addition, a new feature has been introduced in the CLAS12 simulation software in order to generate the geometry of the detector by using a computer-aided design (CAD) file for an accurate geometrical description. U.S. Department of Energy, GWU Columbian College Art and Science Facilitating Fund Award (CCAS CCFF).

  15. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  16. Geometrie verstehen: statisch - kinematisch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Ekkehard

    Dem Allgemeinen steht begrifflich das Besondere gegenüber. In diesem Sinne sind allgemeine Überlegungen zum Verstehen von Mathematik zu ergänzen durch Untersuchungen hinsichtlich des Verstehens der einzelnen mathematischen Disziplinen, insbesondere der Geometrie. Hier haben viele Schülerinnen und Schüler Probleme. Diese rühren hauptsächlich daher, dass eine fertige geometrische Konstruktion in ihrer statischen Präsentation auf Papier nicht mehr die einzelnen Konstruktionsschritte erkennen lässt; zum Nachvollzug müssen sie daher ergänzend in einer Konstruktionsbeschreibung festgehalten werden.

  17. Wrinkling crystallography on spherical surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Brojan, Miha; Terwagne, Denis; Lagrange, Romain; Reis, Pedro M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation on the crystallography of the dimpled patterns obtained through wrinkling of a curved elastic system. Our macroscopic samples comprise a thin hemispherical shell bound to an equally curved compliant substrate. Under compression, a crystalline pattern of dimples self-organizes on the surface of the shell. Stresses are relaxed by both out-of-surface buckling and the emergence of defects in the quasi-hexagonal pattern. Three-dimensional scanning is used to digitize the topography. Regarding the dimples as point-like packing units produces spherical Voronoi tessellations with cells that are polydisperse and distorted, away from their regular shapes. We analyze the structure of crystalline defects, as a function of system size. Disclinations are observed and, above a threshold value, dislocations proliferate rapidly with system size. Our samples exhibit striking similarities with other curved crystals of charged particles and colloids. Differences are also found and attributed to the far-from-equilibrium nature of our patterns due to the random and initially frozen material imperfections which act as nucleation points, the presence of a physical boundary which represents an additional source of stress, and the inability of dimples to rearrange during crystallization. Even if we do not have access to the exact form of the interdimple interaction, our experiments suggest a broader generality of previous results of curved crystallography and their robustness on the details of the interaction potential. Furthermore, our findings open the door to future studies on curved crystals far from equilibrium. PMID:25535355

  18. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Harding, E C; Ao, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Sinars, D B; Geissel, M; Rochau, G A; Smith, I C

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  19. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, A. S.; Zambon, M.

    2009-02-02

    The main result extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result.

  20. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  1. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  2. Magnetic and acoustic investigations of turbulent spherical Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew Michael

    This dissertation describes experiments in spherical Couette devices, using both gas and liquid sodium. The experimental geometry is motivated by the Earth's outer core, the seat of the geodynamo, and consists of an outer spherical shell and an inner sphere, both of which can be rotated independently to drive a shear flow in the fluid lying between them. In the case of experiments with liquid sodium, we apply DC axial magnetic fields, with a dominant dipole or quadrupole component, to the system. We measure the magnetic field induced by the flow of liquid sodium using an external array of Hall effect magnetic field probes, as well as two probes inserted into the fluid volume. This gives information about possible velocity patterns present, and we extend previous work categorizing flow states, noting further information that can be extracted from the induced field measurements. The limitations due to a lack of direct velocity measurements prompted us to work on developing the technique of using acoustic modes to measure zonal flows. Using gas as the working fluid in our 60 cm diameter spherical Couette experiment, we identified acoustic modes of the container, and obtained excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. For the case of uniform rotation of the system, we compared the acoustic mode frequency splittings with theoretical predictions for solid body flow, and obtained excellent agreement. This gave us confidence in extending this work to the case of differential rotation, with a turbulent flow state. Using the measured splittings for this case, our colleagues performed an inversion to infer the pattern of zonal velocities within the flow, the first such inversion in a rotating laboratory experiment. This technique holds promise for use in liquid sodium experiments, for which zonal flow measurements have historically been challenging.

  3. A Spherical Earth Solution for TOA Lightning Location Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J,

    1999-01-01

    With the advent of high-speed digital computers, the method of chi square minimization is a highly practical means for analyzing a wide variety of (otherwise intractable) nonlinear inversion problems in applied mathematical physics. Little thought or effort is required to apply the chi square method to obtain quick and reasonable estimates of a solution, and the method offers a means to assess retrieval errors. Because the method is simple and practical it is sometimes hastily applied to problems that can be solved by formal analytic or quasi-analytic means. Presently, Global Atmospherics Inc. (GAI) finds the minimum of a chi square function to analyze time-of-arrival (TOA) and magnetic bearing data derived from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN); ellipsoidal Earth geometry is assumed. An analytic solution to this problem has not yet been attained, but the consideration and solving of less general problem statements might eventually lead to a final solution. In the present study, the problem of retrieving lightning ground-strike location on a spherical Earth surface using a network of 4 or more time-of-arrival (TOA) sensors is considered. It is shown that this problem has an analytic solution and therefore does not require the use of nonlinear estimation theory (such as the chi square method mentioned above). The mathematical robustness of the analytic solution is tested using computer-generated lightning sources and simulated TOA measurement errors. A quasi-analytic extension of the spherical Earth solution for an oblate spheroidal Earth geometry is considered in a related study. The incorporation of magnetic bearing information into these analytic solutions would lead to a general and elegant analytic retrieval scheme that would most likely replace the chi square estimation theory currently employed by Global Atmospherics Inc. (GAI).

  4. Numerical studies of diffusive shock acceleration at spherical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a cosmic ray (CR) shock code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with which the particle distribution, the gas flow and their nonlinear interaction can be followed numerically in a frame comoving with an expanding shock. In order to accommodate a very wide dynamic range of diffusion length scales in the CR shock problem, we have incorporated subzone shock tracking and adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We find the spatial grid resolution required for numerical convergence is less stringent in this code compared to typical, fixed-grid Eulerian codes. The improved convergence behavior derives from maintaining the shock discontinuity inside the same grid zone in the comoving code. That feature improves numerical estimates of the compression rate experienced by CRs crossing the subshock compared to codes that allow the subshock to drift on the grid. Using this code with a Bohm-like diffusion model we have calculated the CR acceleration and the nonlinear feedback at supernova remnant shocks during the Sedov-Taylor stage. Similarly to plane-parallel shocks, with an adopted thermal leakage injection model, about 10 -3 of the particles that pass through the shock and up to 60% of the explosion energy are transferred to the CR component. These results are in good agreement with previous nonlinear spherical CR shock calculations of Berezhko and collaborators.

  5. Core geometry in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Moira R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they preserve scene and object geometry from canonical points of view. Young children show limits when using geometry both in non-symbolic tasks and in symbolic map tasks that present 3D contexts from unusual, unfamiliar points of view. When presented with the familiar viewpoints in perspectival line drawings, however, do children engage more integrated geometric representations? In three experiments, children successfully interpreted line drawings with respect to their depicted scene or object. Nevertheless, children recruited distinct processes when navigating based on the information in these drawings, and these processes depended on the context in which the drawings were presented. These results suggest that children are flexible but limited in using geometric information to form integrated representations of scenes and objects, even when interpreting spatial symbols that are highly familiar and faithful renditions of the visual world. PMID:25441089

  6. How Spherical Is a Cube (Gravitationally)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanny, Jeff; Smith, David

    2015-02-01

    An important concept that is presented in the discussion of Newton's law of universal gravitation is that the gravitational effect external to a spherically symmetric mass distribution is the same as if all of the mass of the distribution were concentrated at the center.1,2 By integrating over ring elements of a spherical shell, we show that the gravitational force on a point mass outside the shell is the same as that of a particle with the same mass as the shell at its center. This derivation works for objects with spherical symmetry while depending on the fact that the gravitational force between two point masses varies inversely as the square of their separation.3 If these conditions are not met, then the problem becomes more difficult. In this paper, we remove the condition of spherical symmetry and examine the gravitational force between two uniform cubes.

  7. Observation of spherical ion-acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Y.; Ooyama, M.; Ogino, T.

    1980-11-10

    Spherically converging positive and negative ion-acoustic pulses are investigated experimentally. Their behavior agrees with computer simulations based on the fluid model of plasma. Large positive pulses are identified as solitons.

  8. FY 2006 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  9. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a "best" spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere.

  10. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Visscher, W.M.

    1994-10-18

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a 'best' spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere. 14 figs.

  11. FY 2005 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Sliger, William A.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical and chromatic aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional bistatic LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  12. Feasibility study for the Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, E.A.; Attenberger, S.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Borowski, S.K.; Brown, R.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Charlton, L.A.; Chipley, K.K.; Dalton, G.R.; Fowler, R.H.

    1985-10-01

    The design of the Spherical Torus Experiment (STX) is discussed. The physics of the plasma are given in a magnetohydrodynamic model. The structural aspects and instrumentation of the device are described. 19 refs., 103 figs. (WRF)

  13. Simulating higher-dimensional geometries in GADRAS using approximate one-dimensional solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.

    2013-02-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) software package is capable of simulating the radiation transport physics for one-dimensional models. Spherical shells are naturally one-dimensional, and have been the focus of development and benchmarking. However, some objects are not spherical in shape, such as cylinders and boxes. These are not one-dimensional. Simulating the radiation transport in two or three dimensions is unattractive because of the extra computation time required. To maintain computational efficiency, higher-dimensional geometries require approximations to simulate them in one-dimension. This report summarizes the theory behind these approximations, tests the theory against other simulations, and compares the results to experimental data. Based on the results, it is recommended that GADRAS users always attempt to approximate reality using spherical shells. However, if fissile material is present, it is imperative that the shape of the one-dimensional model matches the fissile material, including the use of slab and cylinder geometry.

  14. Acoustic field of a wedge-shaped section of a spherical cap transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2003-12-01

    The acoustic pressure field at an arbitrary point in space is derived for a wedge-shaped section of a spherical cap transducer using the spatial impulse response (SIR) method. For a spherical surface centered at the origin, a wedge shape is created by taking cuts in the X-Y and X-Z planes and removing the smallest surface component. Analytic expressions are derived for the SIR based on spatial location. The expressions utilize the SIR solutions for a spherical cap transducer [Arditi et al., Ultrason. Imaging 3, 37-61 (1981)] with additional terms added to account for the reduced surface area of the wedge. Results from the numerical model are compared to experimental measurements from a wedge transducer with an 8-cm outer diameter and 9-cm geometric focus. The experimental and theoretical -3-dB beamwidths agreed to within 10%+/-5%. The SIR model for a wedge-shaped transducer is easily extended to other spherically curved transducer geometries that consist of combinations of wedge sections and spherical caps.

  15. Phase behaviour and gravity-directed self assembly of hard convex spherical caps.

    PubMed

    McBride, John M; Avendaño, Carlos

    2017-03-08

    We investigate the phase behaviour and self-assembly of convex spherical caps using Monte Carlo simulations. This model is used to represent the main features observed in experimental colloidal particles with mushroom-cap shape [Riley et al., Langmuir, 2010, 26, 1648]. The geometry of this non-centrosymmetric convex model is fully characterized by the aspect ratio χ* defined as the spherical cap height to diameter ratio. We use NPT Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations to determine the most stable crystal structures and the phase behaviour of convex spherical caps with different aspect ratios. We find a variety of crystal structures at each aspect ratio, including plastic and dimer-based crystals; small differences in chemical potential between the structures with similar morphology suggest that convex spherical caps have the tendency to form polycrystalline phases rather than crystallising into a single uniform structure. With the exception of plastic crystals observed at large aspect ratios (χ* > 0.75), crystallisation kinetics seem to be too slow, hindering the spontaneous formation of ordered structures. As an alternative, we also present a study of directing the self-assembly of convex spherical caps via sedimentation onto solid substrates. This study contributes to show how small changes to particle shape can significantly alter the self-assembly of crystal structures, and how a simple gravity field and a template can substantially enhance the process.

  16. PREPARATION OF SPHERICAL URANIUM DIOXIDE PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Levey, R.P. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1963-04-30

    This patent relates to the preparation of high-density, spherical UO/sub 2/ particles 80 to 150 microns in diameter. Sinterable UO/sub 2/ powder is wetted with 3 to 5 weight per cent water and tumbled for at least 48 hours. The resulting spherical particles are then sintered. The sintered particles are useful in dispersion-type fuel elements for nuclear reactors. (AEC)

  17. Localized waves with spherical harmonic symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, M. S.; Siviloglou, G. A.; Efremidis, N.; Graf, T.; Wright, E. M.; Moloney, J. V.; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a class of propagation invariant spatiotemporal optical wave packets with spherical harmonic symmetries in their field configurations. The evolution of these light orbitals is considered theoretically in anomalously dispersive media, and their spinning dynamics are analyzed in terms of their corresponding energy flows. Similarly, localized waves generated via spherical superposition from Archimedean and Platonic solids in k⃗-ω space are investigated in this work.

  18. On Nonlinear Functionals of Random Spherical Eigenfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Domenico; Wigman, Igor

    2014-05-01

    We prove central limit theorems and Stein-like bounds for the asymptotic behaviour of nonlinear functionals of spherical Gaussian eigenfunctions. Our investigation combines asymptotic analysis of higher order moments for Legendre polynomials and, in addition, recent results on Malliavin calculus and total variation bounds for Gaussian subordinated fields. We discuss applications to geometric functionals like the defect and invariant statistics, e.g., polyspectra of isotropic spherical random fields. Both of these have relevance for applications, especially in an astrophysical environment.

  19. Spherical cows in dark matter indirect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Necib, Lina; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-12-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos have long been known to be triaxial, but in studies of possible annihilation and decay signals they are often treated as approximately spherical. In this work, we examine the asymmetry of potential indirect detection signals of DM annihilation and decay, exploiting the large statistics of the hydrodynamic simulation Illustris. We carefully investigate the effects of the baryons on the sphericity of annihilation and decay signals for both the case where the observer is at 8.5 kpc from the center of the halo (exemplified in the case of Milky Way-like halos), and for an observer situated well outside the halo. In the case of Galactic signals, we find that both annihilation and decay signals are expected to be quite symmetric, with axis ratios very different from 1 occurring rarely. In the case of extragalactic signals, while decay signals are still preferentially spherical, the axis ratio for annihilation signals has a much flatter distribution, with elongated profiles appearing frequently. Many of these elongated profiles are due to large subhalos and/or recent mergers. Comparing to gamma-ray emission from the Milky Way and X-ray maps of clusters, we find that the gamma-ray background appears less spherical/more elongated than the expected DM signal from the large majority of halos, and the Galactic gamma ray excess appears very spherical, while the X-ray data would be difficult to distinguish from a DM signal by elongation/sphericity measurements alone.

  20. Noncommutative geometry of Zitterbewegung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Michał; Franco, Nicolas; Miller, Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    Drawing from the advanced mathematics of noncommutative geometry, we model a "classical" Dirac fermion propagating in a curved spacetime. We demonstrate that the inherent causal structure of the model encodes the possibility of Zitterbewegung—the "trembling motion" of the fermion. We recover the well-known frequency of Zitterbewegung as the highest possible speed of change in the fermion's "internal space." Furthermore, we show that the bound does not change in the presence of an external electromagnetic field and derive its explicit analogue when the mass parameter is promoted to a Yukawa field. We explain the universal character of the model and discuss a table-top experiment in the domain of quantum simulation to test its predictions.

  1. Critique of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  2. Equivalent sources method for supersonic intensity of arbitrarily shaped geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Nicolas P.; Williams, Earl G.; Herdic, Peter C.

    2015-07-01

    Supersonic acoustic intensity is utilized to locate radiating regions on a complex vibrating structure. The supersonic intensity is obtained by a special process that removes the evanescent waves from the near-field acoustical holography measurement. The filtering process is well understood for separable geometries, but unfortunately, there are few results for arbitrarily shaped objects. This work proposes a methodology based on a stable invertible representation of the radiated power operator. The power operator is approximated numerically by the equivalent source formulation and the appropriate complete spectral basis is employed to form the stable invertible operator. The operator is formed with the most efficient radiation modes and these modes are utilized to obtain the supersonic solution for the near-field holographic problem. This concept is tested using numerically generated data in a spherical geometry and the results are validated with the spherical harmonic, supersonic filter. Finally, a vibrating ship-hull structure provides a physical example for application and validation of the proposed methodology in a more complex geometry.

  3. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water.

    PubMed

    Lau, Gabriel V; Ford, Ian J; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  4. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  5. Magnetism in curved geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  6. Magnetism in curved geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; ...

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  7. Solar Proton Transport within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Combinatorial Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z (is) less than 2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency.

  8. Preparation and Optical Properties of Spherical Inverse Opals by Liquid Phase Deposition Using Spherical Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Y.; Tominaga, T.

    2013-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) inverse opals in spherical shape were prepared by liquid phase deposition (LPD) using spherical colloidal crystals as templates. Spherical colloidal crystals were produced by ink-jet drying technique. Aqueous emulsion droplets that contain polystyrene latex particles were ejected into air and dried. Closely packed colloidal crystals with spherical shape were obtained. The obtained spherical colloidal crystals were used as templates for the LPD. The templates were dispersed in the deposition solution of the LPD, i.e. a mixed solution of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid and reacted for 4 h at 30 °C. After the LPD process, the interstitial spaces of the spherical colloidal crystals were completely filled with titanium oxide. Subsequent heat treatment resulted in removal of templates and spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals. The spherical shape of the template was retained. SEM observations indicated that the periodic ordered voids were surrounded by titanium dioxide. The optical reflectance spectra indicated that the optical properties of the spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals were due to Bragg diffractions from the ordered structure. Filling in the voids of the inverse opals with different solvents caused remarkable changes in the reflectance peak.

  9. Realistic and spherical head modeling for EEG forward problem solution: a comparative cortex-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Vatta, Federica; Meneghini, Fabio; Esposito, Fabrizio; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of forward models for electroencephalography (EEG) partly depends on head tissues geometry and strongly affects the reliability of the source reconstruction process, but it is not yet clear which brain regions are more sensitive to the choice of different model geometry. In this paper we compare different spherical and realistic head modeling techniques in estimating EEG forward solutions from current dipole sources distributed on a standard cortical space reconstructed from Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) MRI data. Computer simulations are presented for three different four-shell head models, two with realistic geometry, either surface-based (BEM) or volume-based (FDM), and the corresponding sensor-fitted spherical-shaped model. Point Spread Function (PSF) and Lead Field (LF) cross-correlation analyses were performed for 26 symmetric dipole sources to quantitatively assess models' accuracy in EEG source reconstruction. Realistic geometry turns out to be a relevant factor of improvement, particularly important when considering sources placed in the temporal or in the occipital cortex.

  10. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  11. Generalized Kähler Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Generalized Kähler geometry is the natural analogue of Kähler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We prove that generalized Kähler geometry is equivalent to the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2, 2) supersymmetry. We also prove the existence of natural holomorphic Courant algebroids for each of the underlying complex structures, and that these split into a sum of transverse holomorphic Dirac structures. Finally, we explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kähler geometry.

  12. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  13. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    PubMed

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  14. One-degree-of-freedom spherical model for the passive motion of the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Sancisi, Nicola; Baldisserri, Benedetta; Parenti-Castelli, Vincenzo; Belvedere, Claudio; Leardini, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical modelling of mobility at the human ankle joint is essential for prosthetics and orthotic design. The scope of this study is to show that the ankle joint passive motion can be represented by a one-degree-of-freedom spherical motion. Moreover, this motion is modelled by a one-degree-of-freedom spherical parallel mechanism model, and the optimal pivot-point position is determined. Passive motion and anatomical data were taken from in vitro experiments in nine lower limb specimens. For each of these, a spherical mechanism, including the tibiofibular and talocalcaneal segments connected by a spherical pair and by the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligament links, was defined from the corresponding experimental kinematics and geometry. An iterative procedure was used to optimize the geometry of the model, able to predict original experimental motion. The results of the simulations showed a good replication of the original natural motion, despite the numerous model assumptions and simplifications, with mean differences between experiments and predictions smaller than 1.3 mm (average 0.33 mm) for the three joint position components and smaller than 0.7° (average 0.32°) for the two out-of-sagittal plane rotations, once plotted versus the full flexion arc. The relevant pivot-point position after model optimization was found within the tibial mortise, but not exactly in a central location. The present combined experimental and modelling analysis of passive motion at the human ankle joint shows that a one degree-of-freedom spherical mechanism predicts well what is observed in real joints, although its computational complexity is comparable to the standard hinge joint model.

  15. Investigating Fractal Geometry Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses dimensionality in Euclidean geometry. Presents methods to produce fractals using LOGO. Uses the idea of self-similarity. Included are program listings and suggested extension activities. (MVL)

  16. Geometry of blind thrusts

    SciTech Connect

    Kligfield, R.; Geiser, P.; Geiser, J.

    1985-01-01

    Blind thrusts are structures which at no time in their history broke the erosion surface and along which displacement progressively changes upwards. Faults of the stiff layer along which displacement progressively decreases to zero (tip) are one prominent type of blind thrust structure. Shortening above such tips is accommodated entirely by folding whereas shortening below the tip is partitioned between folding and faulting. For these types of faults it is possible to determine the original length of the stiff layer for balancing purposes. A systematic methodology for line length and area restoration is outlined for determining blind thrust geometry. Application of the methodology is particularly suitable for use with microcomputers. If the folded form of the cover is known along with the position of the fault and its tip, then it is possible to locate hanging and footwall cutoffs. If the fault trajectory, tip, and a single hanging wall footwall cutoff pair are known, then the folded form of the cover layer can be determined. In these constructions it is necessary to specify pin lines for balancing purposes. These pin lines may or may not have a zero displacement gradient, depending upon the amount of simple shear deformation. Examples are given from both Laramide structures of the western USA and the Appalachians.

  17. ELSA- The European Levitated Spherical Actruator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, M.; Serin, J.; Telteu-Nedelcu, D.; De La Vallee Poussin, H.; Onillon, E.; Rossini, L.

    2014-08-01

    The reaction sphere is a magnetic bearing spherical actuator consisting of a permanent magnet spherical rotor that can be accelerated in any direction. It consists of an 8-pole permanent magnet spherical rotor that is magnetically levitated and can be accelerated about any axis by a 20-pole stator with electromagnets. The spherical actuator is proposed as a potential alternative to traditional momentum exchange devices such as reaction wheels (RWs) or control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). This new actuator provides several benefits such as reduced mass and power supply allocated to the attitude and navigation unit, performance gain, and improved reliability due to the absence of mechanical bearings. The paper presents the work done on the levitated spherical actuator and more precisely the electrical drive including its control unit and power parts. An elegant breadboard is currently being manufactured within the frame of an FP7 project. This project also comprises a feasibility study to show the feasibility of integrating such a system on a flight platform and to identify all the challenges to be solved in terms of technology or components to be developed.

  18. Statistical Mechanics of Thin Spherical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We explore how thermal fluctuations affect the mechanics of thin amorphous spherical shells. In flat membranes with a shear modulus, thermal fluctuations increase the bending rigidity and reduce the in-plane elastic moduli in a scale-dependent fashion. This is still true for spherical shells. However, the additional coupling between the shell curvature, the local in-plane stretching modes, and the local out-of-plane undulations leads to novel phenomena. In spherical shells, thermal fluctuations produce a radius-dependent negative effective surface tension, equivalent to applying an inward external pressure. By adapting renormalization group calculations to allow for a spherical background curvature, we show that while small spherical shells are stable, sufficiently large shells are crushed by this thermally generated "pressure." Such shells can be stabilized by an outward osmotic pressure, but the effective shell size grows nonlinearly with increasing outward pressure, with the same universal power-law exponent that characterizes the response of fluctuating flat membranes to a uniform tension.

  19. Tensor Spherical and Pseudo-Spherical Harmonics in Four-Dimensional Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, K.

    1982-07-01

    Explicit expressions for tensor spherical harmonics on the 3 sphere in the four-dimensional Euclidean space are derived, and extended to derive those for pseudo-spherical harmonics. They are useful for the analyses of large-scale perturbations in the Friedmann universe models.

  20. Towards AN Easier Orientation for Spherical Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangi, G.

    2015-02-01

    For architectural metric documentation, Spherical Photogrammetry (SP) has demonstrated its validity and efficiency in many projects already. The speed of surveying is high, the accuracy and completeness of the plotting are satisfactory. However, there are still many problems to be solved. The weakest point is the orientation procedure, which is rather difficult to perform, in the sense that only very experienced people can run it, and few people only make use of it. The old orientation steps are 1) model formation (limited to binocular panoramas couples); 2) link of all the models in a block adjustment with independent model triangulation; 3) block bundle adjustment with 4 parameters/pano (3 coord.+1 orientation bearing); 4) block bundle adjustment with 6 parameters/pano, say the previous 4 + 2 correction angles around the horizontal axes. The panoramas must be spherical and quasi-horizontal. In order to make easier the orientation, enabling more people to use SP, an improved approach has been set up. It consists in the combination of any possible model formed either by three and two panoramas. The trinocular vision, say the combination of three different panoramas to form a unique model, has the advantage to be much more robust in comparison to binocular vision in the sense that the trinocular model is likely to be more error-free than any of the three composing binocular models. It contains less model deformation, the model coordinates are validated by the mutual comparison of the three intersecting binocular models. In addition, the number of possible trinocular models is normally much larger than the one of binocular models. The steps for a semi-automatic orientation of a block of panoramas proceed as follows: - Form any possible trinocular models by combination of the panoramas; - in case that no trinocular model has been formed, form any possible binocular model; - run a block adjustment with the algorithm of independent model, to link together the models in

  1. Generalized quantum gravity condensates for homogeneous geometries and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Ryan, James P.; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    We construct a generalized class of quantum gravity condensate states that allows the description of continuum homogeneous quantum geometries within the full theory. They are based on similar ideas already applied to extract effective cosmological dynamics from the group field theory formalism, and thus also from loop quantum gravity. However, they represent an improvement over the simplest condensates used in the literature, in that they are defined by an infinite superposition of graph-based states encoding in a precise way the topology of the spatial manifold. The construction is based on the definition of refinement operators on spin network states, written in a second quantized language. The construction also lends itself easily to application to the case of spherically symmetric quantum geometries.

  2. Theory of diffusion-influenced reactions in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Traytak, Sergey D.; Piazza, Francesco

    Chemical reactions involving diffusion of reactants and subsequent chemical fixation steps are generally termed "diffusion-influenced" (DI). Virtually all biochemical processes in living media can be counted among them, together with those occurring in an ever-growing number of emerging nano-technologies. The role of the environment's geometry (obstacles, compartmentalization) and distributed reactivity (competitive reactants, traps) is key in modulating the rate constants of DI reactions, and is therefore a prime design parameter. Yet, it is a formidable challenge to build a comprehensive theory able to describe the environment's "reactive geometry". Here we show that such a theory can be built by unfolding this many-body problem through addition theorems for special functions. Our method is powerful and general and allows one to study a given DI reaction occurring in arbitrary "reactive landscapes", made of multiple spherical boundaries of given size and reactivity. Importantly, ready-to-use analytical formulas can be derived easily in most cases.

  3. Design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki; Toyama, Shigeki; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    We present a mechanical design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor (SUSM) that is an actuator with multiple rotational degrees of freedom (multi-DOF). The motor is constructed of 3 annular stators and a spherical rotor and is much smaller and simpler than conventional multi-DOF mechanisms such as gimbals using servomotors. We designed a novel SUSM using experimental data from a single annular stator and a finite element method. The SUSM using a spherical rotor of diameter 20 mm without any reduction gear has demonstrated advantages of high responsiveness, good accuracy, and high torque at low speed. The dynamic implementation of SUSM was consistent with the driving model of SUSM based on a friction drive.

  4. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi; Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice; Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François; Savvidis, Ilias

    2015-08-01

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal 210Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  5. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi; Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice; Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François

    2015-08-17

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal {sup 210}Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  6. The ESSA solution. [Electronic Switching Spherical Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockensmith, R. P.; Stockton, R.

    1977-01-01

    ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) is a fixed truncated spherical antenna with its elements over the complete surface, conceived to satisfy many future antenna system requirements. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. In the present paper, the two existing types of ESSA are discussed. ESSA I is a simple nonphase correcting aperture approach characterized by light weight, low dc power consumption, gain between +7 and +14 dB, and 90% spherical coverage. ESSA II is a phase corrected aperture which would have very low sidelobe levels and improved gain over ESSA I (12 to 22 dB), but would be heavier and require more dc power.

  7. The spherically symmetric Standard Model with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasin, H.; Böhmer, C. G.; Grumiller, D.

    2005-08-01

    Spherical reduction of generic four-dimensional theories is revisited. Three different notions of "spherical symmetry" are defined. The following sectors are investigated: Einstein-Cartan theory, spinors, (non-)abelian gauge fields and scalar fields. In each sector a different formalism seems to be most convenient: the Cartan formulation of gravity works best in the purely gravitational sector, the Einstein formulation is convenient for the Yang-Mills sector and for reducing scalar fields, and the Newman-Penrose formalism seems to be the most transparent one in the fermionic sector. Combining them the spherically reduced Standard Model of particle physics together with the usually omitted gravity part can be presented as a two-dimensional (dilaton gravity) theory.

  8. Static spherically symmetric wormholes with isotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Liempi, Luis; Rodríguez, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions sustained by matter sources with isotropic pressure. We show that such spherical wormholes do not exist in the framework of zero-tidal-force wormholes. On the other hand, it is shown that for the often used power-law shape function there are no spherically symmetric traversable wormholes sustained by sources with a linear equation of state p = ωρ for the isotropic pressure, independently of the form of the redshift function ϕ (r). We consider a solution obtained by Tolman at 1939 for describing static spheres of isotropic fluids, and show that it also may describe wormhole spacetimes with a power-law redshift function, which leads to a polynomial shape function, generalizing a power-law shape function, and inducing a solid angle deficit.

  9. Laser scattering properties of rough spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-ping; Wu, Jian

    2007-12-01

    An approximate model is developed to study the properties of laser scattering from a rough spherical surface based on a random facet model and the electromagnetic scattering theory. For actual spheres, for instance oilcan, its lateral correlation length is much longer than the incident laser wavelength, and its surface distribution is usually isotropic and conforms to Gaussian distribution. Hence, it is feasible to deal with scattering of the rough spherical surface with the random facet model. First, power scattered into a detective system can be denoted for every facet with the scattering model of a coarse plane corresponded to the isotropic Gaussian statistics. Second, total power received by the detective system should correspond to incoherent addition of power scattered into a far-field detector system by all facets. Here, an incident shadow function has been taken into account to exclude the contribution of the facets not being illuminated. Likewise, a scattering shadow function is introduced to exclude the contribution of the scattered light blocked by undulations of spherical surface. An unfolded factor has been taken into account in this model, too. Finally, to verify this model, the angular distribution of the scattering intensity in far field is calculated and analyzed under different cases. The results show that the scattering intensity is stronger in the backward than in other directions if the spherical surface is smooth, but if the spherical surface is rough to some extent, the incident laser power will be scattered to other direction and there is faint scattered intensity in forward direction concomitantly. We can use these properties to make remote sensing for spherical objects.

  10. Linguistic geometry for autonomous navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stilman, B.

    1995-09-01

    To discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which were successful in a certain class of complex control systems, we develop a formal theory, the Linguistic Geometry. This paper reports two examples of application of Linguistic Geometry to autonomous navigation of aerospace vehicles that demonstrate dramatic search reduction.

  11. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world…

  12. Transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a novel metal-on-metal hip prosthesis with a non-spherical femoral bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Q E; Liu, F; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2011-01-01

    Effective lubrication performance of metal-on-metal hip implants only requires optimum conformity within the main loaded area, while it is advantageous to increase the clearance in the equatorial region. Such a varying clearance can be achieved by using non-spherical bearing surfaces for either acetabular or femoral components. An elastohydrodynamic lubrication model of a novel metal-on-metal hip prosthesis using a non-spherical femoral bearing surface against a spherical cup was solved under loading and motion conditions specified by ISO standard. A full numerical methodology of considering the geometric variation in the rotating non-spherical head in elastohydrodynamic lubrication solution was presented, which is applicable to all non-spherical head designs. The lubrication performance of a hip prosthesis using a specific non-spherical femoral head, Alpharabola, was analysed and compared with those of spherical bearing surfaces and a non-spherical Alpharabola cup investigated in previous studies. The sensitivity of the lubrication performance to the anteversion angle of the Alpharabola head was also investigated. Results showed that the non-spherical head introduced a large squeeze-film action and also led to a large variation in clearance within the loaded area. With the same equatorial clearance, the lubrication performance of the metal-on-metal hip prosthesis using an Alpharabola head was better than that of the conventional spherical bearings but worse than that of the metal-on-metal hip prosthesis using an Alpharabola cup. The reduction in the lubrication performance caused by the initial anteversion angle of the non-spherical head was small, compared with the improvement resulted from the non-spherical geometry.

  13. A Spherical Electro Optic High Voltage Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    electro - optic (EO) crystal is introduced for photonic measurement of pulsed high-voltage fields. A spherical shape is used in order to reduce electric field gradients in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor is pure dielectric and is interrogated remotely using a laser. The sensor does not require the connection of any conducting components, which results in the highest electrical isolation. The spherical nature of the crystal coupled with the incident laser beam, and crossed polarizers (intensity modulation scheme). automatically produces interference figures. The

  14. Direct-illumination spherical-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical target experiments was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of three techniques for achieving higher convergence implosions. They are (1) cryogenically frozen fuel layers, (2) submicron wavelength laser light, and (3) temporally tailored pulse shapes. A second set of experiments provides information about energy transport by thermal and suprathermal electrons and uses multilayered targets as an integral component of the diagnostics. These results, in conjunction with existing laser-target coupling data, provide a more comprehensive test of our understanding of laser plasma interaction, energy transport, and hydrodynamic response of small scale spherical laser fusion experiments.

  15. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  16. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  17. Design of artificial spherical superposition compound eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaolou; Zhai, Chunjie; Wang, Keyi

    2015-12-01

    In this research, design of artificial spherical superposition compound eye is presented. The imaging system consists of three layers of lens arrays. In each channel, two lenses are designed to control the angular magnification and a field lens is added to improve the image quality and extend the field of view. Aspherical surfaces are introduced to improve the image quality. Ray tracing results demonstrate that the light from the same object point is focused at the same imaging point through different channels. Therefore the system has much higher energy efficiency than conventional spherical apposition compound eye.

  18. Spherical harmonic analysis of steady photospheric flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented in which full disk Doppler velocity measurements are analyzed using spherical harmonic functions to determine the characteristics of the spectrum of spherical harmonic modes and the nature of steady photospheric flows. Synthetic data are constructed in order to test the technique. In spite of the mode mixing due to the lack of information about the motions on the backside of the sun, solar rotation and differential rotation can be accurately measured and monitored for secular changes, and meridional circulations with small amplitudes can be measured. Furthermore, limb shift measurements can be accurately obtained, and supergranules can be fully resolved and separated from giant cells by their spatial characteristics.

  19. The defect variance of random spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Domenico; Wigman, Igor

    2011-09-01

    The defect of a function f:M\\rightarrow {R} is defined as the difference between the measure of the positive and negative regions. In this paper, we begin the analysis of the distribution of defect of random Gaussian spherical harmonics. By an easy argument, the defect is non-trivial only for even degree and the expected value always vanishes. Our principal result is evaluating the defect variance, asymptotically in the high-frequency limit. As other geometric functionals of random eigenfunctions, the defect may be used as a tool to probe the statistical properties of spherical random fields, a topic of great interest for modern cosmological data analysis.

  20. Three-dimensional spherical spatial boundary conditions differentially regulate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yin-Ping; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Rimando, Marilyn G.; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun; Lin, Keng-hui; Lee, Oscar K.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial boundary condition (SBC) arising from the surrounding microenvironment imposes specific geometry and spatial constraints that affect organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) sensitively respond to alterations of mechanical cues generated from the SBC. However, mechanical cues provided by a three-dimensional (3D) environment are deprived in a reductionist 2D culture system. This study investigates how SBC affects osteogenic differentiation of MSCs using 3D scaffolds with monodispersed pores and homogenous spherical geometries. MSCs cultured under SBCs with diameters of 100 and 150 μm possessed the greatest capability of osteogenic differentiation. This phenomenon was strongly correlated with MSC morphology, organization of actin cytoskeleton, and distribution of focal adhesion involving α2 and α5 integrins. Further silencing either α2 or α5 integrin significantly reduced the above mentioned mechanosensitivity, indicating that the α2 and α5 integrins as mechano-sensitive molecules mediate MSCs’ ability to provide enhanced osteogenic differentiation in response to different spherical SBCs. Taken together, the findings provide new insights regarding how MSCs respond to mechanical cues from the surrounding microenvironment in a spherical SBC, and such biophysical stimuli should be taken into consideration in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in conjunction with biochemical cues. PMID:26884253

  1. Scaling relationships and physics for mixed heating convection in planetary interiors: Isoviscous spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Matthew B.; Lenardic, Adrian; Moore, William B.

    2016-10-01

    We use a suite of 3-D numerical experiments to test and expand 2-D planar isoviscous scaling relationships of Moore (2008) for mixed heating convection in spherical geometry mantles over a range of Rayleigh numbers (Ra). The internal temperature scaling of Moore (2008), when modified to account for spherical geometry, matches our experimental results to a high degree of fit. The heat flux through the boundary layers scale as a linear combination of internal (Q) and basal heating, and the modified theory predictions match our experimental results. Our results indicate that boundary layer thickness and surface heat flux are not controlled by a local boundary layer stability condition (in agreement with the results of Moore (2008)) and are instead strongly influenced by boundary layer interactions. Subadiabatic mantle temperature gradients, in spherical 3-D, are well described by a vertical velocity scaling based on discrete drips as opposed to a scaling based on coherent sinking sheets, which was found to describe 2-D planar results. Root-mean-square (RMS) velocities are asymptotic for both low Q and high Q, with a region of rapid adjustment between asymptotes for moderate Q. RMS velocities are highest in the low Q asymptote and decrease as internal heating is applied. The scaling laws derived by Moore (2008), and extended here, are robust and highlight the importance of differing boundary layer processes acting over variable Q and moderate Ra.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation study of friction force and torque on a rough spherical particle.

    PubMed

    Kohale, Swapnil C; Khare, Rajesh

    2010-06-21

    Recent developments in techniques of micro- and nanofluidics have led to an increased interest in nanoscale hydrodynamics in confined geometries. In our previous study [S. C. Kohale and R. Khare, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164706 (2008)], we analyzed the friction force experienced by a smooth spherical particle that is translating in a fluid confined between parallel plates. The magnitude of three effects--velocity slip at particle surface, the presence of confining surfaces, and the cooperative hydrodynamic interactions between periodic images of the moving particle--that determine the friction force was quantified in that work using molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we have studied the motion of a rough spherical particle in a confined geometry. Specifically, the friction force experienced by a translating particle and the torque experienced by a rotating particle are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness of the particle significantly reduces the slip at the particle surface, thus leading to higher values of the friction force and hence a better agreement with the continuum predictions. The particle size dependence of the friction force and the torque values is shown to be consistent with the expectations from the continuum theory. As was observed for the smooth sphere, the cooperative hydrodynamic interactions between the images of the sphere have a significant effect on the value of the friction force experienced by the translating sphere. On the other hand, the torque experienced by a spherical particle that is rotating at the channel center is insensitive to this effect.

  3. Research on the feature set construction method for spherical stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junchao; Wan, Li; Röning, Juha; Feng, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    Spherical stereo vision is a kind of stereo vision system built by fish-eye lenses, which discussing the stereo algorithms conform to the spherical model. Epipolar geometry is the theory which describes the relationship of the two imaging plane in cameras for the stereo vision system based on perspective projection model. However, the epipolar in uncorrected fish-eye image will not be a line but an arc which intersects at the poles. It is polar curve. In this paper, the theory of nonlinear epipolar geometry will be explored and the method of nonlinear epipolar rectification will be proposed to eliminate the vertical parallax between two fish-eye images. Maximally Stable Extremal Region (MSER) utilizes grayscale as independent variables, and uses the local extremum of the area variation as the testing results. It is demonstrated in literatures that MSER is only depending on the gray variations of images, and not relating with local structural characteristics and resolution of image. Here, MSER will be combined with the nonlinear epipolar rectification method proposed in this paper. The intersection of the rectified epipolar and the corresponding MSER region is determined as the feature set of spherical stereo vision. Experiments show that this study achieved the expected results.

  4. On The Explosion Geometry of Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Douglas C.; Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project (SNSPOL)

    2016-06-01

    From progenitor studies, type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) have been decisively and uniquely determined to arise from isolated red supergiant (RSG) stars, establishing the most homogeneous --- and well understood --- progenitor class of any type of core-collapse supernova. The physical process by which these stars explode, however, remains a mystery. A fundamental clue to the nature of the explosion mechanism is explosion geometry: In short, are supernovae round? Because young supernova atmospheres are electron-scattering dominated, their net linear polarization provides a direct probe of early-time supernova geometry, with higher degrees of polarization generally indicating greater departures from spherical symmetry. This presentation will describe the ongoing work being carried out on RSG explosion geometry by the SuperNova SpectroPOLarimetry project (SNSPOL), with a particular focus on SN 2013ej -- an SN II-P that exhibited remarkably high polarization just days after the explosion, and for which twelve epochs of spectropolarimetry trace an intriguing tale about its geometry deep into the nebular phase.We acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1009571 and AST-1210311, under which part of this research was carried out.

  5. A non-spherical core in the explosion of supernova SN 2004dj.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Douglas C; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Serduke, Franklin J D; Li, Weidong; Swift, Brandon J; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Foley, Ryan J; Fox, Derek B; Park, Sung; Hoffman, Jennifer L; Wong, Diane S

    2006-03-23

    An important and perhaps critical clue to the mechanism driving the explosion of massive stars as supernovae is provided by the accumulating evidence for asymmetry in the explosion. Indirect evidence comes from high pulsar velocities, associations of supernovae with long-soft gamma-ray bursts, and asymmetries in late-time emission-line profiles. Spectropolarimetry provides a direct probe of young supernova geometry, with higher polarization generally indicating a greater departure from spherical symmetry. Large polarizations have been measured for 'stripped-envelope' (that is, type Ic; ref. 7) supernovae, which confirms their non-spherical morphology; but the explosions of massive stars with intact hydrogen envelopes (type II-P supernovae) have shown only weak polarizations at the early times observed. Here we report multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of a classic type II-P supernova that reveals the abrupt appearance of significant polarization when the inner core is first exposed in the thinning ejecta (approximately 90 days after explosion). We infer a departure from spherical symmetry of at least 30 per cent for the inner ejecta. Combined with earlier results, this suggests that a strongly non-spherical explosion may be a generic feature of core-collapse supernovae of all types, where the asphericity in type II-P supernovae is cloaked at early times by the massive, opaque, hydrogen envelope.

  6. Comparison of spherical and realistically shaped boundary element head models for transcranial magnetic stimulation navigation

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Aapo; Stenroos, Matti; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Okada, Yoshio C.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Raij, Tommi

    2013-01-01

    Objective MRI-guided real-time transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) navigators that apply electromagnetic modeling have improved the utility of TMS. However, their accuracy and speed depends on the assumed volume conductor geometry. Spherical models found in present navigators are computationally fast but may be inaccurate in some areas. Realistically-shaped boundary-element models (BEMs) could increase accuracy at a moderate computational cost, but it is unknown which model features have the largest influence on accuracy. Thus, we compared different types of spherical models and BEMs. Methods Globally and locally fitted spherical models and different BEMs with either one or three compartments and with different skull-to-brain conductivity ratios (1/1 – 1/80) were compared against a reference BEM. Results The one-compartment BEM at inner skull surface was almost as accurate as the reference BEM. Skull/brain conductivity ratio in the range 1/10 – 1/80 had only a minor influence. BEMs were superior to spherical models especially in frontal and temporal areas (up to 20 mm localization and 40% intensity improvement); in motor cortex all models provided similar results. Conclusions One-compartment BEMs offer a good balance between accuracy and computational cost. Significance Realistically-shaped BEMs may increase TMS navigation accuracy in several brain areas, such as in prefrontal regions often targeted in clinical applications. PMID:23890512

  7. The influence of the magnetic field on the heat transfer rate in rotating spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Ares; Avila, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Studies of the relationship between natural convection and magnetic field generation in spherical annular geometries with rotation are essential to understand the internal dynamics of the terrestrial planets. In such studies it is important to calculate and analyze the heat transfer rate at the inner and the outer spheres that confine the spherical gap. Previous investigations indicate that the magnetic field has a stabilizing effect on the onset of the natural convection, reduces the intensity of convection and modifies the flow patterns. However so far it is still unclear how the magnetic field change the heat transfer rate behaviour. We investigate the heat transfer rate (Nu) in a rotating spherical gap with a self gravity field varying linearly with radius, and its relation with the intensity of the magnetic field induced by the geodynamo effect. The Boussinesq fluid equations are solved by using a spectral element method (SEM). To avoid the singularity at the poles, the cubed-sphere algorithm is used to generate the spherical mesh. Several cases are simulated in which the Rayleigh number, the magnetic Reynolds number and the Taylor number are the variable parameters. The flow patterns, the temperature distribution and the Nusselt numbers at both spheres are calculated. Special thanks to DGAPA-UNAM Project PAPIIT IN11731, sponsor of this investigation.

  8. Spherical Ethylene/Air Diffusion Flames Subject to Concentric DC Electric Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Z. -G.; Hegde, U.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that microgravity conditions, by eliminating buoyant flow, enable many combustion phenomena to be observed that are not possible to observe at normal gravity. One example is the spherical diffusion flame surrounding a porous spherical burner. The present paper demonstrates that by superimposing a spherical electrical field on such a flame, the flame remains spherical so that we can study the interaction between the electric field and flame in a one-dimensional fashion. Flames are susceptible to electric fields that are much weaker than the breakdown field of the flame gases owing to the presence of ions generated in the high temperature flame reaction zone. These ions and the electric current of the moving ions, in turn, significantly change the distribution of the electric field. Thus, to understand the interplay between the electric field and the flame is challenging. Numerous experimental studies of the effect of electric fields on flames have been reported. Unfortunately, they were all involved in complex geometries of both the flow field and the electric field, which hinders detailed study of the phenomena. In a one-dimensional domain, however, the electric field, the flow field, the thermal field and the chemical species field are all co-linear. Thus the problem is greatly simplified and becomes more tractable.

  9. Two-stream instability in convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, F.T.; Gnavi, G.

    1987-02-01

    The problem of the instability of counterstreaming beams of charged particles is extended to cylindrical and spherical geometries. For well-focused configurations it can be solved by complex contour integral representations. The effects of the convergence of the flow and the density gradient along the trajectories of the particles are considered. The linear spectrum for the cylindrical case is obtained, together with the proof that the solution has finite energy and satisfies two physical matching conditions through the origin. The properties of the special functions which solve this problem are presented. Although the density of the ideally focused model diverges as 1/r at the origin, the growth rate of the instability, for a system of radius R, is given by ..omega../sup 2//sub p/R/V/sub 0/2xi/sub n/, where V/sub 0/ is the beam velocity, xi/sub n/ are the zeros of the Bessel function of zeroth order, and the plasma frequency ..omega../sub p/ is evaluated at one-half the average density of particles.

  10. Role of target geometry in phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Julie A.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a principal component of the body’s innate immunity in which macrophages internalize targets in an actin-dependent manner. Targets vary widely in shape and size and include particles such as pathogens and senescent cells. Despite considerable progress in understanding this complicated process, the role of target geometry in phagocytosis has remained elusive. Previous studies on phagocytosis have been performed using spherical targets, thereby overlooking the role of particle shape. Using polystyrene particles of various sizes and shapes, we studied phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. We report a surprising finding that particle shape, not size, plays a dominant role in phagocytosis. All shapes were capable of initiating phagocytosis in at least one orientation. However, the local particle shape, measured by tangent angles, at the point of initial contact dictates whether macrophages initiate phagocytosis or simply spread on particles. The local shape determines the complexity of the actin structure that must be created to initiate phagocytosis and allow the membrane to move over the particle. Failure to create the required actin structure results in simple spreading and not internalization. Particle size primarily impacts the completion of phagocytosis in cases where particle volume exceeds the cell volume. PMID:16549762

  11. Effective geometry of a white dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Bini, D.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.

    2011-03-15

    The ''effective geometry'' formalism is used to study the perturbations of a white dwarf described as a self-gravitating fermion gas with a completely degenerate relativistic equation of state of barotropic type. The quantum nature of the system causes an absence of homological properties, manifested instead by polytropic stars, and requires a parametric study of the solutions both at the numerical and analytical level. We have explicitly derived a compact analytical parametric approximate solution of Pade type, which gives density curves and stellar radii in good accordance with already existing numerical results. After validation of this new type of approximate solutions, we use them to construct the effective acoustic metric governing general perturbations following Chebsch's formalism. Even in this quantum case, the stellar surface exhibits a curvature singularity due to the vanishing of density, as already evidenced in past studies on nonquantum self-gravitating polytropic stars. The equations of the theory are finally numerically integrated in the simpler case of irrotational spherical pulsating perturbations, including the effect of backreaction, in order to have a dynamical picture of the process occurring in the acoustic metric.

  12. A Generalization of the Spherical Inversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we introduce a generalization of the spherical inversion. In particular, we define an inversion with respect to an ellipsoid, and prove several properties of this new transformation. The inversion in an ellipsoid is the generalization of the elliptic inversion to the three-dimensional space. We also study the inverse images…

  13. METHOD OF MAKING SPHERICAL ACTINIDE CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    White, G.D.; O'Rourke, D.C.

    1962-12-25

    This patent describes a method of making uniform, spherical, nonpyrophoric UC. UO/sub 2/ and carbon are mixed in stoichiometric proportions and passed through a plasma flame of inert gas at 10,000 to 13,000 deg C. (AEC)

  14. Plastic flow around rigid spherical inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.; Nelson, D. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The extent of plastic flow in a spherical solid (assumed to be homogeneous and elastically and plastically isotropic), surrounding a concentric rigid sphere was calculated as a function of applied external pressure. The applied pressure necessary to cause plastic deformation throughout the solid was obtained.

  15. Spherical Model of Interests in Croatia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sverko, Iva

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze the validity of spherical model of interests in Croatia, three Croatian samples of primary school students (N = 437), secondary school students (N = 540) and university students (N = 630) were administered a translated version of the Personal Globe Inventory (PGI, [Tracey, T.J.G. (2002). Personal Globe Inventory: Measurement of…

  16. Fast discharge in a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S. Dorokhin, L. A.

    2014-04-15

    The work is devoted to the study of the plasma, created by a fast discharge in a spherical cavity. The discharge was driven by an inductive storage with plasma erosion opening switch (dI/dt ∼10{sup 12} A/s). The plasma was produced in a spherical cavity (alumina, 11 mm diameter). Xe, Ar, and He at the pressure 80 Pa were used as working gases. The time evolution of the spatial structure and of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of the discharge plasma was studied by means of micro channel plate detector. The discharges with Xe and Ar resulted in the stable appearance of the spherically shaped plasma with the diameter about 1–3 mm. The plasma emission in the EUV region lasts ∼500 ns. The EUV spectrum of Ar discharge at the moment of maximum of the electron temperature T{sub e} contains the lines of Ar X (ionization potential 478.7 eV), that indicates a value of T{sub e} in the range 50–100 eV. The mechanism of plasma appearance can be the cumulation of the convergent spherical shock wave, generated by fast heat deposition and magnetic pressure in working media near the inner surface of the discharge volume.

  17. Stable wormholes on a noncommutative-geometry background admitting a one-parameter group of conformal motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhfittig, P. K. F.

    2016-07-01

    When Morris and Thorne first proposed the possible existence of traversable wormholes, they adopted the following strategy: maintain complete control over the geometry, thereby leaving open the determination of the stress-energy tensor. In this paper we determine this tensor by starting with a noncommutative-geometry background and assuming that the static and spherically symmetric spacetime admits conformal motions. We have shown that the wormhole obtained can be made stable to linearized radial perturbations.

  18. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Taylor, Paul Allen; Collins, Robert T; Hunt, Rodney Dale

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B.; Weir, S.

    1995-08-25

    Due to the sensitivity of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities to initial conditions and due to the difficulty of forming well controlled cylindrical or spherical fluid interfaces, Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are often performed with simple, planar interfaces. Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena of practical interest, however, (e.g., underwater explosions, supernova core collapses, and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions) are typically associated with cylindrical or spherical interfaces in which convergent flow effects have an important influence on the dynamics of instability growth. Recently, Meshkov et.al. have developed a novel technique for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a cylindrically convergent geometry. Their experiments utilized low-strength gelatin rings which are imploded by a detonating gas mixture of oxygen and acetylene. Since the gelatin itself has sufficient strength to resist significant deformation by gravity, no membranes are needed to define the ring shape. This experimental technique is attractive because it offers a high degree of control over the interfacial geometry and over the material`s strength and rigidity, which can be varied by adjusting the gelatin concentration. Finally, since both the gelatin and the explosive product gases are transparent, optical diagnostics can be used.

  20. CATIA-GDML geometry builder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogurov, S.; Berchun, Yu; Chernogorov, A.; Malzacher, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Semennikov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Due to conceptual difference between geometry descriptions in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems and particle transport Monte Carlo (MC) codes direct conversion of detector geometry in either direction is not feasible. An original set of tools has been developed for building a GEANT4/ROOT compatible geometry in the CATIA CAD system and exchanging it with mentioned MC packages using GDML file format. A Special structure of a CATIA product tree, a wide range of primitives, different types of multiple volume instantiation, and supporting macros have been implemented.

  1. An improved combinatorial geometry model for arbitrary geometry in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code based on combinatorial geometry (CG) for simulation of any rarefied gas flow. The developed code, called DgSMC-A, has been supplied with an improved CG modeling able to significantly optimize the particle-tracking process, resulting in a highly reduced runtime compared to the conventional codes. The improved algorithm inserts a grid over the geometry and saves those grid elements containing some part of the geometry border. Since only a small part of a grid is engaged with the geometry border, significant time can be saved using the proposed algorithm. Embedding the modified algorithm in the DgSMC-A resulted in a fast, robust and self-governing code needless to any mesh generator. The code completely handles complex geometries created with first-and second-order surfaces. In addition, we developed a new surface area calculator in the CG methodology for complex geometries based on the Monte Carlo method with acceptable accuracy. Several well-known test cases are examined to indicate the code ability to deal with a wide range of realistic problems. Results are also found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  2. Experiments on Thermal Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells With Radial Gravity: The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments designed to study the fluid dynamics of buoyancy driven circulations in rotating spherical shells were conducted on the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 spacelab mission. These experiments address several aspects of prototypical global convection relevant to large scale motions on the Sun, Earth, and on the giant planets. The key feature is the consistent modeling of radially directed gravity in spherical geometry by using dielectric polarization forces. Imagery of the planforms of thermally driven flows for rapidly-rotating regimes shows an initial separation and eventual merger of equatorial and polar convection as the heating (i.e. the Rayleigh number) is increased. At low rotation rates, multiple-states of motion for the same external parameters were observed.

  3. Broadband light management using low-Q whispering gallery modes in spherical nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yan; Yao, Jie; Narasimhan, Vijay Kris; Ruan, Zhichao; Xie, Chong; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2012-02-07

    Light trapping across a wide band of frequencies is important for applications such as solar cells and photodetectors. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to light management by forming whispering-gallery resonant modes inside a spherical nanoshell structure. The geometry of the structure gives rise to a low quality-factor, facilitating the coupling of light into the resonant modes and substantial enhancement of the light path in the active material, thus dramatically improving absorption. Using nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) as a model system, we observe broadband absorption enhancement across a large range of incident angles. The absorption of a single layer of 50-nm-thick spherical nanoshells is equivalent to a 1-μm-thick planar nc-Si film. This light-trapping structure could enable the manufacturing of high-throughput ultra-thin film absorbers in a variety of material systems that demand shorter deposition time, less material usage and transferability to flexible substrates.

  4. Effect of Cerebrospinal Fluid Modelling on Spherically Convergent Shear Waves during Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Madhukar, Amit; Chen, Ying; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-03-14

    The MRI-based computational model, previously validated by tagged MRI and HARP imaging analysis technique on in vivo human brain deformation, is employed to study transient wave dynamics during blunt head trauma. Three different constitutive models are used for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): incompressible solid elastic, viscoelastic and fluid-like elastic using an equation of state model. Three impact cases are simulated which indicate that the blunt impacts give rise not only to a fast pressure wave but also to a slow, and potentially much more damaging, shear (distortional) wave that converges spherically towards the brain center. The wave amplification due to spherical geometry is balanced by damping due to tissues' viscoelasticity and the heterogeneous brain structure, suggesting a stochastic competition of these two opposite effects. It is observed that this convergent shear wave is dependent on the constitutive property of the CSF whereas the peak pressure is not as significantly affected.

  5. Occurrence of spherical ceramic debris in indentation and sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Indenting experiments were conducted with the silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with a spherical diamond indenter in air. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted with silicon carbide in contact with iron and iron-based binary alloys at room temperature and 800 C. Fracture pits with a spherical particle and spherical wear debris were observed as a result of indenting and sliding. Spherical debris may be produced by a mechanism that involves a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories under the inelastic deformation zone.

  6. Emergent geometry from quantized spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hyun Seok; Sivakumar, M.

    2010-08-15

    We examine the picture of emergent geometry arising from a mass-deformed matrix model. Because of the mass deformation, a vacuum geometry turns out to be a constant curvature spacetime such as d-dimensional sphere and (anti-)de Sitter spaces. We show that the mass-deformed matrix model giving rise to the constant curvature spacetime can be derived from the d-dimensional Snyder algebra. The emergent geometry beautifully confirms all the rationale inferred from the algebraic point of view that the d-dimensional Snyder algebra is equivalent to the Lorentz algebra in (d+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. For example, a vacuum geometry of the mass-deformed matrix model is completely described by a G-invariant metric of coset manifolds G/H defined by the Snyder algebra. We also discuss a nonlinear deformation of the Snyder algebra.

  7. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  8. Do spherical tokamaks have a thermonuclear future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, S. V.

    2012-12-01

    This work has been initiated by the publication of a review by B.V.Kuteev et al., "Intense Fusion Neutron Sources" [Plasma Physics Reports 36, 281 (2010)]. It is stated that the key thesis of the above review that a spherical tokamak can be recommended for research neutron sources and for demonstration hybrid systems as an alternative to expensive "classical" tokamaks of the JET and ITER type is inconsistent. The analysis of the experimental material obtained during the last 10 years in the course of studies on the existing spherical tokamaks shows that the TIN-ST fusion neutron source spherical tokamak proposed by the authors of the review and intended, according to the authors' opinion, to replace "monsters" in view of its table-top dimensions (2 m3) and laboratory-level energetics cannot be transformed into any noticeable stationary megawatt-power neutron source competing with the existing classical tokamaks (in particular, with JET with its quasi-steady DT fusion power at a level of 5 MW). Namely, the maximum plasma current in the proposed tokamak will be not 3 MA, as the authors suppose erroneously, but, according to the present-day practice of spherical tokamaks, within 0.6-0.7 MA, which will lead to a reduction on the neutron flux by two to three orders of magnitude from the expected 5 MW. The possibility of the maintenance of the stationary process itself even in such a "weakened" spherical tokamak is very doubtful. The experience of the largest existing devices of this type (such as NSTX and MAST) has shown that they are incapable of operating even in a quasi-steady operating mode, because the discharge in them is spontaneously interrupted about 1 s after the beginning of the current pulse, although its expected duration is of up to 5 s. The nature of this phenomenon is the subject of further study of the physics of spherical tokamaks. This work deals with a critical analysis of the available experimental data concerning such tokamaks and a discussion of

  9. Preparation and Evaluation of Two Apatites with Spherical Nanocrystal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Li, Qihong; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Yong; Wang, Chunhui; Zhao, Yantao; Song, Yingliang; Liu, Yanpu

    2016-03-01

    Spherical nanocrystal of apatite has been proved to be beneficial for osteoblast growth. Two apatites with spherical nanocrystal morphology were prepared in this study by chemical wet method and further sintering process. SEM exhibited that both apatites had spherical nanocrystal morphology. The crystal morphology and size was approaching to each other. XRD showed the apatites separately were hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate phases. The cellular biocompatibility was evaluated by osteoblasts for these two spherical nanocrstal apatites. The MTT result indicated a higher cell proliferation rate for spherical tricalcium phosphate group. The ALP activity assay also strongly favored the tricalcium phosphate group. RT-PCR results indicated that Collagen I had a higher transcription level on the spherical tricalcium phosphate group. SEM results showed robust cell growth on the materials. It was concluded that the spherical nanophase tricalcium phosphate was superior to the cellular biocompatibility of spherical nanophase hydroxyapatite and the results were helpful in the manufacture of more suitable tissue engineering scaffolds.

  10. Attributes of color represented by a spherical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tieling; Ma, Jun; Deng, Zhongmin

    2013-10-01

    The paper introduces a spherical coordinate system-based color model and studies the color change in the model. A circular cone with a spherical top tightly circumscribing the RGB color cube is equipped with a properly rotated spherical coordinate system. Similar to the commonly used color models with a hue component such as the HSV model, the spherical model specifies color by describing the color attributes recognized by human vision, using the components of the spherical coordinate system. The formulas of conversions between the spherical model and the RGB color model are provided, which are mathematically simpler and more intuitively understandable than those for commonly used models with a hue component. Most importantly, color changes are perceptually smoother in the spherical model. Comparisons between the spherical model and the HSV model on color changes are made in the paper.

  11. Measurement of reflectivity of spherically bent crystals using Kα signal from hot electrons produced by laser-matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, L.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Folpini, G.; Bouillaud, R.; Fedeli, L.; Fourment, C.; Giuffrida, L.; Hulin, S.; Santos, J. J.; Volpe, L.; Batani, D.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, S.

    2015-07-15

    In an experiment at the laser facility ECLIPSE of the CELIA laboratory, University of Bordeaux, we measure the reflectivity of spherically bent crystals that are commonly used to investigate the propagation of fast electrons through the Kα radiation they generate in matter. The experimental reflectivity compares well with predictions from a ray-tracing code that takes into account the specific geometry, although the crystals seem to suffer from aging problems.

  12. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Erin; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume is a rich, largely unexplored problem, with applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. We report simulation results for dense clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N = 60 constituent particles. We discuss similarities between clusters in terms of symmetry, a connection to spherical codes, and generally the interplay between isotropic geometrical confinement and anisotropic particle shape. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the problem of packing in confinement. E.T. acknowledges support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1256260.

  13. Testing the spherical evolution of cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, Vasiliy; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Heymans, Catherine; Peacock, John A.

    2016-11-01

    We study the spherical evolution model for voids in ΛCDM, where the evolution of voids is governed by dark energy at an earlier time than that for the whole universe or in overdensities. We show that the presence of dark energy suppresses the growth of peculiar velocities, causing void shell-crossing to occur at progressively later epochs as ΩΛ increases. We apply the spherical model to evolve the initial conditions of N-body simulated voids and compare the resulting final void profiles. We find that the model is successful in tracking the evolution of voids with radii greater than 30 h-1 Mpc, implying that void profiles could be used to constrain dark energy. We find that the initial peculiar velocities of voids play a significant role in shaping their evolution. Excluding the peculiar velocity in the evolution model delays the time of shell crossing.

  14. Imaging with Spherically Bent Crystals or Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-06-01

    This paper consists of two parts: Part I describes the working principle of a recently developed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, where the astigmatism of spherically bent crystals is being used with advantage to record spatially resolved spectra of highly charged ions for Doppler measurements of the ion-temperature and toroidal plasmarotation- velocity profiles in tokamak plasmas. This type of spectrometer was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, and its concept was recently adopted for the design of the ITER crystal spectrometers. Part II describes imaging schemes, where the astigmatism has been eliminated by the use of matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or reflectors. These imaging schemes are applicable over a wide range of the electromagnetic radiation, which includes microwaves, visible light, EUV radiation, and x-rays. Potential applications with EUV radiation and x-rays are the diagnosis of laserproduced plasmas, imaging of biological samples with synchrotron radiation, and lithography.

  15. Quality metric for spherical panoramic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharchenko, Vladyslav; Choi, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2016-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR)/ augmented reality (AR) applications allow users to view artificial content of a surrounding space simulating presence effect with a help of special applications or devices. Synthetic contents production is well known process form computer graphics domain and pipeline has been already fixed in the industry. However emerging multimedia formats for immersive entertainment applications such as free-viewpoint television (FTV) or spherical panoramic video require different approaches in content management and quality assessment. The international standardization on FTV has been promoted by MPEG. This paper is dedicated to discussion of immersive media distribution format and quality estimation process. Accuracy and reliability of the proposed objective quality estimation method had been verified with spherical panoramic images demonstrating good correlation results with subjective quality estimation held by a group of experts.

  16. Flow past a porous approximate spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the creeping flow of an incompressible viscous liquid past a porous approximate spherical shell is considered. The flow in the free fluid region outside the shell and in the cavity region of the shell is governed by the Navier Stokes equation. The flow within the porous annulus region of the shell is governed by Darcy’s Law. The boundary conditions used at the interface are continuity of the normal velocity, continuity of the pressure and Beavers and Joseph slip condition. An exact solution for the problem is obtained. An expression for the drag on the porous approximate spherical shell is obtained. The drag experienced by the shell is evaluated numerically for several values of the parameters governing the flow.

  17. Spherical harmonics and integration in superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBie, H.; Sommen, F.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, the classical theory of spherical harmonics in {\\bb R}^m is extended to superspace using techniques from Clifford analysis. After defining a super-Laplace operator and studying some basic properties of polynomial null-solutions of this operator, a new type of integration over the supersphere is introduced by exploiting the formal equivalence with an old result of Pizzetti. This integral is then used to prove orthogonality of spherical harmonics of different degree, Green-like theorems and also an extension of the important Funk-Hecke theorem to superspace. Finally, this integration over the supersphere is used to define an integral over the whole superspace, and it is proven that this is equivalent with the Berezin integral, thus providing a more sound definition of the Berezin integral.

  18. Spherical roller bearing analysis. SKF computer program SPHERBEAN. Volume 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1980-01-01

    The models and associated mathematics used within the SPHERBEAN computer program for prediction of the thermomechanical performance characteristics of high speed lubricated double row spherical roller bearings are presented. The analysis allows six degrees of freedom for each roller and three for each half of an optionally split cage. Roller skew, free lubricant, inertial loads, appropriate elastic and friction forces, and flexible outer ring are considered. Roller quasidynamic equilibrium is calculated for a bearing with up to 30 rollers per row, and distinct roller and flange geometries are specifiable. The user is referred to the material contained here for formulation assumptions and algorithm detail.

  19. Semiclassical estimates of electromagnetic Casimir self-energies of spherical and cylindrical metallic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, Martin

    2010-08-15

    The leading semiclassical estimates of the electromagnetic Casimir stresses on a spherical and a cylindrical metallic shell are within 1% of the field theoretical values. The electromagnetic Casimir energy for both geometries is given by two decoupled massless scalars that satisfy conformally covariant boundary conditions. Surface contributions vanish for smooth metallic boundaries, and the finite electromagnetic Casimir energy in leading semiclassical approximation is due to quadratic fluctuations about periodic rays in the interior of the cavity only. Semiclassically, the nonvanishing Casimir energy of a metallic cylindrical shell is almost entirely due to Fresnel diffraction.

  20. Microwave and optical ray geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornbleet, S.

    The laws of refraction and reflection are examined, and the zero-distance phase front is discussed, taking into account aspects of definition and general derivation, refraction in a circular interface, reflection in a circle, reflection in a general curve, geometrical constructions, and caustic approximations. Other subjects explored are related to the inversion theorem of Damien, the mechanical description of optical surfaces, ray-tracing in nonuniform media, rays in linear and cylindrical media, rays in spherical and axisymmetric media, geodesics, rays and trajectories, curves and their formulae, derived curves, applications of Abel's integral, and the radiation patterns of Luneburg lenses. Attention is given to a geometrical method of optical design, lens bending, the general two-surface reflector system, the ray-tracing equations, expansions of the ray equations, transformations of the spherical lenses, and rays in an angular variable medium.

  1. Loading PEG-Catalase into Filamentous and Spherical Polymer Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric A.; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vardon, Vanessa; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Based on a unique phase alignment that occurs during formulation, we postulated that PEG-ylation of the cargo enzyme would enhance its encapsulation within diblock copolymer nanocarriers and thus resistance to proteases. Methods A freeze–thaw modified double emulsion technique was utilized to encapsulate either the catalytically active enzyme catalase (MW ~250 kDa) or PEG-catalase in PEG–PLA polymer nanocarriers (PNC). Spectrophotometer measurement of substrate depletion was utilized to monitor enzyme activity. Isotope labeling of the enzyme was used in conjunction with activity measurements to determine PNC loading efficiency and PNC-enzyme resistance to proteases. This labeling also enabled blood clearance measurements of PNC-loaded and non-loaded enzymes in mice. Results Non-loaded PEG-catalase exhibited longer circulation times than catalase, but was equally susceptible to proteolysis. Modulation of the ratio of relatively hydrophilic to hydrophobic domains in the diblock PEG–PLA copolymer provided either filamentous or spherical PNC loaded with PEG-catalase. For both PNC geometries, encapsulation and resistance to proteases of the resultant PNC-loaded enzyme were more effective for PEG-catalase than catalase. Isotope tracing showed similar blood levels of PNC-loaded and free PEG-catalase in mice. Conclusions PEGylation enhances active catalase loading within PNC and resistance to protease degradation, relative to unloaded PEG-catalase. PMID:18956141

  2. Direct Simulation of Extinction in a Slab of Spherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D.W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    The exact multiple sphere superposition method is used to calculate the coherent and incoherent contributions to the ensemble-averaged electric field amplitude and Poynting vector in systems of randomly positioned nonabsorbing spherical particles. The target systems consist of cylindrical volumes, with radius several times larger than length, containing spheres with positional configurations generated by a Monte Carlo sampling method. Spatially dependent values for coherent electric field amplitude, coherent energy flux, and diffuse energy flux, are calculated by averaging of exact local field and flux values over multiple configurations and over spatially independent directions for fixed target geometry, sphere properties, and sphere volume fraction. Our results reveal exponential attenuation of the coherent field and the coherent energy flux inside the particulate layer and thereby further corroborate the general methodology of the microphysical radiative transfer theory. An effective medium model based on plane wave transmission and reflection by a plane layer is used to model the dependence of the coherent electric field on particle packing density. The effective attenuation coefficient of the random medium, computed from the direct simulations, is found to agree closely with effective medium theories and with measurements. In addition, the simulation results reveal the presence of a counter-propagating component to the coherent field, which arises due to the internal reflection of the main coherent field component by the target boundary. The characteristics of the diffuse flux are compared to, and found to be consistent with, a model based on the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer theory.

  3. Interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Stark, Holger; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    We numerically investigate the interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal mediated by elastic distortions in the orientational order. We pay attention to the cases where two particles with equal radii R0 impose rigid normal anchoring on their surfaces and carry a pointlike topological defect referred to as a hyperbolic hedgehog. To describe the geometry of our system, we use bispherical coordinates, which prove useful in the implementation of boundary conditions at the particle surfaces and at infinity. We adopt the Landau de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Qij for the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal. We also utilize an adaptive mesh refinement scheme that has proven to be an efficient way of dealing with topological defects whose core size is much smaller than the particle size. When the two “dipoles,” composed of a particle and a hyperbolic hedgehog, are in parallel directions, the two-particle interaction potential is attractive for large interparticle distances D and proportional to D-3 as expected from the form of the dipole-dipole interaction, until the well-defined potential minimum at D≃2.46 R0 is reached. For the antiparallel configuration with no hedgehogs between the two particles, the interaction potential is repulsive and behaves as D-2 for D≲10 R0 , which is stronger than the dipole-dipole repulsion ( ˜ D-3 ) expected theoretically as an asymptotic behavior for large D .

  4. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75° latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180°. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker’s Ω-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10°. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  5. The Dynamics of Non Spherical Particles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    than 0.1 m) Spherical 0-20 10 Smoke, pollen fly- ash Irregular 10-90 40 Mineral Cubical Cinder Flakes 0-10 5 Mineral... epidermis Fibrous 5-35 10 Lint plant fibers Condensation floes 0-40 15 Carbon, smoke fume Table 1: Airborne Dust Particle Shapes (Stern...A discoid-type particle ( flake ) may be envisaged as an oblate rotational ellipsoid of a very small axial ratio, and a straight-chain condensation

  6. Nonlinear axisymmetric flexural vibration of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunieda, H.

    1972-01-01

    Axisymmetric responses are presented of a nonshallow thin-walled spherical shell on the basis of nonlinear bending theory. An ordinary differential equation with nonlinearity of quadratic as well as cubic terms associated with variable time is derived. The derivation is based on the assumption that the deflection mode is the sum of four Legendre polynomials, and the Galerkin procedure is applied. The equation is solved by asymptotic expansion, and a first approximate solution is adopted. Unstable regions of this solution are discussed.

  7. Interpolating Spherical Harmonics for Computing Antenna Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    and Antenna Patterns 1 2 Short-Wire Antennas 3 3 Spherical Harmonic Expansions 10 4 Adaptive Spline Interpolation ( ASI ) 14 5 Testing the ASI Algorithm...frequency band is possible. This report offers a simple adaptive spline interpolation ( ASI ) algorithm to benchmark more sophisticated pattern...θ, φ) and their expansions. Sec- tion 4 uses one of the antenna patterns to develop the ASI algorithm and the error bounds. Section 5 tests the ASI

  8. Wave equation on spherically symmetric Lorentzian metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Al-Dweik, Ahmad Y.; Zaman, F. D.; Kara, A. H.; Karim, M.

    2011-06-15

    Wave equation on a general spherically symmetric spacetime metric is constructed. Noether symmetries of the equation in terms of explicit functions of {theta} and {phi} are derived subject to certain differential constraints. By restricting the metric to flat Friedman case the Noether symmetries of the wave equation are presented. Invertible transformations are constructed from a specific subalgebra of these Noether symmetries to convert the wave equation with variable coefficients to the one with constant coefficients.

  9. Spherical Cancer Models in Tumor Biology1

    PubMed Central

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Bellet, Dominique; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type. PMID:25622895

  10. Two particle system in spherically confined plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, Dipti; Sen, K. D.; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-03-01

    Energy eigenvalues of Harmonium atom are reported for the first time under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential. Energy of different states of Harmonium is analyzed as a function of confinement radius and Debye screening length. Comparison of radial matrix elements of Harmonium atom under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential is done. Interesting results are obtained.

  11. Earth Sphericity Effects on Subduction Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, G.; Chatelain, P.; Tackley, P.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present here the first application in Geodynamics of a Multipole accelerated Boundary Element Method (FMM- BEM) for Stokes Flow. The approach offers the advantage of a reduced number of computational elements and linear scaling with the problem size. We show that this numerical mehod can be fruitfully applied to the simulation of several geodynamic systems at the planetary scale in spheical coordinates and we suggest a general appraoch for modeling combined mantle convection and plate tectonics. The potentialities of the approach are shown investigating the effect played by Earth sphericity on the subduction of a very wide oceanic lithosphere , comparing the morphology of the subducted lithosphere in a spherical and in flat setting. The results show a striking difference between the two models: while the slab on a "flat Earth" shows slight undulation, the same subducting plate on a spherical Earth-like setting presents a distinct folding below the trench far from the edges, with wavelength of (1000km-2000km) as Pacific trenches.

  12. Quantum corrected spherical collapse: A phenomenological framework

    SciTech Connect

    Ziprick, Jonathan; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2010-08-15

    A phenomenological framework is presented for incorporating quantum gravity motivated corrections into the dynamics of spherically symmetric collapse. The effective equations are derived from a variational principle that guarantees energy conservation and the existence of a Birkhoff theorem. The gravitational potential can be chosen as a function of the areal radius to yield specific nonsingular static spherically symmetric solutions that generically have two horizons. For a specific choice of potential, the effective stress energy tensor violates only the dominant energy condition. The violations are maximum near the inner horizon and die off rapidly. A numerical study of the quantum corrected collapse of a spherically symmetric scalar field in this case reveals that the modified gravitational potential prevents the formation of a central singularity and ultimately yields a static, mostly vacuum, spacetime with two horizons. The matter 'piles up' on the inner horizon giving rise to mass inflation at late times. The Cauchy horizon is transformed into a null, weak singularity, but in contrast to Einstein gravity, the absence of a central singularity renders this null singularity stable.

  13. Spherically symmetric thick branes cosmological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, A. E.; Cavalcanti, R. T.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-01-01

    Spherically symmetric time-dependent solutions for the 5D system of a scalar field canonically coupled to gravity are obtained and identified as an extension of recent results obtained by Ahmed et al. (JHEP 1404:061. arXiv:1312.3576 [hep-th], 2014). The corresponding cosmology of models with regularized branes generated by such a 5D scalar field scenario is also investigated. It has been shown that the anisotropic evolution of the warp factor and consequently the Hubble like parameter are both driven by the radial coordinate on the brane, which leads to an emergent thick brane-world scenario with spherically symmetric time dependent warp factor. Meanwhile, the separability of variables depending on fifth dimension, , which is exhibited by the equations of motion, allows one to recover the extra dimensional profiles obtained in Ahmed et al. (2014), namely the extra dimensional part of the scale (warp) factor and the scalar field dependence on . Therefore, our results are mainly concerned with the time dependence of a spherically symmetric warp factor. Besides evincing possibilities for obtaining asymmetric stable brane-world scenarios, the extra dimensional profiles here obtained can also be reduced to those ones investigated in Ahmed et al. (2014).

  14. Light propagation from fluorescent probes in biological tissues by coupled time-dependent parabolic simplified spherical harmonics equations

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Jorge Bouza; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a system of coupled time-dependent parabolic simplified spherical harmonic equations to model the propagation of both excitation and fluorescence light in biological tissues. We resort to a finite element approach to obtain the time-dependent profile of the excitation and the fluorescence light fields in the medium. We present results for cases involving two geometries in three-dimensions: a homogeneous cylinder with an embedded fluorescent inclusion and a realistically-shaped rodent with an embedded inclusion alike an organ filled with a fluorescent probe. For the cylindrical geometry, we show the differences in the time-dependent fluorescence response for a point-like, a spherical, and a spherically Gaussian distributed fluorescent inclusion. From our results, we conclude that the model is able to describe the time-dependent excitation and fluorescent light transfer in small geometries with high absorption coefficients and in nondiffusive domains, as may be found in small animal diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and fluorescence DOT imaging. PMID:21483606

  15. Impact of contact lens zone geometry and ocular optics on bifocal retinal image quality

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Arthur; Nam, Jayoung; Xu, Renfeng; Harman, Leslie; Thibos, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the separate and combined influences of zone geometry, pupil size, diffraction, apodisation and spherical aberration on the optical performance of concentric zonal bifocals. Methods Zonal bifocal pupil functions representing eye + ophthalmic correction were defined by interleaving wavefronts from separate optical zones of the bifocal. A two-zone design (a central circular inner zone surrounded by an annular outer-zone which is bounded by the pupil) and a five-zone design (a central small circular zone surrounded by four concentric annuli) were configured with programmable zone geometry, wavefront phase and pupil transmission characteristics. Using computational methods, we examined the effects of diffraction, Stiles Crawford apodisation, pupil size and spherical aberration on optical transfer functions for different target distances. Results Apodisation alters the relative weighting of each zone, and thus the balance of near and distance optical quality. When spherical aberration is included, the effective distance correction, add power and image quality depend on zone-geometry and Stiles Crawford Effect apodisation. When the outer zone width is narrow, diffraction limits the available image contrast when focused, but as pupil dilates and outer zone width increases, aberrations will limit the best achievable image quality. With two-zone designs, balancing near and distance image quality is not achieved with equal area inner and outer zones. With significant levels of spherical aberration, multi-zone designs effectively become multifocals. Conclusion Wave optics and pupil varying ocular optics significantly affect the imaging capabilities of different optical zones of concentric bifocals. With two-zone bifocal designs, diffraction, pupil apodisation spherical aberration, and zone size influence both the effective add power and the pupil size required to balance near and distance image quality. Five-zone bifocal designs achieve a high degree of

  16. Spherical Joint Piston and Connecting Rod Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy, the NASA Lewis Research Center manages a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Technology (HDET) research program. The overall program objectives are to reduce fuel consumption through increased engine efficiency, reduce engine exhaust emissions, and provide options for the use of alternative fuels. The program is administered with a balance of research contracts, university research grants, and focused in-house research. The Cummins Engine Company participates in the HDET program under a cost-sharing research contract. Cummins is researching and developing in-cylinder component technologies for heavy-duty diesel engines. An objective of the Cummins research is to develop technologies for a low-emissions, 55-percent thermal efficiency (LE-55) engine. The best current-production engines in this class achieve about 46-percent thermal efficiency. Federal emissions regulations are driving this technology. Regulations for heavy duty diesel engines were tightened in 1994, more demanding emissions regulations are scheduled for 1998, and another step is planned for 2002. The LE-55 engine emissions goal is set at half of the 1998 regulation level and is consistent with plans for 2002 emissions regulations. LE-55 engine design requirements to meet the efficiency target dictate a need to operate at higher peak cylinder pressures. A key technology being developed and evaluated under the Cummins Engine Company LE-55 engine concept is the spherical joint piston and connecting rod. Unlike conventional piston and connecting rod arrangements which are joined by a pin forming a hinged joint, the spherical joint piston and connecting rod use a ball-and-socket joint. The ball-and-socket arrangement enables the piston to have an axisymmetric design allowing rotation within the cylinder. The potential benefits of piston symmetry and rotation are reduced scuffing, improved piston ring sealing, improved lubrication, mechanical and thermal

  17. Some implications of the particle and climb geometry on the climb resistance in nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherji, D.; Wahi, R.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various dislocation climb models were developed for modeling the deformation processes in precipitation hardened alloys at elevated temperatures and low applied stresses. These models have been applied to alloy systems containing spherical, cubic and other precipitate shapes. However, in applying these models to alloys containing cubic precipitates, the particle orientation with respect to the slip plane and the slip geometry relevant to the nickel-base superalloys was not considered. In this paper the authors show that by taking into account the realistic climb and glide geometries, the value of the climb resistances considerably differ from those reported earlier on the basis of simplified geometries.

  18. High definition imaging in the Mega Amp Spherical Torus spherical tokamak from soft x rays to infrared (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolan, P. G.; Patel, A.; Conway, N. J.; Akers, R. J.; Bunting, C. A.; Counsell, G. F.; Dowling, J.; Dunstan, M. R.; Kirk, A.; Lott, F.; Price, M. N.; Tournianski, M. R.; Walsh, M. J.

    2004-10-01

    The Mega Amp Spherical Torus (MAST) diagnostic needs are strongly influenced by physics goals that often require diagnostic integration and cross-mapping, especially in fine-scale investigations, such as transport barriers. Conversely, the unrivalled viewing access to the edge, scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor regions, provided by the MAST open geometry, impacts on the physics program priorities. A supporting suite diagnostics, such as the high definition Thomson scattering systems, provide considerable added value in detailed data interpretation (e.g., bremsstrahlung emissivity in terms of Zeff). Thus, to exploit these advantages, an extensive set of high-resolution imaging diagnostics have been installed, encompassing soft x-rays, visible bremsstrahlung, charge exchange recognisation radiation, Dα from NBI, and edge plasma neutrals, and infrared (IR) from the divertor and wall regions. Plasma light collection optics provide near parallel illumination of narrow bandpass interference filters to give monochromatic images. One adaptation provides multiwavelength images; another accommodates smooth variation of wavelength across an image (e.g., for a range of Doppler shifts beam fast neutrals). Diagnostic synergy is enhanced by combining such diagnostics to common viewing optics which allow exact-mapping. Soft x-ray tangential imaging has been achieved by using a two dimensional charge coupled device detector in a pinhole camera. Finally, a fast IR camera monitors the power deposition on the first wall and divertor plates, important in quantifying power losses (e.g., ELMs, disruptions), and complemented by visible viewing of the SOL, and linear Dα cameras.

  19. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  20. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  1. Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald; Simon, Joan

    2007-05-29

    Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.

  2. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  3. Electromagnetic signatures of thin accretion disks in wormhole geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Harko, Tiberiu; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, we study the physical properties and characteristics of matter forming thin accretion disks in static and spherically symmetric wormhole spacetimes. In particular, the time averaged energy flux, the disk temperature, and the emission spectra of the accretion disks are obtained for these exotic geometries and are compared with the Schwarzschild solution. It is shown that more energy is emitted from the disk in a wormhole geometry than in the case of the Schwarzschild potential and the conversion efficiency of the accreted mass into radiation is more than a factor of 2 higher for the wormholes than for static black holes. These effects in the disk radiation are confirmed in the radial profiles of temperature corresponding to theses flux distributions, and in the emission spectrum {omega}L({omega}) of the accretion disks. We conclude that specific signatures appear in the electromagnetic spectrum, thus leading to the possibility of distinguishing wormhole geometries by using astrophysical observations of the emission spectra from accretion disks.

  4. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-01-01

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  5. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  6. On the implementation of the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation for a pseudo-spherical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, D.; Doicu, A.; Loyola, D.; Trautmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical problems appear when solving the radiative transfer equation for systems with strong anisotropic scattering. To avoid oscillations in the solution a large number of discrete ordinates is required. As a consequence, the computing time increases considerably with O(N3), where N is the number of discrete ordinates. The performance can be improved partially by the delta-M method of Wiscombe [1], but this approach distorts the initial boundary problem and can lead to errors in small viewing angles. The efficiency of the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation for analyzing systems containing clouds and coarsest fraction of aerosol has been demonstrated by Budak and Korkin [2]. In this work we extend the plan-parallel version of the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation, as described in [2], to a pseudo-spherical atmosphere. The conventional pseudo-spherical technique relies on the separation of the total radiance into the direct solar beam and the diffuse radiance [3];the direct solar radiance is treated in a spherical geometry, while the diffuse radiance is computed in a plane-parallel geometry. Taking into account that in the discrete ordinate method with small-angle approximation, the radiance is separated into an 'anisotropic' and a smooth part, and that the direct solar beam is already included into anisotropic part, we introduce a pseudo-spherical correction by substracting the direct solar beam in a plane-parallel geometry and adding it in a pseudo-spherical geometry. In our simulations we considered a scenario which is typically for the UV/UIS instruments like GOME-2: a spectral interval between 315 nm and 335 nm, and an inhomogeneous atmosphere containing a cloud layer with an asymmetry parameter of 0.9. The numerical results evidenced that the differences between the pseudo-spherical and the plan-parallel models are of about 10 % for an incident angle of 80 degrees, 1 % for 65 degrees and less than 0.3 % for 50

  7. Teaching Activity-Based Taxicab Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed on the process of teaching taxicab geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry that is easy to understand and similar to Euclidean geometry with its axiomatic structure. In this regard, several teaching activities were designed such as measuring taxicab distance, defining a taxicab circle, finding a geometric locus in taxicab geometry, and…

  8. Deterministic phase retrieval employing spherical illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carranza, J.; Falaggis, K.; Kozacki, T.

    2015-05-01

    Deterministic Phase Retrieval techniques (DPRTs) employ a series of paraxial beam intensities in order to recover the phase of a complex field. These paraxial intensities are usually generated in systems that employ plane-wave illumination. This type of illumination allows a direct processing of the captured intensities with DPRTs for recovering the phase. Furthermore, it has been shown that intensities for DPRTs can be acquired from systems that use spherical illumination as well. However, this type of illumination presents a major setback for DPRTs: the captured intensities change their size for each position of the detector on the propagation axis. In order to apply the DPRTs, reescalation of the captured intensities has to be applied. This condition can increase the error sensitivity of the final phase result if it is not carried out properly. In this work, we introduce a novel system based on a Phase Light Modulator (PLM) for capturing the intensities when employing spherical illumination. The proposed optical system enables us to capture the diffraction pattern of under, in, and over-focus intensities. The employment of the PLM allows capturing the corresponding intensities without displacing the detector. Moreover, with the proposed optical system we can control accurately the magnification of the captured intensities. Thus, the stack of captured intensities can be used in DPRTs, overcoming the problems related with the resizing of the images. In order to prove our claims, the corresponding numerical experiments will be carried out. These simulations will show that the retrieved phases with spherical illumination are accurate and can be compared with those that employ plane wave illumination. We demonstrate that with the employment of the PLM, the proposed optical system has several advantages as: the optical system is compact, the beam size on the detector plane is controlled accurately, and the errors coming from mechanical motion can be suppressed easily.

  9. Spherical transceivers for ultrafast optical wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xian; Hristovski, Blago A.; Collier, Christopher M.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Born, Brandon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2016-02-01

    Optical wireless communications (OWC) offers the potential for high-speed and mobile operation in indoor networks. Such OWC systems often employ a fixed transmitter grid and mobile transceivers, with the mobile transceivers carrying out bi-directional communication via active downlinks (ideally with high-speed signal detection) and passive uplinks (ideally with broad angular retroreflection and high-speed modulation). It can be challenging to integrate all of these bidirectional communication capabilities within the mobile transceivers, however, as there is a simultaneous desire for compact packaging. With this in mind, the work presented here introduces a new form of transceiver for bi-directional OWC systems. The transceiver incorporates radial photoconductive switches (for high-speed signal detection) and a spherical retro-modulator (for broad angular retroreflection and high-speed all-optical modulation). All-optical retromodulation are investigated by way of theoretical models and experimental testing, for spherical retro-modulators comprised of three glasses, N-BK7, N-LASF9, and S-LAH79, having differing levels of refraction and nonlinearity. It is found that the spherical retro-modulator comprised of S-LAH79, with a refractive index of n ≍ 2 and a Kerr nonlinear index of n2 ≍ (1.8 ± 0.1) × 10-15 cm2/W, yields both broad angular retroreflection (over a solid angle of 2π steradians) and ultrafast modulation (over a duration of 120 fs). Such transceivers can become important elements for all-optical implementations in future bi-directional OWC systems.

  10. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  11. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  12. Improving Student Reasoning in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Bobson; Bukalov, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    In their years of teaching geometry, Wong and Bukalov realized that the greatest challenge has been getting students to improve their reasoning. Many students have difficulty writing formal proofs--a task that requires a good deal of reasoning. Wong and Bukalov reasoned that the solution was to divide the lessons into parallel tasks, allowing…

  13. Generative CAI in Analytical Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, William R.; And Others

    A generative computer-assisted instruction system is being developed to tutor students in analytical geometry. The basis of this development is the thesis that a generative teaching system can be developed by establishing and then stimulating a simplified, explicit model of the human tutor. The goal attempted is that of a computer environment…

  14. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  15. 3DHZETRN: Inhomogeneous Geometry Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2017-01-01

    Historical methods for assessing radiation exposure inside complicated geometries for space applications were limited by computational constraints and lack of knowledge associated with nuclear processes occurring over a broad range of particles and energies. Various methods were developed and utilized to simplify geometric representations and enable coupling with simplified but efficient particle transport codes. Recent transport code development efforts, leading to 3DHZETRN, now enable such approximate methods to be carefully assessed to determine if past exposure analyses and validation efforts based on those approximate methods need to be revisited. In this work, historical methods of representing inhomogeneous spacecraft geometry for radiation protection analysis are first reviewed. Two inhomogeneous geometry cases, previously studied with 3DHZETRN and Monte Carlo codes, are considered with various levels of geometric approximation. Fluence, dose, and dose equivalent values are computed in all cases and compared. It is found that although these historical geometry approximations can induce large errors in neutron fluences up to 100 MeV, errors on dose and dose equivalent are modest (<10%) for the cases studied here.

  16. Teaching Geometry According to Euclid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This essay contains some reflections and questions arising from encounters with the text of Euclid's Elements. The reflections arise out of the teaching of a course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry to undergraduates. It is concluded that teachers of such courses should read Euclid and ask questions, then teach a course on Euclid and later…

  17. Math Sense: Algebra and Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howett, Jerry

    This book is designed to help students gain the range of math skills they need to succeed in life, work, and on standardized tests; overcome math anxiety; discover math as interesting and purposeful; and develop good number sense. Topics covered in this book include algebra and geometry. Lessons are organized around four strands: (1) skill lessons…

  18. Stress analysis of spherical-mirror panels

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, V J; Sanford, R J

    1982-04-01

    An experimental analysis is reported of the stresses that occur in elastically deformed, spherically curved glass mirrors for solar energy applications. Bending and membrance stresses generated in forming the glass and the effects of springback are analyzed. In addition, thermal stresses caused by focusing the sun's rays on a small region of the mirrors are analyzed. Methods used in the analysis included the use of grids, photoelasticity, and strain gages. Results of the analysis are compared with a theoretical analysis performed by Shelltech Associates in a parallel effort.

  19. A spherical gas bearing for airborne application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouvier, A.; Schmertz, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A spherical gas bearing is analyzed and tested for an airborne application. The externally pressurized bearing supports an inertially stabilized 36-in aperture, infrared telescope. The bearing provides the isolation of rotary motion from the aircraft and also serves as a seal between the aircraft cabin and cavity condition at 50,000 ft altitude. The accompanying temperature gradient of 135 F across the 16-in.-diam bearing created special design and manufacturing considerations. Test data on the static load under temperature and vacuum environment are presented in support of the analysis.

  20. Diffusion of spherical particles in microcavities.

    PubMed

    Imperio, A; Padding, J T; Briels, W J

    2011-04-21

    The diffusive motion of a colloidal particle trapped inside a small cavity filled with fluid is reduced by hydrodynamic interactions with the confining walls. In this work, we study these wall effects on a spherical particle entrapped in a closed cylinder. We calculate the diffusion coefficient along the radial, azimuthal, and axial direction for different particle positions. At all locations the diffusion is smaller than in a bulk fluid and it becomes anisotropic near the container's walls. We present a simple model which reasonably well describes the simulation results for the given dimensions of the cylinder, which are taken from the recent experimental work.

  1. Inversion of band patterns in spherical tumblers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Lochman, Bryan J; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2009-04-10

    Bidisperse granular mixtures in spherical tumblers segregate into three bands: one at each pole and one at the equator. For low fill levels, large particles are at the equator; for high fill levels, the opposite occurs. Segregation is robust, though the transition depends on fill level, particle size, and rotational speed. Discrete element method simulations reproduce surface patterns and reveal internal structures. Particle trajectories show that small particles flow farther toward the poles than large particles in the upstream portion of the flowing layer for low fill levels leading to a band of small particles at each pole. The opposite occurs for high fill levels, though more slowly.

  2. Zeeman transitions in spherical quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakar, Y.; ćakır, B.; Yılmazer, F.; Özmen, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of external magnetic field on the energy states of a spherical quantum dot with infinite potential barrier have been investigated by using Quantum Genetic Algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock Roothaan (HFR) method. Linear Zeeman states and Zeeman transition energies are calculated as a function of dot radius and magnetic field strength. We also carry out the effect of external magnetic field on the ground state binding energy. The results show that the impurity energy states, binding energy and Zeeman transition energies are strongly affected by magnetic field strength and dot radius.

  3. Complete model of a spherical gravitational wave detector with capacitive transducers: Calibration and sensitivity optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Gottardi, Luciano

    2007-01-15

    We report the results of a detailed numerical analysis of a real resonant spherical gravitational wave antenna operating with six resonant two-mode capacitive transducers read out by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) amplifiers. We derive a set of equations to describe the electromechanical dynamics of the detector. The model takes into account the effect of all the noise sources present in each transducer chain: the thermal noise associated with the mechanical resonators, the thermal noise from the superconducting impedance matching transformer, the backaction noise, and the additive current noise of the SQUID amplifier. Asymmetries in the detector signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth, coming from considering the transducers not as pointlike objects but as a sensor with physically defined geometry and dimension, are also investigated. We calculate the sensitivity for an ultracryogenic, 30 ton, 2 m in diameter, spherical detector with optimal and nonoptimal impedance matching of the electrical readout scheme to the mechanical modes. The results of the analysis are useful not only to optimize existing smaller mass spherical detector like MiniGrail, in Leiden, but also as a technological guideline for future massive detectors. Furthermore we calculate the antenna patterns when the sphere operates with one, three, and six transducers. The sky coverage for two detectors based in The Netherlands and Brazil and operating in coincidence is also estimated. Finally, we describe and numerically verify a calibration and filtering procedure useful for diagnostic and detection purposes in analogy with existing resonant bar detectors.

  4. A model for investigating the behaviour of non-spherical particles at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for modelling non-spherical particles with a fixed contact angle at an interface whilst also providing a method to fix the particles orientation. It is shown how a wide variety of particle shapes (spherical, ellipsoidal, disc) can be created from a simple initial geometry containing only six vertices. The shapes are made from one continuous surface with edges and corners treated as smooth curves not discontinuities. As such, particles approaching cylindrical and orthorhombic shapes can be simulated but the contact angle crossing the edges will be fixed. Non-spherical particles, when attached to an interface can cause large distortions in the surface which affect the forces acting on the particle. The model presented is capable of resolving this distortion of the surface around the particle at the interface as well as allowing for the particle's orientation to be controlled. It is shown that, when considering orthorhombic particles with rounded edges, the flatter the particle the more energetically stable it is to sit flat at the interface. However, as the particle becomes more cube like, the effects of contact angle have a greater effect on the energetically stable orientations. Results for cylindrical particles with rounded edges are also discussed. The model presented allows the user to define the shape, dimensions, contact angle and orientation of the particle at the interface allowing more in-depth investigation of the complex phenomenon of 3D film distortion around an attached particle and the forces that arise due to it.

  5. Spherical Rayleigh-Taylor Growth of Three-Dimensional Broadband Perturbations on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Hu, S.X.; Hager, J.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-10

    Spherical Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) growth experiments of three-dimensional (3D) broadband nonuniformities were conducted in the acceleration phase of spherical implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The targets consisted of 20- and 24-um-thick plastic spherical shells having diagnostic openings for backlighter x rays to image shell modulations. Experiments were conducted with square laser pulses at a low drive intensity of ~2 x 10^14 W/cm^2, high drive intensity of ~1 x 10^15 W/cm^2, and a shaped pulse consisting of a low-intensity foot and high-intensity drive part (peak intensity of ~1 x 10^15 W/cm^2). In low-intensity experiments, large RT growth was measured, resulting in shells being broken up by 3D modulations at the end of the drive. In the high-intensity experiments, no RT growth of the 3D modulations was detected. In the shaped-pulse experiments, perturbations grew during the low-intensity part of the drive and were stabilized later during the high-intensity part of the drive. The measured RT growth stabilization with the high-intensity drive was similar to previous observations in planar geometry [V. A. Smalyuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 025002 (2008)].

  6. Transport of barrel and spherical shaped colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Model colloids are usually spherical, but natural colloids have irregular geometries. Transport experiments of spherical colloids may not reflect the transport characteristics of natural colloids in porous media. We investigated saturated and unsaturated transport of colloids with spherical and angular shapes under steady-state, flow conditions. A pulse of negatively-charged colloids was introduced into a silica sand column at three different effective water saturations (Se = 0.31, 0.45, and 1.0). Colloids were introduced under high ionic strength of [106]mM to cause attachment to the secondary energy minimum and later released by changing the pore water to low ionic strength. After the experiment, sand was sampled from different depths (0, -4, and -11 cm) for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and colloid extraction. Water saturation affected colloid transport with more retention under low than under high saturation. Colloids were retained and released from a secondary energy minimum with more angular-shaped colloids being retained and released. Colloids extracted from the sand revealed highest colloid deposition in the top layer and decreasing deposition with depth. Pore straining and grain-grain wedging dominated colloid retention.

  7. Transport of barrel and spherical shaped colloids in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Model colloids are usually spherical, but natural colloids have irregular geometries. Transport experiments of spherical colloids may not reflect the transport characteristics of natural colloids in porous media. We investigated saturated and unsaturated transport of colloids with spherical and angular shapes under steady-state, flow conditions. A pulse of negatively-charged colloids was introduced into a silica sand column at three different effective water saturations (Se = 0.31, 0.45, and 1.0). Colloids were introduced under high ionic strength of [106]mM to cause attachment to the secondary energy minimum and later released by changing the pore water to low ionic strength. After the experiment, sand was sampled from different depths (0, -4, and -11 cm) for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and colloid extraction. Water saturation affected colloid transport with more retention under low than under high saturation. Colloids were retained and released from a secondary energy minimum with more angular-shaped colloids being retained and released. Colloids extracted from the sand revealed highest colloid deposition in the top layer and decreasing deposition with depth. Pore straining and grain-grain wedging dominated colloid retention.

  8. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.

    2014-08-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruction schemes, namely, the piecewise linear method (PLM), third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme and the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). The performance of the improved reconstruction schemes is investigated in a number of selected numerical benchmarks involving the solution of both scalar and systems of nonlinear equations (such as the equations of gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics) in cylindrical and spherical geometries in one and two dimensions. Results confirm that the proposed approach yields considerably smaller errors, higher convergence rates and it avoid spurious numerical effects at a symmetry axis.

  9. Adaptive Geometry Shader Tessellation for Massive Geometry Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    necessary to prepare complex models for use in analysis and visualization tasks. We investigated several avenues for high-speed visualization and worked to...geometry, visualization 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 22 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...Introduction and Background 1 2. Approach 2 3. Speed Improvements in the Visual Simulation Laboratory 2 4. Ray Tracing 4 5. Sharing Display Technologies

  10. Flow above and within granular media composed of spherical and non-spherical particles - using a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Kuhlmann, Jannis; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The entrainment of single grains and, hence, their erosion characteristics are dependent on fluid forcing, grain size and density, but also shape variations. To quantitatively describe and capture the hydrodynamic conditions around individual grains, researchers commonly use empirical approaches such as laboratory flume tanks. Nonetheless, it is difficult with such physical experiments to measure the flow velocities in the direct vicinity or within the pore spaces of sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-invasive way. As a result, the hydrodynamic conditions in the water column, at the fluid-porous interface and within pore spaces of a granular medium of various grain shapes is not yet fully understood. For that reason, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid speeds within a granular medium. A 3D-SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical wave tank model was set up to provide quantitative evidence on the flow velocities in the direct vicinity and in the interior of granular beds composed of two shapes as a complementary method to the difficult task of in situ measurement. On the basis of previous successful numerical wave tank models with SPH, the model geometry was chosen in dimensions of X=2.68 [m], Y=0.48 [m], and Z=0.8 [m]. Three suites of experiments were designed with a range of particle shape models: (1) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the across-stream direction, (2) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the along-stream direction, and (3) spheres. Particle diameters ranged from 0.04 [m] to 0.08 [m]. A wave was introduced by a vertical paddle that accelerated to 0.8 [m/s] perpendicular to the granular bed. Flow measurements showed that the flow velocity values into the beds were highest when the grains were oriented across the stream direction and lowest in case when the grains were oriented parallel to the stream, indicating that the model was capable to simulate simultaneously

  11. Understanding pop-ins in spherical nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Siddhartha E-mail: siddharthapathak@gmail.com; Riesterer, Jessica L.; Michler, Johann; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2014-10-20

    Pop-ins, or sudden displacement-bursts at constant load in a nanoindentation test, are typically attributed to the difficulty of setting up potent dislocation sources in the very small indentation zones in these experiments. Such displacement (and strain) bursts would intuitively indicate a sharp drop in stress during the pop-in event itself. However, spherical indentation stress-strain curves routinely exhibit a high and stable indentation stress value during the pop-in, and the indentation stresses decrease only after a further finite amount of additional indentation displacement has been applied. In order to understand this discrepancy, we utilize a combination of interrupted spherical indentation tests along with depth profiling of the residual indentation surfaces using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study pop-ins. The AFM surface profile maps show that there is an asymmetric profile change over a limited region around the indentation contact area for a single pop-in; the asymmetry disappears upon further loading beyond the pop-in. A plausible sequence of physical processes (related to metal plasticity) occurring underneath the indenter during and immediately after the occurrence of the pop-in is proposed to explain these observations.

  12. Variational extensions of the mean spherical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L.; Ubriaco, M.

    2000-04-01

    In a previous work we have proposed a method to study complex systems with objects of arbitrary size. For certain specific forms of the atomic and molecular interactions, surprisingly simple and accurate theories (The Variational Mean Spherical Scaling Approximation, VMSSA) [(Velazquez, Blum J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1990) 10 931; Blum, Velazquez, J. Quantum Chem. (Theochem), in press)] can be obtained. The basic idea is that if the interactions can be expressed in a rapidly converging sum of (complex) exponentials, then the Ornstein-Zernike equation (OZ) has an analytical solution. This analytical solution is used to construct a robust interpolation scheme, the variation mean spherical scaling approximation (VMSSA). The Helmholtz excess free energy Δ A=Δ E- TΔ S is then written as a function of a scaling matrix Γ. Both the excess energy Δ E( Γ) and the excess entropy Δ S( Γ) will be functionals of Γ. In previous work of this series the form of this functional was found for the two- (Blum, Herrera, Mol. Phys. 96 (1999) 821) and three-exponential closures of the OZ equation (Blum, J. Stat. Phys., submitted for publication). In this paper we extend this to M Yukawas, a complete basis set: We obtain a solution for the one-component case and give a closed-form expression for the MSA excess entropy, which is also the VMSSA entropy.

  13. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Erin G.; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2016-01-01

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N=60 constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem. PMID:26811458

  14. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Teich, Erin G; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2016-02-09

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to [Formula: see text] constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem.

  15. Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic spherical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic spherical flows is numerically examined under the fully special relativistic treatment. We first derive relativistic formal solutions for the relativistic radiative transfer equation in relativistic spherical flows. We then iteratively solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation, using an impact parameter method/tangent ray method, and obtain specific intensities in the inertial and comoving frames, as well as moment quantities, and the Eddington factor. We consider several cases; a scattering wind with a luminous central core, an isothermal wind without a core, a scattering accretion on to a luminous core, and an adiabatic accretion on to a dark core. In the typical wind case with a luminous core, the emergent intensity is enhanced at the center due to the Doppler boost, while it reduces at the outskirts due to the transverse Doppler effect. In contrast to the plane-parallel case, the behavior of the Eddington factor is rather complicated in each case, since the Eddington factor depends on the optical depth, the flow velocity, and other parameters.

  16. Ultrarelativistic bound states in the spherical well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żaba, Mariusz; Garbaczewski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    We address an eigenvalue problem for the ultrarelativistic (Cauchy) operator (-Δ)1/2, whose action is restricted to functions that vanish beyond the interior of a unit sphere in three spatial dimensions. We provide high accuracy spectral data for lowest eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of this infinite spherical well problem. Our focus is on radial and orbital shapes of eigenfunctions. The spectrum consists of an ordered set of strictly positive eigenvalues which naturally splits into non-overlapping, orbitally labelled E(k,l) series. For each orbital label l = 0, 1, 2, …, the label k = 1, 2, … enumerates consecutive lth series eigenvalues. Each of them is 2l + 1-degenerate. The l = 0 eigenvalues series E(k,0) are identical with the set of even labeled eigenvalues for the d = 1 Cauchy well: E(k,0)(d = 3) = E2k(d = 1). Likewise, the eigenfunctions ψ(k,0)(d = 3) and ψ2k(d = 1) show affinity. We have identified the generic functional form of eigenfunctions of the spherical well which appear to be composed of a product of a solid harmonic and of a suitable purely radial function. The method to evaluate (approximately) the latter has been found to follow the universal pattern which effectively allows to skip all, sometimes involved, intermediate calculations (those were in usage, while computing the eigenvalues for l ≤ 3).

  17. Light gradients in spherical photosynthetic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Leibl, W; Gapiński, J; Breton, J; Dobek, A

    1998-07-01

    Light-gradient photovoltage measurements were performed on EDTA-treated thylakoids and on osmotically swollen thylakoids (blebs), both of spherical symmetry but of different sizes. In the case of EDTA vesicles, a negative polarity (due to the normal light gradient) was observed in the blue range of the absorption spectrum, and a positive polarity, corresponding to an inverse light gradient, was observed at lambda = 530 and lambda = 682 nm. The sign of the photovoltage polarity measured in large blebs (swollen thylakoids) is the same as that obtained for whole chloroplasts, although differences in the amplitudes are observed. An approach based on the use of polar coordinates was adapted for a theoretical description of these membrane systems of spherical symmetry. The light intensity distribution and the photovoltage in such systems were calculated. Fits to the photovoltage amplitudes, measured as a function of light wavelength, made it possible to derive the values of the dielectric constant of the protein, epsilons = 3, and the refractive index of the photosynthetic membrane for light propagating perpendicular and parallel to the membrane surface, nt = 1.42 and nn = 1.60, respectively. The latter two values determine the birefringence of the biological membrane, Deltan = nn - nt = 0.18.

  18. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  19. Understanding pop-ins in spherical nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Riesterer, Jessica L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Michler, Johann

    2014-10-24

    In this study, pop-ins, or sudden displacement-bursts at constant load in a nanoindentation test, are typically attributed to the difficulty of setting up potent dislocation sources in the very small indentation zones in these experiments. Such displacement (and strain) bursts would intuitively indicate a sharp drop in stress during the pop-in event itself. However, spherical indentation stress-strain curves routinely exhibit a high and stable indentation stress value during the pop-in, and the indentation stresses decrease only after a further finite amount of additional indentation displacement has been applied. In order to understand this discrepancy, we utilize a combination of interrupted spherical indentation tests along with depth profiling of the residual indentation surfaces using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study pop-ins. The AFM surface profile maps show that there is an asymmetric profile change over a limited region around the indentation contact area for a single pop-in; the asymmetry disappears upon further loading beyond the pop-in. A plausible sequence of physical processes (related to metal plasticity) occurring underneath the indenter during and immediately after the occurrence of the pop-in is proposed to explain these observations.

  20. Spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher; Hagopian, John; DeMarco, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) project is an internal research and development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goals of the program are to develop a robust and cost effective way to manufacture spherical mirror segments and demonstrate a new wavefront sensing approach for continuous phasing across the segmented primary. This paper focuses on the fabrication of the mirror segments. Significant cost savings were achieved through the design, since it allowed the mirror segments to be cast rather than machined from a glass blank. Casting was followed by conventional figuring at Goddard Space Flight Center. After polishing, the mirror segments were mounted to their composite assemblies. QED Technologies used magnetorheological finishing (MRF®) for the final figuring. The MRF process polished the mirrors while they were mounted to their composite assemblies. Each assembly included several magnetic invar plugs that extended to within an inch of the face of the mirror. As part of this project, the interaction between the MRF magnetic field and invar plugs was evaluated. By properly selecting the polishing conditions, MRF was able to significantly improve the figure of the mounted segments. The final MRF figuring demonstrates that mirrors, in the mounted configuration, can be polished and tested to specification. There are significant process capability advantes due to polishing and testing the optics in their final, end-use assembled state.

  1. Rayleigh scattering of a spherical sound wave.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic Green's functions for a homogeneous medium with an embedded spherical obstacle arise in analyses of scattering by objects on or near an interface, radiation by finite sources, sound attenuation in and scattering from clouds of suspended particles, etc. An exact solution of the problem of diffraction of a monochromatic spherical sound wave on a sphere is given by an infinite series involving products of Bessel functions and Legendre polynomials. In this paper, a simple, closed-form solution is obtained for scattering by a sphere with a radius that is small compared to the wavelength. Soft, hard, impedance, and fluid obstacles are considered. The solution is valid for arbitrary positions of the source and receiver relative to the scatterer. Low-frequency scattering is shown to be rather sensitive to boundary conditions on the surface of the obstacle. Low-frequency asymptotics of the scattered acoustic field are extended to transient incident waves. The asymptotic expansions admit an intuitive interpretation in terms of image sources and reduce to classical results in appropriate limiting cases.

  2. Understanding pop-ins in spherical nanoindentation

    DOE PAGES

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Riesterer, Jessica L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; ...

    2014-10-24

    In this study, pop-ins, or sudden displacement-bursts at constant load in a nanoindentation test, are typically attributed to the difficulty of setting up potent dislocation sources in the very small indentation zones in these experiments. Such displacement (and strain) bursts would intuitively indicate a sharp drop in stress during the pop-in event itself. However, spherical indentation stress-strain curves routinely exhibit a high and stable indentation stress value during the pop-in, and the indentation stresses decrease only after a further finite amount of additional indentation displacement has been applied. In order to understand this discrepancy, we utilize a combination of interruptedmore » spherical indentation tests along with depth profiling of the residual indentation surfaces using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study pop-ins. The AFM surface profile maps show that there is an asymmetric profile change over a limited region around the indentation contact area for a single pop-in; the asymmetry disappears upon further loading beyond the pop-in. A plausible sequence of physical processes (related to metal plasticity) occurring underneath the indenter during and immediately after the occurrence of the pop-in is proposed to explain these observations.« less

  3. Spherically symmetric conformal gravity and ''gravitational bubbles''

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.A.; Dokuchaev, V.I.; Eroshenko, Yu.N. E-mail: dokuchaev@inr.ac.ru

    2016-01-01

    The general structure of the spherically symmetric solutions in the Weyl conformal gravity is described. The corresponding Bach equations are derived for the special type of metrics, which can be considered as the representative of the general class. The complete set of the pure vacuum solutions is found. It consists of two classes. The first one contains the solutions with constant two-dimensional curvature scalar of our specific metrics, and the representatives are the famous Robertson-Walker metrics. One of them we called the ''gravitational bubbles'', which is compact and with zero Weyl tensor. Thus, we obtained the pure vacuum curved space-times (without any material sources, including the cosmological constant) what is absolutely impossible in General Relativity. Such a phenomenon makes it easier to create the universe from ''nothing''. The second class consists of the solutions with varying curvature scalar. We found its representative as the one-parameter family. It appears that it can be conformally covered by the thee-parameter Mannheim-Kazanas solution. We also investigated the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor in the spherical conformal gravity and constructed the vectorial equation that reveals clearly some features of non-vacuum solutions. Two of them are explicitly written, namely, the metrics à la Vaidya, and the electrovacuum space-time metrics.

  4. Spherically symmetric conformal gravity and ``gravitational bubbles''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2016-01-01

    The general structure of the spherically symmetric solutions in the Weyl conformal gravity is described. The corresponding Bach equations are derived for the special type of metrics, which can be considered as the representative of the general class. The complete set of the pure vacuum solutions is found. It consists of two classes. The first one contains the solutions with constant two-dimensional curvature scalar of our specific metrics, and the representatives are the famous Robertson-Walker metrics. One of them we called the ``gravitational bubbles'', which is compact and with zero Weyl tensor. Thus, we obtained the pure vacuum curved space-times (without any material sources, including the cosmological constant) what is absolutely impossible in General Relativity. Such a phenomenon makes it easier to create the universe from ``nothing''. The second class consists of the solutions with varying curvature scalar. We found its representative as the one-parameter family. It appears that it can be conformally covered by the thee-parameter Mannheim-Kazanas solution. We also investigated the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor in the spherical conformal gravity and constructed the vectorial equation that reveals clearly some features of non-vacuum solutions. Two of them are explicitly written, namely, the metrics à la Vaidya, and the electrovacuum space-time metrics.

  5. Conservative interpolation between general spherical meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsikis, Evaggelos; Aechtner, Matthias; Meurdesoif, Yann; Dubos, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    An efficient, local, explicit, second-order, conservative interpolation algorithm between spherical meshes is presented. The cells composing the source and target meshes may be either spherical polygons or latitude-longitude quadrilaterals. Second-order accuracy is obtained by piece-wise linear finite-volume reconstruction over the source mesh. Global conservation is achieved through the introduction of a supermesh, whose cells are all possible intersections of source and target cells. Areas and intersections are computed exactly to yield a geometrically exact method. The main efficiency bottleneck caused by the construction of the supermesh is overcome by adopting tree-based data structures and algorithms, from which the mesh connectivity can also be deduced efficiently.The theoretical second-order accuracy is verified using a smooth test function and pairs of meshes commonly used for atmospheric modelling. Experiments confirm that the most expensive operations, especially the supermesh construction, have O(NlogN) computational cost. The method presented is meant to be incorporated in pre- or post-processing atmospheric modelling pipelines, or directly into models for flexible input/output. It could also serve as a basis for conservative coupling between model components, e.g., atmosphere and ocean.

  6. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Vatta, Federica; Meneghini, Fabio; Esposito, Fabrino; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the EEG, solving the so called EEG forward problem, and reconstructing the brain electrical activity from recorded EEG data, solving the EEG inverse problem. Many factors affect the accuracy of the forward and hence of the inverse problem solution, one of them is the shape of the head model. Realistic head models can lead to more accurate forward problem solutions, but imply heavier computational burdens in comparison to spherical models. Conversely, inverse solutions require the forward model to be computationally efficient. The aim of this study is to investigate the different general potentialities, in terms of EEG source reconstruction, which can be achieved adopting realistic or spherical geometries in head modeling. Previous studies in the literature analyzed the effect of head model geometry presenting results for particular cases of head models. In this paper, we re-address the effect of realistic geometry in head modeling, seeking for more general results by adopting the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) phantom model to represent a whole family of realistic head models. This paper presents results of a computer simulation study in which the potentialities of two different four-shell head models are compared, the realistic MNI-based FDM and the corresponding sensor-fitted spherical-shaped model, by means of the Point Spread Function (PSF) correlation maps, with a quantitative analysis of the accuracy in EEG source reconstruction given by head modeling refinement from the spherical to the more complex realistic FDM head modeling.

  7. Turbulent convection in rapidly rotating spherical shells: A model for equatorial and high latitude jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2007-04-01

    The origin of zonal jets on the jovian planets has long been a topic of scientific debate. In this paper we show that deep convection in a spherical shell can generate zonal flow comparable to that observed on Jupiter and Saturn, including a broad prograde equatorial jet and multiple alternating jets at higher latitudes. We present fully turbulent, 3D spherical numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection with different spherical shell geometries. The resulting global flow fields tend to be segregated into three regions (north, equatorial, and south), bounded by the tangent cylinder that circumscribes the inner boundary equator. In all of our simulations a strong prograde equatorial jet forms outside the tangent cylinder, whereas multiple jets form in the northern and southern hemispheres, inside the tangent cylinder. The jet scaling of our numerical models and of Jupiter and Saturn is consistent with the theory of geostrophic turbulence, which we extend to include the effect of spherical shell geometry. Zonal flow in a spherical shell is distinguished from that in a full sphere or a shallow layer by the effect of the tangent cylinder, which marks a reversal in the sign of the planetary β-parameter and a jump in the Rhines length. This jump is manifest in the numerical simulations as a sharp equatorward increase in jet widths—a transition that is also observed on Jupiter and Saturn. The location of this transition gives an estimate of the depth of zonal flow, which seems to be consistent with current models of the jovian and saturnian interiors.

  8. Properties of cylindrical and spherical heavy ion-acoustic solitary and shock structures in a multispecies plasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. G.; Rahman, M. M.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical investigation on heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) solitary and shock structures has been accomplished in an unmagnetized multispecies plasma consisting of inertialess kappa-distributed superthermal electrons, Boltzmann light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) Kortewg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations have been derived. The solitary and shock wave solutions of the KdV and Burgers equations, respectively, have been numerically analyzed. The effects of superthermality of electrons, adiabaticity of heavy ions, and nonplanar geometry, which noticeably modify the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, phase speed, etc.) of small but finite amplitude HIA solitary and shock structures, have been carefully investigated. The HIA solitary and shock structures in nonplanar geometry have been found to distinctly differ from those in planar geometry. Novel features of our present attempt may contribute to the physics of nonlinear electrostatic perturbation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  9. Towards numerical simulation of bubbly flows in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Michael; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2008-11-01

    We are developing the LES capability for bubbly flows in complex geometries using unstructured grids and an Euler--Lagrangian methodology. Two Lagrangian bubble models are considered: (i) the bubbles are treated as a dispersed phase in the carrier fluid, and individual bubbles are point particles governed by an equation for bubble motion and (ii) the force coupling method by Maxey et al. [Fluid Dyn. Res., 32 (1997), 143-156]. The evolution of the bubble radius (assuming spherical bubbles) is governed by the Rayleigh--Plesset equation and integrated using a Runge--Kutta integrator with adaptive time-stepping. The talk will discuss numerical issues and contrast results between the two methodologies. Numerical results ranging from the motion of individual bubbles in channels and around bodies to drag reduction by bubbles in turbulent channel flow will be presented.

  10. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  11. Hyperbolic geometry of cosmological attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Roest, Diederik

    2015-08-01

    Cosmological α attractors give a natural explanation for the spectral index ns of inflation as measured by Planck while predicting a range for the tensor-to-scalar ratio r , consistent with all observations, to be measured more precisely in future B-mode experiments. We highlight the crucial role of the hyperbolic geometry of the Poincaré disk or half plane in the supergravity construction. These geometries are isometric under Möbius transformations, which include the shift symmetry of the inflaton field. We introduce a new Kähler potential frame that explicitly preserves this symmetry, enabling the inflaton to be light. Moreover, we include higher-order curvature deformations, which can stabilize a direction orthogonal to the inflationary trajectory. We illustrate this new framework by stabilizing the single superfield α attractors.

  12. Experimental Probes of Spacetime Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne

    2009-07-10

    A novel approach which exploits the geometry of extra spacetime dimensions has been recently proposed as a means to resolving the hierarchy problem, i.e., the large energy gap that separates the electroweak scale and the scale where gravity becomes strong. I will describe two models of this type: one where the apparent hierarchy is generated by a large volume for the extra dimensions, and a second where the observed hierarchy is created by an exponential warp factor which arises from a non-factorizable geometry. Both scenarios have concrete and distinctive phenomenological tests at the TeV scale. I will describe the classes of low-energy and collider signatures for both models, summarize the present constraints from experiment, and examine the ability of future accelerators to probe their parameter space.

  13. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  14. Information geometry of Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Amari, S; Kurata, K; Nagaoka, H

    1992-01-01

    A Boltzmann machine is a network of stochastic neurons. The set of all the Boltzmann machines with a fixed topology forms a geometric manifold of high dimension, where modifiable synaptic weights of connections play the role of a coordinate system to specify networks. A learning trajectory, for example, is a curve in this manifold. It is important to study the geometry of the neural manifold, rather than the behavior of a single network, in order to know the capabilities and limitations of neural networks of a fixed topology. Using the new theory of information geometry, a natural invariant Riemannian metric and a dual pair of affine connections on the Boltzmann neural network manifold are established. The meaning of geometrical structures is elucidated from the stochastic and the statistical point of view. This leads to a natural modification of the Boltzmann machine learning rule.

  15. Inertial electrostatic confinement: Theoretical and experimental studies of spherical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ryan

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is a means to confine ions for fusion purposes with electrostatic fields in a converging geometry. Its engineering simplicity makes it appealing when compared to magnetic confinement devices. It is hoped that such a device may one day be a net energy producer, but it has near term applications as a neutron generator. We study spherical IECs (SIECs), both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, we compute solutions in the free molecular limit and map out regions in control parameter space conducive to the formation of double potential wells. In addition, several other observables are mapped in the control parameter space. Such studies predict the threshold for the phenomena of "core splitting" to occur when the fractional well depth (FWD) is ˜70%-80%. With respect to double potential wells, it is shown that an optimal population of electrons exists for double well formation. In addition, double well depth is relatively insensitive to space charge spreading of ion beams. Glow discharge devices are studied experimentally with double and single Langmuir probes. The postulated micro-channeling phenomenon is verified with density measurements along a micro-channel and along the radius where micro-channels are absent. In addition, the measurements allow an evaluation of the neutrality of micro-channels and the heterogeneous structure of "Star Mode". It is shown that, despite visual evidence, micro-channeling persists well into "Jet" mode. In addition, the threshold for the "Star" mode to "Jet" mode transition is obtained experimentally. The studies have revealed new techniques for estimating tangential electric field components and studying the focusing of ion flow.

  16. Snowflake divertor configuration studies in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G.; Rognlien, T. D.; Ryutov, D. D.; Umansky, M. V.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaye, S.; Kolemen, E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Menard, J. E.; Paul, S. F.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Scotti, F.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, M. G.; Gates, D. A.; Kaita, R.; and others

    2012-08-15

    Experimental results from NSTX indicate that the snowflake divertor (D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 14, 064502 (2007)) may be a viable solution for outstanding tokamak plasma-material interface issues. Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux and divertor plate erosion remains to be critical issues for ITER and future concept devices based on conventional and spherical tokamak geometry with high power density divertors. Experiments conducted in 4-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in NSTX demonstrated that the snowflake divertor is compatible with high-confinement core plasma operation, while being very effective in steady-state divertor heat flux mitigation and impurity reduction. A steady-state snowflake divertor was obtained in recent NSTX experiments for up to 600 ms using three divertor magnetic coils. The high magnetic flux expansion region of the scrape-off layer (SOL) spanning up to 50% of the SOL width {lambda}{sub q} was partially detached in the snowflake divertor. In the detached zone, the heat flux profile flattened and decreased to 0.5-1 MW/m{sup 2} (from 4-7 MW/m{sup 2} in the standard divertor) indicative of radiative heating. An up to 50% increase in divertor, P{sub rad} in the snowflake divertor was accompanied by broadening of the intrinsic C III and C IV radiation zones, and a nearly order of magnitude increase in divertor high-n Balmer line emission indicative of volumetric recombination onset. Magnetic reconstructions showed that the x-point connection length, divertor plasma-wetted area and divertor volume, all critical parameters for geometric reduction of deposited heat flux, and increased volumetric divertor losses were significantly increased in the snowflake divertor, as expected from theory.

  17. Dynamics, Spectral Geometry and Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Burghelea, Dan

    2011-02-10

    The paper is an informal report on joint work with Stefan Haller on Dynamics in relation with Topology and Spectral Geometry. By dynamics one means a smooth vector field on a closed smooth manifold; the elements of dynamics of concern are the rest points, instantons and closed trajectories. One discusses their counting in the case of a generic vector field which has some additional properties satisfied by a still very large class of vector fields.

  18. Core foundations of abstract geometry.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-27

    Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious geometric representations that guide their navigation and their analysis of object shape? In what way might these early-arising representations support later-developing Euclidean intuitions? To approach these questions, we investigated the relations among young children's use of geometry in tasks assessing: navigation; visual form analysis; and the interpretation of symbolic, purely geometric maps. Children's navigation depended on the distance and directional relations of the surface layout and predicted their use of a symbolic map with targets designated by surface distances. In contrast, children's analysis of visual forms depended on the size-invariant shape relations of objects and predicted their use of the same map but with targets designated by corner angles. Even though the two map tasks used identical instructions and map displays, children's performance on these tasks showed no evidence of integrated representations of distance and angle. Instead, young children flexibly recruited geometric representations of either navigable layouts or objects to interpret the same spatial symbols. These findings reveal a link between the early-arising geometric representations that humans share with diverse animals and the flexible geometric intuitions that give rise to human knowledge at its highest reaches. Although young children do not appear to integrate core geometric representations, children's use of the abstract geometry in spatial symbols such as maps may provide the earliest clues to the later construction of Euclidean geometry.

  19. Wave Amplitude Dependent Engineering Model of Propellant Slosh in Spherical Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodnick, Jacob; Westra, Douglas G.; Eberhart, Chad J.; Yang, Hong Q.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid propellant slosh is often a concern for the controllability of flight vehicles. Anti-slosh devices are traditionally included in propellant tank designs to limit the amount of sloshing allowed during flight. These devices and any necessary supports can be quite heavy to meet various structural requirements. Some of the burden on anti-slosh devices can be relieved by exploiting the nonlinear behavior of slosh waves in bare smooth wall tanks. A nonlinear regime slosh model for bare spherical tanks was developed through a joint analytical and experimental effort by NASA/MSFC. The developed slosh model accounts for the large damping inherent in nonlinear slosh waves which is more accurate and drives conservatism from vehicle stability analyses that use traditional bare tank slosh models. A more accurate slosh model will result in more realistic predicted slosh forces during flight reducing or removing the need for active controls during a maneuver or baffles in the tank design. Lower control gains and smaller or fewer tank baffles can reduce cost and system complexity while increasing vehicle performance. Both Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and slosh testing of three different spherical tank geometries were performed to develop the proposed slosh model. Several important findings were made during this effort in addition to determining the parameters to the nonlinear regime slosh model. The linear regime slosh damping trend for spherical tanks reported in NASA SP-106 was shown to be inaccurate for certain regions of a tank. Additionally, transition to the nonlinear regime for spherical tanks was only found to occur at very large wave amplitudes in the lower hemisphere and was a strong function of the propellant fill level in the upper hemisphere. The nonlinear regime damping trend was also found to be a function of the propellant fill level.

  20. Characterization of the volume and shape of quasi-spherical resonators using coordinate measurement machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, M.; May, E. F.; Mehl, J. B.; Pitre, L.; Gavioso, R. M.; Benedetto, G.; Giuliano Albo, P. A.; Truong, D.; Flack, D.

    2010-10-01

    Acoustic thermometry using a gas-filled quasi-spherical resonator (QSR) is one of the most promising techniques for measuring the Boltzmann constant kB with low uncertainty. Dimensional metrology with coordinate measurement machines (CMMs) can be used to determine the resonator's volume, either directly or in combination with measurements of the resonator's microwave spectra. We assessed the uncertainty achievable when using a CMM to characterize the shape and volume of three QSRs. The resonators differed significantly in their design and construction: their inner volumes ranged between 524 cm3 and 2225 cm3, while the QSR geometries ranged from a diamond-turned triaxial ellipsoid to the variable misalignment of spheroidal hemispheres. Comparative coordinate measurements of two solid spherical density standards were used to identify and estimate type B uncertainties. We tested the regression of the CMM data to spherical harmonic expansions and determined the volume of a QSR directly with a relative uncertainty uR < 30 parts in 106. Additionally, spherical harmonic regression of the CMM data can place uncertainty bounds on the eccentricity parameters, ε1 and ε2, typically with a relative uncertainty uR ≈ 0.02. This is sufficient to determine corrections to both the acoustic and the microwave resonance frequencies of the QSR with a relative uncertainty uR < 1 part in 106 for all resonances. These figures assume that the enclosed volume of an assembled QSR is equal to the sum of the volumes of its two component 'hemispheres'. In practice this cannot be strictly true and the additional uncertainties in the volume of the assembled QSR are discussed.

  1. Hyperbolic geometry of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Kitsak, Maksim; Vahdat, Amin; Boguñá, Marián

    2010-09-01

    We develop a geometric framework to study the structure and function of complex networks. We assume that hyperbolic geometry underlies these networks, and we show that with this assumption, heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering in complex networks emerge naturally as simple reflections of the negative curvature and metric property of the underlying hyperbolic geometry. Conversely, we show that if a network has some metric structure, and if the network degree distribution is heterogeneous, then the network has an effective hyperbolic geometry underneath. We then establish a mapping between our geometric framework and statistical mechanics of complex networks. This mapping interprets edges in a network as noninteracting fermions whose energies are hyperbolic distances between nodes, while the auxiliary fields coupled to edges are linear functions of these energies or distances. The geometric network ensemble subsumes the standard configuration model and classical random graphs as two limiting cases with degenerate geometric structures. Finally, we show that targeted transport processes without global topology knowledge, made possible by our geometric framework, are maximally efficient, according to all efficiency measures, in networks with strongest heterogeneity and clustering, and that this efficiency is remarkably robust with respect to even catastrophic disturbances and damages to the network structure.

  2. Effect of conductor geometry on source localization: Implications for epilepsy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, H.; Heller, L.; Best, E.; Ranken, D.; Aaron, R.

    1994-07-01

    We shall discuss the effects of conductor geometry on source localization for applications in epilepsy studies. The most popular conductor model for clinical MEG studies is a homogeneous sphere. However, several studies have indicated that a sphere is a poor model for the head when the sources are deep, as is the case for epileptic foci in the mesial temporal lobe. We believe that replacing the spherical model with a more realistic one in the inverse fitting procedure will improve the accuracy of localizing epileptic sources. In order to include a realistic head model in the inverse problem, we must first solve the forward problem for the realistic conductor geometry. We create a conductor geometry model from MR images, and then solve the forward problem via a boundary integral equation for the electric potential due to a specified primary source. One the electric potential is known, the magnetic field can be calculated directly. The most time-intensive part of the problem is generating the conductor model; fortunately, this needs to be done only once for each patient. It takes little time to change the primary current and calculate a new magnetic field for use in the inverse fitting procedure. We present the results of a series of computer simulations in which we investigate the localization accuracy due to replacing the spherical model with the realistic head model in the inverse fitting procedure. The data to be fit consist of a computer generated magnetic field due to a known current dipole in a realistic head model, with added noise. We compare the localization errors when this field is fit using a spherical model to the fit using a realistic head model. Using a spherical model is comparable to what is usually done when localizing epileptic sources in humans, where the conductor model used in the inverse fitting procedure does not correspond to the actual head.

  3. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography in a realistic geometry head model: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Lai, Yuan; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    It is of importance to localize neural sources from scalp recorded EEG. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) has received considerable attention for localizing brain electrical sources. However, most such efforts have used spherical head models in representing the head volume conductor. Investigation of the performance of LORETA in a realistic geometry head model, as compared with the spherical model, will provide useful information guiding interpretation of data obtained by using the spherical head model. The performance of LORETA was evaluated by means of computer simulations. The boundary element method was used to solve the forward problem. A three-shell realistic geometry (RG) head model was constructed from MRI scans of a human subject. Dipole source configurations of a single dipole located at different regions of the brain with varying depth were used to assess the performance of LORETA in different regions of the brain. A three-sphere head model was also used to approximate the RG head model, and similar simulations performed, and results compared with the RG-LORETA with reference to the locations of the simulated sources. Multi-source localizations were discussed and examples given in the RG head model. Localization errors employing the spherical LORETA, with reference to the source locations within the realistic geometry head, were about 20-30 mm, for four brain regions evaluated: frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions. Localization errors employing the RG head model were about 10 mm over the same four brain regions. The present simulation results suggest that the use of the RG head model reduces the localization error of LORETA, and that the RG head model based LORETA is desirable if high localization accuracy is needed.

  4. Crystal growth of drug materials by spherical crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó-Révész, P.; Hasznos-Nezdei, M.; Farkas, B.; Göcző, H.; Pintye-Hódi, K.; Erős, I.

    2002-04-01

    One of the crystal growth processes is the production of crystal agglomerates by spherical crystallization. Agglomerates of drug materials were developed by means of non-typical (magnesium aspartate) and typical (acetylsalicylic acid) spherical crystallization techniques. The growth of particle size and the spherical form of the agglomerates resulted in formation of products with good bulk density, flow, compactibility and cohesivity properties. The crystal agglomerates were developed for direct capsule-filling and tablet-making.

  5. Temperature Chaos in Some Spherical Mixed p-Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Kuo; Panchenko, Dmitry

    2017-03-01

    We give two types of examples of the spherical mixed even- p-spin models for which chaos in temperature holds. These complement some known results for the spherical pure p-spin models and for models with Ising spins. For example, in contrast to a recent result of Subag who showed absence of chaos in temperature in the spherical pure p-spin models for p≥3, we show that even a smaller order perturbation induces temperature chaos.

  6. Spark Plasma Sintering of Titanium Spherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Mohammad; Moskovskikh, Dmitry O.; Rogachev, Alexander S.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-10-01

    The densification kinetics for sintering of titanium spherical particles under two different experimental schemes, i.e., current-assisted and current-insulated were investigated. It was shown that measurable densification rate differences between the two schemes are recognized only for the preheating stage. For current-assisted experiments, consolidation starts at lower temperatures than for current-insulated samples. Also at high heating rates, the change of sample porosity all through the preheating stage is higher for current-assisted conditions, while at relatively low heating rates ( i.e., less than 100 K/min) they are comparable. All through the isothermal sintering stage, at a temperature of 1073 K (800 °C), the shrinkage rates are comparable for both experimental schemes within the measurement accuracy. The explanation of the observed effects within the framework of conventional sintering theory is also provided.

  7. Collective excitations of spherical semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we study the dispersion properties of bulk and surface electrostatic oscillations of a spherical quantum electron-hole semiconductor plasma as a simple model of a semiconductor nanoparticle. We derive general dispersion relation for both bulk and surface modes, using quantum hydrodynamic theory (including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, quantum statistical pressures of the plasma species, as well as exchange and correlation effects) in conjunction with Poisson’s equation and appropriate boundary conditions. We show that for the arbitrary value of angular quantum number {\\ell }≥slant 1 there are only two surface plasmon modes, but two infinite series of bulk modes for {\\ell }≥slant 0 that owe their existence to the curvature of the interface. We use the typical values of GaAs semiconductor to compute the bulk and surface mode frequencies for different value of {\\ell }.

  8. Preparing spherical lignin from rice husk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxi; Zhao, Xu; Ding, Xuefeng; Lei, Hong; Wang, Zichen

    2013-08-01

    Lignin is one of the important branched amorphous polymers, which generally has the irregular and fractal morphology. The preparation of regular sphere of lignin needs long steps and special conditions. In this study, the regular sphere of lignin can be simply prepared from rice husk (RH) under certain conditions. Namely, RH is mixed with 35% ethanol aqueous solution in the proportion of 1:10 (g:mL), non-isothermally heated to 493 K and kept for 5 h. After filtration and air-drying at room temperature, the regular lignin sphere with the diameter of 100-400 nm is obtained. The regular sphere of lignin has the potential utilization in fields such as reactive functional materials, photo sensing materials and surface active materials in cosmetics. The mechanism of formation of the regular spherical lignin is proposed and discussed in this paper.

  9. Differential Light Scattering from Spherical Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunsting, Albert; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    The differential scattered light intensity patterns of spherical mammalian cells were measured with a new photometer which uses high-speed film as the light detector. The scattering objects, interphase and mitotic Chinese hamster ovary cells and HeLa cells, were modeled as (a) a coated sphere, accounting for nucleus and cytoplasm, and (b) a homogeneous sphere when no cellular nucleus was present. The refractive indices and size distribution of the cells were measured for an accurate comparison of the theoretical model with the light-scattering measurements. The light scattered beyond the forward direction is found to contain information about internal cellular morphology, provided the size distribution of the cells is not too broad. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:4134589

  10. Tracking a maneuvering target in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Andrew P.; Blanchard, Jeffrey A.; Grabbe, Michael T.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents an Extended Kalman Filter for tracking a maneuvering target, where the kinematics of a typical target aircraft maneuver have been incorporated into the filter state equations. Such a formulation allows the target's motion to be accurately determined through estimation of heading and lateral acceleration. This is an improvement over the the typical approach of modeling target motion with acceleration terms represented by random processes, such as that used in the Singer model. In the following pages, a three-dimensional target maneuver model is formulated in conjunction with the kinematic equations of a sensor tracking a target in spherical coordinates. Three degree-of-freedom simulation results of the proposed filter, simplified for planar target maneuvers, are compared to a filter modeling target motion with the Singer model.

  11. Refraction by a spherical nematic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Richard David

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed to study refraction by a spherical nematic bubble. It is applicable to bubbles that are larger than light wavelengths, but smaller than the dimensions for excitation of director-fluctuation-induced scattering. The technique yields a nonlinear differential equation and an associated integral which govern the trajectory of a ray inside a nematic region for an arbitrary director configuration. Explicit solutions are provided for five simple interior arrangements-isotropic, onion skin, radial star, horizontal (bottle brush), and vertical. It is then demonstrated that for extraordinary-ordinary refractive-index difference small compared to either, interfacial refraction at the bubble surface is the dominant contribution; deviations from a rectilinear path are small. When ranked in terms of decreasing scattering effectiveness, the sequence is horizontal, onion, isotropic, radial, and vertical if the light is linearly polarized and coupling optimally to the extraordinary index component; for unpolarized incoherent light the order becomes isotropic, horizontal, onion, radial, and vertical.

  12. Indentation of pressurized viscoplastic polymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    2016-08-01

    The indentation response of polymer spherical shells is investigated. Finite deformation analyses are carried out with the polymer characterized as a viscoelastic/viscoplastic solid. Both pressurized and unpressurized shells are considered. Attention is restricted to axisymmetric deformations with a conical indenter. The response is analyzed for various values of the shell thickness to radius ratio and various values of the internal pressure. Two sets of material parameters are considered: one set having network stiffening at a moderate strain and the other having no network stiffening until very large strains are attained. The transition from an indentation type mode of deformation to a structural mode of deformation involving bending that occurs as the indentation depth increases is studied. The results show the effects of shell thickness, internal pressure and polymer constitutive characterization on this transition and on the deformation modes in each of these regimes.

  13. A note on reflection of spherical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraldsen, Gunnar

    2005-06-01

    In 1909 Sommerfeld gave an exact solution for the reflection of a spherical wave from a plane surface in terms of an oscillatory integral and also presented an asymptotic solution for the case where both source and receiver are at the boundary. Weyl (1919) presented an alternative solution and also an asymptotic solution for the case where the source is at the boundary. It is known that the general case is solved if a general solution for the case where the source is at the boundary is known. Here it is demonstrated that it is sufficient to have the general solution for the case where both source and receiver are at the boundary. This is mainly of theoretical interest, but may have practical applications. As an example it is demonstrated that Sommerfeld's approximate solution gives Ingard's (1951) approximate solution which is valid for arbitrary source and receiver heights. .

  14. Laser Pulse Heating of Spherical Metal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Luk'Yanchuk, Boris S.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2011-10-01

    We consider the general problem of laser pulse heating of spherical metal particles with the sizes ranging from nanometers to millimeters. We employ the exact Mie solution of the diffraction problem and solve the heat-transfer equation to determine the maximum temperature rise at the particle surface as a function of optical and thermometric parameters of the problem. Primary attention is paid to the case when the thermal diffusivity of the particle is much larger than that of the environment, as it is in the case of metal particles in fluids. We show that, in this case, for any given duration of the laser pulse, the maximum temperature rise as a function of the particle size reaches a maximum at a certain finite size of the particle. We suggest simple approximate analytical expressions for this dependence, which cover the entire parameter range of the problem and agree well with direct numerical simulations.

  15. Electronic Switching Spherical Array (ESSA) antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockensmith, R. P.

    1984-07-01

    ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) is an antenna system conceived, developed and qualified for linking satellite data transmissions with NASA's tracking and data relay satellites (TDRSS) and tracking and data acquisition satellites (TDAS). ESSA functions in the S band frequency region, cover 2 pi or more steradians with directional gain and operates in multiple selectable modes. ESSA operates in concert with the NASA's TDRS standard transponder in the retrodirective mode or independently in directional beam, program track and special modes. Organizations and projects to the ESSA applications for NASA's space use are introduced. Coverage gain, weight power and implementation and other performance information for satisfying a wide range of data rate requirements are included.

  16. Electronically Steerable Spherical Array capabilities and interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the Electronically Steerable Spherical Array (ESSA) was started in 1975. ESSA provides the inertialess antenna needed by user satellites for communication over their large coverage angles towards the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The performance of ESSA over large coverage angles is better than the performance provided by phased arrays. The primary difference between the two antenna types is the method of beam forming. The ESSA steers a beam by illuminating a set of elements which point in the desired direction. This set of elements is illuminated by a simple multipole switch called a switching power divider (SPD). Attention is given to details regarding the difference in performance between ESSA and phased arrays, the ESSA block diagram, the performance improvement achieved by phase compensation, power requirements, the four operating modes, multibeam operation, and the data interface.

  17. Nonlinear axisymmetric liquid currents in spherical annuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafyeva, N. M.; Vvedenskaya, N. D.; Yavorskaya, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical analysis of non-linear axisymmetric viscous flows in spherical annuli of different gap sizes is presented. Only inner sphere was supposed to rotate at a constant angular velocity. The streamlines, lines of constant angular velocity, kinetic energy spectra, and spectra of velocity components are obtained. A total kinetic energy and torque needed to rotate the inner sphere are calculated as functions of Re for different gap sizes. In small-gap annulus nonuniqueness of steady solutions of Navier-Stokes equations is established and regions of different flow regime existences are found. Numerical solutions in a wide-gap annulus and experimental results are used in conclusions about flow stability in the considered range of Re. The comparison of experimental and numerical results shows close qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  18. Dynamic stiffness model of spherical parallel robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, Alessandro; Caliò, Ivo; D`Urso, Domenico; Greco, Annalisa; Lacagnina, Michele; Fichera, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    A novel approach to study the elastodynamics of Spherical Parallel Robots is described through an exact dynamic model. Timoshenko arches are used to simulate flexible curved links while the base and mobile platforms are modelled as rigid bodies. Spatial joints are inherently included into the model without Lagrangian multipliers. At first, the equivalent dynamic stiffness matrix of each leg, made up of curved links joined by spatial joints, is derived; then these matrices are assembled to obtain the Global Dynamic Stiffness Matrix of the robot at a given pose. Actuator stiffness is also included into the model to verify its influence on vibrations and modes. The latter are found by applying the Wittrick-Williams algorithm. Finally, numerical simulations and direct comparison to commercial FE results are used to validate the proposed model.

  19. Characteristic Matrices for Spherical Shell Photonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.; Smith, David D.

    2004-01-01

    We establish a parallel between the transfer matrix used in the study of plane-parallel photonic structures and the matrix characterizing transfer of partial waves in concentric spheres. We derive explicit expressions for the elements of the transfer matrix for concentric spherical layers, and from those expressions derive the scattering coefficients of a multilayered sphere. The transfer matrices are 4x4 block diagonal with only four independent elements. Matrix elements for the case of TM waves are related to those for the case of TE waves through simple interchange and multiplicative constants. In analogy with plane parallel layers, the transfer matrix for concentric multilayers is simply the product of the transfer matrices of the individual layers.

  20. Spherical boson stars as black hole mimickers

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.; Rueda-Becerril, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We present spherically symmetric boson stars as black hole mimickers based on the power spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. The free parameters of the boson star are the mass of the boson and the fourth-order self-interaction coefficient in the scalar field potential. We show that even if the mass of the boson is the only free parameter, it is possible to find a configuration that mimics the power spectrum of the disk due to a black hole of the same mass. We also show that for each value of the self-interaction a single boson star configuration can mimic a black hole at very different astrophysical scales in terms of the mass of the object and the accretion rate. In order to show that it is possible to distinguish one of our mimickers from a black hole, we also study the deflection of light.

  1. Compact expressions for spherically averaged position and momentum densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Deborah L.; Bernard, Yves A.

    2009-08-01

    Compact expressions for spherically averaged position and momentum density integrals are given in terms of spherical Bessel functions (jn) and modified spherical Bessel functions (in), respectively. All integrals required for ab initio calculations involving s, p, d, and f-type Gaussian functions are tabulated, highlighting a neat isomorphism between position and momentum space formulae. Spherically averaged position and momentum densities are calculated for a set of molecules comprising the ten-electron isoelectronic series (Ne-CH4) and the eighteen-electron series (Ar-SiH4, F2-C2H6).

  2. Foliation dependence of black hole apparent horizons in spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Ellis, George F. R.; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Helou, Alexis; Musco, Ilia

    2017-01-01

    Numerical studies of gravitational collapse to black holes make use of apparent horizons, which are intrinsically foliation dependent. We expose the problem and discuss possible solutions using the Hawking-Hayward quasilocal mass. In spherical symmetry, we present a physically sensible approach to the problem by restricting to spherically symmetric spacetime slicings. In spherical symmetry, the apparent horizons enjoy a restricted gauge independence in any spherically symmetric foliation, but physical quantities associated with them, such as surface gravity and temperature, are fully gauge dependent. The widely used comoving and Kodama foliations, which are of particular interest, are discussed in detail as examples.

  3. Preparation of Spherical Granules of Octacalcium Phosphate for Medical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Natsuko; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ioku, Koji

    2012-06-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is regarded as a precursor of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is an inorganic constituent of human bones and teeth. OCP is also becoming regarded as one of the important biomaterials. Despite some studies on OCP as biomedical materials, there are few methods for shape forming of OCP. The objective of this study is preparing spherical granules of OCP. The spherical granular shape has an advantage for handling. The spherical granules can achieve easy injection into the defect site by a catheter. In the present study, preparation of spherical granules of OCP from α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) was attempted. The starting material of α-TCP powder was dispersed in the gelatin solution. The resultant slurry was added into vegetable oil, and then the spherical granules of α-TCP/gelatin were formed by the surface tension of the slurry and the shearing force of stirring. By calcining the obtained α-TCP/gelatin granules, the spherical granules with α-TCP single phase were obtained. These spherical granules of α-TCP were immersed in the acetic acid buffer solution whose temperature and pH were controlled. The calcium phosphate spherical granules containing OCP were obtained. The shorter treatment time was favorable for preparing spherical granules containing more OCP.

  4. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  5. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  6. Decay rates of a molecule in the vicinity of a spherical surface of an isotropic magnetodielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Leung, P. T.; Tsai, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive study is presented on the decay rates of excited molecules in the vicinity of a magnetodielectric material of spherical geometry via electrodynamic modeling. Both the models based on a driven-damped harmonic oscillator and on energy transfers will be applied so that the total decay rates can be rigorously decomposed into the radiative and the nonradiative rates. Clarifications of the equivalence of these two models for arbitrary geometry will be provided. Different possible orientations and locations of the molecule are studied with the molecule being placed near a spherical particle or a cavity. Among other results, TE modes are observed which can be manifested via nonradiative transfer from a tangential dipole within a small range of dissipation parameters set for the spherical particle. In addition, spectral analysis shows that decay rates at such a particle with small absorption are largely dominated by radiative transfer except at multipolar resonances when nonradiative transfer becomes prominent, and relatively unmodified decay is possible when negative refraction takes place.

  7. The Effect of Geometry Instruction with Dynamic Geometry Software; GeoGebra on Van Hiele Geometry Understanding Levels of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutluca, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dynamic geometry software GeoGebra on Van Hiele geometry understanding level of students at 11th grade geometry course. The study was conducted with pre and posttest control group quasi-experimental method. The sample of the study was 42 eleventh grade students studying in the spring term of…

  8. A Whirlwind Tour of Computational Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ron; Yao, Frances

    1990-01-01

    Described is computational geometry which used concepts and results from classical geometry, topology, combinatorics, as well as standard algorithmic techniques such as sorting and searching, graph manipulations, and linear programing. Also included are special techniques and paradigms. (KR)

  9. The fractal geometry of life.

    PubMed

    Losa, Gabriele A

    2009-01-01

    The extension of the concepts of Fractal Geometry (Mandelbrot [1983]) toward the life sciences has led to significant progress in understanding complex functional properties and architectural / morphological / structural features characterising cells and tissues during ontogenesis and both normal and pathological development processes. It has even been argued that fractal geometry could provide a coherent description of the design principles underlying living organisms (Weibel [1991]). Fractals fulfil a certain number of theoretical and methodological criteria including a high level of organization, shape irregularity, functional and morphological self-similarity, scale invariance, iterative pathways and a peculiar non-integer fractal dimension [FD]. Whereas mathematical objects are deterministic invariant or self-similar over an unlimited range of scales, biological components are statistically self-similar only within a fractal domain defined by upper and lower limits, called scaling window, in which the relationship between the scale of observation and the measured size or length of the object can be established (Losa and Nonnenmacher [1996]). Selected examples will contribute to depict complex biological shapes and structures as fractal entities, and also to show why the application of the fractal principle is valuable for measuring dimensional, geometrical and functional parameters of cells, tissues and organs occurring within the vegetal and animal realms. If the criteria for a strict description of natural fractals are met, then it follows that a Fractal Geometry of Life may be envisaged and all natural objects and biological systems exhibiting self-similar patterns and scaling properties may be considered as belonging to the new subdiscipline of "fractalomics".

  10. Cable equation for general geometry.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Erick J; Romero, Juan M

    2017-02-01

    The cable equation describes the voltage in a straight cylindrical cable, and this model has been employed to model electrical potential in dendrites and axons. However, sometimes this equation might give incorrect predictions for some realistic geometries, in particular when the radius of the cable changes significantly. Cables with a nonconstant radius are important for some phenomena, for example, discrete swellings along the axons appear in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and multiple sclerosis. In this paper, using the Frenet-Serret frame, we propose a generalized cable equation for a general cable geometry. This generalized equation depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. We show that when the cable has a constant circular cross section, the first fundamental form of the cable can be simplified and the generalized cable equation depends on neither the curvature nor the torsion of the cable. Additionally, we find an exact solution for an ideal cable which has a particular variable circular cross section and zero curvature. For this case we show that when the cross section of the cable increases the voltage decreases. Inspired by this ideal case, we rewrite the generalized cable equation as a diffusion equation with a source term generated by the cable geometry. This source term depends on the cable cross-sectional area and its derivates. In addition, we study different cables with swelling and provide their numerical solutions. The numerical solutions show that when the cross section of the cable has abrupt changes, its voltage is smaller than the voltage in the cylindrical cable. Furthermore, these numerical solutions show that the voltage can be affected by geometrical inhomogeneities on the cable.

  11. Cable equation for general geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.

    2017-02-01

    The cable equation describes the voltage in a straight cylindrical cable, and this model has been employed to model electrical potential in dendrites and axons. However, sometimes this equation might give incorrect predictions for some realistic geometries, in particular when the radius of the cable changes significantly. Cables with a nonconstant radius are important for some phenomena, for example, discrete swellings along the axons appear in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and multiple sclerosis. In this paper, using the Frenet-Serret frame, we propose a generalized cable equation for a general cable geometry. This generalized equation depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. We show that when the cable has a constant circular cross section, the first fundamental form of the cable can be simplified and the generalized cable equation depends on neither the curvature nor the torsion of the cable. Additionally, we find an exact solution for an ideal cable which has a particular variable circular cross section and zero curvature. For this case we show that when the cross section of the cable increases the voltage decreases. Inspired by this ideal case, we rewrite the generalized cable equation as a diffusion equation with a source term generated by the cable geometry. This source term depends on the cable cross-sectional area and its derivates. In addition, we study different cables with swelling and provide their numerical solutions. The numerical solutions show that when the cross section of the cable has abrupt changes, its voltage is smaller than the voltage in the cylindrical cable. Furthermore, these numerical solutions show that the voltage can be affected by geometrical inhomogeneities on the cable.

  12. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  13. Theory of diffusion-influenced reactions in complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Traytak, Sergey D; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-06-21

    Chemical transformations involving the diffusion of reactants and subsequent chemical fixation steps are generally termed "diffusion-influenced reactions" (DIR). Virtually all biochemical processes in living media can be counted among them, together with those occurring in an ever-growing number of emerging nano-technologies. The role of the environment's geometry (obstacles, compartmentalization) and distributed reactivity (competitive reactants, traps) is key in modulating the rate constants of DIRs, and is therefore a prime design parameter. Yet, it is a formidable challenge to build a comprehensive theory that is able to describe the environment's "reactive geometry". Here we show that such a theory can be built by unfolding this many-body problem through addition theorems for special functions. Our method is powerful and general and allows one to study a given DIR reaction occurring in arbitrary "reactive landscapes", made of multiple spherical boundaries of given size and reactivity. Importantly, ready-to-use analytical formulas can be derived easily in most cases.

  14. The role of pore geometry in single nanoparticle detection

    DOE PAGES

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Pevarnik, Matthew; ...

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we observe single nanoparticle translocation events via resistive pulse sensing using silicon nitride pores described by a range of lengths and diameters. Pores are prepared by focused ion beam milling in 50 nm-, 100 nm-, and 500 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes with diameters fabricated to accommodate spherical silica nanoparticles with sizes chosen to mimic that of virus particles. In this manner, we are able to characterize the role of pore geometry in three key components of the detection scheme, namely, event magnitude, event duration, and event frequency. We find that the electric field created by the appliedmore » voltage and the pore’s geometry is a critical factor. We develop approximations to describe this field, which are verified with computer simulations, and interactions between particles and this field. In so doing, we formulate what we believe to be the first approximation for the magnitude of ionic current blockage that explicitly addresses the invariance of access resistance of solid-state pores during particle translocation. These approximations also provide a suitable foundation for estimating the zeta potential of the particles and/or pore surface when studied in conjunction with event durations. We also verify that translocation achieved by electro-osmostic transport is an effective means of slowing translocation velocities of highly charged particles without compromising particle capture rate as compared to more traditional approaches based on electrophoretic transport.« less

  15. The role of pore geometry in single nanoparticle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Pevarnik, Matthew; Teslich, Nick; Cabrini, Stefano; Morrison, Alan P.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we observe single nanoparticle translocation events via resistive pulse sensing using silicon nitride pores described by a range of lengths and diameters. Pores are prepared by focused ion beam milling in 50 nm-, 100 nm-, and 500 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes with diameters fabricated to accommodate spherical silica nanoparticles with sizes chosen to mimic that of virus particles. In this manner, we are able to characterize the role of pore geometry in three key components of the detection scheme, namely, event magnitude, event duration, and event frequency. We find that the electric field created by the applied voltage and the pore’s geometry is a critical factor. We develop approximations to describe this field, which are verified with computer simulations, and interactions between particles and this field. In so doing, we formulate what we believe to be the first approximation for the magnitude of ionic current blockage that explicitly addresses the invariance of access resistance of solid-state pores during particle translocation. These approximations also provide a suitable foundation for estimating the zeta potential of the particles and/or pore surface when studied in conjunction with event durations. We also verify that translocation achieved by electro-osmostic transport is an effective means of slowing translocation velocities of highly charged particles without compromising particle capture rate as compared to more traditional approaches based on electrophoretic transport.

  16. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the electromechanical behavior of a compact spherical loudspeaker array for directivity control.

    PubMed

    Pasqual, Alexander Mattioli; Herzog, Philippe; Arruda, José Roberto de França

    2010-12-01

    Sound directivity control is made possible by a compact array of independent loudspeakers operating at the same frequency range. The drivers are usually distributed over a sphere-like frame according to a Platonic solid geometry to obtain a highly symmetrical configuration. The radiation pattern of spherical loudspeaker arrays has been predicted from the surface velocity pattern by approximating the drivers membranes as rigid vibrating spherical caps, although a rigorous assessment of this model has not been provided so far. Many aspects concerning compact array electromechanics remain unclear, such as the effects on the acoustical performance of the drivers interaction inside the array cavity, or the fact that voltages rather than velocities are controlled in practice. This work presents a detailed investigation of the electromechanical behavior of spherical loudspeaker arrays. Simulation results are shown to agree with laser vibrometer measurements and experimental sound power data obtained for a 12-driver spherical array prototype at low frequencies, whereas the non-rigid body motion and the first cavity eigenfrequency yield a discrepancy between theoretical and experimental results at high frequencies. Finally, although the internal acoustic coupling affects the drivers vibration in the low-frequency range, it does not play an important role on the radiated sound power.

  17. Complex geometry and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. Y.; Perelomov, A. M.

    1990-06-01

    The analytic properties of string theory are reviewed. It is demonstrated that the theory of strings is connected with contemporary fields of complex geometry. A massless classical point-like particle which moves in Minkowski space of D dimensions is considered. The formulation used to develop string theory is based on the Polyakov approach. In order to find the quantum scattering amplitude in the Polyakov approach, the functional integral over all Riemannian surfaces is calculated. The simplest case of the amplitude of vacuum-vacuum transitions Z of a closed string is considered. The description of linear bundles in the divisor terms is given.

  18. Worldsheet geometries of ambitwistor string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Kantaro

    2015-06-01

    Mason and Skinner proposed the ambitwistor string theory which directly reproduces the formulas for the amplitudes of massless particles proposed by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In this paper we discuss geometries of the moduli space of worldsheets associated to the bosonic or the RNS ambitwistor string. Further, we investigate the factorization properties of the amplitudes when an internal momentum is near on-shell in the abstract CFT language. Along the way, we propose the existence of the ambitwistor strings with three or four fermionic worldsheet currents.

  19. Bondi accretion in trumpet geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, August J.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2017-02-01

    The Bondi solution, which describes the radial inflow of a gas onto a non-rotating black hole, provides a powerful test for numerical relativistic codes. However, the Bondi solution is usually derived in Schwarzschild coordinates, which are not well suited for dynamical spacetime evolutions. Instead, many current numerical relativistic codes adopt moving-puncture coordinates, which render black holes in trumpet geometries. Here we transform the Bondi solution into trumpet coordinates, which result in regular expressions for the fluid flow extending into the black-hole interior. We also evolve these solutions numerically and demonstrate their usefulness for testing and calibrating numerical codes.

  20. Quanta of geometry and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.

    2016-11-01

    This is a tribute to Abdus Salam’s memory whose insight and creative thinking set for me a role model to follow. In this contribution I show that the simple requirement of volume quantization in spacetime (with Euclidean signature) uniquely determines the geometry to be that of a noncommutative space whose finite part is based on an algebra that leads to Pati-Salam grand unified models. The Standard Model corresponds to a special case where a mathematical constraint (order one condition) is satisfied. This provides evidence that Salam was a visionary who was generations ahead of his time.

  1. Thermophoresis of spherical and non-spherical particles: a review of theories and experiments.

    PubMed

    Zheng, F

    2002-03-29

    Thermophoresis is an important mechanism of micro-particle transport due to a temperature gradient in the surrounding medium and has found numerous applications, especially in the field of aerosol technology. Extensive studies, both theoretical and experimental, have been done to understand the nature of this phenomenon. However, it is clear that a lot more of work needs to be done before we can predict thermophoresis accurately for any given gas-particle system as well as particle shape and orientation in any flow regime. This paper reviews the existing theories and data in two major categories, for spherical particles and for non-spherical particles, as well as the various techniques in making thermophoresis measurements. The current state of development for thermophoresis studies is that for spheres the theories and experimental data agree with each other fairly well but for non-spherical particles in the transition regime the theories are yet to be developed and experimental data showing the effect of particle shape are much needed in all Knudsen number range. The best techniques of thermophoretic force measurements involve the use of electrodynamic balances to work on single micro-particles and the use of microgravity to minimize the effect of convection. A combination of the above two has not been attempted and should provide the most accurate data.

  2. Geometry: Career Related Units. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierro, Mike; And Others

    Using six geometry units as resource units, the document explores 22 math-related careers. The authors intend the document to provide senior high school students with career orientation and exploration experiences while they learn geometry skills. The units are to be considered as a part of a geometry course, not a course by themselves. The six…

  3. Preservice Primary School Teachers' Elementary Geometry Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2012-01-01

    Geometrical notions and properties occur in real-world problems, thus Geometry has an important place in school Mathematics curricula. Primary school curricula lays the foundation of Geometry knowledge, pupils learn Geometry notions and properties by exploring their environment. Thus it is very important that primary school teachers have a good…

  4. Students' Misconceptions and Errors in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Tuba; Kurtulus, Aytac

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the students' performances in two-dimensional transformation geometry and explores the mistakes made by the students taking the analytic geometry course given by researchers. An examination was given to students of Education Faculties who have taken the analytic geometry course at Eskisehir Osmangazi University in Turkey. The…

  5. Teaching Geometry: An Experiential and Artistic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    The view that geometry should be taught at every grade level is promoted. Primary and elementary school children are thought to rarely have any direct experience with geometry, except on an incidental basis. Children are supposed to be able to learn geometry rather easily, so long as the method and content are adapted to their development and…

  6. Geometry in the Early Years: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to provide a commentary on the teaching and learning of geometry in the early years of schooling with the set of papers in this issue as a guiding factor. It is structured around issues about geometry education of young learners, such as: what should we teach in geometry and why; representation of geometrical…

  7. Engaging All Students with "Impossible Geometry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lynda R.; Ayebo, Abraham; Dornoo, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Geometry is an area in which Australian students performed particularly poorly on the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). One innovative area of recreational geometry that has rich potential to engage and challenge a wide variety of students is "impossible geometry." An impossible geometric object is a…

  8. No-scalar-hair theorem for spherically symmetric reflecting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-11-01

    It is proved that spherically symmetric compact reflecting objects cannot support static bound-state configurations made of scalar fields whose self-interaction potential V (ψ2) is a monotonically increasing function of its argument. Our theorem rules out, in particular, the existence of massive scalar hair outside the surface of a spherically symmetric compact reflecting star.

  9. Method for preparing spherical thermoplastic particles of uniform size

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.

    1975-11-17

    Spherical particles of thermoplastic material of virtually uniform roundness and diameter are prepared by cutting monofilaments of a selected diameter into rod-like segments of a selected uniform length which are then heated in a viscous liquid to effect the formation of the spherical particles.

  10. Systematic Calibration for a Backpacked Spherical Photogrammetry Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, J. Y.; Su, B. W.; Hsiao, K. W.; Jhan, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    A spherical camera can observe the environment for almost 720 degrees' field of view in one shoot, which is useful for augmented reality, environment documentation, or mobile mapping applications. This paper aims to develop a spherical photogrammetry imaging system for the purpose of 3D measurement through a backpacked mobile mapping system (MMS). The used equipment contains a Ladybug-5 spherical camera, a tactical grade positioning and orientation system (POS), i.e. SPAN-CPT, and an odometer, etc. This research aims to directly apply photogrammetric space intersection technique for 3D mapping from a spherical image stereo-pair. For this purpose, several systematic calibration procedures are required, including lens distortion calibration, relative orientation calibration, boresight calibration for direct georeferencing, and spherical image calibration. The lens distortion is serious on the ladybug-5 camera's original 6 images. Meanwhile, for spherical image mosaicking from these original 6 images, we propose the use of their relative orientation and correct their lens distortion at the same time. However, the constructed spherical image still contains systematic error, which will reduce the 3D measurement accuracy. Later for direct georeferencing purpose, we need to establish a ground control field for boresight/lever-arm calibration. Then, we can apply the calibrated parameters to obtain the exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of all spherical images. In the end, the 3D positioning accuracy after space intersection will be evaluated, including EOPs obtained by structure from motion method.

  11. Decay rates of spherical and deformed proton emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C. N.; Esbensen, H.

    1999-11-23

    Using Green's function techniques, the authors derive expressions for the width of a proton decaying state in spherical and deformed nuclei. The authors show that the proton decay widths calculated by the exact expressions of Maglione et al. are equivalent to the distorted wave expressions of Bugrov et al., and that of {angstrom} berg et al. in the spherical case.

  12. Improvements in the spherical collapse model and dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    In the present paper, we study how the effects of deviations from spherical symmetry of a system, produced by angular momentum, and shear stress, influence typical parameters of the spherical collapse model, like the linear density threshold for collapse of the non-relativistic component (δ c) and its virial overdensity (Δ V). The study is performed in the framework of the Einstein-de Sitter and Λ CDM models, and assuming that the vacuum component is not clustering within the homogeneous non-spherical overdensities. We start from the standard spherical top hat model (SCM) which does not take account the non-spherical effects, and we add to this model the shear term and angular momentum term, which are finally expressed in terms of the density contrast, δ . We find that the non-spherical terms change the non-linear evolution of the system and that the collapse stops ``naturally" at the virial radius, differently from the standard spherical collapse model. Moreover, shear and rotation gives rise to higher values of the linear overdensity parameter and different values of Δ V with respect to the standard spherical collapse model.

  13. Sextupole system for the correction of spherical aberration

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, A.V.; Kopf, D.A.

    In an electron beam device in which an electron beam is developed and then focused by a lens to a particular spot, there is provided a means for eliminating spherical aberration. A sextupole electromagnetic lens is positioned between two focusing lenses. The interaction of the sextupole with the beam compensates for spherical aberration. (GHT)

  14. Convergence rate of spherical harmonic expansions of smooth functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Feng; Wang, Kunyang

    2008-12-01

    We extend a well-known result of Bonami and Clerc on the almost everywhere (a.e.) convergence of Cesàro means of spherical harmonic expansions. For smooth functions measured in terms of [phi]-derivatives on the unit sphere, we obtained the sharp a.e. convergence rate of Cesàro means of their spherical harmonic expansions.

  15. Target Detection Using Fractal Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, J. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The concepts and theory of fractal geometry were applied to the problem of segmenting a 256 x 256 pixel image so that manmade objects could be extracted from natural backgrounds. The two most important measurements necessary to extract these manmade objects were fractal dimension and lacunarity. Provision was made to pass the manmade portion to a lookup table for subsequent identification. A computer program was written to construct cloud backgrounds of fractal dimensions which were allowed to vary between 2.2 and 2.8. Images of three model space targets were combined with these backgrounds to provide a data set for testing the validity of the approach. Once the data set was constructed, computer programs were written to extract estimates of the fractal dimension and lacunarity on 4 x 4 pixel subsets of the image. It was shown that for clouds of fractal dimension 2.7 or less, appropriate thresholding on fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded a 64 x 64 edge-detected image with all or most of the cloud background removed. These images were enhanced by an erosion and dilation to provide the final image passed to the lookup table. While the ultimate goal was to pass the final image to a neural network for identification, this work shows the applicability of fractal geometry to the problems of image segmentation, edge detection and separating a target of interest from a natural background.

  16. Fuzzy Logic for Incidence Geometry.

    PubMed

    Tserkovny, Alex

    The paper presents a mathematical framework for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects in the context of Geography, in which all entities and their relationships are described by human language. These entities could be labelled by commonly used names of landmarks, water areas, and so forth. Unlike single points that are given in Cartesian coordinates, these geographic entities are extended in space and often loosely defined, but people easily perform spatial reasoning with extended geographic objects "as if they were points." Unfortunately, up to date, geographic information systems (GIS) miss the capability of geometric reasoning with extended objects. The aim of the paper is to present a mathematical apparatus for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects that is usable in GIS. In the paper we discuss the fuzzy logic (Aliev and Tserkovny, 2011) as a reasoning system for geometry of extended objects, as well as a basis for fuzzification of the axioms of incidence geometry. The same fuzzy logic was used for fuzzification of Euclid's first postulate. Fuzzy equivalence relation "extended lines sameness" is introduced. For its approximation we also utilize a fuzzy conditional inference, which is based on proposed fuzzy "degree of indiscernibility" and "discernibility measure" of extended points.

  17. Quanta of geometry: noncommutative aspects.

    PubMed

    Chamseddine, Ali H; Connes, Alain; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2015-03-06

    In the construction of spectral manifolds in noncommutative geometry, a higher degree Heisenberg commutation relation involving the Dirac operator and the Feynman slash of real scalar fields naturally appears and implies, by equality with the index formula, the quantization of the volume. We first show that this condition implies that the manifold decomposes into disconnected spheres, which will represent quanta of geometry. We then refine the condition by involving the real structure and two types of geometric quanta, and show that connected spin manifolds with large quantized volume are then obtained as solutions. The two algebras M_{2}(H) and M_{4}(C) are obtained, which are the exact constituents of the standard model. Using the two maps from M_{4} to S^{4} the four-manifold is built out of a very large number of the two kinds of spheres of Planckian volume. We give several physical applications of this scheme such as quantization of the cosmological constant, mimetic dark matter, and area quantization of black holes.

  18. Weyl gravity and Cartan geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, J.; François, J.; Lazzarini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We point out that the Cartan geometry known as the second-order conformal structure provides a natural differential geometric framework underlying gauge theories of conformal gravity. We are concerned with two theories: the first one is the associated Yang-Mills-like Lagrangian, while the second, inspired by [1], is a slightly more general one that relaxes the conformal Cartan geometry. The corresponding gauge symmetry is treated within the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin language. We show that the Weyl gauge potential is a spurious degree of freedom, analogous to a Stueckelberg field, that can be eliminated through the dressing field method. We derive sets of field equations for both the studied Lagrangians. For the second one, they constrain the gauge field to be the "normal conformal Cartan connection.''Finally, we provide in a Lagrangian framework a justification of the identification, in dimension 4, of the Bach tensor with the Yang-Mills current of the normal conformal Cartan connection, as proved in [2].

  19. Fuzzy Logic for Incidence Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical framework for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects in the context of Geography, in which all entities and their relationships are described by human language. These entities could be labelled by commonly used names of landmarks, water areas, and so forth. Unlike single points that are given in Cartesian coordinates, these geographic entities are extended in space and often loosely defined, but people easily perform spatial reasoning with extended geographic objects “as if they were points.” Unfortunately, up to date, geographic information systems (GIS) miss the capability of geometric reasoning with extended objects. The aim of the paper is to present a mathematical apparatus for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects that is usable in GIS. In the paper we discuss the fuzzy logic (Aliev and Tserkovny, 2011) as a reasoning system for geometry of extended objects, as well as a basis for fuzzification of the axioms of incidence geometry. The same fuzzy logic was used for fuzzification of Euclid's first postulate. Fuzzy equivalence relation “extended lines sameness” is introduced. For its approximation we also utilize a fuzzy conditional inference, which is based on proposed fuzzy “degree of indiscernibility” and “discernibility measure” of extended points. PMID:27689133

  20. Volumetric rendering and metrology of spherical gradient refractive index lens imaged by angular scan optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianing; Thompson, Kevin P; Ma, Bin; Ponting, Michael; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-08-22

    In this paper, we develop the methodology, including the refraction correction, geometrical thickness correction, coordinate transformation, and layer segmentation algorithms, for 3D rendering and metrology of a layered spherical gradient refractive index (S-GRIN) lens based on the imaging data collected by an angular scan optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The 3D mapping and rendering enables direct 3D visualization and internal defect inspection of the lens. The metrology provides assessment of the surface geometry, the lens thickness, the radii of curvature of the internal layer interfaces, and the misalignment of the internal S-GRIN distribution with respect to the lens surface. The OCT metrology results identify the manufacturing defects, and enable targeted process development for optimizing the manufacturing parameters. The newly fabricated S-GRIN lenses show up to a 7x spherical aberration reduction that allows a significantly increased utilizable effective aperture.

  1. Inertial-Fusion-Related Hydrodynamic Instabilities in a Spherical Gas Bubble Accelerated by a Planar Shock Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhaus, John; Ranjan, Devesh; Anderson, Mark; Oakley, Jason; Bonazza, Riccardo; Greenough, Jeff

    2005-05-15

    Experiments studying the compression and unstable growth of a dense spherical bubble in a gaseous medium subjected to a strong planar shock wave (2.8 < M < 3.4) are performed in a vertical shock tube. The test gas is initially contained in a free-falling spherical soap-film bubble, and the shocked bubble is imaged using planar laser diagnostics. Concurrently, simulations are carried out using a compressible hydrodynamics code in r-z axisymmetric geometry.Experiments and computations indicate the formation of characteristic vortical structures in the post-shock flow, due to Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and smaller-scale vortices due to secondary effects. Inconsistencies between experimental and computational results are examined, and the usefulness of the current axisymmetric approach is evaluated.

  2. Vibrations of moderately thick shallow spherical shells at large amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, M.

    1994-04-01

    A shallow shell theory is presented for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of moderately thick isotropic spherical shells. Effects of transverse shear deformation and rotatory inertia are included in the governing equations of motion by means of tracing constants. When these effects are ignored, the governing equations readily reduce to those applicable for thin shallow spherical shells. Solutions to the system of thick shell equations are obtained by means of Galerkin's method and the numerical Runge-Kutta procedure. Numerical results are presented for certain cases of shallow spherical shells considering different geometric shell parameters. Transverse shear and rotatory inertia effects are found to be important in linear as well as nonlinear responses of shallow spherical shells. The nonlinear frequency-amplitude behavior is of the softening type for shallow spherical shells and of the hardening type for circular plates. Frequency ratios are lower at any given amplitude when the effects of transverse shear and rotatory inertia are included in the analysis.

  3. Orientation Maps in V1 and Non-Euclidean Geometry.

    PubMed

    Afgoustidis, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    In the primary visual cortex, the processing of information uses the distribution of orientations in the visual input: neurons react to some orientations in the stimulus more than to others. In many species, orientation preference is mapped in a remarkable way on the cortical surface, and this organization of the neural population seems to be important for visual processing. Now, existing models for the geometry and development of orientation preference maps in higher mammals make a crucial use of symmetry considerations. In this paper, we consider probabilistic models for V1 maps from the point of view of group theory; we focus on Gaussian random fields with symmetry properties and review the probabilistic arguments that allow one to estimate pinwheel densities and predict the observed value of π. Then, in order to test the relevance of general symmetry arguments and to introduce methods which could be of use in modeling curved regions, we reconsider this model in the light of group representation theory, the canonical mathematics of symmetry. We show that through the Plancherel decomposition of the space of complex-valued maps on the Euclidean plane, each infinite-dimensional irreducible unitary representation of the special Euclidean group yields a unique V1-like map, and we use representation theory as a symmetry-based toolbox to build orientation maps adapted to the most famous non-Euclidean geometries, viz. spherical and hyperbolic geometry. We find that most of the dominant traits of V1 maps are preserved in these; we also study the link between symmetry and the statistics of singularities in orientation maps, and show what the striking quantitative characteristics observed in animals become in our curved models.

  4. Key techniques of laser direct writing patterns on spherical substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-guo; Zhao, Jing-li

    2007-12-01

    Comparing with the writing method of plane pattern, spherical pattern' has some remarkable different on several points. Firstly, it is difficult to spin-coated a uniform photoresist film on a spherical substrate, especially the ratio of spherical radius to caliber is smaller, and the spin-coated way must match the ratio of spherical radius to caliber. Secondly, if the sphere couldn't be regarded as a plane, a so-called concentric optical scan movement way must be applied for the generation of spherical pattern, because the reflex of substrate will affect the quantity of illumination. Commonly, an alignment technique is indispensable with pattern generation of spherical surface by the concentric optical scan in order to ensure the orthogonal intersection of focusing laser beam and writing surface. Thirdly, a uniform velocity control must be considered for the laser direct writing method on a spherical substrate. Otherwise, the exposure time of photoresist will be different, and the line widths of pattern will be also different at different areas. Fourthly, commonly, because the errors of concentric machine and substrate surface shape are bigger, so focusing servo-control technique is also needful for writing a pattern on a spherical substrate. Focusing servo-control may keep the focal spot on the spherical surface by a focus detection and control system in the course of writing pattern. Using these techniques, we fabricated a line width of 7μm and a period of 600μm isometric mesh on the concave of a spherical substrate.

  5. Spherical nanoindentation stress–strain curves

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2015-03-24

    Although indentation experiments have long been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus, the utility of this technique in analyzing the complete elastic–plastic response of materials under contact loading has only been realized in the past few years – mostly due to recent advances in testing equipment and analysis protocols. This paper provides a timely review of the recent progress made in this respect in extracting meaningful indentation stress–strain curves from the raw datasets measured in instrumented spherical nanoindentation experiments. These indentation stress–strain curves have produced highly reliable estimates of the indentation modulus and the indentation yield strength in the sample, as well as certain aspects of their post-yield behavior, and have been critically validated through numerical simulations using finite element models as well as direct in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements on micro-pillars. Much of this recent progress was made possible through the introduction of a new measure of indentation strain and the development of new protocols to locate the effective zero-point of initial contact between the indenter and the sample in the measured datasets. As a result, this has led to an important key advance in this field where it is now possible to reliably identify and analyze the initial loading segment in the indentation experiments.

  6. Signatures of Spherical Compactifications at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2007-02-12

    TeV-scale extra dimensions may play an important role in electroweak or supersymmetry breaking. We examine the phenomenology of such dimensions, compactified on a sphere S{sup n}, n {ge} 2, and show that they possess distinct features and signatures. For example, unlike flat toroidal manifolds, spheres do not trivially allow fermion massless modes. Acceptable phenomenology then generically leads to ''non-universal'' extra dimensions with ''pole-localized'' 4-d fermions; the bosonic fields can be in the bulk. Due to spherical symmetry, some Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of bulk gauge fields are either stable or extremely long-lived, depending on the graviton KK spectrum. Using precision electroweak data, we constrain the lightest gauge field KK modes to lie above {approx_equal} 4 TeV. We show that some of these KK resonances are within the reach of the LHC in several different production channels. The models we study can be uniquely identified by their collider signatures.

  7. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    PubMed Central

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Petrov, M. I.; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes. PMID:26926602

  8. Shear & Compression Plasma Viscosity In Spherical ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Richard

    2003-10-01

    In (1) the exceptional viscosity of DT plasmas (Braginskii) was estimated to reduce by orders of magnitude growth rates of the most threatening m=0 modes in liner implosions of cylindrical Z-pinch plasmas that reach a thermonuclear T=10keV. Here in spherical B=0 implosions shear viscosity is estimated, by numerical(2)(implicit in t) & analytic(Chandrasekhar) methods, to reduce similarly the growth of R-T modes in DT plasmas reaching 10keV, where μ ˜5.E4 poise, or higher T. Surface plasma interactions with the confining pusher shell(3) & Knudsen(large mfp) limitation of the viscous effects are discussed. Compression viscosity(Zel'dovich) adds noticeably to irreversible heating(reduced to quadratures) in such systems, esp. with final T>10keV &/or implosion velocities >10E7cm/s. Here double implosions, as suggested in (4), can increase significantly entropy production prior to final implosion &, consequently, heating efficiency. (1)Bull. APS 44-7 Nov99 BP189 (2)McCrory et. al. Nuc.Sci.. 64,163(77) & references (3)Montierth et al., PFB 4(4) Ap92 & references (4)Two Stage Heating Of Theta Pinches, Freidberg & Morse, Proc. '71 Garching Conf. On High β Plasmas

  9. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Petrov, M. I.; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes.

  10. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikova, K V; Petrov, M I; Babicheva, V E; Belov, P A

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes.

  11. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  12. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso; Vargas, Ivan; Guadamuz, Saul; Mora, Jaime; Ansejo, Jose; Zamora, Esteban; Herrera, Julio; Chaves, Esteban; Romero, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak (ST) MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R<0.14m, a<0.10m, BT<0.5T, Ip<40kA, 3ms pulse)[1] is in a process of donation to Costa Rica Institute of Technology. The main objective of MEDUSA is to train students in plasma physics /technical related issues which will help all tasks of the very low aspect ratio stellarator SCR-1(A≡R/>=3.6, under design[2]) and also the ongoing activities in low temperature plasmas. Courses in plasma physics at undergraduate and post-graduate joint programme levels are regularly conducted. The scientific programme is intend to clarify several issues in relevant physics for conventional and mainly STs, including transport, heating and current drive via Alfv'en wave, and natural divertor STs with ergodic magnetic limiter[3,4]. [1] G.D.Garstka, PhD thesis, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1997 [2] L.Barillas et al., Proc. 19^th Int. Conf. Nucl. Eng., Japan, 2011 [3] C.Ribeiro et al., IEEJ Trans. Electrical and Electronic Eng., 2012(accepted) [4] C.Ribeiro et al., Proc. 39^th EPS Conf. Contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Sweden, 2012

  13. Spherical tokamaks with plasma centre-post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2013-10-01

    The metal centre-post (MCP) in tokamaks is a structure which carries the total toroidal field current and also houses the Ohmic heating solenoid in conventional or low aspect ratio (Spherical)(ST) tokamaks. The MCP and solenoid are critical components for producing the toroidal field and for the limited Ohmic flux in STs. Constraints for a ST reactor related to these limitations lead to a minimum plasma aspect ratio of 1.4 which reduces the benefit of operation at higher betas in a more compact ST reactor. Replacing the MCP is of great interest for reactor-based ST studies since the device is simplified, compactness increased, and maintenance reduced. An experiment to show the feasibility of using a plasma centre-post (PCP) is being currently under construction and involves a high level of complexity. A preliminary study of a very simple PCP, which is ECR(Electron Cyclotron Resonance)-assisted and which includes an innovative fuelling system based on pellet injection, has recently been reported. This is highly suitable for an ultra-low aspect ratio tokamak (ULART) device. Advances on this PCP ECR-assisted concept within a ULART and the associated fuelling system are presented here, and will include the field topology for the PCP ECR-assisted scheme, pellet ablation modeling, and a possible global equilibrium simulation. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contr.17592, National Instruments-Costa Rica.

  14. Perforation of woven fabric by spherical projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, V.P.W.; Tan, V.B.C.; Tay, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Rectangular specimens of Twaron{reg_sign} fabric, clamped on two opposite sides, are subjected to impact perforation by 9.5 mm diameter spherical steel projectiles at speeds ranging from 140 m/s to 420 m/s. This plain woven fabric, comprising PPTA (poly-paraphenylene terepthalamide) fibers, is commonly employed in flexible an-nor applications. Its perforation response is examined in terms of residual velocity, energy absorbed and resulting deformation patterns. The existence of a critical or transition impact velocity, beyond which there is a significant reduction in energy absorbed by perforation, is observed. Differences in creasing and deformation induced in specimens are also demarcated by this transition impact velocity. Effects of difference in boundary conditions (clamped and free) on yarn breakage are also noted. A numerical model, based on an initially orthogonal network of pin-jointed bars interconnected at nodes, is formulated to simulate the fabric. Fiber yam mechanical properties are represented via a three-element spring-dashpot model which encapsulates viscoelastic behavior and fiber failure. Numerical results exhibit good correlation with experimental observations in terms of prediction of threshold perforation velocity, energy absorbed, occurrence of a transition critical velocity and fabric deformation characteristics.

  15. Nonlinear fishbone dynamics in spherical tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Fu, G. Y.; Shen, Wei

    2016-11-22

    Linear and nonlinear kinetic-MHD hybrid simulations have been carried out to investigate linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of beam-driven fishbone instability in spherical tokamak plasmas. Realistic NSTX parameters with finite toroidal rotation were used. Our results show that the fishbone is driven by both trapped and passing particles. The instability drive of passing particles is comparable to that of trapped particles in the linear regime. The effects of rotation are destabilizing and a new region of instability appears at higher q min (>1.5) values, q min being the minimum of safety factor profile. In the nonlinear regime, the mode saturates due to flattening of beam ion distribution, and this persists after initial saturation while mode frequency chirps down in such a way that the resonant trapped particles move out radially and keep in resonance with the mode. Correspondingly, the flattening region of beam ion distribution expands radially outward. Furthermore, a substantial fraction of initially non-resonant trapped particles become resonant around the time of mode saturation and keep in resonance with the mode as frequency chirps down. On the other hand, the fraction of resonant passing particles is significantly smaller than that of trapped particles. Finally, our analysis shows that trapped particles provide the main drive to the mode in the nonlinear regime.

  16. Nonlinear fishbone dynamics in spherical tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Feng; Fu, G. Y.; Shen, Wei

    2016-11-22

    Linear and nonlinear kinetic-MHD hybrid simulations have been carried out to investigate linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of beam-driven fishbone instability in spherical tokamak plasmas. Realistic NSTX parameters with finite toroidal rotation were used. Our results show that the fishbone is driven by both trapped and passing particles. The instability drive of passing particles is comparable to that of trapped particles in the linear regime. The effects of rotation are destabilizing and a new region of instability appears at higher q min (>1.5) values, q min being the minimum of safety factor profile. In the nonlinear regime, the mode saturatesmore » due to flattening of beam ion distribution, and this persists after initial saturation while mode frequency chirps down in such a way that the resonant trapped particles move out radially and keep in resonance with the mode. Correspondingly, the flattening region of beam ion distribution expands radially outward. Furthermore, a substantial fraction of initially non-resonant trapped particles become resonant around the time of mode saturation and keep in resonance with the mode as frequency chirps down. On the other hand, the fraction of resonant passing particles is significantly smaller than that of trapped particles. Finally, our analysis shows that trapped particles provide the main drive to the mode in the nonlinear regime.« less

  17. Spherical nanoindentation stress–strain curves

    DOE PAGES

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2015-03-24

    Although indentation experiments have long been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus, the utility of this technique in analyzing the complete elastic–plastic response of materials under contact loading has only been realized in the past few years – mostly due to recent advances in testing equipment and analysis protocols. This paper provides a timely review of the recent progress made in this respect in extracting meaningful indentation stress–strain curves from the raw datasets measured in instrumented spherical nanoindentation experiments. These indentation stress–strain curves have produced highly reliable estimates of the indentation modulus and the indentation yield strength inmore » the sample, as well as certain aspects of their post-yield behavior, and have been critically validated through numerical simulations using finite element models as well as direct in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements on micro-pillars. Much of this recent progress was made possible through the introduction of a new measure of indentation strain and the development of new protocols to locate the effective zero-point of initial contact between the indenter and the sample in the measured datasets. As a result, this has led to an important key advance in this field where it is now possible to reliably identify and analyze the initial loading segment in the indentation experiments.« less

  18. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, C.; Salvador, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Munoz, O.; Tapia, A.; Arredondo, V.; Chavez, R.; Nieto, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Garza, A.; Estrada, I.; Jasso, E.; Acosta, C.; Briones, C.; Cavazos, G.; Martinez, J.; Morones, J.; Almaguer, J.; Fonck, R.

    2011-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R < 0.14m, a < 0.10m, BT < 0.5T, Ip < 40kA, 3ms pulse) is currently being recomissioned at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico, as part of an agreement between the Faculties of Mech.-Elect. Eng. and Phy. Sci.-Maths. The main objective for having MEDUSA is to train students in plasma physics & technical related issues, aiming a full design of a medium size device (e.g. Tokamak-T). Details of technical modifications and a preliminary scientific programme will be presented. MEDUSA-MX will also benefit any developments in the existing Mexican Fusion Network. Strong liaison within national and international plasma physics communities is expected. New activities on plasma & engineering modeling are expected to be developed in parallel by using the existing facilities such as a multi-platform computer (Silicon Graphics Altix XE250, 128G RAM, 3.7TB HD, 2.7GHz, quad-core processor), ancillary graph system (NVIDIA Quadro FE 2000/1GB GDDR-5 PCI X16 128, 3.2GHz), and COMSOL Multiphysics-Solid Works programs.

  19. Nonlinear fishbone dynamics in spherical tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Fu, G. Y.; Shen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear kinetic-MHD hybrid simulations have been carried out to investigate linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of beam-driven fishbone instability in spherical tokamak plasmas. Realistic NSTX parameters with finite toroidal rotation were used. The results show that the fishbone is driven by both trapped and passing particles. The instability drive of passing particles is comparable to that of trapped particles in the linear regime. The effects of rotation are destabilizing and a new region of instability appears at higher q min (>1.5) values, q min being the minimum of safety factor profile. In the nonlinear regime, the mode saturates due to flattening of beam ion distribution, and this persists after initial saturation while mode frequency chirps down in such a way that the resonant trapped particles move out radially and keep in resonance with the mode. Correspondingly, the flattening region of beam ion distribution expands radially outward. A substantial fraction of initially non-resonant trapped particles become resonant around the time of mode saturation and keep in resonance with the mode as frequency chirps down. On the other hand, the fraction of resonant passing particles is significantly smaller than that of trapped particles. Our analysis shows that trapped particles provide the main drive to the mode in the nonlinear regime.

  20. Spherical gravitational curvature boundary-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Values of scalar, vector and second-order tensor parameters of the Earth's gravitational field have been collected by various sensors in geodesy and geophysics. Such observables have been widely exploited in different parametrization methods for the gravitational field modelling. Moreover, theoretical aspects of these quantities have extensively been studied and well understood. On the other hand, new sensors for observing gravitational curvatures, i.e., components of the third-order gravitational tensor, are currently under development. As the gravitational curvatures represent new types of observables, their exploitation for modelling of the Earth's gravitational field is a subject of this study. Firstly, the gravitational curvature tensor is decomposed into six parts which are expanded in terms of third-order tensor spherical harmonics. Secondly, gravitational curvature boundary-value problems defined for four combinations of the gravitational curvatures are formulated and solved in spectral and spatial domains. Thirdly, properties of the corresponding sub-integral kernels are investigated. The presented mathematical formulations reveal some important properties of the gravitational curvatures and extend the so-called Meissl scheme, i.e., an important theoretical framework that relates various parameters of the Earth's gravitational field.

  1. Spherical-wave effects in photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagurton, M.; Bullock, E. L.; Saiki, R.; Kaduwela, A.; Brundle, C. R.; Fadley, C. S.; Rehr, J. J.

    1986-02-01

    The influence of spherical-wave (SW) effects on the analysis of photoelectron diffraction (PD) data is considered by comparing full SW single-scattering calculations with similar calculations based upon the plane-wave (PW) approximation and a new approximation for including SW effects (SW(1)) due to Rehr, Albers, Natoli, and Stern, as well as with experimental data involving both scanned-energy and scanned-angle measurements. In general, SW effects are found to be much more important in forward scattering and to explain prior empirical adjustments of PW x-ray PD scattering amplitudes at higher energies of >~500 eV. The more easily used SW(1) approximation is also seen to allow very well for SW effects. Not all PD data are expected to be equally sensitive to SW corrections. For example, scanned-energy data for S/Ni(001) emphasizing backscattering events are about equally well described by the PW and SW models, whereas higher-energy azimuthal-scan data for O/Ni(001) in which forward scattering is dominant require SW corrections to describe some, but not all, directions of emission quantitatively.

  2. Radiative Transfer in a Scattering Spherical Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. S.; Park, Y.-S.; Kwon, S. M.; Park, C.; Weinberg, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    We have written a code called QDM_sca, which numerically solves the problem of radiative transfer in an anisotropically scattering, spherical atmosphere. First we formulate the problem as a second order differential equation of a quasi-diffusion type. We then apply a three-point finite differencing to the resulting differential equation and transform it to a tri-diagonal system of simultaneous linear equations. After boundary conditions are implemented in the tri-diagonal system, the QDM_sca radiative code fixes the field of specific intensity at every point in the atmosphere. As an application example, we used the code to calculate the brightness of atmospheric diffuse light(ADL) as a function of zenith distance, which plays a pivotal role in reducing the zodiacal light brightness from night sky observations. On the basis of this ADL calculation, frequent uses of effective extinction optical depth have been fully justified in correcting the atmospheric extinction for such extended sources as zodiacal light, integrated starlight and diffuse galactic light. The code will be available on request.

  3. Chirped femtosecond pulse scattering by spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dal-Woo; Xiao, Gang-Yao; Lee, Tong-Nyong

    1996-05-01

    Generalized Lorentz-Mie formulas are used to study the scattering characteristics when a chirped femtosecond pulse illuminates a spherical particle. For a linear chirped Gaussian pulse with the envelope function g( tau ) = exp[- pi (1 + ib) tau 2], dimensionless parameter b is defined as a chirp. The calculation illustrated that even for pulses with a constant carrier wavelength ( lambda 0 = 0.5 mu m) and pulse-filling coefficient (l0 = 1.98), the efficiencies for extinction and scattering differ very much between the carrier wave and the different chirped pulses. The slowly varying background of the extinction and the scattering curves is damped by the chirp. When the pulse is deeply chirped, the maxima and minima of the background curves reduce to the point where they disappear, and the efficiency curves illustrate a steplike dependence on the sphere size. Another feature is that the only on the amount of chirp (|b|), regardless of upchirp (b greater than 0) or downchirp (b less than 0).

  4. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  5. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  6. Spherical harmonic modelling to ultra-high degree of Bouguer and isostatic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmino, G.; Vales, N.; Bonvalot, S.; Briais, A.

    2012-07-01

    harmonic coefficients were computed up to the third degree of the altitude, and the harmonics of the other, smaller parts up to the second degree. Their sum constitutes what we call ETOPG1, the Earth's TOPography derived Gravity model at 1' resolution (half-wavelength). The EGM2008 gravity field model and ETOPG1 were then used to rigorously compute 1' × 1' point values of surface gravity anomalies and disturbances, respectively, worldwide, at the real Earth's surface, i.e. at the lower limit of the atmosphere. The disturbance grid is the most interesting product of this study and can be used in various contexts. The surface gravity anomaly grid is an accurate product associated with EGM2008 and ETOPO1, but its gravity information contents are those of EGM2008. Our method was validated by comparison with a direct numerical integration approach applied to a test area in Morocco-South of Spain (Kuhn, private communication 2011) and the agreement was satisfactory. Finally isostatic corrections according to the Airy model, but in spherical geometry, with harmonic coefficients derived from the sets of the ETOPO1 different parts, were computed with a uniform depth of compensation of 30 km. The new world Bouguer and isostatic gravity maps and grids here produced will be made available through the Commission for the Geological Map of the World. Since gravity values are those of the EGM2008 model, geophysical interpretation from these products should not be done for spatial scales below 5 arc minutes (half-wavelength).

  7. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-01

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST [F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Phys. Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrödinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  8. Geometry of spinning Ellis wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Xiao Yan; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2016-11-01

    We give a detailed account of the properties of spinning Ellis wormholes, supported by a phantom field. The general set of solutions depends on three parameters, associated with the size of the throat, the rotation, and the symmetry of the solutions. For symmetric wormholes the global charges possess the same values in both asymptotic regions, while this is no longer the case for nonsymmetric wormholes. We present mass formulas for these wormholes, study their quadrupole moments, and discuss the geometry of their throat and their ergoregion. We demonstrate, that these wormholes possess limiting configurations corresponding to an extremal Kerr black hole. Moreover, we analyze the geodesics of these wormholes, and show that they possess bound orbits.

  9. Geometry of minisuperspace in examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbrat, Yvan; Kerbrat-Lunc, Hélène; Śniatycki, Jȩdrzej

    1992-04-01

    Minisuperspace, interpreted as the configuration space for homogeneous cosmologies, has a naturally defined pseudo-Riemannian metric (supermetric) such that solutions of the ADM equations correspond to geodesics of the supermetric parametrized by arc-length (supertime). The supermetric is used to analyse the geometry of minisuperspace. In particular, if the supermetric is incomplete, its prolongations relate different components of minisuperspace. For Robertson-Walker universes with a homogeneous scalar field there exists a C1 prolongation of supermetric relating the positive and the negative curvature models. If the potential vanishes, then this prolongation is C∞. There is no prolongation of supermetric through generic boundary points between the Bianchi VIII and Bianchi IX models.

  10. Geometry-induced capillary emptying.

    PubMed

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Aarts, Dirk G A L

    2016-10-24

    When a capillary is half-filled with liquid and turned to the horizontal, the liquid may flow out of the capillary or remain in it. For lack of a better criterion, the standard assumption is that the liquid will remain in a capillary of narrow cross-section, and will flow out otherwise. Here, we present a precise mathematical criterion that determines which of the two outcomes occurs for capillaries of arbitrary cross-sectional shape, and show that the standard assumption fails for certain simple geometries, leading to very rich and counterintuitive behavior. This opens the possibility of creating very sensitive microfluidic devices that respond readily to small physical changes, for instance, by triggering the sudden displacement of fluid along a capillary without the need of any external pumping.

  11. Assessment of and Improvements to Acoustic Velocimetry in Flows in Core-like Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautino, A. R.; Adams, M. M.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lathrop, D. P.; Lekic, V.

    2015-12-01

    Rapidly rotating fluid flows are found in a wide variety of geophysical and astrophysical contexts, including the Earth's outer core. The dynamics of such flows can be studied experimentally at conditions inaccessible to computational modeling. However, accurately measuring the mean and time-varying flows noninvasively presents a technical challenge, particularly in opaque liquids. In this study, we tackle the problem of mapping zonal flow profiles in spherical Couette flows, shear flows in a core-like geometry. These rotating flows induce shifts and splittings in the spectrum of the acoustically resonant fluid-filled cavity. The azimuthal component of flow can be estimated from the spectra of the acoustic modes, using inversion procedures adapted from Helioseismology. Here, we present a technique for reconstructing the mean velocity field using modal analysis by way of the Finite Element Method, which is used to compute the forward model accurately, taking into account structural geometries associated with the experimental setups, such as shafts and axles. Accurate forward modeling is crucial for reliable mode identification, and we demonstrate that it allows us to identify many more modes than is possible when using the spherically symmetric approximation. We model flow geometry as a superposition of low order basis flow patterns, each of which affects mode frequency splittings and shifts through advection and Coriolis forces.

  12. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom

    2008-09-07

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  13. Local geometry of isoscalar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, César; Martín, Jesús; Hierro, Juan

    2007-11-01

    An inert dynamically passive scalar in a constant density fluid forced by a statistically homogeneous field of turbulence has been investigated using the results of a 256(3) grid direct numerical simulation. Mixing characteristics are characterized in terms of either principal curvatures or mean and Gauss curvatures. The most probable small-scale scalar geometries are flat and tilelike isosurfaces. Preliminary correlations between flow and scalar small-scale structures associate highly curved saddle points with large-strain regions and elliptic points with vorticity-dominated zones. The concavity of the scalar profiles along the isosurface normal coordinate xn correlates well with negative mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures displaying any sign, which correspond to scalar minima, tiles, or saddle points; on the other hand, convexity along xn is associated with positive mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures ranging from negative to positive signs, featuring maxima, tiles, or saddle points; inflection points along xn correlate well with small values of the mean curvature and zero or negative values of kg, corresponding to plane isosurfaces or saddle points with curvatures of equal and opposite signs. Small values of the scalar gradient are associated with elliptic points, either concave or convex (kg>0) , for both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn. Large values of the scalar gradient (or, equivalently, scalar fluctuation dissipation rates) are generally connected with small values of the Gauss curvature (either flat or moderate-curvature tilelike local geometries), with both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn equally probable. Vortical local flow structures correlate well with small and moderate values of the scalar gradient, while strain-dominated regions are associated with large values.

  14. World Gravity Map: a set of global complete spherical Bouguer and isostatic anomaly maps and grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, S.; Balmino, G.; Briais, A.; Kuhn, M.; Peyrefitte, A.; Vales, N.; Biancale, R.; Gabalda, G.; Reinquin, F.

    2012-04-01

    We present here a set of digital maps of the Earth's gravity anomalies (surface free air, Bouguer and isostatic), computed at Bureau Gravimetric International (BGI) as a contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Systems (GGOS) and to the global geophysical maps published by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) with support of UNESCO and other institutions. The Bouguer anomaly concept is extensively used in geophysical interpretation to investigate the density distributions in the Earth's interior. Complete Bouguer anomalies (including terrain effects) are usually computed at regional scales by integrating the gravity attraction of topography elements over and beyond a given area (under planar or spherical approximations). Here, we developed and applied a worldwide spherical approach aimed to provide a set of homogeneous and high resolution gravity anomaly maps and grids computed at the Earth's surface, taking into account a realistic Earth model and reconciling geophysical and geodetic definitions of gravity anomalies. This first version (1.0) has been computed by spherical harmonics analysis / synthesis of the Earth's topography-bathymetry up to degree 10800. The detailed theory of the spherical harmonics approach is given in Balmino et al., (Journal of Geodesy, 2011). The Bouguer and terrain corrections have thus been computed in spherical geometry at 1'x1' resolution using the ETOPO1 topography/bathymetry, ice surface and bedrock models from the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and taking into account precise characteristics (boundaries and densities) of major lakes, inner seas, polar caps and of land areas below sea level. Isostatic corrections have been computed according to the Airy-Heiskanen model in spherical geometry for a constant depth of compensation of 30km. The gravity information given here is provided by the Earth Geopotential Model (EGM2008), developed at degree 2160 by the National Geospatial

  15. Cross-code comparisons of mixing during the implosion of dense cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joggerst, C. C.; Nelson, Anthony; Woodward, Paul; Lovekin, Catherine; Masser, Thomas; Fryer, Chris L.; Ramaprabhu, P.; Francois, Marianne; Rockefeller, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We present simulations of the implosion of a dense shell in two-dimensional (2D) spherical and cylindrical geometry performed with four different compressible, Eulerian codes: RAGE, FLASH, CASTRO, and PPM. We follow the growth of instabilities on the inner face of the dense shell. Three codes employed Cartesian grid geometry, and one (FLASH) employed polar grid geometry. While the codes are similar, they employ different advection algorithms, limiters, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes, and interface-preservation techniques. We find that the growth rate of the instability is largely insensitive to the choice of grid geometry or other implementation details specific to an individual code, provided the grid resolution is sufficiently fine. Overall, all simulations from different codes compare very well on the fine grids for which we tested them, though they show slight differences in small-scale mixing. Simulations produced by codes that explicitly limit numerical diffusion show a smaller amount of small-scale mixing than codes that do not. This difference is most prominent for low-mode perturbations where little instability finger interaction takes place, and less prominent for high- or multi-mode simulations where a great deal of interaction takes place, though it is still present. We present RAGE and FLASH simulations to quantify the initial perturbation amplitude to wavelength ratio at which metrics of mixing agree across codes, and find that bubble/spike amplitudes are converged for low-mode and high-mode simulations in which the perturbation amplitude is more than 1% and 5% of the wavelength of the perturbation, respectively. Other metrics of small-scale mixing depend on details of multi-fluid advection and do not converge between codes for the resolutions that were accessible.

  16. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  17. GRMHD formulation of highly super-Chandrasekhar magnetized white dwarfs: stable configurations of non-spherical white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-05-01

    The topic of magnetized super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs is in the limelight, particularly in the last few years, since our proposal of their existence. By full-scale general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) numerical analysis, we confirm in this work the existence of stable, highly magnetized, significantly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs with mass more than 3 solar mass. While a poloidal field geometry renders the white dwarfs oblate, a toroidal field makes them prolate retaining an overall quasi-spherical shape, as speculated in our earlier work. These white dwarfs are expected to serve as the progenitors of over-luminous type Ia supernovae.

  18. Analytical form of current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers with homogeneous ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, D. G.

    2007-11-01

    The elementary processes taking place in the formation of charged particles and their flow in parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical geometry cases of ionization chamber are considered. On the basis of particles and charges balance a differential equation describing the distribution of current densities in the ionization chamber volume is obtained. As a result of the differential equation solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of an ionization chamber with homogeneous ionization is obtained. For the parallel-plane case comparision with experimental data is performed.

  19. Stability of thermal boundary layers for convection in spherical shell : Application to the dynamics of Earth mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchoiselle, L.; Deschamps, F.; Tackley, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Improving the knowledge of convection into mantle of terrestrial planets required a better understanding of its physical and chemical state. Recently, with the help of massive computational resources, significant progresses were achieved in the numerical modeling of planetary mantles convection. Models with a high degree of complexity (including realistic viscosity laws, mixed mode of heating, spherical geometry, thermo-chemical convection, …) are now available. Among the parameters that recently became accessible, spherical geometry is a key ingredient because it affects the relative strength of the top and bottom thermal boundary layers. Despite these progresses, many details of planetary mantles convection remain unclear and so far, no model of Earth's mantle convection fits all available geophysical, geochemical, and geological constraints. Using STAGYY, which solve the usual conservative equations of mass, energy and momentum, we explored the on a yin-yang grid, we explored the influence of various parameters on convection in spherical geometry. First, we have performed several numerical experiments on varying important parameters including the Rayleigh number, the curvature (ratio between radius of the core and the planet one), the mode of heating (only from below or with an internal heating component), rheology (isoviscous or temperature dependence). In particular, we studied the evolution of the style of convection, average temperature, heat flux and critical Rayleigh number depending on these parameters. We have then built scaling laws between the parameters and observables, for instance between the Nusselt and Rayleigh number, and between the temperature and curvature factor. Our results suggest that extrapolations previously made from Cartesian models may not be valid in spherical geometry. In particular, the dependence of temperature on curvature differs significantly from that expected by Cartesian scaling laws. In addition, it also depends on the

  20. Multiple scattering of light in a spherical cometary atmosphere with an axisymmetric dust jet. II - Image simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chick, Kenneth M.; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical solution for the multiple light scattering in spherical axisymmetric geometry is applied to the simulation of images of a coma as it would appear to a near-flying satellite such as Giotto. The appearance of symmetric comas and dust jets is examined in detail; the nucleus visibility is studied; the effect of forward scattering is considered; and single and multiple scattering effects are quantified. Attention is given to simulated images of a coma with a hollow cone of dust, as predicted by dust-gas hydrodynamic modeling. The cone's appearance is very similar to the northern area of activity on Comet Halley, observed by the Giotto HMC.